National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for kinetics chamber general

  1. Small scale vacuum chamber for general use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    For this thesis a small scale vacuum chamber assembly was designed and fabricated. This chamber's purpose is to provide high quality vacuum conditions for a variety of samples. Often these samples are in need of precise ...

  2. An action with positive kinetic energy term for general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2007-11-02

    At first, we state some results in arXiv: 0707.2639, and then, using a positive kinetic energy coordinate condition given by arXiv: 0707.2639, we present an action with positive kinetic energy term for general relativity. Based on this action, the corresponding theory of canonical quantization is discussed.

  3. Negative kinetic energy term of general relativity and its removing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2009-03-30

    We first present a new Lagrangian of general relativity, which can be divided into kinetic energy term and potential energy term. Taking advantage of vierbein formalism, we reduce the kinetic energy term to a sum of five positive terms and one negative term. Some gauge conditions removing the negative kinetic energy term are discussed. Finally, we present a Lagrangian that only include positive kinetic energy terms. To remove the negative kinetic energy term leads to a new field equation of general relativity in which there are at least five equations of constraint and at most five dynamical equations, this characteristic is different from the normal Einstein field equation in which there are four equations of constraint and six dynamical equations.

  4. Study of surface kinetics in PECVD chamber cleaning using remote plasma source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Ju Jin

    2008-01-01

    The scope of this research work is to characterize the Transformer Coupled Toroidal Plasma (TCTP); to understand gas phase reactions and surface reactions of neutrals in the cleaning chamber by analyzing the concentration ...

  5. General non-minimal kinetic coupling to gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granda, L.N.; Cardona, W. E-mail: wilalbca@univalle.edu.co

    2010-07-01

    We study a model of scalar field with a general non-minimal kinetic coupling to itself and to the curvature, as a source of dark energy, and analyze the cosmological dynamics of this model and the issue of accelerated expansion. Solutions giving rise to power-law expansion have been found. The dynamical equation of state is studied for the two cases, without and with free kinetic term . In the first case, a behavior very close to that of the cosmological constant was found. In the second case, a solution was found, which match the current phenomenology of the dark energy. The model shows a rich variety of dynamical scenarios.

  6. General solutions for the oxidation kinetics of polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.; Wise, J.

    1996-08-01

    The simplest general kinetic schemes applicable to the oxidation of polymers are presented, discussed and analyzed in terms of the underlying kinetic assumptions. For the classic basic autoxidation scheme (BAS), which involves three bimolecular termination steps and is applicable mainly to unstabilized polymers, typical assumptions used singly or in groups include (1) long kinetic chain length, (2) a specific ratio of the termination rate constants and (3) insensitivity to the oxygen concentration (e.g., domination by a single termination step). Steady-state solutions for the rate of oxidation are given in terms of one, two, three, or four parameters, corresponding respectively to three, two, one, or zero kinetic assumptions. The recently derived four-parameter solution predicts conditions yielding unusual dependencies of the oxidation rate on oxygen concentration and on initiation rate, as well as conditions leading to some unusual diffusion-limited oxidation profile shapes. For stabilized polymers, unimolecular termination schemes are typically more appropriate than bimolecular. Kinetics incorporating unimolecular termination reactions are shown to result in very simple oxidation expressions which have been experimentally verified for both radiation-initiated oxidation of an EPDM and thermoxidative degradation of nitrile and chloroprene elastomers.

  7. Flow chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA)

    2011-01-18

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  8. A generalized kinetic model for the formation and growth of single-walled metal oxide nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    A generalized kinetic model for the formation and growth of single-walled metal oxide nanotubes G,n a School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA b School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c

  9. Generalized kinetics of overall phase transition in terms of logistic equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avramov, I

    2015-01-01

    We summarize and to discuss briefly the geometrical practice of modeling attitudes so far popular in treating reaction kinetics of solid-state processes. The model equations existing in the literature have been explored to describe the thermal decomposition and crystallization data and are deeply questioned and analyzed showing that under such a simple algebraic representation, the reacting system is thus classified as a set of geometrical bodies (spheres) where each and every one reaction interface is represented by similar and smooth characteristics of reaction curve. It brings an unsolved question whether the sharp and even boundary factually exists or if it resides jointly just inside the global whole of the sample entirety preventing individual particles from having their individual reaction front. Most of the derived expressions are specified in an averaged generalization in terms of the three and two parameters equation (so called JMAK and SB models) characterized by a combination of power exponents m,...

  10. Wire chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atac, Muzaffer (Wheaton, IL)

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  11. Target Chamber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:TakeSeptember 13,TaraTarget Chamber

  12. Nonlinear effects in kinetic resolutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Derrell W.

    1999-01-01

    The impact of nonlinear effects in the asymmetric catalysis of kinetic resolutions is analyzed. It is found with minimal assumptions that the kinetics of homocompetitive reactions should apply generally to kinetic resolutions involving partially...

  13. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaugher, Richard D. (Evergreen, CO)

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  14. BNL | ATF Experimental Chambers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Injection Vacuum Chamber Located on beam line 1, the "Smith-Purcell box" has 140 liters of usable volume. Due to its size, it is mounted on a fixed platform. Hosted...

  15. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Beeman, Barton V. (San Mateo, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Hadley, Dean R. (Manteca, CA); Landre, Phoebe (Livermore, CA); Lehew, Stacy L. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  16. Kinetic equilibrium and relativistic thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ván

    2011-02-01

    Relativistic thermodynamics is treated from the point of view of kinetic theory. It is shown that the generalized J\\"uttner distribution suggested in [1] is compatible with kinetic equilibrium. The requirement of compatibility of kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium reveals several generalizations of the Gibbs relation where the velocity field is an independent thermodynamic variable.

  17. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  18. Secondary emission gas chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. In'shakov; V. Kryshkin; V. Skvortsov

    2014-12-10

    For a hadron calorimeter active element there is considered a gaseous secondary emis-sion detector (150 micron gap, 50 kV/cm). Such one-stage parallel plate chamber must be a radiation hard, fast and simple. A model of such detector has been produced, tested and some characteristics are presented.

  19. Mercury Chamber Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Pump Gravity Drain Flow Control Valve Storage Tank Heat Exchanger Beam Dump #12;4 Managed by UT Mercury Jet Proton Beam Mercury Overflow Gravity Drain Flow Control Overflow drains WC Shielding #12 tungsten shielding · Chamber shape requires significant increase in complexity · Integrating resistive

  20. Improved wire chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  1. Miniature reaction chamber and devices incorporating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathies, Richard A. (Moraga, CA); Woolley, Adam T. (Albany, CA)

    2000-10-17

    The present invention generally relates to miniaturized devices for carrying out and controlling chemical reactions and analyses. In particular, the present invention provides devices which have miniature temperature controlled reaction chambers for carrying out a variety of synthetic and diagnostic applications, such as PCR amplification, nucleic acid hybridization, chemical labeling, nucleic acid fragmentation and the like.

  2. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Richard L. (Roseville, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (Shoreview, MN); Westerberg, Roger K. (Cottage Grove, MN)

    1989-10-17

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  3. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Richard L. (Roseville, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (Shoreview, MN); Westerberg, Roger K. (Cottage Grove, MN)

    1989-06-27

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  4. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA); Hiskes, John R. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  5. Combustion chamber noise suppressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.M.

    1986-08-19

    A combustion chamber is described for a hot fog generating machine comprising a hollow cylindrical combustion chamber shell having a closure plate at one end and outlet means at the opposite end for directing hot combustion gasses to a fogging nozzle, air inlet means disposed adjacent the outlet means, fuel inlet means and ignition means mounted in the closure plate and liner means disposed concentrically within the cylindrical combustion chamber for controlling the flow of air and combustion gasses within the shell. The liner means includes a liner base having a frustroconical configuration with the smaller diameter end thereof disposed in communication with the outlet means and with the larger diameter end thereof disposed in spaced relation to the shell, circumferentially spaced, longitudinally extending fins extending outwardly from the liner base intermediate the liner base and the shell, a cylindrical liner midsection having circumferentially spaced fins extending outwardly therefrom between the midsection and the shell with the fins supporting the midsection on the larger diameter end of the liner base.

  6. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  7. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaugher, Richard D. (Evergreen, CO)

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  8. MAIN CHAMBER NEUTRAL PRESSURE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitcher, C. S.

    MAIN CHAMBER NEUTRAL PRESSURE IN ALCATOR C-MOD AND JET C S Pitcher, S K Erents*, W Fundamenski*, B on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics 18 ­ 22 June 1999, Madeira, Portugal MAIN CHAMBER NEUTRAL PRESSURE Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB,UK #12;(1) Introduction · main chamber gas can have a number

  9. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Smith, Graham (Port Jefferson, NY); Mahler, George J. (Rocky Point, NY); Vanier, Peter E. (Setauket, NY)

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  10. Ionization chamber dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Renner, Tim R. (Berkeley, CA); Nyman, Mark A. (Berkeley, CA); Stradtner, Ronald (Kensington, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A method for fabricating an ion chamber dosimeter collecting array of the type utilizing plural discrete elements formed on a uniform collecting surface which includes forming a thin insulating layer over an aperture in a frame having surfaces, forming a predetermined pattern of through holes in the layer, plating both surfaces of the layer and simultaneously tilting and rotating the frame for uniform plate-through of the holes between surfaces. Aligned masking and patterned etching of the surfaces provides interconnects between the through holes and copper leads provided to external circuitry.

  11. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  12. Ultraviolet laser calibration of drift chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Grant (Grant Andrew)

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a focused ultraviolet laser as a track calibration source in drift chambers, and specifically in a small time projection chamber (TPC). Drift chambers such as TPCs reconstruct the trajectories of ...

  13. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2013-12-03

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  14. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  15. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2014-05-13

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  16. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  17. The TESLA Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabil Ghodbane

    2002-12-12

    A large Time Projection Chamber is proposed as part of the tracking system for a detector at the TESLA electron positron linear collider. Different ongoing R&D studies are reviewed, stressing progress made on a new type readout technique based on Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors.

  18. Cosmological Kinetic Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Ashok; Pino, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we generalize the kinetic mixing idea to time reparametrization invariant theories, namely, relativistic point particles and cosmology in order to obtain new insights for dark matter and energy. In the first example, two relativistic particles interact through an appropriately chosen coupling term. It is shown that the system can be diagonalized by means of a non-local field redefinition, and, as a result of this procedure, the mass of one the particles gets rescaled. In the second case, inspired by the previous example, two cosmological models (each with its own scale factor) are made to interact in a similar fashion. The equations of motion are solved numerically in different scenarios (dust, radiation or a cosmological constant coupled to each sector of the system). When a cosmological constant term is present, kinetic mixing rescales it to a lower value which may be more amenable to observations.

  19. Cosmological Kinetic Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok Das; Jorge Gamboa; Miguel Pino

    2015-06-22

    In this paper we generalize the kinetic mixing idea to time reparametrization invariant theories, namely, relativistic point particles and cosmology in order to obtain new insights for dark matter and energy. In the first example, two relativistic particles interact through an appropriately chosen coupling term. It is shown that the system can be diagonalized by means of a non-local field redefinition, and, as a result of this procedure, the mass of one the particles gets rescaled. In the second case, inspired by the previous example, two cosmological models (each with its own scale factor) are made to interact in a similar fashion. The equations of motion are solved numerically in different scenarios (dust, radiation or a cosmological constant coupled to each sector of the system). When a cosmological constant term is present, kinetic mixing rescales it to a lower value which may be more amenable to observations.

  20. “Batch” Kinetics in Flow: Online IR Analysis and Continuous Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jason S.

    Currently, kinetic data is either collected under steady-state conditions in flow or by generating time-series data in batch. Batch experiments are generally considered to be more suitable for the generation of kinetic ...

  1. TRU waste characterization chamber gloveboxes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D. S.

    1998-07-02

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) is participating in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Transuranic Waste Program in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Laboratory's support currently consists of intrusive characterization of a selected population of drums containing transuranic waste. This characterization is performed in a complex of alpha containment gloveboxes termed the Waste Characterization Gloveboxes. Made up of the Waste Characterization Chamber, Sample Preparation Glovebox, and the Equipment Repair Glovebox, they were designed as a small production characterization facility for support of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This paper presents salient features of these gloveboxes.

  2. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maniscalco, James A. (Danville, CA); Meier, Wayne R. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  3. Sandia Energy - Combustion Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kinetics Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Combustion Kinetics Combustion KineticsAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:45:13+00:00 The...

  4. Internal combustion engine with rotary combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, C.N.; Cross, P.C.

    1986-09-23

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine comprising: a block having at least one cylindrical wall surrounding a piston chamber, piston means located in the piston chamber means operable to reciprocate the piston means in the chamber, head means mounted on the block covering the chamber. The head means has an air and fuel intake passage, and exhaust gas passage, a rotary valve assembly operatively associated with the head means for controlling the flow of air and fuel into the rotary valve assembly and piston chamber and the flow of exhaust gas from rotary valve assembly and the piston chamber. The means has a housing with a bore open to the piston chamber accommodating the rotary valve assembly, the valve assembly comprising a cylindrical sleeve located in the bore, the sleeve having an inner surface, an ignition hole, and intake and exhaust ports aligned with the intake passage and exhaust gas passage, spark generating means mounted on the housing operable to generate a spark. The rotatable valving means is located within the sleeve for controlling the flow of air and fuel into the rotary valve assembly and piston chamber and the flow of exhaust gases out of the rotary valve assembly and piston chamber.

  5. The Fractional Kinetic Equation and Thermonuclear Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16

    The paper discusses the solution of a simple kinetic equation of the type used for the computation of the change of the chemical composition in stars like the Sun. Starting from the standard form of the kinetic equation it is generalized to a fractional kinetic equation and its solutions in terms of H-functions are obtained. The role of thermonuclear functions, which are also represented in terms of G- and H-functions, in such a fractional kinetic equation is emphasized. Results contained in this paper are related to recent investigations of possible astrophysical solutions of the solar neutrino problem.

  6. IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    chamber technology testing program in NIF involoving: criteria for evaluation to testing in ignition facility serves a critical role in chamber R&D test plans in order to reduce the risks for chamber technology testing in NIF might not be achievable because its integrated performance is evaluated

  7. meters in CO2 euthanasia chambers. All CO2 euthanasia chambers in both

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    meters in CO2 euthanasia chambers. All CO2 euthanasia chambers in both the facilities, and durable flow meter to install in all of the CO2 chambers in all of the vivaria. When a specific model and laboratories will need flow meters. ULAR is currently in the process of identifying a cost-effective, accurate

  8. Blogs Are Echo Chambers: Blogs Are Echo Chambers Eric Gilbert, Tony Bergstrom and Karrie Karahalios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karahalios, Karrie G.

    Blogs Are Echo Chambers: Blogs Are Echo Chambers Eric Gilbert, Tony Bergstrom and Karrie Karahalios decade, blogs have exploded in number, popularity and scope. However, many commentators and researchers speculate that blogs isolate readers in echo chambers, cutting them off from dissenting opin- ions. Our

  9. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  10. Proceedings of the Workshop on Radiation Damage to Wire Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadyk, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    from chamber cleaning, outgassing from elastomers or otherTPC -- perhaps by normal outgassing and perhaps by reactionproperites and low outgassing. WIRE CHAMBER DEGRADATION AT

  11. ON THE ANALYSIS OF BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS Bradner, H.; Solmitz...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ON THE ANALYSIS OF BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS Bradner, H.; Solmitz, F. 08 HYDROGEN; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; BEVATRON; BUBBLE CHAMBERS; DETECTION; HYDROCARBONS; HYDROGEN; INVENTIONS;...

  12. Formation mechanisms of combustion chamber deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Christopher J. (Christopher John)

    2001-01-01

    Combustion chamber deposits are found in virtually all internal combustion engines after a few hundred hours of operation. Deposits form on cylinder, piston, and head surfaces that are in contact with fuel-air mixture ...

  13. Kinetic decoupling of WIMPs: analytic expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visinelli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present a general expression for the values of the average kinetic energy and of the temperature of kinetic decoupling of a WIMP, valid for any cosmological model. We show an example of the usage of our solution when the Hubble rate has a power-law dependence on temperature, and we show results for the specific cases of kination cosmology and low- temperature reheating cosmology.

  14. Main Chamber Pressure why do we care about it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitcher, C. S.

    Main Chamber Pressure why do we care about it? - neutrals in the main chamber imply a particle-surface interaction there which may result in impurity production and erosion - neutrals in the main chamber may.main chamber recycling 3.ion flux to the upper part of the outer plate 4.upper divertor leakage #12

  15. Cosmic Muon Detector Using Proportional Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dezs? Varga; Zoltán Gál; Gerg? Hamar; Janka Sára Molnár; Éva Oláh; Péter Pázmándi

    2015-07-28

    A set of classical multi-wire proportional chambers were designed and constructed with the main purpose of efficient cosmic muon detection. These detectors are relatively simple to construct, and at the same time are low cost, making them ideal for educational purposes. The detector layers have efficiencies above 99% for minimum ionizing cosmic muons, and their position resolution is about 1 cm, that is, particle trajectories are clearly observable. Visualization of straight tracks is possible using an LED array, with the discriminated and latched signal driving the display. Due to the exceptional operating stability of the chambers, the design can also be used for cosmic muon telescopes.

  16. Reduce Steam Trap Failures at Chambers Works 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouba, C.

    2010-01-01

    Failures at Chambers Works GB/BB Name: Cyndi Kouba Mentor/MBB: Andrew Degraff Team Members Michael Crowley(Site Energy Lead), (Charlie) Flanigan (Aramids-maintenance), Ben Snyder (Aramids-ATO), Michael Scruggs (Central Maintenance Mechanic), Rick... is it sustainable HOW we went about finding a solution What do you have learn from this 10/20/2010 3 Six Sigma Methodology was KEY to success Savings: $1MM annualized in only 6 months! 10/20/2010 4Define: Project CTQ?s Customer: Chambers Works site Voice...

  17. Recent Advances in Chamber Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Recent Advances in Chamber Science and Technology Mohamed Abdou April 8, 2002ISFNT-6 San Diego, USA;HYLIFE-II ALPS/APEX NSTX Li module Liquid Wall Science & Technology are being Advanced in Several MFE with Swirl Flow - Fast liquid adheres to back wall by centrifugal force - Applicable to LM's or molten salts

  18. Mini-PROTEAN Multi-Casting Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    Mini-PROTEAN® 3 Multi-Casting Chamber Instruction Manual Catalog Number 165-4110 For Technical components should be cleaned with a suitable laboratory detergent (Bio-Rad's Cleaning Concentrate, catalog number 161-0772), rinsed thoroughly with distilled water, and dried before use. Section 2 Loading

  19. Accounting & Compliance Alert: Chamber of Commerce Seeks Bigger Voice for Business in Regulatory Decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    overrides of a company's financial reporting system, which are generally considered a red flag inspectors to do unnecessary work. The chamber says a specialized advisory panel dominated by business Reporting That Is Integrated with An Audit of Financial Statements, are effective at stopping misstatements

  20. General Permit General Permit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L General Permit Parking LOT A General Permit Parking LOT C General Permit Parking LOT R Reserved Parking LOT D Faculty/Staff Parking LOT K General Permit Parking LOT J Reserved Parking PV LOT General Parking after 3 p.m. WEST CAMPUS PARKING LOT O General Permit Parking LOT M General Permit Parking LOT P

  1. General Permit General Permit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98 28 28 60 96 31 7 23 LOT L General Permit Parking LOT A General Permit Parking LOT C General Permit Parking LOT R Reserved Parking LOT D Faculty/Staff Parking LOT K General Permit Parking LOT J Reserved Parking PV LOT General Parking after 3 p.m. WEST CAMPUS PARKING LOT O General Permit Parking LOT M General

  2. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Leaching Chambers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2000-02-04

    Leaching chambers distribute treated wastewater into the soil. This publication lists the advantages and disadvantages of leaching chamber systems, explains how to maintain them and gives estimates of costs....

  3. Development of the Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution Chamber System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonietti, Carlos G

    2014-08-28

    . The reactor cylinder end walls are made of a permeable Teflon membrane for gas exchange between the inside of the chamber and pre- conditioned or filtered ambient gas. This continuous gas exchange permits dynamic control of the chamber composition without...

  4. Gas Injection Apparatus for Vacuum Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almabouada, F.; Louhibi, D.; Hamici, M.

    2011-12-26

    We present in this article a gas injection apparatus which comprises the gas injector and its electronic command for vacuum chamber applications. Some of these applications are thin-film deposition by a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) or a cathodic arc deposition (arc-PVD) and the plasma generation. The electronic part has been developed to adjust the flow of the gas inside the vacuum chamber by controlling both of the injector's opening time and the repetition frequency to allow a better gas flow. In this case, the system works either on a pulsed mode or a continuous mode for some applications. In addition, the repetition frequency can be synchronised with a pulsed laser by an external signal coming from the laser, which is considered as an advantage for users. Good results have been obtained using the apparatus and testing with Argon and Nitrogen gases.

  5. Engineering analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers for GEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horvath, J.A.; Belser, F.C.; Pratuch, S.M.; Wuest, C.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mitselmakher, G. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)] [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Gordeev, A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Johnson, C.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Polychronakos, V.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Golutvin, I.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1993-10-21

    Structural analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers performed up to the date of this publication are documented. Mechanical property data for typical chamber materials are included. This information, originally intended to be an appendix to the {open_quotes}CSC Structural Design Bible,{close_quotes} is presented as a guide for future designers of large chambers.

  6. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING KINETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinner, Aaron

    STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING KINETICS AARON R. DINNER New Chemistry Laboratory for Protein Folding: Advances in Chemical Physics, Volume 120. Edited by Richard A. Friesner. Series Editors Experimental and theoretical studies have led to the emergence of a unified general mechanism for protein

  7. A patient-specific quality assurance study on absolute dose verification using ionization chambers of different volumes in RapidArc treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syam Kumar, S.A., E-mail: skppm@rediffmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute (WIA), Adyar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Sukumar, Prabakar; Sriram, Padmanaban; Rajasekaran, Dhanabalan; Aketi, Srinu; Vivekanandan, Nagarajan [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute (WIA), Adyar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2012-01-01

    The recalculation of 1 fraction from a patient treatment plan on a phantom and subsequent measurements have become the norms for measurement-based verification, which combines the quality assurance recommendations that deal with the treatment planning system and the beam delivery system. This type of evaluation has prompted attention to measurement equipment and techniques. Ionization chambers are considered the gold standard because of their precision, availability, and relative ease of use. This study evaluates and compares 5 different ionization chambers: phantom combinations for verification in routine patient-specific quality assurance of RapidArc treatments. Fifteen different RapidArc plans conforming to the clinical standards were selected for the study. Verification plans were then created for each treatment plan with different chamber-phantom combinations scanned by computed tomography. This includes Medtec intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) phantom with micro-ionization chamber (0.007 cm{sup 3}) and pinpoint chamber (0.015 cm{sup 3}), PTW-Octavius phantom with semiflex chamber (0.125 cm{sup 3}) and 2D array (0.125 cm{sup 3}), and indigenously made Circular wax phantom with 0.6 cm{sup 3} chamber. The measured isocenter absolute dose was compared with the treatment planning system (TPS) plan. The micro-ionization chamber shows more deviations when compared with semiflex and 0.6 cm{sup 3} with a maximum variation of -4.76%, -1.49%, and 2.23% for micro-ionization, semiflex, and farmer chambers, respectively. The positive variations indicate that the chamber with larger volume overestimates. Farmer chamber shows higher deviation when compared with 0.125 cm{sup 3}. In general the deviation was found to be <1% with the semiflex and farmer chambers. A maximum variation of 2% was observed for the 0.007 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber, except in a few cases. Pinpoint chamber underestimates the calculated isocenter dose by a maximum of 4.8%. Absolute dose measurements using the semiflex ionization chamber with intermediate volume (0.125 cm{sup 3}) shows good agreement with the TPS calculated among the detectors used in this study. Positioning is very important when using smaller volume chambers because they are more sensitive to geometrical errors within the treatment fields. It is also suggested to average the dose over the sensitive volume for larger-volume chambers. The ionization chamber-phantom combinations used in this study can be used interchangeably for routine RapidArc patient-specific quality assurance with a satisfactory accuracy for clinical practice.

  8. Vacuum chamber with a supersonic flow aerodynamic window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, Clark L. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A supersonic flow aerodynamic window, whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

  9. Vacuum chamber with a supersonic-flow aerodynamic window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, C.L.

    1980-10-14

    A supersonic flow aerodynamic window is disclosed whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

  10. Protein folding kinetics: timescales, pathways and energy landscapes in terms of sequence-dependent properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirumalai, Devarajan

    Protein folding kinetics: timescales, pathways and energy landscapes in terms of sequence and theoretical studies have revealed that protein folding kinetics can be quite complex and diverse depending theoretical understanding of the kinetics of protein folding [1­8]. The general scenarios that have emerged

  11. Using Stochastic Roadmap Simulation to Predict Experimental Quantities in Protein Folding Kinetics: Folding Rates and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latombe, Jean-Claude

    Using Stochastic Roadmap Simulation to Predict Experimental Quantities in Protein Folding Kinetics for studying protein folding kinetics. It uses the recently intro- duced Stochastic Roadmap Simulation (SRS validate the SRS method and indicate its potential as a general tool for studying protein folding kinetics

  12. The electronics of ALICE Dimuon tracking chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambert, V

    2008-01-01

    The muon spectrometer is one of the main detection system of ALICE, the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at CERN LHC. The muon tracking system consists of five cathodepad chamber station (ST) with two detection planes each. The readout architecture, based on dedicated FE boards, embedded digital crates and a trigger dispatcher crate and the process to reach the electronics final design will be described, as well as the production and the tests of the 19.600 FE boards. Finally, the integration of ST1 at CERN (including EMC issues and commissioning) will be highlighted.

  13. Vacuum chamber for containing particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harvey, A.

    1985-11-26

    A vacuum chamber for containing a charged particle beam in a rapidly changing magnetic environment comprises a ceramic pipe with conducting strips oriented along the longitudinal axis of the pipe and with circumferential conducting bands oriented perpendicular to the longitudinal axis but joined with a single longitudinal electrical connection. When both strips and bands are on the outside of the ceramic pipe, insulated from each other, a high-resistance conductive layer such as nickel can be coated on the inside of the pipe.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Mode Stirred Chamber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming Release of thePrograms:Mode Stirred Chamber The Mode Stirred

  15. Resonance Van Hove Singularities in Wave Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Yi-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Wave kinetic theory has been developed to describe the statistical dynamics of weakly nonlinear, dispersive waves. However, we show that systems which are generally dispersive can have resonant sets of wave modes with identical group velocities, leading to a local breakdown of dispersivity. This shows up as a geometric singularity of the resonant manifold and possibly as an infinite phase measure in the collision integral. Such singularities occur widely for classical wave systems, including acoustical waves, Rossby waves, helical waves in rotating fluids, light waves in nonlinear optics and also in quantum transport, e.g. kinetics of electron-hole excitations (matter waves) in graphene. These singularities are the exact analogue of the critical points found by Van Hove in 1953 for phonon dispersion relations in crystals. The importance of these singularities in wave kinetics depends on the dimension of phase space $D=(N-2)d$ ($d$ physical space dimension, $N$ the number of waves in resonance) and the degree ...

  16. May 31-June 1, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Dry Chamber Walls as Preliminary Step in Defining Key Processes for Chamber Clearing Code 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    in Defining Key Processes for Chamber Clearing Code 3 Outline of Presentation · Chamber Wall Options ­ Thermal in Defining Key Processes for Chamber Clearing Code 7 Temporal Distribution of Energy Depositions from Photons in Defining Key Processes for Chamber Clearing Code 1 Assessment of Dry Chamber Wall Configurations

  17. Resonance Van Hove Singularities in Wave Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Kang Shi; Gregory Eyink

    2015-07-29

    Wave kinetic theory has been developed to describe the statistical dynamics of weakly nonlinear, dispersive waves. However, we show that systems which are generally dispersive can have resonant sets of wave modes with identical group velocities, leading to a local breakdown of dispersivity. This shows up as a geometric singularity of the resonant manifold and possibly as an infinite phase measure in the collision integral. Such singularities occur widely for classical wave systems, including acoustical waves, Rossby waves, helical waves in rotating fluids, light waves in nonlinear optics and also in quantum transport, e.g. kinetics of electron-hole excitations (matter waves) in graphene. These singularities are the exact analogue of the critical points found by Van Hove in 1953 for phonon dispersion relations in crystals. The importance of these singularities in wave kinetics depends on the dimension of phase space $D=(N-2)d$ ($d$ physical space dimension, $N$ the number of waves in resonance) and the degree of degeneracy $\\delta$ of the critical points. Following Van Hove, we show that non-degenerate singularities lead to finite phase measures for $D>2$ but produce divergences when $D\\leq 2$ and possible breakdown of wave kinetics if the collision integral itself becomes too large (or even infinite). Similar divergences and possible breakdown can occur for degenerate singularities, when $D-\\delta\\leq 2,$ as we find for several physical examples, including electron-hole kinetics in graphene. When the standard kinetic equation breaks down, then one must develop a new singular wave kinetics. We discuss approaches from pioneering 1971 work of Newell \\& Aucoin on multi-scale perturbation theory for acoustic waves and field-theoretic methods based on exact Schwinger-Dyson integral equations for the wave dynamics.

  18. Paint decontamination kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, E.W.

    1984-04-01

    Decontamination kinetics of a high-gloss polyurethane paint have been investigated using a novel flow cell experiment where the sample was counted in situ during decontamination. The /sup 134/Cs, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 90/Y decontaminations follow a rate law that can be predicted theoretically for contaminant ion desorption from weakly heterogeneous random surface adsorption sites. Paint surfaces show the same decontamination kinetics after damage by abrasion or ultraviolet irradiation prior to contamination. The systems investigated exhibit Freundlich adsorption isotherm behavior during contamination; this is also characteristic of weakly heterogeneous random surfaces and is very commonly observed in ion adsorption studies at low concentrations.

  19. Dielectric liquid ionization chambers for detecting fast neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Erin M

    2008-01-01

    Three ionization chambers with different geometries have been constructed and filled with dielectric liquids for detection of fast neutrons. The three dielectric liquids studied were Tetramethylsilane (TMS), Tetramethylpentane ...

  20. Donald Glaser, the Bubble Chamber, and Elementary Particles

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    construction of computational models that shed light on the physics and physiology of human perception." - Edited excerpt from: 1960: Donald Glaser and His Bubble Chamber,...

  1. Quantum combustion chamber for the digital engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evers, L.W.; Baasch, V.

    1985-01-01

    For increasing fuel economy and reducing hydrocarbon emissions, a two-stoke-cycle, loop-scavenged single cylinder engine was modified by replacing the head with a head having three subchambers and incorporating a distributing pump fuel injection system. The fuel injection system allowed one subchamber to be operated at a time. The quantum combustion system demonstrated both lower fuel consumption and lower hydrocarbon emissions than a conventional homogeneous charge engine. The experimental evidence also indicates that the combustion essentially occurred in the one chamber into which fuel was injected. Establishing stratified charge combustion by mechanically separating the regions of air from the regions of air/fuel mixtures by means of subchambers is feasible.

  2. On spherically symmetric metric satisfying the positive kinetic energy coordinate condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2008-02-28

    Generally speaking, there is a negative kinetic energy term in the Lagrangian of the Einstein-Hilbert action of general relativity; On the other hand, the negative kinetic energy term can be vanished by designating a special coordinate system. For general spherically symmetric metric, the question that seeking special coordinate system that satisfies the positive kinetic energy coordinate condition is referred to solving a linear first-order partial differential equation. And then, we present a metric corresponding to the Reissner-Nordstrom solution that satisfies the positive kinetic energy coordinate condition. Finally, we discuss simply the case of the Tolman metric.

  3. Kinetic freeze out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magas, V K; Csernai, László P; Grassi, Frédérique; Greiner, W; Hama, Y; Kodama, T; Lázár, Z I; Stöcker, H; Lázár, Zs.I.

    1999-01-01

    Freeze out of particles across a space-time hypersurface is discussed in kinetic models. The calculation of final momentum distribution of emitted particles is described for freeze out surfaces, with spacelike normals. The resulting non-equilibrium distribution does not resemble, the previously proposed, cut Juttner distribution, and shows non-exponential p_t-spectra similar to the ones observed in experiments.

  4. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  5. Make Music with The Boston College Chamber Music Society!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Make Music with The Boston College Chamber Music Society! The BC Chamber Music Society is the umbrella organization for most small ensembles based in the Music Department, and includes instrumentalists to provide music for various university functions. All members of the BC community are welcome to audition

  6. Consistent description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiv, B.; Tokarchuk, M.; National University “Lviv Polytechnic,” 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv

    2014-02-15

    A consistent statistical description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma is proposed based on the Zubarev nonequilibrium statistical operator method. For the case of partial dynamics, the nonequilibrium statistical operator and the generalized transport equations for a consistent description of kinetics of dust particles and hydrodynamics of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms are obtained. In the approximation of weakly nonequilibrium process, a spectrum of collective excitations of dusty plasma is investigated in the hydrodynamic limit.

  7. Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high efficiency clean combustion engines Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high...

  8. A Proportional Wire Chamber Array: GRAND's Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Poirier; C. D'Andrea; M. Lopez del Puerto; E. Strahler; J. Vermedahl

    2003-06-18

    Project GRAND is a 100m x 100m air shower array of position sensitive proportional wire chambers (PWCs) located at 41.7 degrees North and 86.2 degrees West at an elevation of 220m above sea level. Its convenient location adjacent to the campus of the University of Notre Dame makes it a good training ground for students. There are 64 stations each with eight 1.29 m^2 PWCs. The geometry of the stations allows for the angles of charged secondaries to be determined to within 0.26 degrees in each of two orthogonal planes; muons are differentiated from electrons and hadrons by means of a steel plate. Two triggers are run simultaneously: a multiple hit coincidence trigger, rich in extensive air showers, and a single track trigger, rich in secondary muon tracks. The former trigger is sensitive to primary energies greater than ~100 TeV, the latter to energies greater than ~10 GeV.

  9. Vacuum chamber for ion manipulation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D; Anderson, Gordon A; Baker, Erin M

    2014-12-09

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area. A predetermined number of pairs of surfaces are disposed in one or more chambers, forming a multiple-layer ion mobility cyclotron device.

  10. Paint coatings: Controlled field and chamber experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edney, E.O.

    1989-04-01

    To determine the impact of pollution levels on the weathering rates of coatings, laboratory chamber experiments and controlled field exposures at North Carolina and Ohio sites were conducted in such a manner to separate the contributions due to dry deposition, wet deposition, precipitation pH, etc. The results of these studies confirm that acidic gases such as SO/sub 2/ and HNO/sub 3/, as well as acids within rain, promote the dissolution of alkaline components including CaCO/sub 3/, ZnO, and Al flake from paint films. It is unclear from these studies whether the removal of these components reduces the service life or protective properties of the paint film. Other researchers within the Coatings Effects Program are conducting subsequent analyses to determine micro-damage of these paints. The uptake of acidic gases to painted surfaces is a complex process that depends on several factors. The deposition rate of SO/sub 2/ to a wet, painted surface may be controlled by the level of oxidants such as H/sub 2/O/sub 2/.

  11. October 24, 2001 1. Remaining Action Items on Dry Chamber Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    and chamber wall design · Power to chamber wall · Coolant outlet temperature · Cycle efficiency · Thermal-hydraulic parameters · Maximum temperature of chamber wall - Chamber wall power assumed to be spread over the completeOctober 24, 2001 1 1. Remaining Action Items on Dry Chamber Wall 2. "Overlap" Design Regions 3

  12. Turbine component cooling channel mesh with intersection chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Marra, John J

    2014-05-06

    A mesh (35) of cooling channels (35A, 35B) with an array of cooling channel intersections (42) in a wall (21, 22) of a turbine component. A mixing chamber (42A-C) at each intersection is wider (W1, W2)) than a width (W) of each of the cooling channels connected to the mixing chamber. The mixing chamber promotes swirl, and slows the coolant for more efficient and uniform cooling. A series of cooling meshes (M1, M2) may be separated by mixing manifolds (44), which may have film cooling holes (46) and/or coolant refresher holes (48).

  13. Kinetic distance and kinetic maps from molecular dynamics simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noe, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing macromolecular kinetics from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations requires a distance metric that can distinguish slowly-interconverting states. Here we build upon diffusion map theory and define a kinetic distance for irreducible Markov processes that quantifies how slowly molecular conformations interconvert. The kinetic distance can be computed given a model that approximates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors (reaction coordinates) of the MD Markov operator. Here we employ the time-lagged independent component analysis (TICA). The TICA components can be scaled to provide a kinetic map in which the Euclidean distance corresponds to the kinetic distance. As a result, the question of how many TICA dimensions should be kept in a dimensionality reduction approach becomes obsolete, and one parameter less needs to be specified in the kinetic model construction. We demonstrate the approach using TICA and Markov state model (MSM) analyses for illustrative models, protein conformation dynamics in bovine...

  14. On the kinetic foundations of Kaluza's magnetohydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Sandoval-Villalbazo; A. R. Sagaceta-Mejia; A. L. Garcia-Perciante

    2015-02-20

    Recent work has shown the existence of a relativistic effect present in a single component non-equilibrium fluid, corresponding to a heat flux due to an electric field. The treatment in that work was limited to a four-dimensional Minkowksi space-time in which the Boltzmann equation was treated in a special relativistic approach. The more complete framework of general relativity can be introduced to kinetic theory in order to describe transport processes associated to electromagnetic fields. In this context the original Kaluza's formalism is a promising approach. The present work contains a kinetic theory basis for Kaluza's magnetohydrodynamics and gives a novel description for the establishment of thermodynamic forces beyond the special relativistic description.

  15. On the kinetic foundations of Kaluza's magnetohydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A; Garcia-Perciante, A L

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has shown the existence of a relativistic effect present in a single component non-equilibrium fluid, corresponding to a heat flux due to an electric field. The treatment in that work was limited to a four-dimensional Minkowksy space-time in which the Boltzmann equation was treated in a special relativistic approach. The more complete framework of general relativity can be introduced to kinetic theory in order to describe transport processes associated to electromagnetic fields. In this context the original Kaluza's formalism is a promising approach. The present work contains a kinetic theory basis for Kaluza's magnetohydrodynamics and gives a novel description for the establishment of thermodynamic forces beyond the special relativistic description.

  16. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  17. Sandia Energy - Combustion Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumniProjects Caterpillar, SandiaCombustion Kinetics Home

  18. Carrying Semiautomatic Pistols with a Round in the Chamber

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-10-28

    Sets forth requirements for a DOE security police officer who must carry a round in the chamber of a semiautomatic pistol while on duty. Does not cancel other directives.

  19. Neutral Gas Expansion in a Cylindrical Helicon Discharge Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Mitchell

    ­1500 G) magnetic field parallel to the axis of the tube. In many helicon experiments for basic plasma research, the discharge chamber is composed of a small diameter (2­10 cm), relatively long (0.5­1.75 m

  20. Effects of outgassing of loader chamber walls on hydriding of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gas pressure. Complete process data for (1) a copper-(1.83 wt. %)beryllium wet hydrogen fired passivated (600 C-1 h) externally heated pipe hydriding chamber are reported....

  1. E-Cloud Build-up in Grooved Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venturini, Marco

    2007-01-01

    and F. Zimmermann, ”LC e-Cloud Activities at CERN”, talkal. , Simulations of the Electron Cloud for Vari- ous Con?E-CLOUD BUILD-UP IN GROOVED CHAMBERS ? M. Venturini † LBNL,

  2. Laser calibration system for the CERES Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dariusz Miskowiec; Peter Braun-Munzinger

    2008-02-15

    A Nd:YAG laser was used to simulate charged particle tracks at known positions in the CERES Time Projection Chamber at the CERN SPS. The system was primarily developed to study the response of the readout electronics and to calibrate the electron drift velocity. Further applications were the determination of the gating grid transparency, the chamber position calibration, and long-term monitoring of drift properties of the gas in the detector.

  3. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. ); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. ); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. ); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. )

    1989-07-01

    This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

  4. Scintillation Pulse Shape Discrimination in a Two-Phase Xenon Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kwong; P. Brusov; T. Shutt; C. E. Dahl; A. I. Bolozdynya; A. Bradley

    2009-08-06

    The energy and electric field dependence of pulse shape discrimination in liquid xenon have been measured in a 10 gm two-phase xenon time projection chamber. We have demonstrated the use of the pulse shape and charge-to-light ratio simultaneously to obtain a leakage below that achievable by either discriminant alone. A Monte Carlo is used to show that the dominant fluctuation in the pulse shape quantity is statistical in nature, and project the performance of these techniques in larger detectors. Although the performance is generally weak at low energies relevant to elastic WIMP recoil searches, the pulse shape can be used in probing for higher energy inelastic WIMP recoils.

  5. Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydagis, Matthew Mark; /Chicago U.

    2010-12-01

    The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

  6. A large dynamic chamber for characterizing particulate and VOC emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawless, P.A.; Smith, D.D.; Ensor, D.S. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Sparks, L.E. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.

    1996-12-31

    A dynamic chamber (8 m{sup 3}) was designed and constructed for the investigation of particulate emissions from appliances and office equipment and their impact on indoor air quality. The supply air incorporated high efficiency particle filters to provide a near-zero particle background in a low turbulence flow. The flow rate could be varied from 2 to 80 m{sup 3}/min. For testing operating appliances, such as vacuum cleaners, the dimensions of the chamber were chosen to allow an operator to use an appliance over a floor area of about 2 m{sup 2}. The need for low particle backgrounds dictated that the chamber be operated in an overpressure mode, so that all leaks were from the inside and would only affect the total flow measurements. The flow converges into an outlet tube 20 cm in diameter where velocity and concentration measurements could be made in multiple ports. The chamber was furnished with interior lights and electrical outlets. Recently, the chamber has been modified with carbon filters on the inlet to allow for sampling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as from floor wax. The filters remove the VOC background to a level below that detectable by the sorbent cartridges/analysis system used for sampling. The chamber has even been pressed into service as a small cleanroom for some operations that required its unique characteristics. The chamber has been successfully operated in both a closed-loop mode and in an open-loop mode. The main advantage of the closed loop mode is that the backgrounds can be reduced to zero more quickly, but the disadvantage is that humidity and carbon dioxide concentrations grow because they are not removed by the filters.

  7. Dimensional enhancement of kinetic energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. P. Schleich; J. P. Dahl

    2002-03-14

    Simple thermodynamics considers kinetic energy to be an extensive variable which is proportional to the number, N, of particles. We present a quantum state of N non-interacting particles for which the kinetic energy increases quadratically with N. This enhancement effect is tied to the quantum centrifugal potential whose strength is quadratic in the number of dimensions of configuration space.

  8. Stratospheric sulfur oxidation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayne, J.T.; Worsnop, D.R.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Oxidation of SO2 to H2SO4 in the atmosphere is believed to involve the reaction of SO3 with water. It is commonly assumed that this is an important step leading to homogeneous nucleation of H2SO4 aerosol particles. Heterogeneous chemistry on sulfuric acid aerosols regulate much of the ozone photochemistry in the lower stratosphere and are also believed to have significant effect on the climate. Understanding aerosol loading requires a detailed knowledge of the stratospheric sulfur budget, including its oxidation kinetics. Here we present results of a laboratory project studying a key step in the oxidation process, the homogeneous reaction between SO3 and H2O vapor. Kinetic measurements are performed in a high-pressure turbulent fast-flow reactor (fabricated at MIT) which minimizes heterogeneous loss of SO3 on reactorwalls. The rate of decay of SO3 and the appearance of H2SO4 is monitored in the presence of excess water vapor. Gas phase reactants and products are detected via an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometer which is coupled to the exit of the flow reactor. Sulfuric acid nucleation studies can also be performed using the turbulent flow reactor. Initial measurements using a particle detector (based on Mie scattering) showed that aerosol formation and particle size distribution are controlled by varying the SO3/H2O gas ratio and the reactor temperature. Results for the reaction SO3J+ H2O show a second order dependence in water vapor density and a strong negative temperature dependence. The results, measured in the range -30C to +95C, imply that an SO3.H2O adduct and/or a water dimer species is likely involved in the reaction mechanism. Results of recent theoretical calculations on the SO3 + H2O system also support the finding that two water molecules are involved. Implications for the gas phase production of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere will be discussed.

  9. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howes, G G

    2007-01-01

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the ther...

  10. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Howes

    2007-11-27

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  11. Georges Charpak, Particle Detectors, and Multiwire Chambers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunities NuclearlongGeneralGeorge T. "Rusty"

  12. Fig.1a. Schematic picture of ITER tokamak, showing the toroidal main chamber,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    Fig.1a. Schematic picture of ITER tokamak, showing the toroidal main chamber, material wall, and the small divertor chamber at the bottom of the main chamber Gyrokinetic particle simulation of neoclassical and b). The wall plates in the divertor chamber are periodically replaced, giving the main wall a much

  13. Kinetics of Ion Removal from an Iron-Rich Industrial Coproduct: I. Chloride Yigal Salingar, Donald L. Sparks,* Masoud Ghodrati, and Gerald J. Hendricks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    and water quality aspects. Therefore, determining the mechanism and rate of Cl removal by water from the IRM the chamber, and that no chemical kinetics were involved. THE DISPOSAL of industrial byproducts and coproducts and as fertilizer sources. Their disposal, however, is often pre- cluded by a lack of information on the accompanied

  14. Initial Back-to-Back Fission Chamber Testing in ATRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Chase; Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe

    2014-06-01

    Development and testing of in-pile, real-time neutron sensors for use in Materials Test Reactor experiments is an ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility has sponsored a series of projects to evaluate neutron detector options in the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC). Special hardware was designed and fabricated to enable testing of the detectors in the ATRC. Initial testing of Self-Powered Neutron Detectors and miniature fission chambers produced promising results. Follow-on testing required more experiment hardware to be developed. The follow-on testing used a Back-to-Back fission chamber with the intent to provide calibration data, and a means of measuring spectral indices. As indicated within this document, this is the first time in decades that BTB fission chambers have been used in INL facilities. Results from these fission chamber measurements provide a baseline reference for future measurements with Back-to-Back fission chambers.

  15. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Battaglia, J.M.; Buksa, J.J.; Creedson, R.L.; Erlandson, O.D.; Levine, H.E.; Roelant, D.F.; Sanchez, H.W.; Schrader, S.A.

    1984-09-01

    GA Technologies has developed a conceptual ICF reactor system based on the Cascade rotating-bed reaction chamber concept. Unique features of the system design include the use of low activation SiC in a reaction chamber constructed of box-shaped tiles held together in compression by prestressing tendons to the vacuum chamber. Circulating Li/sub 2/O granules serve as the tritium breeding and energy transport material, cascading down the sides of the reaction chamber to the power conversion system. The total tritium inventory of the system is 6 kg; tritium recovery is accomplished directly from the granules via the vacuum system. A system for centrifugal throw transport of the hot Li/sub 2/O granules from the reaction chamber to the power conversion system has been developed. A number of issues were evaluated during the course of this study. These include the response of first-layer granules to the intense microexplosion surface heat flux, cost effective fabrication of Li/sub 2/O granules, tritium inventory and recovery issues, the thermodynamics of solids-flow options, vacuum versus helium-medium heat transfer, and the tradeoffs of capital cost versus efficiency for alternate heat exchange and power conversion system option. The resultant design options appear to be economically competitive, safe, and environmentally attractive.

  16. Atmosphere contamination following repainting of a human hyperbaric chamber complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lillo, R.S.; Morris, J.W.; Caldwell, J.M.; Balk, D.M.; Flynn, E.T. )

    1990-09-01

    The Naval Medical Research Institute currently conducts hyperbaric research in a Man-Rated Chamber Complex (MRCC) originally installed in 1977. Significant engineering alterations to the MRCC and rusting of some of its interior sections necessitated repainting, which was completed in 1988. Great care was taken in selecting an appropriate paint (polyamide epoxy) and in ensuring correct application and curing procedures. Only very low levels of hydrocarbons were found in the MRCC atmosphere before initial pressurization after painting and curing. After pressurization, however, significant chemical contamination was found. The primary contaminants were aromatic hydrocarbons: xylenes (which were a major component of both the primer and topcoat paint) and ethyl benzene. The role that pressure played in stimulating off-gassing from the paint is not clear; the off-gassing rate was observed to be similar over a large range in chamber pressures from 1.6 to 31.0 atm abs. Scrubbing the chamber atmosphere with the chemical absorbent Purafil was effective in removing the contaminants. Contamination has been observed to slowly decline with chamber use and is expected to continue to improve with time. However, this contamination experience emphasizes the need for a high precision gas analysis program at any diving facility to ensure the safety of the breathing gas and chamber atmosphere.

  17. Methyl Formate Oxidation: Speciation Data, Laminar Burning Velocities, Ignition Delay Times and a Validated Chemical Kinetic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, S.; Burke, M. P.; Chaos, M.; Stein, Y.; Dryer, F. L.; Zhukov, V. P.; Finch, O.; Simmie, J. M.; Curran, H. J.

    2010-07-16

    The oxidation of methyl formate (CH{sub 3}OCHO) has been studied in three experimental environments over a range of applied combustion relevant conditions: 1. A variable-pressure flow reactor has been used to quantify reactant, major intermediate and product species as a function of residence time at 3 atm and 0.5% fuel concentration for oxygen/fuel stoichiometries of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at 900 K, and for pyrolysis at 975 K. 2. Shock tube ignition delays have been determined for CH{sub 3}OCHO/O{sub 2}/Ar mixtures at pressures of ? 2.7, 5.4, and 9.2 atm and temperatures of 1275–1935 K for mixture compositions of 0.5% fuel (at equivalence ratios of 1.0, 2.0, and 0.5) and 2.5% fuel (at an equivalence ratio of 1.0). 3. Laminar burning velocities of outwardly propagating spherical CH{sub 3}OCHO/air flames have been determined for stoichiometries ranging from 0.8–1.6, at atmospheric pressure using a pressure-release-type high-pressure chamber. A detailed chemical kinetic model has been constructed, validated against, and used to interpret these experimental data. The kinetic model shows that methyl formate oxidation proceeds through concerted elimination reactions, principally forming methanol and carbon monoxide as well as through bimolecular hydrogen abstraction reactions. The relative importance of elimination versus abstraction was found to depend on the particular environment. In general, methyl formate is consumed exclusively through molecular decomposition in shock tube environments, while at flow reactor and freely propagating premixed flame conditions, there is significant competition between hydrogen abstraction and concerted elimination channels. It is suspected that in diffusion flame configurations the elimination channels contribute more significantly than in premixed environments.

  18. Modeling the Kinetics of Bimolecular Reactions Antonio Fernandez-Ramos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    -dependent energy transfer processes. The section on thermal reactions has a heavy emphasis on (generalized-Phase Thermal Reactions 4518 2.1. Thermodynamics: Enthalpies and Free Energies of Reaction 4518 2.2. Kinetics 4520 2.2.1. Arrhenius Parameters and Free Energy of Activation 4520 2.2.2. Collision Theory 4521 2

  19. Statistical Analysis of Protein Folding Kinetics Aaron R. Dinner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinner, Aaron

    Statistical Analysis of Protein Folding Kinetics Aaron R. Dinner , Sung-Sau So ˇ , and Martin and theoretical studies over several years have led to the emergence of a unified general mechanism for protein folding that serves as a framework for the design and interpretation of research in this area [1

  20. Scaling of asymmetric magnetic reconnection: Kinetic particleincell simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this scaling theory using fully electromagnetic particleincell simulations of antiparallel asymmetric magnetic, outflow speeds, and outflow densities are consistent with the general scaling theory. This implies that kinetic electron and proton physics beyond the Hall term does not fundamentally alter the gross properties

  1. Single-particle kinetics of influenza virus membrane fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Single-particle kinetics of influenza virus membrane fusion Daniel L. Floyd*, Justin R. Ragains for review July 24, 2008) Membrane fusion is an essential step during entry of enveloped viruses into cells. Conventional fusion assays are generally limited to observation of ensembles of multiple fusion events

  2. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print Wednesday, 25 January 2012 00:00 In the earth's troposphere, which...

  3. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Herron, Donald Joe (Manteca, CA); Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  4. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Herron, Donald Joe (Manteca, CA); Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-15

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  5. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Herron, Donald Joe (Manteca, CA); Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-08

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  6. Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

    2010-11-30

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  7. On the vierbein formalism of general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2007-12-06

    Both the Einstein-Hilbert action and the Einstein equations are discussed under the absolute vierbein formalism. Taking advantage of this form, we prove that the "kinetic energy" term, i.e., the quadratic term of time derivative term, in the Lagrangian of the Einstein-Hilbert action is non-positive definitive. And then, we present two groups of coordinate conditions that lead to positive definitive kinetic energy term in the Lagrangian, as well as the corresponding actions with positive definitive kinetic energy term, respectively. Based on the ADM decomposition, the Hamiltonian representation and canonical quantization of general relativity taking advantage of the actions with positive definitive kinetic energy term are discussed; especially, the Hamiltonian constraints with positive definitive kinetic energy term are given, respectively. Finally, we present a group of gauge conditions such that there is not any second time derivative term in the ten Einstein equations.

  8. Fab 5: noncanonical kinetic gravity, self tuning, and cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleby, Stephen A.; Linder, Eric V. [Institute for the Early Universe WCU, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Felice, Antonio De, E-mail: stephen.appleby@ewha.ac.kr, E-mail: adefelic@gmail.com, E-mail: evlinder@lbl.gov [ThEP's CRL, NEP, The Institute for Fundamental Study, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 (Thailand)

    2012-10-01

    We investigate circumstances under which one can generalize Horndeski's most general scalar-tensor theory of gravity. Specifically we demonstrate that a nonlinear combination of purely kinetic gravity terms can give rise to an accelerating universe without the addition of extra propagating degrees of freedom on cosmological backgrounds, and exhibit self tuning to bring a large cosmological constant under control. This nonlinear approach leads to new properties that may be instructive for exploring the behaviors of gravity.

  9. On the relationships between Michaelis–Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics, Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics and quadratic kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-09-03

    The Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use which of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics, which is the first order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of enzyme-substrate complex exactly for a single enzyme single substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of quasi-steady-state formore »the enzyme-substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme-substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme-substrate complexes, substrates and enzymes. In particular, I showed that the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis–Menten kinetics was found to persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln [ E ]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [ E ]T and persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln [ S ]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration [ S ]T. Meanwhile, the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics persistently under-predicts ? ln v / ? ln k2+ and ? ln v / ? ln [ E ]T, and persistently over-predicts ? ln v / ? ln k1+ and ? ln v / ? ln [ S ]T. In contrast, the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics always gives consistent predictions of ? ln v / ? ln k2+, ? ln v / ? ln k1+, ? ln v / ? ln [ E ]T and ? ln v / ? ln [ S ]T. Since the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics includes the advantages from both the Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics and it is applicable for almost the whole range of substrate and enzyme abundances, soil biogeochemical modelers therefore no longer need to choose when to use the Michaelis–Menten kinetics or the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics. I expect removing this choice ambiguity will make it easier to formulate more robust and consistent land biogeochemical models.« less

  10. Solution of the space-dependent reactor kinetics equations in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Donald Ross

    1971-01-01

    A general class of two-step alternating-direction semi-implicit methods is proposed for the approximate solution of the semi-discrete form of the space-dependent reactor kinetics equations. An exponential transformation ...

  11. A Kinetic Theory Approach to Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu

    2002-04-22

    We describe a kinetic theory approach to quantum gravity -- by which we mean a theory of the microscopic structure of spacetime, not a theory obtained by quantizing general relativity. A figurative conception of this program is like building a ladder with two knotted poles: quantum matter field on the right and spacetime on the left. Each rung connecting the corresponding knots represent a distinct level of structure. The lowest rung is hydrodynamics and general relativity; the next rung is semiclassical gravity, with the expectation value of quantum fields acting as source in the semiclassical Einstein equation. We recall how ideas from the statistical mechanics of interacting quantum fields helped us identify the existence of noise in the matter field and its effect on metric fluctuations, leading to the establishment of the third rung: stochastic gravity, described by the Einstein-Langevin equation. Our pathway from stochastic to quantum gravity is via the correlation hierarchy of noise and induced metric fluctuations. Three essential tasks beckon: 1) Deduce the correlations of metric fluctuations from correlation noise in the matter field; 2) Reconstituting quantum coherence -- this is the reverse of decoherence -- from these correlation functions 3) Use the Boltzmann-Langevin equations to identify distinct collective variables depicting recognizable metastable structures in the kinetic and hydrodynamic regimes of quantum matter fields and how they demand of their corresponding spacetime counterparts. This will give us a hierarchy of generalized stochastic equations -- call them the Boltzmann-Einstein hierarchy of quantum gravity -- for each level of spacetime structure, from the macroscopic (general relativity) through the mesoscopic (stochastic gravity) to the microscopic (quantum gravity).

  12. Modification of {Delta}{sup Prime} by magnetic feedback and kinetic effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Yueqiang; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    Two possible ways of modifying the linear tearing mode index, by active magnetic feedback and by drift kinetic effects of deeply trapped particles, are analytically investigated. Magnetic feedback schemes, studied in this work, are found generally stabilizing for {Delta}{sup Prime }. The drift kinetic effects from both thermal particles and hot ions tend to reduce the power of the large solution from the outer region. This generally leads to a destabilization of {Delta} Prime for the toroidal analytic equilibria considered here.

  13. The complete relativistic kinetic model of violation of symmetry in isotopic expanding plasma and production of baryons in hot Universe. I. Exact model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. G. Ignatyev; K. Alsmadi

    2010-12-27

    The complete model of production of baryons in expanding primordial symmetrical hot Universe is constructed in terms of general relativistic kinetic theory

  14. QER- Comment of PA Chamber of Business and Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On behalf of Gene Barr, President & CEO of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, please find attached our comments regarding Natural Gas Transmission, Storage & Distribution, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania July 21, 2014. Thanks in advance for the attention to our comments and for holding a hearing today in our state. All the best, Kevin

  15. Thermodynamic Analysis of a single chamber Microbial Eric A. Zielke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 #12;Microbial Fuel Cell Zielke 1 1 Introduction Renewable energy (RE) applications are becomingThermodynamic Analysis of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Eric A. Zielke May 5, 2006 #12;Microbial Fuel Cell Zielke ii List of Tables 1 First Law Thermodynamic Efficiencies from Experimental Data

  16. Hydrogen Production in a Single Chamber Microbial Electrolysis Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Production in a Single Chamber Microbial Electrolysis Cell Lacking a Membrane D O U G L 7, 2008. Hydrogen gas can be produced by electrohydrogenesis in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs assumed that a membrane is needed in an MEC to avoid hydrogen losses due to bacterial consumption

  17. Verifying Sensor Response to Difficult Chemicals with a New Test Chamber Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maughan, A. D.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Probasco, Kathleen M.

    2004-06-01

    In this article we discuss the application of technology innovations to optimize detection of hard-to-measure (less- or semi-volatile) compounds. These chemicals are found all around us: in pesticides and herbicides, the higher boiling polyaromatic hydrocarbons in diesel exhaust, and linked polyurethane foams in products ranging from hiking boots to acoustic ceilings. They appear in low concentrations and evaporate very slowly. These heavier chemicals are rarely measured accurately because they stick to surfaces and sampling equipment and, consequently, are not reliably sampled or delivered to analytical detectors. It’s like trying to identify cold, sticky honey by getting it to flow in through a sampling tube to a detector –it will hardly move. Honey generally coats out on surfaces and sample lines to the extent that even if it is detected, the amount present is vastly underestimated. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) addressed the problem by developing a chamber facility with instrumentation that can overcome the under-reporting of these ubiquitous chemical compounds. The atmospheric chemistry chamber provides a controlled environment in which to certify the accuracy of and conditions under which sensors can best respond to volatile and semi-volatile chemicals. The facility is designed to handle and measure chemicals at the levels at which they are found in nature. Test environments can be created in which atmospheric concentrations are at low part-per-trillion concentrations. These concentrations are equivalent to an herbicide off-gassing from a commercially grown apple. The chamber can be set up to simulate releases ranging from industrial vents with high concentrations to releases from surfaces, soils, and/or vegetation where the concentrations are low.

  18. Passivity Based Adaptive Control of a Two Chamber Single Rod Hydraulic Actuator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    Passivity Based Adaptive Control of a Two Chamber Single Rod Hydraulic Actuator Meng Wang and Perry based backstepping controller using a physical compressibility energy function for a chamber hydraulic produces an accurate trajectory tracking performance. I. INTRODUCTION Electronically controlled hydraulic

  19. The Laser Calibration System of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Renault; B. S. Nielsen; J. Westergaard; J. J. Gaardhřje

    2005-11-07

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is the only experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) dedicated to the study of heavy ion collisions. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector covering the pseudo rapidity range $|\\eta|laser system is to simulate ionizing tracks at predifined positions throughout the drift volume in order to monitor the TPC response to a known source. In particular, the alignment of the read-out chambers will be performed, and variations of the drift velocity due to drift field imperfections can be measured and used as calibration data in the physics data analysis. In this paper we present the design of the pulsed UV laser and optical system, together with the control and monitoring systems.

  20. Chamber for the optical manipulation of microscopic particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buican, Tudor N. (Los Alamos, NM); Upham, Bryan D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A particle control chamber enables experiments to be carried out on biological cells and the like using a laser system to trap and manipulate the particles. A manipulation chamber provides a plurality of inlet and outlet ports for the particles and for fluids used to control or to contact the particles. A central manipulation area is optically accessible by the laser and includes first enlarged volumes for containing a selected number of particles for experimentation. A number of first enlarged volumes are connected by flow channels through second enlarged volumes. The second enlarged volumes act as bubble valves for controlling the interconnections between the first enlarged volumes. Electrode surfaces may be applied above the first enlarged volumes to enable experimentation using the application of electric fields within the first enlarged volumes. A variety of chemical and environmental conditions may be established within individual first enlarged volumes to enable experimental conditions for small scale cellular interactions.

  1. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  2. Using sputter coated glass to stabilize microstrip gas chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gong, Wen G. (Albany, CA)

    1997-01-01

    By sputter coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics, thin-film Pestov glass), microstrip gas chambers (MSGC) of high gain stability, low leakage current, and a high rate capability can be fabricated. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material.

  3. The Hydriding Kinetics of Organic Hydrogen Getters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, G. L.

    2002-02-11

    The aging of hermetically sealed systems is often accompanied by the gradual production of hydrogen gas that is a result of the decay of environmental gases and the degradation of organic materials. In particular, the oxygen, water, hydrogen ''equilibrium'' is affected by the removal of oxygen due the oxidation of metals and organic materials. This shift of the above ''equilibrium'' towards the formation of hydrogen gas, particularly in crevices, may eventually reach an explosive level of hydrogen gas or degrade metals by hydriding them. The latter process is generally delayed until the oxidizing species are significantly reduced. Organic hydrogen getters introduced by Allied Signal Aerospace Company, Kansas City Division have proven to be a very effective means of preventing hydrogen gas accumulation in sealed containers. These getters are relatively unaffected by air and environmental gases. They can be packaged in a variety of ways to fit particular needs such as porous pellets, fine or coarse [gravel] powder, or loaded into silicone rubber. The hydrogen gettering reactions are extremely irreversible since the hydrogen gas is converted into an organic hydrocarbon. These getters are based on the palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to double and then single bonds in aromatic aryl compounds. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) typically mixed with 25% by weight carbon with palladium (1% by weight of carbon) is one of the newest and best of these organic hydrogen getters. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reaction with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates, including mixed alkyl and aryl hydrocarbons with the possibilities of many isomers. The reaction kinetics mechanisms are also strongly influenced by the form in which they are packaged. For example, the hydriding rates for pellets and gravel have a strong dependence on reaction extent (i.e., DEB reduction) and a kinetic order in pressure of 0.76. Silicone rubber based DEB getters hydride at a much lower rate, have little dependence on reaction extent, have a higher kinetic order in pressure (0.87), and have a lower activation energy. The kinetics of the reaction as a function of hydrogen pressure, stoichiometry, and temperature for hydrogen and deuterium near ambient temperature (0 to 75 C) for pressures near or below 100 Pa over a wide range (in some cases, the complete) hydrogenation range are presented along with multi-dimensional rate models.

  4. Development of a time projection chamber with micro pixel electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kubo; K. Miuchi; T. Nagayoshi; A. Ochi; R. Orito; A. Takada; T. Tanimori; M. Ueno

    2003-01-09

    A time projection chamber (TPC) based on a gaseous chamber with micro pixel electrodes (micro-PIC) has been developed for measuring three-dimensional tracks of charged particles. The micro-PIC with a detection area of 10 cm square consists of a double-sided printing circuit board. Anode pixels are formed with 0.4 mm pitch on strips aligned perpendicular to the cathode strips in order to obtain a two-dimensional position. In the TPC with drift length of 8 cm, 4 mm wide field cage electrodes are aligned at 1mm spaces and a uniform electric field of about 0.4 kV/cm is produced. For encoding of the three-dimensional position a synchronous readout system has been developed using Field Programmable Gate Arrays with 40 MHz clock. This system enables us to reconstruct the three-dimensional track of the particle at successive points like a cloud chamber even at high event rate. The drift velocity of electrons in the TPC was measured with the tracks of cosmic muons for three days, during which the TPC worked stably with the gas gain of 3000. With a radioisotope of gamma-ray source the three-dimensional track of a Compton scattered electron was taken successfully.

  5. Compensation for the Eddy Current Effect in the APS Storage Ring Vacuum Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Compensation for the Eddy Current Effect in the APS Storage Ring Vacuum Chamber Y. Chung Abstract inside the APS storage ring vacuum chamber due to the eddy current effect were measured. A circuit of the correction magnet field, externally applied to the vac- uum chamber, induces eddy current inside the aluminum

  6. Explicit Representation of Main-Chamber Recycling in the OEDGE Boundary Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stangeby, P. C.

    Explicit Representation of Main-Chamber Recycling in the OEDGE Boundary Code S. LISGO, P contact occurs with the main chamber walls, additional to the divertor target. In order to investigate the role of main chamber recycling on core fuelling and impurity behavior, the OSM-EIRENE- DIVIMP (OEDGE

  7. A study of the polyethylene membrane used in diffusion chambers for radon gas concentration measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    A study of the polyethylene membrane used in diffusion chambers for radon gas concentration. Thoron can also be deterred from entering the diffusion chamber by using a polyethylene (PE) membrane rights reserved. PACS: 29.40; 23.60 Keywords: Diffusion chamber; Polyethylene membrane; Radon and thoron

  8. Recent advances in single-chamber fuel-cells: Experiment and modeling , Zongping Shao b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Sossina M.

    Recent advances in single-chamber fuel-cells: Experiment and modeling Yong Hao a , Zongping Shao b; accepted 6 May 2006 Abstract Single-chamber fuel cells (SCFC) are ones in which the fuel and oxidizer is discussed. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Solid oxide fuel cell; Single chamber

  9. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-03-09

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  10. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Fuels Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels...

  11. Medicinal Chemistry and Enzyme Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    Prof. Donald G. Truhlar, Department of Chemistry, February 2007 Recent Results ·Novel analytic functionMedicinal Chemistry and Enzyme Kinetics Elizabeth Amin and C. R. Wagner, Medicinal Chemistry Jiali Gao, Chemistry Don Truhlar, Chemistry February 2007 #12;Zn Metalloprotein Force Field Design ·Zn

  12. Dual chamber system providing simultaneous etch and deposition on opposing substrate sides for growing low defect density epitaxial layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Nagraj S. (Knoxville, TN); Kasica, Richard J. (Ashburn, VA) ,

    2011-03-08

    A dual-chamber reactor can include a housing enclosing a volume having a divider therein, where the divider defines a first chamber and a second chamber. The divider can include a substrate holder that supports at least one substrate and exposes a first side of the substrate to the first chamber and a second side of the substrate to the second chamber. The first chamber can include an inlet for delivering at least one reagent to the first chamber for forming a film on the first side of the substrate, and the second chamber can include a removal device for removing material from the second side of the substrate.

  13. Kinetics-controlled growth of aligned mesocrystalline SnO2 nanorod arrays for lithium-ion batteries with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Limin

    Kinetics-controlled growth of aligned mesocrystalline SnO2 nanorod arrays for lithium-ion batteries structures, lithium-ion batteries ABSTRACT A general method for facile kinetics-controlled growth of aligned material for lithium-ion batteries. 1 Introduction Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have been considered

  14. Tolman's law in linear irreversible thermodynamics: a kinetic theory approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Sandoval-Villalbazo; A. L. Garcia-Perciante; D. Brun-Battistini

    2012-07-10

    In this paper it is shown that Tolman's law can be derived from relativistic kinetic theory applied to a simple fluid in a BGK-like approximation. Using this framework, it becomes clear that the contribution of the gravitational field can be viewed as a cross effect that resembles the so-called \\emph{Thomson effect} in irreversible thermodynamics. A proper generalization of Tolman's law in an inhomogeneous medium is formally established based on these grounds.

  15. Construction and test of MDT chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, F; Dietl, H; Kroha, H; Lagouri, T; Manz, A; Ostapchuk, A Ya; Richter, R; Schael, S; Chouridou, S; Deile, M; Kortner, O; Staude, A; Ströhmer, R; Trefzger, T M

    2001-01-01

    The Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) consist of 3-4 layers of pressurized drift tubes on either side ofa space frame carrying an optical monitoring system to correct fordeformations. The full-scale prototype of a large MDT chamber has been constructed with methods suitable for large-scale production. X-ray measurements at CERN showed a positioning accuracy of the sense wires in the chamber of better than the required 20 micrometers (rms). The performance of the chamber was studied in a muon beam at CERN. Chamber production for ATLAS now has started.

  16. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-15

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  17. Performance parameters of a liquid filled ionization chamber array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppe, B.; Stelljes, T. S.; Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Harder, D.; Willborn, K.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: In this work, the properties of the two-dimensional liquid filled ionization chamber array Octavius 1000SRS (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) for use in clinical photon-beam dosimetry are investigated.Methods: Measurements were carried out at an Elekta Synergy and Siemens Primus accelerator. For measurements of stability, linearity, and saturation effects of the 1000SRS array a Semiflex 31013 ionization chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used as a reference. The effective point of measurement was determined by TPR measurements of the array in comparison with a Roos chamber (type 31004, PTW-Freiburg, Germany). The response of the array with varying field size and depth of measurement was evaluated using a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber as a reference. Output factor measurements were carried out with a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber, a diode (type 60012, PTW-Freiburg, Germany), and the detector array under investigation. The dose response function for a single detector of the array was determined by measuring 1 cm wide slit-beam dose profiles and comparing them against diode-measured profiles. Theoretical aspects of the low pass properties and of the sampling frequency of the detector array were evaluated. Dose profiles measured with the array and the diode detector were compared, and an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) field was verified using the Gamma-Index method and the visualization of line dose profiles.Results: The array showed a short and long term stability better than 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively. Fluctuations in linearity were found to be within ±0.2% for the vendor specified dose range. Saturation effects were found to be similar to those reported in other studies for liquid-filled ionization chambers. The detector's relative response varied with field size and depth of measurement, showing a small energy dependence accounting for maximum signal deviations of ±2.6% from the reference condition for the setup used. The ?-values of the Gaussian dose response function for a single detector of the array were found to be (0.72 ± 0.25) mm at 6 MV and (0.74 ± 0.25) mm at 15 MV and the corresponding low pass cutoff frequencies are 0.22 and 0.21 mm{sup ?1}, respectively. For the inner 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} region and the outer 11 × 11 cm{sup 2} region of the array the Nyquist theorem is fulfilled for maximum sampling frequencies of 0.2 and 0.1 mm{sup ?1}, respectively. An IMRT field verification with a Gamma-Index analysis yielded a passing rate of 95.2% for a 3 mm/3% criterion with a TPS calculation as reference.Conclusions: This study shows the applicability of the Octavius 1000SRS in modern dosimetry. Output factor and dose profile measurements illustrated the applicability of the array in small field and stereotactic dosimetry. The high spatial resolution ensures adequate measurements of dose profiles in regular and intensity modulated photon-beam fields.

  18. Nov 13-14, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Progress Report on Chamber Clearing Code Effort 1 Progress Report on Chamber Clearing Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Nov 13-14, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Progress Report on Chamber Clearing Code Effort 1 Progress Livermore November 13-14, 2001 #12;Nov 13-14, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Progress Report on Chamber.g. - CFDRC - HEIGHTS - RECON · Code implementation and integration of packages #12;Nov 13-14, 2001 A. R

  19. Statistics of the electromagnetic response of a chaotic reverberation chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -B. Gros; U. Kuhl; O. Legrand; F. Mortessagne; O. Picon; E. Richalot

    2014-09-20

    This article presents a study of the electromagnetic response of a chaotic reverberation chamber (RC) in the presence of losses. By means of simulations and of experiments, the fluctuations in the maxima of the field obtained in a conventional mode-stirred RC are compared with those in a chaotic RC in the neighborhood of the Lowest Useable Frequency (LUF). The present work illustrates that the universal spectral and spatial statistical properties of chaotic RCs allow to meet more adequately the criteria required by the Standard IEC 61000-4-21 to perform tests of electromagnetic compatibility.

  20. Performance Evaluation of Reverberant Chamber Background Noise Levels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravi, Sankaranarayana

    2012-02-14

    ?higher?octave?bands,? the reby? increasing? the? loudness?of? the? fan.?? For?better?system?design,?it? is?necessary?to?obtain ?the?sound?power?signatures?of?the? fan?in?the?various?octave?bands?rather?than?a?singl e?rating?number?for?sound?power?level.?? Laboratory? fan...?installed?or?a?rotating?boom?microphone?s etup??is?adopted.? 4.2 ? Literature?Review? Table?5?presents? the?survey?of?all? relevant? literat ure?on?reverberant?chamber? testing? with?a?particular?attention?to?sound?power?measurem ent?testing?facilities.? ? ? 15? Ta bl e?5 ???????? Li...

  1. An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santoro, Robers; Dryer, Frederick; Ju, Yiguang

    2013-09-30

    An integrated and collaborative effort involving experiments and complementary chemical kinetic modeling investigated the effects of significant concentrations of water and CO2 and minor contaminant species (methane [CH4], ethane [C2H6], NOX, etc.) on the ignition and combustion of HHC fuels. The research effort specifically addressed broadening the experimental data base for ignition delay, burning rate, and oxidation kinetics at high pressures, and further refinement of chemical kinetic models so as to develop compositional specifications related to the above major and minor species. The foundation for the chemical kinetic modeling was the well validated mechanism for hydrogen and carbon monoxide developed over the last 25 years by Professor Frederick Dryer and his co-workers at Princeton University. This research furthered advance the understanding needed to develop practical guidelines for realistic composition limits and operating characteristics for HHC fuels. A suite of experiments was utilized that that involved a high-pressure laminar flow reactor, a pressure-release type high-pressure combustion chamber and a high-pressure turbulent flow reactor.

  2. Fuel, lubricant and additive effects in combustion chamber deposit formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelemen, S.R.; Homan, H.S.

    1996-10-01

    CCD causes octane requirement increase (ORI) and can potentially contributes to exhaust emissions and combustion chamber deposit interference (CCDI). Experiments were conducted to identify the separate fuel, lubricant and additive contributions to the amount and composition of CCD. CCD originates from multiple sources. Gasoline hydrocarbon components, gasoline additives, engine lubricant, and atmospheric nitrogen contribute to CCD in different ways. With some fuels the engine lubricant is the main contributor to CCD and this is shown by the high ash level in the CCD. For other fuels CCD is predominantly organic. Significant amounts of nitrogen were found in the CCD even when the fuel and lubricant were nitrogen free. The pyrolysis reactivity of different CCDs was studied to gain an understanding about the transformations that potentially happen over longer times and lower temperatures on the combustion chamber walls. In all cases during mild pyrolysis (375{degrees}C) there was a substantial increase in the level of aromatic carbon and a decrease in the level of organic oxygen. The largest increases in the amount of aromatic carbon occurred for CCDs that were the least aromatic.

  3. Slag monitoring system for combustion chambers of steam boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taler, J.; Taler, D.

    2009-07-01

    The computer-based boiler performance system presented in this article has been developed to provide a direct and quantitative assessment of furnace and convective surface cleanliness. Temperature, pressure, and flow measurements and gas analysis data are used to perform heat transfer analysis in the boiler furnace and evaporator. Power boiler efficiency is calculated using an indirect method. The on-line calculation of the exit flue gas temperature in a combustion chamber allows for an on-line heat flow rate determination, which is transferred to the boiler evaporator. Based on the energy balance for the boiler evaporator, the superheated steam mass flow rate is calculated taking into the account water flow rate in attemperators. Comparing the calculated and the measured superheated steam mass flow rate, the effectiveness of the combustion chamber water walls is determined in an on-line mode. Soot-blower sequencing can be optimized based on actual cleaning requirements rather than on fixed time cycles contributing to lowering of the medium usage in soot blowers and increasing of the water-wall lifetime.

  4. Atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herrmann, Hans W. (Los Alamos, NM); Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber is described. The apparatus is useful for decontaminating sensitive equipment and materials, such as electronics, optics and national treasures, which have been contaminated with chemical and/or biological warfare agents, such as anthrax, mustard blistering agent, VX nerve gas, and the like. There is currently no acceptable procedure for decontaminating such equipment. The apparatus may also be used for sterilization in the medical and food industries. Items to be decontaminated or sterilized are supported inside the chamber. Reactive gases containing atomic and metastable oxygen species are generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge in a He/O.sub.2 mixture and directed into the region of these items resulting in chemical reaction between the reactive species and organic substances. This reaction typically kills and/or neutralizes the contamination without damaging most equipment and materials. The plasma gases are recirculated through a closed-loop system to minimize the loss of helium and the possibility of escape of aerosolized harmful substances.

  5. Wire-chamber radiation detector with discharge control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Mulera, T.A.

    1982-03-29

    A wire chamber; radiation detector has spaced apart parallel electrodes and grids defining an ignition region in which charged particles or other ionizing radiations initiate brief localized avalanche discharges and defining an adjacent memory region in which sustained glow discharges are initiated by the primary discharges. Conductors of the grids at each side of the memory section extend in orthogonal directions enabling readout of the X-Y coordinates of locations at which charged particles were detected by sequentially transmitting pulses to the conductors of one grid while detecting transmissions of the pulses to the orthogonal conductors of the other grid through glow discharges. One of the grids bounding the memory region is defined by an array of conductive elements each of which is connected to the associated readout conductor through a separate resistance. The wire chamber avoids ambiguities and imprecisions in the readout of coordinates when large numbers of simultaneous or; near simultaneous charged particles have been detected. Down time between detection periods and the generation of radio frequency noise are also reduced.

  6. General Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position may be located in either the Office of Energy Statistics or the Office of Energy Analysis of EIA. This position is established to provide a professional general engineer to perform...

  7. General Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERALProblemsGeneral Information General

  8. Dose response of selected ion chambers in applied homogeneous transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, M. [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B. G. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Departments of Oncology and Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Rathee, S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The magnetic fields of an integrated MR-Linac system will alter the paths of electrons that produce ions in the ionization chambers. The dose response of selected ion chambers is evaluated in the presence of varying transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields. The investigation is useful in calibration of therapeutic x-ray beams associated with MR-Linac systems. Methods: The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to model the irradiation of NE2571, and PR06C ionization chambers in the presence of a transverse and longitudinal (with respect to the photon beam) magnetic fields of varying magnitude. The long axis of each chamber was simulated both parallel and perpendicular to the incident photon beam for each magnetic field case. The dose deposited in each chamber for each case was compared to the case with zero magnetic field by means of a ratio. The PR06C chamber's response was measured in the presence of a transverse magnetic field with field strengths ranging from 0.0 to 0.2 T to compare to simulated results. Results: The simulations and measured data show that in the presence of a transverse magnetic field there is a considerable dose response (maximum of 11% near 1.0 T in the ion chambers investigated, which depends on the magnitude of magnetic field, and relative orientation of the magnetic field, radiation beam, and ion chamber. Measurements made with the PR06C chamber verify these results in the region of measurement. In contrast, a longitudinal magnetic field produces only a slight increase in dose response (2% at 1.5 T) that rises slowly with increasing magnetic field and is seemingly independent of chamber orientation. Response trends were similar for the two ion chambers and relative orientations considered, but slight variations are present from chamber to chamber. Conclusions: Care must be taken when making ion chamber measurements in a transverse magnetic field. Ion chamber responses vary not only with transverse field strength, but with chamber orientation and type, and can be considerable. Longitudinal magnetic fields influence ion chamber responses relatively little (2% at 1.5 T), and only at field strengths in excess of 1.0 T.

  9. The effect of discharge chamber geometry on the ignition of low-pressure rf capacitive discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisovskiy, V.; Martins, S.; Landry, K.; Douai, D.; Booth, J.-P.; Cassagne, V.; Yegorenkov, V. [Laboratoire de Physique et Technologie des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau 91128, France and Kharkov National University, Kharkov 61077 (Ukraine); Unaxis Displays Division France SAS, 5, Rue Leon Blum, Palaiseau 91120 (France); Laboratoire de Physique et Technologie des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau 91128 (France); Unaxis Displays Division France SAS, 5, Rue Leon Blum, Palaiseau 91120 (France); Kharkov National University, Kharkov 61077 (Ukraine)

    2005-09-15

    This paper reports measured and calculated breakdown curves in several gases of rf capacitive discharges excited at 13.56 MHz in chambers of three different geometries: parallel plates surrounded by a dielectric cylinder ('symmetric parallel plate'), parallel plates surrounded by a grounded metallic cylinder ('asymmetric parallel plate'), and parallel plates inside a much larger grounded metallic chamber ('large chamber'). The breakdown curves for the symmetric chamber have a multivalued section at low pressure. For the asymmetric chamber the breakdown curves are shifted to lower pressures and rf voltages, but the multivalued feature is still present. At higher pressures the breakdown voltages are much lower than for the symmetric geometry. For the large chamber geometry the multivalued behavior is not observed. The breakdown curves were also calculated using a numerical model based on fluid equations, giving results that are in satisfactory agreement with the measurements.

  10. A kinetic-MHD model for low frequency phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    A hybrid kinetic-MHD model for describing low-frequency phenomena in high beta anisotropic plasmas that consist of two components: a low energy core component and an energetic component with low density. The kinetic-MHD model treats the low energy core component by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description, the energetic component by kinetic approach such as the gyrokinetic equation, and the coupling between the dynamics of these two components through plasma pressure in the momentum equation. The kinetic-MHD model optimizes both the physics contents and the theoretical efforts in studying low frequency MHD waves and transport phenomena in general magnetic field geometries, and can be easily modified to include the core plasma kinetic effects if necessary. It is applicable to any magnetized collisionless plasma system where the parallel electric field effects are negligibly small. In the linearized limit two coupled eigenmode equations for describing the coupling between the transverse Alfven type and the compressional Alfven type waves are derived. The eigenmode equations are identical to those derived from the full gyrokinetic equation in the low frequency limit and were previously analyzed both analytically nd numerically to obtain the eigenmode structure of the drift mirror instability which explains successfully the multi-satellite observation of antisymmetric field-aligned structure of the compressional magnetic field of Pc 5 waves in the magnetospheric ring current plasma. Finally, a quadratic form is derived to demonstrate the stability of the low-frequency transverse and compressional Alfven type instabilities in terms of the pressure anisotropy parameter {tau} and the magnetic field curvature-pressure gradient parameter. A procedure for determining the stability of a marginally stable MHD wave due to wave-particle resonances is also presented.

  11. Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akkelin, S V; Karpenko, Iu A; Sinyukov, Yu M

    2008-01-01

    We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support ...

  12. Prediction of inertial confinement fusion chamber gas evolution using multi-species computational fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Robert Scott

    2007-01-01

    to the pro- duction of fusion energy for power generation.injection in an inertial fusion energy chamber, Fusionas Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (Laser IFE), the ability to

  13. Liquid fuel vaporizer and combustion chamber having an adjustable thermal conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, Michael R; Whyatt, Greg A; Howe, Daniel T; Fountain, Matthew S

    2014-03-04

    The efficiency and effectiveness of apparatuses for vaporizing and combusting liquid fuel can be improved using thermal conductors. For example, an apparatus having a liquid fuel vaporizer and a combustion chamber can be characterized by a thermal conductor that conducts heat from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The thermal conductor can be a movable member positioned at an insertion depth within the combustion chamber that corresponds to a rate of heat conduction from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The rate of heat conduction can, therefore, be adjusted by positioning the movable member at a different insertion depth.

  14. Kinetic Modeling of Microbiological Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Fang, Yilin

    2012-09-17

    Kinetic description of microbiological processes is vital for the design and control of microbe-based biotechnologies such as waste water treatment, petroleum oil recovery, and contaminant attenuation and remediation. Various models have been proposed to describe microbiological processes. This editorial article discusses the advantages and limiation of these modeling approaches in cluding tranditional, Monod-type models and derivatives, and recently developed constraint-based approaches. The article also offers the future direction of modeling researches that best suit for petroleum and environmental biotechnologies.

  15. Eco Kinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetek EuropeEPG|ElecSolutionsKinetics Jump

  16. Conceptual Design Report for the Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Barnes; J. Beller; K. Caldwell; K. Croft; R. Cherry; W. Landman

    1998-12-01

    This conceptual design supports the creation of Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers, which will replicate deep subsurface and subocean environments characterized by high pressure (2,000 psi) and subfreezing to high temperature (-4 to 300 degrees F) with differing chemical and saturation conditions. The design provides a system to support research and development that includes heat transfer, phase change issues in porous media, microbiology in extreme environments, and carbon sequestration and extraction. The initial system design is based on the research needs to support the commercial production of methane hydrates from subsurface sediments. The design provides for three pressure vessels: a Down Hole Test Vessel, a Vertical Multi-phase Test Vessel, and a Horizontal Multi-phase Test Vessel.

  17. Effects of acidic deposition on paint: A chamber study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, J.W.; Lemmons, T.J.; Hou, Y.; Schadt, R.J.; Fornes, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    Exterior acrylic latex and alkyd architectural coatings were exposed to different conditions in a chamber exposure system involving simulated sunlight, dew, and photochemical smog-containing sulfur dioxide (SO2). A simulated sunlight exposure of the coating films in the presence of clean air was also incorporated into the experimental design. Changes in surface features after 1,370 hours of exposure were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of x-rays (EDAX). Gaseous species that deposited to the films were determined by ion chromatography of the dew collections. Color-change measurements of the exposed films were recorded as Delta E values. Latex and alkyd films that were formulated with calcium carbonate (CACO3) as an extender pigment were found to undergo the most change in surface features, composition, and color.

  18. Charge-Focusing Readout of Time Projection Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Ross; M. T. Hedges; I. Jaegle; M. D. Rosen; I. S. Seong; T. N. Thorpe; S. E. Vahsen; J. Yamaoka

    2013-04-02

    Time projection chambers (TPCs) have found a wide range of applications in particle physics, nuclear physics, and homeland security. For TPCs with high-resolution readout, the readout electronics often dominate the price of the final detector. We have developed a novel method which could be used to build large-scale detectors while limiting the necessary readout area. By focusing the drift charge with static electric fields, we would allow a small area of electronics to be sensitive to particle detection for a much larger detector volume. The resulting cost reduction could be important in areas of research which demand large-scale detectors, including dark matter searches and detection of special nuclear material. We present simulations made using the software package Garfield of a focusing structure to be used with a prototype TPC with pixel readout. This design should enable significant focusing while retaining directional sensitivity to incoming particles. We also present first experimental results and compare them with simulation.

  19. General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canuto, V

    2015-01-01

    This is an English translation of the Italian version of an encyclopedia chapter that appeared in the Italian Encyclopedia of the Physical Sciences, edited by Bruno Bertotti (1994). Following requests from colleagues we have decided to make it available to a more general readership. We present the motivation for constructing General Relativity, provide a short discussion of tensor algebra, and follow the set up of Einstein equations. We discuss briefly the initial value problem, the linear approximation and how should non gravitational physics be described in curved spacetime.

  20. General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunities NuclearlongGeneral Tables The General Tables for

  1. Multiscale Mathematics For Plasma Kinetics Spanning Multiple...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Multiscale Mathematics For Plasma Kinetics Spanning Multiple Collisionality Regimes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multiscale Mathematics For Plasma...

  2. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules,...

  3. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  4. *Always wear lint and powder free clean room gloves when reaching into the specimen chamber to reduce leaving oils, dust, or other contaminants inside the chamber.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SX-100 *Always wear lint and powder free clean room gloves when reaching into the specimen chamber (off) on the small on/off box behind the monitors. 6) Wait 30 minutes to cool down the diffusion pump

  5. Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

    2004-09-21

    The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

  6. Neoclassical toroidal viscosity in perturbed equilibria with general tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, Nikolas C.; Park, Jong-Kyu; Kim, Kimin; Wang, Zhirui; Berkery, John W.

    2013-12-15

    This paper presents a calculation of neoclassical toroidal viscous torque independent of large-aspect-ratio expansions across kinetic regimes. The Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) code was developed for this purpose, and is compared to previous combined regime models as well as regime specific limits and a drift kinetic ?f guiding center code. It is shown that retaining general expressions, without circular large-aspect-ratio or other orbit approximations, can be important at experimentally relevant aspect ratio and shaping. The superbanana plateau, a kinetic resonance effect recently recognized for its relevance to ITER, is recovered by the PENT calculations and shown to require highly accurate treatment of geometric effects.

  7. Source of methane and methods to control its formation in single chamber microbial electrolysis cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Source of methane and methods to control its formation in single chamber microbial electrolysis online 31 March 2009 Keywords: Hydrogen Microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) Methane Single chamber Exoelectrogenic a b s t r a c t Methane production occurs during hydrogen gas generation in microbial electrolysis

  8. Subsidence in magma chamber and the development of magmatic foliation in Oman ophiolite gabbros

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattin, Rodolphe

    Subsidence in magma chamber and the development of magmatic foliation in Oman ophiolite gabbros Keywords: Oman ophiolite fast spreading ridges magma chamber gabbro subsidence In the Oman ophiolite these gabbros to subsidence of a compacting mush from the floor of the melt lens into the underlying, main magma

  9. On the dynamic nature of azimuthal thermoacoustic modes in annular gas turbine combustion chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    On the dynamic nature of azimuthal thermoacoustic modes in annular gas turbine combustion chambers with the dynamics of standing and rotating azimuthal thermoacoustic modes in annular combustion chambers source intensity, the asymmetry in the system and the strength of the thermo-acoustic interaction

  10. Dynamic Chamber System to Measure Gaseous Compounds Emissions and Atmospheric-Biospheric Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aneja, Viney P.

    : Dynamic chamber, Emissions, Ammonia, Nitrogen oxide, Hydrogen sulphide, Hydrogen peroxide Abstract agricultural soils where nitrogen-rich fertilizers have been applied. Ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N) and reduced-liquid interface at swine waste treatment anaerobic storage lagoons, and agricultural fields. Similar chamber

  11. A simple analytical model to study and control azimuthal instabilities in annular combustion chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    . It is based on a one-dimensional zero Mach number formulation where N burners are connected to a single) a single burner connected to an annular chamber (N = 1), (2) two burners connected to the chamber (N = 2), (3) four burners (N = 4). In this case, the tool also allows to study passive control methods where

  12. In situ reduction and evaluation of anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    In situ reduction and evaluation of anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells D.05.118 #12;Abstract Single chamber anode-supported fuel cells are investigated under several methane under methane-to-oxygen ratio (Rmix) of 2. Anode-supported fuel cells are investigated regarding

  13. Sensitivity of LR 115 detectors in hemispherical chambers for radon measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Sensitivity of LR 115 detectors in hemispherical chambers for radon measurements D. Nikezic 1 , F, if the radius is larger than 3 cm, the effects of the deposition fraction of radon progeny will come into effect, which will again introduce uncertainties in radon measurements. For the hemispherical chamber

  14. Micro Strip Gas Chambers Overcoated with Carbon, Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon, and Glass Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micro Strip Gas Chambers Overcoated with Carbon, Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon, and Glass Films M Moscow GSP­1, Russia c Moscow Power Engineering Institute, Krasnokazarmennaya St. 14, Moscow, Russia Abstract The performance of glass and sapphire substrate Micro Strip Gas Chambers with chromium

  15. October 27-28, 2004 HAPL meeting, PPPL Overview of the Components of an IFE Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Energy Source: IFE Based on Lasers, Direct Drive Targets and Solid Wall Chambers Target injection (including radiation) - Turbulence effects - Laser lines and effect on final optics - Impact target injection for Chamber with R=6.5 m (from BUCKY) #12;October 27-28, 2004 HAPL meeting, PPPL 4 · Target injection

  16. The development and application of advanced analytical methods to commercial ICF reactor chambers. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousseau, P.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.L. [and others

    1997-10-01

    Progress is summarized in this report for each of the following tasks: (1) multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics computer code development; (2) 2D radiation-hydrodynamic code development; (3) ALARA: analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis -- a complete package for analysis of induced activation; (4) structural dynamics modeling of ICF reactor chambers; and (5) analysis of self-consistent target chamber clearing.

  17. IFE CHAMBER TECHNOLOGY STATUS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES W.R. Meier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    1 IFE CHAMBER TECHNOLOGY ­ STATUS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES W.R. Meier1 , A.R. Raffrary2 , S.I. Abdel.gov (925) 422-8536 2. University of California, San Diego, CA 3. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta-ion, laser and Z-pinch drivers. A variety of chamber concepts are being investigated including dry- wall

  18. IFE CHAMBER TECHNOLOGY STATUS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES W.R. Meier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    IFE CHAMBER TECHNOLOGY ­ STATUS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES W.R. Meier1 , A.R. Raffray2 , S.I. Abdel.gov (925) 422-8536 2. University of California, San Diego, CA 3. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta-ion, laser and Z-pinch drivers. A variety of chamber concepts are being investigated including dry- wall

  19. THE IMAGING PERFORMANCE OF A MULTIWIRE PROPORTIONAL CHAMBER POSITRON CAMERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    2010-01-01

    and tf. R. Kelson, "The EGS Code system: Computer programand Problem Model The EGS Code: General Considerations Totransport code called EGS (Eleetron-Gaama-Shower)'")

  20. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  1. Integrated Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latkowski, J F; Kramer, K J; Abbott, R P; Morris, K R; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G; Reyes, S; Moses, G A; Fratoni, M; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Rhodes, M; Kane, J; Scott, H; Kramer, R; Pantano, C; Scullard, C; Sawicki, R; Wilks, S; Mehl, M

    2010-12-07

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. The present work details the chamber design for the pure fusion option. The fusion chamber consists of the first wall and blanket. This integrated system must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated LIFE design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  2. Fluid intensifier having a double acting power chamber with interconnected signal rods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A fluid driven reciprocating apparatus having a double acting power chamber with signal rods serving as high pressure pistons, or to transmit mechanical power. The signal rods are connected to a double acting piston in the power chamber thereby eliminating the need for pilot valves, with the piston being controlled by a pair of intake-exhaust valves. The signal rod includes two spaced seals along its length with a vented space therebetween so that the driving fluid and driven fluid can't mix, and performs a switching function to eliminate separate pilot valves. The intake-exhaust valves can be integrated into a single housing with the power chamber, or these valves can be built into the cylinder head only of the power chamber, or they can be separate from the power chamber.

  3. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Xiaoming

    2012-09-26

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  4. General Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunities Nuclearlong version)shortGateGeneralMotors

  5. General Recommendations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunities Nuclearlong version)shortGateGeneralMotors»

  6. GENERAL ASSIGNMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERAL ASSIGNMENT KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE

  7. Kinetic equation for a dense soliton gas and A.M. Kamchatnov2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinetic equation for a dense soliton gas G.A. El1 and A.M. Kamchatnov2 1 Department of Mathematical of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow Region, 142190, Russia (Dated: September 27, 2005) We propose a general method arises when solitons form a disordered finite-density en- semble (a soliton gas) rather than well

  8. The complete relativistic kinetic model of symmetry violation in isotopic expanding plasma. III. Specific entropy calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. G. Ignatyev; K. Alsmadi

    2010-12-27

    A complete model of baryon production in an expanding, primordially symmetric hot Universe is constructed in the framework of general-relativistic kinetic theory. In this model specific model for a baryon is calculated and graphs of the value dependence are constructed.

  9. Comparison of secondary organic aerosol formed with an aerosol flow reactor and environmental reaction chambers: effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time and seed particles on chemical composition and yield

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lambe, A. T.; Chhabra, P. S.; Onasch, T. B.; Brune, W. H.; Hunter, J. F.; Kroll, J. H.; Cummings, M. J.; Brogan, J. F.; Parmar, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; et al

    2014-12-02

    We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of SOA generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0×108 to 2.2×1010 molec cm-3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2×106 to 2×107 molec cm-3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in the chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, butmore »the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. A linear correlation analysis of the mass spectra (m=0.91–0.92, r2=0.93–0.94) and carbon oxidation state (m=1.1, r2=0.58) of SOA produced in the flow reactor and environmental chambers for OH exposures of approximately 1011 molec cm-3 s suggests that the composition of SOA produced in the flow reactor and chambers is the same within experimental accuracy as measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors, rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of sulfate seed particles on isoprene SOA yield measurements was examined in the flow reactor. The studies show that seed particles increase the yield of SOA produced in flow reactors by a factor of 3 to 5 and may also account in part for higher SOA yields obtained in the chambers, where seed particles are routinely used.« less

  10. Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid Flow Variations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid Flow Variations. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid...

  11. Model simplification of chemical kinetic systems under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Thomas Michael Kyte

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates the impact of uncertainty on the reduction and simplification of chemical kinetics mechanisms. Chemical kinetics simulations of complex fuels are very computationally expensive, especially when ...

  12. Large kinetic asymmetry in the metal-insulator transition nucleated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Large kinetic asymmetry in the metal-insulator transition nucleated at localized and extended defects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Large kinetic...

  13. A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data...

  14. Global kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust hydrocarbons Global kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust hydrocarbons...

  15. Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  16. Photoelectron Yield and Photon Reflectivity from Candidate LHC Vacuum Chamber Materials with Implications to the Vacuum Chamber Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baglin, V; Gröbner, Oswald

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the photoelectron yield and photon reflectivity at grazing incidence (11 mrad) from candidate LHC vacuum chamber materials have been made on a dedicated beam line on the Electron Positron A ccumulator (EPA) ring at CERN. These measurements provide realistic input toward a better understanding of the electron cloud phenomena expected in the LHC. The measurements were made using synchrotro n radiation with critical photon energies of 194 eV and 45 eV; the latter corresponding to that of the LHC at the design energy of 7 TeV. The test materials are mainly copper, either, i) coated by co- lamination or by electroplating onto stainless steel, or ii) bulk copper prepared by special machining. The key parameters explored were the effect of surface roughness on the reflectivity and the pho toelectron yield at grazing photon incidence, and the effect of magnetic field direction on the yields measured at normal photon incidence. The implications of the results on the electron cloud phenom ena, and thus the L...

  17. The effect of heat treatments and coatings on the outgassing rate of stainless steel chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamun, M A; Stutzman, M L; Adderley, P A; Poelker, M

    2014-01-01

    The outgassing rates of four nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. One chamber remained uncoated throughout, and the last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 {\\deg}C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 {\\deg}C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by more than a factor of 20 after a 400 {\\deg}C heat treatment (4x10-12 TorrLs-1cm-2 prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7x10-13 following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coa...

  18. An Alternative Method for Solving a Certain Class of Fractional Kinetic Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. K. Saxena; A. M. Mathai; H. J. Haubold

    2010-01-13

    An alternative method for solving the fractional kinetic equations solved earlier by Haubold and Mathai (2000) and Saxena et al. (2002, 2004a, 2004b) is recently given by Saxena and Kalla (2007). This method can also be applied in solving more general fractional kinetic equations than the ones solved by the aforesaid authors. In view of the usefulness and importance of the kinetic equation in certain physical problems governing reaction-diffusion in complex systems and anomalous diffusion, the authors present an alternative simple method for deriving the solution of the generalized forms of the fractional kinetic equations solved by the aforesaid authors and Nonnenmacher and Metzler (1995). The method depends on the use of the Riemann-Liouville fractional calculus operators. It has been shown by the application of Riemann-Liouville fractional integral operator and its interesting properties, that the solution of the given fractional kinetic equation can be obtained in a straight-forward manner. This method does not make use of the Laplace transform.

  19. Modeling of Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Johnson; Scott Lucas; Pavel Tsvetkov

    2010-09-01

    In order to model a full fuel cycle in a nuclear reactor, it is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by coupling fuel burnup equations with the kinetics equations. When the equations are solved simultaneously with a nonlinear equation solver, the end result is a code with the unique capability of modeling transients at any time during a fuel cycle.

  20. On the relationships between the Michaelis–Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics, equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics, and quadratic kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use either of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the equilibrium chemistry approximation (ECA) kinetics, which is the first-order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of an enzyme–substrate complex exactly for a single-enzyme and single-substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of a quasi-steadymore »state for the enzyme–substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme–substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme–substrate complexes, substrates, and enzymes. In particular, I show that the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in deriving the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis–Menten kinetics was found to persistently underpredict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently overpredict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently overpredict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln [E]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [E]T, and persistently underpredict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln [S]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration [S]T. Meanwhile, the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics persistently underpredicts ? ln v / ? ln k2+ and ? ln v / ? ln [E]T, and persistently overpredicts ? ln v / ? ln k1+ and ? ln v / ? ln [S]T. In contrast, the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics always gives consistent predictions of ? ln v / ? ln k2+, ? ln v / ? ln k1+, ? ln v / ? ln [E]T, and ? ln v / ? ln [S]T, indicating that ECA-based models will be more calibratable if the modeled processes do obey the law of mass action. Since the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics includes advantages from both the Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics and it is applicable for almost the whole range of substrate and enzyme abundances, land biogeochemical modelers therefore no longer need to choose when to use the Michaelis–Menten kinetics or the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics. I expect that removing this choice ambiguity will make it easier to formulate more robust and consistent land biogeochemical models.« less

  1. Quantum Potential Via General Hamilton - Jacobi Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maedeh Mollai; Mohammad Razavi; Safa Jami; Ali Ahanj

    2011-10-29

    In this paper, we sketch and emphasize the automatic emergence of a quantum potential (QP) in general Hamilton-Jacobi equation via commuting relations, quantum canonical transformations and without the straight effect of wave function. The interpretation of QP in terms of independent entity is discussed along with the introduction of quantum kinetic energy. The method has been extended to relativistic regime, and same results have been concluded.

  2. Voltage Oscillations in Single-Chamber Fuel Cells operating under a C3H8 / O2 mixture.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Voltage Oscillations in Single-Chamber Fuel Cells operating under a C3H8 / O2 mixture. Geoffroy : Jean-Paul Viricelle, viricelle@emse.fr Phone : 33 4 77 42 02 52 Abstract : Single-Chamber Fuel Cells this behaviour. Keywords: Single Chamber Fuel Cell, Propane, Oscillation, Anode. 1. Introduction Solid Oxide Fuel

  3. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monchick, L. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  4. Kinetic vs. energetic discrimination in biological copying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Sartori; Simone Pigolotti

    2013-04-12

    We study stochastic copying schemes in which discrimination between a right and a wrong match is achieved via different kinetic barriers or different binding energies of the two matches. We demonstrate that, in single-step reactions, the two discrimination mechanisms are strictly alternative and can not be mixed to further reduce the error fraction. Close to the lowest error limit, kinetic discrimination results in a diverging copying velocity and dissipation per copied bit. On the opposite, energetic discrimination reaches its lowest error limit in an adiabatic regime where dissipation and velocity vanish. By analyzing experimentally measured kinetic rates of two DNA polymerases, T7 and Pol{\\gamma}, we argue that one of them operates in the kinetic and the other in the energetic regime. Finally, we show how the two mechanisms can be combined in copying schemes implementing error correction through a proofreading pathway

  5. Nonlinear response theory in chemical kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kryvohuz, M; Mukamel, S

    2014-01-01

    ?D(t) are D 0 (t) = (1) Chemical reactions, N h i ( x , t) iOF NONLINEAR RESPONSE THEORY TO CHEMICAL KINETICS Equation (non- linear responses of chemical systems to perturbations

  6. Time integration methods for reactor kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nóbrega, José de Anchieta Wanderley da

    A technique based on the Padé approximations is applied to the solution of the point kinetics equations. The method consists of treating explicitly the roots of the inhour formula which would make the Padé approximations ...

  7. Kinetics of Anionic Surfactant Anoxic Degradation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camacho, Julianna G.

    2010-07-14

    The biodegradation kinetics of Geropon TC-42 (trademark) by an acclimated culture was investigated in anoxic batch reactors to determine biokinetic coefficients to be implemented in two biofilm mathematical models. Geropon ...

  8. The Kinetic Energy of Hydrocarbons as a Function of Electron Density and Convolutional Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a convolutional neural network trained to reproduce the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy of hydrocarbons from electron density. The output of the network is used as a non-local correction to the conventional local and semi-local kinetic functionals. We show that this approximation qualitatively reproduces Kohn-Sham potential energy surfaces when used with conventional exchange correlation functionals. Numerical noise inherited from the non-linearity of the neural network is identified as the major challenge for the model. Finally we examine the features in the density learned by the neural network to anticipate the prospects of generalizing these models.

  9. Global optimization algorithms for semi-infinite and generalized semi-infinite programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemonidis, Panayiotis

    2008-01-01

    The goals of this thesis are the development of global optimization algorithms for semi-infinite and generalized semi-infinite programs and the application of these algorithms to kinetic model reduction. The outstanding ...

  10. Design and construction of a compact multi-chamber tissue equivalent proportional counter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taplin, Temeka

    2006-04-12

    This project was designed to determine the feasibility of constructing a multichamber proportional counter. A multi-chamber detector is designed to increase the total surface area which will increase the number of radiation interactions that occur...

  11. Potential applications of the natural design of internal explosion chambers in the bombardier beetle (Carabidae, Brachinus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Changquan

    2010-01-01

    The Bombardier Beetle (Carabidae, Brachinus) has a unique form of defense mechanism which involves the explosive mixing of hydroquinones and hydrogen peroxide in its internal explosion chambers and using the resultant high ...

  12. Monte Carlo calculations of electron beam quality conversion factors for several ion chamber types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To provide a comprehensive investigation of electron beam reference dosimetry using Monte Carlo simulations of the response of 10 plane-parallel and 18 cylindrical ion chamber types. Specific emphasis is placed on the determination of the optimal shift of the chambers’ effective point of measurement (EPOM) and beam quality conversion factors. Methods: The EGSnrc system is used for calculations of the absorbed dose to gas in ion chamber models and the absorbed dose to water as a function of depth in a water phantom on which cobalt-60 and several electron beam source models are incident. The optimal EPOM shifts of the ion chambers are determined by comparing calculations of R{sub 50} converted from I{sub 50} (calculated using ion chamber simulations in phantom) to R{sub 50} calculated using simulations of the absorbed dose to water vs depth in water. Beam quality conversion factors are determined as the calculated ratio of the absorbed dose to water to the absorbed dose to air in the ion chamber at the reference depth in a cobalt-60 beam to that in electron beams. Results: For most plane-parallel chambers, the optimal EPOM shift is inside of the active cavity but different from the shift determined with water-equivalent scaling of the front window of the chamber. These optimal shifts for plane-parallel chambers also reduce the scatter of beam quality conversion factors, k{sub Q}, as a function of R{sub 50}. The optimal shift of cylindrical chambers is found to be less than the 0.5 r{sub cav} recommended by current dosimetry protocols. In most cases, the values of the optimal shift are close to 0.3 r{sub cav}. Values of k{sub ecal} are calculated and compared to those from the TG-51 protocol and differences are explained using accurate individual correction factors for a subset of ion chambers investigated. High-precision fits to beam quality conversion factors normalized to unity in a beam with R{sub 50} = 7.5 cm (k{sub Q}{sup ?}) are provided. These factors avoid the use of gradient correction factors as used in the TG-51 protocol although a chamber dependent optimal shift in the EPOM is required when using plane-parallel chambers while no shift is needed with cylindrical chambers. The sensitivity of these results to parameters used to model the ion chambers is discussed and the uncertainty related to the practical use of these results is evaluated. Conclusions: These results will prove useful as electron beam reference dosimetry protocols are being updated. The analysis of this work indicates that cylindrical ion chambers may be appropriate for use in low-energy electron beams but measurements are required to characterize their use in these beams.

  13. Fabrication and Characterisation of Oil-Free Large Bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajesh Ganai; Arindam Roy; Kshitij Agarwal; Zubayer Ahammed; Subikash Choudhury; Subhasis Chattopadhyay

    2015-10-08

    A large (240 cm $\\times$ 120 cm $\\times$ 0.2 cm) oil-free bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) has been developed at VECC-Kolkata using locally available P-301 OLTC grade bakelite paper laminates. The chamber has been operated in streamer mode using Argon, Freon(R134a) and Iso-butane in a ratio of 34:57:9 by volume. The electrodes and glue samples have been characterised by measuring their electrical parameters like bulk resistivity and surface resistivity. The performance of the chamber has been studied by measuring the efficiency, time resolution and uniformity in detection of cosmic muons. The chamber showed an efficiency $>$95$\\%$ and time resolution ($\\sigma$) of $\\sim$0.83 ns at 9000V. Details of the material characterisation, fabrication procedure and performance studies have been discussed.

  14. The design, fabrication, and implications of a solvothermal vapor annealing chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Nathaniel R., Jr

    2013-01-01

    This thesis documents the design, fabrication, use, and benefits of a prototype aluminum solvothermal vapor annealing chamber which facilitates the self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) on silicon wafers which are then ...

  15. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-01-01

    A. Moses, “Inertial fusion energy target output and chamberA. J. Schmitt, et al. , “Fusion energy research with lasers,o?s for inertial fusion energy power plants,” presented at

  16. Aug. 8-9, 2006 HAPL meeting, GA Advanced Chamber Concept with Magnetic Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    ). · The initial configuration was rotated 90° for the blanket analysis as this seems to favor the maintenance droplets falling in chamber Pb flow Porous mesh Pb film Pump Liquid recycling #12;Aug. 8-9, 2006 HAPL

  17. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-12-01

    In heavy ion inertial fusion energy systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. In this paper, we examine three different modes of beam propagation: neutralized ballistic transport, assisted pinched transport, and self-pinched transport. The status of our understanding of these three modes is summarized, and the constraints imposed by beam propagation upon the chamber environment, as well as their compatibility with various chamber and target concepts, are considered. We conclude that, on the basis of our present understanding, there is a reasonable range of parameter space where beams can propagate in thick-liquid wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers.

  18. Fabrication and Characterisation of Oil-Free Large Bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganai, Rajesh; Agarwal, Kshitij; Ahammed, Zubayer; Choudhury, Subikash; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    A large (240 cm $\\times$ 120 cm $\\times$ 0.2 cm) oil-free bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) has been developed at VECC-Kolkata using locally available P-301 OLTC grade bakelite paper laminates. The chamber has been operated in streamer mode using Argon, Freon(R134a) and Iso-butane in a ratio of 34:57:9 by volume. The electrodes and glue samples were characterised by measuring their electrical parameters like bulk resistivity and surface resistivity. The performance of the chamber was studied by measuring the efficiency, time resolution and uniformity in detection of cosmic muons. The chamber showed an efficiency $>$95$\\%$ and time resolution ($\\sigma$) of $\\sim$0.83 ns. Details of the material characterisation, fabrication procedure and performance studies have been discussed.

  19. A sun-tracking environmental chamber for the outdoor quantification of CPV modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faiman, David Melnichak, Vladimir Bokobza, Dov Kabalo, Shlomo

    2014-09-26

    The paper describes a sun-tracking environmental chamber and its associated fast electronics, devised for the accurate outdoor characterization of CPV cells, receivers, mono-modules, and modules. Some typical measurement results are presented.

  20. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-01-01

    A. Moses, “Inertial fusion energy target output and chamberA. J. Schmitt, et al. , “Fusion energy research with lasers,and focusing,” J. Fusion Energy 1, 309 (1982). [35] D. R.

  1. Connecting Software Architecture to Implementation Jonathan Aldrich Craig Chambers David Notkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Hoek, André

    ArchJava: Connecting Software Architecture to Implementation Jonathan Aldrich Craig Chambers David architecture describes the structure of a system, enabling more effective design, program understanding, and formal analysis. However, existing approaches decouple implementation code from architecture, allowing

  2. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  3. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danby, Gordon T. (Wading River, NY); Jackson, John W. (Shoreham, NY)

    1991-01-01

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  4. Kinetic equation for a soliton gas Chernogolovka, July 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Kinetic equation for a soliton gas Gennady El Chernogolovka, July 2009 Gennady El Kinetic equation, Kinetic equation for solitons, JETP (1971) Here we consider only strongly integrable systems (like KdV, NLS etc.) Gennady El Kinetic equation for a soliton gas #12;From N-solitons/N-gap potentials

  5. Extending Newton's Law from Nonlocal-in-Time Kinetic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extending Newton's Law from Nonlocal-in-Time Kinetic Energy J.A.K. Suykens K.U. Leuven, ESAT: nonlocal-in-time kinetic energy, higher order Euler-Lagrange equation, Newton's sec- ond law of motion the kinetic energy with a form of nonlocal-in-time kinetic energy. It leads to a hypothetical extension

  6. Invention and History of the Bubble Chamber (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Glaser, Don

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Don Glaser won the 1960 Nobel Prize for Physics for his 1952 invention of the bubble chamber at Berkeley Lab, a type of particle detector that became the mainstay of high-energy physics research throughout the 1960s and 1970s. He discusses how, inspired by bubbles in a glass of beer, he invented the bubble chamber and detected cosmic-ray muons.

  7. The Effect of Heat Treatments and Coatings on the Outgassing Rate of Stainless Steel Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamum, Md Abdullah A. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A, [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Stutzman, Marcy L. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Adderley, Philip A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Poelker, Matthew [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The outgassing rates of four nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. One chamber remained uncoated throughout, and the last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 deg C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 deg C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by more than a factor of 20 after a 400 deg C heat treatment (3.5 x 10{sup 12} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7 x 10{ sup -13} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coating was successfully preserved throughout a series of bakes. The TiN coated chamber exhibited remarkably low outgassing rates, up to four orders of magnitude lower than the uncoated stainless steel. An evaluation of coating composition suggests the presence of elemental titanium which could provide pumping and lead to an artificially low outgassing rate. The outgassing results are discussed in terms of diffusion-limited versus recombination-limited processes.

  8. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the CALIBAN metallic core reactor from stochastic neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Chapelle, A. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives, CEA, DAM, F-21120 Is sur Tille (France)

    2012-07-01

    Several experimental devices are operated by the Criticality and Neutron Science Research Dept. of the CEA Valduc Laboratory. One of these is the Caliban metallic core reactor. The purpose of this study is to develop and perform experiments allowing to determinate some of fundamental kinetic parameters of the reactor. The prompt neutron decay constant and particularly its value at criticality can be measured with reactor noise techniques such as Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman variance-to-mean methods. Subcritical, critical, and even supercritical experiments were performed. Fission chambers detectors were put nearby the core and measurements were analyzed with the Rossi-{alpha} technique. A new value of the prompt neutron decay constant at criticality was determined, which allows, using the Nelson number method, new evaluations of the effective delayed neutron fraction and the in core neutron lifetime. As an introduction of this paper, some motivations of this work are given in part 1. In part 2, principles of the noise measurements experiments performed at the CEA Valduc Laboratory are reminded. The Caliban reactor is described in part 3. Stochastic neutron measurements analysis techniques used in this study are then presented in part 4. Results of fission chamber experiments are summarized in part 5. Part 6 is devoted to the current work, improvement of the experimental device using He 3 neutron detectors and first results obtained with it. Finally, conclusions and perspectives are given in part 7. (authors)

  9. The effect of heat treatments and coatings on the outgassing rate of stainless steel chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Mamun; A. A. Elmustafa; M. L. Stutzman; P. A. Adderley; M. Poelker

    2014-01-27

    The outgassing rates of three nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. The last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 {\\deg}C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 {\\deg}C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by nearly a factor of 20 after a 400 {\\deg}C heat treatment (3.5x10-12 Torr L s-1 cm-2 prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7x10-13 Torr L s-1 cm-2 following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coating was successfully preserved throughout a series of bakes. The TiN coated chamber exhibited remarkably low outgassing rates, up to four orders of magnitude lower than the uncoated stainless steel, but the uncertainty in these rates is large due to the sensitivity limitations of the spinning rotor gauge accumulation measurement and the possibility of a small pump speed due to inhomogeneity in the TiN coating. The outgassing results are discussed in terms of diffusion-limited versus recombination-limited processes.

  10. NIF Target Chamber Dedicated | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal of Honor recipients honored atIAEA Reporting, GeneralNGSINIF

  11. Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2008-08-28

    We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

  12. Split Kinetic Energy Method for Quantum Systems with Competing Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Mineo; Sheng D. Chao

    2012-06-11

    For quantum systems with competing potentials, the conventional perturbation theory often yields an asymptotic series and the subsequent numerical outcome becomes uncertain. To tackle such kind of problems, we develop a general solution scheme based on a new energy dissection idea. Instead of dividing the potential energy into "unperturbed" and "perturbed" terms, a partition of the kinetic energy is performed. By distributing the kinetic energy term in part into each individual potential, the Hamiltonian can be expressed as the sum of the subsystem Hamiltonians with respective competing potentials. The total wavefunction is expanded by using a linear combination of the basis sets of respective subsystem Hamiltonians. We first illustrate the solution procedure using a simple system consisting of a particle under the action of double delta-function potentials. Next, this method is applied to the prototype systems of a charged harmonic oscillator in strong magnetic field and the hydrogen molecule ion. Compared with the usual perturbation approach, this new scheme converges much faster to the exact solutions for both eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. When properly extended, this new solution scheme can be very useful for dealing with strongly coupling quantum systems.

  13. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  14. A simple theory of protein folding kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Vijay S

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple model of protein folding dynamics that captures key qualitative elements recently seen in all-atom simulations. The goals of this theory are to serve as a simple formalism for gaining deeper insight into the physical properties seen in detailed simulations as well as to serve as a model to easily compare why these simulations suggest a different kinetic mechanism than previous simple models. Specifically, we find that non-native contacts play a key role in determining the mechanism, which can shift dramatically as the energetic strength of non-native interactions is changed. For protein-like non-native interactions, our model finds that the native state is a kinetic hub, connecting the strength of relevant interactions directly to the nature of folding kinetics.

  15. Generalized nonlinear oscillators with quasi-harmonic behaviour: classical solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Quesne

    2015-01-27

    The classical nonlinear oscillator, proposed by Mathews and Lakshmanan in 1974 and including a position-dependent mass in the kinetic energy term, is generalized in two different ways by adding an extra term to the potential. The solutions of the Euler-Lagrange equation are shown to exhibit richer behaviour patterns than those of the original nonlinear oscillator.

  16. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  17. Analysis of the methods for the derivation of binary kinetic equations in the theory of fluorescence concentration quenching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doktorov, A. B. [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia and Physics Department Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-14

    In the framework of unified many-particle approach the familiar problem of fluorescence concentration quenching in the presence of pumping (light pulse) of arbitrary intensity is considered. This process is a vivid and the simplest example of multistage bulk reaction including bimolecular irreversible quenching reaction and reversible monomolecular transformation as elementary stages. General relation between the kinetics of multistage bulk reaction and that of the elementary stage of quenching has been established. This allows one to derive general kinetic equations (of two types) for the multistage reaction in question on the basis of general kinetic equations (differential and integro-differential) of elementary stage of quenching. Relying on the same unified many-particle approach we have developed binary approximations with the use of two (frequently employed in the literature) many-particle methods (such as simple superposition approximation and the method of extracting pair channels in three-particle correlation evolution) to the derivation of non-Markovian binary kinetic equations. The possibility of reducing the obtained binary equations to the Markovian equations of formal chemical kinetics has been considered. As an example the exact solution of the problem (for the specific case) is examined, and the applicability of two many particle methods of derivation of binary equations is analyzed.

  18. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Analysis of Low Temperature Non-Sooting Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

    2004-10-01

    We have developed a model of the diesel fuel injection process for application to analysis of low temperature non-sooting combustion. The model uses a simplified mixing correlation and detailed chemical kinetics, and analyzes a parcel of fuel as it moves along the fuel jet, from injection into evaporation and ignition. The model predicts chemical composition and soot precursors, and is applied at conditions that result in low temperature non-sooting combustion. Production of soot precursors is the first step toward production of soot, and modeling precursor production is expected to give insight into the overall evolution of soot inside the engine. The results of the analysis show that the model has been successful in describing many of the observed characteristics of low temperature combustion. The model predicts results that are qualitatively similar to those obtained for soot formation experiments at conditions in which the EGR rate is increased from zero to very high values as the fueling rate is kept constant. The model also describes the two paths to achieve non-sooting combustion. The first is smokeless rich combustion and the second is modulated kinetics (MK). The importance of the temperature after ignition and the equivalence ratio at the time of ignition is demonstrated, as these parameters can be used to collapse onto a single line all the results for soot precursors for multiple fueling rates. A parametric analysis indicates that precursor formation increases considerably as the gas temperature in the combustion chamber and the characteristic mixing time are increased. The model provides a chemical kinetic description of low temperature diesel combustion that improves the understanding of this clean and efficient regime of operation.

  19. Sustainability of Transient Kinetic Regimes and Origins of Death

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubarev, Dmitry Yu

    2015-01-01

    It is generally recognized that a distinguishing feature of life is its peculiar capability to avoid equilibration. The origin of this capability and its evolution along the timeline of abiogenesis is not yet understood. We propose to study an analog of this phenomenon that could emerge in non-biological systems. To this end, we introduce the concept of sustainability of transient kinetic regimes. This concept is illustrated via investigation of cooperative effects in an extended system of compartmentalized chemical oscillators under batch conditions. The computational study of a model system shows robust enhancement of lifetimes of the decaying oscillations which translates into the evolution of the survival function of the non-equilibrium regime. This model does not rely on any form of replication. Rather, it explores the role of a structured effective environment as a contributor to the system-bath interactions that define non- equilibrium regimes. We implicate the noise produced by the effective environme...

  20. Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-02-13

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  1. Lossy chaotic electromagnetic reverberation chambers: Universal statistical behavior of the vectorial field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -B. Gros; U. Kuhl; O. Legrand; F. Mortessagne

    2015-09-22

    The effective Hamiltonian formalism is extended to vectorial electromagnetic waves in order to describe statistical properties of the field in reverberation chambers. The latter are commonly used in electromagnetic compatibility tests. As a first step, the distribution of wave intensities in chaotic systems with varying opening in the weak coupling limit for scalar quantum waves is derived by means of random matrix theory. In this limit the only parameters are the modal overlap and the number of open channels. Using the extended effective Hamiltonian, we describe the intensity statistics of the vectorial electromagnetic eigenmodes of lossy reverberation chambers. Finally, the typical quantity of interest in such chambers, namely, the distribution of the electromagnetic response, is discussed. By determining the distribution of the phase rigidity - describing the coupling to the environment - using random matrix numerical data, we find good agreement between the theoretical prediction and numerical calculations of the response.

  2. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the Rn-222 decays detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavrilyuk, Yu M; Gezhaev, A M; Etezov, R A; Kazalov, V V; Kuzminov, V V; Panasenko, S I; Ratkevich, S S; Tekueva, D A; Yakimenko, S P

    2015-01-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register alpha-particles from the $^{222}$Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV alpha-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  3. Effects of outgassing of loader chamber walls on hydriding of thin films for commercial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provo, James L., E-mail: jlprovo@verizon.net [Consultant, J.L. Provo Consulting, Trinity, Florida 34655-7179 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    An important aspect of understanding industrial processing is to know the characteristics of the materials used in such processes. A study was performed to determine the effects of hydriding chamber material on the degree of hydriding for the commercial production of thin film hydride targets for various research universities, commercial companies, and government national laboratories. The goal was to increase the degree of hydriding of various thin film hydrides and to study the vacuum environment during air-exposure hydriding. For this purpose, dynamic residual gas analysis during deuterium gas hydride processing was utilized with erbium thin films, employing a special set-up for direct dynamic hydride gas sampling during processing at elevated temperature and full loading gas pressure. Complete process data for (1) a copper–(1.83?wt.?%)beryllium wet hydrogen fired passivated (600?°C–1?h) externally heated pipe hydriding chamber are reported. Dynamic residual gas analysis comparisons during hydriding are presented for hydriding chambers made from (2) alumina (99.8 wt.?%), (3) copper (with an interior aluminum coating ?10 k Ĺ thick, and (4) for a stainless-steel air-fired passivated (900?°C–1?h) chamber. Dynamic data with deuterium gas in the chamber at the hydriding temperature (450?°C) showed the presence and growth of water vapor (D{sub 2}O) and related mixed ion species(H{sub 2}O{sup +}, HDO{sup +}, D{sub 2}O{sup +}, and OD{sup +}) from hydrogen isotope exchange reactions during the 1?h process time. Peaks at mass-to-charge ratios (i.e., m/e) of 12(C{sup +}), 16(CD{sub 2}{sup +}), 17(CHD{sub 2}{sup +}), and 18(CD{sub 3}{sup +}, OD{sup +}) increased for approximately the first half hour of a 1?h hydriding process and then approach steady state. Mass-to-charge peaks at 19(HDO{sup +}) and 20(D{sub 2}O{sup +}) continue to increase throughout the process cycle. Using the m/e?=?20 (D{sub 2}O{sup +}) peak intensity from chamber (1)–Cu(1.83 wt.?%)Be as a standard, the peak intensity from chamber (4)—stainless-steel (air-fired) was 7.1× higher, indicating that the surface of stainless-steel had a larger concentration of reactive oxygen and/or water than hydrogen. The (D{sub 2}O{sup +}) peak intensity from chamber (3)—Cu (interior Al coating) was 1.55× larger and chamber (2)—alumina(99.8%) was 1.33× higher than Cu(1.83 wt.?%)Be. Thus copper–(1.83 wt.?%)beryllium was the best hydriding chamber material studied followed closely by the alumina (99.8 wt.?%) chamber. Gas take-up by Er occluder targets processed in Cu(1.83?wt.?%)Be hydriding chambers (i.e., gas/metal atomic ratios) correlate with the dynamic RGA data.

  4. DNA Nanomechanical Switches under Folding Kinetics Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meller, Amit

    DNA Nanomechanical Switches under Folding Kinetics Control Virgile Viasnoff,, Amit Meller operate at equilibrium under changes in solution composition. We propose an alternative DNA switch design after heat denaturation drives the switch to its lowest energy conformation, while rapid cooling (>100

  5. Nonlocal kinetic equation: integrable hydrodynamic reductions, symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Troitsk, Moscow Region, Russia Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow § SISSA, Trieste, Italy, and Institute of Metal Physics, Urals Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg, Russia We study a new class of nonlinear kinetic equations recently derived in the context

  6. Calcite Reaction Kinetics in Saline Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finneran, David

    2012-02-14

    The effect of ionic strength (I), pCO2, and temperature on the reaction kinetics of calcite was investigated in magnesium-free, phosphate-free, low calcium (mCa^2 ? 0.01 – 0.02 molal) simple KCl and NaCl solutions from both undersaturated...

  7. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    CHEM 6471 CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings 9:35 ­ 10:55 am, Tuesday and Thursday of October 22-26 Textbooks Molecular Thermodynamics by D.A McQuarrie and J.D. Simon, University Science Books the laws of classical thermodynamics and some of their chemical applications. It also covers basic

  8. Computationally Efficient Model for Dopant Precipitation Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Scott

    Computationally Efficient Model for Dopant Precipitation Kinetics Iuval Clejan and Scott T. Dunham and precipitates. Dopant deactivation is typically modeled using a steady­state solid solubility or clustering such as dopant activation/deactivation, it is essential to consider the fact that precipitation involves a range

  9. Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers as a Time-of-Flight System for the PHENIX Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velkovska, Julia

    2013-12-08

    In this project a Time-of-Flight detector based on multi-gap resistive plate chambers was built and installed for the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

  10. Wafer chamber having a gas curtain for extreme-UV lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kanouff, Michael P. (Livermore, CA); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    An EUVL device includes a wafer chamber that is separated from the upstream optics by a barrier having an aperture that is permeable to the inert gas. Maintaining an inert gas curtain in the proximity of a wafer positioned in a chamber of an extreme ultraviolet lithography device can effectively prevent contaminants from reaching the optics in an extreme ultraviolet photolithography device even though solid window filters are not employed between the source of reflected radiation, e.g., the camera, and the wafer. The inert gas removes the contaminants by entrainment.

  11. Design and performance of an ionisation chamber for the measurement of low alpha-activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Hartmann; Jochen Hutsch; Felix Krüger; Manfred Sobiella; Heinrich Wilsenach; Kai Zuber

    2015-11-04

    A new ionisation chamber for alpha-spectroscopy has been built from radio-pure materials for the purpose of investigating long lived alpha-decays. The measurement makes use of pulse shape analysis to discriminate between signal and background events. The design and performance of the chamber is described in this paper. A background rate of ($10.9 \\pm 0.6$) counts per day in the energy region of 1 MeV to 9 MeV was achieved with a run period of 30.8 days. The background is dominantly produced by radon daughters.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Earth Pressure on Head Chamber of Shield Machine with FEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Shouju; Kang Chengang [State Key Laboratory of structural analysis for industrial equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Wei [School of Mechanical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Shangguan Zichang [School of Civil and Hydraulic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Institute of Civil Engineering, Dalian Fishery University, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2010-05-21

    Model parameters of conditioned soils in head chamber of shield machine are determined based on tree-axial compression tests in laboratory. The loads acting on tunneling face are estimated according to static earth pressure principle. Based on Duncan-Chang nonlinear elastic constitutive model, the earth pressures on head chamber of shield machine are simulated in different aperture ratio cases for rotating cutterhead of shield machine. Relationship between pressure transportation factor and aperture ratio of shield machine is proposed by using aggression analysis.

  13. Predicting Protein Folding Kinetics via Temporal Logic Model Checking: Extended

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langmead, Christopher James

    Predicting Protein Folding Kinetics via Temporal Logic Model Checking: Extended Abstract Abstract. We present a novel approach for predicting protein folding kinetics using techniques from checking. We tested our method on 19 test proteins. The quantitative predictions regarding folding rates

  14. Jeff Haack: Applications of computational kinetic theory | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeff Haack: Applications of computational kinetic theory Jan 28 2014 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM ORNL CONTACT : Email: Billy Fields Phone: Add to Calendar SHARE Kinetic theory describes...

  15. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenation into styrene: kinetic modeling and reactor simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Won Jae

    2007-04-25

    A fundamental kinetic model based upon the Hougen-Watson formalism was derived as a basis not only for a better understanding of the reaction behavior but also for the design and simulation of industrial reactors. Kinetic ...

  16. Reflected kinetics model for nuclear space reactor kinetics and control scoping calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, K.E.

    1986-05-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a model that offers an alternative to the point kinetics (PK) modelling approach in the analysis of space reactor kinetics and control studies. Modelling effort will focus on the explicit treatment of control drums as reactivity input devices so that the transition to automatic control can be smoothly done. The proposed model is developed for the specific integration of automatic control and the solution of the servo mechanism problem. The integration of the kinetics model with an automatic controller will provide a useful tool for performing space reactor scoping studies for different designs and configurations. Such a tool should prove to be invaluable in the design phase of a space nuclear system from the point of view of kinetics and control limitations.

  17. Non-meanfield deterministic limits in chemical reaction kinetics far from equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. E. Lee DeVille; Cyrill B. Muratov; Eric Vanden-Eijnden

    2005-12-25

    A general mechanism is proposed by which small intrinsic fluctuations in a system far from equilibrium can result in nearly deterministic dynamical behaviors which are markedly distinct from those realized in the meanfield limit. The mechanism is demonstrated for the kinetic Monte-Carlo version of the Schnakenberg reaction where we identified a scaling limit in which the global deterministic bifurcation picture is fundamentally altered by fluctuations. Numerical simulations of the model are found to be in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions.

  18. Chemical Kinetics Research on HCCI and Diesel Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses detailed chemical kinetics mechanisms for complex hydrocarbon fuels and computationally efficiecnt, accurate methodologies for modeling advanced combustion strategies.

  19. MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE Feng Lin Submitted in partial and Sciences COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 2006 #12;MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE;ABSTRACT MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE Feng Lin A mathematical

  20. Harvesting Kinetic Energy with Switched-Inductor DCDC Converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

    energy in motion may not compete with solar power but, in contrast to indoor lighting and thermal sources- power piezoelectric and electrostatic kinetic-harvesting sources. I. HARVESTING KINETIC ENERGY temperature gradients, the fundamental source from which the device draws energy [3]. Harvesting the kinetic

  1. Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Correlation and Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Topic 4 Correlation and Regression Transformed Variables 1 / 13 #12;Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Outline Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Lineweaver-Burke double reciprocal plot 2 / 13 #12;Worldwide Oil Production

  2. Behavior of Calibration Electrons in the Mu2e Tracking Chamber Devyn Shafera,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollin, George

    Behavior of Calibration Electrons in the Mu2e Tracking Chamber Devyn Shafera,b , George Gollina, University of Pennsylvania July 30, 2010 ABSTRACT The paper describes the simulation of calibration electrons and a description of methods of determining electron paths. The final objective of the project involves creating

  3. Modelling of e-cloud build-up in grooved vacuum chambers usingPOSINST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venturini, Marco; Celata, C.; Furman, Miguel; Vay, Jean-Luc; Pivi, Mauro

    2007-06-29

    Use of grooved vacuum chambers have been suggested as a wayto limitelectron cloud accumulation in the ILC-DR. We report onsimulations carried out using an augmented version of POSINST, accountingfor e-cloud dynamics in the presence of grooves, and make contact withprevious estimates of an effective secondary electron yield for groovedsurfaces.

  4. Nested reactor chamber and operation for Hg-196 isotope separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.

    1991-10-08

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for use in [sup 196]Hg separation and its method of operation. Specifically, the present invention is directed to a nested reactor chamber useful for [sup 196]Hg isotope separation reactions avoiding the photon starved condition commonly encountered in coaxial reactor systems. 6 figures.

  5. Multi-property characterization chamber for geophysical-hydrological investigations of hydrate bearing sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seol, Yongkoo Choi, Jeong-Hoon; Dai, Sheng

    2014-08-01

    With the increase in the interest of producing natural gas from methane hydrates as well as potential risks of massive hydrate dissociation in the context of global warming, studies have recently shifted from pure hydrate crystals to hydrates in sediments. Such a research focus shift requires a series of innovative laboratory devices that are capable of investigating various properties of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS). This study introduces a newly developed high pressure testing chamber, i.e., multi-property characterization chamber (MPCC), that allows simultaneous investigation of a series of fundamental properties of HBS, including small-strain stiffness (i.e., P- and S-waves), shear strength, large-strain deformation, stress-volume responses, and permeability. The peripheral coolant circulation system of the MPCC permits stable and accurate temperature control, while the core holder body, made of aluminum, enables X-ray computer tomography scanning to be easily employed for structural and morphological characterization of specimens. Samples of hydrate-bearing sediments are held within a rubber sleeve inside the chamber. The thick sleeve is more durable and versatile than thin membranes while also being much softer than oedometer-type chambers that are incapable of enabling flow tests. Bias introduced by the rubber sleeve during large deformation tests are also calibrated both theoretically and experimentally. This system provides insight into full characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments in the laboratory, as well as pressure core technology in the field.

  6. OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) the detailed character- ization of the target yield and spectrum has a major impact on the chamber; (b National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Fusion Safety Program, EROB E-3 MS 3815, Idaho Falls Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 §§Mission Research Corporation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 77

  7. Numerical simulation of detonation processes in a variable cross-section chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    in a combustion chamber with variable cross- sections are numerically simulated for a hydrogen­air reacting flow facilities [2]. The pri- mary advantage of detonation combustion as com- pared to deflagration is its rapid energy release. This rapid energy release allows the design of pulse detona- tion engines with high

  8. Numerical Study of Unsteady Detonation Wave Propagation in a Supersonic Combustion Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Numerical Study of Unsteady Detonation Wave Propagation in a Supersonic Combustion Chamber T.H. Yi, of which each mode has unique features and operation ranges: an ejector aug- mented pulsed detonation rocket (PDR) mode, a pulsed normal detonation wave engine (NDWE) mode, an oblique detonation wave engine

  9. Measurements of Snow Crystal Growth Dynamics in a Free-fall Convection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libbrecht, Kenneth G.

    Measurements of Snow Crystal Growth Dynamics in a Free-fall Convection Chamber Kenneth G. Libbrecht example of this phenomenon is the formation of snow crystals, which are ice crystals that grow from water vapor in an inert background gas. Although this is a relatively simple physical system, snow crystals

  10. Lifespan-on-a-chip: microfluidic chambers for performing lifelong observation of C. elegans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, Walter

    Lifespan-on-a-chip: microfluidic chambers for performing lifelong observation of C. elegans S on the web 18th December 2009 DOI: 10.1039/b919265d This article describes the fabrication of a microfluidic, the device includes microfluidic worm clamps, which enable periodic, temporary immobilization of each worm

  11. -The Bubble Chamber -http://thebubblechamber.org -Review: Cold War Social Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solovey, Mark

    [1] - The Bubble Chamber - http://thebubblechamber.org - Review: Cold War Social Science Posted By Mike Thicke On July 10, 2013 @ 11:04 pm In What We're Reading | No Comments Cold War Social Science.) Palgrave Macmillan (2012) Cold War Social Science is an edited volume that serves as an ideal entrée

  12. Increased performance of single-chamber microbial fuel cells using an improved cathode structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    performance. We show here that application of successive polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) layers (DLs), on a carbon/PTFE base layer, to the air-side of the cath- ode in a single chamber MFC significantly improved reserved. Keywords: Microbial fuel cell; Air cathode; Diffusion layer; PTFE coating; Coulombic efficiency 1

  13. IFE chamber walls: requirements, design options, and synergy with MFE plasma facing components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    is cyclic in nature and the power plant chamber wall must accom- modate the cyclic and intense photon discussed but to a lesser extent. 2. IFE operating conditions In an IFE power plant, a target is first gas may be needed to * Corresponding author. Tel.: +1-858 534 9720; fax: +1-858 822 2120. E

  14. Neutronics Assessment of Blanket Options for the HAPL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Neutronics Assessment of Blanket Options for the HAPL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Chamber M-cooled lithium blanket, a helium-cooled solid breeder blanket, and a dual-coolant lithium lead blanket; nuclear heating I. INTRODUCTION The High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program led by the Naval Research

  15. Hydrogen production using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrolysis cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Hydrogen production using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrolysis cells Hongqiang Hu Received in revised form 13 June 2008 Accepted 17 June 2008 Published online - Keywords: Hydrogen Microbial electrohydrogenesis provides a new approach for hydrogen generation from renewable biomass. Membranes were used in all

  16. First limit from a surface run of a 10 liter Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caldwell, Thomas S., Jr

    2009-01-01

    A 10 liter prototype Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC) is operated on the surface of the earth at 75 Torr using carbon-tetrafluoride (CF4) as a target material to obtain a 24.57 gram-day exposure. A limit is set ...

  17. Numerical Analysis of a one dimensional Diffusion Equation for a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Analysis of a one dimensional Diffusion Equation for a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell generation within our society. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a new form of renewable energy using a Linked Simulation Optimization (LSO) technique E521: Advanced Numerical Methods Eric A. Zielke

  18. OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    subsystems was performed parametrically to uncover key physics/technology uncertainties and to iden- tify be necessary that may preclude propagation of the laser driver and require assisted pinch transport issue for wetted-wall concepts. KEYWORDS: inertial fusion, fusion technology, IFE chambers *E

  19. Development of an ion drift chamber for Laser Induced Fluorescence studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cain, Benjamin J

    1998-01-01

    The use of Laser Induced Fluorescence to image ions in a gas has been proposed for a possible new type of subatomic particle detector.1 As a means to investigate this idea, an ion drift chamber has been developed that produces a collimated beam...

  20. ForPeerReview A climate-controlled whole-tree chamber system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to impose combinations of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentra- tion, [CO2], and air temperature treatments in the ambient [CO2] chambers was too low to be maintained during winter because of tree dormancy and the high natural increase in [CO2] over winter at high latitudes such as the Flakaliden site. Accurate control over

  1. Calculating Radiative Heat Transfer in an Axisymmetric Closed Chamber: An Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    Calculating Radiative Heat Transfer in an Axisymmetric Closed Chamber: An Application to Crystal University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook N.Y. 11794 ABSTRACT Radiative heat transfer plays simulating radiative heat transfer in the crystal and in the region above the melt containing gas under

  2. Design and optimization of 6li neutron-capture pulse mode ion chamber 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Kiwhan

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this research is to design and optimize the performance of a unique, inexpensive 6Li neutron-capture pulse-mode ion chamber (LiPMIC) for neutron detection that overcomes the fill-gas contamination stemming from outgas of detector...

  3. IMPACT OF BEAM TRANSPORT METHOD ON CHAMBER AND DRIVER DESIGN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    IMPACT OF BEAM TRANSPORT METHOD ON CHAMBER AND DRIVER DESIGN FOR HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY D National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 W. M. SHARP Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 ARIES-IFE TEAM Received June 1, 2003 Accepted for Publication February 3, 2004

  4. Report on Fission Time Projection Chamber M3FT-12IN0210052

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James K. Jewell

    2012-08-01

    The Time Projection Chamber is a collaborative effort to implement an innovative approach and deliver unprecedented fission measurements to DOE programs. This 4?-detector system will provide unrivaled 3-D data about the fission process. Shown here is a half populated TPC (2?) at the LLNL TPC laboratory as it undergoes testing before being shipped to LANSCE for beam experiments.

  5. In vivo multi-modality photoacoustic and pulse echo tracking of prostate tumor growth using a window chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witte, Russell S.

    with a dorsal skin flap window chamber. PC-3 prostate tumor cells, expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. Keywords: optoacoustic, ultrasound, window chamber, prostate cancer, green fluorescent protein, GFP, cancer energy pulsed laser. As light penetrates the skin, its energy is partially absorbed and converted to heat

  6. WPo4.9 SIMULATION OF IFE CHAMBER DYNAMIC RESPONSE BY A SECOND ORDER GODUNOV METHOD WITH ARBITRARY GEOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    GEOMETRY Zoran Dragojlovic and Farrokh Najmabadi Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering of chamber environment at this "long" timescale is essential in developing a rap-rated laser-fusion facility and heat conduction) on the chamber state prior to the insertion of the next target are estimated. I

  7. Applied Radiation and Isotopes 56 (2002) 953956 Sensitivity of LR115 detector in diffusion chamber to 222

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    2002-01-01

    Applied Radiation and Isotopes 56 (2002) 953­956 Sensitivity of LR115 detector in diffusion chamber Determination has been made of the sensitivity of LR115 type 2-track detectors (in units of m) to 222 Rn chamber. r 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Radon; Thoron; LR115 track detector

  8. IFE chamber dry wall materials response to pulsed X-rays and ions at power-plant level fluences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    IFE chamber dry wall materials response to pulsed X-rays and ions at power-plant level fluences T exposure at the 3Á/4 J/cm2 level, significantly below doses expected in future dry-wall power plants a collaborative investigation of the response of candidate first-wall inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor chamber

  9. March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber Walls under IFE Energy Depositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber Walls under IFE March 8-9, 2001 #12;March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber on analysis ­ Remaining issues #12;March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry

  10. Anode-supported thin-film fuel cells operated in a single chamber configuration 2T-I-12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Sossina M.

    on the anode, producing a complex response in fuel cell power output. Under optimized gas compositions and flowAnode-supported thin-film fuel cells operated in a single chamber configuration 2T-I-12 Zongping of anode-supported, thin-film, single chamber fuel cells (SCFCs) have been investigated. Cells, in which Ni

  11. Nov 5-9, 2006 IAEA meeting, Vienna, Austria Target and Chamber Technologies for Direct-Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Nov 5-9, 2006 IAEA meeting, Vienna, Austria 1 Target and Chamber Technologies for Direct-Drive cycle) Dry wall chamber (armor must accommodate ion+photon threat and provide required lifetime) · Multi-institution Activities led by NRL with the Goal of Developing a New Energy Source: IFE Based on Lasers, Direct Drive

  12. Ion mediated crosslink driven mucous swelling kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sircar, S

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimentally guided, multi-phasic, multi-species ionic gel model to compare and make qualitative predictions on the rheology of mucus of healthy individuals (Wild Type) versus those infected with Cystic Fibrosis. The mixture theory consists of the mucus (polymer phase) and water (solvent phase) as well as several different ions: H+, Na+ and Ca++. The model is linearized to study the hydration of spherically symmetric mucus gels and calibrated against the experimental data of mucus diffusivities. Near equilibrium, the linearized form of the equation describing the radial size of the gel, reduces to the well-known expression used in the kinetic theory of swelling hydrogels. Numerical studies reveal that the Donnan potential is the dominating mechanism driving the mucus swelling/deswelling transition. However, the altered swelling kinetics of the Cystic Fibrosis infected mucus is not merely governed by the hydroelectric composition of the swelling media, but also due to the altered movement of el...

  13. Bivariate Generalized Exponential Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Bivariate Generalized Exponential Distribution Debasis Kundu and Rameshwar D. Gupta Abstract Recently it is observed that the generalized exponential distribution can be used quite effectively exponential distribution so that the marginals have generalized exponential distributions. It is observed

  14. From residue matching patterns to protein folding topographies: General model and bovine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    From residue matching patterns to protein folding topographies: General model and bovine pancreatic-grained model for protein-folding dynamics is introduced based on a discretized representation of torsional, pattern recognition, and general characteristics of protein folding kinetics. Topology here implies

  15. Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lionel Foret; Pierre Sens

    2008-07-28

    The secretion of vesicles for intracellular transport often rely on the aggregation of specialized membrane-bound proteins into a coat able to curve cell membranes. The nucleation and growth of a protein coat is a kinetic process that competes with the energy-consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We propose a generic kinetic description of coat assembly and the formation of coated vesicles, and discuss its implication to the dynamics of COP vesicles that traffic within the Golgi and with the Endoplasmic Reticulum. We show that stationary coats of fixed area emerge from the competition between coat growth and the recycling of coat components, in a fashion resembling the treadmilling of cytoskeletal filaments. We further show that the turnover of coat components allows for a highly sensitive switching mechanism between a quiescent and a vesicle producing membrane, upon a slowing down of the exchange kinetics. We claim that the existence of this switching behaviour, also triggered by factors such as the presence of cargo and variation of the membrane mechanical tension, allows for efficient regulation of vesicle secretion. We propose a model, supported by different experimental observations, in which vesiculation of secretory membranes is impaired by the energy consuming desorption of coat proteins, until the presence of cargo or other factors triggers a dynamical switch into a vesicle producing state.

  16. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  17. Scaling of the known exact explicit forms of the non-interacting kinetic-energy density functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lázaro Calderín

    2014-10-15

    It has been previously proven that the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy functional scales homogeneusly under generalized coordinate scaling, in a way that is obeyed by the von Weiz\\"acker functional, but seems to be in contradiction with the scaling of the Thomas-Fermi functional. A very puzzling situation, taking in to account that the von Weiz\\"acker and Thomas-Fermi functionals are exact cases of the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy functional for two electron systems, and the non-interacting electron gas, respectively. The apparent contradiction is resolved in this paper.

  18. Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  19. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  20. Casting 12 BioRad Mini SDS PAGE Gels 1. Assemble multicasting chamber. Make sure ALL plates and spacers are flush with bottom. Clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    120 Casting 12 BioRad Mini SDS PAGE Gels 1. Assemble multicasting chamber. Make sure ALL plates, disassemble casting chamber. Carefully separate gels. Rinse with ddH2O. Remove excess polyacrylamide. Place

  1. Kinetic extensions of magnetohydrodynamic models for axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1989-04-01

    A nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K) has been developed to integrate a set of non-Hermitian integro-differential eigenmode equations due to energetic particles for axisymmetric toroidal plasmas in a general flux coordinate system with an arbitrary Jacobian. The NOVA-K code employs the Galerkin method involving Fourier expansions in the generalized poloidal angle theta and generalized toroidal angle /zeta/ directions, and cubic-B spline finite elements in the radial /Psi/ direction. Extensive comparisons with the existing variational ideal MHD codes show that the ideal MHD version of the NOVA-K code converges faster and gives more accurate results. The NOVA-K code is employed to study the effects of energetic particles on MHD-type modes: the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of ''fishbone'' internal kink modes; and the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances. Analytical theories are also presented to help explain the NOVA-K results. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral beam injection (NBI) or ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH), a stability window for the n = 1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beta space exists even in the absence of the core ion finite Larmor radius effect. On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to have negligible effects on the stability of the n = 1 internal kink mode, but the circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha particle pressure. 60 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Phi-values in protein folding kinetics have energetic and structural components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudia Merlo; Ken A. Dill; Thomas R. Weikl

    2005-07-14

    Phi-values are experimental measures of how the kinetics of protein folding is changed by single-site mutations. Phi-values measure energetic quantities, but are often interpreted in terms of the structures of the transition state ensemble. Here we describe a simple analytical model of the folding kinetics in terms of the formation of protein substructures. The model shows that Phi-values have both structural and energetic components. In addition, it provides a natural and general interpretation of "nonclassical" Phi-values (i.e., less than zero, or greater than one). The model reproduces the Phi-values for 20 single-residue mutations in the alpha-helix of the protein CI2, including several nonclassical Phi-values, in good agreement with experiments.

  3. Thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors of trinitrotoluene adsorption on powdered activated carbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.W.; Hwang, K.J.; Shim, W.G.; Moon, I.S. [Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Regulations on the removal of trinitrotoluene (TNT) from wastewater have become increasingly more stringent, demanding faster, less expensive, and more efficient treatment. This study focuses on the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of TNT on powered activated carbons (PAC). Three types of PACs (i.e., wood based, coal based, and coconut-shell based) were studied as functions of temperature and pH. Thermodynamic properties including Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy, were evaluated by applying the Van't Hoff equation. In addition, the adsorption energy distribution functions which describe heterogeneous characteristics of porous solid sorbents were calculated by using the generalized nonlinear regularization method. Adsorption kinetic studies were carried out in batch adsorber under important conditions such as PAC types, temperature, pH, and concentration. We found that fast and efficient removal of TNT dissolved in water can be successfully achieved by PAC adsorption.

  4. Effects of chamber pressure variation on the grid temperature in an inertial electrostatic confinement device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murali, S. Krupakar [Lawrenceville Plasma Physics, 128 Lincoln Blvd., Middlesex, New Jersey 08846 (United States); Emmert, G. A.; Santarius, J. F.; Kulcinski, G. L. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Inertial electrostatic confinement fusion devices are compact sources of neutrons, protons, electrons, and x rays. Such sources have many applications. Improving the efficiency of the device also increases the applications of this device. Hence a thorough understanding of the operation of this device is needed. In this paper, we study the effect of chamber pressure on the temperature of the cathode. Experimentally, the grid temperature decreases as the chamber pressure increases; numerical simulations suggest that this is caused by the reduction of the hot ion current to the cathode as the pressure increases for constant power supply current. Such an understanding further supports the conclusion that the asymmetric heating of the cathode can be decreased by homogenizing the ion flow around the cathode.

  5. The Drift Chamber for the Experiment to Study the Nature of the Confinement

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berdnikov, Vladimir V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, Lubomir; Zihlmann, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    The GlueX experiment was designed to search for hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers using a beam of linearly polarized photons incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The spectrum of these states and their mass splitting from normal mesons may yield information on confinement. The description of the GlueX spectrometer and Forward Drift Chambers (FDC) as a part of track reconstruction system is presented in the text. FDC‘s are multiwire chambers with cathode and anode read-out. The system allows reconstructing tracks of charged particles with ~200mkm accuracy with angles from 20° up to 1°. One of the detector features ismore »1.64% X0 material amount in the active area. The cathode gain calibration procedure is presented. The results of such calibration using cosmic data and beam data are presented as well.« less

  6. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  7. A study of electromagnetic showers in the high density projection chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, E.; Berggren, M.; Cattai, A.; Fischer, H.G.; Flammier, M.; Gerutti, G.; Innocenti, P.G.; Iversen, P.S.

    1983-02-01

    A prototype module of a High density Projection Chamber (HPC) has been tested in an electron beam. The HPC, with the shower conversion separated from the charge collection, offers a simple, homogeneous large volume detector with an energy resolution of 12.5%/..sqrt..E and an exceptionally fine granularity both along and transverse to the shower axis. The results from the test are presented together with a description of the calorimeter system.

  8. Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

  9. Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium-contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.

    1981-01-27

    A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

  10. A Multiwire Proportional Chamber for Precision Studies of Neutron Beta Decay Angular Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Ito; R. Carr; B. W. Filippone; J. W. Martin; B. Plaster; G. Rybka; J. Yuan

    2007-02-10

    A new multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) was designed and constructed for precision studies of neutron beta decay angular correlations. Its design has several novel features, including the use of low pressure neopentane as the MWPC gas and an entrance window made of thin Mylar sheet reinforced with Kevlar fibers. In the initial off-line performance tests, the gas gain of neopentane and the position resolution were studied.

  11. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirectDirectDirect Kinetic

  12. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutman, D. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  13. Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Drywall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy; Russell, Marion; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-06-01

    Imported drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. To support an investigation of those building materials by the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) measured chemical-specific emission factors for 30 samples of drywall materials. Emission factors are reported for 75 chemicals and 30 different drywall samples encompassing both domestic and imported stock and incorporating natural, synthetic, or mixed gypsum core material. CPSC supplied all drywall materials. First the drywall samples were isolated and conditioned in dedicated chambers, then they were transferred to small chambers where emission testing was performed. Four sampling and analysis methods were utilized to assess (1) volatile organic compounds, (2) low molecular weight carbonyls, (3) volatile sulfur compounds, and (4) reactive sulfur gases. LBNL developed a new method that combines the use of solid phase microextraction (SPME) with small emission chambers to measure the reactive sulfur gases, then extended that technique to measure the full suite of volatile sulfur compounds. The testing procedure and analysis methods are described in detail herein. Emission factors were measured under a single set of controlled environmental conditions. The results are compared graphically for each method and in detailed tables for use in estimating indoor exposure concentrations.

  14. Microwave remote plasma enhanced-atomic layer deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dechana, A.; Thamboon, P.; Boonyawan, D.

    2014-10-15

    A microwave remote Plasma Enhanced-Atomic Layer Deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber is established at the Plasma and Beam Physics research facilities, Chiang Mai, Thailand. The system produces highly-reactive plasma species in order to enhance the deposition process of thin films. The addition of the multicusp magnetic fields further improves the plasma density and uniformity in the reaction chamber. Thus, the system is more favorable to temperature-sensitive substrates when heating becomes unwanted. Furthermore, the remote-plasma feature, which is generated via microwave power source, offers tunability of the plasma properties separately from the process. As a result, the system provides high flexibility in choice of materials and design experiments, particularly for low-temperature applications. Performance evaluations of the system were carried on coating experiments of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers onto a silicon wafer. The plasma characteristics in the chamber will be described. The resulted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films—analyzed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in channeling mode and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy techniques—will be discussed.

  15. Performance studies of resistive Micromegas chambers for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ntekas, Konstantinos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration at LHC has endorsed the resistive Micromegas technology (MM), along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC), for the high luminosity upgrade of the first muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW) project. The NSW requires fully efficient MM chambers, up to a particle rate of $\\sim15\\,\\mathrm{kHz/cm^2}$, with spatial resolution better than $100\\,\\mu\\mathrm{m}$ independent of the track incidence angle and the magnetic field ($B \\leq 0.3\\,\\mathrm{T}$). Along with the precise tracking the MM should be able to provide a trigger signal, complementary to the sTGC, thus a decent timing resolution is required. Several tests have been performed on small ($10\\times10\\,\\mathrm{cm^2}$) MM chambers using medium ($10\\,\\mathrm{GeV/c}$, PS) and high ($150\\,\\mathrm{GeV/c}$, SPS) momentum hadron beams at CERN. Results on the efficiency and position resolution measured during these tests are presented demonstrating the excellent characteristics of the MM that fulf...

  16. Polymer Growth Rate in a Wire Chamber with Oxygen,Water, or Alcohol Gas Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyarski, Adam; /SLAC

    2008-07-02

    The rate of polymer growth on wires was measured in a wire chamber while the chamber was aged initially with helium-isobutane (80:20) gas, and then with either oxygen, water, or alcohol added to the gas. At the completion of the aging process for each gas mixture, the carbon content on the wires was measured in a SEM/EDX instrument. The same physical wires were used in all the gas mixtures, allowing measurement of polymer build up or polymer depletion by each gas additive. It is found that the rate of polymer growth is not changed by the presence of oxygen, water or alcohol. Conjecture that oxygen reduces breakdown by removing polymer deposits on field wires is negated by these measurements. Instead, it appears that the reduced breakdown is due to lower resistance in the polymer from oxygen ions being transported into the polymer. It is also observed that field wires bombarded by the electrons in the SEM and then placed back into the chamber show an abundance of single electrons being emitted, indicating that electron charge is stored in the polymer layer and that a high electric field is necessary to remove the charge.

  17. Interpretation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Diesel Exhaust Photooxidation in an Environmental Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakao, Shunsuke; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Nguyen, Anh; Jung, Hee-Jung; Cocker, David R.

    2011-04-14

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from diesel exhaust in a smog chamber was investigated. Particle volume measurement based on mobility diameter is shown to underestimate SOA formation from diesel exhaust due to the external void space of agglomerate particles, in which case mass-based measurement technique is necessary. Rapid determination of particle effective density as a function of particle mass was performed by an Aerosol Particle Mass analyzer – Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (APM-SMPS) to obtain particle mass concentration and fractal dimension. Continuous aging of aerosol was observed in terms of atomic ratio (O/C), from 0.05 to 0.25 in 12 hours, underscoring the importance of multi-generational oxidation of low-volatile organic vapors emitted from diesel engine as the significant source of oxygenated SOA. Experimental conditions possibly have strong impacts on physical evolution of diesel particulates in a smog chamber. Higher particle effective densities were observed when raw exhaust was injected into a full bag as opposed to filling a bag with diluted exhaust using an ejector diluter. When longer transfer line was used for injecting diesel exhaust into the smog chamber, rapid particle coagulation was observed, leading to increasing particle volume concentration in dark while its mass concentration is decreasing.

  18. Evaluation of tecniques for controlling UF/sub 6/ release clouds in the GAT environmental chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lux, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    Studies designed to characterize the reaction between UF/sub 6/ and atmospheric moisture, evaluate environmental variables of UF/sub 6/ cloud formation and ultimate cloud fate, and UF/sub 6/ release cloud control procedure have been conducted in the 1200 cu. ft. GAT environmental chamber. In earlier chamber experiments, 30 separate UF/sub 6/ release tests indicated that variations of atmospheric conditions and sample sizes had no significant effect on UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ particle size distribution, release cloud formation, or cloud settling rates. During the past year, numerous procedures have been evaluated for accelerating UF/sub 6/ cloud knockdown in a series of 37 environmental chamber releases. Knockdown procedures included: coarse water spray; air jet; steam spray (electrostatically charged and uncharged); carbon dioxide; Freon-12; fine water mist (uncharged); boric acid mist (charged and uncharged); and an ionized dry air stream. UF/sub 6/ hydrolysis cloud settling rates monitored by a laser/powermeter densitometer, indicated the relative effectiveness of various cloud knockdown techniques. Electrostatically charged boric acid/water mist, and electrostatically ionized dry air were both found to be very effective, knocking down the UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ release cloud particles in two to five minutes. Work to adapt these knockdown techniques for use under field conditions is continuing, taking into account recovery of the released uranium as well as nuclear criticality constraints.

  19. Particle tracking in kaon electroproduction with cathode-charge sampling in multi-wire proportional chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Achenbach; C. Ayerbe Gayoso; J. C. Bernauer; R. Böhm; D. Bosnar; M. Bösz; L. Debenjak; M. O. Distler; A. Esser; I. Friš?i?; M. Gómez Rodríguez de la Paz; M. Makek; H. Merkel; U. Müller; L. Nungesser; J. Pochodzalla; M. Potokar; S. Sánchez Majos; B. S. Schlimme; S. Širca; M. Weinriefer

    2011-04-21

    Wire chambers are routinely operated as tracking detectors in magnetic spectrometers at high-intensity continuous electron beams. Especially in experiments studying reactions with small cross-sections the reaction yield is limited by the background rate in the chambers. One way to determine the track of a charged particle through a multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC) is the measurement of the charge distribution induced on its cathodes. In practical applications of this read-out method, the algorithm to relate the measured charge distribution to the avalanche position is an important factor for the achievable position resolution and for the track reconstruction efficiency. An algorithm was developed for operating two large-sized MWPCs in a strong background environment with multiple-particle tracks. Resulting efficiencies were determined as a function of the electron beam current and on the signal amplitudes. Because of the different energy-losses of pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range of the spectrometer the efficiencies depend also on the particle species.

  20. Steam supply system for superposed turbine and process chamber, such as coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menger, W.M.

    1986-08-26

    A steam supply system is described for a process chamber consuming superheated steam at a pressure of about 600 psi or below which is driven by a boiler operating at a pressure of about 2000 psi, a pressure range above that needed by the process chamber for also driving a superposed turbine. The system consists of: (a) a high pressure boiler feed pump for supplying highly purified water to the boiler; (b) a condensing reboiler connected to receive steam from the superposed turbine in a high pressure side; (c) the condensing reboiler also having a low pressure side, essentially isolated from fluid contact with the high pressure side, for receiving water for use in the lower operating pressure steam processes; (d) the condensing reboiler further comprising integral superheating means for heating the water received in the low pressure side into superheated low pressure steam with the steam received in the high pressure side; (e) means for conveying fluid from the high pressure side of the condensing reboiler to the boiler feed pump; and (f) means for conveying the low pressure superheated steam from the condensing reboiler to the process chamber.

  1. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-05

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  2. Teaching Thermodynamics and Kinetics to Advanced General Chemistry Students and to Upper-Level Undergraduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    on reversible and irreversible processes helps connect entropy to pressure- volume phase diagrams, through work. The composition of this honors course and its logistics have been previously presented,18 but for convenience

  3. Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic Membraneless Fuel Cells Abruna, Hector Daniel Cornell University 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION Our work is...

  4. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leone, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    novel measurements of chemical dynamics for clusters, Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at theUniversity of California Chemical Sciences Division,

  5. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- Washington D.C. es17sastry.pdf More Documents & Publications Modeling-Thermo-electrochemistry, Capacity Degradation and Mechanics with SEI Layer Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and...

  6. Evaluation of Thermal Evolution Profiles and Estimation of Kinetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evaluation of Thermal Evolution Profiles and Estimation of Kinetic Parameters for Pyrolysis of CoalCorn Stover Blends Using Thermogravimetric Analysis Citation Details...

  7. Pressure Dependent Decomposition Kinetics of the Energetic Material...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ACCELERATION; DIAMONDS; KINETICS; PYROLYSIS...

  8. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to...

  9. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    geothermal systems (EGS) | geothermal 2015 peer review Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes 2015 GTO Peer Review | Poster Session...

  10. Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into Mesoporous Silica Friday, February 27, 2015 Figure 1 Figure 1. Transmission electron microscopy images of (A)...

  11. Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion Batteries 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  12. CaF/sub 2/:Mn thermoluminescence: a single glow peak not described by 1st or 2nd order kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hornyak, W.F.; Levy, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.

    1984-12-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) of CaF/sub 2/:Mn has been studied using photon counting and digital recording. For doses of 10 rad or less the TL glow curves appear to consist of a single glow peak. However, there are indications - which are pronounced at larger doses - that one additional low intensity peak (area less than or equal to one percent) is superimposed on each side of the central peak. The intense peak is not described by 1st or 2nd order kinetics but is well described by the more general kinetics from which these kinetics are derived. These observations, and the results of additional kinetic analysis, demonstrate that retrapping is not negligible and may include all three peaks. In such systems, which are likely to include other dosimeter materials and minerals, peak height will not increase linearly with dose; an important factor for dosimetry and dating applications.

  13. Ion mediated crosslink driven mucous swelling kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Sircar; A. J. Roberts

    2015-01-20

    We present an experimentally guided, multi-phasic, multi-species ionic gel model to compare and make qualitative predictions on the rheology of mucus of healthy individuals (Wild Type) versus those infected with Cystic Fibrosis. The mixture theory consists of the mucus (polymer phase) and water (solvent phase) as well as several different ions: H+, Na+ and Ca++. The model is linearized to study the hydration of spherically symmetric mucus gels and calibrated against the experimental data of mucus diffusivities. Near equilibrium, the linearized form of the equation describing the radial size of the gel, reduces to the well-known expression used in the kinetic theory of swelling hydrogels. Numerical studies reveal that the Donnan potential is the dominating mechanism driving the mucus swelling/deswelling transition. However, the altered swelling kinetics of the Cystic Fibrosis infected mucus is not merely governed by the hydroelectric composition of the swelling media, but also due to the altered movement of electrolytes as well as due to the defective properties of the mucin polymer network.

  14. PBXN-9 Ignition Kinetics and Deflagration Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, E; Maienschein, J; Burnham, A; Koerner, J; Hsu, P; Wemhoff, A

    2008-04-24

    The ignition kinetics and deflagration rates of PBXN-9 were measured using specially designed instruments at LLNL and compared with previous work on similar HMX based materials. Ignition kinetics were measured based on the One Dimensional Time-to-Explosion combined with ALE3D modeling. Results of these experiments indicate that PBXN-9 behaves much like other HMX based materials (i.e. LX-04, LX-07, LX-10 and PBX-9501) and the dominant factor in these experiments is the type of explosive, not the type of binder/plasticizer. In contrast, the deflagration behavior of PBXN-9 is quite different from similar high weight percent HMX based materials (i.e LX-10, LX-07 and PBX-9501). PBXN-9 burns in a laminar manner over the full pressure range studied (0-310 MPa) unlike LX-10, LX-07, and PBX-9501. The difference in deflagration behavior is attributed to the nature of the binder/plasticizer alone or in conjunction with the volume of binder present in PBXN-9.

  15. Threshold bubble chamber for measurement of knock-on DT neutron tails from magnetic and inertial confinement experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R.K. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Zaveryaev, V.S. [Russian Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation). Kurchatov Institute; Trusillo, S.V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre, Arzamas (Russian Federation). Experimental Physics Institute

    1996-07-01

    We propose a new {open_quotes}threshold{close_quotes} bubble chamber detector for measurement of knock-on neutron tails. These energetic neutrons result from fusion reactions involving energetic fuel ions created by alpha knock-on collisions in tokamak and other magnetic confinement experiments, and by both alpha and neutron knock-on collisions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The energy spectrum of these neutrons will yield information on the alpha population and energy distribution in tokamaks, and on alpha target physics and {rho}R measurements in ICF experiments. The bubble chamber should only detect neutrons with energies above a selectable threshold energy controlled by the bubble chamber pressure. The bubble chamber threshold mechanism, detection efficiency, and proposed applications to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and National Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments will be discussed.

  16. Mechanism and kinetics of peptide partitioning into membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmschneider, Martin [University of Oxford; Killian, J Antoinette [University of Utrecht; Doux, Jacques P. F. [University of Utrecht; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Ulmschneider, Jakob [University of Heidelberg

    2010-02-01

    Partitioning properties of transmembrane (TM) polypeptide segments directly determine membrane protein folding, stability, and function, and their understanding is vital for rational design of membrane active peptides. However, direct determination of water-to-bilayer transfer of TM peptides has proved difficult. Experimentally, sufficiently hydrophobic peptides tend to aggregate, while atomistic computer simulations at physiological temperatures cannot yet reach the long time scales required to capture partitioning. Elevating temperatures to accelerate the dynamics has been avoided, as this was thought to lead to rapid denaturing. However, we show here that model TM peptides (WALP) are exceptionally thermostable. Circular dichroism experiments reveal that the peptides remain inserted into the lipid bilayer and are fully helical, even at 90 C. At these temperatures, sampling is 50 500 times faster, sufficient to directly simulate spontaneous partitioning at atomic resolution. A folded insertion pathway is observed, consistent with three-stage partitioning theory. Elevated temperature simulation ensembles further allow the direct calculation of the insertion kinetics, which is found to be first-order for all systems. Insertion barriers are Hin = 15 kcal/mol for a general hydrophobic peptide and 23 kcal/mol for the tryptophan-flanked WALP peptides. The corresponding insertion times at room temperature range from 8.5 s to 163 ms. High-temperature simulations of experimentally validated thermostable systems suggest a new avenue for systematic exploration of peptide partitioning properties.

  17. Stochastic cooling of bunched beams from fluctuation and kinetic theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1982-09-01

    A theoretical formalism for stochastic phase-space cooling of bunched beams in storage rings is developed on the dual basis of classical fluctuation theory and kinetic theory of many-body systems in phase-space. The physics is that of a collection of three-dimensional oscillators coupled via retarded nonconservative interactions determined by an electronic feedback loop. At the heart of the formulation is the existence of several disparate time-scales characterizing the cooling process. Both theoretical approaches describe the cooling process in the form of a Fokker-Planck transport equation in phase-space valid up to second order in the strength and first order in the auto-correlation of the cooling signal. With neglect of the collective correlations induced by the feedback loop, identical expressions are obtained in both cases for the coherent damping and Schottky noise diffusion coefficients. These are expressed in terms of Fourier coefficients in a harmonic decomposition in angle of the generalized nonconservative cooling force written in canonical action-angle variables of the particles in six-dimensional phase-space. Comparison of analytic results to a numerical simulation study with 90 pseudo-particles in a model cooling system is presented.

  18. Utilization of Kinetic Isotope Effects for the Concentration of Tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Meyer, Thomas j.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this research program is to develop methods for concentrating tritium in water based on large primary isotope effects in catalytic redox processes. Basic research is being conducted to develop the chemistry of a complete cyclic process. Because tritium (generally present as HTO) is in a rapidly established equilibrium with protio-water, it moves with groundwater and separation from water cannot be achieved by the usual pump-and-treat methods using sorbants. The general methodology developed in this work will be applicable to a number of DOE waste streams, and as a consequence of the process tritium will be incorporated into an organic compound that will not readily exchange the tritium with groundwater. The process to be developed will remove tritium from H2O by concentrating it with respect to protio-water. This research involves developing chemical cycles that produce high concentration factors for HTO and T2O based on the discrimination of C-H and C-T bonds in oxidation reactions. Several steps are required in a cyclic process for the concentration of tritium in water. In the first step the tritium is incorporated in an organic compound. H-T discrimination occurs as the tritium containing compound is oxidized in a step involving a Ru(IV) oxo complex. Strong primary kinetic isotope effects lead to the oxidation of C-H bonds in preference to C-T bonds, and this reaction leads to concentration of tritium in the organic compound. The reduced form of the ruthenium compound can be reoxidized so that the oxidation step can be made catalytic.

  19. The solubility and kinetics of minerals under CO2-EGS geothermal conditions: Comparison of experimental and modeling results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2014-01-01

    of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics forKinetic rate law for mineral dissolution and precipitationwhere n denotes kinetic mineral index, positive values of r

  20. Chemomechanical mapping of ligandreceptor binding kinetics on cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    Chemomechanical mapping of ligand­receptor binding kinetics on cells Sunyoung Lee, Jelena Mandic, Providence, RI, April 23, 2007 (received for review January 2, 2007) The binding kinetics between cell activity. Modeling and prediction of receptor-mediated cell func- tions are facilitated by measurement

  1. Microdroplet fusion mass spectrometry for fast reaction kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Microdroplet fusion mass spectrometry for fast reaction kinetics Jae Kyoo Leea,b , Samuel Kima,b,1 investigated the fusion of high-speed liquid droplets as a way to record the kinetics of liquid-phase chemical between the mass spec- trometer inlet and the droplet fusion center. Fused droplet trajec- tories were

  2. Predicting Protein Folding Kinetics via Temporal Logic Model Checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predicting Protein Folding Kinetics via Temporal Logic Model Checking Christopher James Langmead award from the U.S. Department of Energy. #12;Keywords: protein folding, model checking, temporal logic #12;Abstract We present a novel approach for predicting protein folding kinetics using techniques from

  3. Radon transform and kinetic equations in tomographic representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Chernega; V. I. Man'ko; B. I. Sadovnikov

    2009-11-01

    Statistical properties of classical random process are considered in tomographic representation. The Radon integral transform is used to construct the tomographic form of kinetic equations. Relation of probability density on phase space for classical systems with tomographic probability distributions is elucidated. Examples of simple kinetic equations like Liouville equations for one and many particles are studied in detail.

  4. Kinetic Theory for Metallic Clusters II. Klimontovich Equation Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonitz, Michael

    is then applied to write a formal kinetic theory for electrons in a strong electromagnetic field. SinceKinetic Theory for Metallic Clusters II. Klimontovich Equation Approach James W Dufty Department on the microscopic phase space density as the fundamental variable in terms of which all other properties

  5. A kinetic model for anisotropic reactions in amorphous solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Wei

    , and does not need to introduce kinetic-dependent plasticity or modify basic thermodynamic quantities models either attribute such deformation to the plastic flow driven by the stress exceeding a non1 A kinetic model for anisotropic reactions in amorphous solids Wei Hong* Department of Aerospace

  6. Hydraulic design of leaves: insights from rehydration kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, N. Michele

    Hydraulic design of leaves: insights from rehydration kinetics MACIEJ A. ZWIENIECKI1 , TIMOTHY J design in 10 species based on their rehydration kinetics. In all cases, a biphasic response described extension; tran- spiration stream; hydraulic compartmentalization. INTRODUCTION Leaves of terrestrial plants

  7. Zinc Adsorption Effects on Arsenite Oxidation Kinetics at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Zinc Adsorption Effects on Arsenite Oxidation Kinetics at the Birnessite-Water Interface L A U R(III) oxidation. Accordingly, the effects of adsorbed and nonadsorbed Zn on arsenite (As(III)) oxidation kinetics Arsenic often occurs in aquatic/terrestrial environments because of anthropogenic inputs (e.g., use

  8. A Chemical Kinetic Model of Transcriptional Elongation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yujiro Richard Yamada; Charles S. Peskin

    2006-05-23

    A chemical kinetic model of the elongation dynamics of RNA polymerase along a DNA sequence is introduced. The proposed model governs the discrete movement of the RNA polymerase along a DNA template, with no consideration given to elastic effects. The model's novel concept is a ``look-ahead'' feature, in which nucleotides bind reversibly to the DNA prior to being incorporated covalently into the nascent RNA chain. Results are presented for specific DNA sequences that have been used in single-molecule experiments of the random walk of RNA polymerase along DNA. By replicating the data analysis algorithm from the experimental procedure, the model produces velocity histograms, enabling direct comparison with these published results.

  9. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  10. Active Polymers Confer Fast Reorganization Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Swanson; Ned S. Wingreen

    2011-10-02

    Many cytoskeletal biopolymers are "active," consuming energy in large quantities. In this Letter, we identify a fundamental difference between active polymers and passive, equilibrium polymers: for equal mean lengths, active polymers can reorganize faster than equilibrium polymers. We show that equilibrium polymers are intrinsically limited to linear scaling between mean lifetime and mean length, MFPT ~ , by analogy to 1-d Potts models. By contrast, we present a simple active-polymer model that improves upon this scaling, such that MFPT ~ ^{1/2}. Since to be biologically useful, structural biopolymers must typically be many monomers long, yet respond dynamically to the needs of the cell, the difference in reorganization kinetics may help to justify active polymers' greater energy cost. PACS numbers: 87.10.Ed, 87.16.ad, 87.16.Ln

  11. Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-08-06

    Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ?10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

  12. Brittle failure kinetics model for concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silling, S.A.

    1997-03-01

    A new constitutive model is proposed for the modeling of penetration and large stress waves in concrete. Rate effects are incorporated explicitly into the damage evolution law, hence the term brittle failure kinetics. The damage variable parameterizes a family of Mohr-Coulomb strength curves. The model, which has been implemented in the CTH code, has been shown to reproduce some distinctive phenomena that occur in penetration of concrete targets. Among these are the sharp spike in deceleration of a rigid penetrator immediately after impact. Another is the size scale effect, which leads to a nonlinear scaling of penetration depth with penetrator size. This paper discusses the theory of the model and some results of an extensive validation effort.

  13. Transition from gas to plasma kinetic equilibria in gravitating axisymmetric structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Stuchlík, Zden?k [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava, Bezru?ovo nám.13, CZ-74601 Opava (Czech Republic)] [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava, Bezru?ovo nám.13, CZ-74601 Opava (Czech Republic)

    2014-04-15

    The problem of the transition from gas to plasma in gravitating axisymmetric structures is addressed under the assumption of having initial and final states realized by kinetic Maxwellian-like equilibria. In astrophysics, the theory applies to accretion-disc scenarios around compact objects. A formulation based on non-relativistic kinetic theory for collisionless systems is adopted. Equilibrium solutions for the kinetic distribution functions describing the initial neutral matter and the resulting plasma state are constructed in terms of single-particle invariants and expressed by generalized Maxwellian distributions. The final plasma configuration is related to the initial gas distribution by the introduction of appropriate functional constraints. Qualitative aspects of the solution are investigated and physical properties of the system are pointed out. In particular, the admitted functional dependences of the fluid fields carried by the corresponding equilibrium distributions are determined. Then, the plasma is proved to violate the condition of quasi-neutrality, implying a net charge separation between ions and electrons. This result is shown to be independent of the precise realization of the plasma distribution function, while a physical mechanism able to support a non-neutral equilibrium state is proposed.

  14. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; et al

    2015-01-06

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformations similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivitymore »arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump pertubation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.« less

  15. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M.; Welch, D.; Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C.

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  16. Elementary gas kinetic theory. Today we will give kinetic theory definitions to main macroscopic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexeenko, Alina

    proportional to mean kinetic energy of thermal motion. p= nmv- v0 2 3 = nm v 2 3 . #12;7 Derivation of Avogadro . #12;8 Avogadro's Law Number of molecules in a volume of gas is a quantity of particles in a given of C12 =6.022x1023 atoms. NA =6.022x1023 ­ Avogadro number. The volume V0 occupied by a mole of ideal

  17. Design and Construction of Large Size Micromegas Chambers for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Lösel; Ralph Müller

    2015-08-11

    Large area Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments. A total surface of about $\\mathbf{150~m^2}$ of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at LHC will be equipped with 8-layer Micromegas modules. Each layer covers more than $\\mathbf{2~m^2}$ for a total active area of $\\mathbf{1200~m^2}$. Together with the small strip Thin Gap Chambers they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS endcap muon tracking system in the 2018/19 shutdown. In order to achieve a 15$\\mathbf{\\%}$ transverse momentum resolution for $\\mathbf{1~TeV}$ muons, in addition to an excellent intrinsic resolution, the mechanical precision of each plane of the assembled module must be as good as $\\mathbf{30~\\mu m}$ along the precision coordinate and $\\mathbf{80~\\mu m}$ perpendicular to the chamber. The design and construction procedure of the Micromegas modules will be presented, as well as the design for the assembly of modules onto the New Small Wheel. Emphasis will be on the methods developed to achieve the challenging mechanical precision. Measurements and simulations of deformations created on chamber prototypes as a function of thermal gradients, internal stress (mesh tension and module fixation on supports) and gas over-pressure were essential in the development of the final design. During installation and operation all deformations and relative misalignments will be monitored by an optical alignment system and compensated in the tracking software.

  18. PICASSO, COUPP and PICO - Search for dark matter with bubble chambers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amole, C.; Ardid, M.; Asner, D. M.; Baxter, D.; Behnke, E.; Bhattacharjee, P.; Borsodi, H.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Brice, S. J.; Broemmelsiek, D.; et al

    2015-05-29

    The PICASSO and COUPP collaborations use superheated liquid detectors to search for cold dark matter through the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). These experiments, located in the underground laboratory of SNOLAB, Canada, detect phase transitions triggered by nuclear recoils in the keV range induced by interactions with WIMPs. We present details of the construction and operation of these detectors as well as the results, obtained by several years of observations. We also introduce PICO, a joint effort of the two collaborations to build a second generation ton-scale bubble chamber with 250 liters of active liquid.

  19. High-Rate Glass Resistive Plate Chambers For LHC Muon Detectors Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laktineh, I; Cauwenbergh, S; Combret, C; Crotty, I; Haddad, Y; Grenier, G; Guida, R; Kieffer, R; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Schirra, F; Seguin, N; Tytgat, M; Van der Donckt, M; Wang, Y; Zaganidis, N

    2012-01-01

    The limitation of the detection rate of standard bakelite resistive plate chambers (RPC) used as muon detector in LHC experiments is behind the absence of such detectors in the high TJ regions in both CMS and ATLAS detectors. RPCs made with low resistivity glass plates (10ID O.cm) could be an adequate solution to equip the high TJ regions extending thus both the trigger efficiency and the physics performance. Different beam tests with single and multi-gap configurations using the new glass have shown that such detectors can operate at few thousands Hzlcm2 with high efficiency( > 90%).

  20. Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); Mori, Yoshitaka [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

  1. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Arimoto; N. Higashi; Y. Igarashi; Y. Iwashita; T. Ino; R. Katayama; R. Kitahara; M. Kitaguchi; H. Matsumura; K. Mishima; H. Oide; H. Otono; R. Sakakibara; T. Shima; H. M. Shimizu; T. Sugino; N. Sumi; H. Sumino; K. Taketani; G. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; K. Tauchi; A. Toyoda; T. Yamada; S. Yamashita; H. Yokoyama; T. Yoshioka

    2015-09-11

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with $^6$Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  2. General Service LED Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A U.S. DOE SSL technology fact sheet that compares general service LED light bulbs with incandescent and CFL bulbs.

  3. Generalizations of quantum statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. W. Greenberg

    2008-05-02

    We review generalizations of quantum statistics, including parabose, parafermi, and quon statistics, but not including anyon statistics, which is special to two dimensions.

  4. Ultrarelativistic Decoupling Transformation for Generalized Dirac Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, J H

    2015-01-01

    The Foldy--Wouthuysen transformation is known to uncover the nonrelativistic limit of a generalized Dirac Hamiltonian, lending an intuitive physical interpretation to the effective operators within Schr\\"{o}dinger--Pauli theory. We here discuss the opposite, ultrarelativistic limit which requires the use of a fundamentally different expansion where the leading kinetic term in the Dirac equation is perturbed by the mass of the particle and other interaction (potential) terms, rather than vice versa. The ultrarelativistic decoupling transformation is applied to free Dirac particles (in the Weyl basis) and to high-energy tachyons, which are faster-than-light particles described by a fully Lorentz-covariant equation. The effective gravitational interactions are found. For tachyons, the dominant gravitational interaction term in the high-energy limit is shown to be attractive, and equal to the leading term for subluminal Dirac particles (tardyons) in the high-energy limit.

  5. Ultrarelativistic Decoupling Transformation for Generalized Dirac Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Noble; U. D. Jentschura

    2015-06-05

    The Foldy--Wouthuysen transformation is known to uncover the nonrelativistic limit of a generalized Dirac Hamiltonian, lending an intuitive physical interpretation to the effective operators within Schr\\"{o}dinger--Pauli theory. We here discuss the opposite, ultrarelativistic limit which requires the use of a fundamentally different expansion where the leading kinetic term in the Dirac equation is perturbed by the mass of the particle and other interaction (potential) terms, rather than vice versa. The ultrarelativistic decoupling transformation is applied to free Dirac particles (in the Weyl basis) and to high-energy tachyons, which are faster-than-light particles described by a fully Lorentz-covariant equation. The effective gravitational interactions are found. For tachyons, the dominant gravitational interaction term in the high-energy limit is shown to be attractive, and equal to the leading term for subluminal Dirac particles (tardyons) in the high-energy limit.

  6. Performance Studies of Micromegas Chambers for the New Small Wheel Upgrade Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ntekas, Konstantinos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Micromegas, an abbreviation for Micro MEsh Gaseous Structure (MM), is a robust detector with excellent spatial resolution and high rate capability. An $R\\&D$ activity, called Muon ATLAS MicroMegas Activity (MAMMA), was initiated in 2007 in order to explore the potential of the MM technology for use in the ATLAS experiment. After several years of prototyping and testing, the ATLAS collaboration has chosen the MM technology along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) for the upgrade of the inner muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW) upgrade project. It will employ eight layers of MM and eight layers of sTGC detectors per wheel. The NSW project requires fully efficient MM chambers, able to cope with the maximum expected rate of $15\\,\\mathrm{kHz/cm^2}$ featuring single plane spatial resolution better than $100\\,\\mu\\mathrm{m}$. The MM detectors will cover a total active area of $\\sim1200\\,\\mathrm{m^2}$ and will be operated in a moderate magnetic field with intens...

  7. Study of the performance of the MicroMegas chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanadia, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Micromegas (MICRO MEsh GAseous Structure) chambers are Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors designed to provide a high spatial resolution in highly irradiated environments. In 2007 an ambitious long-term R&D activity was started in the context of the ATLAS experiment, at CERN: the Muon ATLAS Micromegas Activity (MAMMA). After years of tests on prototypes and technology breakthroughs, Micromegas chambers were chosen as tracking detectors for an upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. These novel detectors will be installed in 2018 and 2019 during the second long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider, and will serve as precision detectors in the innermost part of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. Eight layers of Micromegas modules of unprecedented size, up to 3 $\\rm{{m^2}}$, will cover a surface of 150 $\\rm{{m^2}}$ for a total active area of about 1200 $\\rm{{m^2}}$. This upgrade will be crucial to ensure high quality performance for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer in view of the third run of the Large Hadron Collider and...

  8. Method And Apparatus For Launching Microwave Energy Into A Plasma Processing Chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DOUGHTY, FRANK C.; [et al

    2001-05-01

    A method and apparatus for launching microwave energy to a plasma processing chamber in which the required magnetic field is generated by a permanent magnet structure and the permanent magnet material effectively comprises one or more surfaces of the waveguide structure. The waveguide structure functions as an impedance matching device and controls the field pattern of the launched microwave field to create a uniform plasma. The waveguide launcher may comprise a rectangular waveguide, a circular waveguide, or a coaxial waveguide with permanent magnet material forming the sidewalls of the guide and a magnetization pattern which produces the required microwave electron cyclotron resonance magnetic field, a uniform field absorption pattern, and a rapid decay of the fields away from the resonance zone. In addition, the incorporation of permanent magnet material as a portion of the waveguide structure places the magnetic material in close proximity to the vacuum chamber, allowing for a precisely controlled magnetic field configuration, and a reduction of the amount of permanent magnet material required.

  9. Design and Construction of Large Size Micromegas Chambers for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lösel, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Large area Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments. A total surface of about $\\mathbf{150~m^2}$ of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at LHC will be equipped with 8-layer Micromegas modules. Each layer covers more than $\\mathbf{2~m^2}$ for a total active area of $\\mathbf{1200~m^2}$. Together with the small strip Thin Gap Chambers they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS endcap muon tracking system in the 2018/19 shutdown. In order to achieve a 15$\\mathbf{\\%}$ transverse momentum resolution for $\\mathbf{1~TeV}$ muons, in addition to an excellent intrinsic resolution, the mechanical precision of each plane of the assembled module must be as good as $\\mathbf{30~\\mu m}$ along the precision coordinate and $\\mathbf{80~\\mu m}$ perpendicular to the chamber. The design and construction procedure of the Micromegas modules will be presented, as well as the design for the assembly ...

  10. Experimental and theoretical evaluation of a toroidal combustion chamber for stratified-charge engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quiros, E.N.; Adams, J.W.; Otis, D.R.; Myers, P.S.

    1990-03-02

    Maximum efficiency of cyclic combustion engines (CCE) is achieved when using stratified charge and high compression ratio with controlled air circulation and combustion. A description is given of a varying-area, toroidal-shaped combustion chamber designed to achieve the above objectives by: obtaining initial circulatory air motion induced by the piston late in the compression stroke; increasing this piston-induced velocity using the momentum of fuel injected tangentially to the center line of the toroid; and by using combustion to further increase the circulation rate. Four combustion chamber configurations were studied in a bomb with zero initial air velocity to ascertain whether significant rotation could be achieved by injection and combustion. Gas pressure was measured and high speed photographs were taken of the injection and combustion process. The ideal situation, at full load, is to have one rotation of the gas during the time allocated to combustion. The experimental results, with zero initial velocity, show that fuel momentum plus combustion produces from one-half to three-quarters of a rotation in the available time. Modeling suggests that the use of initial, piston-induced velocities would result in the desired one rotation in the available time.

  11. A Proposal for a Ton Scale Bubble Chamber for Dark Matter Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan; Dahl, C.Eric; Fustin, Drew; Robinson, Alan; Behnke, Ed; Behnke, Joshua; Breznau, William; Connor, Austin; Kuehnemund, Emily Grace; Levine, Ilan; Moan, Timothy; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2010-10-07

    The nature of non-baryonic dark matter is one of the most intriguing questions for particle physics at the start of the 21st century. There is ample evidence for its existence, but almost nothing is known of its properties. WIMPs are a very appealing candidate particle and several experimental campaigns are underway around the world to search for these particles via the nuclear recoils that they should induce. The COUPP series of bubble chambers has played a significant role in the WIMP search. Through a sequence of detectors of increasing size, a number of R&D issues have arisen and been solved, and the technology has now been advanced to the point where the construction of large chambers requires a modest research effort, some development, but mostly just engineering. It is within this context that we propose to build the next COUPP detector - COUPP-500, a ton scale device to be built over the next three years at Fermilab and then deployed deep underground at SNOLAB. The primary advantages of the COUPP approach over other technologies are: (1) The ability to reject electron and gamma backgrounds by arranging the chamber thermodynamics such that these particles do not even trigger the detector. (2) The ability to suppress neutron backgrounds by having the radioactively impure detection elements far from the active volume and by using the self-shielding of a large device and the high granularity to identify multiple bubbles. (3) The ability to build large chambers cheaply and with a choice of target fluids. (4) The ability to increase the size of the chambers without changing the size or complexity of the data acquisition. (5) Sensitivity to spin-dependent and spin-independent WIMP couplings. These key advantages should enable the goal of one background event in a ton-year of exposure to be achieved. The conceptual design of COUPP-500 is scaled from the preceding devices. In many cases all that is needed is a simple scaling up of components previously used. Calibration and R&D are still needed on some aspects of the system. We know we have the ability to distinguish alpha-induced events from nuclear recoils, but we do not yet know whether the combination of material purity and rejection are good enough to run for a year with no alpha background. We also need to have more detailed measurements of the detector threshold and a better understanding of its high gamma rejection. In addition, there are important checks to make on the longevity of the detector components in the hydraulic fluid and on the chemistry of the active fluid. The 2009 PASAG report explicitly supported the construction of the COUPP-500 device in all funding scenarios. The NSF has shown similar enthusiasm. It awarded one of its DUSEL S4 grants to assist in the engineering needed to build COUPP-500. The currently estimated cost of COUPP-500 is $8M, about half the $15M-$20M price tag expected by the PASAG report for a next generation dark matter search experiment. The COUPP-500 device will have a spin independent WIMP-nucleus cross-section sensitivity of 6 x 10{sup -47} cm{sup 2} after a background-free year of running. This device should then provide the benchmark against which all other WIMP searches are measured.

  12. Determination of Correction Factors for Small Field Based on Measurement and Numerical Calculation using Cylindrical Ionization Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Kwangwoo; Park, Sungho; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Bak, Jino

    2015-01-01

    We studied the investigation of volume averaging effect for air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers to determine correction factors in small photon field for the given chamber. As a method, we measured output factors using several cylindrical ionization chambers and calculated with mathematical method similar to deconvolution in which we modeled non-constant and inhomogeneous exposure function in the cavity of chamber. The parameters in exposure function and correction factors were determined by solving a system of equations we developed with measurement data and geometry of the given chamber. Correction factors (CFs) we had found are very similar to that from Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. For example, CFs in this study were computed as 1.116 for PTW31010, and 1.0225 for PTW31016, while CFs from MC were reported as approximately between 1.17 and 1.20 for PTW31010, and between 1.02 and 1.06 for PTW31016 in of 6MV photon beam . Furthermore, the result from the method of deconvolution combined with MC for cham...

  13. 2D Axisymmetric Coupled CFD-kinetics Modeling of a Nonthermal Arc Plasma Torch for Diesel Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -4 , autothermal reforming of biogas5 or hexadecane6 with very simple kinetic mechanism. CFD-kinetics models have

  14. ROLES OF THE KINETIC AND DYNAMIC MECHANISMS IN THE L{sub p} -E{sub p} RELATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Yi-Ping; Chen, Zhi-Fu

    2013-04-10

    The L{sub p} -E{sub p} relation is a well-known relation in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Its implication remains unclear. We propose to investigate the underlying mechanisms of this relation by considering the corresponding kinetic and dynamic mechanisms separately. In this way, one can tell how much the kinetic or dynamic mechanism contributes to the index of the relationship. Our analysis gives rise to several conclusions. (1) The index of the kinetic effect in the L{sub p} -E{sub p} relation can simply be derived from the theory of special relativity, which is generally larger than 2, depending on the situation concerned. (2) The index of the dynamic effect in the relation can be deduced from observation once a model of jets is adopted. According to current GRB data, we find that the dynamic effect alone tends to give rise to an anti-correlation between L{sub p} and E{sub p} ; in terms of statistics, the dynamic effect is obviously smaller than the kinetic effect; in the situation of jets with moving discrete radio clouds that move directly toward the observer, the index of the dynamic effect is currently constrained within (- 1.6, -1), while in other situations of jets, the constraints are different; both internal and external shocks can account for the current data.

  15. Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Dooley, S; Westbrook, C K

    2008-05-29

    Detailed kinetic models of pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels are nowadays widely used in the design of internal combustion engines and these models are effectively applied to help meet the increasingly stringent environmental and energetic standards. In previous studies by the combustion community, such models not only contributed to the understanding of pure component combustion, but also provided a deeper insight into the combustion behavior of complex mixtures. One of the major challenges in this field is now the definition and the development of appropriate surrogate models able to mimic the actual features of real fuels. Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. Their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. Aside the most commonly used surrogates containing iso-octane and n-heptane only, the so called Primary Reference Fuels (PRF), new mixtures have recently been suggested to extend the reference components in surrogate mixtures to also include alkenes and aromatics. It is generally agreed that, including representative species for all the main classes of hydrocarbons which can be found in real fuels, it is possible to reproduce very effectively in a wide range of operating conditions not just the auto-ignition propensity of gasoline or Diesel fuels, but also their physical properties and their combustion residuals [1]. In this work, the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation is computationally examined. The attention is focused on the autoignition of iso-octane, hexene and their mixtures. Some important issues relevant to the experimental and modeling investigation of such fuels are discussed with the help of rapid compression machine data and calculations. Following the model validation, the behavior of mixtures is discussed on the basis of computational results.

  16. Two-scale large deviations for chemical reaction kinetics through second quantization path integral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiejun Li; Feng Lin

    2015-08-26

    Motivated by the study of the rare event for a typical genetic switching model in systems biology, we aim to establish the general two-scale large deviations for chemical reaction kinetic systems in this paper. We build a formal approach to explicitly obtain the large deviation rate functionals of the considered two-scale processes based upon the second-quantization path integral technique. This approach is shown to be superior than the well-known WKB asymptotics in giving the correct large deviation rate functionals rather than a non-unique Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the quasi-potential. We get three important types of large deviation results when the underlying two times scales are in three different regimes. This is realized by singular perturbation analysis to the rate functionals obtained by path integral. We find that the three regimes correspond to the same mean-field deterministic limit but completely different chemical Langevin approximations. The obtained results are natural extensions of the classical large volume limit in chemical reaction kinetics. Our framework and results can be applied to understand general multi-scale systems including diffusion processes.

  17. A gas kinetic scheme for the Baer-Nunziato two-phase flow model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Liang, E-mail: panliangjlu@sina.com [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China) [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); The Graduate School of China Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China); Zhao, Guiping, E-mail: zhaogp@nsfc.gov.cn [National Natural Science Foundation of China, Beijing 100085 (China)] [National Natural Science Foundation of China, Beijing 100085 (China); Tian, Baolin, E-mail: tian_baolin@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China) [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Wang, Shuanghu, E-mail: wang_shuanghu@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China) [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Numerical methods for the Baer-Nunziato (BN) two-phase flow model have attracted much attention in recent years. In this paper, we present a new gas kinetic scheme for the BN two-phase flow model containing non-conservative terms in the framework of finite volume method. In the view of microscopic aspect, a generalized Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) model which matches with the BN model is constructed. Based on the integral solution of the generalized BGK model, we construct the distribution functions at the cell interface. Then numerical fluxes can be obtained by taking moments of the distribution functions, and non-conservative terms are explicitly introduced into the construction of numerical fluxes. In this method, not only the complex iterative process of exact solutions is avoided, but also the non-conservative terms included in the equation can be handled well.

  18. Embeddings for General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ponce de Leon

    2015-09-01

    We present a systematic approach to embed $n$-dimensional vacuum general relativity in an $(n + 1)$-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian spacetime whose source is either a (non)zero cosmological constant or a scalar field minimally-coupled to Einstein gravity. Our approach allows us to generalize a number of results discussed in the literature. We construct {\\it all} the possible (physically distinct) embeddings in Einstein spaces, including the Ricci-flat ones widely discussed in the literature. We examine in detail their generalization, which - in the framework under consideration - are higher-dimensional spacetimes sourced by a scalar field with flat (constant $\

  19. Construction of a scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials in undergraduate physics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBrake, Scott M.; Vineyard, Michael F.; Turley, Colin F.; Moore, Robert D.; Johnson, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    We have developed a new scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials with the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The chamber was constructed from a ten-inch, Conflat, multi-port cross and includes a three-axis target manipulator and target ladder assembly, an eight-inch turbo pump, an Amptek X-ray detector, and multiple charged particle detectors. Recent projects performed by our undergraduate research team include proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analyses of atmospheric aerosols collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor in Upstate New York. We will describe the construction of the chamber and discuss the results of some commissioning experiments.

  20. THERMOSTATICS AND KINETICS OF TRANSFORMATIONS IN PU-BASED ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, P; Kaufman, L; Liu, Z

    2006-06-30

    CALPHAD assessment of the thermodynamic properties of a series of Pu-based alloys is briefly presented together with some results on the kinetics of phase formation and transformations in Pu-Ga alloys.

  1. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments A multi-rate expression for uranyl U(VI) surface complexation reactions has been proposed to describe diffusion-limited...

  2. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of nanocrystalline film deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, Shiyun

    A full diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm is used to model nanocrystalline film deposition, and study the mechanisms of grain nucleation and microstructure formation in such films. The major finding of this work is ...

  3. Kinetic modeling and automated optimization in microreactor systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jason Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The optimization, kinetic investigation, or scale-up of a reaction often requires significant time and materials. Silicon microreactor systems have been shown advantageous for studying chemical reactions due to their small ...

  4. Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle Self-Assembly Chinmay Soman1 using nanoparticle self-assembly mediated by molecular interactions, including polynucleotide Directed self-assembly of nanostructures into microstructures through intermolecular interactions

  5. Structural kinetics of myosin by transient time-resolved FRET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    occurs before ATP is hydrolyzed, and two struc- tural states (relay helix straight and bent) are resolved structural data, determined primarily from static protein crystals, and kinetics, measured dur- ing

  6. Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. acep01larson.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for...

  7. Kinetic studies of isoprene reactions with hydroxyl and chlorine radicals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Inseon

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic studies of the isoprene oxidation reactions initiated by the hydroxyl radical OH and the chlorine atom Cl have been investigated using a fast-flow reactor in conjunction with chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and using laser...

  8. Elucidating Hydrogen Oxidation/Evolution Kinetics in Base and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Elucidating Hydrogen OxidationEvolution Kinetics in Base and Acid by Enhanced Activities at the Optimized Pt Shell Thickness on the Ru Core Citation Details In-Document Search...

  9. Integrating Acclimated Kinetic Envelopes into Sustainable Building Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jialiang

    2014-05-28

    affects the energy usage of a building. In an effort to simultaneously consider and satisfy all of the various indoor comfort requirements, changing climatic conditions can generate conflicting conditions. Acclimated Kinetic Envelope (AKE) is a notion...

  10. Cellular Senescence: Ex Vivo p53-Dependent Asymmetric Cell Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambhatla, Lakshmi

    2001-01-01

    Although senescence is a defining property of euploid mammalian cells, its physiologic basis remains obscure. Previously, cell kinetics properties of normal tissue cells have not been considered in models for senescence. ...

  11. Mechanistic kinetic modeling of the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Hans

    2009-05-15

    Two separate mechanistic kinetic models have been developed for the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks. The first model is targeted for the hydrocracking of vacuum gas oil. The second one addresses specifically the hydrocracking of long...

  12. Active shapes : introducing guidelines for designing kinetic architectural structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Zanfaly, Dina E

    2011-01-01

    This thesis proposes guidelines for designing kinetic architectural structures, in which rules based on shape grammars, are used for motion capturing and design. There is an increasing demand for adaptive architecture that ...

  13. Topobo : a 3-D constructive assembly system with kinetic memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffle, Hayes Solos, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    We introduce Topobo, a 3-D constructive assembly system em- bedded with kinetic memory, the ability to record and playback physical motion. Unique among modeling systems is Topobo's coincident physical input and output ...

  14. Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of the CO2 chemisorption mechanism...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of the CO2 chemisorption mechanism on Na2TiO3: Experimental and theoretical evidences Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  15. Energy landscapes, folding mechanisms and kinetics of RNA tetraloop hairpins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Debayan; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Wales, David J.

    2014-12-02

    of its biological functions, are poorly understood. In this work, we use the discrete path sampling (DPS) approach to explore the energy landscapes of two RNA tetraloop hairpins, and provide insights into their folding mechanisms and kinetics in atomistic...

  16. Dissolution Kinetics of Pyrochlore Ceramics for the Disposition of Plutonium.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Strachan, Denis M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Scheele, Randall D.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Steele, Jackie L.; Legore, Virginia L.

    2006-01-30

    This is an article in which the dissolution kinetics of titanate ceramics are reported and discussed. These ceramics are made with non-radioactive elements as analogues to those made with Pu.

  17. Crystallization Kinetics of Thermosensitive Colloids Probed by Transmission Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianzhong

    Crystallization Kinetics of Thermosensitive Colloids Probed by Transmission Spectroscopy Shijun hard spheres, soft spheres, and PNIPAM spheres. Introduction Crystallization of colloidal systems systems.1-15 In recent years, colloidal crystals have been used extensively for the fabrication

  18. Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model PtRhBa NOx Traps for Design and Optimization Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model PtRhBa NOx...

  19. General relativity and experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Damour

    1994-12-08

    The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

  20. Symmetric generalized binomial distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, H.; Curado, E. M. F.; Instituto Nacional de Cięncia e Tecnologia - Sistemas Complexos, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 - Rio de Janeiro, RJ ; Gazeau, J. P.; APC, UMR 7164, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75205 Paris ; Rodrigues, Ligia M. C. S. E-mail: evaldo@cbpf.br E-mail: ligia@cbpf.br

    2013-12-15

    In two recent articles, we have examined a generalization of the binomial distribution associated with a sequence of positive numbers, involving asymmetric expressions of probabilities that break the symmetry win-loss. We present in this article another generalization (always associated with a sequence of positive numbers) that preserves the symmetry win-loss. This approach is also based on generating functions and presents constraints of non-negativeness, similar to those encountered in our previous articles.

  1. Kinetics of Mercury(II) Adsorption and Desorption on Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics of Mercury(II) Adsorption and Desorption on Soil Y U J U N Y I N , H E R B E R T E . A L L of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 D O N A L D L . S P A R K S Department of Plant and Soil Sciences kinetics of Hg(II) on four soils at pH 6 were investigated to discern the mechanisms controlling

  2. Precipitation kinetics in ultra-high lime softening 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacock, Edward Dale

    1986-01-01

    PRECIPITATION KINETICS IN ULTRA-HIGH LIME SOFTENING A Thesis EDWARD DALE PEACOCK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August l986 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering PRECIPITATION KINETICS IN ULTRA-HIGH LIME SOFTENING A Thesis by EDWARD DALE PEACOCK Approved as to style and content by: Bill Batchelor (Chair of Commi e) T D. eynol s (Member) Michael T. Lo necker (Member) Donald Mc...

  3. Point kinetics calculations with fully coupled thermal fluids reactivity feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, H.; Zou, L.; Andrs, D.; Zhao, H.; Martineau, R.

    2013-07-01

    The point kinetics model has been widely used in the analysis of the transient behavior of a nuclear reactor. In the traditional nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes such as RELAP5, the reactivity feedback effects are calculated in a loosely coupled fashion through operator splitting approach. This paper discusses the point kinetics calculations with the fully coupled thermal fluids and fuel temperature feedback implemented into the RELAP-7 code currently being developed with the MOOSE framework. (authors)

  4. Generalizing Optical Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rickard Jonsson; Hans Westman

    2007-08-21

    We show that by employing the standard projected curvature as a measure of spatial curvature, we can make a certain generalization of optical geometry (Abramowicz and Lasota 1997, Class. Quantum Grav. 14 (1997) A23). This generalization applies to any spacetime that admits a hypersurface orthogonal shearfree congruence of worldlines. This is a somewhat larger class of spacetimes than the conformally static spacetimes assumed in standard optical geometry. In the generalized optical geometry, which in the generic case is time dependent, photons move with unit speed along spatial geodesics and the sideways force experienced by a particle following a spatially straight line is independent of the velocity. Also gyroscopes moving along spatial geodesics do not precess (relative to the forward direction). Gyroscopes that follow a curved spatial trajectory precess according to a very simple law of three-rotation. We also present an inertial force formalism in coordinate representation for this generalization. Furthermore, we show that by employing a new sense of spatial curvature (Jonsson, Class. Quantum Grav. 23 (2006) 1) closely connected to Fermat's principle, we can make a more extensive generalization of optical geometry that applies to arbitrary spacetimes. In general this optical geometry will be time dependent, but still geodesic photons move with unit speed and follow lines that are spatially straight in the new sense. Also, the sideways experienced (comoving) force on a test particle following a line that is straight in the new sense will be independent of the velocity.

  5. Specification for a real-time computer for use with the CERN 2 metre-liquid Hydrogen Bubble Chamber and associated particle beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva. TC-200

    1966-01-01

    Specification for a real-time computer for use with the CERN 2 metre-liquid Hydrogen Bubble Chamber and associated particle beam

  6. Arrangements for the Building and Use of a 150 cm Cloud Chamber in Co-operation Between CERN and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (ETH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1960-01-01

    Arrangements for the Building and Use of a 150 cm Cloud Chamber in Co-operation Between CERN and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (ETH)

  7. Contract for Reinforced Concrete and Masonry Work on the Canteen and the Connecting Wing, and for the Completion of the Council Chamber in the Main Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1958-01-01

    Contract for Reinforced Concrete and Masonry Work on the Canteen and the Connecting Wing, and for the Completion of the Council Chamber in the Main Building

  8. Arrangements for the Building and Use of a 150 cm Cloud Chamber in Co-operation between CERN and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (ETH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    European Organization for Nuclear Research

    1960-01-01

    Arrangements for the Building and Use of a 150 cm Cloud Chamber in Co-operation between CERN and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (ETH)

  9. Langmuir probe studies and ion energy distributions in pure argon, argon + 10% oxygen and pure hydrogen discharges used for cleaning stainless steel ultrahigh vacuum chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathewson, A G; Hazeltine, S; Lee-Li, K; Foakes, A P; Störi, H

    1980-01-01

    Langmuir probe studies and ion energy distributions in pure argon, argon + 10% oxygen and pure hydrogen discharges used for cleaning stainless steel ultrahigh vacuum chambers

  10. Usiing NovoCOS cleaning equipment in repairing the furnace-chamber lining in coke batteries 4 & 5 at OAO Koks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.G. Protasov; R. Linden; A. Gross [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15

    Experience with a new surface-preparation technology for the ceramic resurfacing of the refractory furnace-chamber lining in coke batteries is described.

  11. Investigation of light emission from a parallel-plate avalanche chamber filled with noble gases and with TEA, TMAE, and $H_{2}O$ vapours at atmospheric pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peskov, Vladimir; Dominik, Wojciech; Sauli, Fabio

    1989-01-01

    Investigation of light emission from a parallel-plate avalanche chamber filled with noble gases and with TEA, TMAE, and $H_{2}O$ vapours at atmospheric pressure

  12. Cryogenic argon ionization chamber detector for analysis of radioactive noble gases. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, S.R.

    1982-03-01

    Two ionization chamber detectors, using liquid or solid argon as their medium were designed, constructed and tested as an improved means of analyzing quantitatively xenon 131m and xenon 133. Problems with the first detector, including vibrational noise and inadequate temperature control, limited its use to studies using solid argon. In the second design, many operating problems of the first detector were corrected. Properties of the detectors were studied using external gamma sources and xenon 131m dispersed inside the detector medium. The xenon sample and argon were purified and cryogenically pumped into the detector for spectral analysis. Both the purity of the argon and bias voltages affected resolution by changing the trapping distance of the electrons in the medium. Lower temperatures increased detection efficiency by condensing more of the sample into the cell. No clearly recognizable energy peak could be found in spectra from external or internal sources.

  13. Focusing, in-chamber spectrometer triplet for high resolution measurements on the Sandia Z facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenger, D. F.; Sinars, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Porter, J. L.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.

    2006-10-15

    An early prototype of a focusing spectrometer with one-dimensional (1D) spatial resolution (FSSR) instrument was previously developed for use in the vacuum chamber of the Sandia Z facility [Sinars et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 99, 595 (2006)]. This instrument used a single, spherically bent crystal to measure time-integrated Ar spectra from 0.295-0.378 nm with {lambda}/{delta}{lambda}>2000 and a 1D axial spatial resolution of {approx}50 {mu}m. We present the design of a final version of this instrument that improves the shielding, can be aligned more accurately, and uses three crystals instead of one. The last change enables coverage of multiple spectral ranges if different crystals are used, or multiple times if identical crystals and time-gated detectors are used. We also present results from initial prototyping tests on the Z facility using two crystals in a time-integrated mode.

  14. A microwave applicator for uniform irradiation by circularly polarized waves in an anechoic chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, W. Y.; Wu, M. H.; Wu, K. L.; Lin, M. H.; Teng, H. H.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R., E-mail: krchu@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Y. F.; Ko, C. C.; Yang, E. C. [Department of Entomology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jiang, J. A. [Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-15

    Microwave applicators are widely employed for materials heating in scientific research and industrial applications, such as food processing, wood drying, ceramic sintering, chemical synthesis, waste treatment, and insect control. For the majority of microwave applicators, materials are heated in the standing waves of a resonant cavity, which can be highly efficient in energy consumption, but often lacks the field uniformity and controllability required for a scientific study. Here, we report a microwave applicator for rapid heating of small samples by highly uniform irradiation. It features an anechoic chamber, a 24-GHz microwave source, and a linear-to-circular polarization converter. With a rather low energy efficiency, such an applicator functions mainly as a research tool. This paper discusses the significance of its special features and describes the structure, in situ diagnostic tools, calculated and measured field patterns, and a preliminary heating test of the overall system.

  15. Microbial Community Analysis of a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Using Potato Wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhen Li; Rishika Haynes; Eugene Sato; Malcolm Shields; Yoshiko Fujita; Chikashi Sato

    2014-04-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) convert chemical energy to electrical energy via bioelectrochemical reactions mediated by microorganisms. We investigated the diversity of the microbial community in an air cathode single chamber MFC that utilized potato-process wastewater as substrate. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) results indicated that the bacterial communities on the anode, cathode, control electrode, and MFC bulk fluid were similar, but differed dramatically from that of the anaerobic domestic sludge and potato wastewater inoculum. The 16S rDNA sequencing results showed that microbial species detected on the anode were predominantly within the phyla of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Fluorescent microscopy results indicated that there was a clear enhancement of biofilm formation on the anode. Results of this study could help improve understanding of the complexity of microbial communities and optimize the microbial composition for generating electricity by MFCs that utilize potato wastewater.

  16. Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekney, Natalie J.; Martello, Donald; Schroeder, Karl; Granite, Evan

    2009-05-01

    An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7- day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m(2) h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m(2) h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

  17. Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekney, N.J.; Martello, D.V.; Schroeder, K.T.; Granite, E.J.

    2009-05-01

    An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7-day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m2 h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m2 h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

  18. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Baller; C. Bromberg; N. Buchanan; F. Cavanna; H. Chen; E. Church; V. Gehman; H. Greenlee; E. Guardincerri; B. Jones; T. Junk; T. Katori; M. Kirby; K. Lang; B. Loer; A. Marchionni; T. Maruyama; C. Mauger; A. Menegolli; D. Montanari; S. Mufson; B. Norris; S. Pordes; J. Raaf; B. Rebel; R. Sanders; M. Soderberg; J. St. John; T. Strauss; A. Szelc; C. Touramanis; C. Thorn; J. Urheim; R. Van de Water; H. Wang; B. Yu; M. Zuckerbrot

    2014-03-09

    A workshop was held at Fermilab on March 20-21, 2013 to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPC) in the United States. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in plenary sessions organized into seven topical categories: $i)$ Argon Purity, $ii)$ Cryogenics, $iii)$ TPC and High Voltage, $iv)$ Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, $v)$ Scintillation Light Detection, $vi)$ Calibration and Test Beams, and $vii)$ Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these topical categories. It also highlights areas in LArTPC research and development that are common between neutrino experiments and dark matter experiments.

  19. Silicon nitride swirl lower-chamber for high power turbocharged diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamiya, S.; Murachi, M.; Kawamoto, H.; Kato, S.; Kawakami, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes application of sintered silicon nitride to the swirl lower-chamber in order to improve performance of turbocharged diesel engines. Various stress analyses by finite element method and stress measurements have been applied to determine the design specifications for the component, which compromise brittleness of ceramic materials. Material development was conducted to evaluate strength, fracture toughness, and thermal properties for the sintered bodies. Ceramic injection molding has been employed to fabricate components with large quantities. In the present work. Quality assurance for the components can be made by reliability evaluation methods as well as non-destructive and stress loading inspections. It is found that the engine performance with ceramic component has been increased in the power out put of 9ps as compared to that of conventional engines.

  20. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ? A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(1–40) fibril formation. ? At high A?(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  1. Engineering model reduction of bio-chemical kinetic David Csercsik, Katalin M. Hangos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorban, Alexander N.

    Engineering model reduction of bio-chemical kinetic models D´avid Csercsik, Katalin M. Hangos, Hungary Significance and Aim Bio-chemical kinetic models of enzyme kinetic processes, as well reaction kinetic scheme. Therefore it is of great importance to develop bio-chemically meaningful

  2. Chemistry 231 Fall 2013 Chemistry 231, Chemical Kinetics and Molecular Reaction Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continetti, Robert E.

    Chemistry 231 Fall 2013 Chemistry 231, Chemical Kinetics and Molecular Reaction Dynamics Dept chemical kinetics, the connection between chemical kinetics and molecular reaction dynamics as well as some and Hase, Prentice Hall (1999) 4. Chemical Kinetics, K.J. Laidler, McGraw Hill (1965) 5. Gas Phase Reaction

  3. General Infrastructure Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERALProblemsGeneral Information GeneralOn the

  4. General Presentation Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERALProblemsGeneral Information GeneralOnSteve

  5. General User Proposals (GUPs)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERALProblemsGeneral InformationGeneral User

  6. 2014 National Small Business Contracting Summit- US Women’s Chamber of Commerce & National Association of Small Business Contractors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Association of Small Business Contractors and the U.S. Women's Chamber of Commerce present the 2014 National Small Business Federal Contracting Summit. The event will include sessions on securing a fair share of federal contracting, legal issues, trends and opportunities.

  7. Methane efflux from boreal wetlands: Theory and testing of the ecosystem model Ecosys with chamber and tower flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roulet, Nigel T.

    Methane efflux from boreal wetlands: Theory and testing of the ecosystem model Ecosys with chamber and Structure: Biosphere/atmosphere interactions; 1890 Hydrology: Wetlands; KEYWORDS: Ecosys, methane emissions, wetlands, modeling Citation: Grant, R. F., and N. T. Roulet, Methane efflux from boreal wetlands: Theory

  8. Probabilistic Analysis of a Monod-type equation by use of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for our society. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a new form of renewable energy by convertingProbabilistic Analysis of a Monod-type equation by use of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Eric A. Zielke December 9, 2005 #12;Abstract Renewable energy forms have become an increasing need

  9. ARIES Inertial Fusion Chamber Assessment M. S. Tillack*, F. Najmabadi, L. A. El-Guebaly, D. Goodin, W. R. Meier,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    commissioned two large, multi-institutional IFE power plant design studies: Prometheus [1] and OSIRIS/ER-54101) March 1992. [2] W. R. MEIER, et al., "OSIRIS and SOMBRERO Inertial Fusion Power Plant Designs components (i.e., final optics, final focus magnets), chamber physics (particle and radiation transport, gas

  10. Volcano-tectonic modelling of magma chambers, ring-faults, unrest, and eruptions in the Tianchi Volcano, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    this range to AD938-946), produced between 96 and 172 km3 of deposits, or around 30 km3 of dense magma, and is one of the largest eruptions on Earth during the past 1100 years. A 5-km-diameter collapse caldera, indicating that the shallow magma chamber and/or an associated geothermal system beneath the volcano

  11. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile, C. A.; Blanchard, W. R.; Kozub, T. A.; Aristova, M.; McGahan, C.; Natta, S.; Pagdon, K.; Zelenty, J.

    2010-01-14

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber wall acts as the primary heat exchanger. During removal, gas is pumped through the laser ports by turbo molecular-drag pumps (TM-DP). For the purpose of reducing organic based lubricants and seals, a magnetically levitated TM-DP is being investigated with pump manufacturers. Currently, magnetically levitated turbo molecular pumps are commercially available. The pumps will be exposed to thermal loads and ionizing radiation (tritium, Ar-41, post detonation neutrons). Although the TM-DP's will be subjected to these various radiations, current designs for similar pumping devices have been hardened and have the ability of locating control electronics in remote radiation shielded enclosures4. The radiation hardened TM-DP's will be 5 required to operate with minimal maintenance for periods of up to 18 continuous months. As part of this initial investigation for developing a conceptual engineering strategy for a gas fill solution, commercial suppliers of low pressure gas pumping systems have been contacted and engaged in this evaluation. Current technology in the area of mechanical pumping systems indicates that the development of a robust pumping system to meet the requirements of the FTF gas fill concept is within the limits of COTS equipment3,4.

  12. Parking Legend General Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Parking Legend General Parking Faculty/Staff Parking Satellite/Freshman Lot Sophomore Parking Reserved Parking Off-Campus Parking (OC) Visitor/Off Campus Employee Parking Visitor Parking Winston-Salem First Church Vehicle Parking Only WFU-Owned Residential Theme Housing Call Boxes (Emergency Phones) Z2

  13. Optimization Under Generalized Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lodwick, Weldon

    11 Optimization Under Generalized Uncertainty Optimization Modeling Math 4794/5794: Spring 2013 Weldon A. Lodwick Weldon.Lodwick@ucdenver.edu 2/14/2013 Optimization Modeling - Spring 2013 #12 in the context of optimization problems. The theoretical frame-work for these notes is interval analysis. From

  14. 38520152016 GENERAL BULLETIN Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    3852015­2016 GENERAL BULLETIN Sciences& Mathematics THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS A primary aim of the College of Sciences and Mathematics is to contribute to the liberal arts education of all students through the presentation of fundamental con- cepts and methods of science and mathematics

  15. DRILLING MACHINES GENERAL INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    TC 9-524 Chapter 4 DRILLING MACHINES GENERAL INFORMATION PURPOSE This chapter contains basic information pertaining to drilling machines. A drilling machine comes in many shapes and sizes, from small hand-held power drills to bench mounted and finally floor-mounted models. They can perform operations

  16. General Syllabus Physics 45100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmann, Peter

    General Syllabus Physics 45100 Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Designation: Undergraduate Catalog description: 45100: Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Temperature; equation of state; work and statistical mechanics; low-temperature physics; the Third Law. 3 HR./Wk.; 3 CR. Prerequisites: Physics 35100

  17. MAIN CHAMBER NEUTRAL PRESSURE IN ALCATOR C-MOD AND JET C S Pitcher, S K Erents*, W Fundamenski*, B LaBombard, B Lipschultz, G F Matthews*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitcher, C. S.

    MAIN CHAMBER NEUTRAL PRESSURE IN ALCATOR C-MOD AND JET C S Pitcher, S K Erents*, W Fundamenski*, B *Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB,UK 1 Introduction Main chamber gas in a divertor tokamak arises due to recombination of plasma ions either directly in the main

  18. Nickel based anodes for single chamber solid oxide fuel cells : a catalytic study Geoffroy Gadacz, Sorina Udroiu, Jean-Paul Viricelle, Christophe Pijolat, Michle Pijolat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Nickel based anodes for single chamber solid oxide fuel cells : a catalytic study Geoffroy Gadacz Single chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SCFC) are an alternative concept to traditional SOFC's. Conventional anodes, which consist of a cermet of metallic Ni and ionic conductor, have to work under a mixture

  19. Constrained Generalized Supersymmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toppan, Francesco; Kuznetsova, Zhanna

    2005-10-17

    We present a classification of admissible types of constraint (hermitian, holomorphic, with reality condition on the bosonic sectors, etc.) for generalized supersymmetries in the presence of complex spinors. A generalized supersymmetry algebra involving n-component real spinors Qa is given by the anticommutators {l_brace}Q{sub a},Q{sub b}{r_brace} = Z{sub ab} where the matrix Z appearing in the r.h.s. is the most general symmetric matrix. A complex generalized supersymmetry algebra is expressed in terms of complex spinors Qa and their complex conjugate Q* a. The most general (with a saturated r.h.s.) algebra is in this case given by {l_brace}Q{sub a},Q{sub b}{r_brace} P{sub ab}{l_brace}Q*{sub a}, Q*{sub b}{r_brace} = P*{sub ab}{l_brace}Q{sub a},Q*{sub b}{r_brace} = R{sub ab} where the matrix Pab is symmetric, while Rab is hermitian. The bosonic right hand side can be expressed in terms of the rank-k totally antisymmetric tensors P{sub ab} {sigma}k(C{gamma}{sub [{mu}}{sub 1...{mu}}{sub k]}){sub ab}P{sup [{mu}{sup 1...{mu}{sup k}]}.The decomposition in terms of anti-symmetric tensors for any space-time up to dimension D = 13 is presented. Real type, complex type, and quaternionic type space-times are classified. Any restriction on the saturated bosonic generators that allows all possible combinations of these tensors is in principle admissible by a Lorenz-covariant requirement. We investigate division algebra constraints and their influence on physical models. High spin theory models are presented as examples of the applications of such models.

  20. Gravitationally Induced Particle Production: Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. S. Lima; I. P. Baranov

    2014-11-24

    A relativistic kinetic description for the irreversible thermodynamic process of gravitationally induced particle production is proposed in the context of an expanding Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) geometry. We show that the covariant thermodynamic treatment referred to as "adiabatic" particle production provoked by the cosmic time-varying gravitational field has a consistent kinetic counterpart. The variation of the distribution function is associated to a non-collisional kinetic term of quantum-gravitational origin which is proportional to the ratio $\\Gamma/H$, where $\\Gamma$ is the gravitational particle production rate and H is the Hubble parameter. For $\\Gamma gravitation. The resulting non-equilibrium distribution function has the same functional form of equilibrium with the evolution laws corrected by the particle production process. The macroscopic temperature evolution law is also kinetically derived for massive and massless particles. The present approach points to the possibility of an exact (semi-classical) quantum-gravitational kinetic treatment by incorporating back-reaction effects in the cosmic background.

  1. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer and GeneralRelativistic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    systems using a fully general relativistic radiative transfer formulation, with flow structures obtained by general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamic simulations. We consider...

  2. Modeling of the saturation current of a fission chamber taking into account the distorsion of electric field due to space charge effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Poujade; Alain Lebrun

    2002-02-08

    Fission chambers were first made fifty years ago for neutron detection. At the moment, the French Atomic Energy Commission \\textsf{(CEA-Cadarache)} is developing a sub-miniature fission chamber technology with a diameter of 1.5 mm working in the current mode (Bign). To be able to measure intense fluxes, it is necessary to adjust the chamber geometry and the gas pressure before testing it under real neutron flux. In the present paper, we describe a theoretical method to foresee the current-voltage characteristics (sensitivity and saturation plateau) of a fission chamber whose geometrical features are given, taking into account the neutron flux to be measured (spectrum and intensity). The proposed theoretical model describes electric field distortion resulting from charge collection effect. A computer code has been developed on this model basis. Its application to 3 kinds of fission chambers indicates excellent agreement between theoretical model and measured characteristics.

  3. Kinetic extruder - a dry pulverized solid material pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1983-01-01

    Method and apparatus are shown for the continuous feeding of pulverized material to a high pressure container. A rotor is located within the high pressure container. The pulverized material is fed from a feed hopper through a stationary feed pipe to a vented spin-up chamber to a plurality of two-stage sprues mounted in the rotor. Control nozzles downstream from the sprues meter the flow of coal through the sprues.

  4. Kinetic extruder - a dry pulverized solid material pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, J. W.; Bonin, J. H.; Daniel, A. D. Jr.

    1983-03-15

    Method and apparatus are shown for the continuous feeding of pulverized material to a high pressure container. A rotor is located within the high pressure container. The pulverized material is fed from a feed hopper through a stationary feed pipe to a vented spin-up chamber to a plurality of two-stage sprues mounted in the rotor. Control nozzles downstream from the sprues meter the flow of coal through the sprues. 19 figs.

  5. Regulation XVI: GENERAL UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regulation XVI: GENERAL UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS APPLICATION AND INTERPRETATION 1. Unless stated otherwise, these and the following Regulations apply to students in all Faculties, including the International Faculty: General Regulations for First Degrees; General Regulations for Higher Degrees

  6. Kinetics of silicide formation over a wide range of heating rates spanning six orders of magnitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molina-Ruiz, Manel; Lopeandía, Aitor F.; Gonzalez-Silveira, Marta; Garcia, Gemma; Clavaguera-Mora, Maria T. [Grup de Nanomaterials i Microsistemes, Departament de Física, Universitat Autňnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Peral, Inma [ALBA Synchrotron Light Facility, 08290 Cerdanyola del Vallčs (Spain); Rodríguez-Viejo, Javier, E-mail: javier.rodriguez@uab.cat [Grup de Nanomaterials i Microsistemes, Departament de Física, Universitat Autňnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); MATGAS Research Centre, UAB Campus, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2014-07-07

    Kinetic processes involving intermediate phase formation are often assumed to follow an Arrhenius temperature dependence. This behavior is usually inferred from limited data over narrow temperature intervals, where the exponential dependence is generally fully satisfied. However, direct evidence over wide temperature intervals is experimentally challenging and data are scarce. Here, we report a study of silicide formation between a 12?nm film of palladium and 15?nm of amorphous silicon in a wide range of heating rates, spanning six orders of magnitude, from 0.1 to 10{sup 5?}K/s, or equivalently more than 300?K of variation in reaction temperature. The calorimetric traces exhibit several distinct exothermic events related to interdiffusion, nucleation of Pd{sub 2}Si, crystallization of amorphous silicon, and vertical growth of Pd{sub 2}Si. Interestingly, the thickness of the initial nucleation layer depends on the heating rate revealing enhanced mass diffusion at the fastest heating rates during the initial stages of the reaction. In spite of this, the formation of the silicide strictly follows an Arrhenius temperature dependence over the whole temperature interval explored. A kinetic model is used to fit the calorimetric data over the complete heating rate range. Calorimetry is complemented by structural analysis through transmission electron microscopy and both standard and in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

  7. Isobutane ignition delay time measurements at high pressure and detailed chemical kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healy, D.; Curran, H.J.; Donato, N.S.; Aul, C.J.; Petersen, E.L.; Zinner, C.M.; Bourque, G.

    2010-08-15

    Rapid compression machine and shock-tube ignition experiments were performed for real fuel/air isobutane mixtures at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2. The wide range of experimental conditions included temperatures from 590 to 1567 K at pressures of approximately 1, 10, 20, and 30 atm. These data represent the most comprehensive set of experiments currently available for isobutane oxidation and further accentuate the complementary attributes of the two techniques toward high-pressure oxidation experiments over a wide range of temperatures. The experimental results were used to validate a detailed chemical kinetic model composed of 1328 reactions involving 230 species. This mechanism has been successfully used to simulate previously published ignition delay times as well. A thorough sensitivity analysis was performed to gain further insight to the chemical processes occurring at various conditions. Additionally, useful ignition delay time correlations were developed for temperatures greater than 1025 K. Comparisons are also made with available isobutane data from the literature, as well as with 100% n-butane and 50-50% n-butane-isobutane mixtures in air that were presented by the authors in recent studies. In general, the kinetic model shows excellent agreement with the data over the wide range of conditions of the present study. (author)

  8. Extension of the quantum-kinetic model to lunar and Mars return physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liechty, D. S.; Lewis, M. J.

    2014-02-15

    The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high-mass payloads on Mars, and the exploration of the outer planets and their satellites are being considered. A recently introduced molecular-level chemistry model, the quantum-kinetic, or Q-K, model that predicts reaction rates for gases in thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties, is extended in the current work to include electronic energy level transitions and reactions involving charged particles. Like the Q-K procedures for neutral species chemical reactions, these new models are phenomenological procedures that aim to reproduce the reaction/transition rates but do not necessarily capture the exact physics. These engineering models are necessarily efficient due to the requirement to compute billions of simulated collisions in direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations. The new models are shown to generally agree within the spread of reported transition and reaction rates from the literature for near equilibrium conditions.

  9. Carbon kinetic isotope effects on the hydration of carbon dioxide and the dehydration of bicarbonate ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlier, J.F.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1984-09-05

    /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effects on the hydration of CO/sub 2/ and the dehydration of HCO/sub 3//sup -/ in aqueous solution have been measured by rapid removal of the product and conversion to an isotopically stable form, followed by isotope-ratio analysis. The isotope effect on hydration is k/sup 12//k/sup 13/ = 1.0069 +/- 0.0003 at 24/sup 0/C. The isotope effect on dehydration is 1.0147 +/- 0.0007. The ratio of these two values gives an equilibrium isotope effect of K/sup 12//K/sup 13/ = 1.0077, in good agreement with previously measured values. The small magnitudes of the kinetic isotope effects indicate that the transition state for conversion of HCO/sub 3//sup -/ to CO/sub 2/ is very similar to that of HCO/sub 3//sup -/. This information together with previously measured solvent isotope effects indicates that the mechanism of HCO/sub 3//sup -/ dehydration probably involves general-acid-catalyzed donation of a proton from H/sub 3/O/sup +/ to the departing oxygen, rather than unimolecular decomposition of the zwitterion H/sub 2/O/sup +/-CO/sub 2//sup -/ in the rate-determining step. 21 references, 2 figures.

  10. Kinetic Electron and Ion Instability of the Lunar Wake Simulated at Physical Mass Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haakonsen, Christian Bernt; Zhou, Chuteng

    2015-01-01

    The solar wind wake behind the moon is studied with 1D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations using a physical ion to electron mass ratio (unlike prior investigations); the simulations also apply more generally to supersonic flow of dense magnetized plasma past non-magnetic objects. A hybrid electrostatic Boltzmann electron treatment is first used to investigate the ion stability in the absence of kinetic electron effects, showing that the ions are two-stream unstable for downstream wake distances (in lunar radii) greater than about three times the solar wind Mach number. Simulations with PIC electrons are then used to show that kinetic electron effects can lead to disruption of the ion streams at least three times closer to the moon than in the hybrid simulations. This disruption occurs as the result of a novel wake phenomenon: the non-linear growth of electron holes spawned from a narrow dimple in the electron velocity distribution. Most of the holes arising from the dimple are small and quickly l...

  11. Kinetics of Mismatch Formation opposite Lesions by the Replicative DNA Polymerase from Bacteriophage RB69

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogg, Matthew; Rudnicki, Jean; Midkiff, John; Reha-Krantz, Linda; Doubli, Sylvie; Wallace, Susan S. (Alberta); (Vermont)

    2010-04-12

    The fidelity of DNA replication is under constant threat from the formation of lesions within the genome. Oxidation of DNA bases leads to the formation of altered DNA bases such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, commonly called 8-oxoG, and 2-hydroxyadenenine, or 2-OHA. In this work we have examined the incorporation kinetics opposite these two oxidatively derived lesions as well as an abasic site analogue by the replicative DNA polymerase from bacteriophage RB69. We compared the kinetic parameters for both wild type and the low fidelity L561A variant. While nucleotide incorporation rates (k{sub pol}) were generally higher for the variant, the presence of a lesion in the templating position reduced the ability of both the wild-type and variant DNA polymerases to form ternary enzyme-DNA-dNTP complexes. Thus, the L561A substitution does not significantly affect the ability of the RB69 DNA polymerase to recognize damaged DNA; instead, the mutation increases the probability that nucleotide incorporation will occur. We have also solved the crystal structure of the L561A variant forming an 8-oxoG {center_dot} dATP mispair and show that the propensity for forming this mispair depends on an enlarged polymerase active site.

  12. Chemical Kinetic Models for HCCI and Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Sarathy, S M

    2010-11-15

    Predictive engine simulation models are needed to make rapid progress towards DOE's goals of increasing combustion engine efficiency and reducing pollutant emissions. These engine simulation models require chemical kinetic submodels to allow the prediction of the effect of fuel composition on engine performance and emissions. Chemical kinetic models for conventional and next-generation transportation fuels need to be developed so that engine simulation tools can predict fuel effects. The objectives are to: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for diesel and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate fuel models to represent real fuels and model low temperature combustion strategies in HCCI and diesel engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on low temperature combustion modes of advanced combustion engines.

  13. Kinetics of bond formation in crosslinked gelatin gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Abete; E. Del Gado; D. Hellio Serughetti; L. de Arcangelis; M. Djabourov; A. Coniglio

    2006-11-07

    In chemical crosslinking of gelatin solutions, two different time scales affect the kinetics of the gel formation in the experiments. We complement the experimental study with Monte Carlo numerical simulations of a lattice model. This approach shows that the two characteristic time scales are related to the formation of single bonds crosslinker-chain and of bridges between chains. In particular their ratio turns out to control the kinetics of the gel formation. We discuss the effect of the concentration of chains. Finally our results suggest that, by varying the probability of forming bridges as an independent parameter, one can finely tune the kinetics of the gelation via the ratio of the two characteristic times.

  14. Kinetics of the carbon monoxide oxidation reaction under microwave heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, W.L.; Katz, J.D.; Rees, D.; Paffett, M.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Datye, A. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    915 MHz microwave heating has been used to drive the CO oxidation reaction over Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with out significantly affecting the reaction kinetics. As compared to an identical conventionally heated system, the activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and reaction order with respect to CO were unchanged. Temperature was measured using a thermocouple extrapolation technique. Microwave-induced thermal gradients were found to play a significant role in kinetic observations. The authors chose the CO oxidation reaction over a supported metal catalyst because the reaction kinetics are well known, and because of the diverse dielectric properties of the various elements in the system: CO is a polar molecule, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are non-polar, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a dielectric, and Pt and Pd are conductors.

  15. Kinetics of high-conversion hydrocracking of bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagaishi, H.; Gray, M.R.; Chan, E.W.; Sanford, E.C.

    1995-12-31

    Residues are complex mixtures of thousands of components. This mixture will change during hydrocracking, so that high conversion may result in a residue material with different characteristics from the starting material. Our objective is to determine the kinetics of residue conversion and yields of distillates at high conversions, and to relate these observations to the underlying chemical reactions. Athabasca bitumen was reacted in a 1-L CSTR in a multipass operation. Product from the first pass was collected, then run through the reactor again and so on, giving kinetic data under conditions that simulated a multi-reactor or packed-bed operation. Experiments were run both with hydrocracking catalyst and without added catalyst. Products were analyzed by distillation, elemental analysis, NMR, and GPC. These data will be used to derive a kinetic model for hydrocracking of bitumen residue covering a wide range of conversion (from 30% to 95%+), based on the underlying chemistry.

  16. Magnetic Field Rotations in the Solar Wind at Kinetic Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Burgess, D; Horbury, T S

    2015-01-01

    The solar wind magnetic field contains rotations at a broad range of scales, which have been extensively studied in the MHD range. Here we present an extension of this analysis to the range between ion and electron kinetic scales. The distribution of rotation angles was found to be approximately log-normal, shifting to smaller angles at smaller scales almost self-similarly, but with small, statistically significant changes of shape. The fraction of energy in fluctuations with angles larger than $\\alpha$ was found to drop approximately exponentially with $\\alpha$, with e-folding angle $9.8^\\circ$ at ion scales and $0.66^\\circ$ at electron scales, showing that large angles ($\\alpha > 30^\\circ$) do not contain a significant amount of energy at kinetic scales. Implications for kinetic turbulence theory and the dissipation of solar wind turbulence are discussed.

  17. Kinetic Alfvén wave turbulence and formation of localized structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P.; Modi, K. V.; Mechanical Engineering Department, Government Engineering College Valsad, Gujarat 396001

    2013-08-15

    This work presents non-linear interaction of magnetosonic wave with kinetic Alfvén wave for intermediate ?-plasma (m{sub e}/m{sub i}???1). A set of dimensionless equations have been developed for analysis by considering ponderomotive force due to pump kinetic Alfvén wave in the dynamics of magnetosonic wave. Stability analysis has been done to study modulational instability or linear growth rate. Further, numerical simulation has been carried out to study the nonlinear stage of instability and resulting power spectrum applicable to solar wind around 1 AU. Due to the nonlinearity, background density of magnetosonic wave gets modified which results in localization of kinetic Alfvén wave. From the obtained results, we observed that spectral index follows k{sup ?3.0}, consistent with observation received by Cluster spacecraft for the solar wind around 1 AU. The result shows the steepening of power spectrum which may be responsible for heating and acceleration of plasma particles in solar wind.

  18. Widening the Axion Window via Kinetic and Stückelberg Mixings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary Shiu; Wieland Staessens; Fang Ye

    2015-11-17

    We point out that kinetic and St\\"uckelberg mixings that are generically present in the low energy effective action of axions can significantly widen the window of axion decay constants. We show that an effective super-Planckian decay constant can be obtained even when the axion kinetic matrix has only sub-Planckian entries. Our minimal model involves only two axions, a St\\"uckelberg U(1) and a modest rank instanton generating non-Abelian group. Below the mass of the St\\"uckelberg U(1), there is only a single axion with a non-perturbatively generated potential. In contrast to previous approaches, the enhancement of the axion decay constant is not tied to the number of degrees of freedom introduced. We also discuss how kinetic mixings can lower the decay constant to the desired axion dark matter window. String theory embeddings of this scenario and their phenomenological features are briefly discussed.

  19. Generalized constructive tree weights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivasseau, Vincent E-mail: adrian.tanasa@ens-lyon.org; Tanasa, Adrian E-mail: adrian.tanasa@ens-lyon.org

    2014-04-15

    The Loop Vertex Expansion (LVE) is a quantum field theory (QFT) method which explicitly computes the Borel sum of Feynman perturbation series. This LVE relies in a crucial way on symmetric tree weights which define a measure on the set of spanning trees of any connected graph. In this paper we generalize this method by defining new tree weights. They depend on the choice of a partition of a set of vertices of the graph, and when the partition is non-trivial, they are no longer symmetric under permutation of vertices. Nevertheless we prove they have the required positivity property to lead to a convergent LVE; in fact we formulate this positivity property precisely for the first time. Our generalized tree weights are inspired by the Brydges-Battle-Federbush work on cluster expansions and could be particularly suited to the computation of connected functions in QFT. Several concrete examples are explicitly given.

  20. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Knop; P. H. Hauschildt; E. Baron

    2006-11-30

    We present a general method to calculate radiative transfer including scattering in the continuum as well as in lines in spherically symmetric systems that are influenced by the effects of general relativity (GR). We utilize a comoving wavelength ansatz that allows to resolve spectral lines throughout the atmosphere. The used numerical solution is an operator splitting (OS) technique that uses a characteristic formal solution. The bending of photon paths and the wavelength shifts due to the effects of GR are fully taken into account, as is the treatment of image generation in a curved spacetime. We describe the algorithm we use and demonstrate the effects of GR on the radiative transport of a two level atom line in a neutron star like atmosphere for various combinations of continuous and line scattering coefficients. In addition, we present grey continuum models and discuss the effects of different scattering albedos on the emergent spectra and the determination of effective temperatures and radii of neutron star atmospheres.

  1. A Generalized Deletion Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indranil Chakrabarty; Satyabrata Adhikari

    2005-11-22

    In this work we prescribe a more generalized quantum-deleting machine (input state dependent). The fidelity of deletion is dependent on some machine parameters such that on alteration of machine parameters we get back to standard deleting machines. We also carried out a various comparative study of various kinds of quantum deleting machines. We also plotted graphs, making a comparative study of fidelity of deletion of the deletion machines, obtained as particular cases on changing the machine parameters of our machine.

  2. General User Proposals (GUPs)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERALProblemsGeneral Information

  3. Generalized utility metrics for supercomputers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strohmaier, Erich

    2009-01-01

    2007:1–12 Generalized utility metrics for supercomputers 12.ISSUE PAPER Generalized utility metrics for supercomputersproblem of ranking the utility of supercom- puter systems

  4. Generalized Adaptive A* Xiaoxun Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeoh, William

    Generalized Adaptive A* Xiaoxun Sun USC Computer Science Los Angeles, California xiaoxuns spaces changes. Adaptive A* [7] is a Cite as: Generalized Adaptive A*, Xiaoxun Sun, Sven Koenig

  5. Ageing studies on small Thin Gap Chambers for the ATLAS New Small Wheel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gignac, Matthew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The largest upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs), to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2018/19. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) detectors are one chosen technology to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. We study ageing effects of sTGC detectors with a gas mixture of 55% of CO2 and 45% of n-pentane. A sTGC detector was irradiated with beta-rays from a Sr-90 source. Three different gas flow rates were tested. We observed no deterioration on pulse height of the sTGC up to an accumulated charge of 6.7 C/cm.

  6. The design and performance of a prototype water Cherenkov optical time-projection chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oberla, E

    2015-01-01

    A first experimental test of tracking relativistic charged particles by `drifting' Cherenkov photons in a water-based optical time-projection chamber (OTPC) has been performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. The prototype OTPC detector consists of a 77~cm long, 28~cm diameter, 40~kg cylindrical water mass instrumented with a combination of commercial $5.1\\times5.1$~cm$^2$ micro-channel plate photo-multipliers (MCP-PMT) and $6.7\\times6.7$~cm$^2$ mirrors. Five MCP-PMTs are installed in two columns along the OTPC cylinder in a small-angle stereo configuration. A mirror is mounted opposite each MCP-PMT on the far side of the detector cylinder, effectively doubling the photo-detection efficiency and providing a time-resolved image of the Cherenkov light on the opposing wall. Each MCP-PMT is coupled to an anode readout consisting of thirty 50 Ohm microstrips. A 180-channel data acquisition system digitizes the MCP-PMT signals on one end of the microstrips using the PSEC4 waveform sampling-and-digitizing chip op...

  7. A steerable UV laser system for the calibration of liquid argon time projection chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ereditato; I. Kreslo; M. Lüthi; C. Rudolf von Rohr; M. Schenk; T. Strauss; M. Weber; M. Zeller

    2014-10-04

    A number of liquid argon time projection chambers (LAr TPC's) are being build or are proposed for neutrino experiments on long- and short baseline beams. For these detectors a distortion in the drift field due to geometrical or physics reasons can affect the reconstruction of the events. Depending on the TPC geometry and electric drift field intensity this distortion could be of the same magnitude as the drift field itself. Recently, we presented a method to calibrate the drift field and correct for these possible distortions. While straight cosmic ray muon tracks could be used for calibration, multiple coulomb scattering and momentum uncertainties allow only a limited resolution. A UV laser instead can create straight ionization tracks in liquid argon, and allows one to map the drift field along different paths in the TPC inner volume. Here we present a UV laser feed-through design with a steerable UV mirror immersed in liquid argon that can point the laser beam at many locations through the TPC. The straight ionization paths are sensitive to drift field distortions, a fit of these distortion to the linear optical path allows to extract the drift field, by using these laser tracks along the whole TPC volume one can obtain a 3D drift field map. The UV laser feed-through assembly is a prototype of the system that will be used for the MicroBooNE experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL).

  8. Performance of a Drift Chamber Candidate for a Cosmic Muon Tomography System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anghel, V.; Jewett, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Thompson, M.; Armitage, J.; Botte, J.; Boudjemline, K.; Erlandson, A.; Oakham, G.; Bueno, J.; Bryman, D.; Liu, Z.; Charles, E.; Gallant, G.; Cousins, T.; Noel, S.; Drouin, P.-L.; Waller, D.; Stocki, T. J.

    2011-12-13

    In the last decade, many groups around the world have been exploring different ways to probe transport containers which may contain illicit Special Nuclear Materials such as uranium. The muon tomography technique has been proposed as a cost effective system with an acceptable accuracy. A group of Canadian institutions (see above), funded by Defence Research and Development Canada, is testing different technologies to track the cosmic muons. One candidate is the single wire Drift Chamber. With the capability of a 2D impact position measurement, two detectors will be placed above and two below the object to be probed. In order to achieve a good 3D image quality of the cargo content, a good angular resolution is required. The simulation showed that 1mrad was required implying the spatial resolution of the trackers must be in the range of 1 to 2 mm for 1 m separation. A tracking system using three prototypes has been built and tested. The spatial resolution obtained is 1.7 mm perpendicular to the wire and 3 mm along the wire.

  9. A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Tanioka, Seiichi [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Sakaide (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  10. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  11. Spectroscopy and kinetics of combustion gases at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, R.K.; Bowman, C.T. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program involves two complementary activities: (1) development and application of cw ring dye laser absorption methods for sensitive detection of radical species and measurement of fundamental spectroscopic parameters at high temperatures; and (2) shock tube studies of reaction kinetics relevant to combustion. Species currently under investigation in the spectroscopic portion of the research include NO and CH{sub 3}; this has necessitated the continued operated at wavelengths in the range 210-230 nm. Shock tube studies of reaction kinetics currently are focussed on reactions involving CH{sub 3} radicals.

  12. Chemical and kinetic equilibrations via radiative parton transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Zhang; Warner A. Wortman

    2011-02-21

    A hot and dense partonic system can be produced in the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision. How it equilibrates is important for the extraction of Quark-Gluon Plasma properties. We study the chemical and kinetic equilibrations of the Quark-Gluon Plasma using a radiative transport model. Thermal and Color-Glass-Condensate motivated initial conditions are used. We observe that screened parton interactions always lead to partial pressure isotropization. Different initial pressure anisotropies result in the same asymptotic evolution. Comparison of evolutions with and without radiative processes shows that chemical equilibration interacts with kinetic equilibration and radiative processes can contribute significantly to pressure isotropization.

  13. Bifurcation in kinetic equation for interacting Fermi systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Morawetz

    2003-01-27

    The finite duration of collisions appear as time-nonlocality in the kinetic equation. Analyzing the corresponding quantum kinetic equation for dense interacting Fermi systems a delay differential equation is obtained which combines time derivatives with finite time stepping known from the logistic mapping. The responsible delay time is explicitly calculated and discussed. As a novel feature oscillations in the time evolution of the distribution function itself appear and bifurcations up to chaotic behavior can occur. The temperature and density conditions are presented where such oscillations and bifurcations arise indicating an onset of phase transition.

  14. Recent advances in the kinetics of oxygen reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adzic, R.

    1996-07-01

    Oxygen reduction is considered an important electrocatalytic reaction; the most notable need remains improvement of the catalytic activity of existing metal electrocatalysts and development of new ones. A review is given of new advances in the understanding of reaction kinetics and improvements of the electrocatalytic properties of some surfaces, with focus on recent studies of relationship of the surface properties to its activity and reaction kinetics. The urgent need is to improve catalytic activity of Pt and synthesize new, possibly non- noble metal catalysts. New experimental techniques for obtaining new level of information include various {ital in situ} spectroscopies and scanning probes, some involving synchrotron radiation. 138 refs, 18 figs, 2 tabs.

  15. UGA DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SUPPLEMENTAL GENERAL REQUIREMENTS & STANDARDS GENERAL UTILITIES REQUIREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    UGA DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SUPPLEMENTAL GENERAL REQUIREMENTS & STANDARDS GENERAL UTILITIES REQUIREMENTS JANUARY 16, 2015 33 00 001 33 00 00 GENERAL UTILITIES REQUIREMENTS 1. GENERAL A. Related sections: i. 01 41 26.02 ­ Utility Information & Locate ii. 23 05 19 ­ Meters and Gages iii

  16. On the measurement of kinetic temperature in high redshift galactic halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei A. Levshakov; Wilhelm W. Kegel

    1999-05-11

    We consider the deconvolution of the thermal and the turbulent profiles for a pair of ions with different atomic weights under the condition that the lines are formed in an absorbing medium with fluctuating density and velocity fields. Our method is based on the entropy-regularized minimization (ERM) procedure. From synthetic spectra we found that the CII and SiII lines can be used to estimate the mean (density weighted) kinetic temperature with a sufficiently high accuracy (of about 10%) in a rather wide range of the ionization parameter, -6 < log U < -2. This is a generalization of a previous result (Levshakov, Takahara and Agafonova 1999) where we did not account for density fluctuations.

  17. Communication: Kinetics of scavenging of small, nucleating clusters: First nucleation theorem and sum rules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malila, Jussi; McGraw, Robert; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.

    2015-01-07

    Despite recent advances in monitoring nucleation from a vapor at close-to-molecular resolution, the identity of the critical cluster, forming the bottleneck for the nucleation process, remains elusive. During past twenty years, the first nucleation theorem has been often used to extract the size of the critical cluster from nucleation rate measurements. However, derivations of the first nucleation theorem invoke certain questionable assumptions that may fail, e.g., in the case of atmospheric new particle formation, including absence of subcritical cluster losses and heterogeneous nucleation on pre-existing nanoparticles. Here we extend the kinetic derivation of the first nucleation theorem to give amore »general framework to include such processes, yielding sum rules connecting the size dependent particle formation and loss rates to the corresponding loss-free nucleation rate and the apparent critical size from a naďve application of the first nucleation theorem that neglects them.« less

  18. Time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for chemical kinetics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheps, Leonid; Chandler, David W.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental measurements of elementary reaction rate coefficients and product branching ratios are essential to our understanding of many fundamentally important processes in Combustion Chemistry. However, such measurements are often impossible because of a lack of adequate detection techniques. Some of the largest gaps in our knowledge concern some of the most important radical species, because their short lifetimes and low steady-state concentrations make them particularly difficult to detect. To address this challenge, we propose a novel general detection method for gas-phase chemical kinetics: time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (TR-BB-CEAS). This all-optical, non-intrusive, multiplexed method enables sensitive direct probing of transient reaction intermediates in a simple, inexpensive, and robust experimental package.

  19. Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Components and Mixtures under Engine Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Curran, H J

    2010-01-11

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, an improved version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multicomponent gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines (3-50 atm, 650-1200K, stoichiometric fuel/air mixtures). Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  20. A passive THz video camera based on lumped element kinetic inductance detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowe, Sam; Doyle, Simon; Dunscombe, Chris; Hargrave, Peter; Papageorgio, Andreas; Wood, Ken; Ade, Peter A R; Barry, Peter; Bideaud, Aurélien; Brien, Tom; Dodd, Chris; Grainger, William; House, Julian; Mauskopf, Philip; Moseley, Paul; Spencer, Locke; Sudiwala, Rashmi; Tucker, Carole; Walker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a passive 350 GHz (850 {\\mu}m) video-camera to demonstrate lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) -- designed originally for far-infrared astronomy -- as an option for general purpose terrestrial terahertz imaging applications. The camera currently operates at a quasi-video frame rate of 2 Hz with a noise equivalent temperature difference per frame of $\\sim$0.1 K, which is close to the background limit. The 152 element superconducting LEKID array is fabricated from a simple 40 nm aluminum film on a silicon dielectric substrate and is read out through a single microwave feedline with a cryogenic low noise amplifier and room temperature frequency domain multiplexing electronics.