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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

A general kinetic model: Kinetics and atomic-scale mechanisms of feldspar dissolution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a general kinetic model and its application to feldspar dissolution. In the framework of Monte Carlo methods, the model simulates the stochastic… (more)

Zhang, Li

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Exposure chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

Moss, Owen R. (Kennewick, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Band-trap capture and emission in the generalized kinetic theory of electrons and holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the applications. These assumptions amount to discard the kinetic equation for phonons, and to replace np The Boltzmann Equation and its Applications (New York: Springer Verlag). [8] Spiga G 1992 On extended kinetic theory with chemical reaction Nonlinear Kinetic Theory and Mathematical Aspects of Hyperbolic Systems ed

Spiga, Giampiero

4

Wire chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

Atac, Muzaffer (Wheaton, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

IONIZATION CHAMBER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

1958-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ionization chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

Walenta, Albert H. (Port Jefferson Station, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Balance of Kinetic and Total Energy Simulated by the OSU Two-Level Atmospheric General Circulation Model for January and July  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The horizontal structure of the balances of kinetic energy and total energy simulated by the Oregon State University (OSU) two-level atmospheric general circulation model are studied for January and July on the basis of a three-year simulation ...

Jough-Tai Wang; Jeong-Woo Kim; W. Lawrence Gates

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Chamber propagation  

SciTech Connect

Propagation of a heavy ion beam to the target appears possible under conditions thought to be realizable by several reactor designs. Beam quality at the lens is believed to provide adequate intensity at the target -- but the beam must pass through chamber debris and its self fields along the way. This paper reviews present consensus on propagation modes and presents recent results on the effects of photoionization of the beam ions by thermal x-rays from the heated target. Ballistic propagation through very low densities is a conservative mode. The more-speculative self-pinched mode, at 1 to 10 Torr, offers reactor advantages and is being re-examined by others. 13 refs.

Langdon, B.

1991-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

Glossary Term - Cloud Chamber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ceres Previous Term (Ceres) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Composition of the Earth's Atmosphere) Composition of the
Earth's Atmosphere Cloud Chamber A cloud chamber showing the...

10

A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing NE equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-NE kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

Zhang, Fan [ORNL; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh [University of Central Florida, Orlando; Parker, Jack C [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Pace, Molly [ORNL; Kim, Young Jin [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

A Comparison of Baroclinic Instability with the Time Variations of Kinetic Energy in a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flow generated by a general circulation model is zonally averaged at 1-day intervals, and, for each of the axisymmetric flows obtained, the linear growth-rate spectrum for baroclinic waves is computed using a linear model. The time sequence ...

Robert Walko; Robert Gall

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

A Generalized Biomass Pyrolysis Model Based on Superimposed Cellulose, IIemi-CCIIU1OSC and Lignin Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper is to present a model for the numerical simulation of macro-particle of general of the is to predict pyrolysis yields associated with "typical" biomass samples. Potential alterations necessary to account for mineral and moisture content pressure arc postponed for future work. A ncw based on superimposed CC1IU1OSC,

R. S. Miller; J. Bellan; I. Ignin Kinetics; J. Bj. An; Jd Iyqmlsion; Greek Syqbols

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hupmobile cloud chamber parameters  

SciTech Connect

The accompanying table lists the presently selected parameters for the twelve cloud chambers. The chambers are numbered consecutively from 4 through 15 as they are lined up in the bunker. The lowest number is closest to the source. All except the first chamber have some thin metal filters to attenuate the flux and harden the spectrum. Cloud chambers 10, 12, and 14 are shielded by a collimator with about 200 pinholes in it. The flux in these chambers is attenuated by the ratio of the pinhole area to total beam area which is a factor of 50. Various gases and gas pressures are used to obtain suitable track lengths and interaction cross sections. Neon, argon, and krypton are used to obtain photo electrons. Hydrogen is used to obtain Compton electrons.

Hansen, N. E.

1967-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

14

The Environmental Chamber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 The Environmental Chamber Al Hodgson and Richard Allen test methyl chloride exposures using the environmental chamber. On the second floor of an unremarkable building at LBL, researchers are using a room within a room to smoke out indoor air pollutants. The environmental chamber is a stainless-steel-lined room of 540 ft cubed (20 meters cubed) which can be operated in several ways to meet the needs of different research projects, including studies for which a very low background is required. Scientists of the Indoor Environment Program and their collaborators use the chamber as a controlled indoor environment to study the behavior of a variety of indoor pollutants ranging from cigarette smoke to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from new carpets. At the moment, four projects use the facility. Principal investigator Al

15

Sleeve reaction chamber system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Beeman, Barton V. (San Mateo, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Hadley, Dean R. (Manteca, CA); Landre, Phoebe (Livermore, CA); Lehew, Stacy L. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA)

2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

16

Kinetic equilibrium and relativistic thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relativistic thermodynamics is treated from the point of view of kinetic theory. It is shown that the generalized J\\"uttner distribution suggested in [1] is compatible with kinetic equilibrium. The requirement of compatibility of kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium reveals several generalizations of the Gibbs relation where the velocity field is an independent thermodynamic variable.

Ván, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Kinetic equilibrium and relativistic thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relativistic thermodynamics is treated from the point of view of kinetic theory. It is shown that the generalized J\\"uttner distribution suggested in [1] is compatible with kinetic equilibrium. The requirement of compatibility of kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium reveals several generalizations of the Gibbs relation where the velocity field is an independent thermodynamic variable.

P. Ván

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

CALCULATION OF PULSED KICKER MAGNETIC FIELD ATTENUATION INSIDE BEAM CHAMBERS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CALCULATION OF PULSED KICKER MAGNETIC FIELD ATTENUATION CALCULATION OF PULSED KICKER MAGNETIC FIELD ATTENUATION INSIDE BEAM CHAMBERS S. H. Kim January 8, 2001 1. Introduction and Summary The ceramic beam chambers in the sections of the kicker magnets for the beam injection and extraction in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are made of alumina. The inner surface of the ceramic chamber is coated with a conductive paste. The choice of coating thickness is intended to reduce the shielding of the pulsed kicker magnetic field while containing the electromagnetic fields due to the beam bunches inside the chamber, and minimize the Ohmic heating due to the fields on the chamber [1]. The thin coating generally does not give a uniform surface resistivity for typical dimensions of the ceramic chambers in use. The chamber cross section is a circular or

19

Photo of Spray Combustion Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Spray Combustion Chamber. NIST, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Material Measurement Laboratory, ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Miniature reaction chamber and devices incorporating same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to miniaturized devices for carrying out and controlling chemical reactions and analyses. In particular, the present invention provides devices which have miniature temperature controlled reaction chambers for carrying out a variety of synthetic and diagnostic applications, such as PCR amplification, nucleic acid hybridization, chemical labeling, nucleic acid fragmentation and the like.

Mathies, Richard A. (Moraga, CA); Woolley, Adam T. (Albany, CA)

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Improved wire chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

Atac, M.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

22

Multi-chamber deposition system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

Jacobson, Richard L. (Roseville, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (Shoreview, MN); Westerberg, Roger K. (Cottage Grove, MN)

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

23

Multi-chamber deposition system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

Jacobson, Richard L. (Roseville, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (Shoreview, MN); Westerberg, Roger K. (Cottage Grove, MN)

1989-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

24

Three chamber negative ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA); Hiskes, John R. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

CONTINUOUSLY SENSITIVE BUBBLE CHAMBER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector of the bubble chamber class is described which is continuously sensitive and which does not require the complex pressure cycling equipment characteristic of prior forms of the chamber. The radiation sensitive element is a gas-saturated liquid and means are provided for establishing a thermal gradient across a region of the liquid. The gradient has a temperature range including both the saturation temperature of the liquid and more elevated temperatures. Thus a supersaturated zone is created in which ionizing radiations may give rise to visible gas bubbles indicative of the passage of the radiation through the liquid. Additional means are provided for replenishing the supply of gas-saturated liquid to maintaincontinuous sensitivity.

Good, R.H.

1959-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

26

Argus target chamber  

SciTech Connect

A target chamber for application in the laser fusion program must satisfy some very basic requirements. (1) Provide a vacuum on the order of 10$sup -6$ torr. (2) Support a microscopically small target in a fixed point in space and verify its location within 5 micrometers. (3) Contain an adjustable beam focusing system capable of delivering a number of laser beams onto the target simultaneously, both in time and space. (4) Provide access for diagnostics to evaluate the results of target irradiation. (5) Have flexibility to allow changes in targets, focusing optics and number of beams. The ARGUS laser which is now under construction at LLL will have a target chamber which meets these requirements in a simple economic manner. The chamber and auxiliary equipment are described, with reference to two double beam focusing systems; namely, lenses and ellipsoidal mirrors. Provision is made for future operation with four beams, using ellipsoidal mirrors for two-sided illumination and lens systems for tetragonal and tetrahedral irradiation. (auth)

Rienecker, F. Jr.; Glaros, S.S.; Kobierecki, M.

1975-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

27

Vertical two chamber reaction furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

Blaugher, R.D.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

28

Multi-anode ionization chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Smith, Graham (Port Jefferson, NY); Mahler, George J. (Rocky Point, NY); Vanier, Peter E. (Setauket, NY)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

29

Application of chemical kinetic modeling to improve design and performance criteria for a practical incineration system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this study, detailed thermo-chemical kinetics with networked ideal reactor model were applied to simulate a practical combustion system -the Secondary Combustion Chamber (SCC) of… (more)

Bass, Jr., Charles A.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

HVAC&R Equipment Environmental Chambers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with relative humidity controlled within ±2 %. Small Appliance and Refrigerator Chamber. This chamber is used to test small ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

A MODIFIED LUNDEGARDH SPRAY CHAMBER  

SciTech Connect

Operation of an apparatus for analysis of solutions by the Lundegardh flame technique was greatiy facilituted by the modification of a spray chamber. Samples can be introduced and removed from the modified spray chamber without extinguishing the flame or dismantling the assembly. (auth)

Palin, P.C.

1951-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

LRL 25-inch Bubble Chamber  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The recently completed 25-inch hydrogen bubble chamber combines excellent picture quality with a fast operating cycle. The chamber has a unique optical system and is designed to take several pictures each Bevatron pulse, in conjunction with the Bevatron rapid beam ejection system.

Alvarez, L. W.; Gow, J. D.; Barrera, F.; Eckman, G.; Shand, J.; Watt, R.; Norgren, D.; Hernandez, H. P.

1964-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

33

National Ignition Facility Target Chamber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was necessary to achieve the overall schedule. Plans had to be developed for the precise location and alignment of laser beam ports. Upon completion of the fabrication of the aluminum target chamber in a temporary structure the 130 ton sphere was moved from the temporary construction enclosure to its final location in the target building. Prior to the installation of a concrete shield and after completion of the welding of the chamber penetrations vacuum leak checking was performed to insure the vacuum integrity of target chamber. The entire spherical chamber external surface supports a 40 cm thick reinforced concrete shield after installation in the target building. The final task is a total survey of the laser ports and the contour machining of spacer plates so that laser devices attached to these ports meet the alignment criteria.

Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

34

Application of Ice Nucleation Kinetics in Orographic Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice nucleation by silver iodide-sodium iodide aerosol particles has been characterized in the Colorado State University isothermal cloud chamber using the techniques of chemical kinetics. Two separate mechanisms of condensation-freezing ice ...

Rochelle R. Blumenstein; Robert M. Rauber; Lewis O. Grant; William G. Finnegan

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Humidity effects in ionization chambers  

SciTech Connect

Capacitance variations due to humidity alterations have been suggested as the cause of ionization chamber current variations. The validity of the arguments is seriously questioned on several points. (auth)

Bengtsson, L.G.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Light diffusing fiber optic chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

Maitland, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Plasma chemistry in wire chambers  

SciTech Connect

The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

Wise, J.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The TESLA Time Projection Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large Time Projection Chamber is proposed as part of the tracking system for a detector at the TESLA electron positron linear collider. Different ongoing R&D studies are reviewed, stressing progress made on a new type readout technique based on Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors.

Nabil Ghodbane

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

39

Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

40

AN IONIZATION CHAMBER LAUNDRY MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

The determination of the amount of contamination remaining on a garment after it has been washed is an important part of hot laundry operations. In the past garments were monitored by measuring the contamination concentrated in the crotch with a GM tube probe. This type of spot check does not detect any isolated hot spots on other pants of the garment. To monitor the entire garment with a GM tube instrument is excessively time consuming for a large number of garments. To overcome these difficulties a sensitive, large-volume ionization chamber was constructed. It is rectangular in shape, 5 ft high by 2 1/2 ft wide by 4 in. deep. The center electrode is of a grid type and is mounted halfway between the front window and the back of the chamber. In a 0.5-mr/hr field, 180 v is sufficient to saturate toe chamber. In order to insure beta sensitivity, the front window has an equivalent thickness of approximately 7 mg/cm/sup 2/. The measuring device is a line-operated electrometer circuit equipped with an alarm that may be set at the rejection limit for the type of garment being monitored. A fullscale deflection on the most sensitive range is given by 2 to 3 mu C of liquid mixed fission products deposited on a garment. Since the chamber monitors the entire garment, the results are independent of the location of the contarnination. In practice, garments may be monitored at the rate of 7 per min, while only 3 per min may be completely checked with a GM tube probs. Field tests indicate that this instrument is stable and trouble free. Background causes a meter deflection of about 20 divisions, which is low enough to give reliable accuracy for monitoring garments. (auth)

Chester, J.D.; Handloser, J.S.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Chamber Comments on Cybersecurity Green Paper Final  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Using security disclosure as an incentive,” its authors ... The Chamber noted that incentives would prove more productive than regulation. ...

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

42

Noise Analysis of Statham Temperature Chamber  

SciTech Connect

A procedure is described to subdue the noise made by the LN2 control valve on a Statham Temperature Chamber.

Mielke, R. L.

1973-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Kinetic Economies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a minimalist kinetic model for economies. A system of agents with local trading rules display emergent demand behaviour. We examine the resulting wealth distribution to look for non-thermal behaviour. We compare and contrast this model with other similar models.

Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Nonlinear effects in kinetic resolutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of nonlinear effects in the asymmetric catalysis of kinetic resolutions is analyzed. It is found with minimal assumptions that the kinetics of homocompetitive reactions should apply generally to kinetic resolutions involving partially resolved catalysts, and this is supported by experimental observations with the Jacobsen hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of epoxides. The criterion for a nonlinear effect in asymmetric catalysis--a nonlinear correlation between the enantiomeric excess in a choral ligand and the product enantiomeric excess obtained from a reaction--is examined. The nonlinear effect idea is found to be generalizable to kinetic resolutions and other reactions by replacing consideration of the product enantiomeric excess with the quantity (k[]/k[]-1)/(k[]/k[]+1), a differential kinetic enantiomeric enhancement (DKEE). A nonlinear effect may then be defined by a nonlinear correlation between the DKEE and the chiral ligand enantiomeric excess. The application of these ideas to previously reported kinetic resolutions of sulfoxides and to nonlinear effects in the Jacobsen HKR is described. Relatively small nonlinear effects in kinetic resolutions are sufficient to obtain large asymmetric amplifications. A catalyst modification in the Jacobsen HKR also allows for the development of a novel recyclable system for the iterative enhancement of optical activity.

Johnson, Derrell W.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Georges Charpak, Particle Detectors, and Multiwire Chambers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Georges Charpak, Particle Detectors, and Multiwire Chambers Georges Charpak, Particle Detectors, and Multiwire Chambers Resources with Additional Information · Patents Georges Charpak Courtesy of CERN Nobel laureate Georges Charpak [was] a pioneer in the art and science of particle detection ... . [He] developed a host of particle detectors used throughout experimental particle physics. In 1968, he invented and developed the first multiwire proportional chamber, for which he won the [Physics] Nobel Prize in 1992 ... . The multiwire chamber differed from earlier detectors in the speed with which it could record particle tracks from a collision-millions per second, rather than one or two per second for bubble chambers. The speed of the multiwire chamber and its successor technologies, along with their extraordinary precision, led to a revolution in particle physics ... . The technology that Charpak pioneered also finds applications in medicine and industry.

46

Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

Maniscalco, James A. (Danville, CA); Meier, Wayne R. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

On the property of measurements with the PTW microLion chamber in continuous beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The performance of liquid ionization chambers, which may prove to be useful tools in the field of radiation dosimetry, is based on several chamber and liquid specific characteristics. The present work investigates the performance of the PTW microLion liquid ionization chamber with respect to recombination losses and perturbations from ambient electric fields at various dose rates in continuous beams. Methods: In the investigation, experiments were performed using two microLion chambers, containing isooctane (C{sub 8}H{sub 18}) and tetramethylsilane [Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}] as the sensitive media, and a NACP-02 monitor chamber. An initial activity of approximately 250 GBq {sup 18}F was employed as the radiation source in the experiments. The initial dose rate in each measurement series was estimated to 1.0 Gy min{sup -1} by Monte Carlo simulations and the measurements were carried out during the decay of the radioactive source. In the investigation of general recombination losses, employing the two-dose-rate method for continuous beams, the liquid ionization chambers were operated at polarizing voltages 25, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 300 V. Furthermore, measurements were also performed at 500 V polarizing voltage in the investigation of the sensitivity of the microLion chamber to ambient electric fields. Results: The measurement results from the liquid ionization chambers, corrected for general recombination losses according to the two-dose-rate method for continuous beams, had a good agreement with the signal to dose linearity from the NACP-02 monitor chamber for general collection efficiencies above 70%. The results also displayed an agreement with the theoretical collection efficiencies according to the Greening theory, except for the liquid ionization chamber containing isooctane operated at 25 V. At lower dose rates, perturbations from ambient electric fields were found in the microLion chamber measurement results. Due to the perturbations, measurement results below an estimated dose rate of 0.2 Gy min{sup -1} were excluded from the present investigation of the general collection efficiency. The perturbations were found to be more pronounced when the chamber polarizing voltage was increased. Conclusions: By using the two-dose-rate method for continuous beams, comparable corrected ionization currents from experiments in low and medium energy photon beams can be achieved. However, the valid range of general collection efficiencies has been found to vary in a comparison between experiments performed in continuous beams of 120 kVp x ray, and the present investigation of 511 keV annihilation photons. At very high dose rates in continuous beams, there are presently no methods that can be used to correct for general recombination losses and at low dose rates the microLion chamber may be perturbed by ambient electric fields. Increasing the chamber polarizing voltage, which diminishes the general recombination effect, was found to increase the microLion chamber sensitivity to ambient electric fields. Prudence is thus advised when employing the microLion chamber in radiation dosimetry, as ambient electric fields of the strength observed in the present work may be found in many common situations. Due to uncertainties in the theoretical basis for recombination losses in liquids, further studies on the underlying theories for the initial and general recombination effect are needed if liquid ionization chambers are to become a viable option in high precision radiation dosimetry.

Andersson, Jonas; Johansson, Erik; Toelli, Heikki [Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, Umea University, SE-901 85 Umea (Sweden); Swedish Defense Research Agency, FOI CBRN Defense and Security, SE-901 82 Umea (Sweden); Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, Umea University, SE-901 85 Umea (Sweden)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Insitu Oxygen Conduction Into Internal Combustion Chamber  

Insitu Oxygen Conduction Into Internal Combustion Chamber Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

49

The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber  

SciTech Connect

We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 {mu}m spatial resolution and <1000 {mu}m track-pair resolution in pressurized CO{sub 2} gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO{sub 2} mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.; Hayes, K.; Hoard, C.; Hower, N.; Hutchinson, D.; Jaros, J.A.; Koetke, D.; Kowalski, L.A.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

General Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indium Recovery from Discarded Light Emitting Diode (LED) Liquid Cristal Display (LCD) TVs: Influence of Leaching Reagents · Kinetic Study of Acid Copper ...

51

IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou chamber technology testing program in NIF involoving: criteria for evaluation prior to NIF testing were addressed in this paper. In order to maximize the benefits of testing program

Abdou, Mohamed

52

High Accuracy, Two-Dimensional Read-Out in Multiwire Proportional Chambers  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

In most applications of proportional chambers, especially in high-energy physics, separate chambers are used for measuring different coordinates. In general one coordinate is obtained by recording the pulses from the anode wires around which avalanches have grown. Several methods have been imagined for obtaining the position of an avalanche along a wire. In this article a method is proposed which leads to the same range of accuracies and may be preferred in some cases. The problem of accurate measurements for large-size chamber is also discussed.

Charpak, G.; Sauli, F.

1973-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ionization-chamber smoke detector system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system is designed to reduce false alarms caused by fluctuations in ambient temperature. Means are provided for periodically firing the gas discharge triode and each time recording the triggering voltage required. A computer compares each triggering voltage with its predecessor. The computer is programmed to energize an alarm if the difference between the two compared voltages is a relatively large value indicative of particulates in the measuring chamber and to disregard smaller differences typically resulting from changes in ambient temperature.

Roe, Robert F. (Jackson, OH)

1976-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

54

RADIATION MONITOR CONTAINING TWO CONCENTRIC IONIZATION CHAMBERS AND MEANS FOR INSULATING THE SEPARATE CHAMBERS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a portable radiation monitor containing two concentric ionization chambers which permit the use of standard charging and reading devices. It is particularly adapted as a personnel x-ray dosimeter and to this end comprises a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an inner energy dependent chamber, a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an outer energy independent chamber, and polymeric insulation means which insulates said chambers from each other and holds the chambers together with exposed connections in a simple, trouble-free, and compact assembly substantially without variation in directional response. (AEC)

Braestrup, C.B.; Mooney, R.T.

1964-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

55

Commissioning of SLAC SLD 45-Degree Chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center had a significant gap in its muon tracking coverage, provided by the Warm Iron Calorimeter. Supplemental planes of limited streamer tube chambers were added to improve the coverage in the vicinity of the gap at 0.65 commissioning of the forty-five degree chamber region of the SLAC SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter is presented. This task involved the completion of the forty-five degree chamber region geometry for the Warm Iron Calorimeter's fitter and swimmer and the changing of the way multiple scattering effects are treated in the fitter algorithm.

V. O. Eschenburg

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

General Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video Business Small Business General Information General...

57

A TIME PROJECTION CHAMBER DIGITIZER TEST SYSTEM USING A MICROCOMPUTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. Nygren, "The Time Projection Chamber", Physics Today, pp.out System for the Time Projection Chamber", IEEE Trans.on Nuclear Science A TIME PROJECTION CHAMBER DIGITIZER TEST

Nunnally, Curtis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Plasma Kinetic Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Theory / Proceedings of the Ninth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

B. Weyssow

59

Very high intensity reaction chamber design  

SciTech Connect

The problem of achieving very high intensity irradiation by light in minimal regions was studied. Three types of irradiation chamber are suggested: the common laser-reaction chamber, the folded concentric or near-concentric resonator, and the asymmetric confocal resonator. In all designs the ratio of high-intensity illuminated volume to other volume is highly dependent (to the $sup 3$/$sub 2$ power) on the power and fluence tolerances of optical elements, primarily mirrors. Optimization of energy coupling is discussed for the common cavity. For the concentric cavities, optimization for both coherent and incoherent beams is treated. Formulae and numerical examples give the size of chambers, aspect ratios, maximum pass number, image sizes, fluences, and the like. Similarly for the asymmetric confocal chamber, formulae and numerical examples for fluences, dimensions, losses, and totally contained pass numbers are given. (auth)

Devaney, J.J.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Searches for charmed particles using bubble chambers  

SciTech Connect

Searches for charm particle production using bubble chambers are summarized. These searches depend on the detection of neutral strange particles. Upper limits are given for the different charmed mass regions and methods of search. (auth)

Harris, R.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Automated Soil Gas Monitoring Chamber - Oak Ridge National ...  

Automated Soil Gas Monitoring Chamber ... A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural

62

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

63

The BaBar Drift Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The central drift chamber for the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory at SLAC is a cylindrical chamber with a length of 280 cm and outer radius of 81 cm. It consists of 40 layers of small hexagonal cells arranged in 10 axial and stereo super-layers. In order to minimize multiple scattering, light materials are used for the mechanical structure, and the gas mixture is Helium based. The pulse-height and timing electronics are mounted directly on the chamber rear end-plate. A full length prototype of the BaBar drift chamber has been built. The analysis of cosmic ray events measures the spatial resolution averaged in the cell to be 130 m and the dE/dx resolution to be 6.8%, meeting the performance goals for the BaBar central tracker. The mechanical assembly and stringing of the chamber was completed in December 1997 and the detector will be integrated into BaBar during summer 1998. 1

G. Sciolla

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Kinetic Energy and the Equivalence Principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the general theory of relativity, kinetic energy contributes to gravitational mass. Surprisingly, the observational evidence for this prediction does not seem to be discussed in the literature. I reanalyze existing experimental data to test the equivalence principle for the kinetic energy of atomic electrons, and show that fairly strong limits on possible violations can be obtained. I discuss the relationship of this result to the occasional claim that ``light falls with twice the acceleration of ordinary matter.''

S. Carlip

1999-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

65

Plasma Kinetic Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Basic and Kinetic Theory / Proceedings of the Tenth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

B. Weyssow

66

Computational Thermodynamics and Kinetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... About this Symposium. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Computational Thermodynamics and Kinetics.

67

Chapter 13. Chemical Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of chemical reactions. · Only gases, for which the kinetic theory of Chapter 4 is applicable, are consideredChapter 13. Chemical Kinetics #12;· Why do some chemical reactions proceed with lighting speed when the way in which molecules combine to form products? · All of these questions involve chemical kinetics

Ihee, Hyotcherl

68

Modeling and Simulation of 1025t/h CFBB Combustion Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper takes CFBB as simulating object, which has characters of DG1025/17.4-II1 two legs furnace and with external heat exchanger. Combined with thermal process and combustion chamber working characteristics of practical unit, a general dynamic model ... Keywords: CFB, combustion, modeling, simulation

Chang-liang Liu; Yuan-liang Ma; Lin Chen

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Amplifier Design for Proportional Ionization Chambers  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the requirements of a nuclear amplifier of short resolving time, designed to accept pulses of widely varying amplitudes. Data are given which show that a proportional ionization chamber loaded with a 1,000-ohm resistor develops pulses of 0.5 microsecond duration and several volts amplitude. Results indicate that seven basic requirements are imposed on the amplifier when counting soft beta and gamma radiation in the presence of alpha particles, without absorbers. It should, (1) have a fast recovery time, (2) have a relatively good low frequency response, (3) accept pulses of widely varying heights without developing spurious pulsed, (4) have a limiting output stage, (5) preserve the inherently short rise time of the chamber, (6) minimize pulse integration, and (7) have sufficient gain to detect the weak pulses well below the chamber voltage at which continuous discharge takes place. The results obtained with an amplifier which meets these requirements is described. A formula is derived which indicates that redesign of the proportional ionization chamber might eliminate the need for an amplifier. This may be possible if the radioactive particles are collimated parallel to the collecting electrode.

Baker, W. H.

1950-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

70

General Engineers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

General Engineers General Engineers The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the General Engineer, whose work is associated with analytical studies and evaluation projects pertaining to the operations of the energy industry. Responsibilities: General Engineers perform or participate in one or more of the following important functions: * Design modeling systems to represent energy markets and the physical properties of energy industries * Conceive, initiate, monitor and/or conduct planning and evaluation projects and studies of continuing and future

71

Development of bakelite based Resistive Plate Chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Comparative study has been performed on Resistive Plate Chambers made of different grades of bakelite paper laminates, produced and commercially available in India. The chambers, operated in the streamer mode using argon : tetrafluroethane : isobutane in 34:59:7 mixing ratio, are tested with cosmic rays for the efficiency and the stability with cosmic rays. A particular grade of bakelite (P-120, NEMA LI-1989 Grade XXX), used for high voltage insulation in humid conditions, was found to give satisfactory performance with stable efficiency of > 96% continuously for more than 110 days. A silicone treatment of the inner surfaces of the bakelite RPC is found to be necessary for operation of the detector.

S. Biswas; S. Bhattacharya; S. Bose; S. Chattopadhyay; S. Saha; M. K. Sharan; Y. P. Viyogi

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

72

ILLUMINATION OF 80-INCH BUBBLE CHAMBER  

SciTech Connect

A cylindrical condensing system whose geometry allows light to be collected along the length of narrow tubular sources and to pass through a restricted port area is used. The quantity of light collected is many times that possible to obtain with axially symmetric lenses. The optical arrangement is described. Other unique features include the use of plano reilectors to extend optically the flash tube and condenser lengths and the provision of a spot plate to eliminate surface reflections from the chamber window. (auth)

Rosin, S.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Computational Thermodynamics and Kinetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Comprehensive Investigation of Low Angle Grain Boundary Mobility in Pure Al ... A New Treatment for the Kinetics of Isothermal Oxidation of Zinc Powders.

74

Structure and Kinetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... Materials Science in Reduced Gravity: Structure and Kinetics ... Bias fields comprise weak interface energy sources that result from the vector ...

75

Sources of Eddy Kinetic Energy in the Labrador Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments with a suite of North Atlantic general circulation models are used to examine the sources of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in the Labrador Sea. A high-resolution model version (112°) quantitatively reproduces the observed signature. A ...

Carsten Eden; Claus Böning

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Vacuum chamber with a supersonic flow aerodynamic window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supersonic flow aerodynamic window, whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

Hanson, Clark L. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Vacuum chamber with a supersonic-flow aerodynamic window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supersonic flow aerodynamic window is disclosed whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

Hanson, C.L.

1980-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

78

Vacuum chamber for containing particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vacuum chamber for containing a charged particle beam in a rapidly changing magnetic environment comprises a ceramic pipe with conducting strips oriented along the longitudinal axis of the pipe and with circumferential conducting bands oriented perpendicular to the longitudinal axis but joined with a single longitudinal electrical connection. When both strips and bands are on the outside of the ceramic pipe, insulated from each other, a high-resistance conductive layer such as nickel can be coated on the inside of the pipe.

Harvey, A.

1985-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

General Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASD General Information ASD General Information APS Resources & Information A list of useful links for APS staff and users. APS Technical Publications Links to APS technical publications. APS Publications Database The official and comprehensive source of references for APS-related journal articles, conference papers, book chapters, dissertations, abstracts, awards, invited talks, etc. Image Library A collection of APS images. Responsibilities & Interfaces for APS Technical Systems Descriptions of the responsibilities of APS technical groups and how they interface with one another. APS Procedures Operational procedures for the APS. APS Specifications Specifications and approvals for upgrades or changes to existing APS hardware and software. APS Radiation Safety Policy & Procedures Committee Minutes

80

A unified moving grid gas-kinetic method in Eulerian space for viscous flow computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under a generalized coordinate transformation with arbitrary grid velocity, the gas-kinetic BGK equation is reformulated in a moving frame of reference. Then, a unified conservative gas-kinetic scheme is developed for the viscous flow computation in ... Keywords: 65M06, 76P05, 76T05, Gas-kinetic scheme, Moving grid, Navier-Stokes equations, Unified coordinate system

Changqiu Jin; Kun Xu

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive general kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation that describe certain features of the morphogenesis of biological colonies (like bacteria, amoebae, endothelial cells or social insects). Starting from a stochastic model defined in terms of N coupled Langevin equations, we derive a nonlinear mean field Fokker-Planck equation governing the evolution of the distribution function of the system in phase space. By taking the successive moments of this kinetic equation and using a local thermodynamic equilibrium condition, we derive a set of hydrodynamic equations involving a damping term. In the limit of small frictions, we obtain a hyperbolic model describing the formation of network patterns (filaments) and in the limit of strong frictions we obtain a parabolic model which is a generalization of the standard Keller-Segel model describing the formation of clusters (clumps). Our approach connects and generalizes several models introduced in the chemotactic literature. We discuss the anal...

Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Thermodynamic and Kinetic Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 11, 2012... capability of the coating and thus the achievable engine efficiency. ... Aluminide coating of steels enables more efficient power generation through ... and kinetic modeling in order to build a time and temperature dependent ...

83

Thermodynamic & Kinetic Data for Sustainable Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic & Kinetic Data for Sustainable Energy. Summary: Industry needs thermodynamic and kinetic data for the ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Chemical kinetic modelling of hydrocarbon ignition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical kinetic modeling of hydrocarbon ignition is discussed with reference to a range of experimental configurations, including shock tubes, detonations, pulse combustors, static reactors, stirred reactors and internal combustion engines. Important conditions of temperature, pressure or other factors are examined to determine the main chemical reaction sequences responsible for chain branching and ignition, and kinetic factors which can alter the rate of ignition are identified. Hydrocarbon ignition usually involves complex interactions between physical and chemical factors, and it therefore is a suitable and often productive subject for computer simulations. In most of the studies to be discussed below, the focus of the attention is placed on the chemical features of the system. The other physical parts of each application are generally included in the form of initial or boundary conditions to the chemical kinetic parts of the problem, as appropriate for each type of application being addressed.

Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.; Curran, H.J.; Gaffuri, P.; Marinov, N.M.

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

85

Dielectric liquid ionization chambers for detecting fast neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three ionization chambers with different geometries have been constructed and filled with dielectric liquids for detection of fast neutrons. The three dielectric liquids studied were Tetramethylsilane (TMS), Tetramethylpentane ...

Boyd, Erin M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The hydrogen bubble chamber and the strange resonances  

SciTech Connect

The author's recollections of his experience in the use of bubble chambers and the discoveries of strange resonances are given. (LEW)

Alvarez, L.W.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

DOSIMETRY, INSTRUMENTATION AND EXPOSURE CHAMBERS FOR DC MAGNETIC HELD STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. -K. Yen ENGINEERING AND INSTRUMENTATION C. Dols D. NelsonLaboratory DOSIMETRY, INSTRUMENTATION AND EXPOSURE CHAMBERSLBL-9554 DOSIMETRY, INSTRUMENTATION AND EXPOSURE CHAMBERS

Tenforde, T.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The hydrogen bubble chamber and the strange resonances  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The author's recollections of his experience in the use of bubble chambers and the discoveries of strange resonances are given. (LEW)

Alvarez, L.W.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Luis Alvarez, the Hydrogen Bubble Chamber, Tritium, and Dinosaurs  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Luis Alvarez, the Hydrogen Bubble Chamber, Tritium, and Dinosaurs Resources with Additional Information Patents Luis Alvarez Courtesy Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 'Luis...

90

China New Energy Chamber of Commerce CNECC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China Zip 100052 Product A Chinese non-profit membership organization specializing in new energy industry, which is supervised by Chinese National Chamber of Commerce. References...

91

NIF Target Chamber Dedicated | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NIF Target Chamber Dedicated NIF Target...

92

Inspector General  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of the Under Secretary for Nuclear Security Edward B. Held (Acting) Under Secretary for Nuclear Security DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of the Under Secretary for Management & Performance Vacant Under Secretary for Management and Performance Office of the Under Secretary for Science & Energy Vacant Under Secretary for Science and Energy Southwestern Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration U.S. Energy Information Administration Loan Programs Office Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy General Counsel Assistant Secretary for Congressional & Intergovernmental Affairs Chief Human Capital Officer

93

General Category  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sunrise and Sunset Visual Differences Sunrise and Sunset Visual Differences Name: Joey Status: other Grade: other Country: Canada Date: Spring 2012 Question: It seems that sunrise and sunset don't look symmetric. I mean that sunsets tend to have much redder skies and sunrise is usually a bit gloomier. If you see a picture, many times you can tell if its sunrise or sunset, even though I would think they should like identical, except that the sun is either going up or going down. Why do they not appear the same but in reverse? Replies: Funny you should ask as a paper just arrived which is sure to have the answer and I will read it now....... OK, the morning sky, and the sky in general, is blue due to Rayleigh scattering [which affects short wavelengths the most] of the sun light by air molecules and other microscopic particles.

94

Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Improving the performance and fuel consumption of dual chamber stratified charge spark ignition engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the nature of the combustion processes in a dual chamber stratified charge spark ignition engine is described. This work concentrated on understanding the mixing process in the main chamber gases. A specially constructed single cylinder engine was used to both conduct experiments to study mixing effects and to obtain experimental data for the validation of the computer model which was constructed in the theoretical portion of the study. The test procedures are described. Studies were conducted on the effect of fuel injection timing on performance and emissions using the combination of orifice size and prechamber to main chamber flow rate ratio which gave the best overall compromise between emissions and performance. In general, fuel injection gave slightly higher oxides of nitrogen, but considerably lower hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions than the carbureted form of the engine. Experiments with engine intake port redesign to promote swirl mixing indicated a substantial increase in the power output from the engine and, that an equivalent power levels, the nitric oxide emissions are approximately 30% lower with swirl in the main chamber than without swirl. The development of a computer simulation of the combustion process showed that a one-dimensional combustion model can be used to accurately predict trends in engine operation conditions and nitric oxide emissions even though the actual flame in the engine is not completely one-dimensional, and that a simple model for mixing of the main chamber and prechamber intake gases at the start of compression proved adequate to explain the effects of swirl, ignition timing, overall fuel air ratio, volumetric efficiency, and variations in prechamber air fuel ratio and fuel rate percentage on engine power and nitric oxide emissions. (LCL)

Sorenson, S.C.; Pan, S.S.; Bruckbauer, J.J.; Gehrke, G.R.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Numerical Simulation on Forced Swirl Combustion Chamber in Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concept of forced swirl combustion chamber in diesel engine is proposed in this paper. It can be used to enhance the intensity of swirl flow in the cylinder and accelerate the rate of air-fuel mixture process by designing the special structure in the ... Keywords: diesel engine, forced swirl, combustion chamber, simulation

Yong Shang; Fu-shui Liu; Xiang-rong Li

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Numerical Simulation on Forced Swirl Combustion Chamber in Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concept of forced swirl combustion chamber in diesel engine is proposed in this paper. It can be used to enhance the intensity of swirl flow in the cylinder and accelerate the rate of air-fuel mixture process by designing the special structure in the ... Keywords: diesel engine, forced swirl, combustion chamber, simulation

Shang Yong; Liu Fu-shui; Li Xiang-rong

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Jet engine's speed controller with constant pressure chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper deals with an automatic system meant to control a jet engine's rotation speed, through the fuel injection's control, based on a constant pressure chamber controller. One has established the non-linear mathematical model (based on the motion ... Keywords: actuator, control, fuel injection, fuel pump, jet-engine, pressure chamber

Alexandru Nicolae Tudosie

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Chemical kinetics models for semiconductor processing  

SciTech Connect

Chemical reactions in the gas-phase and on surfaces are important in the deposition and etching of materials for microelectronic applications. A general software framework for describing homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction kinetics utilizing the Chemkin suite of codes is presented. Experimental, theoretical and modeling approaches to developing chemical reaction mechanisms are discussed. A number of TCAD application modules for simulating the chemically reacting flow in deposition and etching reactors have been developed and are also described.

Coltrin, M.E.; Creighton, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meeks, E.; Grcar, J.F.; Houf, W.G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Kee, R.J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

NIF Target Chamber Dedicated | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIF Target Chamber Dedicated | National Nuclear Security Administration NIF Target Chamber Dedicated | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NIF Target Chamber Dedicated NIF Target Chamber Dedicated June 11, 1999 Livermore, CA NIF Target Chamber Dedicated Secretary Richardson dedicates the National Ignition Facility target

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers  

SciTech Connect

Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF{sub 4}-rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF{sub 4}, acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl{sub 3}F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds.

Wise, J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Kinetic effects on ballooning modes in mirror machines  

SciTech Connect

A general procedure for examining the influence of kinetic effects on the stability of magnetohydrodynamic ballooning modes in mirror machines is presented. In particular, the basic kinetic ballooning mode equation for a nonaxisymmetric, arbitrary beta system with anisotropic pressure is derived. Considering a long-thin equilibrium typical of the tandem mirror, it is shown that this governing eigenmode equation reduces to a simple form independent of wave-particle resonant effects.

Tang, W.M.; Catto, P.J.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Kinetic Theory of Plasma Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Wave Theory / Proceedings of the Tenth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

D. Van Eester; E. Lerche

104

LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

105

An Application of Chemical Kinetic Theory and Methodology to Characterize the Ice Nucleating Properties of Aerosols Used for Weather Modification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical kinetic theory and methodology is applied to examine the ice nucleating properties of silver iodide (AgI) and silver iodide-silver chloride (AgI-AgCl) aerosols in a large cloud chamber held at water saturation. This approach uses ...

Paul J. DeMott; William G. Finnegan; Lewis O. Grant

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Money Exchange Model and a general Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Kinetic Gas Theory like two-agent money exchange models, recently introduced in the Econophysics of Wealth distributions, are revisited. The emergence of Boltzmann-Gibbs like distribution of individual money to Pareto's law in the tail of the distribution is examined in terms of 2x2 Transition matrix with a general and simple oulook. Some additional interesting results are also reported.

Gupta, A K

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Reaction kinetics for remodeling oil shale retorting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from recent laboratory kinetic studies at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) on gasification, pyrolysis, and mineral reactions in oil shale are presented. The specific pyrolysis reactions investigated include the decomposition of kerogen, the evolution of oil, hydrogen and C/sub 2/ plus C/sub 3/ hydrocarbons and the formation of a carbonaceous residue. Data describing the evolution of H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ during secondary pyrolysis of the carbonaceous residue are also presented. The mineral reaction kinetics discussed include the decomposition and/or reaction (with silica or silicates) of calcite, dolomite, dawsonite and nahcolite. Rate equations describing the effects of CO/sub 2/ and steam on the reactions of calcite and dolomite are presented. Finally, kinetics describing gasification of the carbonaceous residue by CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O are examined. The above kinetic data are summarized in a set of rate expressions that can be used in numerical modeling of oil shale retorting. The rate equations are general enough for modeling both in-situ and surface retorting processes.

Campbell, J.H.; Burnham, A.K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

QN_CloudChamberV1.4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Build a Cosmic-Ray Cloud Chamber How to Build a Cosmic-Ray Cloud Chamber October 2008, Version 1.4 * QuarkNet version. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. * Instructions written by Jeremy Paschke, York High School and Anne Mary Teichert, Fermilab. * Model initially designed and built by Robert Peterson, Fermilab. If you have further questions, or improvements of your own you would like to share with the QuarkNet group, please contact: Jeremy Paschke, York High School Physics Instructor (jpaschke@elmhurst205.org), or Bob Peterson, Fermilab Education Specialist, (rspete@fnal.gov). Justification: Showing your class a working cloud chamber is one of the best ways to generate student interest in modern physics. The cloud chamber described below will display natural background radiation (muons generated by

109

SMALL CHAMBER MEASUREMENT OF CHEMICAL SPECIFIC EMISSION FACTORS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature environmental chamber. The tests were all run at 25 C, 50% relative humidity (RH) and with an area-specific ventilation rate of 1.5 cubic meters per square meter...

110

BSA 08-14: A Multi-Anode Ionization Chamber  

BSA 08-14: A Multi-Anode Ionization Chamber. BNL Reference Number: BSA 08-14. Patent Status: U.S. Patent Number 7,858,949 was issued on December 28, 2010

111

A New Horizontal Gradient, Continuous Flow, Ice Thermal Diffusion Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A continuous-flow, horizontal gradient, ice thermal diffusion chamber has been developed and tested for heterogeneous ice nucleation of aerosol particles under accurately controlled supersaturations and supercooling in the absence of a substrate. ...

E. M. Tomlinson; N. Fukuta

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Single chamber fuel cells: Flow geometry, rate and composition considerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the key technical hurdles in SOFC development. Furthermore,bellow those of dual chamber SOFC, and increase even moresmaller than that of other SOFC, but the heat generated by

Stefan, Ionel C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

representation of the molten-salt jets. Acknowledgments Thisto the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protectshielding, two meters of molten-salt jets inside the chamber

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A self-triggered readout for a time projection chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A self-triggering readout for a time projection chamber (TPC) is presented, with applications to novel forms of data acquisition for high energy physics application. The construction and initial testing of the readout ...

Werner, Andrew Thompson, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Aging in the large CDF axial drift chamber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Central Outer Tracker (COT) is a large axial drift chamber in the Collider Detector at Fermilab operating with a gas mixture that is 50/50 argon/ethane with an admixture of 1.7% isopropanol. In its first two years of operation the COT showed unexpected aging with the worst parts of the chamber experiencing a gain loss of {approx}50% for an accumulated charge of {approx}35 mC/cm. By monitoring the pulse height of hits on good tracks, it was possible to determine the gain as a function of time and location in the chamber. In addition, the currents of the high voltage supplies gave another monitor of chamber gain and its dependence on the charge deposition rate. The aging was worse on the exhaust end of the chamber consistent with polymer buildup as the gas flows through the chamber. The distribution in azimuth suggests that aging is enhanced at lower temperatures, but other factors such as gas flow patterns may be involved. Elemental and molecular analysis of the sense wires found a coating that is mostly carbon and hydrogen with a small amount of oxygen; no silicon or other contaminants were identified. High resolution electron microscope pictures of the wire surface show that the coating is smooth with small sub-micron nodules. In the course of working with the chamber gas system, we discovered a small amount of O{sub 2} is enough to reverse the aging. Operating the chamber with {approx}100 ppm of O{sub 2} reversed almost two years of gain loss in less than 10 days while accumulating {le} 2 mC/cm.

Allspach, D.; Ambrose, D.; Binkley, M.; /Fermilab; Bromberg, C.; /Michigan State U.; Burkett, K.; Kephart, R.; Madrak, R.; Miao, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Roser, R.; Wagner, R.L. /Fermilab

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Broadband impedance calculations of the TAN vacuum chamber for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAMBER FOR THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER (LHC) ? D. Li § , G.chamber for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The TAN is the

Li, D.; Lambertson, G.; Turner, W.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Development of Novel Density Functionals for Thermochemical Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new density functional theory (DFT) exchange-correlation functional for the exploration of reaction mechanisms is proposed. This new functional, denoted BMK (Boese-Martin for Kinetics), has an accuracy in the 2 kcal/mol range for transition state barriers but, unlike previous attempts at such a functional, this improved accuracy does not come at the expense of equilibrium properties. This makes it a general-purpose functional whose domain of applicability has been extended to transition states, rather than a specialized functional for kinetics. The improvement in BMK rests on the inclusion of the kinetic energy density together with a large value of the exact exchange mixing coefficient. For this functional, the kinetic energy density appears to correct `back' the excess exact exchange mixing for ground-state properties, possibly simulating variable exchange.

Boese, A D; Martin, Jan M. L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber  

SciTech Connect

The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

Szydagis, Matthew Mark; /Chicago U.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Kinetics of coal pyrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (USA)); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA)); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (USA))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Amber Kinetics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Amber Kinetics Product Start-up company developing a novel flywheel energy storage system with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. References Amber...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Method to calibrate fission chambers in Campbelling mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fission chambers are neutron detectors which are widely used to instrument experimental reactors such as material testing reactors or zero power reactors. In the presence of a high level mixed gamma and neutron flux, fission chambers can be operated in Campbelling mode (also known as 'fluctuation mode' or 'mean square voltage mode') to provide reliable and precise neutron related measurements. Fission chamber calibration in Campbelling mode (in terms of neutron flux) is usually done empirically using a calibrated reference detector. A major drawback of this method is that calibration measurements have to be performed in a neutron environment very similar to the one in which the calibrated detector will be used afterwards. What we propose here is a different approach based on characterizing the fission chamber response in terms of fission rate. This way, the detector calibration coefficient is independent from the neutron spectrum and can be determined prior to the experiment. The fissile deposit response to the neutron spectrum can then be assessed independently by other means (experimental or numerical). In this paper, the response of CEA made miniature fission chambers in Campbelling mode is studied. We use a theoretical model of the signal to calculate the calibration coefficient. Input parameters of the model come from statistical distribution of individual pulses. Supporting measurements have been made in the CEA Cadarache zero power reactor MINERVE. Results are compared to an empirical Campbelling mode calibration.

Benoit Geslot; Troy C. Unruh; Philippe Filliatre; Christian Jammes; Jacques Di Salvo; Stéphane Bréaud; Jean-François Villard

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Investigation of Argon Gas as a Potential Shock Attenuator in Z-IFE Chambers Using ALEGRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / The Technology of Fusion Energy - Inertial Fusion Technology: Targets and Chambers

Sal B. Rodriguez; Jason Cook

123

A Continuous, In-Chamber Target Tracking and Engagement Approach for Laser Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / The Technology of Fusion Energy - Inertial Fusion Technology: Targets and Chambers

Ron Petzoldt; Neil Alexander; Lane Carlson; Graham Flint; Dan Goodin; Jon Spalding; Mark Tillack

124

Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the ther...

Howes, G G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

G. G. Howes

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

126

Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce & Industry (FICCI) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce & Industry (FICCI) Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce & Industry (FICCI) Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce & Industry (FICCI) March 20, 2007 - 11:37am Addthis Thank you Geoff (Pyatt) for that introduction. I'd like to thank FICCI for hosting this event and thank its leadership for their kind words. I'm very pleased to be here in India - and to be with all of you today. Since his very first days in office, President Bush has considered growing and strengthening the United States' bilateral relationship with India to be a top priority. The shared commitment of President Bush and Prime Minister Singh to building our relationship was evidenced by the historic strategic partnership initiatives announced during the President's visit here in March of last year.

127

Challenge Met as APS Sends Final Chambers to LCLS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Marriage of Hardware and Hard Work A Marriage of Hardware and Hard Work Shaken but Not Stirred 2008 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award The 2008 3-Way Meeting In R&D, Super X-rays Mark Many Spots APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Challenge Met as APS Sends Final Chambers to LCLS MAY 21, 2008 Bookmark and Share The final five (of 40) extruded aluminum vacuum chambers for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) undulator system have been shipped from Argonne National Laboratory - where the chambers were designed and assembled - to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, where the LCLS "will be the world's first x-ray free electron laser when it becomes operational in 2009. Pulses of x-ray laser light from LCLS will be many

128

Electromagnetic pulse generation within a petawatt laser target chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work has been undertaken to characterize the electromagnatic pulse (EMP) generated by the high temperature high density plasma produced by a petawatt laser. This was to evaluate the susceptibility to malfunction and damage of equipment and diagnostics for the new Orion laser. EMP measurement were made using moebius loop antennas fitted inside the target chamber of the Vulcan petawatt laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. These show the EMP as a 63 MHz transient which decays from a peak magnetic field of around 4.3 A/m. A theoretical model presented assumes the EMP is produced by an impulse of 10{sup 12} electron emanating from the target, which charge the chamber wall causing it to ring at natural frequency. The theoretical model provides an estimate of the EMP measured in the Vulcan petawatt target chamber and will be used for the design of the Orion laser.

Mead, M.J.; Neely, D.; Gauoin, J.; Heathcote, R.; Patel, P. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Di usive Kinetic Explicit Schemes for Nonlinear Degenerate Parabolic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Di#11;usive Kinetic Explicit Schemes for Nonlinear Degenerate Parabolic Systems #3; D. Aregba parabolic systems. These schemes are based on discrete BGK models where both characteristic velocities. Evje and K.H. Karlsen [15] and of M. Espedal and K.H. Karlsen [14]. For the theory of general parabolic

131

5, 86898714, 2005 The Kinetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Note: Simulating chemical systems in Fortran90 and Matlab with the Kinetic PreProcessor KPP-2.1 A estimation techniques, and variational chemical data assimilation applications require the development of ef- ficient tools for the computational simulation of chemical kinetics systems. From a numerical point

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

132

Fuel subassembly leak test chamber for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container with a valve at one end is inserted into a nuclear reactor coolant pool. Once in the pool, the valve is opened by a mechanical linkage. An individual fuel subassembly is lifted into the container by a gripper; the valve is then closed providing an isolated chamber for the subassembly. A vacuum is drawn on the chamber to encourage gaseous fission product leakage through any defects in the cladding of the fuel rods comprising the subassembly; this leakage may be detected by instrumentation, and the need for replacement of the assembly ascertained.

Divona, Charles J. (Santa Ana, CA)

1978-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Laser Calibration System of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collider (LHC) dedicated to the study of heavy ion collisions. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector covering the pseudo rapidity range |? | laser system is to simulate ionizing tracks at predifined positions throughout the drift volume in order to monitor the TPC response to a known source. In particular, the alignment of the read-out chambers will be performed, and variations of the drift velocity due to drift field imperfections can be measured and used as calibration data in the physics data analysis. In this paper we present the design of the pulsed UV laser and optical system, together with the control and monitoring systems.

G. Renault; B. S. Nielsen; J. Westergaard; J. J. Gaardhøje For The

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Single chamber fuel cells: Flow geometry, rate and composition considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four different single chamber fuel cell designs were compared using propane-air gas mixtures. Gas flow around the electrodes has a significant influence on the open circuit voltage and the power density of the cell. The strong influence of flow geometry is likely due to its effect on gas composition, particularly on the oxygen chemical potential at the two electrodes as a result of gas mixing. The chamber design which exposes the cathode first to the inlet gas was found to yield the best performance at lower flow rates, while the open tube design with the electrodes equally exposed to the inlet gas worked best at higher flow rates.

Stefan, Ionel C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

135

April 10, 2002 A. R. Raffray, et al., Dynamic Chamber Armor Behavior in IFE and MFE 1 Dynamic Chamber Armor Behavior in IFE and MFE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

April 10, 2002 A. R. Raffray, et al., Dynamic Chamber Armor Behavior in IFE and MFE 1 Dynamic Chamber Armor Behavior in IFE and MFE A. R. Raffray1, G. Federici2, A. Hassanein3, D. Haynes4 1University Diego April 10, 2002 #12;April 10, 2002 A. R. Raffray, et al., Dynamic Chamber Armor Behavior in IFE

Raffray, A. René

136

Right/left assignment in drift chambers and proportional multiwire chambers (PWC's) using induced signals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved multiwire chamber having means for resolving the left/right ambiguity in the location of an ionizing event. The chamber includes a plurality of spaced parallel anode wires positioned between spaced planar cathodes. Associated with each of the anode wires are a pair of localizing wires, one positioned on either side of the anode wire. The localizing wires are connected to a differential amplifier whose output polarity is determined by whether the ionizing event occurs to the right or left of the anode wire.

Walenta, Albert H. (Upton, NY)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Modification of {Delta}{sup Prime} by magnetic feedback and kinetic effects  

SciTech Connect

Two possible ways of modifying the linear tearing mode index, by active magnetic feedback and by drift kinetic effects of deeply trapped particles, are analytically investigated. Magnetic feedback schemes, studied in this work, are found generally stabilizing for {Delta}{sup Prime }. The drift kinetic effects from both thermal particles and hot ions tend to reduce the power of the large solution from the outer region. This generally leads to a destabilization of {Delta} Prime for the toroidal analytic equilibria considered here.

Liu Yueqiang; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

Sharp, W M; Niller, D A C; Tabak, M; Yu, S S; Peterson, P F; Welch, D R; Rose, D V; Olson, C L

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

139

Computation of azimuthal combustion instabilities in an helicopter combustion chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computation of azimuthal combustion instabilities in an helicopter combustion chamber C. Sensiau to compute azimuthal combustion instabilities is presented. It requires a thermoacoustic model using a n - formulation for the coupling between acoutics and combustion. The parameters n and are computed from a LES

Nicoud, Franck

140

ARIES INERTIAL FUSION CHAMBER ASSESSMENT M. S. Tillack, F. Najmabadi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington, DC 20375 L. M. Waganer Boeing Company P.O. Box 516 St Louis, MO 63166-0516 and the ARIES Team to define design windows and explore in detail the tradeoffs for various chamber concepts. The work to better understand fundamental tradeoffs, characterize design windows and offer additional guidance to R

California at San Diego, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Thermodynamics and Kinetics Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Staff (06/28/2013). Thermodynamic & Kinetic Data for Sustainable Energy (10/05/2012). Thermodynamics and Kinetics Group (07/06/2013 ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

142

Metal reduction kinetics in Shewanella  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: Metal reduction kinetics have been studied in cultures of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria which include the Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Estimation of system parameters from time-series data faces obstructions in ...

Raman Lall; Julie Mitchell

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Combustion in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines: Experiments and Detailed Chemical Kinetic Simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines are being considered as an alternative to diesel engines. The HCCI concept involves premixing fuel and air prior to induction into the cylinder (as is done in current spark-ignition engine) then igniting the fuel-air mixture through the compression process (as is done in current diesel engines). The combustion occurring in an HCCI engine is fundamentally different from a spark-ignition or Diesel engine in that the heat release occurs as a global autoignition process, as opposed to the turbulent flame propagation or mixing controlled combustion used in current engines. The advantage of this global autoignition is that the temperatures within the cylinder are uniformly low, yielding very low emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}, the chief precursors to photochemical smog). The inherent features of HCCI combustion allows for design of engines with efficiency comparable to, or potentially higher than, diesel engines. While HCCI engines have great potential, several technical barriers exist which currently prevent widespread commercialization of this technology. The most significant challenge is that the combustion timing cannot be controlled by typical in-cylinder means. Means of controlling combustion have been demonstrated, but a robust control methodology that is applicable to the entire range of operation has yet to be developed. This research focuses on understanding basic characteristics of controlling and operating HCCI engines. Experiments and detailed chemical kinetic simulations have been applied to the characterize some of the fundamental operational and design characteristics of HCCI engines. Experiments have been conducted on single and multi-cylinder engines to investigate general features of how combustion timing affects the performance and emissions of HCCI engines. Single-zone modeling has been used to characterize and compare the implementation of different control strategies. Multi-zone modeling has been applied to investigate combustion chamber design with respect to increasing efficiency and reducing emissions in HCCI engines.

Flowers, D L

2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

144

Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics ^ ^ iCi| Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics ^ ^ iCi| under AEC Contract A T (30-1)-3780 " â–  ' Annual Report (1970) Principal In-vestigator: Martin Karpins Institution: Harvard University The research performed under this contract can best be sunmarized under several headings. (a) Alkali-Halideg Alkali-Halide (MX^ M*X*) Exchange Reactions. This project is being continued. A careful study of certain

145

Investigation of Micro Porosity Sintered wick in Vapor Chamber for Fan Less Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro Porosity Sintered wick is made from metal injection molding processes, which provides a wick density with micro scale. It can keep more than 53 % working fluid inside the wick structure, and presents good pumping ability on working fluid transmission by fine infiltrated effect. Capillary pumping ability is the important factor in heat pipe design, and those general applications on wick structure are manufactured with groove type or screen type. Gravity affects capillary of these two types more than a sintered wick structure does, and mass heat transfer through vaporized working fluid determines the thermal performance of a vapor chamber. First of all, high density of porous wick supports high transmission ability of working fluid. The wick porosity is sintered in micro scale, which limits the bubble size while working fluid vaporizing on vapor section. Maximum heat transfer capacity increases dramatically as thermal resistance of wick decreases. This study on permeability design of wick structure is 0.5 - 0.7, especially permeability (R) = 0.5 can have the best performance, and its heat conductivity is 20 times to a heat pipe with diameter (Phi) = 10mm. Test data of this vapor chamber shows thermal performance increases over 33 %.

C. S. Yu; W. C. Wei; S. W. Kang

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

146

Draft General Conformity Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I I Draft General Conformity Determination U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix I Draft General Conformity Determination Draft General Conformity Determination Cape Wind Energy Project Prepared by Minerals Management Service Herndon, VA November 2008 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION TO THE PROPOSED ACTION............................................................... 1 2.0 GENERAL CONFORMITY REGULATORY BACKGROUND .......................................... 2 2.1 GENERAL CONFORMITY REQUIREMENTS.................................................................... 2 2.2 GENERAL CONFORMITY APPLICABILITY.....................................................................

147

NEWTON's General Science Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Science Videos Do you have a great general science video? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Videos: Videos from National Geographic Kids Videos from National Geographic...

148

NEWTON's General Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Science Archive: Loading Most Recent General Science Questions: What is Equilibrium? Banana and Human Genetics Hair Examination Body Buffer Action Jellyfish : Plant or...

149

Combustion chamber and thermal vapor stream producing apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and improved method and apparatus for burning a hydrocarbon fuel for producing a high pressure thermal vapor stream comprising steam and combustion gases for injecting into a subterranean formation for the recovery of liquefiable minerals therefrom, wherein a high pressure combustion chamber having multiple refractory lined combustion zones of varying diameters is provided for burning a hydrocarbon fuel and pressurized air in predetermined ratios injected into the chamber for producing hot combustion gases essentially free of oxidizing components and solid carbonaceous particles. The combustion zones are formed by zones of increasing diameters up a final zone of decreasing diameter to provide expansion zones which cause turbulence through controlled thorough mixing of the air and fuel to facilitate complete combustion. The high pressure air and fuel is injected into the first of the multiple zones where ignition occurs with a portion of the air injected at or near the point of ignition to further provide turbulence and more complete combustion.

Sperry, John S. (Houston, TX); Krajicek, Richard W. (Sugar Land, TX); Cradeur, Robert R. (Spring, TX)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Study of the response of low pressure ionization chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Beam Loss Monitoring System (BLM) of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is based on parallel plate Ionization Chambers (IC) with active volume 1.5l and a nitrogen filling gas at 0.1 bar overpressure. At the largest loss locations, the ICs generate signals large enough to saturate the read-out electronics. A reduction of the active volume and filling pressure in the ICs would decrease the amount of charge collected in the electrodes, and so provide a higher saturation limit using the same electronics. This makes Little Ionization Chambers (LIC) with both reduced pressure and small active volume a good candidate for these high radiation areas. In this contribution we present measurements performed with several LIC monitors with reduced active volume and various filling pressures. These detectors were tested under various conditions with different beam setups, with standard LHC ICs used for calibration purposes

Nebot Del Busto, E; Effinger, E; Grishin, V; Herranz Alvarez, J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Destruction of nuclear graphite using closed chamber incineration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Closed chamber incineration (CCI) is a novel technique by which irradiated nuclear graphite may be destroyed without the risk of radioactive cation release into the environment. The process utilizes an enclosed combustion chamber coupled with molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). The transport of cations is intrinsically suppressed by the MCFCs, such that only the combustion gases are conducted through for release to the environment. An example CCI design was developed which had as its goal the destruction of graphite fuel elements from the Fort St. Vrain reactor (FSVR). By employing CCI, the volume of high level waste from the FSVR will be reduced by approximately 87 percent. Additionally, the incineration process will convert the SiC coating on the FSVR fuel particles to SiO{sub 2}, thus creating a form potentially suitable for direct incorporation in a vitrification process stream. The design is compact, efficient, and makes use of currently available technology.

Senor, D.J.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Morgan, W.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Marianowski, L.G. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Tobacco smoke aging in the presence of ozone: a room-sized chamber...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tobacco smoke aging in the presence of ozone: a room-sized chamber study Title Tobacco smoke aging in the presence of ozone: a room-sized chamber study Publication Type Journal...

153

A Continuous-Flow Diffusion Chamber for Airborne Measurements of Ice Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A continuous-flow thermal gradient diffusion chamber was developed for operating in an aircraft and detecting ice nucleating aerosol particles in real time. The chamber volume is the annular space between two vertically oriented concentric ...

David C. Rogers; Paul J. DeMott; Sonia M. Kreidenweis; Yalei Chen

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Using sputter coated glass to stabilize microstrip gas chambers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By sputter coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics, thin-film Pestov glass), microstrip gas chambers (MSGC) of high gain stability, low leakage current, and a high rate capability can be fabricated. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material.

Gong, Wen G. (Albany, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Aging Chamber Report Tool (ACRT) Version 5.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 230kV Accelerated Aging Chamber is a multi-year test of more than 50 polymer and fiberglass components.  Photographic inspections occur twice a year.  Thousands of photographs accumulate making conventional reports difficult to read.  This reporting tool enables the reader to jump from component to component and inspection to inspection.  The reader can easily compare components at different levels of aging.  This tool will make reviewing the important results of this ...

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Aging Chamber Report Tool (ACRT) v6.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 230kV Accelerated Aging Chamber is a multi-year test of more than 50 polymer and fiberglass components.  Photographic inspections occur twice a year.  Thousands of photographs accumulate making conventional reports difficult to read.  This reporting tool enables the reader to jump from component to component and inspection to inspection.  The reader can easily compare components at different levels of aging.  This tool will make reviewing the important results of this ...

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

High Rate Resistive Plate Chamber for LHC detector upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The limitation of the detection rate of standard bakelite resistive plate chambers (RPC) used as muon detectors in the LHC experiments has prevented the use of such detectors in the high rate regions in both CMS and ATLAS detectors. One alternative to these detectors are RPCs made with low resistivity glass plates ($10^{10} {\\rm \\Omega .cm}$), a beam test at DESY has shown that such detectors can operate at few thousand Hz/cm$^2$ with high efficiency(> 90%)

Y. Haddad; G. Grenier; I. Laktineh; N. Lumb; S. Cauwenbergh

2012-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

LAYOUT AND SIZING OF ESF ALCOVES AND REFUGE CHAMBERS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to establish size requirements and approximate locations of Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) test and operations alcoves, including refuge chambers during construction of the Topopah Spring (TS) loop. Preliminary conceptual layouts for non-deferred test alcoves will be developed to examine construction feasibility based on current test plans and available equipment. The final location and configuration layout for alcoves will be developed when in-situ rock conditions can be visually determined. This will be after the TBM has excavated beyond the alcove location and the rock has been exposed. The analysis will examine the need for construction of walkways and electrical alcoves in the ramps and main drift. Niches that may be required to accommodate conveyor booster drives and alignments are not included in this analysis. The analysis will develop design criteria for refuge chambers to meet MSHA requirements and will examine the strategic location of refuge chambers based on their potential use in various ESF fire scenarios. This document supersedes DI:BABE00000-01717-0200-00003 Rev 01, ''TS North Ramp Alcove and Stubout Location Analysis'' in its entirety (Reference 5-6).

John Beesley and Romeo S. Jurani

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

159

Uncertain generalized aggregation operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to extend the generalized ordered weighted averaging operator and provide a new class of operators called the uncertain generalized ordered weighted averaging (UGOWA) operator. It provides a very general formulation that includes ... Keywords: Aggregation, Decision making, Generalized mean, OWA operator, Operator weights

Li-Gang Zhou; Hua-You Chen; José M. Merigó; Anna M. Gil-Lafuente

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Test with cosmic rays of the GEM chambers for the LHCb muon system produced in Cagliari  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inner region of the first LHCb muon station will be equipped with twelve Gas Electron Multiplier chambers. The seven chambers produced in Cagliari were studied for several days each using cosmic rays. We measured the efficiency, timing resolution, and uniformity, cluster-size and out-of-time multiplicity. We find all seven chambers perform well.

Bonivento, W; Oldeman, R G C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Hydriding Kinetics of Organic Hydrogen Getters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aging of hermetically sealed systems is often accompanied by the gradual production of hydrogen gas that is a result of the decay of environmental gases and the degradation of organic materials. In particular, the oxygen, water, hydrogen ''equilibrium'' is affected by the removal of oxygen due the oxidation of metals and organic materials. This shift of the above ''equilibrium'' towards the formation of hydrogen gas, particularly in crevices, may eventually reach an explosive level of hydrogen gas or degrade metals by hydriding them. The latter process is generally delayed until the oxidizing species are significantly reduced. Organic hydrogen getters introduced by Allied Signal Aerospace Company, Kansas City Division have proven to be a very effective means of preventing hydrogen gas accumulation in sealed containers. These getters are relatively unaffected by air and environmental gases. They can be packaged in a variety of ways to fit particular needs such as porous pellets, fine or coarse [gravel] powder, or loaded into silicone rubber. The hydrogen gettering reactions are extremely irreversible since the hydrogen gas is converted into an organic hydrocarbon. These getters are based on the palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to double and then single bonds in aromatic aryl compounds. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) typically mixed with 25% by weight carbon with palladium (1% by weight of carbon) is one of the newest and best of these organic hydrogen getters. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reaction with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates, including mixed alkyl and aryl hydrocarbons with the possibilities of many isomers. The reaction kinetics mechanisms are also strongly influenced by the form in which they are packaged. For example, the hydriding rates for pellets and gravel have a strong dependence on reaction extent (i.e., DEB reduction) and a kinetic order in pressure of 0.76. Silicone rubber based DEB getters hydride at a much lower rate, have little dependence on reaction extent, have a higher kinetic order in pressure (0.87), and have a lower activation energy. The kinetics of the reaction as a function of hydrogen pressure, stoichiometry, and temperature for hydrogen and deuterium near ambient temperature (0 to 75 C) for pressures near or below 100 Pa over a wide range (in some cases, the complete) hydrogenation range are presented along with multi-dimensional rate models.

Powell, G. L.

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

163

Observations of Secondary Organic Aerosol Production and Soot Aging under Atmospheric Conditions Using a Novel Environmental Aerosol Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) comprise a substantial fraction of the total global aerosol budget. While laboratory studies involving smog chambers have advanced our understanding of the formation mechanisms responsible for SOA, our knowledge of the processes leading to SOA production under ambient gaseous and particulate concentrations as well as the impact these aerosol types have on climate is poorly understood. Although the majority of atmospheric aerosols scatter radiation either directly or indirectly by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, soot is thought to have a significant warming effect through absorption. Like inorganic salts, soot may undergo atmospheric transformation through the vapor condensation of non-volatile gaseous species which will alter both its chemical and physical properties. Typical smog chamber studies investigating the formation and growth of SOA as well as the soot aging process are temporally limited by the initial gaseous concentrations injected into the chamber environment. Furthermore, data interpretation from such experiments is generally restricted to the singular gaseous species under investigation. This dissertation discusses the use of a new aerosol chamber designed to study the formation and growth of SOA and soot aging under atmospherically relevant conditions. The Ambient Aerosol Chamber for Evolution Studies (AACES) was deployed at three field sites where size and hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of ammonium sulfate seed particles was monitored over time to examine the formation and growth of SOA. Similar studies investigating the soot aging process were also conducted in Houston, TX. It is shown that during the ambient growth of ammonium sulfate seed particles, as particle size increases, hygroscopic growth factors decrease considerably resulting in a significant organic mass fraction in the particle phase concluding an experiment. Observations of soot aging show an increase in measured size, HGF, mass and single scattering albedo. Ambient growth rate comparisons with chamber growth yielded similar trends verifying the use of AACES to study aerosol aging. Based on the results from this study, it is recommended that AACES be employed in future studies involving the production and growth of SOA and soot aging under ambient conditions in order to bridge the gaps in our current scientific knowledge.

Glen, Crystal

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Accuracy of EGSnrc calculations at {sup 60}Co energies for the response of ion chambers configured with various wall materials and cavity dimensions  

SciTech Connect

In this investigation, five experimental data sets are used to evaluate the ability of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to calculate the change in chamber response associated with changes in wall material and cavity dimension at {sup 60}Co energies. Calculations of the ratios of response per unit mass of air as a function of cavity volume for walls ranging from polystyrene to lead are generally within 1%-3% of experiments. A few exceptions, which are discussed, include 20%-30% discrepancies with experiments involving lead-walled chambers used by Attix et al. [J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. 60, 235-243 (1958)] and Cormack and Johns [Radiat. Res. 1, 133-157 (1954)], and 5% discrepancies for the graphite chamber of Attix et al. (relative to data for other wall materials). Simulations of the experiment by Whyte [Radiat. Res. 6, 371-379 (1957)], which varied cavity air pressure in a large cylindrical chamber, are generally within 0.5% (wall/electrode materials ranging from beryllium to copper). In all cases, the agreement between measurements and EGSnrc calculations is much better when the response as a function of cavity height or air pressure is considered for each wall material individually. High-precision measurements [Burns et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 52, 7125-7135 (2007)] of the response per unit mass as a function of cavity height for a graphite chamber are also accurately reproduced, and validate previous tests of the transport mechanics of EGSnrc. Based on the general agreement found in this work between corresponding experimental results and EGSnrc calculations it can be concluded that EGSnrc can reliably be used to calculate changes in response with changes in various wall materials and cavity dimensions at {sup 60}Co energies within a accuracy of a few percent or less.

La Russa, Daniel J.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Ottawa Carleton Institute of Physics, Carleton University Campus, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Dynamic stability of spindles controlled by molecular motor kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the role of the force-dependent kinetics of motor proteins in the stability of antiparallel arrays of polar filaments, such as those in the mitotic spindle. We determine the possible stable structures and show that there exists an instability associated to the collective behavior of motors that leads to the collapse of the spindle. Our analysis provides a general framework to understand several experimental observations in eukaryotic cell division.

Otger Campas; Jaume Casademunt; Ignacio Pagonabarraga

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Global optimization algorithms for semi-infinite and generalized semi-infinite programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goals of this thesis are the development of global optimization algorithms for semi-infinite and generalized semi-infinite programs and the application of these algorithms to kinetic model reduction. The outstanding ...

Lemonidis, Panayiotis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Los Alamos honored by Española Valley Chamber of Commerce  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL Honored By Española Valley Chamber of Commerce LANL Honored By Española Valley Chamber of Commerce Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Los Alamos honored by Española Valley Chamber of Commerce The Espanola Valley Chamber of Commerce recognized the Lab for its support to the chamber and the entire Espanola Valley with a President's Choice Award. February 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives. Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email The Lab received the award for efforts in a variety of areas. In late January, the Espanola Valley Chamber of Commerce recognized the Lab for its support to the chamber and the entire Espanola Valley with a President's Choice Award. Kurt Steinhaus with the Lab's Community

168

General Dynamics, Electric Boat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Dynamics, Electric Boat. NVLAP Lab Code: 100560-0. Address and Contact Information: 75 Eastern Point Road ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

169

Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Panofsky Long Ion Chamber (PLIC) is essentially a gas-filled coaxial cable, and has been used to protect the Stanford Linear Accelerator from damage caused by its electron beam, and as a sensitive diagnostic tool. This old technology has been updated and has found renewed use in the SLC. PLIC systems have been installed as beam steering aids in most parts of the SLC and are a part of the system that protects the SLC from damage by errant beams in several places. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Rolfe, J.; Gearhart, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Jenkins, T.; McComick, D.; Nelson, R.; Reagan, D.; Ross, M.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Time Projection Chamber for the ALICE Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Time Projection Chamber of the ALICE Experiment has been installed in the experimental setup in the underground area at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva. The Alice TPC ReadOut (ALTRO) chip implements intelligent signal processing on the Front-End-Electronics. During the years of 2007 and 2008 commissioning and calibration of the TPC have been carried out with cosmic rays, radioactive Krypton isotopes and with tracks produced by a UV laser system. In addition to these in this publication we present first results on energy loss measurements and on the momentum resolution.

C. Lippmann; the ALICE TPC collaboration

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Horizontal Kinetic Energy Spectrum and Spectral Budget Simulated by a High-Resolution Troposphere–Stratosphere–Mesosphere GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal kinetic energy spectra simulated by high-resolution versions of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory SKYHI middle-atmosphere general circulation model are examined. The model versions considered resolve heights between the ground ...

John N. Koshyk; Kevin Hamilton

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Barotropic Impacts of Surface Friction on Eddy Kinetic Energy and Momentum Fluxes: An Alternative to the Barotropic Governor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the surface drag is increased in a comprehensive general circulation model (GCM), the upper-level zonal winds decrease and eddy momentum flux convergence into the jet core increases. Globally averaged eddy kinetic energy decreases, a response ...

Elizabeth A. Barnes; Chaim I. Garfinkel

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Kinetic Wave Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kinetic Wave Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Kinetic Wave Power Address 2861 N Tupelo St Place Midland Zip 48642 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 989-839-9757...

174

Time-dependent corrections to effective rate and event statistics in Michaelis-Menten kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We generalize the concept of the geometric phase in stochastic kinetics to a noncyclic evolution. Its application is demonstrated on kinetics of the Michaelis-Menten reaction. It is shown that the nonperiodic geometric phase is responsible for the correction to the Michaelis-Menten law when parameters, such as a substrate concentration, are changing with time. We apply these ideas to a model of chemical reactions in a bacterial culture of a growing size, where the geometric correction qualitatively changes the outcome of the reaction kinetics.

Sinitsyn, N A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Anechoic Chamber of the National Research Council of Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anechoic chamber built recently by the National Research Council (approximately 24×17×17 ft) incorporates a number of design features which reduce substantially the cost of the structure with no sacrifice in performance. An appreciable part of the saving was achieved by a simplification in the preparation and mounting of the wedges. (The cost of treatment was $3.53 per square foot.) The wedges were sprayed with three coats of lacquer to improve the binding of the Fiberglas and thus facilitate handling and avoid shedding. The only appreciable effect on the absorption coefficient for normal incidence was to lower the cutoff frequency from 85 cps to 80 cps. The wedges were wrapped in cheese cloth which was then “stitched” by means of hot paraffin. Instead of pre?mounting the wedges on a base individual holders were stamped out of sheet metal and stapled to the furring strips. The wedges could then be mounted in about 8 sec each. The inner room is of frame construction with a removable catwalk hung from the ceiling. The performance of the completed chamber was measured by the standard inverse square law method.

N. Olson; G. J. Thiessen; E. A. G. Shaw; T. F. W. Embleton

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Wire-chamber radiation detector with discharge control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wire chamber; radiation detector has spaced apart parallel electrodes and grids defining an ignition region in which charged particles or other ionizing radiations initiate brief localized avalanche discharges and defining an adjacent memory region in which sustained glow discharges are initiated by the primary discharges. Conductors of the grids at each side of the memory section extend in orthogonal directions enabling readout of the X-Y coordinates of locations at which charged particles were detected by sequentially transmitting pulses to the conductors of one grid while detecting transmissions of the pulses to the orthogonal conductors of the other grid through glow discharges. One of the grids bounding the memory region is defined by an array of conductive elements each of which is connected to the associated readout conductor through a separate resistance. The wire chamber avoids ambiguities and imprecisions in the readout of coordinates when large numbers of simultaneous or; near simultaneous charged particles have been detected. Down time between detection periods and the generation of radio frequency noise are also reduced.

Perez-Mendez, V.; Mulera, T.A.

1982-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

177

Slag monitoring system for combustion chambers of steam boilers  

SciTech Connect

The computer-based boiler performance system presented in this article has been developed to provide a direct and quantitative assessment of furnace and convective surface cleanliness. Temperature, pressure, and flow measurements and gas analysis data are used to perform heat transfer analysis in the boiler furnace and evaporator. Power boiler efficiency is calculated using an indirect method. The on-line calculation of the exit flue gas temperature in a combustion chamber allows for an on-line heat flow rate determination, which is transferred to the boiler evaporator. Based on the energy balance for the boiler evaporator, the superheated steam mass flow rate is calculated taking into the account water flow rate in attemperators. Comparing the calculated and the measured superheated steam mass flow rate, the effectiveness of the combustion chamber water walls is determined in an on-line mode. Soot-blower sequencing can be optimized based on actual cleaning requirements rather than on fixed time cycles contributing to lowering of the medium usage in soot blowers and increasing of the water-wall lifetime.

Taler, J.; Taler, D. [Cracow University of Technology, Krakow (Poland)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Oxidation Kinetics Modeling Applying Phase Field Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Oxidation Kinetics Modeling Applying Phase Field Approach ... chemical reaction rates will increase exponentially and environmental attack ...

179

Kinetics of Nano Ti Carbides Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Steel Product Metallurgy and Applications. Presentation Title, Kinetics of Nano ...

180

Modeling & Characterization of Harvestable Kinetic Energy for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gov 301.975-5479. Modeling & Characterization of Harvestable Kinetic Energy for Wearable Medical Sensors. RF-enabled ...

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

SEY and Surface Analysis Measurements on FNAL Main Injector Ring S/S Beam Chamber Material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Material was provided by Dr. Weiren Chou, FNAL. Both mildly-activated used, and new sections of stainless steel (type 316L) beam chamber were measured. Centimeter-sized coupons were cleanly dry-cut from the large flat surface (called ''flat side'' in the plots) and from the ID end (inside diameter of the ring, in the case of the used material) and narrow end (in the case of the new material). The unused material was ultra-soniced in acetone (to remove storage residue), then rinsed with ethanol and blown dry with filtered N{sub 2}-gas, to simulate new chamber installation final rinse. Used material was installed, as cut. Surface chemistry was measured using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sometimes called ''ESCA''). With this technique, soft x-rays (1486 eV) illuminate the sample, penetrating into the surface ten microns. Photoelectrons are generated from energy levels of the constituent compounds/elements present. Those electrons, within 5 nm or so of the surface, escape without energy loss and preserve valence information about the atomic levels from which they were generated. An electron energy analyzer, of good energy resolution, measures the photoelectron energy, thereby yielding both valence (chemical) information and relative atomic abundances in the top 5 nm of surface. Using appropriate sensitivity factors, these intensities are converted to a semi-quantitative (surface atom %) concentration in the analyzed layer. As a benchmark, the limit for carbon contamination on vacuum components for UHV use at SLAC is 50 at%. That corresponds to about 8-10 monolayers of elemental carbon. XPS does not detect hydrogen because it has no electrons after bonding. Generally, hydrides do not show evidence of ''chemical shift'' of the binding energy of the metal lines.

Kirby, Robert E.; /SLAC

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

182

From continuum Fokker-Planck models to discrete kinetic models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Two theoretical formalisms are widely used in modeling mechanochemical systems such as protein motors: continuum Fokker-Planck models and discrete kinetic models. Both have advantages and disadvantages. Here we present a ‘‘finite volume’ ’ procedure to solve Fokker-Planck equations. The procedure relates the continuum equations to a discrete mechanochemical kinetic model while retaining many of the features of the continuum formulation. The resulting numerical algorithm is a generalization of the algorithm developed previously by Fricks, Wang, and Elston through relaxing the local linearization approximation of the potential functions, and a more accurate treatment of chemical transitions. The new algorithm dramatically reduces the number of numerical cells required for a prescribed accuracy. The kinetic models constructed in this fashion retain some features of the continuum potentials, so that the algorithm provides a systematic and consistent treatment of mechanical-chemical responses such as load-velocity relations, which are difficult to capture with a priori kinetic models. Several numerical examples are given to illustrate the performance of the method.

Jianhua Xing; Hongyun Wang; George Oster

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

DOE General Competencies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The DOE General Competencies are the personal and professional attributes that are critical to successful performance.  A competency model is a collection of competencies that together define...

184

Photon Generalized Parton Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a calculation of the generalized parton distributions of the photon using overlaps of photon light-front wave functions.

Asmita Mukherjee; Sreeraj Nair

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Photon Generalized Parton Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a calculation of the generalized parton distributions of the photon using overlaps of photon light-front wave functions.

Mukherjee, Asmita

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

1998 EMC: General Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For information regarding the DRC, please contact Emmanuel Crabbé, DRC General Meeting Chair, IBM SRDC, MS-E40, Building 630, 1580 Route 52, ...

187

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution...

188

Modeling, Kinetics, and Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , General Abstracts: Materials Processing and Manufacturing Division.

189

BIO-BAG ™ Type Cfj Environmental Chamber DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIO-BAG Type Cfj is a disposable, individual environmental chamber and a gas generator, consisting of one tablet of potassium borohydride-sodium bicarbonate and an ampule of hydrochloric acid, which when activated in the sealed BIO-BAG chamber provides a microaerophilic atmosphere. INTENDED USE BIO-BAG Type Cfj is designed to provide a microaerophilic environment suitable for the isolation of Campylobacter jejuni, formerly known as C. fetus subsp. jejuni (Cfj), from clinical specimens or subcultures from selective media. When used as directed, BIO-BAG Type Cfj will provide an atmosphere that has been shown to provide optimum growth of C. jejuni. 1,2 SUMMARY AND EXPLANATION Campylobacter jejuni has been recognized as a common enteric pathogen. 2,4,7,8 This organism is a true microaerophile and a capnophilic atmosphere has been shown to enhance growth. 5 Use of a selective medium containing 5 % sheep blood and a combination of antimicrobial agents and incubation at 42ºC provides conditions favorable for the selective isolation of C. jejuni from intestinal flora. 3,6 Under ideal conditions, characteristic colonies may be observed in 24 to 48 h, 1,2,5 Each BIO-BAG Type Cfj system allows cultures to be set up and observed for growth individually, so that appropriate atmospheric conditions are not interrupted. Exposure to atmospheric oxygen may interfere with the growth of more oxygen-sensitive strains. 5 PRINCIPLE OF THE PROCEDURE A microaerophilic-capnophilic atmosphere is provided in each sealed BIO-BAG Type Cfj system. A self-contained generator consists of an ampule of a weak hydrochloric acid solution and a gas generator tablet. When the ampule is crushed, the tablet is then activated. A portion of atmospheric oxygen in the chamber is utilized in the reaction. The resulting atmosphere is conducive to the isolation and cultivation of C. jejuni. 1,2 Each BIO-BAG Type Cfj system is disposable and designed to be used only once.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

On fast reactor kinetics studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results and the program of fast reactor core time and space kinetics experiments performed and planned to be performed at the IPPE critical facility is presented. The TIMER code was taken as computation support of the experimental work, which allows transient equations to be solved in 3-D geometry with multi-group diffusion approximation. The number of delayed neutron groups varies from 6 to 8. The code implements the solution of both transient neutron transfer problems: a direct one, where neutron flux density and its derivatives, such as reactor power, etc, are determined at each time step, and an inverse one for the point kinetics equation form, where such a parameter as reactivity is determined with a well-known reactor power time variation function. (authors)

Seleznev, E. F.; Belov, A. A. [Nuclear Safety Inst. of the Russian Academy of Sciences IBRAE (Russian Federation); Matveenko, I. P.; Zhukov, A. M.; Raskach, K. F. [Inst. for Physics and Power Engineering IPPE (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Kinetically Dominated FRII Radio Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of FR II objects that are kinetically dominated, the jet kinetic luminosity, $Q$, is larger than the total thermal luminosity (IR to X-ray) of the accretion flow, $L_{bol}$, is of profound theoretical interest. Such objects are not expected in most theoretical models of the central engine of radio loud AGN. Thus, establishing such a class of objects is an important diagnostic for filtering through the myriad of theoretical possibilities. This paper attempts to establish a class of quasars that have existed in a state of kinetic dominance, $R(t)\\equiv Q(t)/L_{bol}(t)>1$, at some epoch, $t$. It is argued that the 10 quasars in this article with a long term time average $Q(t)$, $\\bar{Q}$, that exceed $L_{Edd}$ are likely to have satisfied the condition $R(t)>1$ either presently or in the past based on the rarity of $L_{bol}>L_{Edd}$ quasars. Finally, the existence of these sources is discussed in the context of the theory of the central engine.

Brian Punsly

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

192

NUFinancials General Ledger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUFinancials General Ledger Reference TroubleshootingGuide Last Updated 11/24/2012 mac © 2010 Northwestern University FMS711 Corrections, Sales, and Transfers Page 1 of 5 Troubleshooting Actuals Journals;NUFinancials General Ledger Reference TroubleshootingGuide Last Updated 11/24/2012 mac © 2010 Northwestern

Shull, Kenneth R.

193

Generalized Region Connection Calculus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Region Connection Calculus (RCC) is one of the most widely referenced system of high-level (qualitative) spatial reasoning. RCC assumes a continuous representation of space. This contrasts sharply with the fact that spatial information obtained from ... Keywords: (Generalized) Boolean connection algebra, (Generalized) Region Connection Calculus, Continuous space, Discrete space, Mereology, Mereotopology, Qualitative spatial reasoning

Sanjiang Li; Mingsheng Ying

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Charge-Focusing Readout of Time Projection Chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time projection chambers (TPCs) have found a wide range of applications in particle physics, nuclear physics, and homeland security. For TPCs with high-resolution readout, the readout electronics often dominate the price of the final detector. We have developed a novel method which could be used to build large-scale detectors while limiting the necessary readout area. By focusing the drift charge with static electric fields, we would allow a small area of electronics to be sensitive to particle detection for a much larger detector volume. The resulting cost reduction could be important in areas of research which demand large-scale detectors, including dark matter searches and detection of special nuclear material. We present simulations made using the software package Garfield of a focusing structure to be used with a prototype TPC with pixel readout. This design should enable significant focusing while retaining directional sensitivity to incoming particles. We also present first experimental results and compare them with simulation.

S. J. Ross; M. T. Hedges; I. Jaegle; M. D. Rosen; I. S. Seong; T. N. Thorpe; S. E. Vahsen; J. Yamaoka

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

195

Charge-Focusing Readout of Time Projection Chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time projection chambers (TPCs) have found a wide range of applications in particle physics, nuclear physics, and homeland security. For TPCs with high-resolution readout, the readout electronics often dominate the price of the final detector. We have developed a novel method which could be used to build large-scale detectors while limiting the necessary readout area. By focusing the drift charge with static electric fields, we would allow a small area of electronics to be sensitive to particle detection for a much larger detector volume. The resulting cost reduction could be important in areas of research which demand large-scale detectors, including dark matter searches and detection of special nuclear material. We present simulations made using the software package Garfield of a focusing structure to be used with a prototype TPC with pixel readout. This design should enable significant focusing while retaining directional sensitivity to incoming particles. We also present first experimental results and com...

Ross, S J; Jaegle, I; Rosen, M D; Seong, I S; Thorpe, T N; Vahsen, S E; Yamaoka, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Radiation damage control in the BNL hypernuclear spectrometer drift chamber system  

SciTech Connect

A high rate drift chamber system has been in use at the BNL hypernuclear spectrometer system for the past three years. Some of the chambers have accumulated charge doses up to about 0.2 C/cm-wire without showing external signs of aging. The system design and performance will be discussed as well as the results of some laboratory drift chamber aging tests. 5 refs., 9 figs.

Pile, P.H.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Quantum instanton evaluation of the kinetic isotope effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general quantum-mechanical method for computing kinetic isotope effects is presented. The method is based on the quantum instanton approximation for the rate constant and on the path integral Metropolis Monte-Carlo evaluation of the Boltzmann operator matrix elements. It computes the kinetic isotope effect directly, using a thermodynamic integration with respect to the mass of the isotope, thus avoiding the more computationally expensive process of computing the individual rate constants. The method is more accurate than variational transition-state theories or the semiclassical instanton method since it does not assume a single reaction path and does not use a semiclassical approximation of the Boltzmann operator. While the general Monte-Carlo implementation makes the method accessible to systems with a large number of atoms, we present numerical results for the Eckart barrier and for the collinear and full three-dimensional isotope variants of the hydrogen exchange reaction H+H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2}+H. In all seven test cases, for temperatures between 250 K and 600 K, the error of the quantum instanton approximation for the kinetic isotope effects is less than {approx}10%.

Vanicek, Jiri; Miller, William H.; Castillo, Jesus F.; Aoiz, F.Javier

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

198

OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APP-005 APP-005 Planning for and Measuring Office of Inspector General Results FY 2002 Annual Performance Report and FY 2003 Annual Performance Plan Office of Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Inspector General's Message We are pleased to present the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) consolidated Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Performance Report and Fiscal Year 2003 Annual Performance Plan. This document evaluates our actual Fiscal Year (FY) 2002 performance and establishes the performance goals and strategies we will pursue in FY 2003 to fulfill our mission. As mandated by the Inspector General Act, the OIG promotes the effective, efficient, and economical operation of the Department of Energy's programs and operations, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

199

Unified Fractional Kinetic Equation and a Fractional Diffusion Equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In earlier papers Saxena et al. (2002, 2003) derived the solutions of a number of fractional kinetic equations in terms of generalized Mittag-Leffler functions which extended the work of Haubold and Mathai (2000). The object of the present paper is to investigate the solution of a unified form of fractional kinetic equation in which the free term contains any integrable function f(t), which provides the unification and extension of the results given earlier recently by Saxena et al. (2002, 2003). The solution has been developed in terms of the Wright function in a closed form by the method of Laplace transform. Further we derive a closed-form solution of a fractional diffusion equation. The asymptotic expansion of the derived solution with respect to the space variable is also discussed. The results obtained are in a form suitable for numerical computation.

R. K. Saxena; A. M. Mathai; H. J. Haubold

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

200

Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support ...

Akkelin, S V; Karpenko, Iu A; Sinyukov, Yu M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

general_atomics.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

former former General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was constructed in 1959 and operated until 1991. The site encompassed approximately 7,400 square feet of laboratory and remote operations cells. Licensed operations at the facility included receipt, handling, and shipment of radioactive materials; remote handling, examination, and storage of previously irradiated nuclear fuel materials; pilot-scale tritium extraction operations; and development, fabrication, and inspection of uranium oxide-beryllium oxide fuel materials. General Atomics performed most of the work for the federal government. The General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was located in a 60-acre complex 13 miles northwest of downtown San Diego, 1 mile inland from the Pacific Ocean, and approximately 300 feet above sea level. The General Atomics site is in the center of Torrey Mesa Science Center, a 304-acre industrial

202

general_atomics.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

former General former General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was constructed in 1959 and operated until 1991. The site encompassed approximately 7,400 square feet of laboratory and remote operations cells. Licensed operations at the facility included receipt, handling, and shipment of radioactive materials; remote handling, examination, and storage of previously irradiated nuclear fuel materials; pilot-scale tritium extraction operations; and development, fabrication, and inspection of uranium oxide-beryllium oxide fuel materials. General Atomics performed most of the work for the federal government. The General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was located in a 60-acre complex 13 miles northwest of downtown San Diego, 1 mile inland from the Pacific Ocean, and approximately 300 feet above sea level.

203

General Laser Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Measurements for Laser Meters. ... 90 to 0 dBm. 0 to 30 dBm. AO 2005, Igor Vayshenker. Laser Dose, 193 nm, SP250-56, David Livigni. ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

204

Anomaly General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anomally models based on a spectral general circulation model (GCM) are formulated and applied to study of low-frequency atmospheric variability in the extratropics, and long-range forecasting research. A steady linear version of the anomaly ...

A. Navarra; K. Miyakoda

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

general_atomics.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Discussions between DOE and General Atomics led to an agreed cost-sharing and no-fee arrangement for the decontamination and site...

206

2011 IAEA General Conference  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 IAEA General Conference 2011 IAEA General Conference Remarks as Prepared for Delivery Secretary Steven Chu Monday, September 19, 2011 Thank you, Ambassador Feruta. Congratulations on your election as President of this Conference. I also want to thank Director General Amano for his outstanding leadership. I am honored to represent the United States today, and I want to share a message from President Barack Obama: "On behalf of the United States, please accept my best wishes for a successful International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference. This year's meeting takes place against the backdrop of the severe earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan in March and the devastating accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station that followed. Along with

207

Dual generalized Bernstein basis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generalized Bernstein basis in the space @P"n of polynomials of degree at most n, being an extension of the q-Bernstein basis introduced by Philips [Bernstein polynomials based on the q-integers, Ann. Numer. Math. 4 (1997) 511-518], is given by the ... Keywords: Bernstein basis, Big q-Jacobi polynomials, Discrete Bernstein basis, Dual basis, Generalized Bernstein basis, Little q-Jacobi polynomials, Shifted Jacobi polynomials, q -Bernstein basis

Stanis?aw Lewanowicz; Pawe? Wo?ny

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Amber Kinetics Flywheel Energy Storage Demo - Ed Chiao, Amber Kinetics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

amber_kinetics amber_kinetics DOE Peer Review September 2012 Ed Chiao, CEO amber_kinetics Amber Kinetics: Our Flywheel History Start-up launched in 2009, Stanford University Cleantech Entrepreneurship class Established a technology licensing & flywheel development partnership with LLNL; Amber Kinetics identified new material & lower-cost rotor designs for commercialization Awarded a Smart Grid Energy Storage Demonstration grant award for flywheels Awarded a matching grant for development & demonstration of flywheel technology Stanford University Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy California Energy Commission World-class institutions | innovative, deep flywheel technology owned by Amber Amber Kinetics, Inc. - Confidential and Proprietary, All Rights Reserved

209

Microreactor for fast chemical kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chemical reaction process in a T-shaped microchannel is studied experimentally through the reaction of Ca++ with a fluorescent tracer, Calcium-green. For thin channels (10 um), diffusion of species is found to behave in a way independent of the thickness direction. In such a situation, simulations of a two-dimensional reaction-diffusion model agree remarkably well with the experimental measurements. The comparison of experiments and simulations is used to measure the chemical kinetic constant, which we find to be k=3.2 x 10^5 dm^3/(mol s). Applications of the analysis to faster reactions and to micro-titration are also discussed.

Baroud, C N; Menetrier, L; Tabeling, P; Baroud, Charles N.; Okkels, Fridolin; Menetrier, Laure; Tabeling, Patrick

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Kinetic Modeling of Microbiological Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic description of microbiological processes is vital for the design and control of microbe-based biotechnologies such as waste water treatment, petroleum oil recovery, and contaminant attenuation and remediation. Various models have been proposed to describe microbiological processes. This editorial article discusses the advantages and limiation of these modeling approaches in cluding tranditional, Monod-type models and derivatives, and recently developed constraint-based approaches. The article also offers the future direction of modeling researches that best suit for petroleum and environmental biotechnologies.

Liu, Chongxuan; Fang, Yilin

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

211

Shale oil cracking. 1. Kinetics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to determine kinetics for thermal cracking of shale oil vapor over shale. Cracking temperatures of 504 to 610/sup 0/C and residence times of 2 to 11 seconds were used. A first-order Arrhenius rate expression and stoichiometry were obtained. Also observed were changes in the oil quality. Cracking decreased the H/C ratio, increased the nitrogen content, and decreased the pour point of the oil. Gas-phase oil cracking is contrasted to liquid-phase oil coking as a loss mechanism in oil-shale retorting.

Burnham, A.K.; Taylor, J.R.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Dynamic chamber armor behavior in IFE and MFE A.R. Raffray a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic chamber armor behavior in IFE and MFE A.R. Raffray a, 1, G. Federici b , A. Hassanein c , D., Madison, WI 53706-1687, USA Abstract The chamber wall armor is subject to demanding conditions in both the requirements on armor imposed by the operating conditions in IFE and MFE, including energy deposition density

Raffray, A. René

213

Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu* , Yanxing Wang, Vigor Yang and Richard A) #12;2 COMBUSTION IN MESO-SCALE VORTEX CHAMBERS Ming-hsun Wu, Yanxing Wang, Vigor Yang and Richard A with the chemical energy varying from 25 to 174W. For the largest combustion volume, hydrogen and hydrocarbons

Yang, Vigor

214

Ionization statistics and diffusion: analytical estimate of their contribution to spatial resolution of drift chambers  

SciTech Connect

The spatial resolution of a drift chamber often is the foremost design parameter. The calculation described here - a design tool - permits us to estimate the contributions of ionization statistics and diffusion to the spatial resolution when actually sampling the drift pulse waveform. Useful formulae are derived for the cylindrical and jet-chamber cell geometries.

Tarnopolsky, G.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Commissioning an animal preference chamber for behavioral studies with laying hens exposed to atmospheric ammonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An environmental preference chamber (EPC) with four double-tiered compartments (C1-C4), each capable of being controlled to distinct ammonia (NH"3) concentrations and temperature, was designed, fabricated and commissioned. Preference chambers are commonly ... Keywords: Ambient conditions, Animal welfare, Automatic control, Cross-contamination

G. T. Sales, A. R. Green, R. S. Gates

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS F. NAJMABADI* University the trade- offs, to develop operational windows for chamber con- cepts, and to identify high the injection process; (d) for relatively low yield targets ( 250 MJ), an operational window with no buffer gas

California at San Diego, University of

217

General Search at HERA A General Search for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 / 18 General Search at HERA G. Brandt A General Search for New Phenomena at HERA Gerhard Brandt Analysis Presented Paper: Phys. Lett. B 674 (2009), 257 [arxiv:0901.0507] #12;2 / 18 General Search at HERA General Search at HERA G. Brandt The H1 General Search General Search for Physics beyond the Standard

218

U.S. Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging Global Biofuels Market U.S. Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging Global Biofuels Market January 29, 2008 - 10:53am Addthis Remarks as Prepared For Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you very much, Bruce, for that kind introduction. My thanks also to Tom Donahue and the leadership of the Chamber for inviting me to be with you today. I was quite pleased to hear that the Chamber was sponsoring this event. As anyone who knows me - or has heard me speak recently - can tell you, the biofuels industry is a favorite topic of mine. In my view, advanced biofuels offer tremendous promise for helping our nation to bring about a new energy future-one that is cleaner, more sustainable, more affordable,

219

The American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad & Tobago | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad & Tobago The American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad & Tobago The American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad & Tobago May 13, 2008 - 12:00pm Addthis Remarks As Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you, Raymond. I appreciate the Chamber organizing this gathering this morning. The American Chamber here on Trinidad and Tobago is an important regional voice in support of the free market, so I want to commend you for hosting the Business Future of the Americas conference next month. Having spent most of my career in the private sector, it is always rewarding to be among colleagues from the business community. I'm also quite pleased to be back in Trinidad & Tobago, having done business here during my time at Cabot Corporation. I've always been impressed with this nation's government, its people and

220

MHK Technologies/Multi Resonant Chambers MRC 1000 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resonant Chambers MRC 1000 Resonant Chambers MRC 1000 < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Multi Resonant Chambers MRC 1000.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization ORECon Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description A 1 5MW Multi Resonant Chamber MRC using Oscillating Water Column OWC principles Consists of 3 x 500kW independent chambers each with a Dresser Rand HydroAir turbine driving an induction generator Full power conversion system delivers grid compliant power 1 5MW 33kV 60Hz to shore Device is tension moored to maximise power capture and minimise footprint All maintenance is done on board No moving parts in the water Turbines are low speed 300rpm high efficiency 75 and low noise

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Integrated Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine  

SciTech Connect

The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. The present work details the chamber design for the pure fusion option. The fusion chamber consists of the first wall and blanket. This integrated system must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated LIFE design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

Latkowski, J F; Kramer, K J; Abbott, R P; Morris, K R; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G; Reyes, S; Moses, G A; Fratoni, M; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Rhodes, M; Kane, J; Scott, H; Kramer, R; Pantano, C; Scullard, C; Sawicki, R; Wilks, S; Mehl, M

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nanocrystallization Reactions and Kinetics, Chemical Partitioning ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary nanocrystallization reactions and kinetics will be discussed for selected FeCo-based ... Search of Half-Metallic Heusler Alloys and their Applications to ...

223

Aluminium Dissolution Kinetics in Caustic Media  

• Žuti?, V. and Stumm, W. (1984) Effect of organic acids and fluoride on the dissolution kinetics of hydrous alumina. A model study using the rotating disk

224

Investigating Grain Boundary Structure-Kinetic Property ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Grain boundary energy landscapes contain all the information that is required to describe the kinetic behavior of grain boundaries (GBs).

225

Thermodynamic and Kinetic Simulation and Experimental Results ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the use of thermodynamic and kinetic modeling software, NETL has designed a systematic method that has been successfully developed to design an ...

226

Geologic evidence for a magma chamber beneath Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

At Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, more than 0.5 m.y. of magmatic activity, including caldera collapse and renewed caldera-filling volcanism, has created a structural and thermal chimney that channels magma ascent. Holocene rhyolitic eruptions (1) have been confined mainly within the caldera in an area 5 km in diameter, (2) have been very similar in chemical composition, phenocryst mineralogy, and eruptive style, and (3) have occurred as recently as 1300 years ago, with repose periods of 2000--3000 years between eruptions. Holocene basaltic andesite eruptions are widespread on the flanks but are excluded from the area of rhyolitic volcanism. Basaltic andesite in fissures at the edge of the rhyolite area has silicic inclusions and shows mixed basalt-rhyolite magma relations. These geologic relations and the high geothermal gradient that characterizes the lower part of a drill hole in the caldera (U.S. Geological Survey Newberry 2) indicate that a rhyolitic magma chamber has existed beneath the caldera throughout the Holocene. Its longevity probably is a result of intermittent underplating by basaltic magma.

Macleod, N.S.; Sherrod, D.R.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

227

Atlas chamber, power flow channel, and diagnostic interface design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Atlas pulsed-power machine, presently being designed at Los Alamos, will deliver a pulse of {approximately} 45 MA, in 4--5 {micro}sec, with energies of up to 6 MJ (from a bank of 36 MJ maximum) to a load assembly, located in vacuum. Design considerations for the vacuum vessel, power flow channel from the vessel inward, are presented. In contrast to Sandia`s PBFA II-Z, where 20 MA currents and 2--2.5 MJ of energy are delivered to ({approximately} 15 mg) loads in {approximately} 100 nsec, the Atlas structures will have to be designed for longer timescales and higher energies to drive heavy lines ({approximately} 70 g). Design issues for the chamber include materials stresses, formation of (and protection from) debris and molten jets, impulse loading, and survivability and ease of replacement of internal structures. For the power flow channel designs, issues are minimizing inductance, preventing movement of conductors during and after firing, damage mitigation, reducing the cost of materials and installation, and electrical insulation. A key issue for damage mitigation is the radius within which total destruction of material objects occurs. Choices of vessel size, insulator materials, cost and ease of manufacturing, and mechanical stability issues are presently in the conceptual design phase. Typical access requirements for diagnostics (including radial and axial X-ray backlighting, flux loops, spectroscopy, interferometry, bolometry, etc.) are provided for in the design.

Wurden, G.A.; Davis, H.A.; Taylor, A.; Bowman, D.; Ballard, E.; Ney, S.; Scudder, D.; Trainor, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Not Measurement Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 December 2007_______ Change Notice 1 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 360 millirem/year. The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 620 millirem/year. Part 2 page 5 Natural background radiation is by far the

229

General User Proposal Scores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General User Proposal Scores General User Proposal Scores General User Proposal Scores Print Tuesday, 01 June 2010 10:34 Scoring Proposals are scored on a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 being the best score and 5 the worst. Reviewers are requested to use the following ranking schema: Must do High Priority Medium Priority Low priority Don't do Beam time is assigned based on each proposal's score in relation to all other proposals for a given beamline. For beamlines where beamtime requests exceed available beamtime, a cutoff score is assigned after which no beam time is allocated. proposal scores Beam Time Cutoff Scores for the Current Cycle The table below lists the percent of beam time shifts allocated/requested for each beamline, and the cutoff scores, below which no beam time was assigned.

230

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

_______ _______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 360 millirem/year. The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 620 millirem/year. Part 2 page 5 Natural background radiation is by far the

231

NEWTON's General Science References  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Science References General Science References Do you have a great general science reference link? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Reference Links: First.gov Science and Technology First.gov Science and Technology This site, sponsered by the US Government provides reference links to topics on science, telecommunications, computers, research agencies, and news. NASA Science NASA Science NASA Science, is a website sponsered by NASA, that supplies resources for understanding our world and the world above. Topics include earth science, heliophysics, the planets, astrophysics and much more. There is also an educator page! Nobel Laueate Listings and Stories Nobel Laueate Listings and Stories See the official site for the Nobel Prize, and read biographies about all of the Nobel Laureates, and there life changing discoveries and accomplishments.

232

Argonne TDC: Intermagnetics General Corporation  

Record-setting joint research spurs growth of superconductor market for Argonne partner. Intermagnetics General Corporation Latham, NY. Intermagnetics General ...

233

Kinetic theory of the interdiffusion coefficient in dense plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Naive applications of Spitzer's theory to very dense plasmas can lead to negative diffusion coefficients. The interdiffusion coefficients in Binary Ionic Mixtures (two species of point ions in a uniform neutralizing background) have been calculated recently using molecular dynamics techniques. These calculations can provide useful benchmarks for theoretical evaluations of the diffusion coefficient in dense plasma mixtures. This paper gives a brief description of a kinetic theoretic approximation to the diffusion coefficient which generalizes Spitzer to high density and is in excellent agreement with the computer simulations. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Boercker, D.B.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Generalized Lorentz Transformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalized Lorentz transformations with modified velocity parameter are considered. Lorentz transformations depending on the mass of the observer are suggested.The modified formula for the addition of velocities remarkably preserves the constancy of the velocity of light for all observers. The Doppler red shift is affected and can provide a test of such generalisations.

Virendra Gupta

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

235

Split kinetic energy method for quantum systems with competing potentials  

SciTech Connect

For quantum systems with competing potentials, the conventional perturbation theory often yields an asymptotic series and the subsequent numerical outcome becomes uncertain. To tackle such a kind of problems, we develop a general solution scheme based on a new energy dissection idea. Instead of dividing the potential energy into 'unperturbed' and 'perturbed' terms, a partition of the kinetic energy is performed. By distributing the kinetic energy term in part into each individual potential, the Hamiltonian can be expressed as the sum of the subsystem Hamiltonians with respective competing potentials. The total wavefunction is expanded by using a linear combination of the basis sets of respective subsystem Hamiltonians. We first illustrate the solution procedure using a simple system consisting of a particle under the action of double {delta}-function potentials. Next, this method is applied to the prototype systems of a charged harmonic oscillator in strong magnetic field and the hydrogen molecule ion. Compared with the usual perturbation approach, this new scheme converges much faster to the exact solutions for both eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. When properly extended, this new solution scheme can be very useful for dealing with strongly coupling quantum systems. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new basis set expansion method is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Split kinetic energy method is proposed to solve quantum eigenvalue problems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant improvement has been obtained in converging to exact results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extension of such methods is promising and discussed.

Mineo, H.; Chao, Sheng D., E-mail: sdchao@spring.iam.ntu.edu.tw

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Characterization of a multi-axis ion chamber array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this work was to characterize a multi-axis ion chamber array (IC PROFILER; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL USA) that has the potential to simplify the acquisition of LINAC beam data. Methods: The IC PROFILER (or panel) measurement response was characterized with respect to radiation beam properties, including dose, dose per pulse, pulse rate frequency (PRF), and energy. Panel properties were also studied, including detector-calibration stability, power-on time, backscatter dependence, and the panel's agreement with water tank measurements [profiles, fractional depth dose (FDD), and output factors]. Results: The panel's relative deviation was typically within ({+-}) 1% of an independent (or nominal) response for all properties that were tested. Notable results were (a) a detectable relative field shape change of {approx}1% with linear accelerator PRF changes; (b) a large range in backscatter thickness had a minimal effect on the measured dose distribution (typically less than 1%); (c) the error spread in profile comparison between the panel and scanning water tank (Blue Phantom, CC13; IBA Schwarzenbruck, DE) was approximately ({+-}) 0.75%. Conclusions: The ability of the panel to accurately reproduce water tank profiles, FDDs, and output factors is an indication of its abilities as a dosimetry system. The benefits of using the panel versus a scanning water tank are less setup time and less error susceptibility. The same measurements (including device setup and breakdown) for both systems took 180 min with the water tank versus 30 min with the panel. The time-savings increase as the measurement load is increased.

Simon, Thomas A.; Kozelka, Jakub; Simon, William E.; Kahler, Darren; Li, Jonathan; Liu, Chihray [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Science Building, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8300 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Health Science Center, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States) and Sun Nuclear Corporation, 425-A Pineda Court, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States); Sun Nuclear Corporation, 425-A Pineda Court, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Health Science Center, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

ERNSTMORITZARNDTUNIVERSITAT Absolute number density and kinetic analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plasma-chemical reactions. Therefore, from the analysis of their kinetics, one can learn more about of the technical applications, many plasma­chemical processes within the discharges as well as mechanisms determines all electron induced plasma-chemical processes and hence influences the kinetics of species

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

238

Kinetics of Enzymatic Depolymerization of Guar Galactomannan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is used as a rheology modifier in many of its applications, previous kinetic studies have been limitedKinetics of Enzymatic Depolymerization of Guar Galactomannan Shamsheer Mahammad, Robert K. Prud'homme, George W. Roberts,*, and Saad A. Khan*, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North

Khan, Saad A.

239

Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

Burnham, A.K.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion  

SciTech Connect

The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

Guo Xiaoming [Physics and Computer Science Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3C5 (Canada)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.  

SciTech Connect

The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

242

Four-Button BPM Coefficients in Cylindrical and Elliptic Beam Chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beam position monitor (BPM) coefficients are calculated from induced charges on four-button BPMs in circular and elliptic beam chambers for ?>> 1. Since the beam chamber cross-section for the APS storage ring is different from an exact elliptic geometry, numerical values of the BPM coefficients and their inversions are computed from two-dimensional electrostatic field distributions inside an exact geometry of the beam chamber. Utilizing Green’s reciprocation theorem, a potential value is applied to the buttons rather than changing the beam position, and potential distributions corresponding to the beam positions are then computed. 1. Cylindrical Chamber A charged particle beam of short bunches induces charges on the beam chamber wall. Due to the Lorentz contraction, for ?>> 1, where ? is the relativistic factor, these charges have the same longitudinal intensity modulation as the beam. The electromagnetic fields associated with the beam are obtained by the Lorentz transformation from the fixed lab frame F to a moving reference frame F', where the charged beam is at rest [1, 2]. The field distribution inside the beam chamber becomes an electrostatic problem in the moving reference frame. Here we assume that the buttons are installed flush with the inner surface of the beam chamber, with the chamber having constant crosssection and the chamber wall at a uniform potential. For the charge density of a filament beam located at (xo,yo) in the transverse plane of the Cartesian coordinates and moving with a wave number k in the longitudinal direction z in the lab frame F, ? = ? ( x, y) cos k( z ? vt); (1) k

S. H. Kim

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

S T A T E OF CONNECTICUT E X E C U T I V E CHAMBERS M  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

T T A T E OF CONNECTICUT E X E C U T I V E CHAMBERS M . JODI R E L L GOVERNOR The Honorable Steven Chu, Secretary United States Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S. W. Washington, D.C. 20585 March 23,2009 Dear Secretary Chu: Re: State Energy Program Assurances In accordance with Section 41 0 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009,I hereby notify you that I have obtained necessary assurances that each of the following will occur: (1) The applicable State regulatory authority will seek to implement, in appropriate proceedings for each electric and gas utility, with respect to which the State regulatory authority has ratemaking authority, a general policy that ensures that utility financial incentives are aligned with helping their customers use energy more efficiently and that provide timely cost recovery

245

Office of Inspector General  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspector General Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Work Plan for FY 2013 Audits Central Audits Division  Ecotality  Funding Overlap  Follow-up on Smart Grid Investment Grant  DOE's Loan Program Office's Portfolio Management  Office of Fossil Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  Advanced Manufacturing Office's Combined Heat and Power Systems  DOE's Management of Contaminated Non-EM Facilities  Unneeded Real Estate  Review of For-Profit Grantees for selected DOE programs  Commercialization Efforts at National Laboratories  Research Misconduct at Office of Science  Public Dissemination of Research Results  BPA's Management of Borrowing Authority Construction  Controls Over PMA's Use of Hedging Instruments

246

EMSL: News: General Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General News General News Battery development may extend range of electric cars Battery development may extend range of electric cars New anode quadruples life of lithium-sulfur battery, could also help store renewable energy more cheaply Released: January 09, 2014 Scientists used EMSL capabilities and expertise to help develop and test a new anode design for lithium-sulfur batteries. The "hybrid" anode significantly extends the life of lithium-sulfur batteries, bringing them closer to commercial use. Read the PNNL news release. Batteries as they are meant to be seen Batteries as they are meant to be seen The search for long-lasting, inexpensive rechargeable batteries Released: December 27, 2013 Researchers working at EMSL study how a battery works under wet conditions

247

Warped General Gauge Mediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop the formalism of "General gauge mediation" for five dimensional theories in a slice of AdS space. A set of current correlators encodes the effect of a supersymmetry breaking hidden sector localised on the IR brane. These current correlators provide a tree-level gaugino mass and loop-level sfermion masses on the UV brane. We also use this formalism to calculate the Casimir energy and masses for bulk hyperscalars. To illustrate this general construction we consider a perturbative hidden sector of generalised messengers coupled to a spurion. For models with large warping, we find that when the AdS warp factor $k$ is less than the characteristc mass scale $M$ of the hidden sector, the whole Kaluza-Klein tower of vector superfields propagate supersymmetry breaking effects to the UV brane. When $M$ is less than $k$, the zero modes dominate.

Moritz McGarrie; Daniel C. Thompson

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

248

Tests of General Relativity  

SciTech Connect

The last years have seen continuing activities in the exploration of our understanding of gravity, motivated by results from precision cosmology and new precision astrophysical experiments. At the centre of attention lies the question as to whether general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. In answering this question, we work not only towards correctly interpreting the phenomenon of 'dark energy' but also towards the goal of achieving a quantum theory of gravity. In these efforts, the observations of pulsars, especially those in binary systems, play an important role. Pulsars do not only provide the only evidence for the existence of gravitational waves so far, but they also provide precision tests of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity. This talk summarizes the current state-of-art in these experiments and looks into the future.

Kramer, Michael [MPI fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

249

Generalized Inverse Seesaws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The seesaw mechanism can be generalized to a Type-III variant and a quintuplet variant. We present two models that provide analogous generalizations of the inverse seesaw mechanism. The first model employs a fermion triplet F ~ (1,3,0) and requires no additional multiplets or parameters relative to the standard inverse seesaw. We argue that, from a bottom-up perspective, there appears to be no particular reason to preference the usual scenario over this variant. The second model employs a fermion quintuplet F ~ (1,5,0) and requires an additional scalar S ~ (1,4,1). We also show that minimal inverse seesaws with even larger fermionic representations are not expected to realize naturally small neutrino masses.

Law, Sandy S C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Generalized Inverse Seesaws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The seesaw mechanism can be generalized to a Type-III variant and a quintuplet variant. We present two models that provide analogous generalizations of the inverse seesaw mechanism. The first model employs a fermion triplet F ~ (1,3,0) and requires no additional multiplets or parameters relative to the standard inverse seesaw. We argue that, from a bottom-up perspective, there appears to be no particular reason to preference the usual scenario over this variant. The second model employs a fermion quintuplet F ~ (1,5,0) and requires an additional scalar S ~ (1,4,1). We also show that minimal inverse seesaws with even larger fermionic representations are not expected to realize naturally small neutrino masses.

Sandy S. C. Law; Kristian L. McDonald

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

Four-button BPM coefficients in cylindrical and elliptic beam chambers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beam position monitor (BPM) coefficients are calculated from induced charges on four-button BPMs in circular and elliptic beam chambers for {gamma} >>1. Since the beam chamber cross-section for the APS storage ring is different from an exact elliptic geometry, numerical values of the BPM coefficients and their inversions are computed from two-dimensional electrostatic field distributions inside an exact geometry of the beam chamber. Utilizing Green's reciprocation theorem, a potential value is applied to the buttons rather than changing the beam position, and potential distributions corresponding to the beam positions are then computed.

Kim, S.H.

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

252

Enclosed Chambers for Humidity Control And Sample Containment in Fiber Diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A chamber and stretch frame for making fibers for diffraction is described. The chamber is made from a simple plastic cuvette with silicon nitride windows. It is suitable for maintaining constant humidity during fiber drying and data collection, and allows stretching of the fiber and exposure to magnetic fields during sample preparation. If necessary, it provides primary containment for toxic and infectious biological materials. The chamber has been used in fiber diffraction experiments with filamentous plant viruses and a yeast prion protein, and is shown to produce excellent orientation and to maintain hydration and order at the molecular level.

McDonald, M.; Kendall, A.; Tanaka, M.; Weissman, J.S.; Stubbs, G.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

253

Kinetic description of rotating Tokamak plasmas with anisotropic temperatures in the collisionless regime  

SciTech Connect

A largely unsolved theoretical issue in controlled fusion research is the consistent kinetic treatment of slowly-time varying plasma states occurring in collisionless and magnetized axisymmetric plasmas. The phenomenology may include finite pressure anisotropies as well as strong toroidal and poloidal differential rotation, characteristic of Tokamak plasmas. Despite the fact that physical phenomena occurring in fusion plasmas depend fundamentally on the microscopic particle phase-space dynamics, their consistent kinetic treatment remains still essentially unchallenged to date. The goal of this paper is to address the problem within the framework of Vlasov-Maxwell description. The gyrokinetic treatment of charged particles dynamics is adopted for the construction of asymptotic solutions for the quasi-stationary species kinetic distribution functions. These are expressed in terms of the particle exact and adiabatic invariants. The theory relies on a perturbative approach, which permits to construct asymptotic analytical solutions of the Vlasov-Maxwell system. In this way, both diamagnetic and energy corrections are included consistently into the theory. In particular, by imposing suitable kinetic constraints, the existence of generalized bi-Maxwellian asymptotic kinetic equilibria is pointed out. The theory applies for toroidal rotation velocity of the order of the ion thermal speed. These solutions satisfy identically also the constraints imposed by the Maxwell equations, i.e., quasi-neutrality and Ampere's law. As a result, it is shown that, in the presence of nonuniform fluid and EM fields, these kinetic equilibria can sustain simultaneously toroidal differential rotation, quasi-stationary finite poloidal flows and temperature anisotropy.

Cremaschini, Claudio [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) and INFN, Trieste (Italy); Tessarotto, Massimo [Department of Mathematics and Informatics, University of Trieste (Italy)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Model simplification of chemical kinetic systems under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the impact of uncertainty on the reduction and simplification of chemical kinetics mechanisms. Chemical kinetics simulations of complex fuels are very computationally expensive, especially when ...

Coles, Thomas Michael Kyte

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

General Services Administration  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Energy Management Improvement Act of 1988 requires all federal agencies, including the General Services Administration (GSA), to reduce building energy usage by 10 percent from 1985 levels by 1995. While GSA has been actively pursuing energy conservation, it faces a formidable challenge in achieving the required 10-percent building energy reduction by 1995, and it is too early to tell whether GSA's efforts will be successful. Because GSA has developed a comprehensive strategy to reduce building energy usage, has begun funding a variety of specific energy conservation initiatives, and is actively exploring other energy-saving opportunities, this paper makes no recommendations to GSA.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Neutron And Gamma Detector Using An Ionization Chamber With An Integrated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron And Gamma Detector Using An Ionization Chamber Neutron And Gamma Detector Using An Ionization Chamber Neutron And Gamma Detector Using An Ionization Chamber With An Integrated Body And Moderator A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Neutron And Gamma Detector Using An Ionization Chamber With An Integrated Body And Moderator A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an

257

Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

Danby, Gordon T. (Wading River, NY); Jackson, John W. (Shoreham, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

1990-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Rapid-Circulation Evaporation Chamber for Measuring Bulk Stomatal Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relatively simple method is described for determining evaporation of short vegetation at any moment of time. The method is based on the measurement of bulk stomatal resistance of the crop with an evaporation chamber. Once this quantity is known,...

W. Kohsiek

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Condensation Coefficient Measurement for Water in the UMR Cloud Simulation Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic series of condensation coefficient measurements of water have been made using the University of Missouri—Rolla cooled-wall expansion chamber which simulates the thermodynamics of cloud. This coefficient is seen to decrease from a ...

D. E. Hagen; J. Schmitt; M. Trueblood; J. Carstens; D. R. White; D. J. Alofs

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Potential applications of the natural design of internal explosion chambers in the bombardier beetle (Carabidae, Brachinus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bombardier Beetle (Carabidae, Brachinus) has a unique form of defense mechanism which involves the explosive mixing of hydroquinones and hydrogen peroxide in its internal explosion chambers and using the resultant high ...

Lai, Changquan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Space Chamber Reaches Cold Target at Unprecedented Efficiency | U.S. DOE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Space Chamber Reaches Cold Target at Unprecedented Efficiency Space Chamber Reaches Cold Target at Unprecedented Efficiency Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » October 2012 Space Chamber Reaches Cold Target at Unprecedented Efficiency Thomas Jefferson Laboratory lends expertise in cryogenics developments. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of NASA NASA's Space Environment Simulation Lab Chamber A, which is used by the

263

Modeling of Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics  

SciTech Connect

In order to model a full fuel cycle in a nuclear reactor, it is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by coupling fuel burnup equations with the kinetics equations. When the equations are solved simultaneously with a nonlinear equation solver, the end result is a code with the unique capability of modeling transients at any time during a fuel cycle.

Matthew Johnson; Scott Lucas; Pavel Tsvetkov

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

General Employee Radiological Training (GERT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Employee Radiological Training (GERT) Radiological Training for NSLS Access has been replaced with BNL General Employee Radiological Training (GERT). Please read the...

265

Dual-chamber plasma deposition of A-Si:H solar cells at high rates using disilane  

SciTech Connect

The use of a separated chamber deposition system for the fabrication of a-Si:H solar cells from disilane at high deposition rates results in a substantial improvement in short circuit current compared to that obtained from a single-chamber system. The spectral responses of cells fabricated in the dual-chamber mode are compared to those made in the single-chamber mode. The results are interpreted by assuming that the rate of removal of boron contaminants from the chamber is independent of deposition rate.

Rajeswaran, G.; Vanier, P.E.; Corderman, R.R.; Kampas, F.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Directional Detection of Fast Neutrons Using a Time Projection Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spontaneous fission in Special Nuclear Material (SNM) such as plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) results in the emission of neutrons with energies in the MeV range (hereafter 'fast neutrons'). These fast neutrons are largely unaffected by the few centimeters of intervening high-Z material that would suffice for attenuating most emitted gamma rays, while tens of centimeters of hydrogenous materials are required to achieve substantial attenuation of neutron fluxes from SNM. Neutron detectors are therefore an important complement to gamma-ray detectors in SNM search and monitoring applications. The rate at which SNM emits fast neutrons varies from about 2 per kilogram per second for typical HEU to some 60,000 per kilogram per second for metallic weapons grade plutonium. These rates can be compared with typical sea-level (cosmogenic) neutron backgrounds of roughly 5 per second per square meter per steradian in the relevant energy range [1]. The fact that the backgrounds are largely isotropic makes directional neutron detection especially attractive for SNM detection. The ability to detect, localize, and ultimately identify fast neutron sources at standoff will ultimately be limited by this background rate. Fast neutrons are particularly well suited to standoff detection and localization of SNM or other fast neutrons sources. Fast neutrons have attenuation lengths of about 60 meters in air, and retain considerable information about their source direction even after one or two scatters. Knowledge of the incoming direction of a fast neutron, from SNM or otherwise, has the potential to significantly improve signal to background in a variety of applications, since the background arriving from any one direction is a small fraction of the total background. Imaging or directional information therefore allows for source detection at a larger standoff distance or with shorter dwell times compared to nondirectional detectors, provided high detection efficiency can be maintained. Directional detection of neutrons has been previously considered for applications such as controlled fusion neutron imaging [2], nuclear fuel safety research [3], imaging of solar neutrons and SNM [4], and in nuclear science [5]. The use of scintillating crystals and fibers has been proposed for directional neutron detection [6]. Recently, a neutron scatter camera has been designed, constructed, and tested for imaging of fast neutrons, characteristic for SNM material fission [7]. The neutron scatter camera relies on the measurement of the proton recoil angle and proton energy by time of flight between two segmented solid-state detectors. A single-measurement result from the neutron scatter camera is a ring containing the possible incident neutron direction. Here we describe the development and commissioning of a directional neutron detection system based on a time projection chamber (TPC) detector. The TPC, which has been widely used in particle and nuclear physics research for several decades, provides a convenient means of measuring the full 3D trajectory, specific ionization (i.e particle type) and energy of charged particles. For this application, we observe recoil protons produced by fast neutron scatters on protons in hydrogen or methane gas. Gas pressures of a few ATM provide reasonable neutron interaction/scattering rates.

Bowden, N; Heffner, M; Carosi, G; Carter, D; Foxe, M; Jovanovic, I

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

267

Teacher and General Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne Science Project Ideas! Our Teacher and General Resources section provides you with online aids for learning about science, such as a tutorial of science equipment, as well as guides for the metric system. Please select any item below that interests you. Also, if you have an idea for a great teacher resource that we could share, please click our Ideas page. We would love to hear from you! Science Equipment Resources: Online Basic Laboratory Equipment Information An Introduction to Basic Laboratory Equipment All students need to know and understand the function of the equipment that they will be using in the science classroom. This exercise is to help students know a beaker from a bunsen burner! TSwift MB 3200 Microscope Online Tutorial Online Microscope Tutorial

268

Generalized Stochastic Gradient Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#1;#2;#3;#2;#4;#5;#6;#7;#8;#2; #11;#12; #14;#15;#5;#16;#12;#7;#14; #1;#4;#5; #7;#2;#3;#12; #17;#2;#5;#4;#3;#7;#3;#18; George W. Evans, Seppo Honkapohja and Noah Willams #19;#14;#12; #20;#2;#4; #21;#22;#22;#23; #24;#25;#26;#27; #22;#23;#28;#23; #1... ;#2;#3;#4;#3;#2;#4;#5;#6;#4;#7;#8;#2;#3;#6; #4; #11;#3;#12;#2;#8;#3;#4; #6;#14;#15;#11;#16;#16;#11;#2;#17; Generalized Stochastic Gradient Learning? George W. Evans University of Oregon Seppo Honkapohja University of Cambridge Noah Williams Princeton...

Evans, George W; Honkapohja, Seppo; Williams, Noah

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

269

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in chapter 14, Radiation Safety Training, of Implementation Guide G44.1B, Radiation Protection Programs Guide, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard [RCS - DOE-STD-1098-99, Ch. 1]. The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals

270

GENERAL ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since last year’s GTC Conference, a considerable number of significant events have occurred in the gasification technology marketplace. New IGCC projects have come on stream with commercial operation, other new IGCC projects have been announced and started in development, environmental issues have gained emphasis, and energy prices, notably natural gas, have escalated dramatically. Directionally, all of these events appear to have created a more favorable atmosphere for IGCC projects. Related to an ongoing IGCC project currently in development, a joint analysis has been performed by Global Energy, General Electric Power Systems, and Praxair to evaluate technical and economic elements for the performance of BGL Gasification Technology based on solid hydrocarbon fuel feed to an IGCC for power generation. Results of the analysis provide a picture of the relative economics in today’s environment for electrical power generation by conventional natural gas fired combined cycle power systems compared to using BGL Gasification Technology in an IGCC configuration. 2

Igcc Power Generation; Richard A. Olliver; John M. Wainwright; Raymond F. Drnevich Abstract

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Ocean General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

United States Attorney General  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93, 5 U.S. Op. Off. Legal Counsel 1, 1981 WL 30865 (U.S.A.G.) 93, 5 U.S. Op. Off. Legal Counsel 1, 1981 WL 30865 (U.S.A.G.) United States Attorney General ***1 *293 January 16, 1981 **1 The President The White House Washington, D.C. 20500 MY DEAR MR. PRESIDENT: You have asked my opinion concerning the scope of currently existing legal and constitutional authorities for the continuance of government functions during a temporary lapse in appropriations, such as the Government sustained on October 1, 1980. As you know, some initial determination concerning the extent of these authorities had to be made in the waning hours of the last fiscal year in order to avoid extreme administrative confusion that might have arisen from Congress' failure timely to enact 11 of the 13 anticipated regular appropriations bills, FN;B1[FN1]FN;F1 or a

273

Rainfall Kinetic Energy in Eastern Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall kinetic energy is a commonly used climatic parameter for the prediction of soil erosion by water. Such a parameter is difficult to measure and is usually estimated from relationships established between rainfall energy and rainfall ...

Colin John Rosewell

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Kinetic Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Kinetic Energy LLC Place Texas Utility Id 56210 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861...

275

AER NY Kinetics LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Ogdensburg Kinetic Energy Project This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved...

276

The Multiplexed Chemical Kinetic Photoionization Mass Spectrometer: A New Approach To Isomer-resolved Chemical Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

instruments applied to analysis of complex chemical mixturesrelies on chemical separation (by chromatography) into pureThe multiplexed chemical kinetic photoionization mass

Osborne, David L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Kinetic instability of drift-Alfven waves in solar corona and stochastic heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar atmosphere is structured and inhomogeneous both horizontally and vertically. The omnipresence of coronal magnetic loops implies gradients of the equilibrium plasma quantities like the density, magnetic field and temperature. These gradients are responsible for the excitation of drift waves that grow both within the two-component fluid description (in the presence of collisions and without it) and within the two-component kinetic descriptions (due to purely kinetic effects). In the present work the effects of the density gradient in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field vector are investigated within the kinetic theory, in both electrostatic and electromagnetic regimes. The electromagnetic regime implies the coupling of the gradient-driven drift wave with the Alfven wave. The growth rates for the two cases are calculated and compared. It is found that, in general, the electrostatic regime is characterized by stronger growth rates, as compared with the electromagnetic perturbations. Also d...

Vranjes, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Kinetic Theory of Plasma Waves - Part III: Inhomogeneous Plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Theory / Proceedings of the Ninth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

P. U. Lamalle

279

Kinetic Theory of Plasma Waves - Part I: Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Theory / Proceedings of the Ninth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

P. U. Lamalle

280

Kinetics of PBX9404 Aging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PBX 9404 is an early formulation of HMX from which we can learn about the effects of aging in the weapons stockpile. Of particular interest is the presence of 3% nitrocellulose in PBX 9404 as an energetic binder. Nitrocellulose is used pervasively in smokeless gunpowders and was formerly used extensively in the film and art preservation industries. It is well known that nitrocellulose decomposes autocatalytically, and stabilizers, such as the diphenylamine used in PBX 9404, are used to retard its decomposition. Even so, its lifetime is still limited, and the reactions eventually leading to catastrophic autocatalysis are still not understood well despite years of work. In addition to reducing the available energy in the explosive, degradation of nitrocellulose affects the mechanical properties of the pressed PBX 9404 parts by the associated reduction in molecular weight, which reduces the strength of the binder. A structural formula for a monomer of the nitrocellulose used in PBX 9404 is shown. The initial nitration level is 2.3 of 3.0 possible sites, and they have different reactivities. Degradation of nitrocellulose affects many properties. As an aid in examining historical chemical analysis data, several measures of degradation are given for the simple replacement of a nitro group with a hydrogen. The weight percent of nitrocellulose remaining for an initial concentration of 3% as used in PBX 9404 is also given. Of course, the real degradation reaction is more complicated, including chain scission and crosslinking reactions giving other gas species. During the course of this work, we spent considerable time addressing the question, ''Why is PBX 9404 blue?'' There was actually considerable controversy in the color evolution with aging, and the situation was clarified by Ben Richardson at Pantex. Workers there assured us that PBX 9404 starts with an ivory color. Drying the prill prior to pressing turns it a mottled blue, and well-preserved prill samples retain a blue color decades after formulation. Subsequently, heat and light both send it through a progression of colors from grayish blue, blue-green, green, brown, dirty yellow, mottled tan, and eventually pale tan. The progression is accelerated by oxygen and possibly moisture, as has been shown in several accelerated aging studies. The precise compounds causing the color evolution are uncertain, but they are undoubtedly a progression of quinoidal, nitroso, and nitrated DPA compounds. For example, paranitroso DPA is deep blue. Unfortunately, the location of various nitrated DPAs, which ranged from yellow to orange to red to brown and which were used by Pantex as analytical standards in the 1970s, is not currently known. While the color change is indicative of aging, it is by no means a quantitative measure of the extent of nitrocellulose degradation. Inspection of the literature yielded a variety of kinetic models, and the activation energy typically ranges from 25-35 kcal/mol for T<100 C. This literature qualitatively predicts times for 30% decomposition ranging from a few days at 100 C to 1-2 years at 50 C to 50 years at room temperature. To develop a quantitative model, we used the data of Leider and Seaton, which were collected at conditions most closely matching stockpile conditions for any data set we had available. They used PBX 9404 heated as pressed pellets in closed vessels at temperatures ranging from 50 to 100 C for times up to three years, and they report mass loss, gas yield and composition, and chemical analysis of the residual solid by methods used in stockpile surveillance. Initial kinetic analysis of the weight of remaining nitrocellulose as measured by liquid chromatography and the loss of nitrate esters by a colorimetric technique gave an activation energy of 27 kcal/mol. However, the reaction is complex due to the different stability of the three nitroester positions, and this complexity required either parallel first-order reactions or an nth-order reaction (n=3.6), which is mathematically equivalent to a Gamma distribution of frequency factors

Burnham, A K; Fried, L E

2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Photon stimulated desorption measurement of an extruded aluminum beam chamber for the Advanced Photon Source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS), presently being commisioned, will produce X-ray s of unprecedented brightness. The high energy ring of the APS is a 7 GeV positron storage ring, 1104 meters in circumference designed to operate at less than 10{sup {minus}9} Torr with 300 ma of beam and a greater than 10 hour lifetime. The storage ring vacuum chamber is constructed from an extruded 6063 aluminum alloy. During the construction phase, a 2.34 m long section of the APS extruded aluminum chamber was set up on National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X-ray Beamlline X28A and Photon Stimulated Desorption (PSD) was measured. Cleaning and preparation of the chamber was identical to that of the APS construction. In addition to the chamber, small samples of M, Be, and Cu were also exposed to white light having a critical energy of 5 keV. In addition to PSD, measurements were made of specular and diffuse scattering of photons. The chamber and samples were each exposed to a dose greater than 10{sup 23} photons per meter. Desorption yields for H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}0 are reported as a function of accumulated flux, critical energy, incidence angle, and preparation. These results are compared with previous results for aluminum on NSLS Beamlline U1OB and PSD results of other laboratories published for aluminum.

Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Noonan, J.R.; Rosenberg, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Vacuum chamber of the injector synchrotron for the Advanced Photon Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 40 chambers of the 368 m, 7-GeV injector synchrotron of the Advanced Photon Source are made from 1 mm-thick, 316LN stainless steel tubing. Tubes are cold-drawn to an elliptical shape with inside major and minor axes of 6 cm and 3.7 cm, respectively. This results in a thin metallic chamber without corrugations, which allows maximum beam space in the magnets and withstands atmospheric pressure. Sections of the chamber are bent to match the radius of curvature (33.3 m) of the beam over the entire effective length of the dipole magnets. A modified orbital welder is used to join sections of tubing. The chambers and the pumping system required to achieve a pressure of 10{sup {minus}9} Torr are described. A straight section of chamber tubing was tested under external pressure up to 60 psig. At 15 psig, the resulting deflection at the minor half axis was 0.2mm and a maximum compressive stress of 13,500 psi was measured. Tube deformation remained in the elastic region up to {approximately}38 psig. 4 refs., 2 figs.

Benaroya, R.; Dortwegt, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Single Particle Laser Mass Spectrometry Applied to Differential Ice Nucleation Experiments at the AIDA Chamber  

SciTech Connect

Experiments conducted at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located in Karlsruhe, Germany permit investigation of particle properties that affect the nucleation of ice at temperature and water vapor conditions relevant to cloud microphysics and climate issues. Ice clouds were generated by heterogeneous nucleation of Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, and hematite and homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid. Ice crystals formed in the chamber were inertially separated from unactivated, or ‘interstitial’ aerosol particles with a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), then evaporated. The ice residue (i.e., the aerosol which initiated ice nucleation plus any material which was scavenged from the gas- and/or particle-phase), was chemically characterized at the single particle level using a laser ionization mass spectrometer. In this manner the species that first nucleated ice could be identified out of a mixed aerosol population in the chamber. Bare mineral dust particles were more effective ice nuclei (IN) than similar particles with a coating. Metallic particles from contamination in the chamber initiated ice nucleation before other species but there were few enough that they did not compromise the experiments. Nitrate, sulfate, and organics were often detected on particles and ice residue, evidently from scavenging of trace gas-phase species in the chamber. Hematite was a more effective ice nucleus than illite. Ice residue was frequently larger than unactivated test aerosol due to the formation of aggregates due to scavenging, condensation of contaminant gases, and the predominance of larger aerosol in nucleation.

Gallavardin, S. J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Lohmann, U.; Moehler, Ottmar; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Dan

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

Multiple temperature kinetic model and gas-kinetic method for hypersonic non-equilibrium flow computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known that for increasingly rarefied flowfields, the predictions from continuum formulation, such as the Navier-Stokes equations lose accuracy. For the high speed diatomic molecular flow in the transitional regime, the inaccuracies are partially ... Keywords: Gas-kinetic method, Hypersonic and rarefied flows, Multiple temperature kinetic model

Kun Xu; Xin He; Chunpei Cai

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

OSTIblog Posts by Kathy Chambers | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Kathy Chambers Kathy Chambers Kathy Chambers's picture Senior STI Specialist, Information International Associates, Inc. Enjoy the benefits of LED lighting Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uscapitol/6309229615/in/photostream/ Published on Dec 30, 2013 Every day we are bombarded with advertisements in every form and format telling us that our lives will be improved if we buy a particular product because it will save us money, reduce our work effort, save us energy, or benefit the environment. We are justifiably skeptical because we know from experience that if something sounds too good to be true, usually it is. Light-emitting diode (LED) lighting is one of the exceptions. LEDs benefits are so powerful that they seem too good to be true; however, they actually do save us money, reduce our work effort, save us energy and benefit our environment.

287

U.S. Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging Global Biofuels Market U.S. Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging Global Biofuels Market January 29, 2008 - 10:53am Addthis Remarks as Prepared For Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you very much, Bruce, for that kind introduction. My thanks also to Tom Donahue and the leadership of the Chamber for inviting me to be with you today. I was quite pleased to hear that the Chamber was sponsoring this event. As anyone who knows me - or has heard me speak recently - can tell you, the biofuels industry is a favorite topic of mine. In my view, advanced biofuels offer tremendous promise for helping our nation to bring about a new energy future-one that is cleaner, more sustainable, more affordable,

288

Stability of A-150 plastic ionization chamber response over a ~30 year period  

SciTech Connect

At the NIU Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab, the clinical tissue-equivalent ionization chamber response is measured every treatment day using a cesium source that was configured to match readings obtained at the National Bureau of Standards. Daily measurements are performed in air using the air-to-tissue dose conversion factors given in AAPM Report no. 7. The measured exposure calibration factors have been tabulated and graphed as a function of time from 1978 to present. For A-150 plastic ionization chambers, these factors exhibit a sinusoidal variation with a period of approximately one year and amplitude of {+-} 1%. This variation, attributable to the hygroscopic nature of A-150 plastic, is correlated with the relative humidity of the facility, and is greater than the humidity corrections for gas described in the literature. Our data suggest that chamber calibration should be performed at least weekly to accommodate these variations.

Kroc, Thomas K.; Lennox, Arlene J.; /Fermilab

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Faculty of Science General Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty of Science General Science The General Science program gives you maximum flexibility to explore the sciences, plus the core requirements you need for on-going, specialized studies. www.uwindsor.ca/science Rigorous, Enriching Programs The BSc General Science program is a great way to explore your many interests

290

Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Drywall Title Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Drywall Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2010 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Marion L. Russell, Moya Melody, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Imported drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. To support an investigation of those building materials by the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) measured chemical-specific emission factors for 30 samples of drywall materials. Emission factors are reported for 75 chemicals and 30 different drywall samples encompassing both domestic and imported stock and incorporating natural, synthetic, or mixed gypsum core material. CPSC supplied all drywall materials. First the drywall samples were isolated and conditioned in dedicated chambers, then they were transferred to small chambers where emission testing was performed. Four sampling and analysis methods were utilized to assess (1) volatile organic compounds, (2) low molecular weight carbonyls, (3) volatile sulfur compounds, and (4) reactive sulfur gases. LBNL developed a new method that combines the use of solid phase microextraction (SPME) with small emission chambers to measure the reactive sulfur gases, then extended that technique to measure the full suite of volatile sulfur compounds. The testing procedure and analysis methods are described in detail herein. Emission factors were measured under a single set of controlled environmental conditions. The results are compared graphically for each method and in detailed tables for use in estimating indoor exposure concentrations

291

Consistent description of kinetic equation with triangle anomaly  

SciTech Connect

We provide a consistent description of the kinetic equation with a triangle anomaly which is compatible with the entropy principle of the second law of thermodynamics and the charge/energy-momentum conservation equations. In general an anomalous source term is necessary to ensure that the equations for the charge and energy-momentum conservation are satisfied and that the correction terms of distribution functions are compatible to these equations. The constraining equations from the entropy principle are derived for the anomaly-induced leading order corrections to the particle distribution functions. The correction terms can be determined for the minimum number of unknown coefficients in one charge and two charge cases by solving the constraining equations.

Pu Shi; Gao Jianhua; Wang Qun [Interdisciplinary Center for Theoretical Study and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Physicochemical phenomena of electro-kinetic extraction of inorganic contaminants from kaolinite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments investigating the use of electro-kinetics for removal of inorganic chemicals from kaolinite clay were performed. Kaolinite was homogeneously saturated with a NaCl solution and consolidated to the desired void ratio. Fluid reservoir chambers, a power supply and data acquisition instrument were connected to the consolidated sample. A voltage difference was applied to electrodes at each end of the sample to induce electro-osmotic fluid flow and ionic migration of NaCl. After electro-kinetic treatment the sample was disconnected from the reservoirs, power supply and data acquisition system, then sectioned to allow water content, sodium and chloride concentration, and pH analyses of each section. The data obtained was reduced and prepared in graph form for analysis of results. Energy for electrolysis, total energy expended, and removal efficiency were calculated and graphed for selected experiments. It was concluded that the voltage gradient became non-linear during experimentation, contaminant distribution was dependent on initial concentration, and zones of altered pH and ion removal did correspond in some experiments. Also, the removal efficiency decreased with time during experimentation and increased with intial contaminant concentration. Comparisons to a predictive model suggested that ionic mobility and dissusivity values varied between experiments and the model.

Scott, Travis Brooks

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Surface-dependent Coagulation Enzymes: Flow Kinetics of Factor Xa Generation on Live Membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The initial surface reactions of the extrinsic coagulation pathway on live cell membranes were examined under flow conditions. Generation of fXa (activated coagulation factor X) was measured on spherical monolayers of epithelial cells with a total surface area of 41-47 cm$^{2}$ expressing TF(tissue factor) at $>25$ fmol/cm$^{2}$. Concentrations of reactants and product were monitored as a function of time with radiolabeled proteins and a chromogenic substrate at resolutions of 2-8 s. At physiological concentrations of fVIIa and fX, the reaction rate was $3.05 \\pm 0.75$ fmol fXa/s/cm$^{2}$, independent of flux, and 10 times slower than that expected for collision-limited reactions. Rates were also independent of surface fVIIa concentrations within the range 0.6-25 fmol/cm$^{2}$. The transit time of fX activated on the reaction chamber was prolonged relative to transit times of nonreacting tracers or preformed fXa. Membrane reactions were modeled using a set of nonlinear kinetic equations and a lagged normal density curve to track the expected surface concentration of reactants for various hypothetical reaction mechanisms. The experimental results were theoretically predicted only when the models used a slow intermediate reaction step, consistent with surface diffusion. These results provide evidence that the transfer of substrate within the membrane is rate-limiting in the kinetic mechanisms leading to initiation of blood coagulation by the tissue factor pathway.

Maria P. McGee; Tom Chou

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Philips Color Kinetics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Color Kinetics Color Kinetics Jump to: navigation, search Name Philips Color Kinetics Address 3 Burlington Woods Drive, 4th Floor Place Burlington, Massachusetts Zip 01803 Sector Efficiency Product LED lighting systems Website http://www.colorkinetics.com/ Coordinates 42.5005723°, -71.2042619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5005723,"lon":-71.2042619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

295

Calibration and performance of a secondary emission chamber as a beam intensity monitor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on a study of the behavior of a secondary emission chamber (SEC). We show the dependence of the SEC signal on the charge and velocity of the primary beam for beams of protons, and heavy ions including Helium, Neon, Chlorine and Iron. We fill the SEC with a selection of different gases including Hydrogen, Helium, Nitrogen, Argon, and air, studying the SEC response when it is acting as an ion chamber. We also investigate the behavior of the SEC at intermediate pressures between 10{sup -8} torr and atmospheric pressure. The SEC uses thin conducting foils as the source and collector of electrons in a vacuum chamber. When charged particles traverse the vacuum chamber, they pass through a series of thin conducting foils, alternating anode and cathode. Ionization produced in the cathode foils travels across the intervening gap due to an applied high voltage and is collected on the anode foils. Electron production is very inefficient because most of the ionization in the foils remains trapped within the foil due to the short range of most delta-rays and the work function of the foil. It is this inefficiency that allows the SEC to operate at high dose rates and short pulse duration where the standard ion chambers cannot function reliably. The SEC was placed in the NSRL ion beam to receive a variety of heavy ion beams under different beam conditions. We used these ion beams to study the response of the SEC to different species of heavy ion, comparing with proton beams. We studied the response to beam of different energies, and as a function of different counting rate. We compared the behaviour of the SEC when operating under positive and negative high voltage. The SEC can operate as an ion chamber if it is filled with gas. We measured the response of the SEC when filled with a variety of gases, from Hydrogen to Helium, Nitrogen, Argon and air. The performance of the SEC as an ion chamber is compared with the standard NSRL ion chamber, QC3. By evacuating the SEC and filling it with Nitrogen through an adjustable leak valve, we were able to measure the response of the SEC to beam as a function of gas pressure. Many interesting features of the SEC were revealed in these tests.

Sivertz, M.; Chiang, I-H,; Rusek, A.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

296

Investigation of long drift chambers for a nucleon-decay detector  

SciTech Connect

The use of long drift chambers for a nucleon-decay detector is discussed as a means of achieving a detector with very fine tracking, but with a modest number of readout channels. Strategies for reducing the attenuation of drifting electrons are considered, particularly the necessity of shaping the electric field to reduce the effects of diffusion and of nearby grounded conductors. Measured results are presented for a chamber with 1 cm drift gap and 50 cm maximum drift distance. The measured attenuation is 12%.

Price, L.E.; Dawson, J.; Ayres, D.; Denis, R.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Numerical Simulation of Earth Pressure on Head Chamber of Shield Machine with FEM  

SciTech Connect

Model parameters of conditioned soils in head chamber of shield machine are determined based on tree-axial compression tests in laboratory. The loads acting on tunneling face are estimated according to static earth pressure principle. Based on Duncan-Chang nonlinear elastic constitutive model, the earth pressures on head chamber of shield machine are simulated in different aperture ratio cases for rotating cutterhead of shield machine. Relationship between pressure transportation factor and aperture ratio of shield machine is proposed by using aggression analysis.

Li Shouju; Kang Chengang [State Key Laboratory of structural analysis for industrial equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Wei [School of Mechanical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Shangguan Zichang [School of Civil and Hydraulic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Institute of Civil Engineering, Dalian Fishery University, Dalian 116023 (China)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

298

THE TREATMENT OF THE TRUMPET IN SELECTED JAZZ-INFLUENCED CLASSICAL CHAMBER WORKS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The trumpet has always maintained a central role in the jazz genre. However, throughout the history of chamber music the trumpet was overlooked until the… (more)

Harrison, Kathleen Elizabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Dynamics of neutralizing electrons during the focusing of intense heavy ions beams inside a heavy fusion reactor chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

beams inside a heavy ion fusion reactor chamber * Agustin F.of a Heavy Ion Fusion reactor heavily depends on the maximum

Lifschitz, Agustin F.; Maynard, Gilles; Vay, Jean-Luc; Lenglet, Andrian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Dynamics of neutralizing electrons during the focusing of intense heavy ions beams inside a heavy fusion reactor chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

beams inside a heavy ion fusion reactor chamber * Agustin F.efficiency of a Heavy Ion Fusion reactor heavily depends on

Lifschitz, Agustin F.; Maynard, Gilles; Vay, Jean-Luc; Lenglet, Andrian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Model Independent Bounds on Kinetic Mixing  

SciTech Connect

New Abelian vector bosons can kinetically mix with the hypercharge gauge boson of the Standard Model. This letter computes the model independent limits on vector bosons with masses from 1 GeV to 1 TeV. The limits arise from the numerous e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments that have been performed in this energy range and bound the kinetic mixing by {epsilon} {approx}< 0.03 for most of the mass range studied, regardless of any additional interactions that the new vector boson may have.

Hook, Anson; Izaguirre, Eder; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

302

Inspector General Activities and Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

o Clarifies the role of all inspectors general in conducting inspections of government-owned quarters and housing facilities for recovering Servicemembers (para 1-4b(3)(b)). o Provides guidance on inspector general office space (para 1-6k). o Provides guidance on the responsibilities of former inspectors general, and authorizes assistant inspectors general to lead inspections (paras 1-12g(5) and 2-2d(1)). o Expands guidance on curtailments and removal from inspector general duty (para 2-5b). o Updates inspector general duty restrictions (para 2-7). o Updates guidance on submitting Freedom of Information Act requests to the Department of the Army’s Records Release Office (para 3-4c(4)). o Adds guidance on releasing inspector general information to the Army staff

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Analytical solution of the kinetic equation for a uniform plasma in a magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

The kinetic equation for a single-component uniform plasma in a magnetic field is analytically solved by the moment method. The linear system of ordinary differential equations for the moments is decomposed into subsystems of lower dimensions by a geometric method. The eigensystem of each subsystem shows that parallel moments decay monotonically, but perpendicular lth harmonic moments decay while oscillating with the l,l-2,...,-th harmonics of gyrofrequency. A generalization to a multicomponent plasma is discussed.

Ji, Jeong-Young; Held, Eric D. [Department of Physics, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322 (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Thermodynamics and Kinetics of a Go Proteinlike Heteropolymer Model with Two-State Folding Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results of Monte Carlo computer simulations of a coarse-grained hydrophobic-polar Go-like heteropolymer model and discuss thermodynamic properties and kinetics of an exemplified heteropolymer, exhibiting two-state folding behavior. It turns out that general, characteristic folding features of realistic proteins with a single free-energy barrier can also be observed in this simplified model, where the folding transition is primarily driven by the hydrophobic force.

Anna Kallias; Michael Bachmann; Wolfhard Janke

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

305

A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Analysis of Low Temperature Non-Sooting Diesel Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed a model of the diesel fuel injection process for application to analysis of low temperature non-sooting combustion. The model uses a simplified mixing correlation and detailed chemical kinetics, and analyzes a parcel of fuel as it moves along the fuel jet, from injection into evaporation and ignition. The model predicts chemical composition and soot precursors, and is applied at conditions that result in low temperature non-sooting combustion. Production of soot precursors is the first step toward production of soot, and modeling precursor production is expected to give insight into the overall evolution of soot inside the engine. The results of the analysis show that the model has been successful in describing many of the observed characteristics of low temperature combustion. The model predicts results that are qualitatively similar to those obtained for soot formation experiments at conditions in which the EGR rate is increased from zero to very high values as the fueling rate is kept constant. The model also describes the two paths to achieve non-sooting combustion. The first is smokeless rich combustion and the second is modulated kinetics (MK). The importance of the temperature after ignition and the equivalence ratio at the time of ignition is demonstrated, as these parameters can be used to collapse onto a single line all the results for soot precursors for multiple fueling rates. A parametric analysis indicates that precursor formation increases considerably as the gas temperature in the combustion chamber and the characteristic mixing time are increased. The model provides a chemical kinetic description of low temperature diesel combustion that improves the understanding of this clean and efficient regime of operation.

Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Radiation from Kinetic Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the power output and critical frequency of radiation by electrons accelerated by relativistic kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these results with Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We find that the in-situ radiation power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We discuss potential astrophysical applications of these results.

Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

307

Ocean Circulation Kinetic Energy: Reservoirs, Sources,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The coupling of the generation of different energy forms in the dynamics (in either balanced or wave motions are almost nonexistent in the ocean. www.annualreviews.org · Ocean Circulation Kinetic Energy 255 Annu.Rev.Fluid processes? Are the seemingly different dynamical ranges coupled? 2. THE OCEANIC ENERGY BUDGET We begin

Ferrari, Raffaele

308

Thermodynamics and Kinetics of a Brownian Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamics and Kinetics of a Brownian Motor R. Dean Astumian Nonequilibrium fluctuations particle separation and the design of molecular motors and pumps. A small particle in a liquid is subject in conjunction with an- isotropy to drive a motor in the context of a "ratchet and pawl" device shrunk to micro

Linke, Heiner

309

KINETICS, STABILITY, AND CONTROL. A Selected Bibliography  

SciTech Connect

References to 529 articles on nuclear reactor control, kinetics, and stability published before autumn 1962 are included. Emphasis is on calculations and theory since the references serve as an aid in analyzing the dynamic behavior of SNAP reactor systems. (D.C.W.)

Johnson, R.L.

1963-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Neutronics Assessment of Blanket Options for the HAPL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on lasers, direct drive targets and a dry wall chamber [1]. A primary focus is the development of a tungsten-armored-explosion. Only a thin region of the armor (10-100 µm) will experience the highly cyclic x-ray and ion energy deposition transients. The FW structure behind the armor as well as the blanket will operate under quasi

Raffray, A. René

311

Report on Fission Time Projection Chamber M3FT-12IN0210052  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Time Projection Chamber is a collaborative effort to implement an innovative approach and deliver unprecedented fission measurements to DOE programs. This 4?-detector system will provide unrivaled 3-D data about the fission process. Shown here is a half populated TPC (2?) at the LLNL TPC laboratory as it undergoes testing before being shipped to LANSCE for beam experiments.

James K. Jewell

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Fault Detection and Isolation of a Cryogenic Rocket Engine Combustion Chamber Using a Parity Space Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

his paper presents a parity space (PS) approach for fault detection and isolation (FDI) of a cryogenic rocket engine combustion chamber. Nominal and non-nominal simulation data for three engine set points have been provided. The PS approach uses three ... Keywords: Fault Detection, Fault Isolation, Fault Diagnosis, Parity Space, Rocket Engine

Paul van Gelder; André Bos

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

In situ reduction and evaluation of anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cracking (reaction VII) CH4 + H2O CO + 3H2 steam reforming (reaction VIII) CH4 + CO2 2CO + 2H2 dry.05.118 #12;Abstract Single chamber anode-supported fuel cells are investigated under several methane analyses of anode reduction are performed at 700°C. Carbon deposition is observed under diluted methane

314

Combustion chamber for gas turbines and the like having a fluidized burner bed  

SciTech Connect

A combustion chamber with a fluidized burner bed preferably for gas turbines is described. It contains means for controlling the supply of fuel, combustion air and a cooling medium for the fluidized bed to maintain a predetermined proportional relationship between combustion air and cooling air under varying load conditions.

Harboe, H.

1975-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

315

Nested reactor chamber and operation for Hg-196 isotope separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an apparatus for use in .sup.196 Hg separation and its method of operation. Specifically, the present invention is directed to a nested reactor chamber useful for .sup.196 Hg isotope separation reactions avoiding the photon starved condition commonly encountered in coaxial reactor systems.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

A Diffusion Cloud Chamber Study of Very Slow Mesons. II. Beta Decay of the Muon  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The spectrum of electrons arising from the decay of the negative mu meson has been determined. The muons are arrested in the gas of a high pressure hydrogen filled diffusion cloud chamber. The momenta of the decay electrons are determined from their curvature in a magnetic field of 7750 gauss. The spectrum of 415 electrons has been analyzed according to the theory of Michel.

Lederman, L. M.; Sargent, C. P.; Rinehart, M.; Rogers, K.

1955-03-00T23:59:59.000Z

317

Pulse mode readout techniques for use with non-gridded industrial ionization chambers  

SciTech Connect

Highly sensitive readout technique for precision long-term radiation measurements has been developed and tested in the Radiation Control Department at Jefferson Lab. The new electronics design is used to retrieve ionization data in a pulse mode. The dedicated data acquisition system works with M=Audio Audiophile 192 High-Definition 24-bit/192 kHz audio cards, taking data in continuous waveform recording mode. The on-line data processing algorithms extract signals of the ionization events from the data flow and measure the ionization value for each event. Two different ion chambers are evaluated. The first is a Reuter-Stokes Argon-filled (at 25 atm) High Pressure Ionization Chamber (HPIC), commonly used as a detector part in many GE Reuter-Stokes instruments of the RSS series. The second is a VacuTec Model 70181, 5 atm Xenon-filled ionization chamber. Results for both chambers indicate that the techniques allow using industrial ICs for high sensitivity and precision long-term radiation measurements, while at the same time providing information about spectral characteristics of the radiation fields.

Popov, Vladimir E. [JLAB; Degtiarenko, Pavel V. [JLAB

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

LASER IFE DIRECT DRIVE CHAMBER CONCEPTS WITH MAGNETIC INTERVENTION A. R. Raffray1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Washington, DC 20375, aerobson@earthlink.net 3 Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, john, Washington, D.C. REFERENCES 1. J. SETHIAN, et al., "An Overview of the Development of the First Wall. RAFFRAY and the HAPL Team, "Threats, Design Limits and Design Windows for Laser IFE Dry Wall Chambers," J

Raffray, A. René

319

SFS Exhibit A General Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 6/14/13) Exhibit A General Conditions 2, 6/14/13) Exhibit A General Conditions Page 1 of 16 EXHIBIT "A" GENERAL CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS GC Title Page GC-1 DEFINITIONS (Aug 2012) .......................................................................................................... 3 GC-2A AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVES, COMMUNICATIONS AND NOTICES (Jan 2010) ........................................................................................................................................... 3 GC-3 INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (Jun 2009) ............................................................................. 4 GC-4 SUBCONTRACT INTERPRETATION (Jun 2009) ...................................................................... 4 GC-5 NOTICE TO PROCEED (Jul 2011)............................................................................................. 4

320

CPFFS Exhibit A General Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 6/14/13) Exhibit A General Conditions 2, 6/14/13) Exhibit A General Conditions Page 1 of 20 EXHIBIT "A" GENERAL CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS GC Title Page GC-1 DEFINITIONS (Aug 2012) .......................................................................................................... 3 GC-2A AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVES, COMMUNICATIONS AND NOTICES (Jan 2010) ........................................................................................................................................... 3 GC-3 INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (Jun 2009) ............................................................................. 4 GC-4 SUBCONTRACT INTERPRETATION (Jun 2009) ...................................................................... 4 GC-5 NOTICE TO PROCEED (Jul 2011)............................................................................................. 4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EFS Exhibit A General Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 6/14/13) Exhibit A General Conditions 2, 6/14/13) Exhibit A General Conditions Page 1 of 26 EXHIBIT "A" GENERAL CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS GC Title Page GC-1 DEFINITIONS (Aug 2012) .......................................................................................................... 3 GC-2 AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVES, COMMUNICATIONS AND NOTICES (Apr 2013) ........................................................................................................................................... 3 GC-3 INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (Jun 2009) ............................................................................. 4 GC-4 SUBCONTRACT INTERPRETATION (Jun 2009) ...................................................................... 4 GC-5 NOTICE TO PROCEED (Jul 2011)............................................................................................. 4

322

EFS Exhibit A General Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, 4/9/13) Exhibit A General Conditions 1, 4/9/13) Exhibit A General Conditions Page 1 of 39 EXHIBIT "A" GENERAL CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS GC Title Page GC-1 DEFINITIONS (Aug 2012) .......................................................................................................... 3 GC-2 AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVES, COMMUNICATIONS AND NOTICES (Apr 2013) ........................................................................................................................................... 3 GC-3 INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (Jun 2009) ............................................................................. 4 GC-4 SUBCONTRACT INTERPRETATION (Jun 2009) ...................................................................... 4 GC-5 NOTICE TO PROCEED (Jul 2011)............................................................................................. 4

323

AES Exhibit A General Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 6/14/13) Exhibit A General Conditions 2, 6/14/13) Exhibit A General Conditions Page 1 of 18 EXHIBIT "A" GENERAL CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS GC Title Page GC-1 DEFINITIONS (Aug 2012) .......................................................................................................... 3 GC-2A AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVES, COMMUNICATIONS AND NOTICES (Jan 2010) ........................................................................................................................................... 3 GC-3 INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (Jun 2009) ............................................................................. 4 GC-4 SUBCONTRACT INTERPRETATION (Jun 2009) ...................................................................... 4 GC-5 NOTICE TO PROCEED (Jul 2011)............................................................................................. 4

324

SFS Exhibit A General Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, 4/9/13) Exhibit A General Conditions 1, 4/9/13) Exhibit A General Conditions Page 1 of 29 EXHIBIT "A" GENERAL CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS GC Title Page GC-1 DEFINITIONS (Aug 2012) .......................................................................................................... 3 GC-2A AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVES, COMMUNICATIONS AND NOTICES (Jan 2010) ........................................................................................................................................... 3 GC-3 INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (Jun 2009) ............................................................................. 4 GC-4 SUBCONTRACT INTERPRETATION (Jun 2009) ...................................................................... 4 GC-5 NOTICE TO PROCEED (Jul 2011)............................................................................................. 4

325

Singularities of Generalized Parton Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress of recent work on modeling generalized parton distributions is given. Special attention was paid to study of their singularities structure.

Radyushkin, Anatoly V. [JLAB, Old Dominion U.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Singularities of Generalized Parton Distributions  

SciTech Connect

The basic ideas of the theory of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) are reviewed. Recent developments in the study of singularities of GPDs are discussed.

Anatoly Radyushkin

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

327

General Questions | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Act General Questions Eligibility Buy American Davis Bacon Historic Preservation Appropriations Questions Procurement Other Topics Sign Up for GC Updates Jobs and Internships All...

328

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrogen Combustion Limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic model is used to explore the flammability and detonability of hydrogen mixtures. In the case of flammability, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for hydrogen is coupled to the CHEMKIN Premix code to compute premixed, laminar flame speeds. The detailed chemical kinetic model reproduces flame speeds in the literature over a range of equivalence ratios, pressures and reactant temperatures. A series of calculation were performed to assess the key parameters determining the flammability of hydrogen mixtures. Increased reactant temperature was found to greatly increase the flame speed and the flammability of the mixture. The effect of added diluents was assessed. Addition of water and carbon dioxide were found to reduce the flame speed and thus the flammability of a hydrogen mixture approximately equally well and much more than the addition of nitrogen. The detailed chemical kinetic model was used to explore the detonability of hydrogen mixtures. A Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (ZND) detonation model coupled with detailed chemical kinetics was used to model the detonation. The effectiveness on different diluents was assessed in reducing the detonability of a hydrogen mixture. Carbon dioxide was found to be most effective in reducing the detonability followed by water and nitrogen. The chemical action of chemical inhibitors on reducing the flammability of hydrogen mixtures is discussed. Bromine and organophosphorus inhibitors act through catalytic cycles that recombine H and OH radicals in the flame. The reduction in H and OH radicals reduces chain branching in the flame through the H + O{sub 2} = OH + O chain branching reaction. The reduction in chain branching and radical production reduces the flame speed and thus the flammability of the hydrogen mixture.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

329

Evaluating Mesoscale NWP Models Using Kinetic Energy Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic energy spectra derived from observations in the free atmosphere possess a wavenumber dependence of k?3 for large scales, characteristic of 2D turbulence, and transition to a k?5/3 dependence in the mesoscale. Kinetic energy spectra ...

William C. Skamarock

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Isothermal Ice Crystallization Kinetics in the Gas-Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isothermal Ice Crystallization Kinetics in the Gas-Diffusion Layer of a Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell Title Isothermal Ice Crystallization Kinetics in the Gas-Diffusion Layer...

331

The Vertical Partition of Oceanic Horizontal Kinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To produce an interpretation of the surface kinetic energy as measured by altimeters, a survey is made of the vertical structure of kinetic energy profiles in a large number of globally distributed long current meter records. Although the data ...

Carl Wunsch

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Fabrication of The Multi-PCR Chamber With Inner Heat-Sink Materials Using a Micro-Blaster Etching Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a new design for a PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) chamber with a temperature sensor under a top glass wafer and heaters on the bottom glass wafer. These chamber sensors are thermally isolated from the heater. The multi PCR ...

Hyoung-Jin Park; Duk-Soo Eun; Dae-Young Kong; Seong-Jin Kong; Seong-Ho Kong; Jong-Hyun Lee

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Neutrino--deuterium reactions in the 7-foot bubble chamber. [Strangeness, CVC theory, V-A theory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent results are reported from the analysis of 569,000 ..nu.. pictures taken in the BNL 7-ft bubble chamber filled with D/sub 2/ (and an additional 204,000 pictures in H/sub 2/). The statistics of current analysis include 648 quasielastic ..nu../sub ..mu../ d ..-->.. ..mu../sup -/pp/sub s/ events and 25 events with visible strangeness present. Using the quasielastic events in the framework of the conventional V-A theory, the values M/sub V/ = 0.87 +- 0.09 GeV and M/sub A/ = 1.03 +- 0.19 GeV are found. The value is in good agreement with the CVC prediction of M/sub V/ = 0.84 GeV. With the fixed value of M/sub V/ = 0.84 GeV, a one-parameter fit yields M/sub A/ = 1.08 +- 0.08 GeV. Also 8 events are found in the exclusive channel ..nu..n ..-->.. ..mu../sup -/K/sup +/..lambda.. in agreement with a theoretical calculation using the generalized Born approximation. 30 references.

Cnops, A M; Connolly, P L; Kahn, S A; Kirk, H G; Murtagh, M J; Palmer, R B; Samios, N P; Tanaka, M

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Generalized Transforms and Special Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the properties of different type of transforms by means of operational methods and discuss the relevant interplay with many families of special functions. We consider in particular the binomial transform and its generalizations. A general method, based on the use of the Fourier transform technique, is proposed for the study of the properties of functions of operators.

G. Dattoli; E. Sabia

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

335

On the Generalized Casson Invariant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The path integral generalization of the Casson invariant as developed by Rozansky and Witten is investigated. The path integral for various three manifolds is explicitly evaluated. A new class of topological observables is introduced that may allow for more effective invariants. Finally it is shown how the dimensional reduction of these theories corresponds to a generalization of the topological B sigma model.

George Thompson

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

336

LS-266 OPTIMIZATION OF FOUR-BUTTON BEAM POSITION MONITOR CONFIGURATION FOR SMALL-GAP VACUUM CHAMBERS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LS-266 LS-266 OPTIMIZATION OF FOUR-BUTTON BEAM POSITION MONITOR CONFIGURATION FOR SMALL-GAP VACUUM CHAMBERS S. H. Kim March 27, 1998 Summary - Induced charges on a four-button beam position monitor (BPM) system attached on a beam chamber of narrow rectangular cross sections are calculated as a 2-D electrostatic problem of image charges. The calculation shows that for a narrow chamber of width/height (2w/2h) >> 1, over 90% of the induced charges are distributed within a distance of 2h from the charged beam position in the direction of the chamber width. Therefore, a four-button system with a button diameter of (2 ~ 2.5)h and no button offset from the beam position is the most efficient configuration. The four-button BPMs used for 8-mm and 5-mm chambers in the APS have relatively low sensitivities because the button locations are outside

337

General  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and participate in the establishment of a comprehensive set of standards for commercial measurement of electricity for both electric vehicle (EV ...

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

general  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ANSYS Fluent software contains the broad physical modeling capabilities needed to model flow, turbulence, heat transfer, and reactions for a wide variety of ...

339

Kinetic Controls on Cu and Pb Sorption by Ferrihydrite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nd ed.; Cambridge University Press: New York, 1993. (51) Sparks, D. L. Kinetics of Soil Chemical Processes; Academic Press: New York, 1989. (52) Espenson, J. H. Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms, 2Kinetic Controls on Cu and Pb Sorption by Ferrihydrite A N D R E A S C . S C H E I N O

Sparks, Donald L.

340

Kinetic and stationary point-set embeddability for plane graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate a kinetic version of point-set embeddability. Given a plane graph G(V,E) where |V|=n, and a set P of n moving points where the trajectory of each point is an algebraic function of constant ... Keywords: kinetic algorithm, kinetic graph drawing, plane graph, point-set embeddability

Zahed Rahmati; Sue H. Whitesides; Valerie King

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Universality of Einstein's general relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among relativistic theories of gravitation the closest ones to general relativity are the scalar-tensor ones and these with Lagrangians being any function f(R) of the curvature scalar. A complete chart of relationships between these theories and general relativity can be delineated. These theories are mathematically (locally) equivalent to general relativity plus a minimally coupled self-interacting scalar field. Physically they describe a massless spin-2 field (graviton) and a spin-0 component of gravity. It is shown that these theories are either physically equivalent to general relativity plus the scalar or flat space is classically unstable (or at least suspected of being unstable). In this sense general relativity is universal: it is an isolated point in the space of gravity theories since small deviations from it either carry the same physical content as it or give rise to physically untenable theories.

Sokolowski, L M

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Asphalt Oxidation Kinetics and Pavement Oxidation Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most paved roads in the United States are surfaced with asphalt. These asphalt pavements suffer from fatigue cracking and thermal cracking, aggravated by the oxidation and hardening of asphalt. This negative impact of asphalt oxidation on pavement performance has not been considered adequately in pavement design. Part of the reason is that the process of asphalt oxidation in pavement is not well understood. This work focused on understanding the asphalt oxidation kinetics and on developing pavement oxidation model that predicts asphalt oxidation and hardening in pavement under environmental conditions. A number of asphalts were studied in laboratory condition. Based on kinetics data, a fast-rate ? constant-rate asphalt oxidation kinetics model was developed to describe the early nonlinear fast-rate aging period and the later constant-rate period of asphalt oxidation. Furthermore, reaction kinetics parameters for the fast-rate and constant-rate reactions were empirically correlated, leading to a simplified model. And the experimental effort and time to obtain these kinetics parameters were significantly reduced. Furthermore, to investigate the mechanism of asphalt oxidation, two antioxidants were studied on their effectiveness. Asphalt oxidation was not significantly affected. It was found that evaluation of antioxidant effectiveness based on viscosity only is not reliable. The asphalt oxidation kinetics model was incorporated into the pavement oxidation model that predicts asphalt oxidation in pavement. The pavement oxidation model mimics the oxidation process of asphalt in real mixture at pavement temperatures. A new parameter, diffusion depth, defined the oxygen diffusion region in the mastic. A field calibration factor accounted for the factors not considered in the model such as the effect of small aggregate particles on oxygen diffusion. Carbonyl area and viscosity of binders recovered from field cores of three pavements in Texas were measured and were used for model calibration and validation. Results demonstrated that the proposed model estimates carbonyl growth over time in pavement, layer-by-layer, quite well. Finally, this work can be useful for incorporating asphalt oxidation into a pavement design method that can predict pavement performance with time and for making strategic decisions such as optimal time for maintenance treatments.

Jin, Xin

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

A new class of accelerated kinetic Monte Carlo algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic (aka dynamic) Monte Carlo (KMC) is a powerful method for numerical simulations of time dependent evolution applied in a wide range of contexts including biology, chemistry, physics, nuclear sciences, financial engineering, etc. Generally, in a KMC the time evolution takes place one event at a time, where the sequence of events and the time intervals between them are selected (or sampled) using random numbers. While details of the method implementation vary depending on the model and context, there exist certain common issues that limit KMC applicability in almost all applications. Among such is the notorious 'flicker problem' where the same states of the systems are repeatedly visited but otherwise no essential evolution is observed. In its simplest form the flicker problem arises when two states are connected to each other by transitions whose rates far exceed the rates of all other transitions out of the same two states. In such cases, the model will endlessly hop between the two states otherwise producing no meaningful evolution. In most situation of practical interest, the trapping cluster includes more than two states making the flicker somewhat more difficult to detect and to deal with. Several methods have been proposed to overcome or mitigate the flicker problem, exactly [1-3] or approximately [4,5]. Of the exact methods, the one proposed by Novotny [1] is perhaps most relevant to our research. Novotny formulates the problem of escaping from a trapping cluster as a Markov system with absorbing states. Given an initial state inside the cluster, it is in principle possible to solve the Master Equation for the time dependent probabilities to find the walker in a given state (transient or absorbing) of the cluster at any time in the future. Novotny then proceeds to demonstrate implementation of his general method to trapping clusters containing the initial state plus one or two transient states and all of their absorbing states. Similar methods have been subsequently proposed in [refs] but applied in a different context. The most serious deficiency of the earlier methods is that size of the trapping cluster size is fixed and often too small to bring substantial simulation speedup. Furthermore, the overhead associated with solving for the probability distribution on the trapping cluster sometimes makes such simulations less efficient than the standard KMC. Here we report on a general and exact accelerated kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm generally applicable to arbitrary Markov models1. Two different implementations are attempted both based on incremental expansion of trapping sub-set of Markov states: (1) numerical solution of the Master Equation with absorbing states and (2) incremental graph reduction followed by randomization. Of the two implementations, the 2nd one performs better allowing, for the first time, to overcome trapping basins spanning several million Markov states. The new method is used for simulations of anomalous diffusion on a 2D substrate and of the kinetics of diffusive 1st order phase transformations in binary alloys. Depending on temperature and (alloy) super-saturation conditions, speedups of 3 to 7 orders of magnitude are demonstrated, with no compromise of simulation accuracy.

Bulatov, V V; Oppelstrup, T; Athenes, M

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Research Laboratories General Motors Corporation General Motors Technical Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MI. 1-q Research Laboratories General Motors Corporation General Motors Technical Center Warren, Michigan 48090 January 21, 1977 Occupational Health Standards Branch Office of Standards Development U. S. Nuclear Requlatory Commission Washington, D.C. 20555 Attention: Mr. Robert E. Alexander, Chief Dear Mr. Alexander: In 1974, General Motors Corporation acquired a manufacturing plant in Adrian, Michigan. On October 21, 1976, General Motors announced that work would begin immediately to prepare the plant for manufacturing operations (Appendix A). A news release, made by Mr. Irving Loop of ERDA and carried by radio station WABJ of Adrian, Michigan on May 11, 1976, stated that natural uranium was handled in the plant after World War II and that

345

Analysis on kinetic chemotaxis models using a functional analytic approach Analysis on kinetic chemotaxis models using a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are applicable at the molecular level. Copyright # 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS: kinetic stability of that system are undergoing constant change. This chemical example of replicator kinetic stability is akin in circumstance may dramatically affect the kinetic stability of physical, chemical and biological, systems. So

Hille, Sander

346

React. Kinet.Catal.Lett., Vol.9, No. 4,377-381 (1978) WHAT IS ESSENTIAL TO EXOTIC KINETIC BEHAVIOR?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6= 10'. I = 1 I=I 378 #12;TOTH: EXOTIC KINETIC BEHAVIOR? COROLLARIES Immediate application). REFERENCES 1. M. Feinberg: Mathamatical Aspects of Mass Action Kinetics. Chapter 1 of Chemical Reactor Theory-London-New York 1972. 3. J. T6th, P. ~rdi: Models, Problems and Applications of Formal Reaction Kinetics (in

Tóth, János

347

Auxiliary power supply with kinetic energy storage  

SciTech Connect

Alternating current is supplied to an auxiliary load on a from a power supply comprised of a dc-energized inverter and a synchronous machine coupled to the inverter. The inverter supplies the alternating current requirements of the load up to the normal steady state load current magnitude. The synchronous machine stores kinetic energy when the load current load does not exceed its normal steady state magnitude, and converts kinetic energy into electrical energy to supply the load current requirements in excess of its normal steady-state load magnitude and to supply load current whenever the dc source inverter connection is interrupted. Frequency and amplitude of load voltage are regulated by operator commands through control apparatus coupled to the inverter and the synchronous machine.

Plunkett, A.B.; Turnbull, F.G.

1982-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

348

ET Kinetics of Bifunctional Redox Protein Maquettes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinetics of Bifunctional Redox Protein Maquettes Kinetics of Bifunctional Redox Protein Maquettes Mitchell W. Mutz, James F. Wishart and George L. McLendon Adv. Chem Ser. 254, Ch. 10, pp. 145-159 Abstract: We prepared three bifunctional redox protein maquettes based on 12-, 16-, and 20-mer three-helix bundles. In each case, the helix was capped with a Co(III) tris-bipyridyl electron acceptor and also functionalized with a C-terminal viologen (1-ethyl-1'-ethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium) donor. Electron transfer (ET) was initiated by pulse radiolysis and flash photolysis and followed spectrometrically to determined average, concentration-independent, first-order rates for the 16-mer and 20-mer maquettes. For the 16-mer bundle, the alpha-helical content was adjusted by the addition of urea or trifluoroethanol to solutions containing the metalloprotein. This

349

DNA hybridization kinetics: zippering, internal displacement and sequence dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While the thermodynamics of DNA hybridization is well understood, much less is known about the kinetics of this classic system. Filling this gap in our understanding has new urgency because DNA nanotechnology often depends critically on binding rates. Here we use a coarse-grained model to explore the hybridization kinetics of DNA oligomers, finding that strand association proceeds through a complex set of intermediate states. Successful binding events start with the formation of a few metastable base-pairing interactions, followed by zippering of the remaining bonds. However, despite reasonably strong interstrand interactions, initial contacts frequently fail to lead to zippering because the typical configurations in which they form differ from typical states of similar enthalpy in the double-stranded equilibrium ensemble. Therefore, if the association process is analyzed on the base-pair (secondary structure) level, it shows non-Markovian behavior. Initial contacts must be stabilized by two or three base pairs before full zippering is likely, resulting in negative effective activation enthalpies. Non-Arrhenius behavior is observed as the number of base pairs in the effective transition state increases with temperature. In addition, we find that alternative pathways involving misbonds can increase association rates. For repetitive sequences, misaligned duplexes frequently rearrange to form fully paired duplexes by two distinct processes which we label `pseudoknot' and `inchworm' internal displacement. We show how the above processes can explain why experimentally observed association rates of GC-rich oligomers are higher than rates of AT-rich equivalents. More generally, we argue that association rates can be modulated by sequence choice.

Thomas E. Ouldridge; Petr Šulc; Flavio Romano; Jonathan P. K. Doye; Ard A. Louis

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

Gas Kinetic Study of Magnetic Field Effects on Plasma Plumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasma flow physics in magnetic nozzles must be clearly understood for optimal design of plasma propulsion devices. Toward that end, in this thesis we: i) perform an extensive literature survey of magnetic nozzle physics, ii) assess the validity of magnetohydrodynamics for studying magnetic nozzle physics, and iii) illustrate the effects of the Hall term in simple flows as well as in magnetic nozzle configurations through numerical experiments with the Magneto-Gas Kinetic Method (MGKM). The crucial steps necessary for thrust generation in magnetic nozzles are energy conversion, plasma detachment, and momentum transfer. These three physical phenomena must be understood to optimize magnetic nozzle design. The operating dimensionless parameter ranges of six prominent experiments are considered and the corresponding mechanisms are discussed. An order of magnitude analysis of the governing equations reveal: i) most magnetic nozzles under consideration operate at the edge of the continuum regime rendering continuum-based description and computation valid; ii) in the context of MHD framework, the generalized Ohm’s law must be used to capture all of the relevant physics. This work also continues the development of the Magneto Gas Kinetic Method (MGKM) computational tool. Validation of the solver is performed in shock-tube and Hartmann channel flows in the Hall physics regime. Comparison with theory and available data is made whenever possible. Novel numerical experiments of magnetic nozzle plasma jets in the Hall regime are performed, confirming the theoretically predicted azimuthal rotation of the plasma jet due to Hall physics. The primary conclusion from this work is that the addition of the Hall effect generates helical structures in magnetic nozzle plasma flows. Preliminary results are encouraging for future magnetic nozzle studies and further challenges are identified.

Ebersohn, Frans 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

MEASUREMENTS, ERRORS, AND NEGATIVE KINETIC ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis of errors in measurement yields new insight into the penetration of quantum particles into classically forbidden regions. In addition to “physical” values, realistic measurements yield “unphysical ” values which, we show, can form a consistent pattern. An experiment to isolate a particle in a classically forbidden region obtains negative values for its kinetic energy. These values realize the concept of a weak value, discussed in previous works. 0

Yakir Aharonov; Sandu Popescu; Daniel Rohrlich; Lev Vaidman

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Rhodopsin kinetics in the cat retina  

SciTech Connect

The bleaching and regeneration of rhodopsin in the living cat retina was studied by means of fundus reflectometry. Bleaching was effected by continuous light exposures of 1 min or 20 min, and the changes in retinal absorbance were measured at 29 wavelengths. For all of the conditions studied (fractional bleaches of from 65 to 100%), the regeneration of rhodopsin to its prebleach levels required greater than 60 min in darkness. After the 1-min exposures, the difference spectra recorded during the first 10 min of dark adaptation were dominated by photoproduct absorption, and rhodopsin regeneration kinetics were obscured by these intermediate processes. Extending the bleaching duration to 20 min gave the products of photolysis an opportunity to dissipate, and it was possible to follow the regenerative process over its full time-course. It was not possible, however, to fit these data with the simple exponential function predicted by first-order reaction kinetics. Other possible mechanisms were considered and are presented in the text. Nevertheless, the kinetics of regeneration compared favorably with the temporal changes in log sensitivity determined electrophysiologically by other investigators. Based on the bleaching curve for cat rhodopsin, the photosensitivity was determined and found to approximate closely the value obtained for human rhodopsin; i.e., the energy Ec required to bleach 1-e-1 of the available rhodopsin was 7.09 log scotopic troland-seconds (corrected for the optics of the cat eye), as compared with approximately 7.0 in man.

Ripps, H.; Mehaffey, L.; Siegel, I.M.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

General Motors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

description http:www.nrel.govnewspress2006375.html LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now General Motors is a company located in...

354

General Aviation Aircraft Reliability Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reliability study estimates Complex General Aviation (GA) Aircraft System reliability. As part of an effort to successfully improve the safety and reliability of the next generation of GA aircraft, a benchmarking of the current reliability of GA ...

Pettit Duane; Turnbull Andrew

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A general weighted grammar library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a general weighted grammar software library, the GRM Library, that can be used in a variety of applications in text, speech, and biosequence processing. The underlying algorithms were designed to support a wide variety of semirings ...

Cyril Allauzen; Mehryar Mohri; Brian Roark

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Processing of O.F.E. copper beam chambers for PEP-II high energy ring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using laboratory scale and full size PEP-II vacuum chambers, chemical cleaning, glow discharge and thermal process effects were evaluated using surface analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These processes were optimized to reduce surface carbon and thereby minimize photodesorption gas loads. The relation of surface carbon to ion dose was investigated and compared for pure argon, 5% oxygen in argon, and pure hydrogen plasmas. Argon incorporation was noted only when the copper was oxidized in the mixed gas. Surfaces, stable in ambient atmosphere, were obtained having surface carbon values less than 10%. These optimized recipes will be used in processing copper vacuum chambers for the PEP-II B-Factory.

Hoyt, E.; Hoyt, M.; Kirby, R.; Perkins, C.; Wright, D.; Farvid, A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

HYDROGEN OUTGASSING AND SURFACE PROPERTIES OF TIN COATED STAINLESS STEEL CHAMBERS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stainless steel vacuum chambers of the 248m accumulator ring of Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) are coated with {approx} 100 nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield. The coating is produced by DC magnetron sputtering using a long cathode imbedded with permanent magnets. The outgassing rates of several SNS half-cell chambers were measured with and without TiN coating, and before and after in-situ bake. One potential benefit of a TiN coating is to serve as hydrogen permeation barrier that reduces the ultimate outgassing rate. By varying the coating parameters, films of different surface roughness were produced and analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to illustrate the dependence of the outgassing on the film structure.

HE,P.; HSEUH,H.C.; MAPES,M.; TODD,R.; WEISS,D.; WILSON,D.

2002-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

358

Model of High Current Breakdown from Cathode Field Emission in Aged Wire Chambers  

SciTech Connect

Observing single electron pulses provides insight into the mechanism that leads to sudden high current jumps (breakdown) in aged wire chambers. This single electron activity is found to be consistent with the Fowler-Nordheim equation for field emission of electrons from a cathode surface in a high electric field. The high electric field arises from the positive ion buildup on a very thin insulating layer on the cathode surface. A model is presented to explain the transient behavior of single electron pulses in response to abrupt changes in chamber ionization, as well as the steady state rate during a long term aging run. The model is based on properties of the insulating layer (dielectric constant, conductivity, and hole-mobility) as well as the Fowler-Nordheim equation.

Boyarski, A

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

359

Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium-contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

Anderson, D.F.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

360

Challenges Surrounding the Injection and Arrival of Targets at LIFE Fusion Chamber Center  

SciTech Connect

IFE target designers must consider several engineering requirements in addition to the physics requirements for successful target implosion. These considerations include low target cost, high manufacturing throughput, the ability of the target to survive the injection into the fusion chamber and arrive in a condition and physical position consistent with proper laser-target interaction and ease of post-implosion debris removal. This article briefly describes these considerations for the Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE) targets currently being designed.

Miles, R; Spaeth, M; Manes, K; Amendt, P; Tabak, M; Bond, T; Kucheyev, S; Latkowski, J; Loosmore, G; Bliss, E; Baker, K; Bhandarkar, S; Petzoldt, R; Alexander, N; Tillack, M; Holdener, D

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

PRE-SW Aging Chamber Report Tool (ACRT) Version 6.0, Beta  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 230kV Accelerated Aging Chamber is a multi-year test of more than 50 polymer and fiberglass components.  Photographic inspections occur twice a year.  Thousands of photographs accumulate making conventional reports difficult to read.  This reporting tool enables the reader to jump from component to component and inspection to inspection.  The reader can easily compare components at different levels of aging.  This tool will make reviewing the important results of this ...

2013-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

362

Performance of Glass Resistive Plate Chambers for a high granularity semi-digital calorimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new design of highly granular hadronic calorimeter using Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPCs) with embedded electronics has been proposed for the future International Linear Collider (ILC) experiments. It features a 2-bit threshold semi-digital read-out. Several GRPC prototypes with their electronics have been successfully built and tested in pion beams. The design of these detectors is presented along with the test results on efficiency, pad multiplicity, stability and reproducibility.

Bedjidian, M; Boudry, V; Combaret, C; Decotigny, D; Gil, E Cortina; de la Taille, C; Dellanegra, R; Gapienko, V A; Grenier, G; Jauffret, C; Kieffer, R; Fouz, M -C; Han, R; Laktineh, I; Lumb, N; Manai, K; Mannai, S; Mathez, H; Mirabito, L; Pelayo, J Puerta; Ruan, M; Schirra, F; Seguin-Moreau, N; Tromeur, W; Tytgat, M; Donckt, M Vander; Zaganidis, N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber  

SciTech Connect

A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fusion Engineering and Design 42 (1998) 537548 Chamber technology concepts for inertial fusion energy--three  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to 650°C and has a low enough vapor pressure. Li and Li17Pb83 would also work but must be 1.5 m thick and increased pumping power features required by use of Li or Li17Pb83 suggest Flibe might be the lowest cost to a large variety of chamber design concepts for inertial fusion energy (IFE). Refs. [1­8] provide

Abdou, Mohamed

365

Interpretation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Diesel Exhaust Photooxidation in an Environmental Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from diesel exhaust in a smog chamber was investigated. Particle volume measurement based on mobility diameter is shown to underestimate SOA formation from diesel exhaust due to the external void space of agglomerate particles, in which case mass-based measurement technique is necessary. Rapid determination of particle effective density as a function of particle mass was performed by an Aerosol Particle Mass analyzer – Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (APM-SMPS) to obtain particle mass concentration and fractal dimension. Continuous aging of aerosol was observed in terms of atomic ratio (O/C), from 0.05 to 0.25 in 12 hours, underscoring the importance of multi-generational oxidation of low-volatile organic vapors emitted from diesel engine as the significant source of oxygenated SOA. Experimental conditions possibly have strong impacts on physical evolution of diesel particulates in a smog chamber. Higher particle effective densities were observed when raw exhaust was injected into a full bag as opposed to filling a bag with diluted exhaust using an ejector diluter. When longer transfer line was used for injecting diesel exhaust into the smog chamber, rapid particle coagulation was observed, leading to increasing particle volume concentration in dark while its mass concentration is decreasing.

Nakao, Shunsuke; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Nguyen, Anh; Jung, Hee-Jung; Cocker, David R.

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

366

Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the second year of a two-year study on the design and evaluation of the Cascade concept as a commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. We developed a reactor design based on the Cascade reaction chamber concept that would be competitive in terms of both capital and operating costs, safe and environmentally acceptable in terms of hazard to the public, occupational exposure and radioactive waste production, and highly efficient. The Cascade reaction chamber is a double-cone-shaped rotating drum. The granulated solid blanket materials inside the rotating chamber are held against the walls by centrifugal force. The fusion energy is captured in a blanket of solid carbon, BeO, and LiAlO/sub 2/ granules. These granules are circulated to the primary side of a ceramic heat exchanger. Primary-side granule temperatures range from 1285 K at the LiAlO/sub 2/ granule heat exchanger outlet to 1600 K at the carbon granule heat exchanger inlet. The secondary side consists of a closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system with helium working fluid, operating at 1300 K peak outlet temperature and achieving a thermal power conversion efficiency of 55%. The net plant efficiency is 49%. The reference design is a plant producing 1500 MW of D-T fusion power and delivering 815 MW of electrical power for sale to the utility grid. 88 refs., 44 figs., 47 tabs.

Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Bourque, R.F.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, R.L.; Norman, J.H.; Price, R.J.; Porter, J.; Schuster, H.L.; Simnad, M.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

All General Counsel Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18, 2013 General Restaurant Equipment: Order (2013-CE-5344) DOE ordered General Restaurant Equipment Co. to pay a 8,000 civil penalty after finding General Restaurant Equipment...

368

Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

369

Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G. Park

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

370

Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Entire General Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Topics Archives General Topics Archives General Topics Archives, Since November 1991 Table of Contents: What Sciences are included in Earth Science? Magnetosphere Magnetic Compasses Aftershocks vs. Earthquakes Illinois Earthquakes Center of the Earth Why is the Earth round? Project Mohole Minerals, Rocks, or not? Water Origin of Saltwater Weight of Clouds Barometers Chaos and Weather Forecasting Lightning Strikes Tornado Spinning Tornado Safety in a Building Tornadoes and High Rise Structures Tornadoes Avoiding Downtown Chicago Coldest Temperature? Thermal Inversions Fog Blue Sky Gravitational pull vs. Atmospheric pressure Weights and Measures Science Demonstrations Cyanide Gas Bermuda Triangle X-30 Flower colors Ice Cream Headaches Rubber Egg Silver Dental Fillings and Aluminum Foil Birds and Wires

372

GENERAL@ELECTtiIC COMPINY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GENERAL@ELECTtiIC GENERAL@ELECTtiIC COMPINY ~9013 ~APPROVAL NO. 143 Article II, Section 8(b) PICHLAND, WASHINGTON .~. "ANFORD ATOMlC PlOD"CTS O*Ert*,ION ,. u/S; Atomic Energy Comisaion Hailfbrd operations Office Richland, Washington Attention: Mr. J. E. Travis, Manager Gentlemen: EXTRUSION OF URANIUM DIOXIDE FOR GENERAL ~ED&'RIC - APED The Atoinic Power Equipment Depart!++ of ~the The uranium dioxide necess :Material License No. C-3351. for establishing the value'of the.material will be developed with appropriate representatives of your office in accordance with established procedures. A small amount of scrap will be generated in the process but, since this will be usable and is needed in waging studies at Hanford, we do not propose to charge for reprocessing.

373

Kinetics of Anionic Surfactant Anoxic Degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biodegradation kinetics of Geropon TC-42 (trademark) by an acclimated culture was investigated in anoxic batch reactors to determine biokinetic coefficients to be implemented in two biofilm mathematical models. Geropon TC-42 (trademark) is the surfactant commonly used in space habitation. The two biofilm models differ in that one assumes a constant biofilm density and the other allows biofilm density changes based on space occupancy theory. Extant kinetic analysis of a mixed microbial culture using Geropon TC-42 (trademark) as sole carbon source was used to determine cell yield, specific growth rate, and the half-saturation constant for S0/X0 ratios of 4, 12.5, and 34.5. To estimate cell yield, linear regression analysis was performed on data obtained from three sets of simultaneous batch experiments for three S0/X0 ratios. The regressions showed non-zero intercepts, suggesting that cell multiplication is not possible at low substrate concentrations. Non-linear least-squares analysis of the integrated equation was used to estimate the specific growth rate and the half-saturation constant. Net specific growth rate dependence on substrate concentration indicates a self-inhibitory effect of Geropon TC-42 (trademark). The flow rate and the ratio of the concentrations of surfactant to nitrate were the factors that most affected the simulations. Higher flow rates resulted in a shorter hydraulic retention time, shorter startup periods, and faster approach to a steady-state biofilm. At steady-state, higher flow resulted in lower surfactant removal. Higher influent surfactant/nitrate concentration ratios caused a longer startup period, supported more surfactant utilization, and biofilm growth. Both models correlate to the empirical data. A model assuming constant biofilm density is computationally simpler and easier to implement. Therefore, a suitable anoxic packed bed reactor for the removal of the surfactant Geropon TC-42 (trademark) can be designed by using the estimated kinetic values and a model assuming constant biofilm density.

Camacho, Julianna G.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Inflation by purely kinetic coupled gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a purely kinetic coupled scalar-tensor gravity. We use FRW metric and obtain the modified Friedmann equations subject to an effective perfect fluid including energy density $\\rho_{\\phi}=\\rho_{g}+\\rho_{_G}$ and pressure $p_{\\phi}=p_{g}+p_{_G}$, where $(\\rho_{g}, p_{g})$ and $(\\rho_{_G}, p_{_G})$ define the perfect fluids corresponding to the coupling of scalar field dynamics with metric and Einstein tensors, respectively. We find that the inflation can occur in this model provided that $p_{_G}=-\\rho_{_G}$. We define Hubble slow-role parameters and find that the Hubble slow-role regime means $\\rho_{_{g}}\\ll\\rho_{_{G}}$. It turns out that the energy is not conserved for the scalar field and its kinetic energy is growing exponentially during inflation. It is proposed that this energy may be supplied by the quantum fluctuations of vacuum. This rapid transfer of energy density from vacuum to the scalar field may solve the cosmological constant problem. When $\\rho_{_{g}}$ becomes sufficiently large, the Hubble parameter starts decreasing and $\\rho_{_{g}}$ becomes comparable with $\\rho_{_{G}}$, hence the slow-role approximation is violated, and the inflation is ended. The large energy density of the scalar field may be transformed, partly into the matter, and partly into the radiation, and the universe experiences a reheating phase. At late times, the kinetic energy of the scalar field decreases as $a^{-6}$ and the remnant energy density of the scalar field may become a source of dark matter. Also, we study the cosmological perturbations during the inflation and obtain the behaviors of perturbations inside and outside the horizon. These results are in agreement with those obtained in common inflationary scenarios.

F. Darabi; A. Parsiya

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

375

Quasilocal Hamiltonians in general relativity  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the definition of quasilocal energy in general relativity based on a Hamiltonian analysis of the Einstein-Hilbert action initiated by Brown-York. The role of the constraint equations, in particular, the Hamiltonian constraint on the timelike boundary, neglected in previous studies, is emphasized here. We argue that a consistent definition of quasilocal energy in general relativity requires, at a minimum, a framework based on the (currently unknown) geometric well-posedness of the initial boundary value problem for the Einstein equations.

Anderson, Michael T. [Department of Mathematics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, N.Y. 11794-3651 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

SPECTRUM OF KINETIC-ALFVEN TURBULENCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical study of strong kinetic-Alfven turbulence at scales smaller than the ion gyroscale is presented, and a phenomenological model is proposed that argues that magnetic and density fluctuations are concentrated mostly in two-dimensional structures, which leads to their Fourier energy spectra E(k ){proportional_to}k {sup -8/3} , where k is the wavevector component normal to the strong background magnetic field. The results may provide an explanation for recent observations of magnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind at sub-proton scales.

Boldyrev, Stanislav; Perez, Jean Carlos [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

377

Detecting Ice Nuclei with a Continuous—Flow Diffusion Chamber-Some Exploratory Tests of Instrument Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A few basic experiments were performed with artificial cloud condensation nuclei and ice-nucleating aerosols in a continuous-flow thermal gradient diffusion chamber to investigate the instrument's response. Brief pulses of ice nuclei were input ...

David C. Rogers

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Measurement of the propagation velocity of single plasma channels in a spark chamber for particle track detection  

SciTech Connect

The velocity of growth of single tracks in a spark chamber is described. It is shown thai in the pressure range 300 < p < 760 torr the tracks propagate with the same velocity to the anode and cathode provided that E/p remains below an experimentally determined value. A rise of this value causes an asymmetry, which makes the chamber no longer suited for the track localization of ionizing particles. (GE)

Timm, U.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Generalized series of Bessel functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Known series of Bessel functions, currently available in handbooks, and many of Neumann type, are generalized to arbitrary order. The underlying result is a Poisson formula due to Titchmarsh. This formula gives rise to a Neumann series involving modified ... Keywords: Bessel functions, Neumann series

A. Al-Jarrah; K. M. Dempsey; M. L. Glasser

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Historical Information H.1 General  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 1 . . General Book 1 Effects Evaluation- for Project Rulison, June 1969 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. . . . . . . . . . . - ,--- ..-... . . . 0 . , . , ~ , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L . < - ....:.-. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - , , - . d - i , . .. * :=.:. 5 . . .:. : - . . . . . . : -.. .. ' . . - - .- - : . 7 : P . f l - ~ . - R - t f - . . . . . . . . . .;- .. +:.7'; . : : - . . . . . - . . . ..- : . . - ' . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . . .~ ~-.-- . . : - ., > .. , . .( . > - - . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . ' : -. . . . - - _ _ . . - . . . . ' * . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . 5 . . . . -- ' . . - ,. . , . . .... . . . * , . ; ) . , . ".ii . . - . '2-io- b . / . N V O - 4 3 ( F I

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

LFS Exhibit A General Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 of 31 Page 1 of 31 EXHIBIT "A" GENERAL CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS GC Title Page GC-1 DEFINITIONS (Aug 2012) .......................................................................................................... 3 GC-2A AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVES, COMMUNICATIONS AND NOTICES (Jan 2010) ........................................................................................................................................... 3 GC-3 INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (Jun 2009) ............................................................................. 4 GC-4 SUBCONTRACT INTERPRETATION (Jun 2009) ...................................................................... 4 GC-5 NOTICE TO PROCEED (Jul 2011)............................................................................................. 4

382

Interacting new generalized Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have presented a model in which the new generalized Chaplygin gas interacts with matter. We find that there exists a stable scaling solution at late times in the evolution of the universe. Moreover, the phantom crossing scenario is observed in this model.

Mubasher Jamil

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

383

Generalized power domination of graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce the concept of k-power domination which is a common generalization of domination and power domination. We extend several known results for power domination to k-power domination. Concerning the complexity of the k-power domination ... Keywords: Domination, Electrical network monitoring, Power domination

Gerard Jennhwa Chang; Paul Dorbec; Mickael Montassier; André Raspaud

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

General Relativity and Weyl Geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the general theory of relativity can be formulated in the language of Weyl geometry. We develop the concept of Weyl frames and point out that the new mathematical formalism may lead to different pictures of the same gravitational phenomena. We show that in an arbitrary Weyl frame general relativity, which takes the form of a scalar-tensor gravitational theory, is invariant with respect to Weyl tranformations. A kew point in the development of the formalism is to build an action that is manifestly invariant with respect to Weyl transformations. When this action is expressed in terms of Riemannian geometry we find that the theory has some similarities with Brans-Dicke gravitational theory. In this scenario, the gravitational field is not described by the metric tensor only, but by a combination of both the metric and a geometrical scalar field. We illustrate this point by, firstly, discussing the Newtonian limit in an arbitrary frame, and, secondly, by examining how distinct geometrical and physical pictures of the same phenomena may arise in different frames. To give an example, we discuss the gravitational spectral shift as viewed in a general Weyl frame. We further explore the analogy of general relativity with scalar-tensor theories and show how a known Brans-Dicke vacuum solution may appear as a solution of general relativity theory when reinterpreted in a particular Weyl frame. Finally, we show that the so-called WIST gravity theories are mathematically equivalent to Brans-Dicke theory when viewed in a particular frame.

C. Romero; J. B. Fonseca-Neto; M. L. Pucheu

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

385

Spatial redistribution of turbulent and mean kinetic energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The turbulent spatial redistribution of turbulent and mean kinetic energy and its exchange is investigated in the framework of an K-{epsilon} model in a magnetized plasma column. The kinetic energy is transferred from the turbulence into the zonal flow around the shear layer. The Reynolds stress profile adjusts to the shear layer, which results in a transport of mean kinetic energy from the region around the shear layer into the shear layer.

Manz, P.; Xu, M.; Fedorczak, N.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization,University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Stochastic cooling of bunched beams from fluctuation and kinetic theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical formalism for stochastic phase-space cooling of bunched beams in storage rings is developed on the dual basis of classical fluctuation theory and kinetic theory of many-body systems in phase-space. The physics is that of a collection of three-dimensional oscillators coupled via retarded nonconservative interactions determined by an electronic feedback loop. At the heart of the formulation is the existence of several disparate time-scales characterizing the cooling process. Both theoretical approaches describe the cooling process in the form of a Fokker-Planck transport equation in phase-space valid up to second order in the strength and first order in the auto-correlation of the cooling signal. With neglect of the collective correlations induced by the feedback loop, identical expressions are obtained in both cases for the coherent damping and Schottky noise diffusion coefficients. These are expressed in terms of Fourier coefficients in a harmonic decomposition in angle of the generalized nonconservative cooling force written in canonical action-angle variables of the particles in six-dimensional phase-space. Comparison of analytic results to a numerical simulation study with 90 pseudo-particles in a model cooling system is presented.

Chattopadhyay, S.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Carbon Dioxide Binding to Two Stereoisomers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Binding to Stereoisomers of a Cobalt(I) Macrocycle Binding to Stereoisomers of a Cobalt(I) Macrocycle Carol Creutz, Harold A. Schwarz, James F. Wishart, Etsuko Fujita and Norman Sutin J. Am. Chem. Soc. 113, 3361-3371 (1991) Abstract: The thermodynamics and kinetics of binding of CO2, CO, and H+ to N-racemic and N-meso stereoisomers of the cobalt(I) macrocycle CoL+ (L=5,7,7,12,14,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-4,11-diene) have been determined in aqueous media with use of the pulse radiolysis technique and transient ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. N-rac or N-meso-CoL+ was produced by the hydrated electron reduction of N-rac or N-meso-CoL2+, with tert-butyl alcohol generally added to scavenge hydroxyl radicals. Reactions of both N-rac- and N-meso CoL+ are readily followed by the disappearance of intense ([epsilon] 1 x 104 M-1 cm-1) absorption bands

388

PBXN-9 Ignition Kinetics and Deflagration Rates  

SciTech Connect

The ignition kinetics and deflagration rates of PBXN-9 were measured using specially designed instruments at LLNL and compared with previous work on similar HMX based materials. Ignition kinetics were measured based on the One Dimensional Time-to-Explosion combined with ALE3D modeling. Results of these experiments indicate that PBXN-9 behaves much like other HMX based materials (i.e. LX-04, LX-07, LX-10 and PBX-9501) and the dominant factor in these experiments is the type of explosive, not the type of binder/plasticizer. In contrast, the deflagration behavior of PBXN-9 is quite different from similar high weight percent HMX based materials (i.e LX-10, LX-07 and PBX-9501). PBXN-9 burns in a laminar manner over the full pressure range studied (0-310 MPa) unlike LX-10, LX-07, and PBX-9501. The difference in deflagration behavior is attributed to the nature of the binder/plasticizer alone or in conjunction with the volume of binder present in PBXN-9.

Glascoe, E; Maienschein, J; Burnham, A; Koerner, J; Hsu, P; Wemhoff, A

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

389

Kinetics of zeolite dealumination in steam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zeolite dealumination is a well known phenomenon that contributes to the deactivation or activation of catalysts in several different applications. The most obvious effect is in acid catalysis where dealumination under reaction conditions removes the Broensted sites, thus deactivating the catalyst. The authors are interested in the use of cation exchanged zeolites as selective reduction catalysts for removal of NO{sub x} from exhaust streams, particularly from automotive exhaust. In this case, copper exchanged ZSM-5 has been shown to be an effective catalyst for the generic reaction of NO{sub x} with hydrocarbons. However, high temperature and steam in combustion exhaust causes dealumination and consequent migration of copper out of the zeolite structure resulting in rapid deactivation of the catalyst. Dealumination of zeolites has been reported by many authors in uncountable papers and cannot be reviewed here. However, to the authors` knowledge there are no reports on the kinetics of dealumination under varying conditions of temperature and steam. By measuring the kinetics of dealumination with different zeolites and exchange cations they expect to develop working models of the dealumination process that will allow control of zeolite deactivation. This manuscript is a description of the basic techniques used and a progress report on the very beginning of this study.

Hughes, C.D.; Labouriau, A.; Crawford, S.N.; Romero, R.; Quirin, J.; Earl, W.L.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type of hydrocarbon), via reaction with ozone, a key pollutant in the troposphere. Although there has been much indirect evidence supporting Criegee's mechanism, breakthrough research done at the ALS by chemists from Sandia National Laboratories, the University of Manchester, and Bristol University has for the first time directly measured reaction rates for so-called "Criegee intermediates," elusive molecules formed at intermediate stages of ozonolysis. The surprising results may have important implications for subjects ranging from advanced engine design to air quality and climate modeling.

391

Thermo -Dynamic & -Kinetic Modeling to Quantify the Evolution of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermo-kinetic model is applied on various chemical compositions of type ... Application of the Phase-Field Model to Four-Phase Reactions in Ternary Alloys.

392

Kinetic Simulations of Fusion Energy Dynamics at the Extreme...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinetic Simulations of Fusion Energy Dynamics at the Extreme Scale PI Name: William Tang PI Email: tang@pppl.gov Institution: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Allocation...

393

An Integrated CALPHAD Tool for Modeling Precipitation Kinetics ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, An Integrated CALPHAD Tool for Modeling Precipitation Kinetics and Accelerating Materials Design. Author(s), Qing Chen, Herng-Jeng Jou, ...

394

The Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Dissolution of Coarse Particles ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of the kinetics of dissolution of Nb-rich and Nb2C particles in .... The Influence of Specimen Fabrication Method on the Measured Tensile ...

395

Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

novel measurements of chemical dynamics for clusters, Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at theUniversity of California Chemical Sciences Division,

Leone, Stephen R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Dissolution Kinetics of Steelmaking Slag and Its Promotion for the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Dissolution Kinetics of Steelmaking Slag and Its Promotion for the Growth of Algae. Author(s), Chunfang Zi, Kai Huang, Lianyun Liu, Xiaohui ...

397

Kinetics of Supercritical Water Reformation of Ethanol to H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 16, 2007 ... Description Kinetics of the supercritical water reformation of ethanol was experimentally studied in a tubular reactor made of Inconel 625 alloy.

398

Kinetic characterization of enhanced lipase activity on oil bodies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

reaction kinetics of oil bodies versus oil emulsions as sub- strates for lipolytic ... of hydrolysis for the oil body system was comparatively very low due to a brief ...

399

Defect Chemistry and Kinetics of Electrons in Ion Conducting Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Defect Chemistry and Kinetics of Electrons in Ion Conducting Materials – Recent Results and Applications. Author(s), Hans D. Wiemhöfer.

400

Particle Size Distribution Model for Leaching Kinetics of Alumina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Particle Size Distribution Model for Leaching Kinetics of Alumina. Author(s), Li Bao, Ting-an Zhang, Weimin Long, Anh V Nguyen, Guozhi Lv, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A Kinetic Monte Carlo Model for Material Aging: Simulations of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we develop a kinetic Monte Carlo framework aiming at ... A Controlled Stress Energy Minimization Method for Coarse-grained Atomistic Simulation.

402

Thermal Stabilization of Nanocrystalline Grain Size by Kinetic and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This talk will review both kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms and ... Basic Criteria for Formation of Growth Twins in High Stacking Fault Energy Metals.

403

Oxygen Exchange Kinetics on SOFC Cathode Materials: Importance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Oxygen Exchange Kinetics on SOFC Cathode Materials: Importance of Ionic and Electronic Carriers. Author(s), Rotraut Merkle, Lei Wang,

404

Kinetic Modeling of Esterification of Ethylene Glycol with Acetic Acid  

SciTech Connect

The reaction kinetics of the esterification of ethylene glycol with acetic acid in the presence of cation exchange resin has been studied and kinetic models based on empirical and Langmuir approach has been developed. The Langmuir based model involving eight kinetic parameters fits experimental data much better compared to empirical model involving four kinetic parameters. The effect of temperature and catalyst loading on the reaction system has been analyzed. Further, the activation energy and frequency factor of the rate constants for Langmuir based model has been estimated.

Yadav, Vishnu P.; Maity, Sunil K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad, Ordnance Factory Estate, Yeddumailiram-502205, Andhra Pradesh (India); Mukherjee, Rudra Palash [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Durgapur, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur-713209, West Bengal (India); Bantraj, Kandi [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela-769008, Orissa (India)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

405

3.205 Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials, Fall 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laws of thermodynamics applied to materials and materials processes. Solution theory. Equilibrium diagrams. Overview of fluid transport processes. Kinetics of processes that occur in materials, including diffusion, phase ...

Allen, Samuel M.

406

Kinetics, Transport, and Structure in Hard and Soft Materials - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 25, 2007 ... REVIEWED BY: Stephen Rankin, associate professor, University of Kentucky. In his book Kinetics, Transport, and Structure in Hard and Soft ...

407

Filling the vacuum chamber of a technological system with homogeneous plasma using a stationary glow discharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental study of a glow discharge with electrostatic confinement of electrons is carried out in the vacuum chamber volume V {approx} 0.12 m{sup 3} of a technological system 'Bulat-6' in argon pressure range 0.005-5 Pa. The chamber is used as a hollow cathode of the discharge with the inner surface area S {approx} 1.5 m{sup 2}. It is equipped with two feedthroughs, which make it possible to immerse in the discharge plasma interchangeable anodes with surface area S{sub a} ranging from {approx}0.001 to {approx}0.1 m{sup 2}, as well as floating electrodes isolated from both the chamber and the anode. Dependences of the cathode fall U{sub c} = 0.4-3 kV on the pressure p at a constant discharge current in the range I = 0.2-2 A proved that aperture of the electron escape out of the electrostatic trap is equal to the sum S{sub o} = S{sub a} + S{sub f} of the anode surface S{sub a} and the floating electrode surface S{sub f}. The sum S{sub o} defines the lower limit p{sub o} of the pressure range, in which U{sub c} is independent of p. At p fall U{sub c} grows up dramatically, when the pressure decreases, and the pressure p tends to the limit p{sup ex}, which is in fact the discharge extinction pressure. At p {approx} p{sup ex} electrons emitted by the cathode and the first generation of fast electrons produced in the cathode sheath spend almost all their energy up to 3 keV on heating the anode and the floating electrode up to 600-800{sup o}C and higher. In this case the gas in the chamber is being ionized by the next generations of electrons produced in the cathode sheath, their energy being one order of magnitude lower. When S{sub a} fall of potential U{sub a} up to 0.5 kV.

Metel, A. S., E-mail: ametel@stankin.ru; Grigoriev, S. N.; Melnik, Yu. A.; Panin, V. V. [Moscow State University of Technology 'Stankin' (Russian Federation)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Voltage Pulse Profile Characteristics with Space Charge of a Loaded Pulsed Ionization Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical model describing the voltage pulse profile of a pulsed ionization chamber and its relationship to the electron density in a field drift dominated plasma is formulated. The differential equation derived from the equations of motion and conservation of electron density combined with Poisson's equation for the electric space?charge field in the system is solved analytically for the cylindrical?electrode geometry with an external RC circuit. The numerical analysis for the given initial and boundary conditions yields the anode voltage?signal pulse profiles for the period of electron collection as a function of the initial electron density

S.H. Kim; W.H. Ellis

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); Mori, Yoshitaka [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Analysis of Combustion Chamber Deposits by ESI-TOF-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combustion chamber deposits (CCDs) in internal combustion engines have been studied by various techniques to understand the relationship of performance degradation with deposit quantity and structure. XPS, XAS, NMR, and elemental analysis have offered insight into the bulk structure of C, H, N, O and metal components [1]. MS has offered some information about compound structure, but results are limited due to the insolubility and complexity of the materials. Recent advances in MS have opened new possibilities for analysis of CCDs. Here we report initial findings on the carbon structure of these deposits determined by ESI-TOF-MS and MADLI-TOF-MS.

Reynolds, J G; Shields, S J; Roos, J W

2001-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

411

United States General Accounting Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington, DC 20548 Washington, DC 20548 Comptroller General of the United States Decision Matter of: The Jones/Hill Joint Venture File: B-286194.4; B-286194.5; B-286194.6 Date: December 5, 2001 William A. Roberts III, Esq., Phillip H. Harrington, Esq., William S. Lieth, Esq., and Janet L. Eichers, Esq., Wiley, Rein & Fielding, for the protester. Marvin D. Norman, Esq., Vicki E. O'Keefe, Esq., and Robert E. Little, Jr., Esq., Department of the Navy, for the agency. Louis A. Chiarella, Esq., John L. Formica, Esq., and James A. Spangenberg, Esq., Office of the General Counsel, GAO, participated in the preparation of the decision. DIGEST 1. A conflict of interest existed in an Office of Management and Budget Circular A-76 commercial activities study where a Navy employee and a private-sector consultant

412

Additional Symmetries of Generalized Hierarchies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The non-isospectral symmetries of a general class of integrable hierarchies are found, generalizing the Galilean and scaling symmetries of the Korteweg--de Vries equation and its hierarchy. The symmetries arise in a very natural way from the semi-direct product structure of the Virasoro algebra and the affine Kac--Moody algebra underlying the construction of the hierarchy. In particular, the generators of the symmetries are shown to satisfy a subalgebra of the Virasoro algebra. When a tau-function formalism is available, the infinitesimal symmetries act directly on the tau-functions as moments of Virasoro currents. Some comments are made regarding the r\\^ole of the non-isospectral symmetries and the form of the string equations in matrix-model formulations of quantum gravity in two-dimensions and related systems.

T. J. Hollowood; J. L. Miramontes; J. Sanchez Guillen

1993-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Dynamic Space of General Relativity in Second Atomization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The notion that the geometry of our space-time is not only a static background but can be physically dynamic is well established in general relativity. Geometry can be described as shaped by the presence of matter, where such shaping manifests itself as gravitational force. We consider here probabilistic or atomistic models of such space-time, in which the active geometry emerges from a statistical distribution of 'atoms'. Such atoms are not to be confused with their chemical counterparts, however the shift of perspective obtained in analyzing a gas via its molecules rather than its bulk properties is analogous to this "second atomization". In this atomization, space-time itself (i.e. the meter and the second) is effectively atomized, so the atoms themselves must exist in a 'subspace'. Here we build a simple model of such a space-time from the ground up, establishing a route for more complete theories, and enabling a review of recent work. We first introduce the motivation behind statistical interpretations and atomism, and look at applications to the realm of dynamic space-time theories. We then consider models of kinetic media in subspace compatible with our understanding of light. From the equations governing the propagation of light in subspace we can build a metric geometry, describing the dynamic and physical space-time of general relativity. Finally, implications of the theory on current frontiers of general relativity including cosmology, black holes, and quantum gravity are discussed.

Lukas A. Saul

2004-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

414

LFS Exhibit A General Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dated 5-20-13 Dated 5-20-13 Subcontract No. 241314 Page 1 of 19 EXHIBIT "A" GENERAL CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS GC Title Page GC-1 DEFINITIONS (Aug 2012 - Deviation) ........................................................................................ 3 GC-2A AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVES, COMMUNICATIONS AND NOTICES (Jan 2010) ........................................................................................................................................... 4 GC-3 INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (Jun 2009) ............................................................................. 4 GC-4 SUBCONTRACT INTERPRETATION (Jun 2009) ...................................................................... 4 GC-5 NOTICE TO PROCEED (Jul 2011)............................................................................................. 4

415

Quantum information and general relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox (1935) is reexamined in the light of Shannon's information theory (1948). The EPR argument did not take into account that the observers' information was localized, like any other physical object. General relativity introduces new problems: there are horizons which act as one-way membranes for the propagation of quantum information, in particular black holes which act like sinks.

Asher Peres

2004-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

416

A General Weighted Grammar Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a general weighted grammar software library, the GRM Library, that can be used in a variety of applications in text, speech, and biosequence processing. The underlying algorithms were designed to support a wide variety of semirings and the representation and use of very large grammars and automata of several hundred million rules or transitions. We describe several algorithms and utilities of this library and point out in each case their application to several text and speech processing tasks.

Cyril Allauzen; Mehryar Mohri; Brian Roark

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Kinetic electrocaloric effect and giant net cooling of lead-free ferroelectric refrigerants  

SciTech Connect

The electrocaloric effect of BaTiO{sub 3} multilayer thick film structure was investigated by direct measurement using differential scanning calorimeter. The samples show a giant electrocaloric effect of 0.89 J/g under E=176 kV/cm, which also depends on the varying rate of applied field, following a general power-law relation. Based on the large net-cooling (0.37 J/g) resulting from the difference in the varying rates of rising and falling fields, the kinetic electrocaloric effect provides a solution for the design of refrigeration cycle in ferroelectric microrefrigerator.

Bai Yang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Key Laboratory of Environmental Fracture, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100083 (China); Zheng Guangping; Shi Sanqiang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Chemical kinetic study of the oxidation of toluene and related cyclic compounds  

SciTech Connect

Chemical kinetic models of hydrocarbons found in transportation fuels are needed to simulate combustion in engines and to improve engine performance. The study of the combustion of practical fuels, however, has to deal with their complex compositions, which generally involve hundreds of compounds. To provide a simplified approach for practical fuels, surrogate fuels including few relevant components are used instead of including all components. Among those components, toluene, the simplest of the alkyl benzenes, is one of the most prevalent aromatic compounds in gasoline in the U.S. (up to 30%) and is a promising candidate for formulating gasoline surrogates. Unfortunately, even though the combustion of aromatics been studied for a long time, the oxidation processes relevant to this class of compounds are still matter of discussion. In this work, the combustion of toluene is systematically approached through the analysis of the kinetics of some important intermediates contained in its kinetic submechanism. After discussing the combustion chemistry of cyclopentadiene, benzene, phenol and, finally, of toluene, the model is validated against literature experimental data over a wide range of operating conditions.

Mehl, M; Frassoldati, A; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W; Ranzi, E

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Metal Oxidation Kinetics and the Transition from Thin to Thick Films  

SciTech Connect

We report an investigation of growth kinetics and transition from thin to thick films during metal oxidation. In the thin film limit (< 20 nm), Cabrera and Mott’s theory is usually adopted by explicitly considering ionic drift through the oxide in response to electric fields, where the growth kinetics follow an inverse logarithmic law . It is generally accepted that Wagner’s theory, involving self-diffusion, is valid only in the limit of thick film regime (>1?m) and leads to parabolic growth kinetics , where l is the oxide film thickness. Theory presented here unifies the two models and provides a complete description of oxidation including the transition from thin to thick film. The range of validity of Cabrera and Mott’s theory and Wagner’s theory can be well defined in terms of the Debye-Hückel screening length. The transition from drift-dominated ionic transport for thin film to diffusion-dominated transport for thick film is found to strictly follow the direct logarithmic law that is frequently observed in many experiments.

Xu, Zhijie; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

ON THE EMERGENCE OF BIOLOGICAL COMPLEXITY: LIFE AS A KINETIC STATE OF MATTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, whereas for replicating chemical systems selection is effectively kinetic. Building on an extension. Keywords: biological complexification, chemical evolution, kinetic stability, kinetic state of matter that are kinetically more stable. So though all chemical reactions are governed by a combination of kinetic

Pross, Addy

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Kinetic Energy Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Kinetic Energy Systems Place Ocala, Florida Zip 34476 Sector Hydro Product Designs and develops tidal generators. Has notably patented the KESC Tidal Generator which is based on free flow hydrodynamics. Coordinates 29.187525°, -82.140394° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.187525,"lon":-82.140394,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

422

A Chemical Kinetic Model of Transcriptional Elongation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A chemical kinetic model of the elongation dynamics of RNA polymerase along a DNA sequence is introduced. The proposed model governs the discrete movement of the RNA polymerase along a DNA template, with no consideration given to elastic effects. The model's novel concept is a ``look-ahead'' feature, in which nucleotides bind reversibly to the DNA prior to being incorporated covalently into the nascent RNA chain. Results are presented for specific DNA sequences that have been used in single-molecule experiments of the random walk of RNA polymerase along DNA. By replicating the data analysis algorithm from the experimental procedure, the model produces velocity histograms, enabling direct comparison with these published results.

Yujiro Richard Yamada; Charles S. Peskin

2006-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

Kinetics driving high-density chlorine plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple fluid model was developed in order to investigate the driving kinetics of neutral and charged species in high-density chlorine plasmas. It was found that the dissociation degree of Cl{sub 2} molecules is directly linked to the power balance of the discharge which controls the electron density. The model was also used to identify those reactions that could be neglected in the particle balance of charged species and those that must be included. Our results further indicate that diffusion losses need to be considered up to a pressure that depends on magnetic-field intensity and reactor aspect ratio. Finally, it is shown that the dominant charged carriers are linked to the dissociation level of Cl{sub 2} molecules.

Stafford, L.; Margot, J.; Vidal, F.; Chaker, M.; Giroux, K.; Poirier, J.-S.; Quintal-Leonard, A.; Saussac, J. [Department de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Varennes, Quebec (Canada); Department de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals  

SciTech Connect

Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ?10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

Nesbitt, David J. [Research/Professor

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

425

Design and optimization of 6li neutron-capture pulse mode ion chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to design and optimize the performance of a unique, inexpensive 6Li neutron-capture pulse-mode ion chamber (LiPMIC) for neutron detection that overcomes the fill-gas contamination stemming from outgas of detector components. This research also provides a demonstration of performance of LiPMICs. Simulations performed with GARFIELD, a drift-chamber simulation package for ion transport in an electrostatic field, have shown that argon-methane mixtures of fill-gas allow maintenance of electron drift velocity through a surprisingly wide range of fill-gas content. During the design stage of LiPMIC development, the thicknesses of lithium metallization layer, the neutron energy conversion site of the detector, and the thickness of neutron moderator, the high-density polyethylene body, are optimized through analytical and MCNPX calculations. Also, a methodology of obtaining the suitable combination of electric field strength, electron drift velocity, and fill-gas mixtures has been tested and simulated using argon-methane gas mixtures. The LiPMIC is shown to have comparable efficiency to 3He proportional counters at a fraction of cost. Six-month long baseline measurements of overall detector performance shows there is a 3% reduction in total counts for 252Cf sources, which provides a good indicator for the longevity of the detector.

Chung, Kiwhan

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

A new visible spectroscopy diagnostic for the JET ITER-like wall main chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In preparation for ITER, JET has been upgraded with a new ITER-like wall (ILW), whereby the main plasma facing components, previously of carbon, have been replaced by mainly Be in the main chamber and W in the divertor. As part of the many diagnostic enhancements, a new, survey, visible spectroscopy diagnostic has been installed for the characterization of the ILW. An array of eight lines-of-sight (LOS) view radially one of the two JET neutral beam shine through areas (W coated carbon fibre composite tiles) at the inner wall. In addition, one vertical LOS views the solid W tile at the outer divertor. The light emitted from the plasma is coupled to a series of compact overview spectrometers, with overall wavelength range of 380-960 nm and to one high resolution Echelle overview spectrometer covering the wavelength range 365-720 nm. The new survey diagnostic has been absolutely calibrated in situ by means of a radiometric light source placed inside the JET vessel in front of the whole optical path and operated by remote handling. The diagnostic is operated in every JET discharge, routinely monitoring photon fluxes from intrinsic and extrinsic impurities (e.g., Be, C, W, N, and Ne), molecules (e.g., BeD, D{sub 2}, ND) and main chamber and divertor recycling (typically D{alpha}, D{beta}, and D{gamma}). The paper presents a technical description of the diagnostic and first measurements during JET discharges.

Maggi, C. F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Stamp, M. F.; Griph, S.; Heesterman, P.; Hogben, C.; Horton, A.; Meigs, A.; Studholme, W.; Zastrow, K.-D. [EURATOM/CCFE, Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Morlock, C. [EFDA-CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

CMS reconstruction improvement for the muon tracking by the RPC chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The contribution of Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) to muon reconstruction in CMS has been studied on a sample of muons collected in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV at the LHC in 2011. Muon reconstruction is performed using the all-silicon inner tracker and with up to four stations of gas-ionization muon detectors. Drift Tubes and Cathode Strip Chambers detect muons in the barrel and endcap regions, respectively, and are complemented by the RPC system. Measured distributions of reconstructed hits in the RPCs crossed by muons from Z decays with a transverse momentum pT above 20 GeV/c are well reproduced by the Monte Carlo simulation. From the samples of J/psi and Z events, the efficiencies for muons with and without the inclusion of the RPC hits in the muon track reconstruction are measured and compared with the simulation. Using RPC information in track reconstruction improves up to about 3% of offline reconstruction efficiency for the muons in the region of pT above 7 GeV/c, in good agreement with simulation.

Min Suk Kim on behalf of the CMS Collaboration

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

428

Development and validation of compressible mixture viscous fluid algorithm applied to predict the evolution of inertial fusion energy chamber gas and the impact of gas on direct-drive target survival  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conversion be- tween kinetic (green) and thermal energy (energy lost through ra- diation (red), kinetic (green), andenergy lost through radiation (red), kinetic (green), and

Martin, Robert Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A new approach to the application of the classic methods of physicochemical kinetics in the analysis of the efficiency of plasma technology of coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

This work is devoted to the problem of improving the efficiency of new plasma technologies of coal combustion that have minimum negative environmental impact. In particular, the authors consider a general method of formulating and solving the inverse kinetic problem to elucidate advantages of plasma gasification.

Karpenko, E.I.; Devyatov, B.N. [Kutateladze Inst. of Thermal Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Extracting biochemical reaction kinetics from time series data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We consider the problem of inferring kinetic mechanisms for biochemical reactions from time series data. Using a priori knowledge about the structure of chemical reaction kinetics we develop global nonlinear models which use elementary reactions as a basis set, and discuss model construction using top-down and bottom-up approaches. 1

Edmund J. Crampin; Patrick E. Mcsharry; Santiago Schnell

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Computing realizations of reaction kinetic networks with given properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engineering­chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, and fluid mechanics­are developed in the second CHEME 3900 Chemical Kinetics and Reactor Design CHEME 4320 Chemical Engineering Laboratory CHEME 4620UndergradUate degree Program as a chemical engineer you'll work with chemical change and chemical

Gorban, Alexander N.

432

Nonlinear adaptive control for bioreactors with unknown kinetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a control problem for a single bioreaction occurring in a continuous and well-mixed bioreactor, assuming that the bioreaction's kinetics is not represented by a validated model. We develop a nonlinear controller and prove the global asymptotic ... Keywords: Continuous bioprocesses, Nonlinear adaptive control, Unknown kinetics, Wastewater treatment

Ludovic Mailleret; Olivier Bernard; Jean-Philippe Steyer

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Towards cleaner combustion engines through groundbreaking detailed chemical kinetic models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards cleaner combustion engines through groundbreaking detailed chemical kinetic models of more predictive and more accurate detailed chemical kinetic models for the combustion of fuels that the combustion of liquid fuels will remain the main source of energy for transportation for the next 50 years.1

434

Kinetics of Diuron Adsorption onto Activated Carbon Fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted on the adsorption kinetics of diuron from aqueous solutions onto activated carbon fiber. The results showed that the formation of hydrogen bonds between diuron and water, and temperature variations may possibly affect the adsorption ... Keywords: activated carbon fiber, diuron adsorption, kinetic models, hydrogen bonds

Jianhua Xu; Yabing Sun; Zhenyu Li; Jingwei Feng

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Pyrolysis kinetics for western and eastern oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil yield and kinetic results are reviewed for Western (Colorado Mahogany zone) and Eastern (Sunbury and Ohio (Cleveland member)) oil shales for conditions ranging from those encountered in in-situ processing to those in fluidized-bed retorting. The authors briefly summarize kinetic models for the pyrolysis reactions. Oil yields from Eastern shale are much more sensitive to pyrolysis conditions than Western shale.

Burnham, A.K.; Coburn, T.T.; Richardson, J.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Reconciling competing models: a case study of wine fermentation kinetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical models of wine fermentation kinetics promise early diagnosis of stuck or sluggish winemaking processes as well as better matching of industrial yeast strains to specific vineyards. The economic impact of these challenges is significant: ... Keywords: combined and refined model, fermentation problems, mechanistic kinetic models, statistical comparison with experimental data, wine fermentation

Rodrigo Assar; Felipe A. Vargas; David J. Sherman

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Solubilty and growth kinetics of silver nitrate in ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solubility of silver nitrate in ethanol was determined at various temperatures. The growth kinetics of silver nitrate in ethanol were then determined using initial derivaties of temperature and desupersaturation in a mixed-batch crystallizer. For ... Keywords: ethanol, growth kinetics, initial derivatives, silver nitrate, solubility

M. Manteghian; A. Ebrahimi

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics  

SciTech Connect

Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. The injected CO{sub 2} is expected to react with the host rocks and these reactions can potentially alter the porosity, permeability, and mechanical properties of the host or cap rocks. Reactions can also result in precipitation of carbonate-containing minerals that favorably and permanently trap CO{sub 2} underground. Many numerical models have been used to predict these reactions for the carbon sequestration program. However, a firm experimental basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO{sub 2} injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation of silicate dissolution rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In this four year research grant (three years plus a one year no cost extension), seven (7) laboratory experiments of CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions were carried out. An experimental design allowed the collection of water samples during experiments in situ and thus prevented back reactions. Analysis of the in situ samples delineated the temporal evolution of aqueous chemistry because of CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions. The solid products of the experiments were retrieved at the end of the experimental run, and analyzed with a suite of advanced analytical and electron microscopic techniques (i.e., atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)). As a result, the research project probably has produced one of the best data sets for CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions in terms of both aqueous solution chemistry and solid characterization. Three experiments were performed using the Navajo sandstone. Navajo sandstone is geologically equivalent to the Nugget sandstone, which is a target formation for a regional partnership injection project. Our experiments provided the experimental data on the potential CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions that are likely to occur in the aquifer. Geochemical modeling was performed to interpret the experimental results. Our single mineral (feldspar) experiments addressed a basic research need. i.e., the coupled nature of dissolution and precipitation reactions, which has universal implication to the reaction kinetics as it applied to CO{sub 2} sequestration. Our whole rock experiments (Navajo sandstone) addressed the applied research component, e.g., reacting Navajo sandstone with brine and CO{sub 2} has direct relevance on the activities of a number of regional partnerships. The following are the major findings from this project: (1) The project generated a large amount of experimental data that is central to evaluating CO{sub 2}-water-rock interactions and providing ground truth to predictive models, which have been used and will inevitably be increasingly more used in carbon sequestration. (2) Results from the feldspar experiments demonstrated stronger coupling between dissolution and precipitation reactions. We show that the partial equilibrium assumption did not hold in the feldspar hydrolysis experiments (Zhu and Lu, submitted, Appendix A-2). The precipitation of clay minerals influenced dissolution of primary silicate in a much stronger way as previously envisioned. Therefore, our experimental data indicated a much more complex chemical kinetics as it has been applied to carbon sequestration program in terms of preliminary predictive models of CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions. Adopting this complexity (strong coupling) may influence estimates of mineral trapping and porosity/permeability for geological carbon sequestration. In general, our knowledge of the coupling of different reactions is poor, and we must consider the uncertainties resultin

Chen Zhu

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rather than repeat these compliance requirements, audit objectives, and suggested audit procedures for each program, they are provided once in this part. For each program in this Compliance Supplement (this Supplement), the program-specific compliance guidance section (Part III of this guidance) contains additional information about the compliance requirements that arise from laws and regulations applicable to each program, including the requirements specific to each program that should be tested using the guidance in this part. Compliance Requirements, Audit Objectives, and Suggested Audit Procedures At the end of this General Compliance Supplement is a matrix that outlines the compliance requirements, including special tests and provisions, that are applicable to programs performed under

440

Accelerator experiments contradicting general relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The deflection of gamma-rays in Earth's gravitational field is tested in laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators. Within a formalism connecting the bending angle to the photon's momentum it follows that detected gamma-ray spectra are inconsistent with a deflection magnitude of 2.78 nrad, predicted by Einstein's gravity theory. Moreover, preliminary results for 13-28 GeV photons from two different laboratories show opposite - away from the Earth - deflection, amounting to 33.8-0.8 prad. I conclude that general relativity, which describes gravity at low energies precisely, break down at high energies.

Vahagn Gharibyan

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Extraction of depth-dependent perturbation factors for parallel-plate chambers in electron beams using a plastic scintillation detector  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This work presents the experimental extraction of the overall perturbation factor P{sub Q} in megavoltage electron beams for NACP-02 and Roos parallel-plate ionization chambers using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The authors used a single scanning PSD mounted on a high-precision scanning tank to measure depth-dose curves in 6, 12, and 18 MeV clinical electron beams. The authors also measured depth-dose curves using the NACP-02 and PTW Roos chambers. Results: The authors found that the perturbation factors for the NACP-02 and Roos chambers increased substantially with depth, especially for low-energy electron beams. The experimental results were in good agreement with the results of Monte Carlo simulations reported by other investigators. The authors also found that using an effective point of measurement (EPOM) placed inside the air cavity reduced the variation of perturbation factors with depth and that the optimal EPOM appears to be energy dependent. Conclusions: A PSD can be used to experimentally extract perturbation factors for ionization chambers. The dosimetry protocol recommendations indicating that the point of measurement be placed on the inside face of the front window appear to be incorrect for parallel-plate chambers and result in errors in the R{sub 50} of approximately 0.4 mm at 6 MeV, 1.0 mm at 12 MeV, and 1.2 mm at 18 MeV.

Lacroix, Frederic; Guillot, Mathieu; McEwen, Malcolm; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Gingras, Luc; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal (CHUM), 1560 Sherbrooke Est, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry (D-428), 2900 Boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Ho circumflex tel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Ionizing Radiation Standards, Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council (NRC), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Ho circumflex tel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Services General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products

443

A Conic Programming Approach to Generalized Tchebycheff ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a special class of Generalized Tchebycheff Inequalities in probability theory. ... Relying on a general approximation scheme for conic programming,.

444

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Jump to: navigation, search Name Computable General Equilibrium Models for...

445

SRS - SRNS General Provisions and Related Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SRNS General Provisions and Related Documents General ProvisionsTerms and Conditions Documents Certifications SolicitationSubcontract Documents Focused Observation Safety...

446

LA-2271 CHEMISTRY-GENERAL  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

2271 2271 CHEMISTRY-GENERAL TID-4500, 14th Ed. LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ALAMOS NEW MEXICO REPORT WRITTEN: August 1958 REPORT DISTRIBUTED: March 17, 1959 COMPRESSIBILITY FACTORS AND FUGACITY COEFFICIENTS CALCULATED FROM THE BEATTIE-BRIDGEMAN EQUATION OF STATE FOR HYDROGEN, NITROGEN, OXYGEN, CARBON DIOXIDE, AMMONIA, METHANE, AND HELIUM by C. E. Holley, J r . W. J. Worlton R. K. Zeigler » * This report expresses the opinions of the author or authors and does not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Contract W-7405-ENG. 36 with the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

447

rmotc general letter.qxp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Teapot Dome Oilfield Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center T eapot Dome was the popular name for the scandal during the administration of U.S. President Warren G. Harding. The scandal, which involved the secret leasing of naval oil reserve lands to private companies, was first revealed to the general public in 1924 after findings by a committee of the U.S. Senate. The creation of the Naval Petroleum Reserves originated with the growth of federal conserva- tion policy under presidents Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson. The reserves were tracts of public land where oil should be kept in its natural reservoirs for the future use of the Navy. "Teapot Dome" originally acquired its name from a rock nearby which resembled a teapot.

448

LLNL-JRNL-501931 Generalized  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JRNL-501931 JRNL-501931 Generalized displacement correlation method for estimating stress intensity factors P. Fu, S. M. Johnson, R. R. Settgast, C. R. Carrigan September 29, 2011 Engineering Fracture Mechanics Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or

449

Part I, General Audit Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and subrecipients of and subrecipients of federal financial assistance from the Department of Energy (DOE). Such compliance audits must be conducted in accordance with the requirements and guidance set forth in Statement on Auditing Standards No. 117, Compliance Audits (SAS 117) and generally accepted government auditing standards (GAGAS). See section C below for more detail. The audit procedures provided in this Audit Program are the minimum necessary for uniform and consistent audit coverage. Auditors conducting audits of entities subject to the requirements of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular No. A-133, Audits of States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations, should not use this Audit Program and should instead refer to the Circular and the

450

General Electric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Electric Jump to: navigation, search Name General Electric Place Fairfield, Connecticut Zip 06828 Stock Symbol GE Year founded 1892 Number of employees 10,000+"+" is not declared as a valid unit of measurement for this property. Website http://www.ge.com/ Coordinates 41.1758333°, -73.2719444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.1758333,"lon":-73.2719444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

451

General Compression | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compression Compression Jump to: navigation, search Name General Compression Place Newton, Massachusetts Zip 2458 Product Massachusetts-based developer of compressed air energy storage systems. Coordinates 43.996685°, -87.803724° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.996685,"lon":-87.803724,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

452

Drilling and general petroleum engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forty-nine papers are included in the Drilling and General Petroleum Engineering Volume of the SPE Annual Conference and Exhibition proceedings. The conference was held in New Orleans, Louisiana, September 25-28, 1994. The papers cover such topics as: extended reach well drilling, development of marginal satellite fields, slim hole drilling, pressure loss predictions, models for cuttings transport, ester-based drilling fluid systems, borehole stability, cementing, operations, bit failures, roller core bits, well tracking techniques, nitrogen drilling systems, plug failures, drill bit and drillstring dynamics, slim hole vibrations, reserve estimates, enhanced recovery methods, waste disposal, and engineering salary trends. A separate abstract and indexing was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

General Biodiesel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biodiesel Biodiesel Jump to: navigation, search Name General Biodiesel Address 4034 West Marginal Way Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98106 Sector Biofuels Product Aims to turn waste cooking oil and animal fat into feedstock for biodiesel Website http://generalbiodiesel.com/ Coordinates 47.5677317°, -122.3542271° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.5677317,"lon":-122.3542271,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

454

Determination of cohesive and normal stresses and simulation of fluidization using kinetic theory  

SciTech Connect

The general objective of this study is focused on the solid stresses involved in gas-solid flow. These stresses are generally included in the momentum conservation equations, essentially for stability and to prevent particles from collapsing to unreasonably low values of gas volume fraction. The first half of this work undertakes the measurement of the stresses in various powders by direct means, while the second part uses a newly developed kinetic theory constitutive equation for stress to predict the flow and also the solids viscosity in a CFB. The cohesive or tensile stress found to exist in some classes of powders is measured using a Cohetester, based on which a cohesive force model is derived, which is sensitive to the characteristic properties of the powder material. The normal stress is measured using a Consolidometer, and the powder solids modulus is obtained as a function of the volume fraction. The solids modulus is seen to vary with particle size and particle type, with the smaller size particles being more compressible. The simulation of flow in the CFB using Gidaspow's (1991) extension of Ding's (1990) kinetic theory model to dilute phase flow, predicts realistic values of solids viscosity that are comparable to viscosities obtained experimentally by Miller (1991). However, to obtain a match between the two the value of the restitution coefficient has to be close to unity. The flow behavior showed periodic oscillations of flow (turbulence) as seen in a real system. 26 refs., 51 figs., 1 tab.

Bezbaruah, R.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction mechanism for the NBFZ tests.

Stefano Orsino

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

U.S. Chamber of Commerce's 4th Annual North America Forum | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commerce's 4th Annual North America Forum Commerce's 4th Annual North America Forum U.S. Chamber of Commerce's 4th Annual North America Forum June 16, 2008 - 1:30pm Addthis Remarks As Prepared for Delivery for Secretary Bodman Thank you very much, Ron, for that kind introduction and for the critically important work that you and your colleagues do at Lawrence Livermore. I also want to thank my good friend Secretary George Shultz - along with his esteemed co-chairs for this event, Peter Lougheed and Pedro Aspe, for inviting me to be with you. It's a pleasure to be here. The way I see it, this event could not come at a better time. With its focus on enhancing cooperation among the United States, Canada and Mexico - and on bringing together representatives of our governments and the private sector - you are helping to develop and achieve real and lasting solutions

457

Formation of metal nanoparticles by short-distance sputter deposition in a reactive ion etching chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method is reported to form metal nanoparticles by sputter deposition inside a reactive ion etching chamber with a very short target-substrate distance. The distribution and morphology of nanoparticles are found to be affected by the distance, the ion concentration, and the sputtering time. Densely distributed nanoparticles of various compositions were fabricated on the substrates that were kept at a distance of 130 mum or smaller from the target. When the distance was increased to 510 mum, island structures were formed, indicating the tendency to form continuous thin film with longer distance. The observed trend for nanoparticle formation is opposite to the previously reported mechanism for the formation of nanoparticles by sputtering. A new mechanism based on the seeding effect of the substrate is proposed to interpret the experimental results.

Nie Min; Meng, Dennis Desheng [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Sun Kai [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Length and Straightness of the Tubes for the BOS Prototype Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured length and straightness of 50 tubes of 3.8~m length, after cleaning, wiring and testing from a batch that was used in the construction of the BOS prototype chamber. The specifi ed length (aluminum tube only, without endplug) was 3800~mm with a tolerance of $\\pm$1~mm. We found a mean value of (3805$\\pm$2)~mm with a standard deviation of (0.3$\\pm$0.1)~mm. The measureme nts of the straightness of the 50 BOS MDT tubes gave a mean of the maximum deviation of 150~$\\mu$m for 10 measured points along the tubes at 0$^{\\circ}$, 90$^{\\circ}$, 180$^{\\circ}$ and 270$^{\\circ }$ around the tube diameter and a mean value of all deviations of 20~$\\mu$m with a measuring accuracy of 10~$\\mu$m.

Lagouri, T

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Chamber Surface Roughness and Electron Cloud for the Advanced Photon Source Superconducting Undulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electron cloud is a possible heat source in the superconducting undulator (SCU) designed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS), a 7-GeV electron synchrotron radiation source at Argonne National Laboratory. In electron cloud generation extensive research has been done, and is continuing, to understand the secondary electron component. However, little work has been done to understand the parameters of photoemission in the accelerator environment. To better understand the primary electron generation in the APS; a beamline at the Australian Light Source synchrotron was used to characterize two samples of the Al APS vacuum chamber. The total photoelectron yield and the photoemission spectra were measured. Four parameters were varied: surface roughness, sample temperature, incident photon energy, and incident photon angle, with their results presented here.

Boon, Laura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Analysis of Combustion Chamber Deposits by ESI-TOF-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combustion chamber deposits (CCD) in internal combustion engines have been studied by various techniques to understand the relationship of performance degradation with deposit quantity and structure. XPS, XAS, NMR, and elemental analysis have offered insight into the bulk structure of C, H, N, O and metal components. MS has offered some information about compound structure, but results are limited due to the insolubility and complexity of the materials. Recently, we have reported on the metal structure by XPS and XAS of several deposits from a GM 3800 engine generated using a standard fuel and one that contains low levels of the gasoline anti-knock additive, MMT. Here we report the initial findings on the carbon structure of these deposits determined by ESI-TOF-MS and MADLI-TOF-MS.

Reynolds, J G; Shields, S J; Roos, J W

2001-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kinetics chamber general" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Measurement of electrical properties of electrode materials for the bakelite Resistive Plate Chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single gap (gas gap 2 mm) bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) modules of various sizes from 10 cm \\times 10 cm to 1 m \\times 1 m have been fabricated, characterized and optimized for efficiency and time resolution. Thin layers of different grades of silicone compound are applied to the inner electrode surfaces to make them smooth and also to reduce the surface resistivity. In the silicone coated RPCs an efficiency > 90% and time resolution \\sim 2 ns (FWHM) have been obtained for both the streamer and the avalanche mode of operation. Before fabrication of detectors the electrical properties such as bulk resistivity and surface resistivity of the electrode materials are measured carefully. Effectiveness of different silicone coating in modifying the surface resistivity was evaluated by an instrument developed for monitoring the I-V curve of a high resistive surface. The results indicate definite correlation of the detector efficiency for the atmospheric muons and the RPC noise rates with the surface resistiv...

Meghna, K K; Biswas, S; Bhattacharya, S; Bose, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Das, G; Marick, C; Saha, S; Viyogi, Y P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Office of Inspector General | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Inspector General Inspector General Search Search form Search Office of Inspector General Office of Inspector General Services Services Home Hotline Whistleblower Ombudsman FOIA Reports Reports Home Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Recovery Act Home Recovery Act Reports Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission Mission Home Audits & Inspections Investigations Management & Administration About Us About Us Home Leadership Careers Careers Home Auditor Criminal Investigator Inspector Other Positions Vacancies Audits & Inspections Investigations Management & Administration Field Offices Contact Us Offices You are here Energy Department » Office of Inspector General Office of Inspector General Office of Inspector General

463

Kinetics of spin relaxation in quantum wires and channels: Boundary spin echo and formation of a persistent spin helix  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we use a spin kinetic equation to study spin-polarization dynamics in one-dimensional (1D) wires and 2D channels. The spin kinetic equation is valid in both diffusive and ballistic spin transport regimes and therefore is more general than the usual spin drift-diffusion equations. In particular, we demonstrate that in infinite 1D wires with Rashba spin-orbit interaction the exponential spin-relaxation decay can be modulated by an oscillating function. In the case of spin relaxation in finite length 1D wires, it is shown that an initially homogeneous spin polarization spontaneously transforms into a persistent spin helix. We find that a propagating spin-polarization profile reflects from a system boundary and returns back to its initial position similarly to the reflectance of sound waves from an obstacle. The Green's function of the spin kinetic equation is derived for both finite and infinite 1D systems. Moreover, we demonstrate explicitly that the spin relaxation in specifically oriented 2D channels with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions of equal strength occurs similarly to that in 1D wires of finite length. Finally, a simple transformation mapping 1D spin kinetic equation into the Klein-Gordon equation with an imaginary mass is found thus establishing an interesting connection between semiconductor spintronics and relativistic quantum mechanics.

Slipko, Valeriy A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and USC Nanocenter, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Department of Physics and Technology, V. N. Karazin Kharkov National University, Kharkov 61077 (Ukraine); Pershin, Yuriy V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and USC Nanocenter, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

ROLES OF THE KINETIC AND DYNAMIC MECHANISMS IN THE L{sub p} -E{sub p} RELATION  

SciTech Connect

The L{sub p} -E{sub p} relation is a well-known relation in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Its implication remains unclear. We propose to investigate the underlying mechanisms of this relation by considering the corresponding kinetic and dynamic mechanisms separately. In this way, one can tell how much the kinetic or dynamic mechanism contributes to the index of the relationship. Our analysis gives rise to several conclusions. (1) The index of the kinetic effect in the L{sub p} -E{sub p} relation can simply be derived from the theory of special relativity, which is generally larger than 2, depending on the situation concerned. (2) The index of the dynamic effect in the relation can be deduced from observation once a model of jets is adopted. According to current GRB data, we find that the dynamic effect alone tends to give rise to an anti-correlation between L{sub p} and E{sub p} ; in terms of statistics, the dynamic effect is obviously smaller than the kinetic effect; in the situation of jets with moving discrete radio clouds that move directly toward the observer, the index of the dynamic effect is currently constrained within (- 1.6, -1), while in other situations of jets, the constraints are different; both internal and external shocks can account for the current data.

Qin, Yi-Ping; Chen, Zhi-Fu, E-mail: ypqin@gzhu.edu.cn [Center for Astrophysics, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)] [Center for Astrophysics, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

465

Usiing NovoCOS cleaning equipment in repairing the furnace-chamber lining in coke batteries 4 & 5 at OAO Koks  

SciTech Connect

Experience with a new surface-preparation technology for the ceramic resurfacing of the refractory furnace-chamber lining in coke batteries is described.

S.G. Protasov; R. Linden; A. Gross [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Kinetics of the reactions of hydrogen fluoride with calcium oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the kinetics of interaction of gaseous hydrogen fluoride with calcium oxide at temperatures 300-700 degrees. The experiments were conducted in a laboratory adsorption apparatus modified and adapted for work with corrosive hydrogen fluoride. Calcium oxide samples in granulated form and deposited on gamma-alumina were used in the experiments. Kinetic curves representing variations of the degree of conversion of the solid samples with time are shown. The influence of retardation dure to diffusion was observed in the experiments. The influence of diffusion control on the reaction rate was also observed in a study of the reaction kinetics on supported layers of calcium oxide.

Kossaya, A.M.; Belyakov, B.P.; Kuchma, Z.V.; Sandrozd, M.K.; Vasil'eva, V.G.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Evidence of critical balance in kinetic Alfven wave turbulence simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical simulation of kinetic plasma turbulence is performed to assess the applicability of critical balance to kinetic, dissipation scale turbulence. The analysis is performed in the frequency domain to obviate complications inherent in performing a local analysis of turbulence. A theoretical model of dissipation scale critical balance is constructed and compared to simulation results, and excellent agreement is found. This result constitutes the first evidence of critical balance in a kinetic turbulence simulation and provides evidence of an anisotropic turbulence cascade extending into the dissipation range. We also perform an Eulerian frequency analysis of the simulation data and compare it to the results of a previous study of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations.

TenBarge, J. M.; Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Otherregarding preferences in general equilibrium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study competitive market outcomes in economies where agents have other-regarding preferences (ORPs). We identify a separability condition on monotone preferences that is necessary and sufficient for one’s own demand to be independent of the allocations and characteristics of other agents in the economy. Given separability, it is impossible to identify ORPs from market behaviour: agents behave as if they had classical preferences that depend only on own consumption in competitive equilibrium. If preferences, in addition, depend only on the final allocation of consumption in society, the Second Welfare Theorem holds as long as any increase in resources can be distributed in a way that makes all agents better off. The First Welfare Theorem generally does not hold. Allowing agents to care about their own consumption and the distribution of consumption possibilities in the economy, the competitive equilibria are efficient given prices if and only if there is no Pareto-improving redistribution of income. Downloaded from restud.oxfordjournals.org at University of Arizona on April 27, 2011

Martin Dufwenberg; Paul Heidhues; Georg Kirchsteiger; Frank Riedel; Joel Sobel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

INFRARED ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND CHEMICAL KINETICS OF FREE RADICALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mNAL PERFORMANCE REPORT mNAL PERFORMANCE REPORT for INFRARED ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND CHEMICAL KINETICS OF FREE RADICALS DE-FG05-85ER13439 1-AUG-1985 to 31-JUL-1994 Robert F. Curl and Graham P. Glass Principal Investigators Introduction This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study (by infrared absorption spectroscopy) of the chemical kinetic behavior of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. The work typically progressed from the detection and analysis of the infrared spectrum of combustion radical to the utilization of the infrared spectrum thus obtained in the investigation of chemical kinetics of the radical species. The methodology employed was infrared kinetic spectroscopy. In this technique the radical is produced by UV flash photolysis using an excimer laser and then

470

An Improved Equilibrium-Kinetics Speciation Algorithm For Redox Reactions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Equilibrium-Kinetics Speciation Algorithm For Redox Reactions Improved Equilibrium-Kinetics Speciation Algorithm For Redox Reactions In Variably Saturated Subsurface Flow Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Improved Equilibrium-Kinetics Speciation Algorithm For Redox Reactions In Variably Saturated Subsurface Flow Systems Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Reactive chemical transport occurs in a variety of geochemical environments, and over a broad range of space and time scales. Efficiency of the chemical speciation and water-rock-gas interaction calculations is important for modeling field-scale multidimensional reactive transport problems. An improved efficient model, REACT, for simulating water-rock-gas interaction under equilibrium and kinetic conditions, has been developed.

471

Momentum and Kinetic Energy Budgets of Simulated Supercell Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of numerical simulations of severe thunderstorms with rotating updrafts and supercell characteristics are analyzed to determine their sources, sinks, and transports of momentum and kinetic energy. Two simulations are used, one ...

Douglas K. Lilly; Brian F. Jewett

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of nanocrystalline film deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A full diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm is used to model nanocrystalline film deposition, and study the mechanisms of grain nucleation and microstructure formation in such films. The major finding of this work is ...

Ruan, Shiyun

473

Kinetic modeling and automated optimization in microreactor systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optimization, kinetic investigation, or scale-up of a reaction often requires significant time and materials. Silicon microreactor systems have been shown advantageous for studying chemical reactions due to their small ...

Moore, Jason Stuart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Review Crystal Gateway Marriott, Crystal City, VA May 18, 2006 Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media Anter El-Azab Tel: 850-410-6655, E-mail...

475

Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget Profiles Derived from Doppler Sodar Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doppler sodar wind measurements made in light wind conditions in September 1979 near a power plant in Turbigo, Italy, are used to derive terms in the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) budget. Measurements on five days are grouped into two classes: ...

Gary K. Greenhut; Giangiuseppe Mastrantonio

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Reversibility and Non-reversibility in Stochastic Chemical Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical problems with mean field and local type interaction related to stochastic chemical kinetics,are considered. Our main concern various definitions of reversibility, their corollaries (Boltzmann type equations, fluctuations, Onsager relations, etc.) and emergence of irreversibility.

Malyshev, V A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Solar wind plasma : kinetic properties and micro-instabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The kinetic properties of ions in the solar wind plasma are studied. Observations of solar wind +H and +2He by the Faraday Cup instrument component of the Solar Wind Experiment on the Wind spacecraft show that these ions ...

Kasper, Justin Christophe, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Kinetic Energy Transfer between Internal Gravity Waves and Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a reliable method for distinguishing the mean, wave and turbulence fields when internal waves with changing amplitude perturb the turbulent boundary layer. By integrating the component wave and turbulence kinetic energy budgets ...

J. J. Finnigan

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Ducted kinetic Alfven waves in plasma with steep density gradients  

SciTech Connect

Given their high plasma density (n {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}), it is theoretically possible to excite Alfven waves in a conventional, moderate length (L {approx} 2 m) helicon plasma source. However, helicon plasmas are decidedly inhomogeneous, having a steep radial density gradient, and typically have a significant background neutral pressure. The inhomogeneity introduces regions of kinetic and inertial Alfven wave propagation. Ion-neutral and electron-neutral collisions alter the Alfven wave dispersion characteristics. Here, we present the measurements of propagating kinetic Alfven waves in helium helicon plasma. The measured wave dispersion is well fit with a kinetic model that includes the effects of ion-neutral damping and that assumes the high density plasma core defines the radial extent of the wave propagation region. The measured wave amplitude versus plasma radius is consistent with the pile up of wave magnetic energy at the boundary between the kinetic and inertial regime regions.

Houshmandyar, Saeid [Solar Observatory Department, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, Texas 77446 (United States); Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Scime, Earl E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

The Mesoscale Kinetic Energy Spectrum of a Baroclinic Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric mesoscale kinetic energy spectrum is investigated through numerical simulations of an idealized baroclinic wave life cycle, from linear instability to mature nonlinear evolution and with high horizontal and vertical resolution (?x ...

Michael L. Waite; Chris Snyder

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Determining Turbulent Kinetic Energy Dissipation from Batchelor Curve Fitting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm is presented for obtaining the rate of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation by fitting the theoretical Batchelor spectrum to the temperature gradient spectrum at high wavenumbers. The algorithm is relatively robust in selecting the ...

David A. Luketina; Jörg Imberger

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Automated generation of kinetic chemical mechanisms using rewriting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several software systems have been developed recently for the automated generation of combustion reactions kinetic mechanisms using different representations of species and reactions and different generation algorithms. In parallel, several software ...

Olivier Bournez; Guy-Marie Côme; Valérie Conraud; Hélène Kirchner; Liliana Ib?nescu

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Evaluation of the Turbulent Kinetic Energy Dissipation Rate Inside ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Inferring the vertical variation of the mean turbulent kinetic energy ..... the times at which a threshold-crossings occurs are defined by the indicator function .... of noise infection and noise intensity, introducing a threshold Tc significantly ...

484

Estimates of Kinetic Energy Dissipation under Breaking Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dissipation of kinetic energy at the surface of natural water bodies has important consequences for many Physical and biochemical processes including wave dynamics, gas transfer, mixing of nutrients and pollutants, and photosynthetic ...

E.A. Terray; M.A. Donelan; Y.C. Agrawal; W.M. Drennan; K.K. Kahma; A.J. Williams; P.A. Hwang; S.A. Kitaigorodskii

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

485