National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for kinematic structural analysis

  1. CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey: project overview with analysis of dense gas structure and kinematics in Barnard 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Lee, Katherine I.; Teuben, Peter; Pound, Marc W.; Salter, Demerese M.; Chen, Che-Yu; Gong, Hao; Fernndez-Lpez, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique M.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Arce, Hctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Volgenau, Nikolaus H.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Tobin, John J.; Kwon, Woojin; Isella, Andrea; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present details of the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), while focusing on observations of Barnard 1. CLASSy is a CARMA Key Project that spectrally imaged N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HCO{sup +}, and HCN (J = 1 ? 0 transitions) across over 800 square arcminutes of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds. The observations have angular resolution near 7'' and spectral resolution near 0.16 km s{sup 1}. We imaged ?150 square arcminutes of Barnard 1, focusing on the main core, and the B1 Ridge and clumps to its southwest. N{sub 2}H{sup +} shows the strongest emission, with morphology similar to cool dust in the region, while HCO{sup +} and HCN trace several molecular outflows from a collection of protostars in the main core. We identify a range of kinematic complexity, with N{sub 2}H{sup +} velocity dispersions ranging from ?0.05 to 0.50 km s{sup 1} across the field. Simultaneous continuum mapping at 3 mm reveals six compact object detections, three of which are new detections. A new, non-binary dendrogram algorithm is used to analyze dense gas structures in the N{sub 2}H{sup +} position-position-velocity (PPV) cube. The projected sizes of dendrogram-identified structures range from about 0.01 to 0.34 pc. Size-linewidth relations using those structures show that non-thermal line-of-sight velocity dispersion varies weakly with projected size, while rms variation in the centroid velocity rises steeply with projected size. Comparing these relations, we propose that all dense gas structures in Barnard 1 have comparable depths into the sky, around 0.1-0.2 pc; this suggests that overdense, parsec-scale regions within molecular clouds are better described as flattened structures rather than spherical collections of gas. Science-ready PPV cubes for Barnard 1 molecular emission are available for download.

  2. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR and Kinematic Structural Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teplow, William J.; Warren, Ian

    2015-08-12

    The DOE cost-share program applied innovative and cutting edge seismic surveying and processing, permanent scatter interferometry-synthetic aperture radar (PSInSAR) and structural kinematics to the exploration problem of locating and mapping largeaperture fractures (LAFs) for the purpose of targeting geothermal production wells. The San Emidio geothermal resource area, which is under lease to USG, contains production wells that have encountered and currently produce from LAFs in the southern half of the resource area (Figure 2). The USG lease block, incorporating the northern extension of the San Emidio geothermal resource, extends 3 miles north of the operating wellfield. The northern lease block was known to contain shallow thermal waters but was previously unexplored by deep drilling. Results of the Phase 1 exploration program are described in detail in the Phase 1 Final Report (Teplow et al., 2011). The DOE cost shared program was completed as planned on September 30, 2014. This report summarizes results from all of Phase 1 and 2 activities.

  3. Dynamic simulation of kinematic Stirling engines: Coupled and decoupled analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, K.; Lemrani, H.; Stouffs, P.

    1995-12-31

    A coupled analysis modelling method of Stirling engines is presented. The main feature of this modelling method is the use of a software package combining the capabilities of a pre-/post-processor with a differential algebraic equations solver. As a result, modelling is merely a matter of linking appropriate objects from a model library and the outcoming tool is very flexible and powerful. Some simulation results are presented and compared with those obtained from a decoupled analysis. It clearly appears that the main imperfection of the model does not come from the modelling process itself but from their incomplete knowledge of the physics behind the Stirling engine operation.

  4. Safety assessment of historical masonry churches based on pre-assigned kinematic limit analysis, FE limit and pushover analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milani, Gabriele Valente, Marco

    2014-10-06

    This study presents some results of a comprehensive numerical analysis on three masonry churches damaged by the recent Emilia-Romagna (Italy) seismic events occurred in May 2012. The numerical study comprises: (a) pushover analyses conducted with a commercial code, standard nonlinear material models and two different horizontal load distributions; (b) FE kinematic limit analyses performed using a non-commercial software based on a preliminary homogenization of the masonry materials and a subsequent limit analysis with triangular elements and interfaces; (c) kinematic limit analyses conducted in agreement with the Italian code and based on the a-priori assumption of preassigned failure mechanisms, where the masonry material is considered unable to withstand tensile stresses. All models are capable of giving information on the active failure mechanism and the base shear at failure, which, if properly made non-dimensional with the weight of the structure, gives also an indication of the horizontal peak ground acceleration causing the collapse of the church. The results obtained from all three models indicate that the collapse is usually due to the activation of partial mechanisms (apse, faade, lateral walls, etc.). Moreover the horizontal peak ground acceleration associated to the collapse is largely lower than that required in that seismic zone by the Italian code for ordinary buildings. These outcomes highlight that structural upgrading interventions would be extremely beneficial for the considerable reduction of the seismic vulnerability of such kind of historical structures.

  5. BAYESIAN ANALYSIS TO IDENTIFY NEW STAR CANDIDATES IN NEARBY YOUNG STELLAR KINEMATIC GROUPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malo, Lison; Doyon, Rene; Lafreniere, David; Artigau, Etienne; Gagne, Jonathan; Baron, Frederique; Riedel, Adric E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca E-mail: artigau@astro.umontreal.ca E-mail: baron@astro.umontreal.ca

    2013-01-10

    We present a new method based on a Bayesian analysis to identify new members of nearby young kinematic groups. The analysis minimally takes into account the position, proper motion, magnitude, and color of a star, but other observables can be readily added (e.g., radial velocity, distance). We use this method to find new young low-mass stars in the {beta} Pictoris and AB Doradus moving groups and in the TW Hydrae, Tucana-Horologium, Columba, Carina, and Argus associations. Starting from a sample of 758 mid-K to mid-M (K5V-M5V) stars showing youth indicators such as H{alpha} and X-ray emission, our analysis yields 214 new highly probable low-mass members of the kinematic groups analyzed. One is in TW Hydrae, 37 in {beta} Pictoris, 17 in Tucana-Horologium, 20 in Columba, 6 in Carina, 50 in Argus, 32 in AB Doradus, and the remaining 51 candidates are likely young but have an ambiguous membership to more than one association. The false alarm rate for new candidates is estimated to be 5% for {beta} Pictoris and TW Hydrae, 10% for Tucana-Horologium, Columba, Carina, and Argus, and 14% for AB Doradus. Our analysis confirms the membership of 58 stars proposed in the literature. Firm membership confirmation of our new candidates will require measurement of their radial velocity (predicted by our analysis), parallax, and lithium 6708 A equivalent width. We have initiated these follow-up observations for a number of candidates, and we have identified two stars (2MASSJ01112542+1526214, 2MASSJ05241914-1601153) as very strong candidate members of the {beta} Pictoris moving group and one strong candidate member (2MASSJ05332558-5117131) of the Tucana-Horologium association; these three stars have radial velocity measurements confirming their membership and lithium detections consistent with young age.

  6. CARMA LARGE AREA STAR FORMATION SURVEY: STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF DENSE GAS IN SERPENS MAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Katherine I.; Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Teuben, Peter; Pound, Marc W.; Salter, Demerese M.; Chen, Che-Yu; Fernndez-Lpez, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Rosolowsky, Erik; Arce, Hctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Kwon, Woojin; Kauffmann, Jens; Tobin, John J.; Volgenau, N. H.; Tassis, Konstantinos; and others

    2014-12-20

    We present observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1 ? 0), HCO{sup +} (J = 1 ? 0), and HCN (J = 1 ? 0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 arcmin{sup 2} of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of ?7''. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified six filaments in the SE subcluster. These filaments have lengths of ?0.2 pc and widths of ?0.03 pc, which is smaller than a characteristic width of 0.1 pc suggested by Herschel observations. The filaments can be classified into two types based on their properties. The first type, located in the northeast of the SE subcluster, has larger velocity gradients, smaller masses, and nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios. The other type, located in the southwest of the SE subcluster, has the opposite properties. Several YSOs are formed along two filaments which have supercritical mass per unit length ratios, while filaments with nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios are not associated with YSOs, suggesting that stars are formed on gravitationally unstable filaments.

  7. Modular multimorphic kinematic arm structure and pitch and yaw joint for same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, H. Lee; Williams, Daniel M.; Holt, W. Eugene

    1989-01-01

    A multimorphic kinematic manipulator arm is provided with seven degrees of freedom and modular kinematic redundancy through identical pitch/yaw, shoulder, elbow and wrist joints and a wrist roll device at the wrist joint, which further provides to the manipulator arm an obstacle avoidance capability. The modular pitch/yaw joints are traction drive devices which provide backlash free operation with smooth torque transmission and enhanced rigidity. A dual input drive arrangement is provided for each joint resulting in a reduction of the load required to be assumed by each drive and providing selective pitch and yaw motions by control of the relative rotational directions of the input drive.

  8. Modular multimorphic kinematic arm structure and pitch and yaw joint for same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, H.L.; Williams, D.M.; Holt, W.E.

    1987-04-21

    A multimorphic kinematic manipulator arm is provided with seven degrees of freedom and modular kinematic redundancy through identical pitch/yaw, shoulder, elbow and wrist joints and a wrist roll device at the wrist joint, which further provides to the manipulator arm an obstacle avoidance capability. The modular pitch/yaw joints are traction drive devices which provide backlash free operation with smooth torque transmission and enhanced rigidity. A dual input drive arrangement is provided for each joint resulting in a reduction of the load required to be assumed by each drive means and providing selective pitch and yaw motions by control of the relative rotational directions of the input drive means. 12 figs.

  9. STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF THE STELLAR HALOS AND THICK DISKS OF THE MILKY WAY BASED ON CALIBRATION STARS FROM SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DR7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carollo, Daniela; Norris, John E.; Freeman, Ken C.; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Chiba, Masashi; Ivezic, Zeljko; Rockosi, Constance M.; Yanny, Brian E-mail: jen@mso.anu.edu.a E-mail: beers@pa.msu.ed E-mail: chiba@astr.tohoku.ac.j E-mail: crockosi@ucolick.or

    2010-03-20

    The structure and kinematics of the recognized stellar components of the Milky Way are explored, based on well-determined atmospheric parameters and kinematic quantities for 32360 'calibration stars' from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its first extension, SDSS-II, which included the sub-survey Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). Full space motions for a sub-sample of 16,920 stars, exploring a local volume within 4 kpc of the Sun, are used to derive velocity ellipsoids for the inner- and outer-halo components of the Galaxy, as well as for the canonical thick-disk and proposed metal-weak thick-disk (MWTD) populations. This new sample of calibration stars represents an increase of 60% relative to the numbers used in a previous analysis. We first examine the question of whether the data require the presence of at least a two-component halo in order to account for the rotational behavior of likely halo stars in the local volume, and whether more than two components are needed. We also address the question of whether the proposed MWTD is kinematically and chemically distinct from the canonical thick disk, and point out that the Galactocentric rotational velocity inferred for the MWTD, as well as its mean metallicity, appear quite similar to the values derived previously for the Monoceros stream, suggesting a possible association between these structures. In addition, we consider the fractions of each component required to understand the nature of the observed kinematic behavior of the stellar populations of the Galaxy as a function of distance from the plane. Scale lengths and scale heights for the thick-disk and MWTD components are determined. Spatial density profiles for the inner- and outer-halo populations are inferred from a Jeans theorem analysis. The full set of calibration stars (including those outside the local volume) is used to test for the expected changes in the observed stellar metallicity distribution function

  10. CRISS-CROSS MAPPING OF BD+30 3639: A NEW KINEMATIC ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Wolfgang; Koning, Nico E-mail: nkoning@iras.ucalgary.ca

    2011-03-15

    We introduce a new method to analyze kinematic proper motion data. The method is called 'criss-cross' mapping. It emphasizes regions where proper motion vector extensions cross or converge. From a superposition of lines through the vectors a map is generated which helps to interpret the kinematic data. The new mapping technique is applied to the young planetary nebula BD+30 3639. The data are more than 200 internal proper motion measurements from Li et al. From the criss-cross mapping of BD+30 3639, we conclude that the kinematic center is approximately 0.5 arcsec off-set to the southeast from the central star. The mapping also shows evidence for a non-homologous expansion of the nebula that is consistent with a disturbance due to the bipolar molecular bullets.

  11. Kinematic morphology of large-scale structure: evolution from potential to rotational flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin; Szalay, Alex; Aragn-Calvo, Miguel A.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Eyink, Gregory L.

    2014-09-20

    As an alternative way to describe the cosmological velocity field, we discuss the evolution of rotational invariants constructed from the velocity gradient tensor. Compared with the traditional divergence-vorticity decomposition, these invariants, defined as coefficients of the characteristic equation of the velocity gradient tensor, enable a complete classification of all possible flow patterns in the dark-matter comoving frame, including both potential and vortical flows. We show that this tool, first introduced in turbulence two decades ago, is very useful for understanding the evolution of the cosmic web structure, and in classifying its morphology. Before shell crossing, different categories of potential flow are highly associated with the cosmic web structure because of the coherent evolution of density and velocity. This correspondence is even preserved at some level when vorticity is generated after shell crossing. The evolution from the potential to vortical flow can be traced continuously by these invariants. With the help of this tool, we show that the vorticity is generated in a particular way that is highly correlated with the large-scale structure. This includes a distinct spatial distribution and different types of alignment between the cosmic web and vorticity direction for various vortical flows. Incorporating shell crossing into closed dynamical systems is highly non-trivial, but we propose a possible statistical explanation for some of the phenomena relating to the internal structure of the three-dimensional invariant space.

  12. STELLAR KINEMATICS AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VIRGO CLUSTER DWARF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM THE SMAKCED PROJECT. III. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND CONSTRAINTS ON FORMATION SCENARIOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Peletier, R. F.; Emsellem, E.; Lisker, T.; Van de Ven, G.; Simon, J. D.; Adams, J. J.; Benson, A. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ryś, A.; Gorgas, J.; Hensler, G.; Janz, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Paudel, S.

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the stellar kinematics of 39 dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo Cluster. Based on the specific stellar angular momentum λ{sub Re} and the ellipticity, we find 11 slow rotators and 28 fast rotators. The fast rotators in the outer parts of the Virgo Cluster rotate significantly faster than fast rotators in the inner parts of the cluster. Moreover, 10 out of the 11 slow rotators are located in the inner 3° (D < 1 Mpc) of the cluster. The fast rotators contain subtle disk-like structures that are visible in high-pass filtered optical images, while the slow rotators do not exhibit these structures. In addition, two of the dEs have kinematically decoupled cores and four more have emission partially filling in the Balmer absorption lines. These properties suggest that Virgo Cluster dEs may have originated from late-type star-forming galaxies that were transformed by the environment after their infall into the cluster. The correlation between λ{sub Re} and the clustercentric distance can be explained by a scenario where low luminosity star-forming galaxies fall into the cluster, their gas is rapidly removed by ram-pressure stripping, although some of it can be retained in their core, their star formation is quenched but their stellar kinematics are preserved. After a long time in the cluster and several passes through its center, the galaxies are heated up and transformed into slow rotating dEs.

  13. Bridge Structural Analysis Using CSM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bridge Structural Analysis Using Computational Structural Mechanics Background Bridge failure due to wind has been observed as far back as 1823. The latest concept for an efficient and cost-effective bridge design is the cable-stayed bridge. Bridge stay cables, however, have exhibited large-amplitude vibrations as a result of wind loadings, sometimes in combination with rain. In recent years, attempts have been made to model this problem both in the laboratory and on the computer. Several wind

  14. Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine esterase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine ...

  15. Characteristics, finite element analysis, test description, and preliminary test results of the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linker, K.L.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Smith, G.

    1991-10-01

    The Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Program has as one of its program elements the development and evaluation of conversion device technologies applicable to dish-electric systems. The primary research and development combines a conversion device (heat engine), solar receiver, and generator mounted at the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator. The Stirling-cycle heat engine was identified as the conversion device for dish-electric with the most potential for meeting the program's goals for efficiency, reliability, and installed cost. To advance the technology toward commercialization, Sandia National Laboratories has acquired a Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., kinematic Stirling engine, STM4-120, for evaluation. The engine is being bench-tested at Sandia's Engine Test Facility and will be combined later with a solar receiver for on-sun evaluation. This report presents the engine characteristics, finite element analyses of critical engine components, test system layout, instrumentation, and preliminary performance results from the bench test.

  16. Characteristics, finite element analysis, test description, and preliminary test results of the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linker, K.L.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Smith, G.

    1991-10-01

    The Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Program has as one of its program elements the development and evaluation of conversion device technologies applicable to dish-electric systems. The primary research and development combines a conversion device (heat engine), solar receiver, and generator mounted at the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator. The Stirling-cycle heat engine was identified as the conversion device for dish-electric with the most potential for meeting the program`s goals for efficiency, reliability, and installed cost. To advance the technology toward commercialization, Sandia National Laboratories has acquired a Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., kinematic Stirling engine, STM4-120, for evaluation. The engine is being bench-tested at Sandia`s Engine Test Facility and will be combined later with a solar receiver for on-sun evaluation. This report presents the engine characteristics, finite element analyses of critical engine components, test system layout, instrumentation, and preliminary performance results from the bench test.

  17. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  18. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Threading Method (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural Threading Method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural Threading Method In this work, they try to understand the protein folding problem using pair-wise hydrophobic interaction as the dominant interaction for the protein folding process. They found a strong correlation

  19. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ThesisDissertation: Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to ... The sensitivity and specificity of this method is discussed, along with a case of blind ...

  20. Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Structures and Geothermal Reservoirs in the Humboldt Structural Zone Citation James E. Faulds,Larry J. Garside,Gary L. Oppliger. 2003. Structural Analysis of the Desert...

  1. Structural Analysis of Sandwich Foam Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, Jan; Huo, X. Sharon

    2010-04-01

    The Sandwich Panel Technologies including Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) can be used to replace the conventional wooden-frame construction method. The main purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and SGI Venture, Inc. was to design a novel high R-value type of metal sandwich panelized technology. This CRADA project report presents design concept discussion and numerical analysis results from thermal performance study of this new building envelope system. The main objective of this work was to develop a basic concept of a new generation of wall panel technologies which will have R-value over R-20 will use thermal mass to improve energy performance in cooling dominated climates and will be 100% termite resistant. The main advantages of using sandwich panels are as follows: (1) better energy saving structural panels with high and uniform overall wall R-value across the elevation that could not be achieved in traditional walls; and (2) reducing the use of raw materials or need for virgin lumber. For better utilization of these Sandwich panels, engineers need to have a thorough understanding of the actual performance of the panels and system. Detailed analysis and study on the capacities and deformation of individual panels and its assembly have to be performed to achieve that goal. The major project activity was to conduct structural analysis of the stresses, strains, load capacities, and deformations of individual sandwich components under various load cases. The analysis simulated the actual loading conditions of the regular residential building and used actual material properties of the steel facings and foam.

  2. System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction (SASSI) Verification...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction, a computer code for performing finite element analyses of soil-structure interaction during seismic ground motions. It was...

  3. Dromion-like structures and stability analysis in the variable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dromion-like structures and stability analysis in the variable coefficients complex Ginzburg-Landau equation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dromion-like structures and ...

  4. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures Print Scientists have developed a fast and efficient way to determine the structure of proteins, shortening a process that...

  5. Kinematic evolution of simulated star-forming galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassin, Susan A.; Brooks, Alyson; Governato, Fabio; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2014-08-01

    Recent observations have shown that star-forming galaxies like our own Milky Way evolve kinematically into ordered thin disks over the last ?8 billion years since z = 1.2, undergoing a process of 'disk settling'. For the first time, we study the kinematic evolution of a suite of four state of the art 'zoom in' hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation and evolution in a fully cosmological context and compare with these observations. Until now, robust measurements of the internal kinematics of simulated galaxies were lacking because the simulations suffered from low resolution, overproduction of stars, and overly massive bulges. The current generation of simulations has made great progress in overcoming these difficulties and is ready for a kinematic analysis. We show that simulated galaxies follow the same kinematic trends as real galaxies: they progressively decrease in disordered motions (?{sub g}) and increase in ordered rotation (V{sub rot}) with time. The slopes of the relations between both ?{sub g} and V{sub rot} with redshift are consistent between the simulations and the observations. In addition, the morphologies of the simulated galaxies become less disturbed with time, also consistent with observations. This match between the simulated and observed trends is a significant success for the current generation of simulations, and a first step in determining the physical processes behind disk settling'.

  6. System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction (SASSI) Verification...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction (SASSI) Verification & Validation (V&V) Problem Set SASSI is the System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction, a computer ...

  7. Adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, L.C.

    1997-07-01

    An adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems is disclosed. The adjustable link is a low-cost, passive device that provides backlash-free adjustment along its single constraint direction and flexural freedom in all other directions. The adjustable link comprises two spheres, two sockets in which the spheres are adjustable retain, and a connection link threadly connected at each end to the spheres, to provide a single direction of restraint and to adjust the length or distance between the sockets. Six such adjustable links provide for six degrees of freedom for mounting an instrument on a support. The adjustable link has applications in any machine or instrument requiring precision adjustment in six degrees of freedom, isolation from deformations of the supporting platform, and/or additional structural damping. The damping is accomplished by using a hollow connection link that contains an inner rod and a viscoelastic separation layer between the two. 3 figs.

  8. Adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C.

    1997-01-01

    An adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems. The adjustable link is a low-cost, passive device that provides backlash-free adjustment along its single constraint direction and flexural freedom in all other directions. The adjustable link comprises two spheres, two sockets in which the spheres are adjustable retain, and a connection link threadly connected at each end to the spheres, to provide a single direction of restraint and to adjust the length or distance between the sockets. Six such adjustable links provide for six degrees of freedom for mounting an instrument on a support. The adjustable link has applications in any machine or instrument requiring precision adjustment in six degrees of freedom, isolation from deformations of the supporting platform, and/or additional structural damping. The damping is accomplished by using a hollow connection link that contains an inner rod and a viscoelastic separation layer between the two.

  9. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures Print Wednesday, 28 October 2009 00:00 Scientists have developed a fast and efficient way to determine the structure of proteins, shortening a process that often takes years into a matter of days. The Structurally Integrated BiologY for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) beamline at the ALS has implemented the world's highest-throughput biological-solution x-ray scattering beamline enabling

  10. Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  11. Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Life Prediction in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life ...

  12. Structural Analysis of the NCSX Vacuum Vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Dahlgren; Art Brooks; Paul Goranson; Mike Cole; Peter Titus

    2004-09-28

    The NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment) vacuum vessel has a rather unique shape being very closely coupled topologically to the three-fold stellarator symmetry of the plasma it contains. This shape does not permit the use of the common forms of pressure vessel analysis and necessitates the reliance on finite element analysis. The current paper describes the NCSX vacuum vessel stress analysis including external pressure, thermal, and electro-magnetic loading from internal plasma disruptions and bakeout temperatures of up to 400 degrees centigrade. Buckling and dynamic loading conditions are also considered.

  13. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures Print Scientists have developed a fast and efficient way to determine the structure of proteins, shortening a process that often takes years into a matter of days. The Structurally Integrated BiologY for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) beamline at the ALS has implemented the world's highest-throughput biological-solution x-ray scattering beamline enabling genomic-scale protein-structure characterization. Coupling brilliant x rays from one of the

  14. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures Print Scientists have developed a fast and efficient way to determine the structure of proteins, shortening a process that often takes years into a matter of days. The Structurally Integrated BiologY for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) beamline at the ALS has implemented the world's highest-throughput biological-solution x-ray scattering beamline enabling genomic-scale protein-structure characterization. Coupling brilliant x rays from one of the

  15. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures Print Scientists have developed a fast and efficient way to determine the structure of proteins, shortening a process that often takes years into a matter of days. The Structurally Integrated BiologY for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) beamline at the ALS has implemented the world's highest-throughput biological-solution x-ray scattering beamline enabling genomic-scale protein-structure characterization. Coupling brilliant x rays from one of the

  16. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures Print Scientists have developed a fast and efficient way to determine the structure of proteins, shortening a process that often takes years into a matter of days. The Structurally Integrated BiologY for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) beamline at the ALS has implemented the world's highest-throughput biological-solution x-ray scattering beamline enabling genomic-scale protein-structure characterization. Coupling brilliant x rays from one of the

  17. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures Print Scientists have developed a fast and efficient way to determine the structure of proteins, shortening a process that often takes years into a matter of days. The Structurally Integrated BiologY for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) beamline at the ALS has implemented the world's highest-throughput biological-solution x-ray scattering beamline enabling genomic-scale protein-structure characterization. Coupling brilliant x rays from one of the

  18. Saybolt universal viscosity converted to kinematic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anaya, C.; Bermudez, O.

    1987-09-21

    This article describes a program for personal and handheld computers, written in Basic, which has been developed for the conversion of Saybolt universal viscosity in Saybolt Universal Seconds (SSU or SUS) to kinematic viscosity in centistokes (cSt), at any selected temperature. It was developed using the mathematical relationship presented in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D2161-82. In the standard, an equation is presented to convert kinematic viscosity to Saybolt universal viscosity, but nothing is presented to convert from Saybolt to kinematic because it is necessary to find the roots of a nonexplicit function. There are several numerical methods that can be used to determine the roots of the nonexplicit function, and therefore, convert Saybolt universal viscosity to kinematic viscosity. In the program, the first iteration of the second-order Newton-Raphson method is followed by the Wegstein method as a convergence accelerator.

  19. Kinematics of compressional and extensional ductile shearing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the kinematics of two main ductile-shearing events (D1 and D2) to be established in the Raft River, Grouse Creek and Albion 'metamorphic core complex'. The first event (D1) is a...

  20. Virtual sine arm kinematic mount system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Randall, K.J.

    1997-09-01

    A novel kinematic mount system for a vertical focusing mirror of the soft x-ray spectroscopy beamline at the Advanced Photon Source is described. The system contains three points in a horizontal plane. Each point consists of two horizontal linear precision stages, a spherical ball bearing, and a vertical precision stage. The horizontal linear stages are aligned orthogonally and are conjoined by a spherical ball bearing, supported by the vertical linear stage at each point. The position of each confined horizontal stage is controlled by a motorized micrometer head by spring-loading the flat tip of the micrometer head onto a tooling ball fixing on the carriage of the stage. A virtual sine arm is formed by tilting the upstream horizontal stage down and the two downstream horizontal stages up by a small angle. The fine pitch motion is achieved by adjusting the upstream stage. This supporting structure is extremely steady due to a relatively large span across the supporting points and yields extremely high resolution on the pitch motion. With a one degree tilt and a microstepping motor, the authors achieved a 0.4 nanoradian resolution on the mirror pitch motion.

  1. Probabilistic Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-03-29

    P-CARES 2.0.0, Probabilistic Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures, was developed for NRC staff use to determine the validity and accuracy of the analysis methods used by various utilities for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants. P-CARES provides the capability to effectively evaluate the probabilistic seismic response using simplified soil and structural models and to quickly check the validity and/or accuracy of the SSI data received from applicants and licensees. The code ismore » organized in a modular format with the basic modules of the system performing static, seismic, and nonlinear analysis.« less

  2. Structural and functional analysis of Nup120 suggests ring formation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Structural and functional analysis of Nup120 suggests ring formation of the Nup84 complex Authors: Seo, Hyuk-Soo ; Ma, Yingli ; Debler, Erik W. ; Wacker, Daniel ; Kutik, ...

  3. Depth-resolved magnetic and structural analysis of relaxing epitaxial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Depth-resolved magnetic and structural analysis of relaxing epitaxial Sr 2 CrReO 6 <...

  4. Highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C.; Jensen, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    A highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments. The kinematic coupling provides support while causing essentially no influence to its nature shape, with such influences coming, for example, from manufacturing tolerances, temperature changes, or ground motion. The coupling uses three ball-cone constraints, each combined with a released flexural degree of freedom. This arrangement enables a gain of higher load capacity and stiffness, but can also significantly reduce the friction level in proportion to the ball radius divided by the distance between the ball and the hinge axis. The blade flexures reduces somewhat the stiffness of the coupling and provides an ideal location to apply constrained-layer damping which is accomplished by attaching a viscoelastic layer and a constraining layer on opposite sides of each of the blade flexures. The three identical ball-cone flexures provide a damped coupling mechanism to kinematically support the projection optics system of the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system, or other load-sensitive apparatus.

  5. Synchrotron IR microspectroscopy for protein structure analysis: Potential and questions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced technique to the study of pure protein inherent structure at a cellular level in biological tissues. In this review, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of the newly developed, advancedmore » synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to localize relatively “pure“ protein in the plant tissues and relatively reveal protein inherent structure and protein molecular chemical make-up within intact tissue at cellular and subcellular levels. Several complex protein IR spectra data analytical techniques (Gaussian and Lorentzian multi-component peak modeling, univariate and multivariate analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) are employed to relatively reveal features of protein inherent structure and distinguish protein inherent structure differences between varieties/species and treatments in plant tissues. By using a multi-peak modeling procedure, RELATIVE estimates (but not EXACT determinations) for protein secondary structure analysis can be made for comparison purpose. The issues of pro- and anti-multi-peaking modeling/fitting procedure for relative estimation of protein structure were discussed. By using the PCA and CLA analyses, the plant molecular structure can be qualitatively separate one group from another, statistically, even though the spectral assignments are not known. The synchrotron-based technology provides a new approach for protein structure research in

  6. Large-scale computations in analysis of structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, D.B.; Goudreau, G.L.

    1993-09-01

    Computer hardware and numerical analysis algorithms have progressed to a point where many engineering organizations and universities can perform nonlinear analyses on a routine basis. Through much remains to be done in terms of advancement of nonlinear analysis techniques and characterization on nonlinear material constitutive behavior, the technology exists today to perform useful nonlinear analysis for many structural systems. In the current paper, a survey on nonlinear analysis technologies developed and employed for many years on programmatic defense work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is provided, and ongoing nonlinear numerical simulation projects relevant to the civil engineering field are described.

  7. Process for structural geologic analysis of topography and point data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eliason, Jay R.; Eliason, Valerie L. C.

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative method of geologic structural analysis of digital terrain data is described for implementation on a computer. Assuming selected valley segments are controlled by the underlying geologic structure, topographic lows in the terrain data, defining valley bottoms, are detected, filtered and accumulated into a series line segments defining contiguous valleys. The line segments are then vectorized to produce vector segments, defining valley segments, which may be indicative of the underlying geologic structure. Coplanar analysis is performed on vector segment pairs to determine which vectors produce planes which represent underlying geologic structure. Point data such as fracture phenomena which can be related to fracture planes in 3-dimensional space can be analyzed to define common plane orientation and locations. The vectors, points, and planes are displayed in various formats for interpretation.

  8. KINEMATICS OF THE CO GAS IN THE INNER REGIONS OF THE TW Hya DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Qi Chunhua; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.; Corder, Stuartt A.; Dullemond, C. P.; Lin Shinyi; Hughes, A. M.; D'Alessio, Paola; Ho, P. T. P.

    2012-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the spatially and spectrally resolved {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 and J = 3-2 emission lines from the TW Hya circumstellar disk, based on science verification data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). These lines exhibit substantial emission in their high-velocity wings (with projected velocities out to 2.1 km s{sup -1}, corresponding to intrinsic orbital velocities >20 km s{sup -1}) that trace molecular gas as close as 2 AU from the central star. However, we are not able to reproduce the intensity of these wings and the general spatio-kinematic pattern of the lines with simple models for the disk structure and kinematics. Using three-dimensional non-local thermodynamic equilibrium molecular excitation and radiative transfer calculations, we construct some alternative models that successfully account for these features by modifying either (1) the temperature structure of the inner disk (inside the dust-depleted disk cavity; r < 4 AU), (2) the intrinsic (Keplerian) disk velocity field, or (3) the distribution of disk inclination angles (a warp). The latter approach is particularly compelling because a representative warped disk model qualitatively reproduces the observed azimuthal modulation of optical light scattered off the disk surface. In any model scenario, the ALMA data clearly require a substantial molecular gas reservoir located inside the region where dust optical depths are known to be substantially diminished in the TW Hya disk, in agreement with previous studies based on infrared spectroscopy. The results from these updated model prescriptions are discussed in terms of their potential physical origins, which might include dynamical perturbations from a low-mass companion with an orbital separation of a few AU.

  9. NRT Rotor Structural / Aeroelastic Analysis for the Preliminary Design Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ennis, Brandon Lee; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2015-10-01

    This document describes the initial structural design for the National Rotor Testbed blade as presented during the preliminary design review at Sandia National Laboratories on October 28- 29, 2015. The document summarizes the structural and aeroelastic requirements placed on the NRT rotor for satisfactory deployment at the DOE/SNL SWiFT experimental facility to produce high-quality datasets for wind turbine model validation. The method and result of the NRT blade structural optimization is also presented within this report, along with analysis of its satisfaction of the design requirements.

  10. ANALYTIC MODELING OF THE MORETON WAVE KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2009-09-10

    The issue whether Moreton waves are flare-ignited or coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven, or a combination of both, is still a matter of debate. We develop an analytical model describing the evolution of a large-amplitude coronal wave emitted by the expansion of a circular source surface in order to mimic the evolution of a Moreton wave. The model results are confronted with observations of a strong Moreton wave observed in association with the X3.8/3B flare/CME event from 2005 January 17. Using different input parameters for the expansion of the source region, either derived from the real CME observations (assuming that the upward moving CME drives the wave), or synthetically generated scenarios (expanding flare region, lateral expansion of the CME flanks), we calculate the kinematics of the associated Moreton wave signature. Those model input parameters are determined which fit the observed Moreton wave kinematics best. Using the measured kinematics of the upward moving CME as the model input, we are not able to reproduce the observed Moreton wave kinematics. The observations of the Moreton wave can be reproduced only by applying a strong and impulsive acceleration for the source region expansion acting in a piston mechanism scenario. Based on these results we propose that the expansion of the flaring region or the lateral expansion of the CME flanks is more likely the driver of the Moreton wave than the upward moving CME front.

  11. Constrained tri-sphere kinematic positioning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viola, Robert J

    2010-12-14

    A scalable and adaptable, six-degree-of-freedom, kinematic positioning system is described. The system can position objects supported on top of, or suspended from, jacks comprising constrained joints. The system is compatible with extreme low temperature or high vacuum environments. When constant adjustment is not required a removable motor unit is available.

  12. Design and Analysis of Muon Beam Stop Support Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okafor, Udenna

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this thesis is to design and analyze support structures to be used in the installation, test and final positioning of the MBS throughout the life of the Mu2e experiment. There several requirements for the MBS imposed by both the scope of the experiment and, other components within the DS bore. The functions of the MBS are: 1. To limit the induced rates in the Tracker, the Calorimeter and the Cosmic Ray Veto due to backsplash-and-secondary interactions, and 2. To reduce radiation levels external to the Detector solenoid. The structures used in supporting the MBS will also adhere to requirements imposed by its functions. These requirements are critical to the support structures and affect design decisions. Other requirements critical to the design are imposed by the weight, positional tolerance and assembly procedure of the MBS, and also, the magnetic field and vacuum dose rate of the DS bore. A detailed breakdown of how each requirement affects the structural design can be found in chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes the design of each support structure and its attachment to the MBS while chapter 4 describes the results from structural analysis of the support structures. Chapter 5 describes evaluation for the design through testing and calculations while the conclusion in chapter 6 reports the current status at the time of this thesis submission with a plan for future work to be completed until final design and installation.

  13. Analysis of fine structure in the nuclear continuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shevchenko, A.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Usman, I.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.

    2008-02-15

    Fine structure has been shown to be a general phenomenon of nuclear giant resonances of different multipolarities over a wide mass range. In this article we assess various techniques that have been proposed to extract quantitative information from the fine structure in terms of characteristic scales. These include the so-called local scaling dimension, the entropy index method, Fourier analysis, and continuous and discrete wavelet transforms. As an example, results on the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in {sup 208}Pb from high-energy-resolution inelastic proton scattering and calculations with the quasiparticle-phonon model are analyzed. Wavelet analysis, both continuous and discrete, of the spectra is shown to be a powerful tool to extract the magnitude and localization of characteristic scales.

  14. WEC and Support Bridge Control Structural Dynamic Interaction Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Support Bridge Control Structural Dynamic Interaction Analysis David Wilson 1 , Giorgio Bacelli 1 , Ryan G. Coe 1 , Rush D. Robinett III 2 , Gareth Thomas 3 , Daniel Linehan 3 , David Newborn 4 , Miguel Quintero 4 1 Sandia National Laboratories 2 Michigan Technological University 3 ATA Engineering, Inc. 4 Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division ABSTRACT Experimental testing is a critical step in the development of models describing the behavior of a system. The objective of the

  15. Crystal Structure and Functional Analysis Identify Evolutionary Secret of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SerRS in Vascular Development | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Crystal Structure and Functional Analysis Identify Evolutionary Secret of SerRS in Vascular Development Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) have been essential enzymes for protein synthesis throughout evolution. As the tree of life was ascended, tRNA synthetases added new domains, which are generally dispensable for aminoacylation, in a progressive and accretive manner. The acquisitions were

  16. KINEMATICS OF OUTER HALO GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veljanoski, J.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Bernard, E. J.; Penarrubia, J.; Mackey, A. D.; Huxor, A. P.; Irwin, M. J.; Chapman, S. C.; Cote, P.; Tanvir, N. R.; McConnachie, A.; Ibata, R. A.; Martin, N. F.; Fardal, M.; Lewis, G. F.

    2013-05-10

    We present the first kinematic analysis of the far outer halo globular cluster (GC) population in the Local Group galaxy M31. Our sample contains 53 objects with projected radii of {approx}20-130 kpc, 44 of which have no previous spectroscopic information. GCs with projected radii {approx}> 30 kpc are found to exhibit net rotation around the minor axis of M31, in the same sense as the inner GCs, albeit with a smaller amplitude of 79 {+-} 19 km s{sup -1}. The rotation-corrected velocity dispersion of the full halo GC sample is 106 {+-} 12 km s{sup -1}, which we observe to decrease with increasing projected radius. We find compelling evidence for kinematic coherence among GCs that project on top of halo substructure, including a clear signature of infall for GCs lying along the northwest stream. Using the tracer mass estimator, we estimate the dynamical mass of M31 within 200 kpc to be M{sub M31} = (1.2-1.5) {+-} 0.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }. This value is highly dependent on the chosen model and assumptions within.

  17. The SLUGGS survey: wide-field stellar kinematics of early-type galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Woodley, Kristin A.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Blom, Christina; Kartha, Sreeja S.; Pastorello, Nicola; Pota, Vincenzo; Usher, Christopher; Strader, Jay; Spitler, Lee R.; Foster, Caroline

    2014-08-20

    We present stellar kinematics of 22 nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs), based on two-dimensional (2D) absorption line stellar spectroscopy out to ?2-4 R {sub e} (effective radii), as part of the ongoing SLUGGS Survey. The galaxies span a factor of 20 in intrinsic luminosity, as well as a full range of environment and ETG morphology. Our data consist of good velocity resolution (?{sub inst} ? 25 km s{sup 1}) integrated stellar-light spectra extracted from the individual slitlets of custom made Keck/DEIMOS slitmasks. We extract stellar kinematics measurements (V, ?, h {sub 3}, and h {sub 4}) for each galaxy. Combining with literature values from smaller radii, we present 2D spatially resolved maps of the large-scale kinematic structure in each galaxy. We find that the kinematic homogeneity found inside 1 R {sub e} often breaks down at larger radii, where a variety of kinematic behaviors are observed. While central slow rotators remain slowly rotating in their halos, central fast rotators show more diversity, ranging from rapidly increasing to rapidly declining specific angular momentum profiles in the outer regions. There are indications that the outer trends depend on morphological type, raising questions about the proposed unification of the elliptical and lenticular (S0) galaxy families in the ATLAS{sup 3D} survey. Several galaxies in our sample show multiple lines of evidence for distinct disk components embedded in more slowly rotating spheroids, and we suggest a joint photometric-kinematic approach for robust bulge-disk decomposition. Our observational results appear generally consistent with a picture of two-phase (in-situ plus accretion) galaxy formation.

  18. Analysis of large structures in separated shear layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panigrahi, P.; Acharya, S.

    1999-07-01

    Large scale structures play an important role in the development of free shear layers and jets, and there is a large body of literature dealing with this subject. For meaningful interpretation of data, different analysis techniques have been used. However, these methods have been plagued with problems associated with phase jitter in the coherent modes. The primary goal of the data analysis techniques is to identify the individual modes present and to accurately determine the evolution of the amplitudes and phases of these modes. The goal of the present work is to develop suitable data analysis techniques for accurately evaluating the amplitude and phases of the coherent structures. In this paper, a pattern recognition technique that has the potential of computing the amplitudes of the large-scale structures correctly has been developed and further extended to include the calculation of the phase jitter. The pattern recognition technique is based on characterizing the coherent components in the form of a Fourier-cosine series with each mode identified by a frequency, amplitude and phase. The series is truncated by pre-selecting the modes (based on a spectral analysis of the signal). The evaluation of the Fourier components for the different modes is then made by segmenting the whole time-series into different segments such that in one segment one period of the corresponding wave is present. The mode corresponding to the lowest frequency is evaluated first, the coherent components corresponding to this mode is then subtracted from the signal, and then the components of the next higher mode is evaluated, and the process continued till all modes have been determined. A second approach has been used in the evaluation of phase jitter, and is based on an extension of a method proposed by Ho and co-workers (referred to as the HZFB method) in this paper. Using simulated data, the HZFB method is shown to produce inaccurate results in the presence of multiple modes and small

  19. Structural analysis of flexible proteins in solution by SmallAngle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Structural analysis of flexible proteins in solution by SmallAngle X-ray ... Combining SAXS results with atomic resolution structures enables detailed ...

  20. Kinematic model for postorogenic Basin and Range extension |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Article: Kinematic model for postorogenic Basin and Range extension Abstract The Raft River extensional shear zone is exposed in the Albion-Raft River-Grouse Creek...

    1. Code System for Analysis of 3-D Reinforced Concrete Structures.

      Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

      1999-11-22

      Version 00 NONSAP-C is a finite element program for determining the static and dynamic response of three-dimensional reinforced concrete structures. Long-term, or creep, behavior of concrete structures can also be analyzed. Nonlinear constitutive relations for concrete under short-term loads are incorporated in two time-independent models, a variable-modulus approach with orthotropic behavior induced in the concrete due to the development of different tangent moduli in different directions and an elastic-plastic model in which the concrete ismore » assumed to be a continuous, isotropic, and linearly elastic-plastic strain-hardening-fracture material. A viscoelastic constitutive model for long-term thermal creep of concrete is included. Three-dimensional finite elements available in NONSAP-C include a truss element, a multinode tendon element for prestressed and post tensioned concrete structures, an elastic-plastic membrane element to represent the behavior of cavity liners, and a general isoparametric element with a variable number of nodes for analysis of solids and thick shells.« less

    2. THE SPLASH SURVEY: KINEMATICS OF ANDROMEDA's INNER SPHEROID

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Dorman, Claire E.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; and others

      2012-06-20

      The combination of large size, high stellar density, high metallicity, and Sersic surface brightness profile of the spheroidal component of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) within R{sub proj} {approx} 20 kpc suggests that it is unlike any subcomponent of the Milky Way. In this work we capitalize on our proximity to and external view of M31 to probe the kinematical properties of this 'inner spheroid'. We employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis of resolved stellar kinematics from Keck/DEIMOS spectra of 5651 red giant branch stars to disentangle M31's inner spheroid from its stellar disk. We measure the mean velocity and dispersion of the spheroid in each of five spatial bins after accounting for a locally cold stellar disk as well as the Giant Southern Stream and associated tidal debris. For the first time, we detect significant spheroid rotation (v{sub rot} {approx} 50 km s{sup -1}) beyond R{sub proj} {approx} 5 kpc. The velocity dispersion decreases from about 140 km s{sup -1} at R{sub proj} = 7 kpc to 120 km s{sup -1} at R{sub proj} = 14 kpc, consistent to 2{sigma} with existing measurements and models. We calculate the probability that a given star is a member of the spheroid and find that the spheroid has a significant presence throughout the spatial extent of our sample. Lastly, we show that the flattening of the spheroid is due to velocity anisotropy in addition to rotation. Though this suggests that the inner spheroid of M31 more closely resembles an elliptical galaxy than a typical spiral galaxy bulge, it should be cautioned that our measurements are much farther out (2-14r{sub eff}) than for the comparison samples.

    3. Analysis of transient heat loss in earth-sheltered structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Szydlowski, R.F.

      1980-09-01

      The two-dimensional transient Fourier heat conduction equation has been solved in cartesian coordinates using an alternating direction implicit finite difference technique for several earth sheltered building configurations. The model has been computer coded and verified by comparing results with data taken from an instrumented conventional residence basement. The present model considers variable soil properties, different types of below grade configurations, and various types, thicknesses, and locations of insulation. The model has been used to analyze the thermal impact of varying levels of interior and exterior insulation on conventional basements, earth bermed walls, and earth covered structures. Local and integrated heat transfer through the exterior building envelope versus time of year are given as functions of construction materials, insulation, and soil geometry. Temperature distributions within the building envelope material and in the surrounding soil are presented versus time of year. An economic analysis is also given to indicate the cost effectiveness of the insulation levels analyzed.

    4. Design and Structural Analysis of Mars Rover RTG

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Schock, Alfred; Hamrick, T.; Sankarankandath, V.; Shirbacheh, M.

      1989-09-29

      The paper describes the design and the structural and mass analysis of a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for powering the MARS Rover vehicle, which is a critical element of the unmanned Mars Rover and Sample Return mission (MRSR). The RTG design study was conducted by Fairchild Space Company for the U.S. Department of Energy, in support of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's MRSR project.; The paper briefly describes a reference mission scenario, an illustrative Rover design and activity pattern on Mars, and its power system requirements and environmental constraints, including the RTG cooling requirements during transit to Mars. It identifies the key RTG design problem, i.e. venting the helium generated by the fuel's alpha decay without intrusion of the Martian atmosphere into the RTG, and proposes a design approach for solving that problem.; Using that approach, it describes a very conservative baseline RTG design. The design is based on the proven and safety-qualified General Purpose Heat Source module, and employs standard thermoelectric unicouples whose reliability and performance stability has been extensively demonstrated on previous space missions. The heat source of the 250-watt RTG consists of a stack of 18 separate modules that is supported at its ends but not along its length. The paper describes and analyzes the structure that holds the stack together during Earth launch and Mars operations but allows it to come apart in case of an inadvertent reentry.; A companion paper presented at this conference describes the RTG's thermal and electrical analysis, and compares its performance with that of several lighter but less conservative design options.; There is a duplicate copy in the ESD files. This document is not relevent to OSTI Library. Do not send.

    5. Advancements in 3D Structural Analysis of Geothermal Systems

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Siler, Drew L; Faulds, James E; Mayhew, Brett; McNamara, David

      2013-06-23

      Robust geothermal activity in the Great Basin, USA is a product of both anomalously high regional heat flow and active fault-controlled extension. Elevated permeability associated with some fault systems provides pathways for circulation of geothermal fluids. Constraining the local-scale 3D geometry of these structures and their roles as fluid flow conduits is crucial in order to mitigate both the costs and risks of geothermal exploration and to identify blind (no surface expression) geothermal resources. Ongoing studies have indicated that much of the robust geothermal activity in the Great Basin is associated with high density faulting at structurally complex fault intersection/interaction areas, such as accommodation/transfer zones between discrete fault systems, step-overs or relay ramps in fault systems, intersection zones between faults with different strikes or different senses of slip, and horse-tailing fault terminations. These conceptualized models are crucial for locating and characterizing geothermal systems in a regional context. At the local scale, however, pinpointing drilling targets and characterizing resource potential within known or probable geothermal areas requires precise 3D characterization of the system. Employing a variety of surface and subsurface data sets, we have conducted detailed 3D geologic analyses of two Great Basin geothermal systems. Using EarthVision (Dynamic Graphics Inc., Alameda, CA) we constructed 3D geologic models of both the actively producing Brady’s geothermal system and a ‘greenfield’ geothermal prospect at Astor Pass, NV. These 3D models allow spatial comparison of disparate data sets in 3D and are the basis for quantitative structural analyses that can aid geothermal resource assessment and be used to pinpoint discrete drilling targets. The relatively abundant data set at Brady’s, ~80 km NE of Reno, NV, includes 24 wells with lithologies interpreted from careful analysis of cuttings and core, a 1

    6. Radial transmission line analysis of multi-layer structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.

      2011-03-28

      The analysis of multi-layer beam tubes is a standard problem and involves axially propagating waves. This treatment is ill suited to a short multi-layer structure such as the present example of a ferrite covered ceramic break in the beam tube at the ERL photo-cathode electron gun. This paper demonstrates that such structure can better be treated by radial wave propagation. The theoretical method is presented and numerical results are compared with measured network analyser data and Microwave Studio generated simulations. The results confirm the concept of radial transmission lines as a valid analytical method. An Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is being constructed at this laboratory for the purpose of research towards an envisioned Electron Ion Collider. One of the pertinent topics is damping of Higher Order Modes (HOM). In this ERL, the damping is provided by ferrite absorbers in the beam tube. A modified version thereof, a ceramic break surrounded by ferrite, is planed for the superconducting electron gun. The damper here is located at room temperature just outside of the gun. If used in a cavity chain, the ceramic break is in the vacuum tube at helium temperature whereas the ferrite is moved into the cryostat insulating vacuum allowing higher temperatures. The general properties of the ferrite HOM dampers have been published but are more detailed in this paper.

    7. GLOBAL H I KINEMATICS IN DWARF GALAXIES

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Stilp, Adrienne M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Warren, Steven R.; Skillman, Evan; Ott, Juergen; Koribalski, Baerbel

      2013-03-10

      H I line widths are typically interpreted as a measure of interstellar medium turbulence, which is potentially driven by star formation (SF). In an effort to better understand the possible connections between line widths and SF, we have characterized H I kinematics in a sample of nearby dwarf galaxies by co-adding line-of-sight spectra after removing the rotational velocity to produce average global H I line profiles. These ''superprofiles'' are composed of a central narrow peak ({approx}6-10 km s{sup -1}) with higher-velocity wings to either side that contain {approx}10%-15% of the total flux. The superprofiles are all very similar, indicating a universal global H I profile for dwarf galaxies. We compare characteristics of the superprofiles to various galaxy properties, such as mass and measures of SF, with the assumption that the superprofile represents a turbulent peak with energetic wings to either side. We use these quantities to derive average scale heights for the sample galaxies. When comparing to physical properties, we find that the velocity dispersion of the central peak is correlated with ({Sigma}{sub HI}). The fraction of mass and characteristic velocity of the high-velocity wings are correlated with measures of SF, consistent with the picture that SF drives surrounding H I to higher velocities. While gravitational instabilities provide too little energy, the SF in the sample galaxies does provide enough energy through supernovae, with realistic estimates of the coupling efficiency, to produce the observed superprofiles.

    8. Aerodynamic, structural, and trajectory analysis of ASTRID-1 vehicle

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Glover, L.S.; Iwaskiw, A.P.; Oursler, M.A.; Perini, L.L.; Schaefer, E.D.

      1994-02-10

      The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory, JHU/API, in support of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, LLNL, is conducting aerodynamic, trajectory, and structural analysis of the Advanced Single Stage Technology Rapid Insertion Demonstration (ASTRID) vehicle, being launched out of Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in February 1994. The launch is designated ASTRID-1 and is the first in a series of three that will be launched out of VAFB. Launch dates for the next two flights have not been identified, but they are scheduled for the 1994-1995 time frame. The primary goal of the ASTRID-1 flight is to test the LLNL light weight thrust on demand bi-propellant pumped divert propulsion system. The system is employed as the main thrusters for the ASTRID-1 vehicle and uses hydrazine as the mono-propellant. The major conclusions are: (1) The vehicle is very stable throughout flight (stability margin = 17 to 24 inches); (2) The aerodynamic frequency and the roll rate are such that pitch-roll interactions will be small; (3) The high stability margin combined with the high launcher elevation angle makes the vehicle flight path highly sensitive to perturbations during the initial phase of flight, i.e., during the first second of flight after leaving the rail; (4) The major impact dispersions for the test flight are due to winds. The wind impact dispersions are 90% dictated by the low altitude, 0 to 1000 ft., wind conditions; and (5) In order to minimize wind dispersions, head wind conditions are favored for the launch as November VAFB mean tail winds result in land impacts. The ballistic wind methodology can be employed to assess the impact points of winds at the launch site.

    9. Structural analysis of underground gunite storage tanks. Environmental Restoration Program

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      1995-08-01

      This report documents the structural analysis of the 50-ft diameter underground gunite storage tanks constructed in 1943 and located in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) South Tank Farm, known as Facility 3507 in the 3500-3999 area. The six gunite tanks (W-5 through W-10) are spaced in a 2 {times} 3 matrix at 60 ft on centers with 6 ft of soil cover. Each tank (Figures 1, 2, and 3) has an inside diameter of 50 ft, a 12-ft vertical sidewall having a thickness of 6 in. (there is an additional 1.5-in. inner liner for much of the height), and a spherical domed roof (nominal thickness is 10 in.) rising another 6 ft, 3 in. at the center of the tank. The thickness of both the sidewall and the domed roof increases to 30 in. near their juncture. The tank floor is nominally 3-in. thick, except at the juncture with the wall where the thickness increases to 9 in. The tanks are constructed of gunite (a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water in the form of a mortar) sprayed from the nozzle of a cement gun against a form or a solid surface. The floor and the dome are reinforced with one layer of welded wire mesh and reinforcing rods placed in the radial direction. The sidewall is reinforced with three layers of welded wire mesh, vertical {1/2}-in. rods, and 21 horizontal rebar hoops (attached to the vertical rods) post-tensioned to 35,000 psi stress. The haunch at the sidewall/roof junction is reinforced with 17 horizontal rebar hoops post-tensioned with 35,000 to 40,000 psi stress. The yield strength of the post-tensioning steel rods is specified to be 60,000 psi, and all other steel is 40,000 psi steel. The specified 28-day design strength of the gunite is 5,000 psi.

    10. Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis Farhang Ostadan Nan Deng Lisa Anderson Bechtel National, Inc. USDOE NPH Workshop October 2014

    11. Three-Dimensional Structural Analysis of MgO-Supported Osmium...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Three-Dimensional Structural Analysis of MgO-Supported Osmium Clusters by Electron Microscopy with Single-Atom Sensitivity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

    12. System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction (SASSI) Verification &

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Validation (V&V) Problem Set | Department of Energy System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction (SASSI) Verification & Validation (V&V) Problem Set System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction (SASSI) Verification & Validation (V&V) Problem Set System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction (SASSI) Verification & Validation (V&V) Problem Set SASSI is the System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction, a computer code for performing finite element

    13. Structure and Kinetic Analysis of H[subscript 2]S Production...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      of Hsubscript 2S Production by Human Mercaptopyruvate Sulfurtransferase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure and Kinetic Analysis of Hsubscript 2S ...

    14. Performance analysis of high quality parallel preconditioners applied to 3D finite element structural analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kolotilina, L.; Nikishin, A.; Yeremin, A.

      1994-12-31

      The solution of large systems of linear equations is a crucial bottleneck when performing 3D finite element analysis of structures. Also, in many cases the reliability and robustness of iterative solution strategies, and their efficiency when exploiting hardware resources, fully determine the scope of industrial applications which can be solved on a particular computer platform. This is especially true for modern vector/parallel supercomputers with large vector length and for modern massively parallel supercomputers. Preconditioned iterative methods have been successfully applied to industrial class finite element analysis of structures. The construction and application of high quality preconditioners constitutes a high percentage of the total solution time. Parallel implementation of high quality preconditioners on such architectures is a formidable challenge. Two common types of existing preconditioners are the implicit preconditioners and the explicit preconditioners. The implicit preconditioners (e.g. incomplete factorizations of several types) are generally high quality but require solution of lower and upper triangular systems of equations per iteration which are difficult to parallelize without deteriorating the convergence rate. The explicit type of preconditionings (e.g. polynomial preconditioners or Jacobi-like preconditioners) require sparse matrix-vector multiplications and can be parallelized but their preconditioning qualities are less than desirable. The authors present results of numerical experiments with Factorized Sparse Approximate Inverses (FSAI) for symmetric positive definite linear systems. These are high quality preconditioners that possess a large resource of parallelism by construction without increasing the serial complexity.

    15. Two worlds collide: Image analysis methods for quantifying structural variation in cluster molecular dynamics

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Steenbergen, K. G.; Gaston, N.

      2014-02-14

      Inspired by methods of remote sensing image analysis, we analyze structural variation in cluster molecular dynamics (MD) simulations through a unique application of the principal component analysis (PCA) and Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC). The PCA analysis characterizes the geometric shape of the cluster structure at each time step, yielding a detailed and quantitative measure of structural stability and variation at finite temperature. Our PCC analysis captures bond structure variation in MD, which can be used to both supplement the PCA analysis as well as compare bond patterns between different cluster sizes. Relying only on atomic position data, without requirement for a priori structural input, PCA and PCC can be used to analyze both classical and ab initio MD simulations for any cluster composition or electronic configuration. Taken together, these statistical tools represent powerful new techniques for quantitative structural characterization and isomer identification in cluster MD.

    16. Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

      Open Energy Info (EERE)

      And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal...

    17. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Civil Structural Engineering

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

      Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

    18. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      applying SAXS to focused biological problems. Current directions include the analysis of DNA repair pathways, which, if malfunctioning, are a leading cause of cancer. An equally...

    19. Code System for Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis.

      Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

      2001-05-30

      Version 00 PELE-IC is a two-dimensional semi-implicit Eulerian hydrodynamics program for the solution of incompressible flow coupled to flexible structures. The code was developed to calculate fluid-structure interactions and bubble dynamics of a pressure-suppression system following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The fluid, structure, and coupling algorithms have been verified by calculation of benchmark problems and air and steam blowdown experiments. The code is written for both plane and cylindrical coordinates. The coupling algorithm is generalmore » enough to handle a wide variety of structural shapes. The concepts of void fractions and interface orientation are used to track the movement of free surfaces, allowing great versatility in following fluid-gas interfaces both for bubble definition and water surface motion without the use of marker particles.« less

    20. Seismic fragility analysis of structural components for HFBR facilities

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

      1992-01-01

      The paper presents a summary of recently completed seismic fragility analyses of the HFBR facilities. Based on a detailed review of past PRA studies, various refinements were made regarding the strength and ductility evaluation of structural components. Available laboratory test data were analysed to evaluate the formulations used to predict the ultimate strength and deformation capacities of steel, reinforced concrete and masonry structures. The biasness and uncertainties were evaluated within the framework of the fragility evaluation methods widely accepted in the nuclear industry. A few examples of fragility calculations are also included to illustrate the use of the presented formulations.

    1. Seismic fragility analysis of structural components for HFBR facilities

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

      1992-04-01

      The paper presents a summary of recently completed seismic fragility analyses of the HFBR facilities. Based on a detailed review of past PRA studies, various refinements were made regarding the strength and ductility evaluation of structural components. Available laboratory test data were analysed to evaluate the formulations used to predict the ultimate strength and deformation capacities of steel, reinforced concrete and masonry structures. The biasness and uncertainties were evaluated within the framework of the fragility evaluation methods widely accepted in the nuclear industry. A few examples of fragility calculations are also included to illustrate the use of the presented formulations.

    2. Nonlinear kinematics for piezoelectricity in ALEGRA-EMMA.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Mitchell, John Anthony; Fuller, Timothy Jesse

      2013-09-01

      This report develops and documents nonlinear kinematic relations needed to implement piezoelectric constitutive models in ALEGRA-EMMA [5], where calculations involving large displacements and rotations are routine. Kinematic relationships are established using Gauss's law and Faraday's law; this presentation on kinematics goes beyond piezoelectric materials and is applicable to all dielectric materials. The report then turns to practical details of implementing piezoelectric models in an application code where material principal axes are rarely aligned with user defined problem coordinate axes. This portion of the report is somewhat pedagogical but is necessary in order to establish documentation for the piezoelectric implementation in ALEGRA-EMMA. This involves transforming elastic, piezoelectric, and permittivity moduli from material principal axes to problem coordinate axes. The report concludes with an overview of the piezoelectric implementation in ALEGRA-EMMA and small verification examples.

    3. ARM - PI Product - Kinematic and Hydrometer Data Products from Scanning

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Radars during MC3E ProductsKinematic and Hydrometer Data Products from Scanning Radars during MC3E Citation DOI: 10.5439/1241493 [ What is this? ] ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Kinematic and Hydrometer Data Products from Scanning Radars during MC3E [ research data - ASR funded ] Recently the Radar Meteorology Group at Colorado State University has completed major case studies of

    4. Moisture and Structural Analysis for High Performance Hybrid Wall Assemblies

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Grin, A.; Lstiburek, J.

      2012-09-01

      Based on past experience in the Building America program, BSC has found that combinations of materials and approachesin other words, systemsusually provide optimum performance. Integration is necessary, as described in this research project. The hybrid walls analyzed utilize a combination of exterior insulation, diagonal metal strapping, and spray polyurethane foam and leave room for cavity-fill insulation. These systems can provide effective thermal, air, moisture, and water barrier systems in one assembly and provide structure.

    5. Geography-based structural analysis of the Internet

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kasiviswanathan, Shiva; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Yan, Guanhua

      2010-01-01

      In this paper, we study some geographic aspects of the Internet. We base our analysis on a large set of geolocated IP hop-level session data (including about 300,000 backbone routers, 150 million end hosts, and 1 billion sessions) that we synthesized from a variety of different input sources such as US census data, computer usage statistics, Internet market share data, IP geolocation data sets, CAJDA's Skitter data set for backbone connectivity, and BGP routing tables. We use this model to perform a nationwide and statewide geographic analysis of the Internet. Our main observations are: (1) There is a dominant coast-to-coast pattern in the US Internet traffic. In fact, in many instances even if the end-devices are not near either coast, still the traffic between them takes a long detour through the coasts. (2) More than half of the Internet paths are inflated by 100% or more compared to their corresponding geometric straight-line distance. This circuitousness makes the average ratio between the routing distance and geometric distance big (around 10). (3) The weighted mean hop count is around 5, but the hop counts are very loosely correlated with the distances. The weighted mean AS count (number of ASes traversed) is around 3. (4) The AS size and the AS location number distributions are heavy-tailed and strongly correlated. Most of the ASes are medium sized and there is a wide variability in the geographic dispersion size (measured in terms of the convex hull area) of these ASes.

    6. Integration of Noise and Coda Correlation Data into Kinematic and Waveform

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Inversions | Department of Energy Noise and Coda Correlation Data into Kinematic and Waveform Inversions Integration of Noise and Coda Correlation Data into Kinematic and Waveform Inversions Integration of Noise and Coda Correlation Data into Kinematic and Waveform Inversions presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. fugro_peer2013.pdf (6.19 MB) More Documents & Publications Integration of Noise and Coda Correlation Data into Kinematic and Waveform

    7. A STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF STAR-FORMING REGION AFGL 490

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Masiunas, L. C.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J. L.; Megeath, S. T.; Myers, P. C.; Kirk, H. M.; Fazio, G. G.; Allen, L. E.

      2012-06-20

      We present Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the star-forming region containing intermediate-mass young stellar object (YSO) AFGL 490. We supplement these data with near-IR Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry and with deep Simultaneous Quad Infrared Imaging Device observations off the central high-extinction region. We have more than doubled the known membership of this region to 57 Class I and 303 Class II YSOs via the combined 1-24 {mu}m photometric catalog derived from these data. We construct and analyze the minimum spanning tree of their projected positions, isolating one locally overdense cluster core containing 219 YSOs (60.8% of the region's members). We find this cluster core to be larger yet less dense than similarly analyzed clusters. Although the structure of this cluster core appears irregular, we demonstrate that the parsec-scale surface densities of both YSOs and gas are correlated with a power-law slope of 2.8, as found for other similarly analyzed nearby molecular clouds. We also explore the mass segregation implications of AFGL 490's offset from the center of its core, finding that it has no apparent preferential central position relative to the low-mass members.

    8. Finite element strategies for the efficient analysis and evaluation of solar collector structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Koteras, J. R.

      1980-01-01

      Concentrating or reflecting structures for solar energy systems must be evaluated as to their structural integrity and optical performance. Computer studies can be used as an integral part of these evaluations. The computer studies make use of finite element structural codes coupled with post-processors that calculate optical data. If the analysis of a solar structure is to be carried out in an efficient manner, these computer codes must have certain capabilities. A number of solar energy projects at Sandia National Laboratories have made extensive use of finite element analyses. The analyses have been useful in evaluating design concepts which hold promise for large scale use in solar energy projects. Analysis procedures have been developed for some structures so that evaluations can be carried out in a straightforward manner.

    9. Ionized gas kinematics at high resolution. IV. Star formation and a rotating core in the Medusa (NGC 4194)

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Beck, Sara C.; Lacy, John; Turner, Jean; Greathouse, Thomas; Neff, Susan

      2014-05-20

      NGC 4194 is a post-merger starburst known as The Medusa for its striking tidal features. We present here a detailed study of the structure and kinematics of ionized gas in the central 0.65 kpc of the Medusa. The data include radio continuum maps with resolution up to 0.''18 (35 pc) and a 12.8 ?m [Ne II] data cube with spectral resolution ?4 km s{sup 1}: the first high-resolution, extinction-free observations of this remarkable object. The ionized gas has the kinematic signature of a core in solid-body rotation. The starburst has formed a complex of bright compact H II regions, probably excited by deeply embedded super star clusters, but none of these sources is a convincing candidate for a Galactic nucleus. The nuclei of the merger partners that created the Medusa have not yet been identified.

    10. THE MILKY WAY TOMOGRAPHY WITH SDSS. III. STELLAR KINEMATICS

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Bond, Nicholas A.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Sesar, Branimir; Kowalski, Adam; Loebman, Sarah; Roskar, Rok; Dalcanton, Julianne; Juric, Mario; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Rockosi, Constance M.; Yanny, Brian; Newberg, Heidi J.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Wilhelm, Ron; Majewski, Steven R.; Norris, John E.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.

      2010-06-10

      We study Milky Way kinematics using a sample of 18.8 million main-sequence stars with r < 20 and proper-motion measurements derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and POSS astrometry, including {approx}170,000 stars with radial-velocity measurements from the SDSS spectroscopic survey. Distances to stars are determined using a photometric-parallax relation, covering a distance range from {approx}100 pc to 10 kpc over a quarter of the sky at high Galactic latitudes (|b|>20{sup 0}). We find that in the region defined by 1 kpc kinematic behavior that captures these features over most of the probed volume, and can be used to search for substructure in kinematic and metallicity space. We use this model to predict further improvements in kinematic mapping of the Galaxy expected from Gaia and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

    11. OVERVIEW ON BNL ASSESSMENT OF SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      XU,J.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.; GRAVES, H.

      2007-04-01

      A study was performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under the sponsorship of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), to determine the applicability of established soil-structure interaction analysis methods and computer programs to deeply embedded and/or buried (DEB) nuclear power plant (NPP) structures. This paper provides an overview of the BNL study including a description and discussions of analyses performed to assess relative performance of various SSI analysis methods typically applied to NPP structures, as well as the importance of interface modeling for DEB structures. There are four main elements contained in the BNL study: (1) Review and evaluation of existing seismic design practice, (2) Assessment of simplified vs. detailed methods for SSI in-structure response spectrum analysis of DEB structures, (3) Assessment of methods for computing seismic induced earth pressures on DEB structures, and (4) Development of the criteria for benchmark problems which could be used for validating computer programs for computing seismic responses of DEB NPP structures. The BNL study concluded that the equivalent linear SSI methods, including both simplified and detailed approaches, can be extended to DEB structures and produce acceptable SSI response calculations, provided that the SSI response induced by the ground motion is very much within the linear regime or the non-linear effect is not anticipated to control the SSI response parameters. The BNL study also revealed that the response calculation is sensitive to the modeling assumptions made for the soil/structure interface and application of a particular material model for the soil.

    12. Analysis of shared data structures for compile-time garbage collection in logic programs

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Mulkers, A.; Bruynooghe, M. . Dept. Computerwetenschappen); Winsborough, W. )

      1990-01-01

      One of the central problems in program analysis for compile-time garbage collection is detecting the sharing of term substructure that can occur during program execution. We present an abstract domain for representing possibly shared structures and an abstract unification operation based on this domain. When supplied to an abstract interpretation framework, this domain induces a powerful analysis of shared structures. We show that the analysis is sound by relating the abstract domain and operation to variants of the concrete domain and operation (substitutions with term unification) that are augmented with information about the term structures shared in actual implementations. We show these instrumented versions of the concrete domain and operation characterize the takes place in standard implementations. 22 refs., 3 figs.

    13. Thermal-Structural Analysis of the MacArthur Maze Freeway Collapse

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Noble, C R; Wemhoff, A P; McMichael, L D

      2008-02-26

      At approximately 3:41 AM on the morning of April 29, 2007, a tractor-trailer rig carrying 8,600 gallons (32.6 m{sup 3}) of fuel overturned on Interstate 880 in Oakland, CA. The resultant fire weakened the surrounding steel superstructure and caused a 50-yard (45.7 m) long section of the above connecting ramp from Interstate 80 to Interstate 580 to fail in approximately 18 minutes. In this study, we performed a loosely-coupled thermal-structural finite element analysis of the freeway using the LLNL Engineering codes NIKE3D, DYNA3D and TOPAZ3D. First, we applied an implicit structural code to statically initialize the stresses and displacements in the roadway at ambient conditions due to gravity loading. Next, we performed a thermal analysis by approximating the tanker fire as a moving box region of uniform temperature. This approach allowed for feasible calculation of the fire-to-structure radiative view factors and convective heat transport. We used a mass scaling methodology in the thermal analysis to reduce the overall simulation time so an explicit structural analysis could be used, which provided a more computationally efficient simulation of structural failure. Our approach showed structural failure of both spans due to thermal softening under gravity loading at approximately 20 minutes for a fixed fire temperature of 1200 C and fixed thermal properties. When temperature-dependent thermal properties were applied, the south and north spans collapsed at approximately 10 minutes and 16 minutes, respectively. Finally, we performed a preliminary fully-coupled analysis of the system using the new LLNL implicit multi-mechanics code Diablo. Our investigation shows that our approach provides a reasonable first-order analysis of the system, but improved modeling of the transport properties and the girder-box beam connections is required for more accurate predictions.

    14. Methods for simulation-based analysis of fluid-structure interaction.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Barone, Matthew Franklin; Payne, Jeffrey L.

      2005-10-01

      Methods for analysis of fluid-structure interaction using high fidelity simulations are critically reviewed. First, a literature review of modern numerical techniques for simulation of aeroelastic phenomena is presented. The review focuses on methods contained within the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework for coupling computational fluid dynamics codes to computational structural mechanics codes. The review treats mesh movement algorithms, the role of the geometric conservation law, time advancement schemes, wetted surface interface strategies, and some representative applications. The complexity and computational expense of coupled Navier-Stokes/structural dynamics simulations points to the need for reduced order modeling to facilitate parametric analysis. The proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)/Galerkin projection approach for building a reduced order model (ROM) is presented, along with ideas for extension of the methodology to allow construction of ROMs based on data generated from ALE simulations.

    15. Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Justin Coleman, P.E. October 25th, 2011

    16. Structural and Energetic Analysis of Activiation by a Cyclic Nucleotide Binding Domain

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Altieri,S.; Clayton, G.; Silverman, W.; Olivares, A.; De La Cruz, E.; Thomas, L.; Morais-Cabral, J.

      2008-01-01

      MlotiK1 is a prokaryotic homolog of cyclic-nucleotide-dependent ion channels that contains an intracellular C-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domain. X-ray structures of the CNB domain have been solved in the absence of ligand and bound to cAMP. Both the full-length channel and CNB domain fragment are easily expressed and purified, making MlotiK1 a useful model system for dissecting activation by ligand binding. We have used X-ray crystallography to determine three new MlotiK1 CNB domain structures: a second apo configuration, a cGMP-bound structure, and a second cAMP-bound structure. In combination, the five MlotiK1 CNB domain structures provide a unique opportunity for analyzing, within a single protein, the structural differences between the apo state and the bound state, and the structural variability within each state. With this analysis as a guide, we have probed the nucleotide selectivity and importance of specific residue side chains in ligand binding and channel activation. These data help to identify ligand-protein interactions that are important for ligand dependence in MlotiK1 and, more globally, in the class of nucleotide-dependent proteins.

    17. Rapid analysis of scattering from periodic dielectric structures using accelerated Cartesian expansions

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Baczewski, Andrew David; Miller, Nicholas C.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

      2012-03-22

      Here, the analysis of fields in periodic dielectric structures arise in numerous applications of recent interest, ranging from photonic bandgap structures and plasmonically active nanostructures to metamaterials. To achieve an accurate representation of the fields in these structures using numerical methods, dense spatial discretization is required. This, in turn, affects the cost of analysis, particularly for integral-equation-based methods, for which traditional iterative methods require Ο(Ν2) operations, Ν being the number of spatial degrees of freedom. In this paper, we introduce a method for the rapid solution of volumetric electric field integral equations used in the analysis of doubly periodic dielectricmore » structures. The crux of our method is the accelerated Cartesian expansion algorithm, which is used to evaluate the requisite potentials in Ο(Ν) cost. Results are provided that corroborate our claims of acceleration without compromising accuracy, as well as the application of our method to a number of compelling photonics applications.« less

    18. Preliminary Dynamic Siol-Structure-Interaction Analysis for the Waste Handling Building

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      G. Wagenblast

      2000-05-01

      The objective of this analysis package is to document a preliminary dynamic seismic evaluation of a simplified design concept of the Wade Handling Building (WHB). Preliminary seismic ground motions and soil data will be used. Loading criteria of the WHB System Design Description will be used. Detail design of structural members will not be performed.. The results of the analysis will be used to determine preliminary sizes of structural concrete and steel members and to determine whether the seismic response of the structure is within an acceptable level for future License Application design of safety related facilities. In order to complete this preliminary dynamic evaluation to meet the Site Recommendation (SR) schedule, the building configuration was ''frozen in time'' as the conceptual design existed in October 1999. Modular design features and dry or wet waste storage features were intentionally excluded from this preliminary dynamic seismic evaluation. The document was prepared in accordance with the Development Plan for the ''Preliminary/Dynamic Soil Structure Interaction Analysis for the Waste Handling Building'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b), which was completed, in accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning''.

    19. Detection of the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with DES...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detection of the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich ... we measure the average central optical depth of the cluster sample, bartaue ...

    20. Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Independent Review of Seismic Structural Analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      SWENSON, C.E.

      2000-09-22

      The following separate reports and correspondence pertains to the independent review of the seismic analysis. The original analysis was performed by GEC-Alsthom Engineering Systems Limited (GEC-ESL) under subcontract to Foster-Wheeler Environmental Corporation (FWEC) who was the prime integration contractor to the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project for the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). The original analysis was performed to the Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) response spectra using 5% damping as required in specification, HNF-S-0468 for the 90% Design Report in June 1997. The independent review was performed by Fluor-Daniel (Irvine) under a separate task from their scope as Architect-Engineer of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in 1997. The comments were issued in April 1998. Later in 1997, the response spectra of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) was revised according to a new soil-structure interaction analysis and accordingly revised the response spectra for the MHM and utilized 7% damping in accordance with American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) NOG-1, ''Rules for Construction of Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top Running Bridge, Multiple Girder).'' The analysis was re-performed to check critical areas but because manufacturing was underway, designs were not altered unless necessary. FWEC responded to SNF Project correspondence on the review comments in two separate letters enclosed. The dispositions were reviewed and accepted. Attached are supplier source surveillance reports on the procedures and process by the engineering group performing the analysis and structural design. All calculation and analysis results are contained in the MHM Final Design Report which is part of the Vendor Information File 50100. Subsequent to the MHM supplier engineering analysis, there was a separate analyses for nuclear safety accident concerns that used the electronic input data files provided by FWEC/GEC-ESL and are contained in document SNF-6248

    1. Composite structures 4; Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference, Paisley College of Technology, Scotland, July 27-29, 1987. Volume 1 - Analysis and design studies

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Marshall, I.H.

      1987-01-01

      Various papers on analysis and design studies in composite structures are presented. The general topics addressed include: space studies, mechanical fasteners, buckling and postbuckling of platework structures, aerospace structures, wind turbine design, pipes and pressure vessels, analysis and buckling of shell-type structures. Also considered are: structural sections and optimization, thermal loading, vibration of platework structures and shell-type structures, dynamic loading, and finite element analysis.

    2. Voronoi analysis of the short–range atomic structure in iron and iron–carbon melts

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Sobolev, Andrey; Mirzoev, Alexander

      2015-08-17

      In this work, we simulated the atomic structure of liquid iron and iron–carbon alloys by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. Voronoi analysis was used to highlight changes in the close environments of Fe atoms as carbon concentration in the melt increases. We have found, that even high concentrations of carbon do not affect short–range atomic order of iron atoms — it remains effectively the same as in pure iron melts.

    3. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Integrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High-Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Principal Investigator: Philip E. Wannamaker University of Utah Energy & Geoscience Institute 423 Wakara Way, Ste 300 Salt Lake City, UT 84108 pewanna@egi.utah.edu April 24, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Track1: Geophysics McGinness Hills, NV October, 2011 2 | US DOE

    4. Structural Analysis of a Highly Glycosylated and Unliganded gp120-Based Antigen Using Mass Spectrometry

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      L Wang; Y Qin; S Ilchenko; J Bohon; W Shi; M Cho; K Takamoto; M Chance

      2011-12-31

      Structural characterization of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 is very important for providing an understanding of the protein's immunogenicity and its binding to cell receptors. So far, the crystallographic structure of gp120 with an intact V3 loop (in the absence of a CD4 coreceptor or antibody) has not been determined. The third variable region (V3) of the gp120 is immunodominant and contains glycosylation signatures that are essential for coreceptor binding and entry of the virus into T-cells. In this study, we characterized the structure of the outer domain of gp120 with an intact V3 loop (gp120-OD8) purified from Drosophila S2 cells utilizing mass spectrometry-based approaches. We mapped the glycosylation sites and calculated the glycosylation occupancy of gp120-OD8; 11 sites from 15 glycosylation motifs were determined as having high-mannose or hybrid glycosylation structures. The specific glycan moieties of nine glycosylation sites from eight unique glycopeptides were determined by a combination of ECD and CID MS approaches. Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting coupled with mass spectrometry analysis was employed to provide detailed information about protein structure of gp120-OD8 by directly identifying accessible and hydroxyl radical-reactive side chain residues. Comparison of gp120-OD8 experimental footprinting data with a homology model derived from the ligated CD4-gp120-OD8 crystal structure revealed a flexible V3 loop structure in which the V3 tip may provide contacts with the rest of the protein while residues in the V3 base remain solvent accessible. In addition, the data illustrate interactions between specific sugar moieties and amino acid side chains potentially important to the gp120-OD8 structure.

    5. Uncertainty in soil-structure interaction analysis of a nuclear power plant due to different analytical techniques

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Chen, J.C.; Chun, R.C.; Goudreau, G.L.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Johnson, J.J.

      1984-01-01

      This paper summarizes the results of the dynamic response analysis of the Zion reactor containment building using three different soil-structure interaction (SSI) analytical procedures which are: the substructure method, CLASSI; the equivalent linear finite element approach, ALUSH; and the nonlinear finite element procedure, DYNA3D. Uncertainties in analyzing a soil-structure system due to SSI analysis procedures were investigated. Responses at selected locations in the structure were compared through peak accelerations and response spectra.

    6. DOE-STD-3014-96; DOE Standard Accident Analysis For Aircraft...

      Energy Savers [EERE]

      ... crash kinematics; impacting missiles; local, global, and vibratory structural ... Missile: A general term used to denote both primary and secondary missiles. See also ...

    7. Real time markerless motion tracking using linked kinematic chains

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Luck, Jason P.; Small, Daniel E.

      2007-08-14

      A markerless method is described for tracking the motion of subjects in a three dimensional environment using a model based on linked kinematic chains. The invention is suitable for tracking robotic, animal or human subjects in real-time using a single computer with inexpensive video equipment, and does not require the use of markers or specialized clothing. A simple model of rigid linked segments is constructed of the subject and tracked using three dimensional volumetric data collected by a multiple camera video imaging system. A physics based method is then used to compute forces to align the model with subsequent volumetric data sets in real-time. The method is able to handle occlusion of segments and accommodates joint limits, velocity constraints, and collision constraints and provides for error recovery. The method further provides for elimination of singularities in Jacobian based calculations, which has been problematic in alternative methods.

    8. Evaluation of the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Linker, K.L.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Smith, G.

      1990-01-01

      The Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Program has identified the Stirling cycle heat engine as the conversion device for dish-electric systems with the most potential for meeting the program's goals. To advance the technology toward commercialization in a dish-electric system, Sandia National Laboratories has acquired a Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc. kinematic Stirling engine, STM4-120, for evaluation. During the past year this engine has been operating at Sandia's Engine Test Facility. The engine's heat input has been provided through fossil fuel combustion and sodium heat pipes, while the output power has been absorbed with an eddy-current dynamometer. This paper presents the evaluation of the engine performance during the past year. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

    9. Data publication with the structural biology data grid supports live analysis

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Meyer, Peter A.; Socias, Stephanie; Key, Jason; Ransey, Elizabeth; Tjon, Emily C.; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Lei, Ming; Botka, Chris; Withrow, James; Neau, David; et al

      2016-03-07

      Access to experimental X-ray diffraction image data is fundamental for validation and reproduction of macromolecular models and indispensable for development of structural biology processing methods. Here, we established a diffraction data publication and dissemination system, Structural Biology Data Grid (SBDG; data.sbgrid.org), to preserve primary experimental data sets that support scientific publications. Data sets are accessible to researchers through a community driven data grid, which facilitates global data access. Our analysis of a pilot collection of crystallographic data sets demonstrates that the information archived by SBDG is sufficient to reprocess data to statistics that meet or exceed the quality of themore » original published structures. SBDG has extended its services to the entire community and is used to develop support for other types of biomedical data sets. In conclusion, it is anticipated that access to the experimental data sets will enhance the paradigm shift in the community towards a much more dynamic body of continuously improving data analysis.« less

    10. Structural Analysis of a Putative Aminoglycoside N-Acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Klimecka, Maria M.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Font, Jose; Skarina, Tatiana; Shumilin, Igor; Onopryienko, Olena; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Cymborowski, Marcin; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Hasseman, Jeremy; Glomski, Ian J.; Lebioda, Lukasz; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek

      2012-02-15

      For the last decade, worldwide efforts for the treatment of anthrax infection have focused on developing effective vaccines. Patients that are already infected are still treated traditionally using different types of standard antimicrobial agents. The most popular are antibiotics such as tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. While aminoglycosides appear to be less effective antimicrobial agents than other antibiotics, synthetic aminoglycosides have been shown to act as potent inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor and may have potential application as antitoxins. Here, we present a structural analysis of the BA2930 protein, a putative aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, which may be a component of the bacterium's aminoglycoside resistance mechanism. The determined structures revealed details of a fold characteristic only for one other protein structure in the Protein Data Bank, namely, YokD from Bacillus subtilis. Both BA2930 and YokD are members of the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily (PF02522). Sequential and structural analyses showed that residues conserved throughout the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily are responsible for the binding of the cofactor acetyl coenzyme A. The interaction of BA2930 with cofactors was characterized by both crystallographic and binding studies.

    11. Memory Efficient Sequence Analysis Using Compressed Data Structures (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      Simpson, Jared [Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

      2013-01-22

      Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Jared Simpson on "Memory efficient sequence analysis using compressed data structures" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

    12. Structure of CPV17 polyhedrin determined by the improved analysis of serial femtosecond crystallographic data

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Ginn, Helen M.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ji, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Hanwen; Axford, Danny; Gildea, Richard J.; Winter, Graeme; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Wagner, Armin; et al

      2015-03-09

      The X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) allows the analysis of small weakly diffracting protein crystals, but has required very many crystals to obtain good data. Here we use an XFEL to determine the room temperature atomic structure for the smallest cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus polyhedra yet characterized, which we failed to solve at a synchrotron. These protein microcrystals, roughly a micron across, accrue within infected cells. We use a new physical model for XFEL diffraction, which better estimates the experimental signal, delivering a high-resolution XFEL structure (1.75 Å), using fewer crystals than previously required for this resolution. The crystal lattice and proteinmore » core are conserved compared with a polyhedrin with less than 10% sequence identity. We explain how the conserved biological phenotype, the crystal lattice, is maintained in the face of extreme environmental challenge and massive evolutionary divergence. Our improved methods should open up more challenging biological samples to XFEL analysis.« less

    13. Microscopic silicon-based lateral high-aspect-ratio structures for thin film conformality analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Gao, Feng; Arpiainen, Sanna; Puurunen, Riikka L.

      2015-01-15

      Film conformality is one of the major drivers for the interest in atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes. This work presents new silicon-based microscopic lateral high-aspect-ratio (LHAR) test structures for the analysis of the conformality of thin films deposited by ALD and by other chemical vapor deposition means. The microscopic LHAR structures consist of a lateral cavity inside silicon with a roof supported by pillars. The cavity length (e.g., 20–5000 μm) and cavity height (e.g., 200–1000 nm) can be varied, giving aspect ratios of, e.g., 20:1 to 25 000:1. Film conformality can be analyzed with the microscopic LHAR by several means, as demonstrated for the ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} processes from Me{sub 3}Al/H{sub 2}O and TiCl{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O. The microscopic LHAR test structures introduced in this work expose a new parameter space for thin film conformality investigations expected to prove useful in the development, tuning and modeling of ALD and other chemical vapor deposition processes.

    14. NASTRAN-based computer program for structural dynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Lobitz, D.W.

      1984-01-01

      This paper describes a computer program developed for structural dynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). It is based on the finite element method through its reliance on NASTRAN for the development of mass, stiffness, and damping matrices of the tower and rotor, which are treated in NASTRAN as separate structures. The tower is modeled in a stationary frame and the rotor in one rotating at a constant angular velocity. The two structures are subsequently joined together (external to NASTRAN) using a time-dependent transformation consistent with the hub configuration. Aerodynamic loads are computed with an established flow model based on strip theory. Aeroelastic effects are included by incorporating the local velocity and twisting deformation of the blade in the load computation. The turbulent nature of the wind, both in space and time, is modeled by adding in stochastic wind increments. The resulting equations of motion are solved in the time domain using the implicit Newmark-Beta integrator. Preliminary comparisons with data from the Boeing/NASA MOD2 HAWT indicate that the code is capable of accurately and efficiently predicting the response of HAWTs driven by turbulent winds.

    15. Structural Analysis of a Ternary Complex of Allantoate Amidohydrolase from Escherichia Coli Reveals its Mechanics

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Agarwal,R.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

      2007-01-01

      Purine metabolism plays a major role in regulating the availability of purine nucleotides destined for nucleic acid synthesis. Allantoate amidohydrolase catalyzes the conversion of allantoate to (S)-ureidoglycolate, one of the crucial alternate steps in purine metabolism. The crystal structure of a ternary complex of allantoate amidohydrolase with its substrate allantoate and an allosteric effector, a sulfate ion, from Escherichia coli was determined to understand better the catalytic mechanism and substrate specificity. The 2.25 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure reveals an {alpha}/{beta} scaffold akin to zinc exopeptidases of the peptidase M20 family and lacks the ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8}-barrel fold characteristic of the amidohydrolases. Arrangement of the substrate and the two co-catalytic zinc ions at the active site governs catalytic specificity for hydrolysis of N-carbamyl versus the peptide bond in exopeptidases. In its crystalline form, allantoate amidohydrolase adopts a relatively open conformation. However, structural analysis reveals the possibility of a significant movement of domains via rotation about two hinge regions upon allosteric effector and substrate binding resulting in a closed catalytically competent conformation by bringing the substrate allantoate closer to co-catalytic zinc ions. Two cis-prolyl peptide bonds found on either side of the dimerization domain in close proximity to the substrate and ligand-binding sites may be involved in protein folding and in preserving the integrity of the catalytic site.

    16. A Visual Analytics Approach to Structured Data Analysis to Enhance Nonproliferation and Arms Control Verification Activities

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Gillen, David S.

      2014-08-07

      Analysis activities for Nonproliferation and Arms Control verification require the use of many types of data. Tabular structured data, such as Excel spreadsheets and relational databases, have traditionally been used for data mining activities, where specific queries are issued against data to look for matching results. The application of visual analytics tools to structured data enables further exploration of datasets to promote discovery of previously unknown results. This paper discusses the application of a specific visual analytics tool to datasets related to the field of Arms Control and Nonproliferation to promote the use of visual analytics more broadly in this domain. Visual analytics focuses on analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces (Wong and Thomas 2004). It promotes exploratory analysis of data, and complements data mining technologies where known patterns can be mined for. Also with a human in the loop, they can bring in domain knowledge and subject matter expertise. Visual analytics has not widely been applied to this domain. In this paper, we will focus on one type of data: structured data, and show the results of applying a specific visual analytics tool to answer questions in the Arms Control and Nonproliferation domain. We chose to use the T.Rex tool, a visual analytics tool developed at PNNL, which uses a variety of visual exploration patterns to discover relationships in structured datasets, including a facet view, graph view, matrix view, and timeline view. The facet view enables discovery of relationships between categorical information, such as countries and locations. The graph tool visualizes node-link relationship patterns, such as the flow of materials being shipped between parties. The matrix visualization shows highly correlated categories of information. The timeline view shows temporal patterns in data. In this paper, we will use T.Rex with two different datasets to demonstrate how interactive exploration of

    17. Why baryons matter: The kinematics of dwarf spheroidal satellites

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Brooks, Alyson M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Zolotov, Adi, E-mail: abrooks@physics.rutgers.edu, E-mail: zolotov@physics.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

      2014-05-10

      We use high-resolution cosmological simulations of Milky Way (MW) mass galaxies that include both baryons and dark matter (DM) to show that baryonic physics (energetic feedback from supernovae and subsequent tidal stripping) significantly reduces the DM mass in the central regions of luminous satellite galaxies. The reduced central masses of the simulated satellites reproduce the observed internal dynamics of MW and M31 satellites as a function of luminosity. We use these realistic satellites to update predictions for the observed velocity and luminosity functions of satellites around MW-mass galaxies when baryonic effects are accounted for. We also predict that field dwarf galaxies in the same luminosity range as the MW classical satellites should not exhibit velocities as low as the satellites because the field dwarfs do not experience tidal stripping. Additionally, the early formation times of the satellites compared to field galaxies at the same luminosity may be apparent in the star formation histories of the two populations. Including baryonic physics in cold dark matter (CDM) models naturally explains the observed low DM densities in the MWs dwarf spheroidal population. Our simulations therefore resolve the tension between kinematics predicted in CDM theory and observations of satellites, without invoking alternative forms of DM.

    18. Model independent x-ray standing wave analysis of periodic multilayer structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Yakunin, S. N.; Pashaev, E. M.; Subbotin, I. A.; Makhotkin, I. A.; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Zoethout, E.; Chuev, M. A.; Louis, E.; Seregin, S. Yu.; Novikov, D. V.; Bijkerk, F.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

      2014-04-07

      We present a model independent approach for the analysis of X-ray fluorescence yield modulated by an X-ray standing wave (XSW), that allow a fast reconstruction of the atomic distribution function inside a sample without fitting procedure. The approach is based on the direct regularized solution of the system of linear equations that characterizes the fluorescence yield. The suggested technique was optimized for, but not limited to, the analysis of periodic layered structures where the XSW is formed under Bragg conditions. The developed approach was applied to the reconstruction of the atomic distribution function for LaN/BN multilayers with 50 periods of 43 Å thick layers. The object is especially difficult to analyze with traditional methods, as the estimated thickness of the interface region between the constituent materials is comparable to the individual layer thicknesses. However, using the suggested technique, it was possible to reconstruct width of the La atomic distribution showing that the La atoms stay localized within the LaN layers and interfaces and do not diffuse into the BN layer. The analysis of the reconstructed profiles showed that the positions of the center of the atomic distribution function can be estimated with an accuracy of 1 Å.

    19. A structural analysis of natural gas consumption by income class from 1987 to 1993

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Poyer, D.A.

      1996-12-01

      This study had two major objectives: (1) assess and compare changes in natural gas consumption between 1987 and 1993 by income group and (2) assess the potential influence of energy policy on observed changes in natural gas consumption over time and across income groups. This analysis used U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) data files and involved both the generation of simple descriptive statistics and the use of multivariate regression analysis. The consumption of natural gas by the groups was studied over a six-year period. The results showed that: (1) natural gas use was substantially higher for the highest income group than for the two lower income groups and (2) natural gas consumption declined for the lowest and middle income quintiles and increased for the highest income quintile between 1987 and 1990; between 1990 and 1993, consumption increased for the lowest and middle income quintile, but remained relatively constant for the highest income quintile. The relative importance of the structural and variable factors in explaining consumption changes between survey periods varies by income group. The analysis provides two major energy policy implications: (1) natural gas intensity has been the highest for the lowest income group, indicating that this group is more vulnerable to sudden changes in demand-indicator variables, in particular weather-related variables, than increase natural gas consumption, and (2) the fall in natural gas intensity between 1987 and 1993 may indicate that energy policy has had some impact on reducing natural gas consumption. 11 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

    20. IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. II. DISCOVERY OF A DOUBLE INFRARED CLUSTER IN II Zw 40

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Beck, Sara; Lahad, Ohr; Turner, Jean; Lacy, John; Greathouse, Thomas

      2013-04-10

      The nearby dwarf galaxy II Zw 40 hosts an intense starburst. At the center of the starburst is a bright compact radio and infrared source, thought to be a giant dense H II region containing Almost-Equal-To 14, 000 O stars. Radio continuum images suggest that the compact source is actually a collection of several smaller emission regions. We accordingly use the kinematics of the ionized gas to probe the structure of the radio-infrared emission region. With TEXES on the NASA-IRTF we measured the 10.5 {mu}m [S IV] emission line with effective spectral resolutions, including thermal broadening, of {approx}25 and {approx}3 km s{sup -1} and spatial resolution {approx}1''. The line profile shows two distinct, spatially coextensive, emission features. The stronger feature is at galactic velocity and has FWHM 47 km s{sup -1}. The second feature is {approx}44 km s{sup -1} redward of the first and has FWHM 32 km s{sup -1}. We argue that these are two giant embedded clusters, and estimate their masses to be Almost-Equal-To 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} and Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. The velocity shift is unexpectedly large for such a small spatial offset. We suggest that it may arise in a previously undetected kinematic feature remaining from the violent merger that formed the galaxy.

    1. CHARACTERISTICS OF KINEMATICS OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION DURING THE 2010 AUGUST 1 CME-CME INTERACTION EVENT

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; Moestl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M.; Flor, Olga; Vrsnak, Bojan; Zic, Tomislav; De Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Eastwood, Jonathan; Forsyth, Robert; Odstrcil, Dusan

      2012-04-10

      We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and heliospheric imager (HI) data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field of view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; {approx}1200 km s{sup -1}) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; {approx}700 km s{sup -1}). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2, suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

    2. BANYAN. II. Very low mass and substellar candidate members to nearby, young kinematic groups with previously known signs of youth

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Gagn, Jonathan; Lafrenire, David; Doyon, Ren; Malo, Lison; Artigau, tienne

      2014-03-10

      We present Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II (BANYAN II), a modified Bayesian analysis for assessing the membership of later-than-M5 objects to any of several Nearby Young Associations (NYAs). In addition to using kinematic information (from sky position and proper motion), this analysis exploits 2MASS-WISE color-magnitude diagrams in which old and young objects follow distinct sequences. As an improvement over our earlier work, the spatial and kinematic distributions for each association are now modeled as ellipsoids whose axes need not be aligned with the Galactic coordinate axes, and we use prior probabilities matching the expected populations of the NYAs considered versus field stars. We present an extensive contamination analysis to characterize the performance of our new method. We find that Bayesian probabilities are generally representative of contamination rates, except when a parallax measurement is considered. In this case contamination rates become significantly smaller and hence Bayesian probabilities for NYA memberships are pessimistic. We apply this new algorithm to a sample of 158 objects from the literature that are either known to display spectroscopic signs of youth or have unusually red near-infrared colors for their spectral type. Based on our analysis, we identify 25 objects as new highly probable candidates to NYAs, including a new M7.5 bona fide member to Tucana-Horologium, making it the latest-type member. In addition, we reveal that a known L2? dwarf is co-moving with a bright M5 dwarf, and we show for the first time that two of the currently known ultra red L dwarfs are strong candidates to the AB Doradus moving group. Several objects identified here as highly probable members to NYAs could be free-floating planetary-mass objects if their membership is confirmed.

    3. KINEMATIC PROPERTIES AS PROBES OF THE EVOLUTION OF DWARF GALAXIES IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Toloba, E.; Gorgas, J.; De Paz, A. Gil; Boselli, A.; Peletier, R. F.; Yildiz, U.; Cenarro, A. J.; Gadotti, D. A.; Pedraz, S.

      2009-12-10

      We present new observational results on the kinematical, morphological, and stellar population properties of a sample of 21 dEs located both in the Virgo Cluster and in the field, which show that 52% of the dEs (1) are rotationally supported, (2) exhibit structural signs of typical rotating systems such as disks, bars, or spiral arms, (3) are younger (approx3 Gyr) than non-rotating dEs, and (4) are preferentially located either in the outskirts of Virgo or in the field. This evidence is consistent with the idea that rotationally supported dwarfs are late-type spirals or irregulars that recently entered the cluster and lost their gas through a ram pressure stripping event, quenching their star formation and becoming dEs through passive evolution. We also find that all, but one, galaxies without photometric hints for hosting disks are pressure supported and are all situated in the inner regions of the cluster. This suggests a different evolution from the rotationally supported systems. Three different scenarios for these non-rotating galaxies are discussed (in situ formation, harassment, and ram pressure stripping).

    4. Morphological and kinematic evolution of three interacting coronal mass ejections of 2011 February 13-15

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Mishra, Wageesh; Srivastava, Nandita

      2014-10-10

      During 2011 February 13-15, three Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) launched in succession were recorded as limb CMEs by STEREO/SECCHI coronagraphs (COR). These CMEs provided an opportunity to study their geometrical and kinematic evolution from multiple vantage points. In this paper, we examine the differences in geometrical evolution of slow and fast CMEs during their propagation in the heliosphere. We also study their interaction and collision using STEREO/SECCHI COR and Heliospheric Imager (HI) observations. We have found evidence of interaction and collision between the CMEs of February 15 and 14 in the COR2 and HI1 field of view (FOV), respectively, while the CME of February 14 caught up with the CME of February 13 in the HI2 FOV. By estimating the true mass of these CMEs and using their pre- and post-collision dynamics, the momentum and energy exchange between them during the collision phase are studied. We classify the nature of the observed collision between the CMEs of February 14 and 15 as inelastic, reaching close to the elastic regime. Relating imaging observations with in situ WIND measurements at L1, we find that the CMEs move adjacent to each other after their collision in the heliosphere and are recognized as distinct structures in in situ observations. Our results highlight the significance of HI observations in studying CME-CME collision for the purpose of improved space weather forecasting.

    5. Integration of Noise and Coda Correlation Data into Kinematic and Waveform

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Inversions | Department of Energy Integration of Noise and Coda Correlation Data into Kinematic and Waveform Inversions Integration of Noise and Coda Correlation Data into Kinematic and Waveform Inversions This project will focus on using microearthquakes (MEQ) and noise correlation Green's functions (NCF) obtained from MEQs and ambient noise and coda-wave interferometry to image the physical properties of geothermal reservoirs and detect and map changes in reservoir properties with time.

    6. DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE INNER CORONA

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, J. [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Saar, S. H., E-mail: xincheng@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

      2012-12-10

      In this paper, we study the temperature and density properties of multiple structural components of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The DEM analysis is based on the six-passband EUV observations of solar corona from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The structural components studied include the hot channel in the core region (presumably the magnetic flux rope of the CME), the bright loop-like leading front (LF), and coronal dimming in the wake of the CME. We find that the presumed flux rope has the highest average temperature (>8 MK) and density ({approx}1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}), resulting in an enhanced emission measure over a broad temperature range (3 {<=} T(MK) {<=} 20). On the other hand, the CME LF has a relatively cool temperature ({approx}2 MK) and a narrow temperature distribution similar to the pre-eruption coronal temperature (1 {<=} T(MK) {<=} 3). The density in the LF, however, is increased by 2%-32% compared with that of the pre-eruption corona, depending on the event and location. In coronal dimmings, the temperature is more broadly distributed (1 {<=} T(MK) {<=} 4), but the density decreases by {approx}35%-{approx}40%. These observational results show that: (1) CME core regions are significantly heated, presumably through magnetic reconnection; (2) CME LFs are a consequence of compression of ambient plasma caused by the expansion of the CME core region; and (3) the dimmings are largely caused by the plasma rarefaction associated with the eruption.

    7. High-throughput analysis of T-DNA location and structure using sequence capture

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Inagaki, Soichi; Henry, Isabelle M.; Lieberman, Meric C.; Comai, Luca

      2015-10-07

      Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of plants with T-DNA is used both to introduce transgenes and for mutagenesis. Conventional approaches used to identify the genomic location and the structure of the inserted T-DNA are laborious and high-throughput methods using next-generation sequencing are being developed to address these problems. Here, we present a cost-effective approach that uses sequence capture targeted to the T-DNA borders to select genomic DNA fragments containing T-DNA—genome junctions, followed by Illumina sequencing to determine the location and junction structure of T-DNA insertions. Multiple probes can be mixed so that transgenic lines transformed with different T-DNA types can be processed simultaneously,more » using a simple, index-based pooling approach. We also developed a simple bioinformatic tool to find sequence read pairs that span the junction between the genome and T-DNA or any foreign DNA. We analyzed 29 transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, each containing inserts from 4 different T-DNA vectors. We determined the location of T-DNA insertions in 22 lines, 4 of which carried multiple insertion sites. Additionally, our analysis uncovered a high frequency of unconventional and complex T-DNA insertions, highlighting the needs for high-throughput methods for T-DNA localization and structural characterization. Transgene insertion events have to be fully characterized prior to use as commercial products. As a result, our method greatly facilitates the first step of this characterization of transgenic plants by providing an efficient screen for the selection of promising lines.« less

    8. High-throughput analysis of T-DNA location and structure using sequence capture

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Inagaki, Soichi; Henry, Isabelle M.; Lieberman, Meric C.; Comai, Luca

      2015-10-07

      Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of plants with T-DNA is used both to introduce transgenes and for mutagenesis. Conventional approaches used to identify the genomic location and the structure of the inserted T-DNA are laborious and high-throughput methods using next-generation sequencing are being developed to address these problems. Here, we present a cost-effective approach that uses sequence capture targeted to the T-DNA borders to select genomic DNA fragments containing T-DNA—genome junctions, followed by Illumina sequencing to determine the location and junction structure of T-DNA insertions. Multiple probes can be mixed so that transgenic lines transformed with different T-DNA types can be processed simultaneously, using a simple, index-based pooling approach. We also developed a simple bioinformatic tool to find sequence read pairs that span the junction between the genome and T-DNA or any foreign DNA. We analyzed 29 transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, each containing inserts from 4 different T-DNA vectors. We determined the location of T-DNA insertions in 22 lines, 4 of which carried multiple insertion sites. Additionally, our analysis uncovered a high frequency of unconventional and complex T-DNA insertions, highlighting the needs for high-throughput methods for T-DNA localization and structural characterization. Transgene insertion events have to be fully characterized prior to use as commercial products. As a result, our method greatly facilitates the first step of this characterization of transgenic plants by providing an efficient screen for the selection of promising lines.

    9. THE KINEMATICS OF THE LOCAL GROUP IN A COSMOLOGICAL CONTEXT

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Forero-Romero, J. E.; Hoffman, Y.; Bustamante, S.; Gottloeber, S.; Yepes, G.

      2013-04-10

      Recent observations constrained the tangential velocity of M31 with respect to the Milky Way to be v{sub M31,tan} < 34.4 km s{sup -1}and the radial velocity to be in the range v{sub M31,rad} = -109 {+-} 4.4 km s{sup -1}. In this study we use a large volume high-resolution N-body cosmological simulation (Bolshoi) together with three constrained simulations to statistically study this kinematics in the context of the {Lambda} cold dark matter ({Lambda}CDM). The comparison of the ensembles of simulated pairs with the observed Local Group (LG) at the 1{sigma} level in the uncertainties has been done with respect to the radial and tangential velocities, the reduced orbital energy (e{sub tot}), angular momentum (l{sub orb}), and the dimensionless spin parameter, {lambda}. Our main results are (1) the preferred radial and tangential velocities for pairs in {Lambda}CDM are v{sub r} = -80 {+-} 20 km s{sup -1} and v{sub t} = 50 {+-} 10 km s{sup -1}, (2) pairs around that region are 3-13 times more common than pairs within the observational values, (3) 15%-24% of LG-like pairs in {Lambda}CDM have energy and angular momentum consistent with observations, while (4) 9%-13% of pairs in the same sample show similar values in the inferred dimensionless spin parameter. It follows that within current observational uncertainties the quasi-conserved quantities that characterize the orbit of the LG, i.e., e{sub tot}, l{sub orb}, and {lambda}, do not challenge the standard {Lambda}CDM model, but the model is in tension with regard to the actual values of the radial and tangential velocities. This might hint to a problem of the {Lambda}CDM model to reproduce the observed LG.

    10. Structure analysis reveals the flexibility of the ADAMTS-5 active site

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Shieh, Huey-Sheng; Tomasselli, Alfredo G.; Mathis, Karl J.; Schnute, Mark E.; Woodard, Scott S.; Caspers, Nicole; Williams, Jennifer M.; Kiefer, James R.; Munie, Grace; Wittwer, Arthur; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Tortorella, Micky D.

      2012-03-02

      A ((1S,2R)-2-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl) succinamide derivative (here referred to as Compound 12) shows significant activity toward many matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9, and MMP-13. Modeling studies had predicted that this compound would not bind to ADAMTS-5 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-5) due to its shallow S1' pocket. However, inhibition analysis revealed it to be a nanomolar inhibitor of both ADAMTS-4 and -5. The observed inconsistency was explained by analysis of crystallographic structures, which showed that Compound 12 in complex with the catalytic domain of ADAMTS-5 (cataTS5) exhibits an unusual conformation in the S1' pocket of the protein. This first demonstration that cataTS5 can undergo an induced conformational change in its active site pocket by a molecule like Compound 12 should enable the design of new aggrecanase inhibitors with better potency and selectivity profiles.

    11. Characterizing the AB Doradus moving group via high-resolution spectroscopy and kinematic traceback

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      McCarthy, Kyle; Wilhelm, Ronald J.

      2014-10-01

      We present a detailed analysis of 10 proposed F and G members of the nearby, young moving group AB Doradus (ABD). Our sample was obtained using the 2.7 m telescope at the McDonald Observatory with the coude echelle spectrograph, achieving R ? 60,000 and signal-to-noise ratio ?200. We derive spectroscopic T {sub eff}, log(g), [Fe/H], and microturbulance (v{sub t} ) using a bootstrap method of the TGVIT software resulting in typical errors of 33K in T {sub eff}, 0.08 dex in log(g), 0.03 dex in [Fe/H], and 0.13 km s{sup 1} in v{sub t} . Characterization of the ABD sample is performed in three ways: (1) chemical homogeneity, (2) kinematic traceback, and (3) isochrone fitting. We find the average metal abundance is [M/H] = 0.03 0.06 with a traceback age of 125 Myr. Our stars were fit to three different evolutionary models and we found that the best match to our ABD sample is the YREC [M/H] = 0.1 model. In our sample of 10 stars, we identify 1 star that is a probable non-member, 3 enigmatic stars, and 6 stars with confirmed membership. We also present a list of chemically coherent stars from this study and the Barenfeld et al. study.

    12. Studies of Single-Particle Structure in the N=16 Region Using Transfer Reactions

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Lemmon, R. C.; Pucknell, V. P. E.; Warner, D. D.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Chartier, M.; Timis, C.; Catford, W. N.; Baldwin, T. D.; Gelletly, W.; Pain, S. D.; Rejmund, M.; Labiche, M.; Amzal, N.; Burns, M.; Chapman, R.; Liang, X.; Spohr, K.; Ashwood, N.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.

      2006-08-14

      We have developed a new experimental setup based at the GANIL/SPIRAL facility in Caen, France to measure one-nucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics in order to study the evolution of the single particle structure of exotic nuclei. The setup couples together three state-of-the-art detection systems: the TIARA Si array, the large-acceptance magnetic spectrometer VAMOS and the high-efficiency segmented Ge {gamma}-ray array EXOGAM. In a first experiment, the 24Ne(d,p)25Ne reaction has been studied to probe the N=16 shell closure. Details of the setup, data analysis and preliminary results are presented.

    13. Integration of Noise and Coda Correlation Data into Kinematic...

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      More Documents & Publications Integration of Noise and Coda Correlation Data into ... Flow Imaging for EGS Applications from Multi-Dimensional Electrical Resistivity Structure

    14. Comparative structural analysis of Bru1 region homeologs in Saccharum spontaneum and S. officinarum

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Zhang, Jisen; Sharma, Anupma; Yu, Qingyi; Wang, Jianping; Li, Leiting; Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Xingtan; Chen, Youqiang; Ming, Ray

      2016-06-10

      Here, sugarcane is a major sugar and biofuel crop, but genomic research and molecular breeding have lagged behind other major crops due to the complexity of auto-allopolyploid genomes. Sugarcane cultivars are frequently aneuploid with chromosome number ranging from 100 to 130, consisting of 70-80 % S. officinarum, 10-20 % S. spontaneum, and 10 % recombinants between these two species. Analysis of a genomic region in the progenitor autoploid genomes of sugarcane hybrid cultivars will reveal the nature and divergence of homologous chromosomes. As a result, to investigate the origin and evolution of haplotypes in the Bru1 genomic regions in sugarcanemore » cultivars, we identified two BAC clones from S. spontaneum and four from S. officinarum and compared to seven haplotype sequences from sugarcane hybrid R570. The results clarified the origin of seven homologous haplotypes in R570, four haplotypes originated from S. officinarum, two from S. spontaneum and one recombinant.. Retrotransposon insertions and sequences variations among the homologous haplotypes sequence divergence ranged from 18.2 % to 60.5 % with an average of 33. 7 %. Gene content and gene structure were relatively well conserved among the homologous haplotypes. Exon splitting occurred in haplotypes of the hybrid genome but not in its progenitor genomes. Tajima's D analysis revealed that S. spontaneum hapotypes in the Bru1 genomic regions were under strong directional selection. Numerous inversions, deletions, insertions and translocations were found between haplotypes within each genome. In conclusion, this is the first comparison among haplotypes of a modern sugarcane hybrid and its two progenitors. Tajima's D results emphasized the crucial role of this fungal disease resistance gene for enhancing the fitness of this species and indicating that the brown rust resistance gene in R570 is from S. spontaneum. Species-specific InDel, sequences similarity and phylogenetic analysis of homologous genes can

    15. Aluminum doped zirconia nanopowders: Wet-chemical synthesis and structural analysis by Rietveld refinement

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Srdic, Vladimir V. Rakic, Srdan; Cvejic, Zeljka

      2008-10-02

      Alumina/zirconia nanopowders, with up to 20 mol% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, were prepared by wet-chemical synthesis technique, using controlled hydrolysis of alkoxides. The as-synthesized powders are amorphous, have very high specific surface area and the corresponding particle size smaller than 4 nm. Amorphous powders with 0, 10 and 20 mol% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallize at 460, 692 and 749 deg. C, respectively, as a single-phase tetragonal zirconia, without any traces of alumina phases. Rietvled refinement of X-ray diffraction data, used for the detailed structural analysis of annealed nanopowders, showed that the high-temperature zirconia phase is stabilized due to the formation of ZrO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} solid solutions. High solubility of alumina in the tetragonal zirconia (up to 28.6 at% Al{sup 3+}) and stabilization of tetragonal zirconia solid solution up to high temperature (as high as 1150 deg. C) were also confirmed.

    16. Structure-sequence based analysis for identification of conserved regions in proteins

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Zemla, Adam T; Zhou, Carol E; Lam, Marisa W; Smith, Jason R; Pardes, Elizabeth

      2013-05-28

      Disclosed are computational methods, and associated hardware and software products for scoring conservation in a protein structure based on a computationally identified family or cluster of protein structures. A method of computationally identifying a family or cluster of protein structures in also disclosed herein.

    17. Argument structure hierarchy system and method for facilitating analysis and decision-making processes

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Janssen, Terry

      2000-01-01

      A system and method for facilitating decision-making comprising a computer program causing linkage of data representing a plurality of argument structure units into a hierarchical argument structure. Each argument structure unit comprises data corresponding to a hypothesis and its corresponding counter-hypothesis, data corresponding to grounds that provide a basis for inference of the hypothesis or its corresponding counter-hypothesis, data corresponding to a warrant linking the grounds to the hypothesis or its corresponding counter-hypothesis, and data corresponding to backing that certifies the warrant. The hierarchical argument structure comprises a top level argument structure unit and a plurality of subordinate level argument structure units. Each of the plurality of subordinate argument structure units comprises at least a portion of the grounds of the argument structure unit to which it is subordinate. Program code located on each of a plurality of remote computers accepts input from one of a plurality of contributors. Each input comprises data corresponding to an argument structure unit in the hierarchical argument structure and supports the hypothesis or its corresponding counter-hypothesis. A second programming code is adapted to combine the inputs into a single hierarchical argument structure. A third computer program code is responsive to the second computer program code and is adapted to represent a degree of support for the hypothesis and its corresponding counter-hypothesis in the single hierarchical argument structure.

    18. A serial-kinematic nanopositioner for high-speed atomic force microscopy

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Wadikhaye, Sachin P. Yong, Yuen Kuan; Reza Moheimani, S. O.

      2014-10-15

      A flexure-guided serial-kinematic XYZ nanopositioner for high-speed Atomic Force Microscopy is presented in this paper. Two aspects influencing the performance of serial-kinematic nanopositioners are studied in this work. First, mass reduction by using tapered flexures is proposed to increased the natural frequency of the nanopositioner. 25% increase in the natural frequency is achieved due to reduced mass with tapered flexures. Second, a study of possible sensor positioning in a serial-kinematic nanopositioner is presented. An arrangement of sensors for exact estimation of cross-coupling is incorporated in the proposed design. A feedforward control strategy based on phaser approach is presented to mitigate the dynamics and nonlinearity in the system. Limitations in design approach and control strategy are discussed in the Conclusion.

    19. Effects of q-profile structure on turbulence spreading: A fluctuation intensity transport analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Yi, S.; Kwon, J. M.; Diamond, P. H.; Hahm, T. S.

      2014-09-15

      This paper studies effects of q-profile structure on turbulence spreading. It reports results of numerical experiments using global gyrokinetic simulations. We examine propagation of turbulence, triggered by an identical linear instability in a source region, into an adjacent, linearly stable region with variable q-profile. The numerical experiments are designed so as to separate the physics of turbulence spreading from that of linear stability. The strength of turbulence spreading is measured by the penetration depth of turbulence. Dynamics of spreading are elucidated by fluctuation intensity balance analysis, using a model intensity evolution equation which retains nonlinear diffusion and damping, and linear growth. It is found that turbulence spreading is strongly affected by magnetic shear s, but is hardly altered by the safety factor q itself. There is an optimal range of modest magnetic shear which maximizes turbulence spreading. For high to modest shear values, the spreading is enhanced by the increase of the mode correlation length with decreasing magnetic shear. However, the efficiency of spreading drops for sufficiently low magnetic shear even though the mode correlation length is comparable to that for the case of optimal magnetic shear. The reduction of spreading is attributed to the increase in time required for the requisite nonlinear mode-mode interactions. The effect of increased interaction time dominates that of increased mode correlation length. Our findings of the reduction of spreading and the increase in interaction time at weak magnetic shear are consistent with the well-known benefit of weak or reversed magnetic shear for core confinement enhancement. Weak shear is shown to promote locality, as well as stability.

    20. EARLIEST STAGES OF PROTOCLUSTER FORMATION: SUBSTRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF STARLESS CORES IN ORION

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Lee, Katherine; Looney, Leslie W.; Schnee, Scott; Li Zhiyun

      2013-08-01

      We study the structure and kinematics of nine 0.1 pc scale cores in Orion with the IRAM 30 m telescope and at higher resolution eight of the cores with CARMA, using CS(2-1) as the main tracer. The single-dish moment zero maps of the starless cores show single structures with central column densities ranging from 7 to 42 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2} and LTE masses from 20 M{sub Sun} to 154 M{sub Sun }. However, at the higher CARMA resolution (5''), all of the cores except one fragment into 3-5 components. The number of fragments is small compared to that found in some turbulent fragmentation models, although inclusion of magnetic fields may reduce the predicted fragment number and improve the model agreement. This result demonstrates that fragmentation from parsec-scale molecular clouds to sub-parsec cores continues to take place inside the starless cores. The starless cores and their fragments are embedded in larger filamentary structures, which likely played a role in the core formation and fragmentation. Most cores show clear velocity gradients, with magnitudes ranging from 1.7 to 14.3 km s{sup -1} pc{sup -1}. We modeled one of them in detail, and found that its spectra are best explained by a converging flow along a filament toward the core center; the gradients in other cores may be modeled similarly. We infer a mass inflow rate of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, which is in principle high enough to overcome radiation pressure and allow for massive star formation. However, the core contains multiple fragments, and it is unclear whether the rapid inflow would feed the growth of primarily a single massive star or a cluster of lower mass objects. We conclude that fast, supersonic converging flow along filaments play an important role in massive star and cluster formation.

    1. Final Report for Geometric Analysis for Data Reduction and Structure Discovery DE-FG02-10ER25983, STRIPES award # DE-SC0004096

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Vixie, Kevin R

      2014-11-27

      This is the final report for the project "Geometric Analysis for Data Reduction and Structure Discovery" in which insights and tools from geometric analysis were developed and exploited for their potential to large scale data challenges.

    2. Gain analysis of higher-order-mode amplification in a dielectric-implanted multi-beam traveling wave structure

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Gee, Anthony; Shin, Young-Min

      2013-01-01

      A multi-beam traveling wave amplifier designed with an overmoded staggered double grating array was examined by small signal analysis combined with simulation. Eigenmode and S-parameter analyses show that the 2cm long slow wave structure (SWS) has 1-5dB insertion loss over the passband (TM31 mode) with ~28% cold bandwidth. Analytic gain calculation indicates that in the SWS, TM31-mode is amplified with 15–20 dB/beam at 64–84GHz with three elliptical beams of 10kV and 150mA/beam, which was compared with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. PIC analysis on the analysis of instability with zero-input driving excitations demonstrated that background noises and non-operating lower order modes are noticeably suppressed by implanting equidistant dielectric absorbers; the overmoded structure only allowed the desired 3rd order mode to propagate in the structure. The designed circuit structure can be widely applied to multi-beam devices for high power RF generation.

    3. Structure of Light Neutron-rich Nuclei Studied with Transfer Reactions

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Wuosmaa, A. H.

      2015-01-01

      Transfer reactions have been used for many years to understand the shell structure of nuclei. Recent studies with rare-isotope beams extend this work and make it possible to probe the evolution of shell structure far beyond the valley of stability, requiring measurements in inverse kinematics. We present a novel technical approach to measurements in inverse kinematics, and apply this method to different transfer reactions, each of which probes different properties of light, neutron-rich nuclei.

    4. Dromion-like structures and stability analysis in the variable coefficients complex Ginzburg–Landau equation

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Wong, Pring; Pang, Li-Hui; Huang, Long-Gang; Li, Yan-Qing; Lei, Ming; Liu, Wen-Jun

      2015-09-15

      The study of the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation, which can describe the fiber laser system, is of significance for ultra-fast laser. In this paper, dromion-like structures for the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation are considered due to their abundant nonlinear dynamics. Via the modified Hirota method and simplified assumption, the analytic dromion-like solution is obtained. The partial asymmetry of structure is particularly discussed, which arises from asymmetry of nonlinear and dispersion terms. Furthermore, the stability of dromion-like structures is analyzed. Oscillation structure emerges to exhibit strong interference when the dispersion loss is perturbed. Through the appropriate modulation of modified exponent parameter, the oscillation structure is transformed into two dromion-like structures. It indicates that the dromion-like structure is unstable, and the coherence intensity is affected by the modified exponent parameter. Results in this paper may be useful in accounting for some nonlinear phenomena in fiber laser systems, and understanding the essential role of modified Hirota method.

    5. IDENTIFYING THE YOUNG LOW-MASS STARS WITHIN 25 pc. II. DISTANCES, KINEMATICS, AND GROUP MEMBERSHIP

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Liu, Michael C.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P.; Reid, I. Neill; Tamura, Motohide

      2012-10-10

      We have conducted a kinematic study of 165 young M dwarfs with ages of {approx}<300 Myr. Our sample is composed of stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from K7 to L0, detected by ROSAT and with photometric distances of {approx}<25 pc assuming that the stars are single and on the main sequence. In order to find stars kinematically linked to known young moving groups (YMGs), we measured radial velocities for the complete sample with Keck and CFHT optical spectroscopy and trigonometric parallaxes for 75 of the M dwarfs with the CAPSCam instrument on the du Pont 2.5 m Telescope. Due to their youthful overluminosity and unresolved binarity, the original photometric distances for our sample underestimated the distances by 70% on average, excluding two extremely young ({approx}<3 Myr) objects found to have distances beyond a few hundred parsecs. We searched for kinematic matches to 14 reported YMGs and identified 10 new members of the AB Dor YMG and 2 of the Ursa Majoris group. Additional possible candidates include six Castor, four Ursa Majoris, two AB Dor members, and one member each of the Her-Lyr and {beta} Pic groups. Our sample also contains 27 young low-mass stars and 4 brown dwarfs with ages {approx}<150 Myr that are not associated with any known YMG. We identified an additional 15 stars that are kinematic matches to one of the YMGs, but the ages from spectroscopic diagnostics and/or the positions on the sky do not match. These warn against grouping stars together based only on kinematics and that a confluence of evidence is required to claim that a group of stars originated from the same star-forming event.

    6. Structural analysis of multiport riser 5A installation on tank 241SY101

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Strehlow, J.P.

      1994-09-16

      The Tank 101-SY multiport riser assembly in the 241-SY-101 waste tank will replace the existing 42 inch riser with four smaller ports. Each smaller port can be used independently to access the tank interior with equipment and instruments needed to mitigate the concentration of hydrogen in the tank. This document provides a design report on the structural evaluation of the multiport riser assembly as well as its anchorage. The multiport riser assembly is a steel structure installed directly above the 42-inch riser and sealed at the existing riser flange. The assembly is structurally supported by the concrete pad placed around the 42 inch riser. The multiport riser assembly will provide two 8-inch penetrations, one 12-inch penetration and one 24-inch penetration. Each penetration will have a shielding plate. These penetrations will be used to insert equipment such as a sonic probe into the tank. In addition to normal loads, non-reactor Safety Class 1 structures, systems and components are to withstand the effects of extreme environmental loads including Design Basis Earthquake (DBE), Design Basis Wind (DBW), Design Basis Flood, Volcanic Eruptions and other abnormal loads considered on a case by case basis. Non-reactor Safety Class 2, 3 and 4 structures, systems and components are those that are not Safety Class 1 and are respectively specified as onsite safety related, occupational safety related and non-safety related items. The 241-SY-101 tank is considered as a non-reactor Safety Class 1 structure. The multiport riser assembly is considered as a non-reactor Safety Class 2 structure since it serves to contain the radioactive and toxic materials under normal operating conditions. However, the pressure relief doors provided on the assembly are considered as Safety Class 1 structures.

    7. Structural investigations of Great Basin geothermal fields: Applications and implications

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Faulds, James E; Hinz, Nicholas H.; Coolbaugh, Mark F

      2010-11-01

      Because fractures and faults are commonly the primary pathway for deeply circulating hydrothermal fluids, structural studies are critical to assessing geothermal systems and selecting drilling targets for geothermal wells. Important tools for structural analysis include detailed geologic mapping, kinematic analysis of faults, and estimations of stress orientations. Structural assessments are especially useful for evaluating geothermal fields in the Great Basin of the western USA, where regional extension and transtension combine with high heat flow to generate abundant geothermal activity in regions having little recent volcanic activity. The northwestern Great Basin is one of the most geothermally active areas in the USA. The prolific geothermal activity is probably due to enhanced dilation on N- to NNE-striking normal faults induced by a transfer of NW-directed dextral shear from the Walker Lane to NW-directed extension. Analysis of several geothermal fields suggests that most systems occupy discrete steps in normal fault zones or lie in belts of intersecting, overlapping, and/or terminating faults. Most fields are associated with steeply dipping faults and, in many cases, with Quaternary faults. The structural settings favoring geothermal activity are characterized by subvertical conduits of highly fractured rock along fault zones oriented approximately perpendicular to the WNW-trending least principal stress. Features indicative of these settings that may be helpful in guiding exploration for geothermal resources include major steps in normal faults, interbasinal highs, groups of relatively low discontinuous ridges, and lateral jogs or terminations of mountain ranges.

    8. Late Cenozoic fault kinematics and basin development, Calabrian arc, Italy

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Knott, S.D.; Turco, E.

      1988-08-01

      Current views for explaining the present structure of the Calabrian arc emphasize bending or buckling of an initially straight zone by rigid indentation. Although bending has played an important role, bending itself cannot explain all structural features now seen in the arc for the following reasons: (1) across-arc extension is inconsistent with buckling, (2) north-south compression predicted by a bending mechanism to occur in the internal part of a curved mountain belt is not present in the Calabrian arc, and (3) lateral shear occurs throughout the arc, not just along the northern and southern boundaries. The model presented here is based on lateral bending of mantle and lower crust (demonstrated by variation in extension in the Tyrrhenian basin) and semibrittle faulting and block rotation in the upper crust. These two styles of deformation are confined to the upper plate of the Calabrian subduction system. This deformation is considered to have been active from the beginning of extension in the Tyrrhenian basin (late Tortonian) and is still active today (based on Holocene seismicity). Block rotations are a consequence of lateral heterogeneous shear during extension. Therefore, some of the observed rotation of paleo-magnetic declinations may have occurred in areas undergoing extension and not just during thrusting. Inversion of sedimentary basins by block rotation is predicted by the model. The model will be a useful aid in interpreting reflection seismic data and exploring and developing offshore and onshore sedimentary basins in southern Italy.

    9. Structure-function analysis of human protein Ero1-L{alpha}

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Chu, Yanyan [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China)] [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); Yang, Charles; Chen, Xianjun; Zheng, Wenyun [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China) [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); Yang, Yi, E-mail: yiyang@ecust.edu.cn [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China) [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); Tang, Yun, E-mail: ytang234@ecust.edu.cn [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China)] [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China)

      2009-11-27

      Human Ero1-L{alpha} catalyzes the formation of disulfide bond and hence plays an essential role in protein folding. Understanding the mechanism of disulfide bond formation in mammals is important because of the involvement of protein misfolding in conditions such as diabetes, arthritis, cancer, and aging. However, the crystal structure of the enzyme is not available yet, which seriously hinders the understanding of biological function of Ero1-L{alpha}. Based on the crystal structure of yeast Ero1p, a rational three-dimensional structural model of Ero1-L{alpha} was built and the characteristics of the enzyme were hence investigated. The characteristic similarities and differences between Ero1-L{alpha} and Ero1p were compared on the basis of computational and experimental results, providing the first insight into the structure-function relationships of the enzymes. Both calculation and experiment got the concordant conclusion that FAD binds more tightly with Ero1-L{alpha} than Ero1p. In addition, the probable electron transfer pathway was proposed on the basis of the structural models.

    10. Structural analysis of the KRIT1 ankyrin repeat and FERM domains reveals a conformationally stable ARD-FERM interface

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Zhang, Rong; Li, Xiaofeng; Boggon, Titus J.

      2015-10-14

      Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular dysplasias that usually occur in the brain and are associated with mutations in the KRIT1/CCM1, CCM2/MGC4607/OSM/Malcavernin, and PDCD10/CCM3/ TFAR15 genes. Here we report the 2.9 Å crystal structure of the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) and FERM domain of the protein product of KRIT1 (KRIT1; Krev interaction trapped 1). The crystal structure reveals that the KRIT1 ARD contains 4 ankyrin repeats. There is also an unusual conformation in the ANK4 repeat that is stabilized by Trp-404, and the structure reveals a solvent exposed ankyrin groove. Domain orientations of the three copies within the asymmetric unit suggest a stable interaction between KRIT1 ARD and FERM domains, indicating a globular ARD–FERM module. It resembles the additional F0 domain found N-terminal to the FERM domain of talin. Structural analysis of KRIT1 ARD–FERM highlights surface regions of high evolutionary conservation, and suggests potential sites that could mediate interaction with binding partners. The structure therefore provides a better understanding of KRIT1 at the molecular level.

    11. Ultrasmall-angle X-ray scattering analysis of photonic crystal structure

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Abramova, V. V.; Sinitskii, A. S.; Grigor'eva, N. A.; Grigor'ev, S. V.; Belov, D. V.; Petukhov, A. V.; Mistonov, A. A.; Vasil'eva, A. V.; Tret'yakov, Yu. D.

      2009-07-15

      The results of an ultrasmall-angle X-ray scattering study of iron(III) oxide inverse opal thin films are presented. The photonic crystals examined are shown to have fcc structure with amount of stacking faults varying among the samples. The method used in this study makes it possible to easily distinguish between samples with predominantly twinned fcc structure and nearly perfect fcc stacking. The difference observed between samples fabricated under identical conditions is attributed to random layer stacking in the self-assembled colloidal crystals used as templates for fabricating the inverse opals. The present method provides a versatile tool for analyzing photonic crystal structure in studies of inverse opals made of various materials, colloidal crystals, and three-dimensional photonic crystals of other types.

    12. Structural analysis of Cr aggregation in ferromagnetic semiconductor (Zn,Cr)Te

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kobayashi, H.; Yamawaki, K.; Nishio, Y.; Kanazawa, K.; Kuroda, S.; Mitome, M.; Bando, Y.

      2013-12-04

      The Cr aggregation in a ferromagnetic semiconductor (Zn,Cr)Te was studied by performing precise analyses using TEM and XRD of microscopic structure of the Cr-aggregated regions formed in iodine-doped Zn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}Te films with a relatively high Cr composition x ? 0.2. It was found that the Cr-aggregated regions are composed of Cr{sub 1??}Te nanocrystals of the hexagonal structure and these hexagonal precipitates are stacked preferentially on the (111)A plane of the zinc-blende (ZB) structure of the host ZnTe crystal with its c-axis nearly parallel to the (111){sub ZB} plane.

    13. A Massively Parallel Sparse Eigensolver for Structural Dynamics Finite Element Analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Day, David M.; Reese, G.M.

      1999-05-01

      Eigenanalysis is a critical component of structural dynamics which is essential for determinating the vibrational response of systems. This effort addresses the development of numerical algorithms associated with scalable eigensolver techniques suitable for use on massively parallel, distributed memory computers that are capable of solving large scale structural dynamics problems. An iterative Lanczos method was determined to be the best choice for the application. Scalability of the eigenproblem depends on scalability of the underlying linear solver. A multi-level solver (FETI) was selected as most promising for this component. Issues relating to heterogeneous materials, mechanisms and multipoint constraints have been examined, and the linear solver algorithm has been developed to incorporate features that result in a scalable, robust algorithm for practical structural dynamics applications. The resulting tools have been demonstrated on large problems representative of a weapon's system.

    14. Dynamic structural analysis of a head assembly for a large loop-type LMFBR

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kulak, R.F.; Fiala, C.

      1984-01-01

      An investigation is presented on the dynamic structural response of the primary vessel's head closure to slug impact loadings generated from a 1000 MJ source term. The reference reactor considered was designed in a loop configuration. The head structure consisted of a deck and a triple rotatable plug assembly. Two designs were considered for the deck structure: a reference design and an alternate design. The reference deck was designed as a single flat annular plate. For the alternate design, the deck plate was reinforced by adding an extender cylinder with a flange and flanged webs between the deck-plate and cylinder. The investigation showed that the reference design cannot maintain containment integrity when subjected to slug loading generated by a 1000 MJ source term. It was determined that the head deformed excessively.

    15. Structural Analysis for Gold Mineralization Using Remote Sensing and Geochemical Techniques in a GIS Environment: Island of Lesvos, Hellas

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Rokos, D. Argialas, D. Mavrantza, R. St Seymour, K.; Vamvoukakis, C.; Kouli, M.; Lamera, S.; Paraskevas, H.; Karfakis, I.; Denes, G

      2000-12-15

      Exploration for epithermal Au has been active lately in the Aegean Sea of the eastern Mediterranean Basin, both in the islands of the Quaternary arc and in those of the back-arc region. The purpose of this study was the structural mapping and analysis for a preliminary investigation of possible epithermal gold mineralization, using remotely sensed data and techniques, structural and field data, and geochemical information, for a specific area on the Island of Lesvos. Therefore, Landsat-TM and SPOT-Pan satellite images and the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the study area were processed digitally using spatial filtering techniques for the enhancement and recognition of the geologically significant lineaments, as well as algebraic operations with band ratios and Principal Component Analysis (PCA), for the identification of alteration zones. Statistical rose diagrams and a SCHMIDT projection Stereo Net were generated from the lineament maps and the collected field data (dip and strike measurements of faults, joints, and veins), respectively. The derived lineament map and the band ratio images were manipulated in a GIS environment, in order to study the relation of the tectonic pattern to both the alteration zoning and the geomorphology of the volcanic field of the study area. Target areas of high interest for possible mineralization also were specified using geochemical techniques, such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis, trace-element, and fluid-inclusion analysis. Finally, preliminary conclusions were derived about possible mineralization, the type (high or low sulfidation), and the extent of mineralization, by combining the structural information with geochemical information.

    16. KINEMATICS OF CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS IN THE NUCLEAR STELLAR DISK

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Fukue, Kei; Yamamoto, Ryo; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi; Inno, Laura; Genovali, Katia; Bono, Giuseppe; Baba, Junichi; Fujii, Michiko S.; Aoki, Wako; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Kondo, Sohei; Ikeda, Yuji; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya

      2015-01-20

      Classical Cepheids are useful tracers of the Galactic young stellar population because their distances and ages can be determined from their period-luminosity and period-age relations. In addition, the radial velocities and chemical abundance of the Cepheids can be derived from spectroscopic observations, providing further insights into the structure and evolution of the Galaxy. Here, we report the radial velocities of classical Cepheids near the Galactic center, three of which were reported in 2011 and a fourth being reported for the first time. The velocities of these Cepheids suggest that the stars orbit within the nuclear stellar disk, a group of stars and interstellar matter occupying a region of ?200pc around the center, although the three-dimensional velocities cannot be determined until the proper motions are known. According to our simulation, these four Cepheids formed within the nuclear stellar disk like younger stars and stellar clusters therein.

    17. Analysis of ground response data at Lotung large-scale soil- structure interaction experiment site. Final report

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Chang, C.Y.; Mok, C.M.; Power, M.S.

      1991-12-01

      The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in cooperation with the Taiwan Power Company (TPC), constructed two models (1/4-scale and 1/2-scale) of a nuclear plant containment structure at a site in Lotung (Tang, 1987), a seismically active region in northeast Taiwan. The models were constructed to gather data for the evaluation and validation of soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis methodologies. Extensive instrumentation was deployed to record both structural and ground responses at the site during earthquakes. The experiment is generally referred to as the Lotung Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST). As part of the LSST, two downhole arrays were installed at the site to record ground motions at depths as well as at the ground surface. Structural response and ground response have been recorded for a number of earthquakes (i.e. a total of 18 earthquakes in the period of October 1985 through November 1986) at the LSST site since the completion of the installation of the downhole instruments in October 1985. These data include those from earthquakes having magnitudes ranging from M{sub L} 4.5 to M{sub L} 7.0 and epicentral distances range from 4.7 km to 77.7 km. Peak ground surface accelerations range from 0.03 g to 0.21 g for the horizontal component and from 0.01 g to 0.20 g for the vertical component. The objectives of the study were: (1) to obtain empirical data on variations of earthquake ground motion with depth; (2) to examine field evidence of nonlinear soil response due to earthquake shaking and to determine the degree of soil nonlinearity; (3) to assess the ability of ground response analysis techniques including techniques to approximate nonlinear soil response to estimate ground motions due to earthquake shaking; and (4) to analyze earth pressures recorded beneath the basemat and on the side wall of the 1/4 scale model structure during selected earthquakes.

    18. Thermal analysis of tank 241-SY-101 to support structural assessment

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Beaver, T.R.

      1994-10-14

      This report documents a thermal model of tank 241-SY-101 and the surrounding soil column that was used to predict tank temperatures resulting from heating of the annulus ventilation air. Transient results from the model were input to a structural model of the tank for evaluation of the annulus heat-up event.

    19. The Beta Environmental Fine Structure (BEFS): The XAFS Nuclear Analogue

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Monfardini, A.; Benedek, G.; Cremonesi, O.; Nucciotti, A.; Sisti, M.; Filipponi, A.

      2007-02-02

      The Beta Environmental Fine Structure (BEFS) effect is an oscillatory modulation on the otherwise smooth spectrum of electrons emitted by beta-decaying nuclei. The existence of this effect was theoretically proposed in 1991, for condensed emitters, in analogy with XAFS. In BEFS the electron, playing the role of the XAFS photoelectron, originates directly from the nucleus and an anti-neutrino is emitted at the same time. We present evidence for BEFS oscillations observed in Silver Perrhenate (AgReO4) low-temperature (0.1K) microbolometers, together with a XAFS-like analysis that allowed for the first time a direct measurement of the anti-neutrino angular momentum. We discuss the physical analogies and differences between BEFS and XAFS and the implications for the next generation experiments aimed at measuring the neutrino mass on purely kinematic grounds. Moreover, we briefly discuss the potential and the limits of BEFS-based techniques with respect to the classical XAFS.

    20. Nonlinear thermal and structural analysis of a brazed solar-central-receiver panel

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Napolitano, L.M. Jr.; Kanouff, M.P.

      1981-07-01

      One part of the evaluation program for a molten sodium central receiver was to be a test of a reduced-scale panel at Sandia's Central Receiver Test Facility in Albuquerque. The panel incorporates a new way of joining tubes - brazing to intermediate filler strips - which can affect the panel's lifetime. To calculate the stresses and strains for the worst-case section of the experimental panel, we have done a nonlinear elastic-plastic analysis with the MARC finite element computer code, which takes the temperature dependence of the material properties into account. From the results, tube design lifetimes are predicted. The analysis shows that concerns for cracking and reduction in lifetime are warranted, but a more detailed fracture analysis is necessary to determine whether there is a stable-crack-growth problem.

    1. Handbook on dynamics of jointed structures.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Ames, Nicoli M.; Lauffer, James P.; Jew, Michael D.; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Gregory, Danny Lynn; Starr, Michael James; Resor, Brian Ray

      2009-07-01

      The problem of understanding and modeling the complicated physics underlying the action and response of the interfaces in typical structures under dynamic loading conditions has occupied researchers for many decades. This handbook presents an integrated approach to the goal of dynamic modeling of typical jointed structures, beginning with a mathematical assessment of experimental or simulation data, development of constitutive models to account for load histories to deformation, establishment of kinematic models coupling to the continuum models, and application of finite element analysis leading to dynamic structural simulation. In addition, formulations are discussed to mitigate the very short simulation time steps that appear to be required in numerical simulation for problems such as this. This handbook satisfies the commitment to DOE that Sandia will develop the technical content and write a Joints Handbook. The content will include: (1) Methods for characterizing the nonlinear stiffness and energy dissipation for typical joints used in mechanical systems and components. (2) The methodology will include practical guidance on experiments, and reduced order models that can be used to characterize joint behavior. (3) Examples for typical bolted and screw joints will be provided.

    2. X-rays structural analysis and thermal stability studies of the ternary compound {alpha}-AlFeSi

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Roger, J.; Bosselet, F.; Viala, J.C.

      2011-05-15

      From literature data presently available, the decomposition temperature and the nature of the decomposition reaction of the ternary compound {alpha}-AlFeSi (also designated as {alpha}{sub H} or {tau}{sub 5}) are not clearly identified. Moreover, some uncertainties remain concerning its crystal structure. The crystallographic structure and thermochemical behaviour of the ternary compound {alpha}-AlFeSi were meticulously studied. The crystal structure of {alpha}-AlFeSi was examined at room temperature from X-ray single crystal intensity data. It presents hexagonal symmetry, space group P6{sub 3}/mmc with unit cell parameters (293 K) a=12.345(2) A and c=26.210(3) A (V=3459 A{sup 3}). The average chemical formula obtained from refinement is Al{sub 7.1}Fe{sub 2}Si. From isothermal reaction-diffusion experiments and Differential Thermal Analysis, the title compound decomposes peritectically upon heating into {theta}-Fe{sub 4}Al{sub 13}(Si), {gamma}-Al{sub 3}FeSi and a ternary Al-rich liquid. Under atmospheric pressure, the temperature of this reversible transformation has been determined to be 772{+-}12 {sup o}C. -- Graphical abstract: Partial representation of the crystal structure of the {alpha}-Al{sub 7.1}Fe{sub 2}Si compound. Display Omitted Highlights: The main findings of our work are: {yields} a detailed X-rays crystal structure determination of the ternary compound {alpha}-AlFeSi. {yields} The precision of the silicon atoms positions in the crystal structure. {yields} A precised determination of the decomposition temperature of this compound.

    3. Soil structural analysis tools and properties for Hanford site waste tank evaluation

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Moore, C.J.; Holtz, R.D.; Wagenblast, G.R.; Weiner, E.D.; Marlow, R.S.

      1995-09-01

      As Hanford Site contractors address future structural demands on nuclear waste tanks, built as early as 1943, it is necessary to address their current safety margins and ensure safe margins are maintained. Although the current civil engineering practice guidelines for soil modeling are suitable as preliminary design tools, future demands potentially result in loads and modifications to the tanks that are outside the original design basis and current code based structural capabilities. For example, waste removal may include cutting a large hole in a tank. This report addresses both spring modeling of site soils and finite-element modeling of soils. Additionally seismic dynamic modeling of Hanford Site soils is also included. Of new and special interest is Section 2.2 that Professor Robert D. Holtz of the University of Washington wrote on plane strain soil testing versus triaxial testing with Hanford Site application to large buried waste tanks.

    4. Low amplitude insult project: Structural analysis and prediction of low order reaction

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Scammon, R.J.; Browning, R.V.; Middleditch, J.; Dienes, J.K.; Haberman, K.S.; Bennett, J.G.

      1998-12-31

      The low velocity impact sensitivity of PBX 9501 has been investigated through a series of experiments based on the Steven Test targets and a set of Shear Impact experiments. The authors describe calculations done using DYNA2D, SPRONTO and DYNA3D to support these, and other, low amplitude insult experiments. The calculations allow them to study pressure and strain rate variables, to investigate structural aspects of the experiment, and to predict velocities required for reaction. Structural analyses have played an active role in this project beginning with the original target design and continuing through analyses of the experimental results. Alternative designs and various ideas for active instrumentation were examined as part of the experiment evolution process. Predictions of reaction are used to guide these design studies, even though the authors do not yet have enough experimental data to fully calibrate any of the models.

    5. Structural analysis of fuel assembly clads for the Upgraded Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT Upgrade)

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Ewing, T.F.; Wu, T.S.

      1986-01-01

      The Upgraded Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT Upgrade) is designed to test full-length, pre-irradiated fuel pins of the type used in large LMFBRs under accident conditions, such as severe transient overpower and loss-of-coolant accidents. In TREAT Upgrade, the central core region is to contain new fuel assemblies of higher fissile loadings to maximize the energy deposition to the test fuel. These fuel assemblies must withstand normal peak clad temperatures of 850/sup 0/C for hundreds of test transients. Due to high temperatures and gradients predicted in the clad, creep and plastic strain effects are significant, and the clad structural behavior cannot be analyzed by conventional linear techniques. Instead, the detailed elastic-plastic-creep behavior must be followed along the time-dependent load history. This paper presents details of the structural evaluations of the conceptual TREAT Upgrade fuel assembly clads.

    6. Monte Carlo analysis of critical phenomenon of the Ising model on memory stabilizer structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Viteri, C. Ricardo; Tomita, Yu; Brown, Kenneth R.

      2009-10-15

      We calculate the critical temperature of the Ising model on a set of graphs representing a concatenated three-bit error-correction code. The graphs are derived from the stabilizer formalism used in quantum error correction. The stabilizer for a subspace is defined as the group of Pauli operators whose eigenvalues are +1 on the subspace. The group can be generated by a subset of operators in the stabilizer, and the choice of generators determines the structure of the graph. The Wolff algorithm, together with the histogram method and finite-size scaling, is used to calculate both the critical temperature and the critical exponents of each structure. The simulations show that the choice of stabilizer generators, both the number and the geometry, has a large effect on the critical temperature.

    7. Quantum-information analysis of electronic states of different molecular structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Barcza, G.; Legeza, Oe.; Marti, K. H.; Reiher, M. [Fachbereich Physik, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest, P. O. Box 49 (Hungary); Laboratorium fuer Physikalische Chemie, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

      2011-01-15

      We have studied transition metal clusters from a quantum information theory perspective using the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method. We demonstrate the competition between entanglement and interaction localization and discuss the application of the configuration interaction-based dynamically extended active space procedure, which significantly reduces the effective system size and accelerates the speed of convergence for complicated molecular electronic structures. Our results indicate the importance of taking entanglement among molecular orbitals into account in order to devise an optimal DMRG orbital ordering and carry out efficient calculations on transition metal clusters. Apart from these algorithmic observations, which lead to a recipe for black-box DMRG calculations, our work provides physical understanding of electron correlation in molecular and cluster structures in terms of entropy measures of relevance also to recent work on tensor-network representations of electronic states. We also identify those molecular orbitals which are highly entangled and discuss the consequences for chemical bonding and for the structural transition from an dioxygen binding copper cluster to an bis-oxygen-bridged system with broken O-O bond.

    8. Structural integrity analysis of the degraded drywell containment at the Oyster Creek Nuclear generating station.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Petti, Jason P.

      2007-01-01

      This study examines the effects of the degradation experienced in the steel drywell containment at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station. Specifically, the structural integrity of the containment shell is examined in terms of the stress limits using the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section III, Division I, Subsection NE, and examined in terms of buckling (stability) using the ASME B&PV Code Case N-284. Degradation of the steel containment shell (drywell) at Oyster Creek was first observed during an outage in the mid-1980s. Subsequent inspections discovered reductions in the shell thickness due to corrosion throughout the containment. Specifically, significant corrosion occurred in the sandbed region of the lower sphere. Since the presence of the wet sand provided an environment which supported corrosion, a series of analyses were conducted by GE Nuclear Energy in the early 1990s. These analyses examined the effects of the degradation on the structural integrity. The current study adopts many of the same assumptions and data used in the previous GE study. However, the additional computational recourses available today enable the construction of a larger and more sophisticated structural model.

    9. Analysis of phases in the structure determination of an icosahedral virus

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Plevka, Pavel; Kaufmann, Bärbel; Rossmann, Michael G.

      2012-03-15

      The constraints imposed on structure-factor phases by noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) allow phase improvement, phase extension to higher resolution and hence ab initio phase determination. The more numerous the NCS redundancy and the greater the volume used for solvent flattening, the greater the power for phase determination. In a case analyzed here the icosahedral NCS phasing appeared to have broken down, although later successful phase extension was possible when the envelope around the NCS region was tightened. The phases from the failed phase-determination attempt fell into four classes, all of which satisfied the NCS constraints. These four classes corresponded to the correct solution, opposite enantiomorph, Babinet inversion and opposite enantiomorph with Babinet inversion. These incorrect solutions can be seeded from structure factors belonging to reciprocal-space volumes that lie close to icosahedral NCS axes where the structure amplitudes tend to be large and the phases tend to be 0 or {pi}. Furthermore, the false solutions can spread more easily if there are large errors in defining the envelope designating the region in which NCS averaging is performed.

    10. Structural and functional analysis of human HtrA3 protease and its subdomains

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Glaza, Przemyslaw; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Wenta, Tomasz; Zurawa-Janicka, Dorota; Jarzab, Miroslaw; Lesner, Adam; Banecki, Bogdan; Skorko-Glonek, Joanna; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Lipinska, Barbara; van Raaij, Mark J.

      2015-06-25

      Human HtrA3 protease, which induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, can be a tumor suppressor and a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer. However, there is little information about its structure and biochemical properties. HtrA3 is composed of an N-terminal domain not required for proteolytic activity, a central serine protease domain and a C-terminal PDZ domain. HtrA3S, its short natural isoform, lacks the PDZ domain which is substituted by a stretch of 7 C-terminal amino acid residues, unique for this isoform. This paper presents the crystal structure of the HtrA3 protease domain together with the PDZ domain (ΔN-HtrA3), showing that the protein forms a trimer whose protease domains are similar to those of human HtrA1 and HtrA2. The ΔN-HtrA3 PDZ domains are placed in a position intermediate between that in the flat saucer-like HtrA1 SAXS structure and the compact pyramidal HtrA2 X-ray structure. The PDZ domain interacts closely with the LB loop of the protease domain in a way not found in other human HtrAs. ΔN-HtrA3 with the PDZ removed (ΔN-HtrA3-ΔPDZ) and an N-terminally truncated HtrA3S (ΔN-HtrA3S) were fully active at a wide range of temperatures and their substrate affinity was not impaired. This indicates that the PDZ domain is dispensable for HtrA3 activity. As determined by size exclusion chromatography, ΔN-HtrA3 formed stable trimers while both ΔN-HtrA3-ΔPDZ and ΔN-HtrA3S were monomeric. This suggests that the presence of the PDZ domain, unlike in HtrA1 and HtrA2, influences HtrA3 trimer formation. The unique C-terminal sequence of ΔN-HtrA3S appeared to have little effect on activity and oligomerization. Additionally, we examined the cleavage specificity of ΔN-HtrA3. Results reported in this paper provide new insights into the structure and function of ΔN-HtrA3, which seems to have a unique combination of features among human HtrA proteases.

    11. Structural and functional analysis of human HtrA3 protease and its subdomains

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Glaza, Przemyslaw; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Wenta, Tomasz; Zurawa-Janicka, Dorota; Jarzab, Miroslaw; Lesner, Adam; Banecki, Bogdan; Skorko-Glonek, Joanna; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Lipinska, Barbara; et al

      2015-06-25

      Human HtrA3 protease, which induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, can be a tumor suppressor and a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer. However, there is little information about its structure and biochemical properties. HtrA3 is composed of an N-terminal domain not required for proteolytic activity, a central serine protease domain and a C-terminal PDZ domain. HtrA3S, its short natural isoform, lacks the PDZ domain which is substituted by a stretch of 7 C-terminal amino acid residues, unique for this isoform. This paper presents the crystal structure of the HtrA3 protease domain together with the PDZ domain (ΔN-HtrA3), showing that themore » protein forms a trimer whose protease domains are similar to those of human HtrA1 and HtrA2. The ΔN-HtrA3 PDZ domains are placed in a position intermediate between that in the flat saucer-like HtrA1 SAXS structure and the compact pyramidal HtrA2 X-ray structure. The PDZ domain interacts closely with the LB loop of the protease domain in a way not found in other human HtrAs. ΔN-HtrA3 with the PDZ removed (ΔN-HtrA3-ΔPDZ) and an N-terminally truncated HtrA3S (ΔN-HtrA3S) were fully active at a wide range of temperatures and their substrate affinity was not impaired. This indicates that the PDZ domain is dispensable for HtrA3 activity. As determined by size exclusion chromatography, ΔN-HtrA3 formed stable trimers while both ΔN-HtrA3-ΔPDZ and ΔN-HtrA3S were monomeric. This suggests that the presence of the PDZ domain, unlike in HtrA1 and HtrA2, influences HtrA3 trimer formation. The unique C-terminal sequence of ΔN-HtrA3S appeared to have little effect on activity and oligomerization. Additionally, we examined the cleavage specificity of ΔN-HtrA3. Results reported in this paper provide new insights into the structure and function of ΔN-HtrA3, which seems to have a unique combination of features among human HtrA proteases.« less

    12. Integration of Noise and Coda Correlation Data into Kinematic and Waveform Inversions

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Noise and Coda Correlation Data into Kinematic and Waveform Inversions Daniel R.H. O'Connell, PhD Fugro Consultants Modeling Project Officer: William Vandermeer Total Project Funding: $1,406,745 April 24, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov Relevance/Impact of Research Project Objectives * Obtain high-accuracy (10 m or less) absolute geothermal field earthquake locations and

    13. POTENTIAL MEMBERS OF STELLAR KINEMATIC GROUPS WITHIN 30 pc OF THE SUN

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Nakajima, Tadashi; Morino, Jun-Ichi

      2012-01-15

      We analyze the kinematic histories of stars within 30 pc of the Sun, for which three-dimensional spatial coordinates and three-dimensional velocity vectors are available. From this sample, we extract members of stellar kinematic groups (SKGs) in the following manner. First, we consider in the three-dimensional velocity space centered on the local standard of rest, a sphere with a radius of 8 km s{sup -1} centered on the mean velocity vector of a particular SKG. Around each SKG velocity center, we have found a significant excess of stars compared to background field stars. For each candidate, in the three-dimensional spatial coordinate space, its trajectory is traced back in time by the age of the relevant SKG to obtain the estimated distance from the SKG center at the time of the SKG's birth by the epicyclic approximation and harmonic vertical motion. It often happens that a star is a candidate member of multiple SKGs. Then we rank the candidacy to multiple SKGs based on the smallness of distance separations. In this manner, we have kinematically selected 238 candidates. We further impose at least one of the following qualitative criteria for being a member: spectral type A or B, variability, or EUV and X-ray emission. We have finally selected 137 candidate members of SKGs out of a sample of 966 stars.

    14. SPATIAL ANISOTROPY OF GALAXY KINEMATICS IN SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY GALAXY CLUSTERS

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Skielboe, Andreas; Wojtak, Radoslaw; Pedersen, Kristian; Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.

      2012-10-10

      Measurements of galaxy cluster kinematics are important in understanding the dynamical state and evolution of clusters of galaxies, as well as constraining cosmological models. While it is well established that clusters exhibit non-spherical geometries, evident in the distribution of galaxies on the sky, azimuthal variations of galaxy kinematics within clusters have yet to be observed. Here we measure the azimuthal dependence of the line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile in a stacked sample of 1743 galaxy clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The clusters are drawn from the SDSS DR8 redMaPPer catalog. We find that the line-of-sight velocity dispersion of galaxies lying along the major axis of the central galaxy is larger than those that lie along the minor axis. This is the first observational detection of anisotropic kinematics of galaxies in clusters. We show that the result is consistent with predictions from numerical simulations. Furthermore, we find that the degree of projected anisotropy is strongly dependent on the line-of-sight orientation of the galaxy cluster, opening new possibilities for assessing systematics in optical cluster finding.

    15. Neural network system and methods for analysis of organic materials and structures using spectral data

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Meyer, B.J.; Sellers, J.P.; Thomsen, J.U.

      1993-06-08

      Apparatus and processes are described for recognizing and identifying materials. Characteristic spectra are obtained for the materials via spectroscopy techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared absorption analysis, x-ray analysis, mass spectroscopy and gas chromatography. Desired portions of the spectra may be selected and then placed in proper form and format for presentation to a number of input layer neurons in an offline neural network. The network is first trained according to a predetermined training process; it may then be employed to identify particular materials. Such apparatus and processes are particularly useful for recognizing and identifying organic compounds such as complex carbohydrates, whose spectra conventionally require a high level of training and many hours of hard work to identify, and are frequently indistinguishable from one another by human interpretation.

    16. Neural network system and methods for analysis of organic materials and structures using spectral data

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Meyer, Bernd J.; Sellers, Jeffrey P.; Thomsen, Jan U.

      1993-01-01

      Apparatus and processes for recognizing and identifying materials. Characteristic spectra are obtained for the materials via spectroscopy techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared absorption analysis, x-ray analysis, mass spectroscopy and gas chromatography. Desired portions of the spectra may be selected and then placed in proper form and format for presentation to a number of input layer neurons in an offline neural network. The network is first trained according to a predetermined training process; it may then be employed to identify particular materials. Such apparatus and processes are particularly useful for recognizing and identifying organic compounds such as complex carbohydrates, whose spectra conventionally require a high level of training and many hours of hard work to identify, and are frequently indistinguishable from one another by human interpretation.

    17. Structural and spectropotentiometric analysis of Blastochloris viridis heterodimer mutant reaction center

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Ponomarenko, Nina S.; Li, Liang; Marino, Antony R.; Tereshko, Valentina; Ostafin, Agnes; Popova, Julia A.; Bylina, Edward J.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Norris, Jr., James R.

      2010-07-22

      Heterodimer mutant reaction centers (RCs) of Blastochloris viridis were crystallized using microfluidic technology. In this mutant, a leucine residue replaced the histidine residue which had acted as a fifth ligand to the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) of the primary electron donor dimer M site (HisM200). With the loss of the histidine-coordinated Mg, one bacteriochlorophyll of the special pair was converted into a bacteriopheophytin (BPhe), and the primary donor became a heterodimer supermolecule. The crystals had dimensions 400 x 100 x 100 {micro}m, belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, and were isomorphous to the ones reported earlier for the wild type (WT) strain. The structure was solved to a 2.5 {angstrom} resolution limit. Electron-density maps confirmed the replacement of the histidine residue and the absence of Mg. Structural changes in the heterodimer mutant RC relative to the WT included the absence of the water molecule that is typically positioned between the M side of the primary donor and the accessory BChl, a slight shift in the position of amino acids surrounding the site of the mutation, and the rotation of the M194 phenylalanine. The cytochrome subunit was anchored similarly as in the WT and had no detectable changes in its overall position. The highly conserved tyrosine L162, located between the primary donor and the highest potential heme C{sub 380}, revealed only a minor deviation of its hydroxyl group. Concomitantly to modification of the BChl molecule, the redox potential of the heterodimer primary donor increased relative to that of the WT organism (772 mV vs. 517 mV). The availability of this heterodimer mutant and its crystal structure provides opportunities for investigating changes in light-induced electron transfer that reflect differences in redox cascades.

    18. Tectonic history and analysis of structures in eastern Kansas and western Missouri

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Berendsen, P.; Wilson, F.W. . Kansas Geological Survey)

      1993-03-01

      Orogenic events in and around the midcontinent in Proterozoic time were responsible for the formation of the dominant master set of younger northeast- and older northwest-trending faults that dominate the structure of the area today. Reactivation of these faults throughout geologic time gave rise to tectonic zones consisting of sets of anastomosing faults or other complex patterns. These zones are likely important in helping to determine the configuration of major uplifts and basins that involve the crust. The Nemaha tectonic zone defines the western boundary of both the Forest City and Cherokee basins, while a structural block delineated by the Chesapeake and Bolivar-Mansfield regional faults coincides with the approximate position of the Bourbon Arch, which is reflected in the thickness of Mississippian carbonate rocks. Rocks of the Ozark uplift began to be uplifted by the end of Maquoketa time. The uplift has historically been described as a landform, rather than a geologic structure. Hence, the extent and the boundaries of the uplift are ill-defined. The northeast-trending line forming the contact between Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks is commonly regarded as the western boundary. This boundary coincides with a major tectonic zone, extending northeastward from Oklahoma through Kansas and Missouri into at least southern Iowa. In the Tri-State area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri the zone is referred to as the Miami trough and features prominently in the localization of major ore deposits. This zone may then also be regarded as the eastern boundary of the Forest City and Cherokee basins.

    19. Networks of silicon nanowires: A large-scale atomistic electronic structure analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kele?, mit; Bulutay, Ceyhun; Liedke, Bartosz; Heinig, Karl-Heinz

      2013-11-11

      Networks of silicon nanowires possess intriguing electronic properties surpassing the predictions based on quantum confinement of individual nanowires. Employing large-scale atomistic pseudopotential computations, as yet unexplored branched nanostructures are investigated in the subsystem level as well as in full assembly. The end product is a simple but versatile expression for the bandgap and band edge alignments of multiply-crossing Si nanowires for various diameters, number of crossings, and wire orientations. Further progress along this line can potentially topple the bottom-up approach for Si nanowire networks to a top-down design by starting with functionality and leading to an enabling structure.

    20. Structure analysis of O,O’-propane-1,3-diyl bis[diphenyl(phosphinothioate)

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Karaman, M.; Irisli, S.; Büyükgüngör, O.

      2013-12-15

      A new diphosphine disulphide compound with the formula C{sub 27}H{sub 26}O{sub 2} vertical bar P{sub 2}S{sub 2}, was synthesized from the reaction between PPh{sub 2}SCl and 1,3-propanediol and characterized with different spectroscopic methods. Its structure has also been studied by X-ray diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-bar1. Pentavalent phosphorus atoms in the molecule are in distorted tetrahedral environments.

    1. Impact and structural analysis of the INEL 55 gallon recycled shielded storage container

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Richins, W.D.

      1996-07-01

      The INEL Recycled Shielded Storage Containers (RSSC) are designed primarily for the transportation and storage of mixed RH-TRU solid waste using recycled, potentially contaminated lead and stainless steel construction materials. Two versions of the RSSC have been developed accommodating either 30 or 55 gallon drums. This report addresses the structural qualification of the 55 gallon version of the RSSC to DOT 7A Type A requirements. The controlling qualification test is a 4 ft drop onto a rigid surface. During and after this test, the container contents must remain within the container and shielding must not be reduced. The container is also designed to withstand stacking, internal pressure, lifting loads, tiedown failure, penetration, and a range of temperatures. Nonlinear dynamic finite element analyses were performed using a range of material properties. Loads in the major connections and strains in the stainless steel and lead were monitored as a function of time during impact analyses for three simulated drop orientations. Initial results were used to develop the final design. For the final design, the stainless steel and lead have maximum strains well below ultimate levels except at an impact corner where additional deformation is acceptable. The predicted loads in the connections indicate that some yielding will occur but the containment and shielding will remain intact. The results presented here provide assurance that the container will pass the DOT 7A Type A drop tests as well as the other structural requirements.

    2. Analysis of structure and orientation of adsorbed polymers in solution subject to a dynamic shear stress

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Smith, G.; Baker, S.; Toprakcioglu, C.

      1996-09-01

      This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Polymer-based separation techniques rely on the ability of a binding portion of the polymer to interact with a specific molecule in a solution flowing past the polymer. The location of the binding site within or out of the entangled polymer chains is thus crucial to the effectiveness of these methods. For this reason, the details of flow induced deformation of the polymer chains is important in such applications as exclusion chromatography, waste water treatment, ultrafiltration, enhanced oil recovery and microbial adhesion. Few techniques exist to examine the structure and orientation of polymeric materials, and even fewer to examine systems in a dynamic fluid flow. The goal of this project was to understand the molecular structure and orientation of adsorbed polymers with and without active binding ligands as a function of solvent shear rate, solvent power, polymer molecular weight, surface polymer coverage and heterogeneity of the surface polymer chains by neutron reflectometry in a newly designed shear cell. Geometrical effects on binding of molecules in the flow was also studied subject to the same parameters.

    3. Measurement of joint kinematics using a conventional clinical single-perspective flat-panel radiography system

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Seslija, Petar; Teeter, Matthew G.; Yuan Xunhua; Naudie, Douglas D. R.; Bourne, Robert B.; MacDonald, Steven J.; Peters, Terry M.; Holdsworth, David W.

      2012-10-15

      Purpose: The ability to accurately measure joint kinematics is an important tool in studying both normal joint function and pathologies associated with injury and disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, accuracy, precision, and clinical safety of measuring 3D joint motion using a conventional flat-panel radiography system prior to its application in an in vivo study. Methods: An automated, image-based tracking algorithm was implemented to measure the three-dimensional pose of a sparse object from a two-dimensional radiographic projection. The algorithm was tested to determine its efficiency and failure rate, defined as the number of image frames where automated tracking failed, or required user intervention. The accuracy and precision of measuring three-dimensional motion were assessed using a robotic controlled, tibiofemoral knee phantom programmed to mimic a subject with a total knee replacement performing a stair ascent activity. Accuracy was assessed by comparing the measurements of the single-plane radiographic tracking technique to those of an optical tracking system, and quantified by the measurement discrepancy between the two systems using the Bland-Altman technique. Precision was assessed through a series of repeated measurements of the tibiofemoral kinematics, and was quantified using the across-trial deviations of the repeated kinematic measurements. The safety of the imaging procedure was assessed by measuring the effective dose of ionizing radiation associated with the x-ray exposures, and analyzing its relative risk to a human subject. Results: The automated tracking algorithm displayed a failure rate of 2% and achieved an average computational throughput of 8 image frames/s. Mean differences between the radiographic and optical measurements for translations and rotations were less than 0.08 mm and 0.07 Degree-Sign in-plane, and 0.24 mm and 0.6 Degree-Sign out-of-plane. The repeatability of kinematics measurements performed

    4. Kinematic modeling of the Milky Way using the RAVE and GCS stellar surveys

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Sharma, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Binney, J.; Freeman, K. C.; Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M. E. K.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Bienaymé, O.; Siebert, A.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G. F.; Kordopatis, G.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. A.; Seabroke, G. M.; Watson, F.; and others

      2014-09-20

      We investigate the kinematic parameters of the Milky Way disk using the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) and Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS) stellar surveys. We do this by fitting a kinematic model to the data and taking the selection function of the data into account. For stars in the GCS we use all phase-space coordinates, but for RAVE stars we use only (ℓ, b, v {sub los}). Using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, we investigate the full posterior distributions of the parameters given the data. We investigate the age-velocity dispersion relation for the three kinematic components (σ {sub R}, σ{sub φ}, σ {sub z}), the radial dependence of the velocity dispersions, the solar peculiar motion (U {sub ☉}, V {sub ☉}, W {sub ☉}), the circular speed Θ{sub 0} at the Sun, and the fall of mean azimuthal motion with height above the midplane. We confirm that the Besançon-style Gaussian model accurately fits the GCS data but fails to match the details of the more spatially extended RAVE survey. In particular, the Shu distribution function (DF) handles noncircular orbits more accurately and provides a better fit to the kinematic data. The Gaussian DF not only fits the data poorly but systematically underestimates the fall of velocity dispersion with radius. The radial scale length of the velocity dispersion profile of the thick disk was found to be smaller than that of the thin disk. We find that correlations exist between a number of parameters, which highlights the importance of doing joint fits. The large size of the RAVE survey allows us to get precise values for most parameters. However, large systematic uncertainties remain, especially in V {sub ☉} and Θ{sub 0}. We find that, for an extended sample of stars, Θ{sub 0} is underestimated by as much as 10% if the vertical dependence of the mean azimuthal motion is neglected. Using a simple model for vertical dependence of kinematics, we find that it is possible to match the Sgr A* proper motion without

    5. Blunt-crack band propagation in finite-element analysis for concrete structures. [LMFBR

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Pfeiffer, P.A.; Bazant, Z.P.; Marchertas, A.H.

      1983-01-01

      The knowledge of concrete fracture is needed in nuclear reactor safety. The question of safety arises from the potential of concrete to crack under thermal loading. It has been postulated that structural concrete could be exposed to very high temperature, which may result from hot reactor coolant or even core debris coming in direct contact with the concrete. The utilization of the blunt crack approach for simulating concrete cracking in a general-purpose code is explored. The difficulties encountered in establishing the proper direction of crack propagation in an arbitrary discretization are described. Crack propagation is considered within the context of two types of solution techniques: (1) implicit solution of the static crack advance, and (2) explicit time integration using a dynamic relaxation technique to simulate the static crack advance. Also, in both solution techniques an elastic model is used to characterize the concrete.

    6. DYNA3D (Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Structures in Three Dimensions) user's manual

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Hallquist, J.O.

      1988-04-01

      This report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces with friction. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node beam elements, 4-node shell elements, 8-node solid shell elements, and rigid bodies. The equations-of-motion are integrated in time by the central difference method. DYNA3D contains twenty-eight material models and eleven equations of state to cover a wide range of material behavior. 56 refs., 46 figs.

    7. DYNA3D user's manual (nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures in three dimensions)

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Hallquist, J.O.; Benson, D.J.

      1987-07-01

      This report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces with friction. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node beam elements, 4-node shell elements, 8-node solid shell elements, and rigid bodies. The equations-of-motion are integrated in time by the central difference method. DYNA3D contains twenty-five material models and eleven equations of state to cover a wide range of material behavior.

    8. DYNA3D user's manual: (Nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures in three dimensions): Revision 5

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Hallquist, J.O.; Whirley, R.G.

      1989-05-01

      This report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation response of inelastic solids and structures. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces with friction. Using a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node beam elements, 4-node shell elements, 8-node solid shell elements, and rigid bodies. The equations-of-motion are integrated in time by the central difference method. The 1989 version of DYNA3D contains thirty material models and ten equations of state to cover a wide range of material behavior.

    9. DYNA3D user's manual (nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures in three dimensions). Revision 2

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Hallquist, J.O.; Benson, D.J.

      1986-03-01

      The user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures is updated. A contact-impact algorithm permit gaps and sliding along material interfaces with friction. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node beam elements, 4-node shell elements, 8-node solid shell elements, and rigid bodies. The equations-of-motion are integrated in time by the central difference method. DYNA3D contains sixteen material models and nine equations of state to cover a wide range of material behavior. 40 refs., 43 figs.

    10. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Final project report

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Smith, D.M.; Hua, D.W.

      1996-02-01

      During the 3 year term of the project, new methods have been developed for characterizing the pore structure of porous materials such as coals, carbons, and amorphous silica gels. In general, these techniques revolve around; (1) combining multiple techniques such as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and adsorption of contrast-matched adsorbates or {sup 129}Xe NMR and thermoporometry (the change in freezing point with pore size), (2) combining adsorption isotherms over several pressure ranges to obtain a more complete description of pore filling, or (3) applying NMR ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}) techniques with well-defined porous solids with pores in the large micropore size range (>1 nm).

    11. Analysis of the electronic structure of ZrO{sub 2} by Compton spectroscopy

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Mahammad, F. M.; Mahammed, S. F.; Kumar, R.; Vijay, Y. K.; Sharma, B. K.; Sharma, G.

      2013-07-15

      The electronic structure of ZrO{sub 2} is studied using the Compton scattering technique. The first-ever Compton profile measurement on polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} was obtained using 59.54 keV gamma-rays emanating from the {sup 241}Am radioisotope. To explain the experimental data, we compute theoretical Compton profile values using the method of linear combination of atomic orbitals in the framework of density functional theory. The correlation scheme proposed by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and the exchange scheme of Becke are considered. The ionic-model-based calculations for a number of configurations, i.e., Zr{sup +x}(O{sup -x/2}){sub 2} (0 {<=} x {<=} 2), are also performed to estimate the charge transfer on compound formation, and the study supports transfer of 1.5 electrons from Zr to O atoms.

    12. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      K.R. Maskaly

      2005-06-01

      increasing RMS roughness. Again, the homogenization approximation is able to predict these results. The problem of surface scratches on 1D photonic crystals is also addressed. Although the reflectivity decreases are lower in this study, up to a 15% change in reflectivity is observed in certain scratched photonic crystal structures. However, this reflectivity change can be significantly decreased by adding a low index protective coating to the surface of the photonic crystal. Again, application of homogenization theory to these structures confirms its predictive power for this type of imperfection as well. Additionally, the problem of a circular pores in 2D photonic crystals is investigated, showing that almost a 50% change in reflectivity can occur for some structures. Furthermore, this study reveals trends that are consistent with the 1D simulations: parameter changes that increase the absolute reflectivity of the photonic crystal will also increase its tolerance to structural imperfections. Finally, experimental reflectance spectra from roughened 1D photonic crystals are compared to the results predicted computationally in this thesis. Both the computed and experimental spectra correlate favorably, validating the findings presented herein.

    13. Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Bush, B.; Jenkin, T.; Lipowicz, D.; Arent, D. J.; Cooke, R.

      2012-01-01

      Does large scale penetration of renewable generation such as wind and solar power pose economic and operational burdens on the electricity system? A number of studies have pointed to the potential benefits of renewable generation as a hedge against the volatility and potential escalation of fossil fuel prices. Research also suggests that the lack of correlation of renewable energy costs with fossil fuel prices means that adding large amounts of wind or solar generation may also reduce the volatility of system-wide electricity costs. Such variance reduction of system costs may be of significant value to consumers due to risk aversion. The analysis in this report recognizes that the potential value of risk mitigation associated with wind generation and natural gas generation may depend on whether one considers the consumer's perspective or the investor's perspective and whether the market is regulated or deregulated. We analyze the risk and return trade-offs for wind and natural gas generation for deregulated markets based on hourly prices and load over a 10-year period using historical data in the PJM Interconnection (PJM) from 1999 to 2008. Similar analysis is then simulated and evaluated for regulated markets under certain assumptions.

    14. Functional gene array-based analysis of microbial community structure in groundwaters with a gradient of contaminant levels

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Waldron, P.J.; Wu, L.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Schadt, C.W.; Watson, D.B.; Jardine, P.M.; Palumbo, A.V.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

      2009-06-15

      To understand how contaminants affect microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure, six groundwater monitoring wells from the Field Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP; Oak Ridge, TN), with a wide range of pH, nitrate, and heavy metal contamination were investigated. DNA from the groundwater community was analyzed with a functional gene array containing 2006 probes to detect genes involved in metal resistance, sulfate reduction, organic contaminant degradation, and carbon and nitrogen cycling. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. Highly contaminated wells had lower gene diversity but greater signal intensity than the pristine well. The microbial composition was heterogeneous, with 17-70% overlap between different wells. Metal-resistant and metal-reducing microorganisms were detected in both contaminated and pristine wells, suggesting the potential for successful bioremediation of metal-contaminated groundwaters. In addition, results of Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis indicate that nitrate, sulfate, pH, uranium, and technetium have a significant (p < 0.05) effect on microbial community structure. This study provides an overall picture of microbial community structure in contaminated environments with functional gene arrays by showing that diversity and heterogeneity can vary greatly in relation to contamination.

    15. Functional gene array-based analysis of microbial community structure in groundwater with gradient of contaminant levels

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong

      2009-04-01

      To understand how contaminants affect microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure, six groundwater monitoring wells from the Field Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP; Oak Ridge, TN), with a wide range of pH, nitrate, and heavy metal contamination were investigated. DNA from the groundwater community was analyzed with a functional gene array containing 2006 probes to detect genes involved in metal resistance, sulfate reduction, organic contaminant degradation, and carbon and nitrogen cycling. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. Highly contaminated wells had lower gene diversity but greater signal intensity than the pristine well. The microbial composition was heterogeneous, with 17?70% overlap between different wells. Metal-resistant and metal-reducing microorganisms were detected in both contaminated and pristine wells, suggesting the potential for successful bioremediation of metal-contaminated groundwaters. In addition, results of Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis indicate that nitrate, sulfate, pH, uranium, and technetium have a significant (p < 0.05) effect on microbial community structure. This study provides an overall picture of microbial community structure in contaminated environments with functional gene arrays by showing that diversity and heterogeneity can vary greatly in relation to contamination.

    16. Large deformation analysis of laminated composite structures by a continuum-based shell element with transverse deformation

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Wung, Pey Min.

      1989-01-01

      In this work, a finite element formulation and associated computer program is developed for the transient large deformation analysis of laminated composite plate/shell structures. In order to satisfy the plate/shell surface traction boundary conditions and to have accurate stress description while maintaining the low cost of the analysis, a newly assumed displacement field theory is formulated by adding higher-order terms to the transverse displacement component of the first-order shear deformation theory. The laminated shell theory is formulated using the Updated Lagrangian description of a general continuum-based theory with assumptions on thickness deformation. The transverse deflection is approximated through the thickness by a quartic polynomial of the thickness coordinate. As a result both the plate/shell surface tractions (including nonzero tangential tractions and nonzero normal pressure) and the interlaminar shear stress continuity conditions at interfaces are satisfied simultaneously. Furthermore, the rotational degree of freedoms become layer dependent quantities and the laminate possesses a transverse deformation capability (i.e the normal strain is no longer zero). Analytical integration through the thickness direction is performed for both the linear analysis and the nonlinear analysis. Resultants of the stress integrations are expressed in terms of the laminate stacking sequence. Consequently, the laminate characteristics in the normal direction can be evaluated precisely and the cost of the overall analysis is reduced. The standard Newmark method and the modified Newton Raphson method are used for the solution of the nonlinear dynamic equilibrium equations. Finally, a variety of numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the validity and efficiency of the finite element program developed herein.

    17. Kinematic dust viscosity effect on linear and nonlinear dust-acoustic waves in space dusty plasmas with nonthermal ions

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      El-Hanbaly, A. M.; Sallah, M.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Darweesh, H. F.

      2015-10-15

      Linear and nonlinear dust-acoustic (DA) waves are studied in a collisionless, unmagnetized and dissipative dusty plasma consisting of negatively charged dust grains, Boltzmann-distributed electrons, and nonthermal ions. The normal mode analysis is used to obtain a linear dispersion relation illustrating the dependence of the wave damping rate on the carrier wave number, the dust viscosity coefficient, the ratio of the ion temperature to the electron temperatures, and the nonthermal parameter. The plasma system is analyzed nonlinearly via the reductive perturbation method that gives the KdV-Burgers equation. Some interesting physical solutions are obtained to study the nonlinear waves. These solutions are related to soliton, a combination between a shock and a soliton, and monotonic and oscillatory shock waves. Their behaviors are illustrated and shown graphically. The characteristics of the DA solitary and shock waves are significantly modified by the presence of nonthermal (fast) ions, the ratio of the ion temperature to the electron temperature, and the dust kinematic viscosity. The topology of the phase portrait and the potential diagram of the KdV-Burgers equation is illustrated, whose advantage is the ability to predict different classes of traveling wave solutions according to different phase orbits. The energy of the soliton wave and the electric field are calculated. The results in this paper can be generalized to analyze the nature of plasma waves in both space and laboratory plasma systems.

    18. Image analysis of jet structure on electrospinning from free liquid surface

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kula, Jiri Linka, Ales Tunak, Maros; Lukas, David

      2014-06-16

      The work analyses intra-jet distances during electrospinning from a free surface of water based poly(vinyl alcohol) solution confined by two thin metallic plates employed as a spinning electrode. A unique computer vision system and digital image processing were designed in order to track position of every polymer jet. Here, we show that jet position data are in good compliance with theoretically predicted intra-jet distances by linear stability analysis. Jet density is a critical parameter of electrospinning technology, since it determines the process efficiency and homogeneity of produced nanofibrous layer. Achievements made in this research could be used as essential approach to study jetting from two-dimensional spinning electrodes, or as fundamentals for further development of control system related to Nanospider{sup ™} technology.

    19. Structural analysis of three global land models on carbon cycle simulations using a traceability framework

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Rafique, R.; Xia, J.; Hararuk, O.; Luo, Y.

      2014-06-27

      Modeled carbon (C) storage capacity is largely determined by the C residence time and net primary productivity (NPP). Extensive research has been done on NPP dynamics but the residence time and their relationships with C storage are much less studied. In this study, we implemented a traceability analysis to understand the modeled C storage and residence time in three land surface models: CSIRO's Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) with 9 C pools, Community Land Model (version 3.5) combined with Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CLM3.5-CASA) with 12 C pools and Community Land Model (version 4) (CLM4) with 26 C pools. The globally averagedmoreC storage and residence time was computed at both individual pool and total ecosystem levels. The spatial distribution of total ecosystem C storage and residence time differ greatly among the three models. The CABLE model showed a closer agreement with measured C storage and residence time in plant and soil pools than CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4. However, CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4 were close to each other in modeled C storage but not with measured data. CABLE stores more C in root whereas CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4 store more C in woody pools, partly due to differential NPP allocation in respective pools. The C residence time in individual C pools is greatly different among models, largely because of different transfer coefficient values among pools. CABLE had higher bulk residence time for soil C pools than the other two models. Overall, the traceability analysis used in this study can help fully characterizes the behavior of complex land models.less

    20. P2P-based botnets: structural analysis, monitoring, and mitigation

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Yan, Guanhua; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Ha, Duc T; Ngo, Hung Q

      2008-01-01

      Botnets, which are networks of compromised machines that are controlled by one or a group of attackers, have emerged as one of the most serious security threats on the Internet. With an army of bots at the scale of tens of thousands of hosts or even as large as 1.5 million PCs, the computational power of botnets can be leveraged to launch large-scale DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attacks, sending spamming emails, stealing identities and financial information, etc. As detection and mitigation techniques against botnets have been stepped up in recent years, attackers are also constantly improving their strategies to operate these botnets. The first generation of botnets typically employ IRC (Internet Relay Chat) channels as their command and control (C&C) centers. Though simple and easy to deploy, the centralized C&C mechanism of such botnets has made them prone to being detected and disabled. Against this backdrop, peer-to-peer (P2P) based botnets have emerged as a new generation of botnets which can conceal their C&C communication. Recently, P2P networks have emerged as a covert communication platform for malicious programs known as bots. As popular distributed systems, they allow bots to communicate easily while protecting the botmaster from being discovered. Existing work on P2P-based hotnets mainly focuses on measurement of botnet sizes. In this work, through simulation, we study extensively the structure of P2P networks running Kademlia, one of a few widely used P2P protocols in practice. Our simulation testbed incorporates the actual code of a real Kademlia client software to achieve great realism, and distributed event-driven simulation techniques to achieve high scalability. Using this testbed, we analyze the scaling, reachability, clustering, and centrality properties of P2P-based botnets from a graph-theoretical perspective. We further demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that monitoring bot activities in a P2P network is difficult

    1. Nano-Hydroxyapatite/Fluoridated and Unfluoridated Bioactive Glass Composites: Structural Analysis and Bioactivity Evaluation

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Batra, Uma; Kapoor, Seema; Sharma, J. D.

      2011-12-12

      Biphasic bioceramic composites containing nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) and nanosized bioactive glasses have been prepared in the form of pellets and have been examined for the effects of bioglass concentrations and sintering temperature on the structural transformations and bioactivity behavior. Pure stoichiometric nano-HAP was synthesized using sol-gel technique. Two bioglasses synthesized in this work--fluoridated bioglass (Cao-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Na{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaF{sub 2}) and unfluoridated bioglass (Cao-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Na{sub 2}O{sub 3}) designated as FBG and UFBG respectively, were added to nano-HAP with concentrations of 5, 10, 12 and 15%. The average particle sizes of synthesized HAP and bioglasses were 23 nm and 35 nm, respectively. The pellets were sintered at four different temperatures i.e. 1000 deg. C, 1150 deg. C, 1250 deg. C and 1350 deg. C. The investigations involved study of structural and bioactivity behavior of green and sintered pellets and their deviations from original materials i.e. HAP, FBG and UFBG, using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The phase composition of the sintered pellets was found to be non-stoichiometric HAP with {alpha}-TCP (tricalcium phosphate) and {beta}-TCP. It was revealed from SEM images that bonding mechanism was mainly solid state sintering for all pellets sintered at 1000 deg. C and 1150 deg. C and also for pellets with lower concentrations of bioglass i.e. 5% and 10% sintered at 1250 deg. C. Partly liquid phase sintering was observed for pellets with higher bioglass concentrations of 12% and 15% sintered at 1250 deg. C and same behaviour was noted for pellets at all concentrations of bioglasses at 1350 deg. C. The sintered density, hardness and compression strength of pellets have been influenced both by the concentration of the bioglasses and sintering temperature. It was observed that the biological HAP layer formation was faster on the green pellets surface than on pure HAP and

    2. Structural Analysis of N- and O-glycans Using ZIC-HILIC/Dialysis Coupled to NMR Detection

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Qu, Yi; Feng, Ju; Deng, Shuang; Cao, Li; Zhang, Qibin; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Zhaorui; Jiang, Yuxuan; Zink, Erika M.; Baker, Scott E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hu, Jian Z.; Wu, Si

      2014-11-19

      Protein glycosylation, an important and complex post-translational modification (PTM), is involved in various biological processes including the receptor-ligand and cell-cell interaction, and plays a crucial role in many biological functions. However, little is known about the glycan structures of important biological complex samples, and the conventional glycan enrichment strategy (i.e., size-exclusion column [SEC] separation,) prior to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection is time-consuming and tedious. In this study, we employed SEC, Zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (ZIC-HILIC), and ZIC-HILIC coupled with dialysis strategies to enrich the glycopeptides from the pronase E digests of RNase B, followed by NMR analysis of the glycoconjugate. Our results suggest that the ZIC-HILIC enrichment coupled with dialysis is the most efficient, which was thus applied to the analysis of biological complex sample, the pronase E digest of the secreted proteins from the fungi Aspergillus niger. The NMR spectra revealed that the secreted proteins from A. niger contain both N-linked glycans with a high-mannose core and O-linked glycans bearing mannose and glucose with 1->3 and 1->6 linkages. In all, our study provides compelling evidence that ZIC-HILIC separation coupled to dialysis is superior to the commonly used SEC separation to prepare glycopeptides for the downstream NMR analysis, which could greatly facilitate the future NMR-based glycoproteomics research.

    3. Structural analysis of palladium-decorated gold nanoparticles as colloidal bimetallic catalysts.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Fang, Y. L.; Miller, J. T.; Guo, N.; Heck, K. N.; Alvarez, P. J. J.; Wong, M. S. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Rice Univ.)

      2011-02-02

      Bimetallic palladium-decorated gold nanoparticle (Pd/Au NP) catalysts are significantly more active than palladium-only catalysts, but the mechanism for enhancement is not completely clear for most reactions, like the aqueous-phase hydrodechlorination of trichloroethene. In this study, we conducted X-ray absorption spectroscopy on carbon-supported Pd/Au NPs to obtain information about the local atomic environment (i.e., oxidation states, coordination numbers, and bond distances) of the two metals under different treatment conditions. The as-synthesized NPs were confirmed to have a Pd-shell/Au-core nanostructure, in which the Pd was found as surface ensembles. Upon exposure to room temperature in air, a portion of the Pd, but not the Au, was oxidized. In comparison, nearly the entire surface of monometallic Pd NPs was oxidized, suggesting that Au in Pd/Au NPs imparts oxidation resistance to Pd atoms. The surface Pd was found randomly distributed, presumably as a PdAu surface alloy, after reduction at 300 C. X-ray absorption spectroscopy provides direct evidence for the Pd-shell/Au-core structure of Pd/Au NPs, and suggests that metallic Pd in the Pd/Au NPs is a source for higher catalytic activity for aqueous-phase trichloroethene hydrodechlorination.

    4. Structural Analysis of Protein Folding by the Long-Chain Archaeal Chaperone FKBP26

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      E Martinez-Hackert; W Hendrickson

      2011-12-31

      In the cell, protein folding is mediated by folding catalysts and chaperones. The two functions are often linked, especially when the catalytic module forms part of a multidomain protein, as in Methanococcus jannaschii peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase FKBP26. Here, we show that FKBP26 chaperone activity requires both a 50-residue insertion in the catalytic FKBP domain, also called 'Insert-in-Flap' or IF domain, and an 80-residue C-terminal domain. We determined FKBP26 structures from four crystal forms and analyzed chaperone domains in light of their ability to mediate protein-protein interactions. FKBP26 is a crescent-shaped homodimer. We reason that folding proteins are bound inside the large crescent cleft, thus enabling their access to inward-facing peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase catalytic sites and ipsilateral chaperone domain surfaces. As these chaperone surfaces participate extensively in crystal lattice contacts, we speculate that the observed lattice contacts reflect a proclivity for protein associations and represent substrate interactions by FKBP26 chaperone domains. Finally, we find that FKBP26 is an exceptionally flexible molecule, suggesting a mechanism for nonspecific substrate recognition.

    5. Structural Design and Thermal Analysis for Thermal Shields of the MICE Coupling Magnets

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Green, Michael A.; Pan, Heng; Liu, X. K.; Wang, Li; Wu, Hong; Chen, A. B.; Guo, X.L.

      2009-07-01

      A superconducting coupling magnet made from copper matrix NbTi conductors operating at 4 K will be used in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) to produce up to 2.6 T on the magnet centerline to keep the muon beam within the thin RF cavity indows. The coupling magnet is to be cooled by two cryocoolers with a total cooling capacity of 3 W at 4.2 K. In order to keep a certain operating temperature margin, the most important is to reduce the heat leakage imposed on cold surfaces of coil cold mass assembly. An ntermediate temperature shield system placed between the coupling coil and warm vacuum chamber is adopted. The shield system consists of upper neck shield, main shields, flexible connections and eight supports, which is to be cooled by the first stage cold heads of two ryocoolers with cooling capacity of 55 W at 60 K each. The maximum temperature difference on the shields should be less than 20 K, so the thermal analyses for the shields with different thicknesses, materials, flexible connections for shields' cooling and structure design for heir supports were carried out. 1100 Al is finally adopted and the maximum temperature difference is around 15 K with 4 mm shield thickness. The paper is to present detailed analyses on the shield system design.

    6. Rural electric cooperatives and the cost structure of the electric power industry: A multiproduct analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Berry, D.M.

      1992-01-01

      Since 1935, the federal government of the United States has administered a program designed to make electricity available to rural Americans. This dissertation traces the history of the rural electrification program, as well as its costs. While the Congress intended to simply provide help in building the capital structure of rural electric distribution systems, the program continues to flourish some 35 years after these systems first fully covered the countryside. Once the rural distribution systems were built, the government began to provide cooperatives with billions of dollars in subsidized loans for the generation of electric power. Although this program costs the taxpayers nearly $1 billion per year, no one has ever tested its efficacy. The coops' owner/members do not have the right to trade their individual ownership shares. The RECs do not fully exploit the scale and scope economies observed in the investor-owned sector of this industry. This dissertation compares the relative productive efficiencies of the RECs and the investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) in the United States. Using multiproduct translog cost functions, the estimated costs of cooperatives are compared to those of IOUs in providing identical output bundles. Three separate products are considered as outputs: (1) wholesale power; (2) power sold to large industrial customers; and (3) power sold to residential and commercial customers. It is estimated that, were the RECs forced to pay market prices for their inputs, their costs would exceed those incurred by the IOUs by about 24 percent. Several policy recommendations are made: (1) the RECs should be converted to stockholder-owned, tax-paying corporations; (2) the government should discontinue its subsidized loan program; (3) the government should sell its hydroelectric power at market prices, nullifying the current preference given to cooperatives and municipal distributors in the purchase of this currently underpriced power.

    7. Group 10 complexes containing phosphinomethylamine ligands: Synthesis, structural analysis and electrochemical studies

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Waggoner, Nolan W.; Spreer, Lindsay S.; Boro, Brian J.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Helm, Monte L.

      2012-01-15

      The reaction of [M(triphos)OTf](OTf) (M = Pd, Pt; triphos = (Ph2PCH2CH2)2PPh; OTf = triflate) with one equivalent of a diphenylphosphinomethylamine ligand (PPh2NPh(R), R = Ph or Me) leads to the formation of the M(II) complexes [Pd(triphos)PPh2NPh(R)](OTf)2 (1a, R = Ph; 1b, R = Me) and [Pt(triphos)PPh2NPh(R)]- (OTf)2 (2a, R = Ph; 2b, R = Me). Complexes 1a, 1b, 2a and 2b were obtained in moderate yields and characterized by elemental analysis, 1H, 13C, 31P NMR and X-ray diffraction. The redox behavior of these complexes shows a reversible reduction wave with half-wave potentials ranging from -1.04 to -1.23 V. Electrocatalytic proton reduction studies demonstrate these complexes function as hydrogen production catalysts with turn over frequencies ranging from 120 to 200 s-1. We thank Research Corporation Cottrell Science Award (7293) and Fort Lewis College for financial support of this project. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collaborators would like to acknowledge the support of the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

    8. Thermal and Structural Analysis of Beamline Components in the Mu2e Experiment

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Martin, Luke Daniel

      2016-01-01

      Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory will be conducting the high energy particle physics experiment Muons to Electrons (Mu2e). In this experiment, physicists will attempt to witness and understand an ultra-rare process which is the conversion of a muon into the lighter mass electron, without creating additional neutrinos. The experiment is conducted by first generating a proton beam which will be collided into a target within the production solenoid (PS). This creates a high-intensity muon beam which passes through a transport solenoid (TS) and into the detector solenoid (DS). In the detector solenoid the muons will be stopped in an aluminum target and a series of detectors will measure the electrons produced. These components have been named the DS train since they are coupled and travel on a rail system when being inserted or extracted from the DS. To facilitate the installation and removal of the DS train, a set of external stands and a support stand for the instrumentation feed-through bulkhead (IFB) have been designed. Full analysis of safety factors and performance of these two designs has been completed. The detector solenoid itself will need to be maintained to a temperature of 22°C ± 10°C. This will minimize thermal strain and ensure the accurate position of the components is maintained to the tolerance of 2 mm. To reduce the thermal gradient, a passive heating system has been developed and reported.

    9. Structural design, analysis, and code evaluation of an odd-shaped pressure vessel

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Rezvani, M.A.; Ziada, H.H.

      1992-12-01

      This paper is the result of an effort to design, analyze and evaluate a rectangular pressure vessel. Normally pressure vessels are designed in circular or spherical shapes to prevent stress concentrations. In this case, because of operational limitations, the choice of vessels was limited to a rectangular pressure box with a removable cover plate. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code is used as a guideline for pressure containments whose width or depth exceeds 15.24 cm (6.0 in.) and where pressures will exceed 103.4 KPa (15.0 lbf/in[sup 2]). This evaluation used Section VIII of this Code, hereafter referred to as the Code. The dimensions and working pressure of the subject vessel fall within the pressure vessel category of the Code. The Code design guidelines and rules do not directly apply to this vessel. Therefore, finite-element methodology was used to analyze the pressure vessel, and the Code then was used in qualifying the vessel to be stamped to the Code. Section VIII, Division 1 of the Code was used for evaluation. This action was justified by selecting a material for which fatigue damage would not be a concern. The stress analysis results were then chocked against the Code, and the thicknesses adjusted to satisfy Code requirements. Although not directly applicable, the Code design formulas for rectangular vessels were also considered and presented in this study.

    10. Structural design, analysis, and code evaluation of an odd-shaped pressure vessel

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Rezvani, M.A.; Ziada, H.H.

      1992-12-01

      This paper is the result of an effort to design, analyze and evaluate a rectangular pressure vessel. Normally pressure vessels are designed in circular or spherical shapes to prevent stress concentrations. In this case, because of operational limitations, the choice of vessels was limited to a rectangular pressure box with a removable cover plate. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code is used as a guideline for pressure containments whose width or depth exceeds 15.24 cm (6.0 in.) and where pressures will exceed 103.4 KPa (15.0 lbf/in{sup 2}). This evaluation used Section VIII of this Code, hereafter referred to as the Code. The dimensions and working pressure of the subject vessel fall within the pressure vessel category of the Code. The Code design guidelines and rules do not directly apply to this vessel. Therefore, finite-element methodology was used to analyze the pressure vessel, and the Code then was used in qualifying the vessel to be stamped to the Code. Section VIII, Division 1 of the Code was used for evaluation. This action was justified by selecting a material for which fatigue damage would not be a concern. The stress analysis results were then chocked against the Code, and the thicknesses adjusted to satisfy Code requirements. Although not directly applicable, the Code design formulas for rectangular vessels were also considered and presented in this study.

    11. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Fernando, I. P.; Goity, J. L.

      2015-02-01

      The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0⁺] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations,more » as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.« less

    12. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Fernando, I.?P.; Goity, J.?L.

      2015-02-01

      The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0?] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.

    13. Fragility Analysis Methodology for Degraded Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants - Illustrated using a Condensate Storage Tank

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Nie, J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y.; Kim, M.; Choi, I.

      2010-06-30

      The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is conducting a five-year research project to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which includes the consideration of aging of structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The KAERI research project includes three specific areas that are essential to seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA): (1) probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, (2) seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and (3) a plant seismic risk analysis. Since 2007, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has entered into a collaboration agreement with KAERI to support its development of seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and components. The collaborative research effort is intended to continue over a five year period. The goal of this collaboration endeavor is to assist KAERI to develop seismic fragility analysis methods that consider the potential effects of age-related degradation of structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The research results of this multi-year collaboration will be utilized as input to seismic PRAs. In the Year 1 scope of work, BNL collected and reviewed degradation occurrences in US NPPs and identified important aging characteristics needed for the seismic capability evaluations. This information is presented in the Annual Report for the Year 1 Task, identified as BNL Report-81741-2008 and also designated as KAERI/RR-2931/2008. The report presents results of the statistical and trending analysis of this data and compares the results to prior aging studies. In addition, the report provides a description of U.S. current regulatory requirements, regulatory guidance documents, generic communications, industry standards and guidance, and past research related to aging degradation of SSCs. In the Year 2 scope of work, BNL carried out a research effort to identify and assess degradation models for the long-term behavior of dominant materials that are

    14. Kinematic Stirling engine as an energy conversion subsystem for paraboloidal dish solar thermal power plants

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Bowyer, J.M.

      1984-04-15

      The potential of a suitably designed and economically manufactured Stirling engine as the energy conversion subsystem of a paraboloidal dish-Stirling solar thermal power module has been estimated. Results obtained by elementary cycle analyses have been shown to match quite well the performance characteristics of an advanced kinematic Stirling engine, the United Stirling P-40, as established by current prototypes of the engine and by a more sophisticated analytic model of its advanced derivative. In addition to performance, brief consideration has been given to other Stirling engine criteria such as durability, reliability, and serviceability. Production costs have not been considered here.

    15. Dwarf galaxy dark matter density profiles inferred from stellar and gas kinematics

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Adams, Joshua J.; Simon, Joshua D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Bender, Ralf; Thomas, Jens [Max-Planck Institut fr extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrae, D-85741 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Van de Ven, Glenn [Max-Planck Institut fr Astronomie, Knigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Barentine, John C.; Gebhardt, Karl; Hill, Gary J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Murphy, Jeremy D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Swaters, R. A., E-mail: jjadams@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: jja439@gmail.com [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

      2014-07-01

      We present new constraints on the density profiles of dark matter (DM) halos in seven nearby dwarf galaxies from measurements of their integrated stellar light and gas kinematics. The gas kinematics of low-mass galaxies frequently suggest that they contain constant density DM cores, while N-body simulations instead predict a cuspy profile. We present a data set of high-resolution integral-field spectroscopy on seven galaxies and measure the stellar and gas kinematics simultaneously. Using Jeans modeling on our full sample, we examine whether gas kinematics in general produce shallower density profiles than are derived from the stars. Although two of the seven galaxies show some localized differences in their rotation curves between the two tracers, estimates of the central logarithmic slope of the DM density profile, ?, are generally robust. The mean and standard deviation of the logarithmic slope for the population are ? = 0.67 0.10 when measured in the stars and ? = 0.58 0.24 when measured in the gas. We also find that the halos are not under-concentrated at the radii of half their maximum velocities. Finally, we search for correlations of the DM density profile with stellar velocity anisotropy and other baryonic properties. Two popular mechanisms to explain cored DM halos are an exotic DM component or feedback models that strongly couple the energy of supernovae into repeatedly driving out gas and dynamically heating the DM halos. While such models do not yet have falsifiable predictions that we can measure, we investigate correlations that may eventually be used to test models. We do not find a secondary parameter that strongly correlates with the central DM density slope, but we do find some weak correlations. The central DM density slope weakly correlates with the abundance of ? elements in the stellar population, anti-correlates with H I fraction, and anti-correlates with vertical orbital anisotropy. We expect, if anything, the opposite of these three

    16. Electromagnetic and Mechanical Analysis of the Coil Structure for the CLAS12 Torus for 12 GeV Upgrade

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Ghoshal, P. K.; Pastor, O.; Kashy, D.; Schneider, W.; Wiseman, M.; Zarecky, M.; Young, G.; Rode, C.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Burkert, V.

      2014-12-18

      The torus magnet for the CLAS12 spectrometer is a 3.6 T superconducting magnet being designed and built as part of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade. The magnet consists of six coil case assemblies mounted to a cold central hub. The coil case assembly consists of an aluminum case and cover enclosing an epoxy vacuum impregnated coil pack. The coil pack consists of a 117 turn double-pancake winding wrapped with 2 layers of 0.635 mm thick copper cooling sheets. The coil case assembly is cooled by supercritical helium at 4.6 K. This report details the structural analysis of the coilmore » case assembly and the assessment of the coil pack stresses. For the normal operation of the torus magnet, the coil case assembly was analyzed for cool down to 4.6 K and the Lorentz forces at normal operating current. In addition to the normal operating configuration, the coil case assembly was analyzed for Lorentz forces arising from coil misalignment and current imbalances. The allowable stress criteria for the magnet followed the approach of the ASME codes. Primary stresses were limited to the lesser of 2/3 times the yield strength or 1/3 times the ultimate tensile strength. Primary plus secondary stresses were limited to 3 times the primary stress allowable. The analysis was performed using ANSYS Maxwell to calculate the magneto-static loads and ANSYS Mechanical to calculate the stresses.« less

    17. Electromagnetic and Mechanical Analysis of the Coil Structure for the CLAS12 Torus for 12 GeV Upgrade

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Ghoshal, P. K.; Pastor, O.; Kashy, D.; Schneider, W.; Wiseman, M.; Zarecky, M.; Young, G.; Rode, C.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Burkert, V.

      2014-12-18

      The torus magnet for the CLAS12 spectrometer is a 3.6 T superconducting magnet being designed and built as part of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade. The magnet consists of six coil case assemblies mounted to a cold central hub. The coil case assembly consists of an aluminum case and cover enclosing an epoxy vacuum impregnated coil pack. The coil pack consists of a 117 turn double-pancake winding wrapped with 2 layers of 0.635 mm thick copper cooling sheets. The coil case assembly is cooled by supercritical helium at 4.6 K. This report details the structural analysis of the coil case assembly and the assessment of the coil pack stresses. For the normal operation of the torus magnet, the coil case assembly was analyzed for cool down to 4.6 K and the Lorentz forces at normal operating current. In addition to the normal operating configuration, the coil case assembly was analyzed for Lorentz forces arising from coil misalignment and current imbalances. The allowable stress criteria for the magnet followed the approach of the ASME codes. Primary stresses were limited to the lesser of 2/3 times the yield strength or 1/3 times the ultimate tensile strength. Primary plus secondary stresses were limited to 3 times the primary stress allowable. The analysis was performed using ANSYS Maxwell to calculate the magneto-static loads and ANSYS Mechanical to calculate the stresses.

    18. Validation of seismic soil-structure interaction analysis methods: EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute)/NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) cooperation in Lotung, Taiwan, experiments

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.; Tang, Y.K.; Kassawara, R.P.

      1986-10-31

      The cooperative program between NRC/ANL and EPRI on the validation of soil-structure interaction analysis methods with actual seismic response data is described. A large scale-model of a containment building has been built by EPRI/Taipower in a highly seismic region of Taiwan. Vibration tests were performed, first on the basemat before the superstructure was built and then on the completed structure. Since its completion, the structure has experienced many earthquakes. The site and structural response to these earthquakes have been recorded with field (surface and downhole) and structural instrumentation. The validation program involves blind predictions of site and structural response during vibration tests and a selected seismic event, and subsequent comparison between the predictions and measurements. The predictive calculations are in progress. The results of the correlation are expected to lead to the evaluation of the methods as to their conservatisms and sensitivities.

    19. Oxyanion Induced Variations in Domain Structure for Amorphous Cobalt Oxide Oxygen Evolving Catalysts, Resolved by X-ray Pair Distribution Function Analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kwon, Gihan; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Han, Ali; Chapman, Karena W.; Chupas, Peter J.; Du, Pingwu; Tiede, David M.

      2015-12-01

      Amorphous thin film oxygen evolving catalysts, OECs, of first-row transition metals show promise to serve as self-assembling photoanode materials in solar-driven, photoelectrochemical `artificial leaf' devices. This report demonstrates the ability to use high-energy X-ray scattering and atomic pair distribution function analysis, PDF, to resolve structure in amorphous metal oxide catalyst films. The analysis is applied here to resolve domain structure differences induced by oxyanion substitution during the electrochemical assembly of amorphous cobalt oxide catalyst films, Co-OEC. PDF patterns for Co-OEC films formed using phosphate, Pi, methylphosphate, MPi, and borate, Bi, electrolyte buffers show that the resulting domains vary in size following the sequence Pi < MPi < Bi. The increases in domain size for CoMPi and CoBi were found to be correlated with increases in the contributions from bilayer and trilayer stacked domains having structures intermediate between those of the LiCoOO and CoO(OH) mineral forms. The lattice structures and offset stacking of adjacent layers in the partially stacked CoMPi and CoBi domains were best matched to those in the LiCoOO layered structure. The results demonstrate the ability of PDF analysis to elucidate features of domain size, structure, defect content and mesoscale organization for amorphous metal oxide catalysts that are not readily accessed by other X-ray techniques. Finally, PDF structure analysis is shown to provide a way to characterize domain structures in different forms of amorphous oxide catalysts, and hence provide an opportunity to investigate correlations between domain structure and catalytic activity.

    20. Oxyanion Induced Variations in Domain Structure for Amorphous Cobalt Oxide Oxygen Evolving Catalysts, Resolved by X-ray Pair Distribution Function Analysis

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Kwon, Gihan; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Han, Ali; Chapman, Karena W.; Chupas, Peter J.; Du, Pingwu; Tiede, David M.

      2015-12-01

      Amorphous thin film oxygen evolving catalysts, OECs, of first-row transition metals show promise to serve as self-assembling photoanode materials in solar-driven, photoelectrochemical `artificial leaf' devices. This report demonstrates the ability to use high-energy X-ray scattering and atomic pair distribution function analysis, PDF, to resolve structure in amorphous metal oxide catalyst films. The analysis is applied here to resolve domain structure differences induced by oxyanion substitution during the electrochemical assembly of amorphous cobalt oxide catalyst films, Co-OEC. PDF patterns for Co-OEC films formed using phosphate, Pi, methylphosphate, MPi, and borate, Bi, electrolyte buffers show that the resulting domains vary in sizemore » following the sequence Pi < MPi < Bi. The increases in domain size for CoMPi and CoBi were found to be correlated with increases in the contributions from bilayer and trilayer stacked domains having structures intermediate between those of the LiCoOO and CoO(OH) mineral forms. The lattice structures and offset stacking of adjacent layers in the partially stacked CoMPi and CoBi domains were best matched to those in the LiCoOO layered structure. The results demonstrate the ability of PDF analysis to elucidate features of domain size, structure, defect content and mesoscale organization for amorphous metal oxide catalysts that are not readily accessed by other X-ray techniques. Finally, PDF structure analysis is shown to provide a way to characterize domain structures in different forms of amorphous oxide catalysts, and hence provide an opportunity to investigate correlations between domain structure and catalytic activity.« less

    1. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Jen, Chun -Min; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide; Vagnoni, Erica

      2015-10-22

      To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two νμ → νμ disappearance experiments operating in different energymore » regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with an O(10%) accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. Thus, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.« less

    2. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Jen, Chun -Min; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide; Vagnoni, Erica

      2015-10-22

      To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two νμ → νμ disappearance experiments operating in different energy regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with an O(10%) accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. Thus, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.

    3. Demonstration of thin film pair distribution function analysis (tfPDF) for the study of local structure in amorphous and crystalline thin films

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Jensen, K. M.Ø.; Blichfeld, A. B.; Bauers, S. R.; Wood, S. R.; Dooryhee, E.; Johnson, D. C.; Iversen, B. B.; Billinge, S.

      2015-07-05

      By means of normal incidence, high flux and high energy x-rays, we have obtained total scattering data for Pair Distribution Function (PDF) analysis from thin films (tf), suitable for local structure analysis. By using amorphous substrates as support for the films, the standard Rapid Acquisition PDF setup can be applied and the scattering signal from the film can be isolated from the total scattering data through subtraction of an independently measured background signal. No angular corrections to the data are needed, as would be the case for grazing incidence measurements. We illustrate the ‘tfPDF’ method through studies of as deposited (i.e. amorphous) and crystalline FeSb3 films, where the local structure analysis gives insight into the stabilization of the metastable skutterudite FeSb3 phase. The films were prepared by depositing ultra-thin alternating layers of Fe and Sb, which interdiffuse and after annealing crystallize to form the FeSb3 structure. The tfPDF data show that the amorphous precursor phase consists of corner-sharing FeSb6 octahedra with motifs highly resembling the local structure in crystalline FeSb3. Analysis of the amorphous structure allows predicting whether the final crystalline product will form the FeSb3 phase with or without excess Sb present. The study thus illustrates how analysis of the local structure in amorphous precursor films can help to understand crystallization processes of metastable phases and opens for a range of new local structure studies of thin films.

    4. Demonstration of thin film pair distribution function analysis (tfPDF) for the study of local structure in amorphous and crystalline thin films

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Jensen, K. M.Ø.; Blichfeld, A. B.; Bauers, S. R.; Wood, S. R.; Dooryhee, E.; Johnson, D. C.; Iversen, B. B.; Billinge, S.

      2015-07-05

      By means of normal incidence, high flux and high energy x-rays, we have obtained total scattering data for Pair Distribution Function (PDF) analysis from thin films (tf), suitable for local structure analysis. By using amorphous substrates as support for the films, the standard Rapid Acquisition PDF setup can be applied and the scattering signal from the film can be isolated from the total scattering data through subtraction of an independently measured background signal. No angular corrections to the data are needed, as would be the case for grazing incidence measurements. We illustrate the ‘tfPDF’ method through studies of as depositedmore » (i.e. amorphous) and crystalline FeSb3 films, where the local structure analysis gives insight into the stabilization of the metastable skutterudite FeSb3 phase. The films were prepared by depositing ultra-thin alternating layers of Fe and Sb, which interdiffuse and after annealing crystallize to form the FeSb3 structure. The tfPDF data show that the amorphous precursor phase consists of corner-sharing FeSb6 octahedra with motifs highly resembling the local structure in crystalline FeSb3. Analysis of the amorphous structure allows predicting whether the final crystalline product will form the FeSb3 phase with or without excess Sb present. The study thus illustrates how analysis of the local structure in amorphous precursor films can help to understand crystallization processes of metastable phases and opens for a range of new local structure studies of thin films.« less

    5. Studies of the Single Particle Structure of Exotic Nuclei using Transfer Reactions

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Chartier, M.; Lemmon, R. C.; Pucknell, V. P. E.; Warner, D. D.; Timis, C.; Catford, W. N.; Baldwin, T. D.; Gelletly, W.; Pain, S. D.; Labiche, M.; Amzal, N.; Burns, M.; Chapman, R.; Liang, X.; Spohr, K.; Ashwood, N.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Caballero, L.

      2006-04-26

      The TIARA+VAMOS+EXOGAM set-up has recently been installed at GANIL to study the single-particle structure of exotic nuclei. The unique characteristics of the TIARA array, combined with the large acceptance spectrometer VAMOS and the high efficiency Germanium detector array EXOGAM, has allowed high-resolution measurements of transfer reactions in inverse kinematics using low intensity exotic beams. We will describe the experimental set-up, data analysis and preliminary results of the first experiments using a 24Ne beam from SPIRAL, concentrating in particular on the performance of VAMOS that has been used to detect the heavy fragments after the (d,p) (d,d) and (d,t) reactions.

    6. Halo mass dependence of H I and O VI absorption: evidence for differential kinematics

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Mathes, Nigel L.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Charlton, Jane; Muzahid, Sowgat

      2014-09-10

      We studied a sample of 14 galaxies (0.1 < z < 0.7) using HST/WFPC2 imaging and high-resolution HST/COS or HST/STIS quasar spectroscopy of Lyα, Lyβ, and O VI λλ1031, 1037 absorption. The galaxies, having 10.8 ≤ log (M {sub h}/M {sub ☉}) ≤ 12.2, lie within D = 300 kpc of quasar sightlines, probing out to D/R {sub vir} = 3. When the full range of M {sub h} and D/R {sub vir} of the sample are examined, ∼40% of the H I absorbing clouds can be inferred to be escaping their host halo. The fraction of bound clouds decreases as D/R {sub vir} increases such that the escaping fraction is ∼15% for D/R {sub vir} < 1, ∼45% for 1 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 2, and ∼90% for 2 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 3. Adopting the median mass log M {sub h}/M {sub ☉} = 11.5 to divide the sample into 'higher' and 'lower' mass galaxies, we find a mass dependency for the hot circumgalactic medium kinematics. To our survey limits, O VI absorption is found in only ∼40% of the H I clouds in and around lower mass halos as compared to ∼85% around higher mass halos. For D/R {sub vir} < 1, lower mass halos have an escape fraction of ∼65%, whereas higher mass halos have an escape fraction of ∼5%. For 1 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 2, the escape fractions are ∼55% and ∼35% for lower mass and higher mass halos, respectively. For 2 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 3, the escape fraction for lower mass halos is ∼90%. We show that it is highly likely that the absorbing clouds reside within 4R {sub vir} of their host galaxies and that the kinematics are dominated by outflows. Our finding of 'differential kinematics' is consistent with the scenario of 'differential wind recycling' proposed by Oppenheimer et al. We discuss the implications for galaxy evolution, the stellar to halo mass function, and the mass-metallicity relationship of galaxies.

    7. Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980. Volume II. Data repository and reports published during fiscal year 1979-1980: regional structure, surface structure, surface fractures, hydrology

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Negus-De Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

      1980-10-01

      This volume comprises appendices giving regional structure data, surface structure data, surface fracture data, and hydrology data. The fracture data covers oriented Devonian shale cores from West Virginia, Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. The subsurface structure of the Eastern Kentucky gas field is also covered. (DLC)

    8. IS THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ASYMMETRY DUE TO THE KINEMATIC DIPOLE?

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Naselsky, P.; Zhao, W.; Kim, J.; Chen, S.

      2012-04-10

      Parity violation found in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation is a crucial clue for the non-standard cosmological model or the possible contamination of various foreground residuals and/or calibration of the CMB data sets. In this paper, we study the directional properties of the CMB parity asymmetry by excluding the m = 0 modes in the definition of parity parameters. We find that the preferred directions of the parity parameters coincide with the CMB kinematic dipole, which implies that the CMB parity asymmetry may be connected with the possible contamination of the residual dipole component. We also find that such tendency is not only localized at l = 2, 3, but in the extended multipole ranges up to l {approx} 22.

    9. The white dwarfs within 25 pc of the Sun: Kinematics and spectroscopic subtypes

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Sion, Edward M.; McCook, George P.; Wasatonic, Richard; Myszka, Janine; Holberg, J. B.; Oswalt, Terry D. E-mail: george.mccook@villanova.edu E-mail: janine.myszka@villanova.edu E-mail: toswalt@fit.edu

      2014-06-01

      We present the fractional distribution of spectroscopic subtypes, range and distribution of surface temperatures, and kinematical properties of the white dwarfs (WDs) within 25 pc of the Sun. There is no convincing evidence of halo WDs in the total 25 pc sample of 224 WDs. There is also little to suggest the presence of genuine thick disk subcomponent members within 25 pc. It appears that the entire 25 pc sample likely belongs to the thin disk. We also find no significant kinematic differences with respect to spectroscopic subtypes. The total DA to non-DA ratio of the 25 pc sample is 1.8, a manifestation of deepening envelope convection, which transforms DA stars with sufficiently thin H surface layers into non-DAs. We compare this ratio with the results of other studies. We find that at least 11% of the WDs within 25 pc of the Sun (the DAZ and DZ stars) have photospheric metals that likely originate from accretion of circumstellar material (debris disks) around them. If this interpretation is correct, then it suggests the possibility that a similar percentage have planets, asteroid-like bodies, or debris disks orbiting them. Our volume-limited sample reveals a pileup of DC WDs at the well-known cutoff in DQ WDs at T {sub eff} ? 6000 K. Mindful of small number statistics, we speculate on its possible evolutionary significance. We find that the incidence of magnetic WDs in the 25 pc sample is at least 8% in our volume-limited sample, dominated by cool WDs. We derive approximate formation rates of DB and DQ degenerates and present a preliminary test of the evolutionary scenario that all cooling DB stars become DQ WDs via helium convective dredge-up with the diffusion tail of carbon extending upward from their cores.

    10. The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Pyka, Grzegorz; Kerckhofs, Greet

      2014-01-15

      In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: • We examine influence of the image resolution

    11. Structural And Functional Analysis of the Ligand Specificity of the HtrA2/OmI PDZ Domain

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Zhang, Y.; Appleton, B.A.; Wu, P.; Wiesmann, C.; Sidhu, S.S.

      2009-06-04

      The mitochondrial serine protease HtrA2/Omi helps to maintain mitochondrial function by handling misfolded proteins in the intermembrane space. In addition, HtrA2/Omi has been implicated as a proapoptotic factor upon release into the cytoplasm during the cell death cascade. The protein contains a C-terminal PDZ domain that packs against the protease active site and inhibits proteolytic activity. Engagement of the PDZ domain by peptide ligands has been shown to activate the protease and also has been proposed to mediate substrate recognition. We report a detailed structural and functional analysis of the human HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain using peptide libraries and affinity assays to define specificity, X-ray crystallography to view molecular details of PDZ-ligand interactions, and alanine-scanning mutagenesis to probe the peptide-binding groove. We show that the HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain recognizes both C-terminal and internal stretches of extended, hydrophobic polypeptides. High-affinity ligand recognition requires contacts with up to five hydrophobic side chains by distinct sites on the PDZ domain. However, no particular residue type is absolutely required at any position, and thus, the HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain appears to be a promiscuous module adapted to recognize unstructured, hydrophobic polypeptides. This type of specificity is consistent with the biological role of HtrA2/Omi in mitochondria, which requires the recognition of diverse, exposed stretches of hydrophobic sequences in misfolded proteins. The findings are less consistent with, but do not exclude, a role for the PDZ domain in targeting the protease to specific substrates during apoptosis.

    12. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT ESTABLISHMENT OF METHODOLOGY FOR TIME DOMAIN SOIL STRUCTURE INTERACTION ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DST

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      MACKEY, T.C.

      2006-03-14

      M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DST assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil, and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DST and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary tank and contained waste. Soil-structure interaction analyses are traditionally solved in the frequency

    13. RSA calibration accuracy of a fluoroscopy-based system using nonorthogonal images for measuring functional kinematics

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kedgley, Angela E.; Jenkyn, Thomas R.

      2009-07-15

      When performing radiostereometric analysis (RSA) in a clinical setting it may be desirable to orient the two imaging devices nonorthogonally to obtain the best views of an anatomical structure. In this study, a calibration frame was constructed that allowed the relative angles of fiducial and control planes to be adjusted. Precision and accuracy were quantified across multiple trials and orientations. The 90 deg. frame was always of equivalent or greater accuracy than a calibration frame with the fiducial and control planes aligned parallel to the image intensifiers. This study also showed that RSA may be performed with imaging devices at relative angles other than 90 deg. without compromising accuracy. This allows researchers greater freedom in positioning equipment.

    14. Astrophysical tests of modified gravity: the morphology and kinematics of dwarf galaxies

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Vikram, Vinu; Cabr, Anna; Jain, Bhuvnesh; VanderPlas, J.T. E-mail: annanusca@gmail.com E-mail: jakevdp@cs.washington.edu

      2013-08-01

      This paper is the third in a series on tests of gravity using observations of stars and nearby dwarf galaxies. We carry out four distinct tests using published data on the kinematics and morphology of dwarf galaxies, motivated by the theoretical work of Hui et al. (2009) and Jain and Vanderplas (2011). In a wide class of gravity theories a scalar field couples to matter and provides an attractive fifth force. Due to their different self-gravity, stars and gas may respond differently to the scalar force leading to several observable deviations from standard gravity. HI gas, red giant stars and main sequence stars can be displaced relative to each other, and the stellar disk can display warps or asymmetric rotation curves aligned with external potential gradients. To distinguish the effects of modified gravity from standard astrophysical phenomena, we use a control sample of galaxies that are expected to be screened from the fifth force. In all cases we find no significant deviation from the null hypothesis of general relativity. The limits obtained from dwarf galaxies are not yet competitive with the limits from cepheids obtained in our first paper, but can be improved to probe regions of parameter space that are inaccessible using other tests. We discuss how our methodology can be applied to new radio and optical observations of nearby galaxies.

    15. METALLICITY AND KINEMATIC DISTRIBUTIONS OF RED HORIZONTAL-BRANCH STARS FROM THE SDSS SURVEY

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Chen, Y. Q.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. K.; Xue, X. X.; Schuster, W. J. E-mail: schuster@astrosen.unam.m

      2010-08-15

      On the basis of a recently derived color-metallicity relation and stellar parameters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 spectroscopic survey, a large sample of red horizontal-branch (RHB) candidates have been selected to serve as standard candles. The metallicity and kinematic distributions of these stars indicate that they mainly originate from the thick-disk and the halo populations. The typical thick disk is characterized by the first group peaking at [Fe/H] {approx} -0.6, V{sub rot} {approx} 170 km s{sup -1} with a vertical scale height around |Z| {approx} 1.2 kpc, while stars with [Fe/H] < -0.9 are dominated by the halo population. Two sub-populations of the halo are suggested by the RHB stars peaking at [Fe/H] {approx} -1.3: one component with V{sub rot} > 0 km s{sup -1} (Halo I) shows a sign of metallicity gradient in the [Fe/H] versus |Z| diagram, while the other with V{sub rot} < 0 km s{sup -1} (Halo II) does not. The Halo I mainly clumps at the inner halo with R < 10 kpc and the Halo II comes both from the inner halo with R < 10 kpc and the outer halo with R > 10 kpc based on the star distribution in the R versus |Z| diagram.

    16. Litho-kinematic facies model for large landslide deposits in arid settings

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Yarnold, J.C.; Lombard, J.P.

      1989-04-01

      Reconnaissance field studies of six large landslide deposits in the S. Basin and Range suggest that a set of characteristic features is common to the deposits of large landslides in an arid setting. These include a coarse boulder cap, an upper massive zone, a lower disrupted zone, and a mixed zone overlying disturbed substrate. The upper massive zone is dominated by crackel breccia. This grades downward into a lower disrupted zone composed of a more matrix-rich breccia that is internally sheared, intruded by clastic dikes, and often contains a cataclasite layer at its base. An underlying discontinuous mixed zone is composed of material from the overlying breccia mixed with material entrained from the underlying substrate. Bedding in the substrate sometimes displays folding and contortion that die out downward. The authors work suggests a spatial zonation of these characteristic features within many landslide deposits. In general, clastic dikes, the basal cataclasite, and folding in the substrate are observed mainly in distal parts of landslides. In most cases, total thickness, thickness of the basal disturbed and mixed zones, and the degree of internal shearing increase distally, whereas maximum clast size commonly decreases distally. Zonation of these features is interpreted to result from kinematics of emplacement that cause generally increased deformation in the distal regions of the landslide.

    17. Linking the spin evolution of massive black holes to galaxy kinematics

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Sesana, A.; Barausse, E.; Dotti, M.; Rossi, E. M. E-mail: barausse@iap.fr E-mail: emr@strw.leidenuniv.nl

      2014-10-20

      We present the results of a semianalytical model that evolves the masses and spins of massive black holes together with the properties of their host galaxies across the cosmic history. As a consistency check, our model broadly reproduces a number of observations, e.g., the cosmic star formation history; the black hole mass, luminosity, and galaxy mass functions at low redshift; the black hole-bulge mass relation; and the morphological distribution at low redshift. For the first time in a semianalytical investigation, we relax the simplifying assumptions of perfect coherency or perfect isotropy of the gas fueling the black holes. The dynamics of gas is instead linked to the morphological properties of the host galaxies, resulting in different spin distributions for black holes hosted in different galaxy types. We compare our results with the observed sample of spin measurements obtained through broad K? iron line fitting. The observational data disfavor both accretion along a fixed direction and isotropic fueling. Conversely, when the properties of the accretion flow are anchored to the kinematics of the host galaxy, we obtain a good match between theoretical expectations and observations. A mixture of coherent accretion and phases of activity in which the gas dynamics is similar to that of the stars in bulges (i.e., with a significant velocity dispersion superimposed to a net rotation) best describes the data, adding further evidence in support of the coevolution of massive black holes and their hosts.

    18. A DOUBLE-RING ALGORITHM FOR MODELING SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS: UNIFYING KINEMATIC DYNAMO MODELS AND SURFACE FLUX-TRANSPORT SIMULATIONS

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; Martens, Petrus C. H.; Nandy, Dibyendu; Yeates, Anthony R. E-mail: dnandi@iiserkol.ac.i E-mail: anthony@maths.dundee.ac.u

      2010-09-01

      The emergence of tilted bipolar active regions (ARs) and the dispersal of their flux, mediated via processes such as diffusion, differential rotation, and meridional circulation, is believed to be responsible for the reversal of the Sun's polar field. This process (commonly known as the Babcock-Leighton mechanism) is usually modeled as a near-surface, spatially distributed {alpha}-effect in kinematic mean-field dynamo models. However, this formulation leads to a relationship between polar field strength and meridional flow speed which is opposite to that suggested by physical insight and predicted by surface flux-transport simulations. With this in mind, we present an improved double-ring algorithm for modeling the Babcock-Leighton mechanism based on AR eruption, within the framework of an axisymmetric dynamo model. Using surface flux-transport simulations, we first show that an axisymmetric formulation-which is usually invoked in kinematic dynamo models-can reasonably approximate the surface flux dynamics. Finally, we demonstrate that our treatment of the Babcock-Leighton mechanism through double-ring eruption leads to an inverse relationship between polar field strength and meridional flow speed as expected, reconciling the discrepancy between surface flux-transport simulations and kinematic dynamo models.

    19. Intergalactic medium emission observations with the cosmic web imager. II. Discovery of extended, kinematically linked emission around SSA22 Ly? BLOB 2

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Christopher Martin, D.; Chang, Daphne; Matuszewski, Matt; Morrissey, Patrick; Rahman, Shahin; Moore, Anna; Steidel, Charles C.; Matsuda, Yuichi

      2014-05-10

      The intergalactic medium (IGM) is the dominant reservoir of baryons, delineates the large-scale structure of the universe at low to moderate overdensities, and provides gas from which galaxies form and evolve. Simulations of a cold-dark-matter- (CDM-) dominated universe predict that the IGM is distributed in a cosmic web of filaments and that galaxies should form along and at the intersections of these filaments. While observations of QSO absorption lines and the large-scale distribution of galaxies have confirmed the CDM paradigm, the cosmic web of IGM has never been confirmed by direct imaging. Here we report our observation of the Ly? blob 2 (LAB2) in SSA22 with the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI). This is an integral field spectrograph optimized for low surface brightness, extended emission. With 22 hr of total on- and off-source exposure, CWI has revealed that LAB2 has extended Ly? emission that is organized into azimuthal zones consistent with filaments. We perform numerous tests with simulations and the data to secure the robustness of this result, which relies on data with modest signal-to-noise ratios. We have developed a smoothing algorithm that permits visualization of data cube slices along image or spectral image planes. With both raw and smoothed data cubes we demonstrate that the filaments are kinematically associated with LAB2 and display double-peaked profiles characteristic of optically thick Ly? emission. The flux is 10-20 times brighter than expected for the average emission from the IGM but is consistent with boosted fluorescence from a buried QSO or gravitation cooling radiation. Using simple emission models, we infer a baryon mass in the filaments of at least 1-4 10{sup 11} M {sub ?}, and the dark halo mass is at least 2 10{sup 12} M {sub ?}. The spatial-kinematic morphology is more consistent with inflow from the cosmic web than outflow from LAB2, although an outflow feature maybe present at one azimuth. LAB2 and the surrounding gas have

    20. THE GRAVITATIONAL POTENTIAL NEAR THE SUN FROM SEGUE K-DWARF KINEMATICS

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Zhang Lan; Liu Chao; Zhao Gang; Rix, Hans-Walter; Van de Ven, Glenn; Bovy, Jo

      2013-08-01

      To constrain the Galactic gravitational potential near the Sun ({approx}1.5 kpc), we derive and model the spatial and velocity distributions for a sample of 9000 K-dwarfs with spectra from SDSS/SEGUE, which yield radial velocities and abundances ([Fe/H] and [{alpha}/Fe]). We first derive the spatial density distribution for three abundance-selected sub-populations of stars accounting for the survey's selection function. The vertical profiles of these sub-populations are simple exponentials and their vertical dispersion profile is nearly isothermal. To model these data, we apply the 'vertical' Jeans equation, which relates the observable tracer number density and vertical velocity dispersion to the gravitational potential or vertical force. We explore a number of functional forms for the vertical force law, fit the dispersion and density profiles of all abundance-selected sub-populations simultaneously in the same potential, and explore all parameter co-variances using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique. Our fits constrain a disk mass scale height {approx}< 300 pc and the total surface mass density to be 67 {+-} 6 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2} at |z| = 1.0 kpc of which the contribution from all stars is 42 {+-} 5 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2} (assuming a contribution from cold gas of 13 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}). We find significant constraints on the local dark matter density of 0.0065 {+-} 0.0023 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -3} (0.25 {+-} 0.09 GeV cm{sup -3}). Together with recent experiments this firms up the best estimate of 0.0075 {+-} 0.0021 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -3} (0.28 {+-} 0.08 GeV cm{sup -3}), consistent with global fits of approximately round dark matter halos to kinematic data in the outskirts of the Galaxy.

    1. KINEMATICS OF SUPERBUBBLES AND SUPERSHELLS IN THE IRREGULAR GALAXY, NGC1569

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Snchez-Cruces, M.; Rosado, M.; Rodrguez-Gonzlez, A.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.

      2015-02-01

      We present observations in the optical lines of H? and [S II](??6717, 6731 ) and in X-rays of the irregular galaxy, NGC1569. The observations in H? and [S II] were made with the UNAM scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer (PUMA) and the X-ray data were obtained from the Chandra data archive. We detected several superbubbles, filaments, and supershells in NGC1569 for which we determined size as well as their kinematic properties. We present a catalog of expansion velocities of 12 superbubbles, listing their positions, diameters, and physical parameters. Likewise, we present a catalog of 15 filaments and 4 supershells. In order to identify possible X-ray emission from the superbubbles in this galaxy, we analyzed the X-ray emission of NGC1569 in two energy bands: 0.2-2.0 keV (soft X-rays) and 2.0-8.0 keV (hard X-rays). Based on X-ray images, we detected X-ray emission that could possibly be related to some of the superbubbles. The spectrum of the X-ray superbubbles can be described by an optically thin thermal plasma model. In order to identify the possible coexistence of galactic super winds and superbubbles we have performed adiabatic three-dimensional N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to follow the evolution of the most important stellar clusters in this galaxy, SSCA and SSCB, using the GADGET-2 code. Those simulations demonstrate that depending on the specific initial conditions, the formation of superbubbles or a galactic superwind can result in NGC1569.

    2. Constraining sub-parsec binary supermassive black holes in quasars with multi-epoch spectroscopy. II. The population with kinematically offset broad Balmer emission lines

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Liu, Xin; Shen, Yue; Bian, Fuyan; Loeb, Abraham; Tremaine, Scott

      2014-07-10

      A small fraction of quasars have long been known to show bulk velocity offsets (of a few hundred to thousands of km s{sup 1}) in the broad Balmer lines with respect to the systemic redshift of the host galaxy. Models to explain these offsets usually invoke broad-line region gas kinematics/asymmetry around single black holes (BHs), orbital motion of massive (?sub-parsec (sub-pc)) binary black holes (BBHs), or recoil BHs, but single-epoch spectra are unable to distinguish between these scenarios. The line-of-sight (LOS) radial velocity (RV) shifts from long-term spectroscopic monitoring can be used to test the BBH hypothesis. We have selected a sample of 399 quasars with kinematically offset broad H? lines from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Seventh Data Release quasar catalog, and have conducted second-epoch optical spectroscopy for 50 of them. Combined with the existing SDSS spectra, the new observations enable us to constrain the LOS RV shifts of broad H? lines with a rest-frame baseline of a few years to nearly a decade. While previous work focused on objects with extreme velocity offset (>10{sup 3} km s{sup 1}), we explore the parameter space with smaller (a few hundred km s{sup 1}) yet significant offsets (99.7% confidence). Using cross-correlation analysis, we detect significant (99% confidence) radial accelerations in the broad H? lines in 24 of the 50 objects, of ?10-200 km s{sup 1} yr{sup 1} with a median measurement uncertainty of ?10 km s{sup 1} yr{sup 1}, implying a high fraction of variability of the broad-line velocity on multi-year timescales. We suggest that 9 of the 24 detections are sub-pc BBH candidates, which show consistent velocity shifts independently measured from a second broad line (either H? or Mg II) without significant changes in the broad-line profiles. Combining the results on the general quasar population studied in Paper I, we find a tentative anti-correlation between the velocity offset in the first-epoch spectrum and

    3. Characterization and Analysis Methods for the Examination of the Heterogeneous Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrode Microstructure, Part 1: Volumetric Measurements of the Heterogeneous Structure

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Grew, Kyle N.; Peracchio, Aldo A.; Joshi, Abhijit S.; Izzo, Jr., John R.; Chiu, W. K. S.

      2010-12-15

      Advanced imaging and characterization methods have permitted the 3-D and phase-specific reconstruction of dense and opaque samples with features that have a length scale on the order of tens of nanometers and comprised of materials with large X-ray mass absorption coefficients. Engineered materials, like those found in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes, use complex materials that have often limited opportunities to perform 3-D characterization and analysis. Still, characterization and analysis methods are needed to better understand these structures and their functional impact. The development, verification, and validation of methods used by the authors for the characterization and analysis of the heterogeneous SOFC anode are discussed in this work. These methods include the measurement of the volume fractions of the individual phases, contiguity or volumetric connectivity, tortuosity, and interfacial properties. A second and complementary part of this work will examine quantitative methods that provide detailed descriptions of the structure and its relations to the transport processes that it must support. These efforts are intended to describe the formulation of methods developed to provide insight into the SOFC anode nano/microstructure.

    4. Surface structure determinations of ordered sulfur overlayers on Mo(100) and Re(0001) by low-energy electron diffraction intensity analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Jentz, D.W.

      1992-11-01

      A newly developed method for surface structure determination, tensor LEED, combined with automated search was used to analyze the structures. The ordered structures of S on Mo(100) which were studied formed a c(2 {times} 2), c(4 {times} 2), and p(2 {times} l) periodicities at coverages of 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 ML (monolayers, of one sulfur atom per one molybdenum atom) respectively. A MO{sub 2}S-like overlayer, which formed at coverages greater than 1.0 ML, is also discussed. Calculations for the c(2 {times} 2) structure gave a best fit geometry with S adsorbed in a four-fold symmetric hollow site and the second layer buckled by 0.09{Angstrom}. The S-Mo bond length is 2.45{Angstrom} and the Pendry R-factor is 0.21. Preliminary calculations for the c(4 {times} 2) structure did not yield an acceptable fit. The three models tried are discussed. Calculations for p(2 {times} l) data did not yield an acceptable geometry either. The types of models that were tried are discussed. Implications of this analysis are discussed along with results of a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) investigation. The ordered structures on the RE(0001) surface studied have p(2 {times} 2) and (2{radical}3 {times} 2{radical}3)R30{degree} periodicities and occurred at S coverages of 0.25 and 0.5 ML respectively. Best fit structure for p(2 {times} 2) structure has S adsorbed in a three-fold hollow hcp site and exhibits a buckling of the first and second Re layers. The first layer is buckled by 0.05{Angstrom} and the second layer is buckled by 0.06{Angstrom}. Re-S bond length is 2.32{Angstrom} and Pendry R-factor is 0.21. Preliminary results of dynamical LEED investigation of (2{radical}3 {times} 2{radical}3)R30{degree} structure show reasonable agreement with a model with a 6-S atom basis.

    5. Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High Temperature NiTiHf Shape Memory Alloy

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Yang, Fan; Coughlin, D. R.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Yang, L.; Devaraj, Arun; Kovarik, Libor; Noebe, Ronald D.; Mills, M. J.

      2013-03-22

      Thermal aging of the high temperature shape memory alloy 50.3Ni-29.7Ti-20Hf (at.%) introduces a novel precipitate phase, which plays an important role in improving shape memory properties. The precipitate phase was investigated by conventional electron diffraction, high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and three dimensional atom probe tomography. An unrelaxed orthorhombic atomic structural model is proposed based on these observations. This model was subsequently relaxed by ab initio calculations. As a result of the relaxation, atom shuffle displacements occur, which in turn yields improved agreement with the STEM images. The relaxed structure, which is termed the “H-phase”, has also been verified to be thermodymanically stable at 0 K.

    6. Analysis of the murine Dtk gene identifies conservation of genomic structure within a new receptor tyrosine kinase subfamily

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Lewis, P.M.; Crosier, K.E.; Crosier, P.S.

      1996-01-01

      The receptor tyrosine kinase Dtk/Tyro 3/Sky/rse/brt/tif is a member of a new subfamily of receptors that also includes Axl/Ufo/Ark and Eyk/Mer. These receptors are characterized by the presence of two immunoglobulin-like loops and two fibronectin type III repeats in their extracellular domains. The structure of the murine Dtk gene has been determined. The gene consists of 21 exons that are distributed over 21 kb of genomic DNA. An isoform of Dtk is generated by differential splicing of exons from the 5{prime} region of the gene. The overall genomic structure of Dtk is virtually identical to that determined for the human UFO gene. This particular genomic organization is likely to have been duplicated and closely maintained throughout evolution. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

    7. Supramolecular cobaloxime assemblies for H{sub 2} photocatalysis: an initial solution state structure-function analysis.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Mulfort, K. L.; Tiede, D. M.

      2010-01-01

      In this report, we have investigated the correlations between structure and light-induced electron transfer of one known and three new axially coordinated cobaloxime-based supramolecular photocatalysts for the reduction of protons to hydrogen. Solution-phase X-ray scattering and ultrafast transient optical spectroscopy analyses were used in tandem to correlate the self-assembled photocatalysts structural integrity in solution with electron transfer and charge separation between the photosensitizer and catalyst fragments. Biphasic excited state decay kinetics were observed for several of the assemblies, suggesting that configurational dispersion plays a role in limiting photoinduced electron transfer. Notably, an assembly featuring a 'push-pull' donor-photosensitizer-acceptor triad motif exhibits considerable ultrafast excited state quenching and, of the assemblies examined, presents the strongest opportunity for efficient solar energy conversion. These results will assist in the design and development of next-generation supramolecular photocatalyst architectures.

    8. Structural evolution across the insulator-metal transition in oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-δ studied using neutron total scattering and Rietveld analysis

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Jeong, I.-K.; Lee, Seunghun; Jeong, Se-Young; Won, C. J.; Hur, N.; Llobet, A.

      2011-08-29

      Oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-δ exhibits an insulator-metal transition with increasing δ. We performed neutron total scattering measurements to study structural evolution across an insulator-metal transition in BaTiO3-δ. Despite its significant impact on resistivity, slight oxygen reduction (δ=0.09) caused only a small disturbance on the local doublet splitting of Ti-O bond. This finding implies that local polarization is well preserved under marginal electric conduction. In the highly oxygen-deficient metallic state (δ=0.25), however, doublet splitting of the Ti-O bond became smeared. The smearing of the local Ti-O doublet is complemented with long-range structural analysis and demonstrates that the metallic conduction in the highly oxygen-reducedmore » BaTiO3-δ is due to the appearance of nonferroelectric cubic lattice.« less

    9. HANFORD DST THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT ANSYS BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMIC INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL PRIMARY TANK

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      MACKEY, T.C.

      2006-03-14

      M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The overall seismic analysis of the DSTs is being performed with the general-purpose finite element code ANSYS. The overall model used for the seismic analysis of the DSTs includes the DST structure, the contained waste, and the surrounding soil. The seismic analysis of the DSTs must address the fluid-structure interaction behavior and sloshing response of the primary tank and contained liquid. ANSYS has demonstrated capabilities for structural analysis, but the capabilities and limitations of ANSYS to perform fluid-structure interaction are less well understood. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities and investigate the limitations of ANSYS for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste. To this end, the ANSYS solutions are benchmarked against theoretical solutions appearing in BNL 1995, when such theoretical solutions exist. When theoretical solutions were not available, comparisons were made to theoretical solutions of similar problems and to the results from Dytran simulations. The capabilities and limitations of the finite element code Dytran for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste were explored in a parallel investigation (Abatt 2006). In conjunction with the results of the global ANSYS analysis

    10. MHD Structure Analysis by Singular Value Decomposition as a Tool for ECRH RT-Control of Instabilities on FTU

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Marchetto, C.; Cirant, S.; Granucci, G.; Lazzaro, E.; Gandini, F.; Esposito, B.

      2009-11-26

      In this work we present the results obtained applying Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) on a Mirnov coil array in FTU discharges where experiments on MHD stabilization or disruption avoidance via ECRH were performed. In these shots the mode analysis has been consolidated off line by means of FFT and SXR-tomography. Although the Mirnov setting was not necessarily optimised, results show that the algorithm based on SVD is able to detect the mode with a precision equal or better than the FFT, while acting on a smaller time interval. The short execution time required, even in the present preliminary form, suggests that this analysis can be a suitable tool to be implemented in a real time control chain.

    11. HANFORD DST THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT DYTRAN ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL PRIMARY TANK

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; ABATT FG

      2007-02-14

      Revision 0A of this document contains new Appendices C and D. Appendix C contains a re-analysis of the rigid and flexible tanks at the 460 in. liquid level and was motivated by recommendations from a Project Review held on March 20-21, 2006 (Rinker et al Appendix E of RPP-RPT-28968 Rev 1). Appendix D contains the benchmark solutions in support of the analyses in Appendix C.

    12. A multifactor analysis of fungal and bacterial community structure of the root microbiome of mature Populus deltoides trees

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Shakya, Migun; Gottel, Neil R; Castro Gonzalez, Hector F; Yang, Zamin; Gunter, Lee E; Labbe, Jessy L; Muchero, Wellington; Bonito, Gregory; Vilgalys, Rytas; Tuskan, Gerald A; Podar, Mircea; Schadt, Christopher Warren

      2013-01-01

      Bacterial and fungal communities associated with plant roots are central to the host- health, survival and growth. However, a robust understanding of root-microbiome and the factors that drive host associated microbial community structure have remained elusive, especially in mature perennial plants from natural settings. Here, we investigated relationships of bacterial and fungal communities in the rhizosphere and root endosphere of the riparian tree species Populus deltoides, and the influence of soil parameters, environmental properties (host phenotype and aboveground environmental settings), host plant genotype (Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers), season (Spring vs. Fall) and geographic setting (at scales from regional watersheds to local riparian zones) on microbial community structure. Each of the trees sampled displayed unique aspects to it s associated community structure with high numbers of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) specific to an individual trees (bacteria >90%, fungi >60%). Over the diverse conditions surveyed only a small number of OTUs were common to all samples within rhizosphere (35 bacterial and 4 fungal) and endosphere (1 bacterial and 1 fungal) microbiomes. As expected, Proteobacteria and Ascomycota were dominant in root communities (>50%) while other higher-level phylogenetic groups (Chytridiomycota, Acidobacteria) displayed greatly reduced abundance in endosphere compared to the rhizosphere. Variance partitioning partially explained differences in microbiome composition between all sampled roots on the basis of seasonal and soil properties (4% to 23%). While most variation remains unattributed, we observed significant differences in the microbiota between watersheds (Tennessee vs. North Carolina) and seasons (Spring vs. Fall). SSR markers clearly delineated two host populations associated with the samples taken in TN vs. NC, but overall genotypic distances did not have a significant effect on corresponding communities that could be

    13. Analysis of band structure, transmission properties, and dispersion behavior of THz wave in one-dimensional parabolic plasma photonic crystal

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Askari, Nasim; Eslami, Esmaeil; Mirzaie, Reza

      2015-11-15

      The photonic band gap of obliquely incident terahertz electromagnetic waves in a one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal is studied. The periodic structure consists of lossless dielectric and inhomogeneous plasma with a parabolic density profile. The dispersion relation and the THz wave transmittance are analyzed based on the electromagnetic equations and transfer matrix method. The dependence of effective plasma frequency and photonic band gap characteristics on dielectric and plasma thickness, plasma density, and incident angle are discussed in detail. A theoretical calculation for effective plasma frequency is presented and compared with numerical results. Results of these two methods are in good agreement.

    14. Electromagnetic structure of few-nucleon ground states

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Marcucci, Laura E.; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; Gross, Franz L.; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility; Peña, M. T.; Piarulli, M.; Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA; Schiavilla, Rocco; Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA; Sick, Ingo; et al

      2016-01-08

      Experimental form factors of the hydrogen and helium isotopes, extracted from an up-to-date global analysis of cross sections and polarization observables measured in elastic electron scattering from these systems, are compared to predictions obtained in three different theoretical approaches: the first is based on realistic interactions and currents, including relativistic corrections (labeled as the conventional approach); the second relies on a chiral effective field theory description of the strong and electromagnetic interactions in nuclei (labeled ChiEFT); the third utilizes a fully relativistic treatment of nuclear dynamics as implemented in the covariant spectator theory (labeled CST). Furthermore, for momentum transfers belowmore » Q < 5 fm-1 there is satisfactory agreement between experimental data and theoretical results in all three approaches. Conversely, at Q > 5 fm-1, particularly in the case of the deuteron, a relativistic treatment of the dynamics, as is done in the CST, is necessary. The experimental data on the deuteron A structure function extend to Q ~ 12 fm-1, and the close agreement between these data and the CST results suggests that, even in this extreme kinematical regime, there is no evidence for new effects coming from quark and gluon degrees of freedom at short distances.« less

    15. Beyond the brim of the hat: Kinematics of globular clusters out to large radii in the Sombrero galaxy

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Dowell, Jessica L.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Bridges, Terry J.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Gebhardt, Karl; Freeman, Ken C.; De Boer, Elizabeth Wylie E-mail: rhode@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: zepf@pa.msu.edu E-mail: kcf@mso.anu.edu.au

      2014-06-01

      We have obtained radial velocity measurements for 51 new globular clusters around the Sombrero galaxy. These measurements were obtained using spectroscopic observations from the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope and the Hydra spectrograph at WIYN. Combining our own past measurements and velocity measurements obtained from the literature, we have constructed a large database of radial velocities that contains a total of 360 confirmed globular clusters. Previous studies' analyses of the kinematics and mass profile of the Sombrero globular cluster system have been constrained to the inner ∼9' (∼24 kpc or ∼5R{sub e} ), but our new measurements have increased the radial coverage of the data, allowing us to determine the kinematic properties of M104 out to ∼15' (∼41 kpc or ∼9R{sub e} ). We use our set of radial velocities to study the GC system kinematics and to determine the mass profile and V-band mass-to-light profile of the galaxy. We find that M/L{sub V} increases from 4.5 at the center to a value of 20.9 at 41 kpc (∼9R{sub e} or 15'), which implies that the dark matter halo extends to the edge of our available data set. We compare our mass profile at 20 kpc (∼4R{sub e} or ∼7.'4) to the mass computed from X-ray data and find good agreement. We also use our data to look for rotation in the globular cluster system as a whole, as well as in the red and blue subpopulations. We find no evidence for significant rotation in any of these samples.

    16. Structural Analysis of Thermal Shields During a Quench of a Torus Magnet for the 12 GeV Upgrade

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Pastor, Orlando; Willard, Thomas; Ghoshal, Probir K.; Kashy, David H.; Wiseman, Mark A.; Kashikhin, V.; Young, Glenn R.; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Rode, Claus H.

      2015-06-01

      A toroidal magnet system consisting of six superconducting coils is being built for the Jefferson Lab 12- GeV accelerator upgrade project. This paper details the analysis of eddy current effects during a quench event on the aluminum thermal shield. The shield has been analyzed for mechanical stresses induced as a result of a coil quench as well as a fast discharge of the complete magnet system. The shield has been designed to reduce the eddy current effects and result in stresses within allowable limits.

    17. Civil Engineer (Structural)

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      This position is located in Structural Design (TELD). The primary purpose of this position is to serve as a senior engineer responsible for loading, design, and analysis of all structures on BPA's...

    18. Identification, characterization and structure analysis of a type I ribosome-inactivating protein from Sapium sebiferum (Euphorbiaceae)

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Wu, Ying; Mao, Yingji; Jin, Shan; Hou, Jinyan; Du, Hua; Yang, Minglei; Wu, Lifang

      2015-08-07

      Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are N-glycosidases (EC3.2.2.22) that universally inactivate the ribosome, thereby inhibiting protein biosynthesis. In this study, a novel type I RIPs named SEBIN was identified in Sapium sebiferum. Nuclear acid depurine experiment showed that SEBIN had rRNA N-Glycosidase activity. Further experiment indicated that SEBIN significantly inhibited Caenorhabditis elegans development as well as resulted in worm cell apoptosis. This is the first report to evaluate RIPs toxicity using C. elegans. We proposed that SEBIN may impaire C. elegans reproduction in a DNA-damage manner besides traditional protein synthesis inhibition approach. The predicted 3D structure was modeled using threading and ab initio modeling, and the r-RNA binding residue of SEBIN was identified through the protein-ligand docking approach. It showed the amino acid residues, Glu195, Asn81, Ala82, Tyr83, Glu164, Ser163, Ile159 and Arg167, played critical roles in catalytic process. Our results provided the theoretical foundation of structure–function relationships between enzymatic properties, toxicity and structural characterization of SEBIN. - Graphical abstract: Superposition of main chains of ricin (cyan) and SEBIN (brown), and adenine binding site residues of SEBIN. - Highlights: • A Ribosome-inactivating proteins gene (SEBIN) was isolated from Sapium sebiferum. • SEBIN had DNase activity besides widely reported ribosome inactivation via N-glycosidases activity. • SEBIN significantly inhibited Caenorhabditis elegans development in vivo. • SEBIN may impaire C. elegans reproduction in a DNA-damage manner with the aid of mutant strains hus-1 and clk-2. • The possible active sites between SEBIN and the adenine of rRNA were predicted.

    19. Ultrahigh and High Resolution Structures and Mutational Analysis of Monomeric Streptococcus pyogenes SpeB Reveal a Functional Role for the Glycine-rich C-terminal Loop

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Gonzlez-Pez, Gonzalo E.; Wolan, Dennis W.

      2012-09-05

      Cysteine protease SpeB is secreted from Streptococcus pyogenes and has been studied as a potential virulence factor since its identification almost 70 years ago. Here, we report the crystal structures of apo mature SpeB to 1.06 {angstrom} resolution as well as complexes with the general cysteine protease inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and a novel substrate mimetic peptide inhibitor. These structures uncover conformational changes associated with maturation of SpeB from the inactive zymogen to its active form and identify the residues required for substrate binding. With the use of a newly developed fluorogenic tripeptide substrate to measure SpeB activity, we determined IC{sub 50} values for trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and our new peptide inhibitor and the effects of mutations within the C-terminal active site loop. The structures and mutational analysis suggest that the conformational movements of the glycine-rich C-terminal loop are important for the recognition and recruitment of biological substrates and release of hydrolyzed products.

    20. Measurement of the Top-antitop Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV using the Kinematic Properties of Events with Leptons and Jets

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

      2011-09-01

      A measurement of the top-antitop production cross section in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV has been performed at the LHC with the CMS detector. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns and is based on the reconstruction of the final state with one isolated, high transverse-momentum electron or muon and three or more hadronic jets. The kinematic properties of the events are used to separate the top-antitop signal from W+jets and QCD multijet background events. The measured cross section is 173 + 39 - 32 (stat. + syst.) pb, consistent with standard model expectations.

    1. Genome-wide Analysis of Drosophila Circular RNAs Reveals Their Structural and Sequence Properties and Age-Dependent Neural Accumulation

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Westholm, Jakub O.; Miura, Pedro; Olson, Sara; Shenker, Sol; Joseph, Brian; Sanfilippo, Piero; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Lai, Eric C.

      2014-11-26

      Circularization was recently recognized to broadly expand transcriptome complexity. Here, we exploit massive Drosophila total RNA-sequencing data, >5 billion paired-end reads from >100 libraries covering diverse developmental stages, tissues, and cultured cells, to rigorously annotate >2,500 fruit fly circular RNAs. These mostly derive from back-splicing of protein-coding genes and lack poly(A) tails, and the circularization of hundreds of genes is conserved across multiple Drosophila species. We elucidate structural and sequence properties of Drosophila circular RNAs, which exhibit commonalities and distinctions from mammalian circles. Notably, Drosophila circular RNAs harbor >1,000 well-conserved canonical miRNA seed matches, especially within coding regions, and coding conserved miRNA sites reside preferentially within circularized exons. Finally, we analyze the developmental and tissue specificity of circular RNAs and note their preferred derivation from neural genes and enhanced accumulation in neural tissues. Interestingly, circular isoforms increase substantially relative to linear isoforms during CNS aging and constitute an aging biomarker.

    2. Recalcitrance and structural analysis by water-only flowthrough pretreatment of 13C enriched corn stover stem

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Foston, Marcus B.; Trajanob, Heather L.; Samuel, Reichel; Wyman, Charles E.; He, Jian; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

      2015-08-28

      Here, this study presents high temperature water-only continuous flowthrough pretreatment coupled with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a promising analytical tool to examine the plant cell wall, to understand its recalcitrance (i.e., cell wall resistance to deconstruction), and to probe the chemistry occurring during batch pretreatment of biomass. 13C-enriched corn stover stems were pretreated at 170 °C for 60 min with a hot-water flow rate of 20 mL/min to control fractionation of the cell wall. This approach helped elucidate the nature of plant cell wall chemical recalcitrance and biomass pretreatment chemistry by tracking cell wall fragmentation as a function ofmore » time. Fractions of the reactor effluent were collected in a time-resolved fashion and characterized by various NMR techniques to determine the degree and sequence of fragments released, as well as, the chemical composition, molecular structure, and relative molecular weight of those released fragments.« less

    3. Genome-wide Analysis of Drosophila Circular RNAs Reveals Their Structural and Sequence Properties and Age-Dependent Neural Accumulation

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Westholm, Jakub O.; Miura, Pedro; Olson, Sara; Shenker, Sol; Joseph, Brian; Sanfilippo, Piero; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Lai, Eric C.

      2014-11-26

      Circularization was recently recognized to broadly expand transcriptome complexity. Here, we exploit massive Drosophila total RNA-sequencing data, >5 billion paired-end reads from >100 libraries covering diverse developmental stages, tissues, and cultured cells, to rigorously annotate >2,500 fruit fly circular RNAs. These mostly derive from back-splicing of protein-coding genes and lack poly(A) tails, and the circularization of hundreds of genes is conserved across multiple Drosophila species. We elucidate structural and sequence properties of Drosophila circular RNAs, which exhibit commonalities and distinctions from mammalian circles. Notably, Drosophila circular RNAs harbor >1,000 well-conserved canonical miRNA seed matches, especially within coding regions, and codingmoreconserved miRNA sites reside preferentially within circularized exons. Finally, we analyze the developmental and tissue specificity of circular RNAs and note their preferred derivation from neural genes and enhanced accumulation in neural tissues. Interestingly, circular isoforms increase substantially relative to linear isoforms during CNS aging and constitute an aging biomarker.less

    4. Transient heat and mass transfer analysis in a porous ceria structure of a novel solar redox reactor

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Chandran, RB; Bader, R; Lipinski, W

      2015-06-01

      Thermal transport processes are numerically analyzed for a porous ceria structure undergoing reduction in a novel redox reactor for solar thermochemical fuel production. The cylindrical reactor cavity is formed by an array of annular reactive elements comprising the porous ceria monolith integrated with gas inlet and outlet channels. Two configurations are considered, with the reactor cavity consisting of 10 and 20 reactive elements, respectively. Temperature dependent boundary heat fluxes are obtained on the irradiated cavity wall by solving for the surface radiative exchange using the net radiation method coupled to the heat and mass transfer model of the reactive element. Predicted oxygen production rates are in the range 40-60 mu mol s(-1) for the geometries considered. After an initial rise, the average temperature of the reactive element levels off at 1660 and 1680 K for the two geometries, respectively. For the chosen reduction reaction rate model, oxygen release continues after the temperature has leveled off which indicates that the oxygen release reaction is limited by chemical kinetics and/or mass transfer rather than by the heating rate. For a fixed total mass of ceria, the peak oxygen release rate is doubled for the cavity with 20 reactive elements due to lower local oxygen partial pressure. (C) 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

    5. Structural and Functional Analysis of Two New Positive Allosteric Modulators of GluA2 Desensitization and Deactivation

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Timm, David E.; Benveniste, Morris; Weeks, Autumn M.; Nisenbaum, Eric S.; Partin, Kathryn M.

      2011-10-14

      At the dimer interface of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of {alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors a hydrophilic pocket is formed that is known to interact with two classes of positive allosteric modulators, represented by cyclothiazide and the ampakine 2H,3H,6aH-pyrrolidino(2,1-3',2')1,3-oxazino(6',5'-5,4)benzo(e)1,4-dioxan-10-one (CX614). Here, we present structural and functional data on two new positive allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors, phenyl-1,4-bis-alkylsulfonamide (CMPDA) and phenyl-1,4-bis-carboxythiophene (CMPDB). Crystallographic data show that these compounds bind within the modulator-binding pocket and that substituents of each compound overlap with distinct moieties of cyclothiazide and CX614. The goals of the present study were to determine (1) the degree of modulation by CMPDA and CMPDB of AMPA receptor deactivation and desensitization; (2) whether these compounds are splice isoform-selective; and (3) whether predictions of mechanism of action could be inferred by comparing molecular interactions between the ligand-binding domain and each compound with those of cyclothiazide and CX614. CMPDB was found to be more isoform-selective than would be predicted from initial binding assays. It is noteworthy that these new compounds are both more potent and more effective and may be more clinically relevant than the AMPA receptor modulators described previously.

    6. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

      2007-07-25

      We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

    7. Engineering ESPT Pathways Based on Structural Analysis of LSSmKate Red Fluorescent Proteins with Large Stokes Shift

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Piatkevich, K.; Malashkevich, V; Almo, S; Verkhusha, V

      2010-01-01

      LSSmKate1 and LSSmKate2 are monomeric red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with large Stokes shifts (LSSs), which allows for efficient separation of absorbance and emission maxima, as well as for excitation with conventional two-photon laser sources. These LSSmKates differ by a single amino acid substitution at position 160 and exhibit absorbance maxima around 460 nm, corresponding to a neutral DsRed-like chromophore. However, excitation at 460 nm leads to fluorescence emission above 600 nm. Structures of LSSmKate1 and LSSmKate2, determined at resolutions of 2.0 and 1.5 {angstrom}, respectively, revealed that the predominant DsRed-chromophore configurations are cis for LSSmKate1 but trans for LSSmKate2. Crystallographic and mutagenesis analyses, as well as isotope and temperature dependences, suggest that an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) is responsible for the LSSs observed in LSSmKates. Hydrogen bonding between the chromophore hydroxyl and Glu160 in LSSmKate1 and a proton relay involving the chromophore tyrosine hydroxyl, Ser158, and the Asp160 carboxylate in LSSmKate2 represent the putative ESPT pathways. Comparisons with mKeima LSS RFP suggest that similar proton relays could be engineered in other FPs. Accordingly, we mutated positions 158 and 160 in several conventional red-shifted FPs, including mNeptune, mCherry, mStrawberry, mOrange, and mKO, and the resulting FP variants exhibited LSS fluorescence emission in a wide range of wavelengths from 560 to 640 nm. These data suggest that different chromophores formed by distinct tripeptides in different environments can be rationally modified to yield RFPs with novel photochemical properties.

    8. Crustal structure beneath two seismic stations in the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone derived from receiver function analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Syuhada; Hananto, Nugroho D.; Handayani, Lina; Puspito, Nanang T; Yudistira, Tedi; Anggono, Titi

      2015-04-24

      We analyzed receiver functions to estimate the crustal thickness and velocity structure beneath two stations of Geofon (GE) network in the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone. The stations are located in two different tectonic regimes: Sumbawa Island (station PLAI) and Timor Island (station SOEI) representing the oceanic and continental characters, respectively. We analyzed teleseismic events of 80 earthquakes to calculate the receiver functions using the time-domain iterative deconvolution technique. We employed 2D grid search (H-κ) algorithm based on the Moho interaction phases to estimate crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio. We also derived the S-wave velocity variation with depth beneath both stations by inverting the receiver functions. We obtained that beneath station PLAI the crustal thickness is about 27.8 km with Vp/Vs ratio 2.01. As station SOEI is covered by very thick low-velocity sediment causing unstable solution for the inversion, we modified the initial velocity model by adding the sediment thickness estimated using high frequency content of receiver functions in H-κ stacking process. We obtained the crustal thickness is about 37 km with VP/Vs ratio 2.2 beneath station SOEI. We suggest that the high Vp/Vs in station PLAI may indicate the presence of fluid ascending from the subducted plate to the volcanic arc, whereas the high Vp/Vs in station SOEI could be due to the presence of sediment and rich mafic composition in the upper crust and possibly related to the serpentinization process in the lower crust. We also suggest that the difference in velocity models and crustal thicknesses between stations PLAI and SOEI are consistent with their contrasting tectonic environments.

    9. Structural Design and Analysis for a Double-Band Cold Mass Support of the MICE Coupling Magnet

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Green, Michael A; Wu, Hong; Liu, X. K.; Wang, Li; Li, S. Y.; Guo, XingLong; Pan, Heng; Xu, FengYu

      2009-07-01

      The cooling channel of Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) consists of eighteen superconducting solenoid coils, which are magnetically hooked together. A pair ofcoupling magnets operating at 4 K is applied to produce up to .6 T magnetic field on the magnet centerline to keep muon beam within the RF cavity windows. The peak magnetic force on the coupling magnet from other magnets in the MICE channel is up to 500 kN inlongitudinal direction, and the requirements for magnet center and axis azimuthal angle at 4 K are stringent. A self-centered double-band cold mass support system with intermediatethermal interruption is applied for the coupling magnet. The physical center of the magnet does not change as it is cooled down from 300 K to 4.2 K with this support system. In this paper the design parameters of the support system are discussed. The integral analysis of the support system using FEA method was carried out to etermine the tension forces in bands when various loads are applied. The magnet centre displacement and concentricity deviation form the axis of the warm bore are obtained, and the peak tension in support bands is also determined according to the simulation results.

    10. Station for X-ray structural analysis of materials and single crystals (including nanocrystals) on a synchrotron radiation beam from the wiggler at the Siberia-2 storage ring

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kheiker, D. M. Kovalchuk, M. V.; Korchuganov, V. N.; Shilin, Yu. N.; Shishkov, V. A.; Sulyanov, S. N.; Dorovatovskii, P. V.; Rubinsky, S. V.; Rusakov, A. A.

      2007-11-15

      The design of the station for structural analysis of polycrystalline materials and single crystals (including nanoobjects and macromolecular crystals) on a synchrotron radiation beam from the superconducting wiggler of the Siberia-2 storage ring is described. The wiggler is constructed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The X-ray optical scheme of the station involves a (1, -1) double-crystal monochromator with a fixed position of the monochromatic beam and a sagittal bending of the second crystal, segmented mirrors bent by piezoelectric motors, and a (2{theta}, {omega}, {phi}) three-circle goniometer with a fixed tilt angle. Almost all devices of the station are designed and fabricated at the Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The Bruker APEX11 two-dimensional CCD detector will serve as a detector in the station.

    11. Structural and Mechanistic Analysis through Electronic Spectra: Aqueous Hyponitrite Radical (N2O2-) and Nitrosyl Hyponitrite Anion (N3O3-)

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Valiev, Marat; Lymar, Sergei V.

      2011-11-03

      Aqueous hyponitrite radical (N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}) and nitrosyl hyponitrite anion (N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}) species are important intermediates in the reductive chemistry of NO. The structures and absorption spectra of various hydrated isomers of these compounds were investigated in this work using high-level quantum mechanical calculations combined with the explicit classical description of the aqueous environment. For N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}, comparison of the calculated spectra and energetics with the experimental data reveals that: (1) upon the one-electron oxidation of trans-hyponitrite (ON=NO{sub 2}{sup -}), the trans configuration of the resulting ON=NO{sup -} radical is preserved; (2) although cis- and trans-ON=NO{sup -} are energetically nearly equivalent, the barrier for the trans-cis isomerization is prohibitively high due to the partial double character of the NN bond; (3) the UV spectrum of ON=NO{sup -} was misinterpreted in the earlier pulse radiolysis work and its more recent revision has been justified. For the N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} ion, the symmetric isomer is the dominant observable species, and the asymmetric isomer contributes little to the experimental spectrum. Coherent analysis of the calculated and experimental data suggests a re-interpretation of the N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -} + NO reaction mechanism, according to which the reaction evenly bifurcates to yield both the symmetric and asymmetric isomers of N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}. While the latter isomer rapidly decomposes to the final NO{sub 2}{sup -} + N{sub 2}O products, the former isomer is stable toward this decomposition but its formation is reversible with the homolysis equilibrium constant Khom = 2.2 - 10{sup -7} M. Collectively, these results demonstrate that advanced theoretical modeling can be of significant benefit in structural and mechanistic analysis of UV spectra.

    12. The H I chronicles of little things BCDs II: The origin of IC 10's H I structure

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Ashley, Trisha; Simpson, Caroline E.; Pokhrel, Nau Raj; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Johnson, Megan; Nidever, David L. E-mail: simpsonc@fiu.edu E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com E-mail: dnidever@umich.edu

      2014-12-01

      In this paper we analyze Very Large Array (VLA) telescope and Green Bank Telescope (GBT) atomic hydrogen (H I) data for the LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey; https://science.nrao.edu/science/surveys/littlethings) blue compact dwarf galaxy IC 10. The VLA data allow us to study the detailed H I kinematics and morphology of IC 10 at high resolution while the GBT data allow us to search the surrounding area at high sensitivity for tenuous H I. IC 10's H I appears highly disturbed in both the VLA and GBT H I maps with a kinematically distinct northern H I extension, a kinematically distinct southern plume, and several spurs in the VLA data that do not follow the general kinematics of the main disk. We discuss three possible origins of its H I structure and kinematics in detail: a current interaction with a nearby companion, an advanced merger, and accretion of intergalactic medium. We find that IC 10 is most likely an advanced merger or a galaxy undergoing accretion.

    13. Understanding the Adsorption Mechanism of Xe and Kr in a Metal-Organic Framework from X-ray Structural Analysis and First- Principles Calculations

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Ghose, Sanjit K.; Li, Yan; Yakovenko, Andrey; Dooryhee, Eric; Ehm, Lars; Ecker, Lynne E.; Dippel, Ann-Christin; Halder, Gregory J.; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

      2015-04-16

      Enhancement of adsorption capacity and separation of radioactive Xe/Kr at room temperature and above is a challenging problem. Here, we report a detailed structural refinement and analysis of the synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data of Ni-DODBC metal organic framework with in situ Xe and Kr adsorption at room temperature and above. Our results reveal that Xe and Kr adsorb at the open metal sites, with adsorption geometries well reproduced by DFT calculations. The measured temperature-dependent adsorption capacity of Xe is substantially larger than that for Kr, indicating the selectivity of Xe over Kr and is consistent with the more negative adsorption energy (dominated by van der Waals dispersion interactions) predicted from DFT. Our results reveal critical structural and energetic information about host–guest interactions that dictate the selective adsorption mechanism of these two inert gases, providing guidance for the design and synthesis of new MOF materials for the separation of environmentally hazardous gases from nuclear reprocessing applications.

    14. Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Santillan, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.; Fernandez van Raap, M. B.

      2013-04-07

      We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 {mu}J and 50 {mu}J. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu{sub 2}O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu{sub 2}O or Cu{sub 2}O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu{sub 2}O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu{sub 2}O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 {mu}J for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu{sub 2}O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 {mu}J threshold energy value, Cu{sub 2}O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

    15. Double-Pionic Fusion of Nuclear Systems and the 'ABC' Effect: Approaching a Puzzle by Exclusive and Kinematically Complete Measurements

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Bashkanov, M.; Clement, H.; Doroshkevich, E.; Khakimova, O.; Kren, F.; Meier, R.; Pricking, A.; Skorodko, T.; Wagner, G. J.; Bargholtz, C.; Geren, L.; Lindberg, K.; Tegner, P.-E.; Zartova, I.; Berlowski, M.; Stepaniak, J.; Bogoslawsky, D.; Ivanov, G.; Jiganov, E.; Morosov, B.

      2009-02-06

      The ABC effect--a puzzling low-mass enhancement in the {pi}{pi} invariant mass spectrum, first observed by Abashian, Booth, and Crowe--is well known from inclusive measurements of two-pion production in nuclear fusion reactions. Here we report on the first exclusive and kinematically complete measurements of the most basic double-pionic fusion reaction pn{yields}d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} at beam energies of 1.03 and 1.35 GeV. The measurements, which have been carried out at CELSIUS-WASA, reveal the ABC effect to be a ({pi}{pi}){sub I=L=0} channel phenomenon associated with both a resonancelike energy dependence in the integral cross section and the formation of a {delta}{delta} system in the intermediate state. A corresponding simple s-channel resonance ansatz provides a surprisingly good description of the data.

    16. Scattering Amplitudes: The Most Perfect Microscopic Structures in the Universe

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Dixon, Lance J.; /CERN /SLAC

      2011-11-04

      This article gives an overview of many of the recent developments in understanding the structure of relativistic scattering amplitudes in gauge theories ranging from QCD to N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory, as well as (super)gravity. I also provide a pedagogical introduction to some of the basic tools used to organize and illuminate the color and kinematic structure of amplitudes. This article is an invited review introducing a special issue of Journal of Physics A devoted to 'Scattering Amplitudes in Gauge Theories'.

    17. Structural and Mechanistic Analysis through Electronic Spectra: Aqueous Hyponitrite Radical (N(2)O(2)(-)) and Nitrosyl Hyponitrite Anion (N(3)O(3)(-))

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Lymar S. V.; Valiev M.

      2011-11-03

      Aqueous hyponitrite radical (N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}) and nitrosyl hyponitrite anion (N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}) are important intermediates in the reductive chemistry of NO. The structures and absorption spectra of various hydrated isomers of these compounds were investigated in this work using high-level quantum mechanical calculations combined with the explicit classical description of the aqueous environment. For N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}, comparison of the calculated spectra and energetics with the experimental data reveals that (1) upon the one-electron oxidation of trans-hyponitrite (ON{double_bond}NO{sup 2-}), the trans configuration of the resulting ON{double_bond}NO{sup -} radical is preserved; (2) although cis- and trans-ON{double_bond}NO{sup -} are energetically nearly equivalent, the barrier for the trans-cis isomerization is prohibitively high because of the partial double character of the NN bond; (3) the calculations confirm that the UV spectrum of ONNO{sup -} was misinterpreted in the earlier pulse radiolysis work, and its more recent revision has been justified. For the N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} ion, the symmetric isomer the dominant observable species, and the asymmetric isomer contributes insignificantly to the experimental spectrum. Coherent analysis of the calculated and experimental data suggests a reinterpretation of the N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -} + NO reaction mechanism according to which the reaction evenly bifurcates to yield both the symmetric and asymmetric isomers of N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}. While the latter isomer rapidly decomposes to the final NO{sub 2}{sup -} + N{sub 2}O products, the former isomer is stable toward this decomposition, but its formation is reversible with the homolysis equilibrium constant K{sub hom} = 2.2 x 10{sup -7} M. Collectively, these results demonstrate that advanced theoretical modeling can be of significant benefit in structural and mechanistic analysis on the basis of the electronic spectra of aqueous transients.

    18. Computational Structural Mechanics

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      load-2 TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling Computational Structural Mechanics Overview of CSM Computational structural mechanics is a well-established methodology for the design and analysis of many components and structures found in the transportation field. Modern finite-element models (FEMs) play a major role in these evaluations, and sophisticated software, such as the commercially available LS-DYNA® code, is

    19. Cambridge Structural Database

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Cambridge Structural Database Cambridge Structural Database Los Alamos researchers can access WebCSD from offsite via Remote Access. Question? 667-5809 Email Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) includes bibliographic, chemical, and crystallographic information for organic molecules and metal-organic compounds. The crystal structure data comes from the open literature or direct deposits by researchers. The CSD System incorporations a suite of flexible search and analysis tools. The Research

    20. Crystallographic analysis of human hemoglobin elucidates the structural basis of the potent and dual antisickling activity of pyridyl derivatives of vanillin

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Ghatge, Mohini S.; Musayev, Faik N.; Parikh, Apurvasena; Chen, Qiukan; Yang, Jisheng; Nnamani, Ijeoma; Danso-Danquah, Richmond; Eseonu, Dorothy N.; Asakura, Toshio; Abraham, Donald J.; Venitz, Jurgen; Safo, Martin K.

      2011-11-01

      Pyridyl derivatives of vanillin increase the fraction of the more soluble oxygenated sickle hemoglobin and/or directly increase the solubility of deoxygenated sickle hemoglobin. Crystallographic analysis reveals the structural basis of the potent and dual antisickling activity of these derivatives. Vanillin has previously been studied clinically as an antisickling agent to treat sickle-cell disease. In vitro investigations with pyridyl derivatives of vanillin, including INN-312 and INN-298, showed as much as a 90-fold increase in antisickling activity compared with vanillin. The compounds preferentially bind to and modify sickle hemoglobin (Hb S) to increase the affinity of Hb for oxygen. INN-312 also led to a considerable increase in the solubility of deoxygenated Hb S under completely deoxygenated conditions. Crystallographic studies of normal human Hb with INN-312 and INN-298 showed that the compounds form Schiff-base adducts with the N-terminus of the ?-subunits to constrain the liganded (or relaxed-state) Hb conformation relative to the unliganded (or tense-state) Hb conformation. Interestingly, while INN-298 binds and directs its meta-positioned pyridine-methoxy moiety (relative to the aldehyde moiety) further down the central water cavity of the protein, that of INN-312, which is ortho to the aldehyde, extends towards the surface of the protein. These studies suggest that these compounds may act to prevent sickling of SS cells by increasing the fraction of the soluble high-affinity Hb S and/or by stereospecific inhibition of deoxygenated Hb S polymerization.

    1. Analysis of the GaInP/GaAs/1-eV/Ge Cell and Related Structures for Terrestrial Concentrator Application: Preprint

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Geisz, J. F.

      2002-05-01

      This conference paper describes the analysis of the potential of GaInP/GaAs/1-eV/Ge four-junction solar cell to improve on the efficiency of the state-of-the-art GaInP/GaAs/Ge benchmark. We emphasize three factors: (1) The newly proposed terrestrial concentrator spectrum has a lower ratio of red to blue light than does the old AM1.5 direct standard spectrum. (2) Standard two-layer antireflection coatings do not provide near-zero reflectance over the full spectral range of interest for these devices. (3) GaInNAs junctions used to date for the 1-eV junction have quantum efficiencies less than {approx}75%. These factors all limit the device current, adversely affecting the four-junction efficiency. We discuss strategies for ameliorating this problem, including going to alternate structures such as a GaInP/GaAs/0.9-eV three-junction device.

    2. Kinematic Interaction and Rocking Effects on the Seismic Response of Viaducts on Pile Foundations

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Dezi, F.; Carbonari, S.; Leoni, G.

      2008-07-08

      This paper is aimed at providing a contribution for a more accurate and effective design of bridges founded on piles. A numerical model is employed herein to determine the stresses and displacements in the piles taking into account soil-foundation-structure interaction. A 3D finite element approach is developed for piles and superstructure whereas the soil is assumed to be a Winkler-type medium. The method is applied to single piers representative for a class of bridges. Varying the soil layers characteristics and the pile spacing (from 3 to 5 diameters), bending and axial stresses along piles as well as the pier base shear are computed. A comparison with respect to a fixed-base model is provided. Special issues such as the contribution of the soil profile, of the local amplification and of the rocking at the foundation level are discussed. Soil-structure interaction is found to be essential for effective design of bridges especially for squat piers and soft soil.

    3. Polarity of annealing and structural analysis of the RNase H resistant alpha-5'-d(TACACA). beta-5'-r(AUGUGU) hybrid determined by high-field sup 1 H, sup 13 C, and sup 31 P NMR analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Gmeiner, W.H.; Rao, K.E.; Rayner, B.; Vasseur, J.J.; Morvan, F.; Imbach, J.L.; Lown, J.W. )

      1990-11-13

      The novel hybrid duplex alpha-5'-d(TACACA)-3'.beta-5'-r(AUGUGU)-3' was analyzed extensively by 1D and 2D NMR methods. Two forms of the duplex exist in about an 80:20 ratio. Analysis of the exchangeable imino protons of the major component revealed that three AU and one AT base pair are present in addition to two GC base pairs, confirming that the duplex anneals in parallel orientation. The presence of the AT base pair, which can only be accounted for by a parallel duplex, was confirmed by a selective INEPT experiment, which correlated the thymidine imino proton to its C5 carbon. The lesser antiparallel form could be detected by exchangeable and nonexchangeable proton resonances in both strands. An exchange peak was observed in the NOESY spectrum for the thymidine methyl group resonance in both the predominant and lesser conformations, indicating the lifetime of the individual structures was on the millisecond time scale. The nonexchangeable protons of the predominant duplex were assigned by standard methods. The sugar pucker of the ribonucleosides was determined to be of the S type by a pseudorotation analysis according to Altona, with the J-couplings measured from the multiplet components of the phase-sensitive COSY experiment. The NOE pattern observed for the alpha-deoxynucleosides also suggested an S-type sugar pucker. The adoption of an S-type sugar pucker for both strands indicates that, in contrast to RNA.DNA duplexes formed exclusively from beta-nucleotides, the alpha-DNA.beta-RNA duplex may form a B-type helix. The 31P resonances of the alpha and beta strands have very different chemical shifts in the hybrid duplex and the difference persists above the helix melting temperature, indicating an intrinsic difference in 31P chemical shift for nucleotides differing only in the configuration about the glycosidic bond.

    4. Strong far-infrared cooling lines, peculiar CO kinematics, and possible star-formation suppression in Hickson compact group 57

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Ogle, P. M.; Rich, J. A.; Xu, C. K.; Lisenfeld, U.; Bitsakis, T.; Guillard, P.; Charmandaris, V.; Cluver, M.; Jarrett, T.; Dopita, M. A.; Kewley, L. J.; Freeland, E.; Rasmussen, J.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.

      2014-11-10

      We present [C II] and [O I] observations from Herschel and CO(1-0) maps from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) of the Hickson compact group HCG 57, focusing on the galaxies HCG 57a and HCG 57d. HCG 57a has been previously shown to contain enhanced quantities of warm molecular hydrogen consistent with shock or turbulent heating. Our observations show that HCG 57d has strong [C II] emission compared to L {sub FIR} and weak CO(1-0), while in HCG 57a, both the [C II] and CO(1-0) are strong. HCG 57a lies at the upper end of the normal distribution of the [C II]/CO and [C II]/FIR ratios, and its far-infrared (FIR) cooling supports a low-density, warm, diffuse gas that falls close to the boundary of acceptable models of a photon-dominated region. However, the power radiated in the [C II] and warm H{sub 2} emissions have similar magnitudes, as seen in other shock-dominated systems and predicted by recent models. We suggest that shock heating of the [C II] is a viable alternative to photoelectric heating in violently disturbed, diffuse gas. The existence of shocks is also consistent with the peculiar CO kinematics in the galaxy, indicating that highly noncircular motions are present. These kinematically disturbed CO regions also show evidence of suppressed star formation, falling a factor of 10-30 below normal galaxies on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We suggest that the peculiar properties of both galaxies are consistent with a highly dissipative, off-center collisional encounter between HCG 57d and 57a, creating ring-like morphologies in both systems. Highly dissipative gas-on-gas collisions may be more common in dense groups because of the likelihood of repeated multiple encounters. The possibility of shock-induced star-formation suppression may explain why a subset of these HCG galaxies has been found previously to fall in the mid-infrared green valley.

    5. TRENDS IN DWARF EARLY-TYPE KINEMATICS WITH CLUSTER-CENTRIC RADIUS DRIVEN BY TIDAL STIRRING

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Benson, A. J.; Toloba, E.; Simon, J. D.; Mayer, L.; Guhathakurta, P.

      2015-02-01

      We model the dynamics of dwarf early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster when subject to a variety of environmental processes. We focus on how these processes imprint trends in the dynamical state (rotational versus pressure support as measured by the λ{sub Re/2}{sup ∗} statistic) with projected distance from the cluster center, and compare these results to observational estimates. We find a large scatter in the gradient of λ{sub Re/2}{sup ∗} with projected radius. A statistical analysis shows that models with no environmental effects produce gradients as steep as those observed in none of the 100 cluster realizations we consider, while in a model incorporating tidal stirring by the cluster potential 34% of realizations produce gradients as steep as that observed. Our results suggest that tidal stirring may be the cause of the observed radial dependence of dwarf early-type dynamics in galaxy clusters.

    6. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems | Department of Energy Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy,

    7. Distribution and kinematics of neutral hydrogen gas and the radio continuum emission in barred spiral galaxies

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Ondrechen, M.P.

      1985-01-01

      VLA radio synthesis observations of three barred spiral galaxies, NGC 1097, NGC 1365, and M83 are presented. Neutral hydrogen spectral line observations were made, as well as continuum observations at wavelengths of 6 cm and 20 cm. The continuum observations of the bars of NGC 1097 and M83 reveal that the radio emission is coincident with the linear dust lanes in the bars, that it is non-thermal in origin, and is moderately polarized. These data show that the dust lanes are generated by shocks, confirming a major theoretical prediction of bar structure. Spectral line observations of the neutral hydrogen gas reveal many interesting properties of these galaxies. Direct observation of the gas flow in the bar of NGC 1097 confirmed the presence of noncircular motions, of similar magnitude, to those predicted based on the presence of the bar and its associated shocks. Noncircular motions in the spiral arms of NGC 1097 and NGC 1365 were also found. The distribution of neutral hydrogen gas in the three galaxies has two common properties. In each galaxy, the peak surface densities of hydrogen gas and the optical spiral arms are coincident. Also, there are rings of gas at radii just larger than the bar lengths in each galaxy, with the greatest concentration of gas occurring at the ends of the bars.

    8. Improved radiative corrections to (e,e{sup '}p) experiments: Explicit treatment of kinematical corrections in multiphoton bremsstrahlung

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Weissbach, Florian; Hencken, Kai; Kiselev, Daniela; Trautmann, Dirk

      2009-08-15

      Radiative processes lead to important corrections to (e,e{sup '}p) experiments. While radiative corrections can be calculated exactly in QED and to a good accuracy also including hadronic corrections, these corrections cannot be included into data analyses to arbitrary orders exactly. Nevertheless consideration of multiphoton bremsstrahlung above the low-energy cutoff is important for many (e,e{sup '}p) experiments. To date, higher-order bremsstrahlung effects concerning electron scattering experiments have been implemented approximately by employing the soft-photon approximation (SPA). In this paper we propose a novel approach to multiphoton emission which partially removes the SPA from (e,e{sup '}p) experiments. In this combined approach one hard photon is treated exactly; and additional (softer) bremsstrahlung photons are taken into account resorting to the soft-photon approximation. This partial removal of the soft-photon approximation is shown to be relevant for the missing-energy distribution for several kinematic settings at MAMI and TJNAF energies.

    9. A VLT/FLAMES STUDY OF THE PECULIAR INTERMEDIATE-AGE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR CLUSTER NGC 1846. I. KINEMATICS

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Mackey, A. D.; Da Costa, G. S.; Yong, D.; Ferguson, A. M. N.

      2013-01-01

      In this paper we present high-resolution VLT/FLAMES observations of red giant stars in the massive intermediate-age Large Magellanic Cloud star cluster NGC 1846, which, on the basis of its extended main-sequence turnoff (EMSTO), possesses an internal age spread of Almost-Equal-To 300 Myr. We describe in detail our target selection and data reduction procedures, and construct a sample of 21 stars possessing radial velocities indicating their membership of NGC 1846 at high confidence. We consider high-resolution spectra of the planetary nebula Mo-17, and conclude that this object is also a member of the cluster. Our measured radial velocities allow us to conduct a detailed investigation of the internal kinematics of NGC 1846, the first time this has been done for an EMSTO system. The key result of this work is that the cluster exhibits a significant degree of systemic rotation, of a magnitude comparable to the mean velocity dispersion. Using an extensive suite of Monte Carlo models we demonstrate that, despite our relatively small sample size and the substantial fraction of unresolved binary stars in the cluster, the rotation signal we detect is very likely to be genuine. Our observations are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of simulations modeling the formation of multiple populations of stars in globular clusters, where a dynamically cold, rapidly rotating second generation is a common feature. NGC 1846 is less than one relaxation time old, so any dynamical signatures encoded during its formation ought to remain present.

    10. Kinematical correlations of dielectrons from semileptonic decays of heavy mesons and Drell-Yan processes at BNL RHIC

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Maciula, R.; Slipek, G.; Szczurek, A.

      2011-03-01

      We discuss kinematical correlations between charged leptons from semileptonic decays of open charm/bottom leptons produced in the Drell-Yan mechanism as well as some other mechanisms not included so far in the literature in proton-proton scattering at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The distributions of charm and bottom quarks/antiquarks are calculated in the framework of the k{sub t}-factorization approach. For this calculation we use different unintegrated parton distributions from the literature. The hadronization of heavy quarks is done with the help of well-known fragmentation functions. Uncertainties of our predictions related to heavy quark masses, factorization, and renormalization scales as well as due to the choice of fragmentation model are also discussed. We use semileptonic decay functions found by fitting recent semileptonic data obtained by the CLEO and BABAR collaborations. The Drell-Yan processes were calculated including transverse momenta of quarks and antiquarks, using the Kwiecinski parton distributions. We have also taken into consideration reactions initiated by purely QED {gamma}{sup *{gamma}*} fusion in elastic and inelastic pp collisions as well as a recently proposed diffractive mechanism of exclusive charm-anticharm production. The contribution of the latter mechanism is rather small. We get a good description of the dilepton invariant mass spectrum measured recently by the PHENIX Collaboration and present predictions for the dilepton pair transverse momentum distribution as well as the distribution in the azimuthal angle between electron and positron.

    11. THE KINEMATICS AND PLASMA PROPERTIES OF A SOLAR SURGE TRIGGERED BY CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY IN AR11271

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kayshap, P.; Srivastava, Abhishek K. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 129 (India)] [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 129 (India); Murawski, K., E-mail: kmur@kft.umcs.lublin.pl [Group of Astrophysics, UMCS, ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

      2013-01-20

      We observe a solar surge in NOAA AR11271 using the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 304 A image data on 2011 August 25. The surge rises vertically from its origin up to a height of Almost-Equal-To 65 Mm with a terminal velocity of Almost-Equal-To 100 km s{sup -1}, and thereafter falls and fades gradually. The total lifetime of the surge was Almost-Equal-To 20 minutes. We also measure the temperature and density distribution of the observed surge during its maximum rise and find an average temperature and a density of 2.0 MK and 4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}, respectively. The temperature map shows the expansion and mixing of cool plasma lagging behind the hot coronal plasma along the surge. Because SDO/HMI temporal image data do not show any detectable evidence of significant photospheric magnetic field cancellation for the formation of the observed surge, we infer that it is probably driven by magnetic-reconnection-generated thermal energy in the lower chromosphere. The radiance (and thus the mass density) oscillations near the base of the surge are also evident, which may be the most likely signature of its formation by a reconnection-generated pulse. In support of the present observational baseline of the triggering of the surge due to chromospheric heating, we devise a numerical model with conceivable implementation of the VAL-C atmosphere and a thermal pulse as an initial trigger. We find that the pulse steepens into a slow shock at higher altitudes which triggers plasma perturbations exhibiting the observed features of the surge, e.g., terminal velocity, height, width, lifetime, and heated fine structures near its base.

    12. Kinematic and Hydrometer Data Products from Scanning Radars during MC3E

      DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

      matthews, Alyssa; Dolan, Brenda; Rutledge, Steven

      2016-02-29

      Recently the Radar Meteorology Group at Colorado State University has completed major case studies of some top cases from MC3E including 25 April, 20 May and 23 May 2011. A discussion on the analysis methods as well as radar quality control methods is included. For each case, a brief overview is first provided. Then, multiple Doppler (using available X-SAPR and C-SAPR data) analyses are presented including statistics on vertical air motions, sub-divided by convective and stratiform precipitation. Mean profiles and CFAD's of vertical motion are included to facilitate comparison with ASR model simulations. Retrieved vertical motion has also been verified with vertically pointing profiler data. Finally for each case, hydrometeor types are included derived from polarimetric radar observations. The latter can be used to provide comparisons to model-generated hydrometeor fields. Instructions for accessing all the data fields are also included. The web page can be found at: http://radarmet.atmos.colostate.edu/mc3e/research/

    13. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Red-Horse, J.R.

      1997-04-01

      Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

    14. Development of the Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory modeling package for the kinematic design and optimization of the Future Armor Rearm System robot

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      March-Leuba, S.; Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M. ); Dubey, R.V. . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

      1992-08-01

      A new program package, Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory (SML), for the automatic generation of both kinematic and static manipulator models in symbolic form is presented. Critical design parameters may be identified and optimized using symbolic models as shown in the sample application presented for the Future Armor Rearm System (FARS) arm. The computer-aided development of the symbolic models yields equations with reduced numerical complexity. Important considerations have been placed on the closed form solutions simplification and on the user friendly operation. The main emphasis of this research is the development of a methodology which is implemented in a computer program capable of generating symbolic kinematic and static forces models of manipulators. The fact that the models are obtained trigonometrically reduced is among the most significant results of this work and the most difficult to implement. Mathematica, a commercial program that allows symbolic manipulation, is used to implement the program package. SML is written such that the user can change any of the subroutines or create new ones easily. To assist the user, an on-line help has been written to make of SML a user friendly package. Some sample applications are presented. The design and optimization of the 5-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) FARS manipulator using SML is discussed. Finally, the kinematic and static models of two different 7-DOF manipulators are calculated symbolically.

    15. Development of the Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory modeling package for the kinematic design and optimization of the Future Armor Rearm System robot. Ammunition Logistics Program

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      March-Leuba, S.; Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M.; Dubey, R.V.

      1992-08-01

      A new program package, Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory (SML), for the automatic generation of both kinematic and static manipulator models in symbolic form is presented. Critical design parameters may be identified and optimized using symbolic models as shown in the sample application presented for the Future Armor Rearm System (FARS) arm. The computer-aided development of the symbolic models yields equations with reduced numerical complexity. Important considerations have been placed on the closed form solutions simplification and on the user friendly operation. The main emphasis of this research is the development of a methodology which is implemented in a computer program capable of generating symbolic kinematic and static forces models of manipulators. The fact that the models are obtained trigonometrically reduced is among the most significant results of this work and the most difficult to implement. Mathematica, a commercial program that allows symbolic manipulation, is used to implement the program package. SML is written such that the user can change any of the subroutines or create new ones easily. To assist the user, an on-line help has been written to make of SML a user friendly package. Some sample applications are presented. The design and optimization of the 5-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) FARS manipulator using SML is discussed. Finally, the kinematic and static models of two different 7-DOF manipulators are calculated symbolically.

    16. THE BROWN DWARF KINEMATICS PROJECT (BDKP). III. PARALLAXES FOR 70 ULTRACOOL DWARFS

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Shara, Michael M.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Walter, Frederick M.; Van der Bliek, Nicole; Vrba, Frederick J.; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

      2012-06-10

      polynomial for analysis.

    17. KAT-7 SCIENCE VERIFICATION: USING H I OBSERVATIONS OF NGC 3109 TO UNDERSTAND ITS KINEMATICS AND MASS DISTRIBUTION

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Carignan, C.; Frank, B. S.; Hess, K. M.; Lucero, D. M.; Randriamampandry, T. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Goedhart, S.; Passmoor, S. S., E-mail: ccarignan@ast.uct.ac.za [SKA South Africa, The Park, Park Road, Pinelands, 7405 (South Africa)

      2013-09-15

      H I observations of the Magellanic-type spiral NGC 3109, obtained with the seven dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), are used to analyze its mass distribution. Our results are compared to those obtained using Very Large Array (VLA) data. KAT-7 is a pathfinder of the Square Kilometer Array precursor MeerKAT, which is under construction. The short baselines and low system temperature of the telescope make it sensitive to large-scale, low surface brightness emission. The new observations with KAT-7 allow the measurement of the rotation curve (RC) of NGC 3109 out to 32', doubling the angular extent of existing measurements. A total H I mass of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is derived, 40% more than what is detected by the VLA observations. The observationally motivated pseudo-isothermal dark matter (DM) halo model can reproduce the observed RC very well, but the cosmologically motivated Navarro-Frenk-White DM model gives a much poorer fit to the data. While having a more accurate gas distribution has reduced the discrepancy between the observed RC and the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) models, this is done at the expense of having to use unrealistic mass-to-light ratios for the stellar disk and/or very large values for the MOND universal constant a{sub 0}. Different distances or H I contents cannot reconcile MOND with the observed kinematics, in view of the small errors on these two quantities. As with many slowly rotating gas-rich galaxies studied recently, the present result for NGC 3109 continues to pose a serious challenge to the MOND theory.

    18. A criterion for the dynamical to kinematical transition of x-ray diffraction on a bent crystal

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kushnir, V.I.; Macrander, A.T.

      1993-09-01

      It is well known that the peak reflectivity of a bent crystal, generally speaking, is smaller than that of a plane crystal, and it goes to zero when the crystal curvature goes to infinity. The reason for this is the transition between dynamical and kinematical diffraction that takes place as the crystal curvature increases. The physical explanation is as follows: the deviation from exact Bragg position along the beam changes so fast that the thickness over which the beam is within a Darwin width becomes too small to reflect the beam. Bent crystals are widely used as focusing elements in X-ray optics, and estimation of whether or not a bent crystal is still perfect enough to provide good reflectivity is of great importance. Currently the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is considering a number of bent crystals as focusing elements for future APS beamlines, including a sagittaly focusing monochromator and bent backscattering analyzer for inelastic X-ray scattering experiments. A criterion is given in answer to the question: To what extent is it possible to bend a crystal without loss of X-ray peak reflectivity? An expression based on the work of Chukhovskii, Gabrielyan and Petrashen, is formulated that applies to anisotropic cubic crystal and that can be used not only for conventional asymmetric Bragg diffraction, but also for inclined crystal diffraction. The following special cases are treated as examples: isotropic crystal, standard symmetrical Bragg diffraction, extremely asymmetric diffraction, and backscattering with Bragg angles near 90{degree}. In addition, an asymptotic behavior for high energies is detailed.

    19. Mechanism analysis of a cam driven rotary engine

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Craven, R.; Cox, J.; Smith, J.E.; Ford, S.

      1988-01-01

      The plate cam rotary mechanism has application as an IC engine, a pump, a compressor or any similar device. The basic design and operating parameters are explained. The kinematic analysis provides the relationships necessary for a parametric cam track equation. Various parameters are explained and tracks for sinusoidal motion and dwell motion are computed. Various applications are discussed of how this mechanism may be employed. 6 references.

    20. STRUCtural Simulator

      Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

      2004-07-01

      STRUC-ANL is a derivative of the FLUSTR-ANL finite element code. It contains only the structural capabilities of the original fluid-structural FLUSTR code.

    1. Structural Materials

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Structural Materials Development enables advanced technologies through the discovery, development, and demonstration of cost-effective advanced structural materials for use in ...

    2. Railway vehicle body structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Not Available

      1985-01-01

      The strength and durability of railway vehicle structures is a major topic of engineering research and design. To reflect this importance the Railway Division of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers organised a conference to discuss all matters relating to railway vehicle design. This book presents the papers discussed in that conference. The contents include: Vehicle body design and the UIC's international contribution; LUL prototype 1986 stock - body structure; vehicle structure for the intermediate capacity transmit system vehicles; car body technology of advanced light rapid transit vehicles; concepts, techniques and experience in the idealization of car body structures for finite element analysis; Calcutta metropolitan railway; design for a lightweight diesel multiple unit body; the design of lightweight inter-city coal structures; the BREL international coach body shell structure; new concepts and design techniques versus material standards; structures of BR diesel electric freight locomotives; structural design philosophy for electric locomotives; suspension design for a locomotive with low structural frequencies; freight wagon structures; a finite element study of coal bodyside panels including the effects of joint flexibility; a fresh approach to the problem of car body design strength; energy absorption in automatic couplings and draw gear; passenger vehicle design loads and structural crashworthiness; design of the front part of railway vehicles (in case of frontal impact); the development of a theoretical technique for rail vehicle structural crashworthiness.

    3. Structural Analysis of the Mn(IV)/Fe(III) Cofactor of Chlamydia Trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase By Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy And Density Functional Theory Calculations

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Younker, J.M.; Krest, C.M.; Jiang, W.; Krebs, C.; Bollinger, J.M.Jr.; Green, M.T.

      2009-05-28

      The class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from Chlamydia trachomatis (C{bar A}) uses a stable Mn(lV)/ Fe(lll) cofactor to initiate nucleotide reduction by a free-radical mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to postulate a structure for this cofactor. Fe and Mn K-edge EXAFS data yield an intermetallic distance of -2.92 {angstrom}. The Mn data also suggest the presence of a short 1.74 {angstrom} Mn-O bond. These metrics are compared to the results of DFT calculations on 12 cofactor models derived from the crystal structure of the inactive Fe2(lll/ III) form of the protein. Models are differentiated by the protonation states of their bridging and terminal OH{sub x} ligands as well as the location of the Mn(lV) ion (site 1 or 2). The models that agree best with experimental observation feature a{mu}-1, 3-carboxylate bridge (E120), terminal solvent (H{sub 2}O/OH) to site 1, one {mu}-O bridge, and one {mu}-OH bridge. The site-placement of the metal ions cannot be discerned from the available data.

    4. Exploration of R2XM2 (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge): Structural Motifs, the novel Compound Gd2AlGe2 and Analysis of the U3Si2 and Zr3Al2 Structure Types

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Sean William McWhorter

      2006-05-01

      the building blocks. The starting point for these models was the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure, and models were created to simulate the transition from the idealized U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure to the distorted Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structure. Analysis of the band structures of the models has shown that the transition from the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure to the Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structure lifts degeneracies along the {Lambda} {yields} Z direction, indicating a Peierls-type mechanism for the displacement occurring in the positions of the Zr atoms.

    5. Supercomputing and nonlinear seismic structural response of freeway structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Goudreau, G.L.; Kay, G.; McCallen, D.; Schauer, D.; Logan, R.

      1990-11-01

      The Loma Prieta earthquake stimulated a major reassessment of Bay Area structures to consider much larger earthquakes than originally designed for. The supercomputers of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were used to demonstrate the feasibility of nonlinear structural time history analysis to assess likelihood of failure of critical structures.

    6. Crystal Structures and Small-angle X-ray Scattering Analysis of UDP-galactopyranose Mutase from the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Karr, Dale B.; Nix, Jay C.; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J.

      2015-10-15

      UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the conversion of UDP-galactopyranose to UDP-galactofuranose, which is a central reaction in galactofuranose biosynthesis. Galactofuranose has never been found in humans but is an essential building block of the cell wall and extracellular matrix of many bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. The importance of UGM for the viability of many pathogens and its absence in humans make UGM a potential drug target. Here we report the first crystal structures and small-angle x-ray scattering data for UGM from the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, the causative agent of aspergillosis. The structures reveal that Aspergillus UGM has several extra secondary and tertiary structural elements that are not found in bacterial UGMs yet are important for substrate recognition and oligomerization. Small-angle x-ray scattering data show that Aspergillus UGM forms a tetramer in solution, which is unprecedented for UGMs. The binding of UDP or the substrate induces profound conformational changes in the enzyme. Two loops on opposite sides of the active site move toward each other by over 10 {angstrom} to cover the substrate and create a closed active site. The degree of substrate-induced conformational change exceeds that of bacterial UGMs and is a direct consequence of the unique quaternary structure of Aspergillus UGM. Galactopyranose binds at the re face of the FAD isoalloxazine with the anomeric carbon atom poised for nucleophilic attack by the FAD N5 atom. The structural data provide new insight into substrate recognition and the catalytic mechanism and thus will aid inhibitor design.

    7. Structure function monitor

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Ackermann, Mark R.

      2012-01-24

      Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

    8. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; Schubot, Florian D.

      2015-08-28

      Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domainmore » of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Lastly, additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD.« less

    9. Structural and biophysical analysis of interactions between cod and human uracil-DNA N-glycosylase (UNG) and UNG inhibitor (Ugi)

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Assefa, Netsanet Gizaw; Niiranen, Laila; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti Schrøder; Smalås, Arne Oskar; Willassen, Nils Peder; Moe, Elin

      2014-08-01

      A structural and biophysical study of the interactions between cod and human uracil-DNA N-glycosylase (UNG) and their inhibitor Ugi is presented. The stronger interaction between cod UNG and Ugi can be explained by a greater positive electrostatic surface potential. Uracil-DNA N-glycosylase from Atlantic cod (cUNG) shows cold-adapted features such as high catalytic efficiency, a low temperature optimum for activity and reduced thermal stability compared with its mesophilic homologue human UNG (hUNG). In order to understand the role of the enzyme–substrate interaction related to the cold-adapted properties, the structure of cUNG in complex with a bacteriophage encoded natural UNG inhibitor (Ugi) has been determined. The interaction has also been analyzed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The crystal structure of cUNG–Ugi was determined to a resolution of 1.9 Å with eight complexes in the asymmetric unit related through noncrystallographic symmetry. A comparison of the cUNG–Ugi complex with previously determined structures of UNG–Ugi shows that they are very similar, and confirmed the nucleotide-mimicking properties of Ugi. Biophysically, the interaction between cUNG and Ugi is very strong and shows a binding constant (K{sub b}) which is one order of magnitude larger than that for hUNG–Ugi. The binding of both cUNG and hUNG to Ugi was shown to be favoured by both enthalpic and entropic forces; however, the binding of cUNG to Ugi is mainly dominated by enthalpy, while the entropic term is dominant for hUNG. The observed differences in the binding properties may be explained by an overall greater positive electrostatic surface potential in the protein–Ugi interface of cUNG and the slightly more hydrophobic surface of hUNG.

    10. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A. Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

      2015-03-15

      Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (R{sub work} = 16.2, R{sub free} = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

    11. Pyridine Nucleotide Complexes with Bacillus anthracis Coenzyme A-Disulfide Reductase: A Structural Analysis of Dual NAD(P)H Specificity

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Wallen,J.; Paige, C.; Mallett, T.; Karplus, P.; Claiborne, A.

      2008-01-01

      We have recently reported that CoASH is the major low-molecular weight thiol in Bacillus anthracis, and we have now characterized the kinetic and redox properties of the B. anthracis coenzyme A-disulfide reductase (CoADR, BACoADR) and determined the crystal structure at 2.30 Angstroms resolution. While the Staphylococcus aureus and Borrelia burgdorferi CoADRs exhibit strong preferences for NADPH and NADH, respectively, B. anthracis CoADR can use either pyridine nucleotide equally well. Sequence elements within the respective NAD(P)H-binding motifs correctly reflect the preferences for S. aureus and Bo. burgdorferi CoADRs, but leave questions as to how BACoADR can interact with both pyridine nucleotides. The structures of the NADH and NADPH complexes at ca. 2.3 Angstroms resolution reveal that a loop consisting of residues Glu180-Thr187 becomes ordered and changes conformation on NAD(P)H binding. NADH and NADPH interact with nearly identical conformations of this loop; the latter interaction, however, involves a novel binding mode in which the 2'-phosphate of NADPH points out toward solvent. In addition, the NAD(P)H-reduced BACoADR structures provide the first view of the reduced form (Cys42-SH/CoASH) of the Cys42-SSCoA redox center. The Cys42-SH side chain adopts a new conformation in which the conserved Tyr367'-OH and Tyr425'-OH interact with the nascent thiol(ate) on the flavin si-face. Kinetic data with Y367F, Y425F, and Y367, 425F BACoADR mutants indicate that Tyr425' is the primary proton donor in catalysis, with Tyr367' functioning as a cryptic alternate donor in the absence of Tyr425'.

    12. Structural Analysis of a Viral Ovarian Tumor Domain Protease from the Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Complex with Covalently Bonded Ubiquitin

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Capodagli, Glenn C.; McKercher, Marissa A.; Baker, Erica A.; Masters, Emily M.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Pegan, Scott D.

      2014-10-02

      Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is a tick-borne, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA [ssRNA(-)] nairovirus that produces fever, prostration, and severe hemorrhages in humans. With fatality rates for CCHF ranging up to 70% based on several factors, CCHF is considered a dangerous emerging disease. Originally identified in the former Soviet Union and the Congo, CCHF has rapidly spread across large sections of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Recent reports have identified a viral homologue of the ovarian tumor protease superfamily (vOTU) within its L protein. This protease has subsequently been implicated in downregulation of the type I interferon immune response through cleavage of posttranslational modifying proteins ubiquitin (Ub) and the Ub-like interferon-simulated gene 15 (ISG15). Additionally, homologues of vOTU have been suggested to perform similar roles in the positive-sense, single-stranded RNA [ssRNA(+)] arteriviruses. By utilizing X-ray crystallographic techniques, the structure of vOTU covalently bound to ubiquitin propylamine, a suicide substrate of the enzyme, was elucidated to 1.7 {angstrom}, revealing unique structural elements that define this new subclass of the OTU superfamily. In addition, kinetic studies were carried out with aminomethylcoumarin (AMC) conjugates of monomeric Ub, ISG15, and NEDD8 (neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 8) substrates in order to provide quantitative insights into vOTU's preference for Ub and Ub-like substrates.

    13. Structural characterization of Green River oil-shale at high-pressure using pair distribution function analysis and small angle x-ray scattering.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Locke, D. R.; Chupas, P. J.; Chapman, K. W.; Pugmire, R. J.; Winans, R. E.; Univ. of Utah

      2008-01-01

      The compression behavior of a silicate-rich oil shale from the Green River formation in the pressure range 0.0-2.4 GPa was studied using in situ high pressure X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) measurements for the sample contained within a Paris-Edinburgh cell. The real-space local structural information in the PDF, G(r), was used to evaluate the compressibility of the oil shale. Specifically, the pressure-induced reduction in the medium- to long-range atom distances (6-20 {angstrom}) yielded an average sample compressibility corresponding to a bulk modulus of ca. 61-67 GPa. A structural model consisting of a three phase mixture of the principal crystalline oil shale components (quartz, albite and Illite) provided a good fit to the ambient pressure PDF data (R 30.7%). Indeed the features in the PDF beyond 6 {angstrom}, were similarly well fit by a single phase model of the highest symmetry, highly crystalline quartz component.

    14. Structural Materials

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Structural Materials Structural Materials Development enables advanced technologies through the discovery, development, and demonstration of cost-effective advanced structural materials for use in extreme environments (high-temperature, high-stress, erosive, and corrosive environments, including the performance of materials in contact with molten slags and salts). Research includes materials design and discovery, materials processing and manufacturing, and service-life prediction of materials

    15. Crystal structure, mutational analysis and RNA-dependent ATPase activity of the yeast DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor Prp28

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Jacewicz, Agata; Schwer, Beate; Smith, Paul; Shuman, Stewart

      2014-10-10

      Yeast Prp28 is a DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor implicated in displacing U1 snRNP from the 5' splice site. Here we report that the 588-aa Prp28 protein consists of a trypsin-sensitive 126-aa N-terminal segment (of which aa 1–89 are dispensable for Prp28 function in vivo) fused to a trypsin-resistant C-terminal catalytic domain. Purified recombinant Prp28 and Prp28-(127–588) have an intrinsic RNA-dependent ATPase activity, albeit with a low turnover number. The crystal structure of Prp28-(127–588) comprises two RecA-like domains splayed widely apart. AMPPNP•Mg2+ is engaged by the proximal domain, with proper and specific contacts from Phe194 and Gln201 (Q motif) to themore » adenine nucleobase. The triphosphate moiety of AMPPNP•Mg2+ is not poised for catalysis in the open domain conformation. Guided by the Prp28•AMPPNP structure, and that of the Drosophila Vasa•AMPPNP•Mg2+•RNA complex, we targeted 20 positions in Prp28 for alanine scanning. ATP-site components Asp341 and Glu342 (motif II) and Arg527 and Arg530 (motif VI) and RNA-site constituent Arg476 (motif Va) are essential for Prp28 activity in vivo. Synthetic lethality of double-alanine mutations highlighted functionally redundant contacts in the ATP-binding (Phe194-Gln201, Gln201-Asp502) and RNA-binding (Arg264-Arg320) sites. As a result, overexpression of defective ATP-site mutants, but not defective RNA-site mutants, elicited severe dominant-negative growth defects.« less

    16. Crystal structure, mutational analysis and RNA-dependent ATPase activity of the yeast DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor Prp28

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Jacewicz, Agata; Schwer, Beate; Smith, Paul; Shuman, Stewart

      2014-10-10

      Yeast Prp28 is a DEAD-box pre-mRNA splicing factor implicated in displacing U1 snRNP from the 5' splice site. Here we report that the 588-aa Prp28 protein consists of a trypsin-sensitive 126-aa N-terminal segment (of which aa 189 are dispensable for Prp28 function in vivo) fused to a trypsin-resistant C-terminal catalytic domain. Purified recombinant Prp28 and Prp28-(127588) have an intrinsic RNA-dependent ATPase activity, albeit with a low turnover number. The crystal structure of Prp28-(127588) comprises two RecA-like domains splayed widely apart. AMPPNPMg2+ is engaged by the proximal domain, with proper and specific contacts from Phe194 and Gln201 (Q motif) to the adenine nucleobase. The triphosphate moiety of AMPPNPMg2+ is not poised for catalysis in the open domain conformation. Guided by the Prp28AMPPNP structure, and that of the Drosophila VasaAMPPNPMg2+RNA complex, we targeted 20 positions in Prp28 for alanine scanning. ATP-site components Asp341 and Glu342 (motif II) and Arg527 and Arg530 (motif VI) and RNA-site constituent Arg476 (motif Va) are essential for Prp28 activity in vivo. Synthetic lethality of double-alanine mutations highlighted functionally redundant contacts in the ATP-binding (Phe194-Gln201, Gln201-Asp502) and RNA-binding (Arg264-Arg320) sites. As a result, overexpression of defective ATP-site mutants, but not defective RNA-site mutants, elicited severe dominant-negative growth defects.

    17. Structure-Based Analysis of Toxoplasma gondii Profilin: A Parasite-Specific Motif Is Required for Recognition by Toll-Like Receptor 11

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      K Kucera; A Koblansky; L Saunders; K Frederick; E De La Cruz; S Ghosh; Y Modis

      2011-12-31

      Profilins promote actin polymerization by exchanging ADP for ATP on monomeric actin and delivering ATP-actin to growing filament barbed ends. Apicomplexan protozoa such as Toxoplasma gondii invade host cells using an actin-dependent gliding motility. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 11 generates an innate immune response upon sensing T. gondii profilin (TgPRF). The crystal structure of TgPRF reveals a parasite-specific surface motif consisting of an acidic loop, followed by a long {beta}-hairpin. A series of structure-based profilin mutants show that TLR11 recognition of the acidic loop is responsible for most of the interleukin (IL)-12 secretion response to TgPRF in peritoneal macrophages. Deletion of both the acidic loop and the {beta}-hairpin completely abrogates IL-12 secretion. Insertion of the T. gondii acidic loop and {beta}-hairpin into yeast profilin is sufficient to generate TLR11-dependent signaling. Substitution of the acidic loop in TgPRF with the homologous loop from the apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum does not affect TLR11-dependent IL-12 secretion, while substitution with the acidic loop from Plasmodium falciparum results in reduced but significant IL-12 secretion. We conclude that the parasite-specific motif in TgPRF is the key molecular pattern recognized by TLR11. Unlike other profilins, TgPRF slows nucleotide exchange on monomeric rabbit actin and binds rabbit actin weakly. The putative TgPRF actin-binding surface includes the {beta}-hairpin and diverges widely from the actin-binding surfaces of vertebrate profilins.

    18. High-Resolution Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Mach Reflection Structures in Detonation Waves in Low-Pressure H2O2Ar Mixtures: A Summary of Results Obtained with the Adaptive Mesh Refinement Framework AMROC

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Deiterding, Ralf

      2011-01-01

      Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multidimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the nonequilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniquesmorein practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, that is, under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis, and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.less

    19. High-Resolution Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Mach Reflection Structures in Detonation Waves in Low-Pressure H 2 –O 2 –Ar Mixtures: A Summary of Results Obtained with the Adaptive Mesh Refinement Framework AMROC

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Deiterding, Ralf

      2011-01-01

      Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multidimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the nonequilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniquesmore » in practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, that is, under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis, and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.« less

    20. Analysis of Strand-Specific RNA-Seq Data Using Machine Learning Reveals the Structures of Transcription Units in Clostridium thermocellum

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Chou, Wen-Chi; Ma, Qin; Yang, Shihui; Cao, Sha; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Brown, Steven D.; Xu, Ying

      2015-03-12

      The identification of transcription units (TUs) encoded in a bacterial genome is essential to elucidation of transcriptional regulation of the organism. To gain a detailed understanding of the dynamically composed TU structures, we have used four strand-specific RNA-seq (ssRNA-seq) datasets collected under two experimental conditions to derive the genomic TU organization of Clostridium thermocellum using a machine-learning approach. Our method accurately predicted the genomic boundaries of individual TUs based on two sets of parameters measuring the RNA-seq expression patterns across the genome: expression-level continuity and variance. A total of 2590 distinct TUs are predicted based on the four RNA-seq datasets.more » Moreover, among the predicted TUs, 44% have multiple genes. We assessed our prediction method on an independent set of RNA-seq data with longer reads. The evaluation confirmed the high quality of the predicted TUs. Functional enrichment analyses on a selected subset of the predicted TUs revealed interesting biology. To demonstrate the generality of the prediction method, we have also applied the method to RNA-seq data collected on Escherichia coli and achieved high prediction accuracies. The TU prediction program named SeqTU is publicly available athttps://code.google.com/p/seqtu/. We expect that the predicted TUs can serve as the baseline information for studying transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in C. thermocellum and other bacteria.« less

    1. In-situ neutron diffraction of LaCoO3 perovskite under uniaxial compression. I. Crystal structure analysis and texture development

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Aman, Amjad; Chen, Yan; Lugovy, Mykola; Orlovskaya, Nina; Reece, Michael John; Ma, Dong; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; An, Ke

      2014-01-01

      The dynamics of texture formation, changes in crystal structure and stress accommodation mechanisms are studied in R3c rhombohedral LaCoO3 perovskite during in-situ uniaxial compression experiment by neutron diffraction. The neutron diffraction revealed the complex crystallographic changes causing the texture formation and significant straining along certain crystallographic directions during in-situ compression, which are responsible for the appearance of hysteresis and non-linear ferroelastic deformation in LaCoO3 perovskite. The irreversible strain after the first loading was connected with the appearance of non-recoverable changes in the intensity ratio of certain crystallographic peaks, causing non-reversible texture formation. However in the second loading/unloading cycle the hysteresis loop was closed and no irreversible strain appears after deformation. The significant texture formation is responsible for increase in the Young s modulus of LaCoO3 at high compressive loads, where the reported values of Young s modulus increase from 76 GPa measured at the very beginning of the loading to 194 GPa at 900 MPa applied compressive stress measured at the beginning of the unloading curve.

    2. In-situ neutron diffraction of LaCoO? perovskite under uniaxial compression. I. Crystal structure analysis and texture development

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Aman, Amjad; Orlovskaya, Nina; Chen, Yan; Lugovy, Mykola; Reece, Michael J.; Ma, Dong; Stoica, Alexandru D.; An, Ke

      2014-07-07

      The dynamics of texture formation, changes in crystal structure, and stress accommodation mechanisms have been studied in perovskite-type R3?c rhombohedral LaCoO? during uniaxial compression using in-situ neutron diffraction. The in-situ neutron diffraction revealed the complex crystallographic changes causing the texture formation and significant straining along certain crystallographic directions during compression, which are responsible for the appearance of hysteresis and non-linear ferroelastic deformation in the LaCoO? perovskite. The irreversible strain after the first loading was connected with the appearance of non-recoverable changes in the intensity ratio of certain crystallographic peaks, causing non-reversible texture formation. However, in the second loading/unloading cycle, the hysteresis loop was closed and no further irrecoverable strain appeared after deformation. The significant texture formation is responsible for an increase in the Young's modulus of LaCoO? at high compressive stresses, ranging from 76 GPa at the very beginning of the loading to 194 GPa at 900 MPa at the beginning of the unloading curve.

    3. Mutational analysis of three predicted 5'-proximal stem-loop structures in the genome of tick-borne encephalitis virus indicates different roles in RNA replication and translation

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Rouha, Harald; Hoenninger, Verena M.; Thurner, Caroline; Mandl, Christian W.

      2011-08-15

      Flavivirus gene expression is modulated by RNA secondary structure elements at the terminal ends of the viral RNA molecule. For tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), four stem-loop (SL) elements have been predicted in the first 180 nucleotides of the viral genome: 5'-SL1, 5'-SL2, 5'-SL3 and 5'-SL4. The last three of these appear to be unique to tick-borne flaviviruses. Here, we report their characterization by mutagenesis in a TBEV luciferase reporter system. By manipulating their thermodynamic properties, we found that an optimal stability of the 5'-SL2 is required for efficient RNA replication. 5'-SL3 formation is also important for viral RNA replication, but although it contains the viral start codon, its formation is dispensable for RNA translation. 5'-SL4 appears to facilitate both RNA translation and replication. Our data suggest that maintenance of the balanced thermodynamic stability of these SL elements is important for temporal regulation of its different functions.

    4. Analysis of the rotational structure in the high-resolution infrared spectra of trans-hexatriene-2-d1 and -3-d1

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Craig, Norman C.; Chen, Yihui; van Besien, Herman; Blake, Thomas A.

      2014-09-01

      The 2-d1 and 3-d1 isotopologues of trans-hexatriene have been synthesized, and their high-resolution (0.0015 cm-1) IR spectra have been recorded. For each of the isotopologues the rotational structure in four C-type bands for out-of-plane vibrational modes has been analyzed, and the ground state combination differences (GSCDs) have been pooled. Ground state rotational constants have been fitted to the GSCDs. For the 2-d species, A0, B0, and C0 values of 0.7837254(5), 0.0442806(3), and 0.0419299(2) cm-1 were fitted to 2450 GSCDs. For the 3-d species, A0, B0, and C0 values of 0.7952226(8), 0.0446149(7), and 0.0422661(4) cm-1 were fitted to 2234 GSCDs. For the eleven out-of-plane modes of the two isotopologues, predictions of anharmonic wavenumbers and harmonic intensities have been computed and compared with experiment where possible.

    5. Analysis of Strand-Specific RNA-Seq Data Using Machine Learning Reveals the Structures of Transcription Units in Clostridium thermocellum

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Chou, Wen-Chi; Ma, Qin; Yang, Shihui; Cao, Sha; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Brown, Steven D.; Xu, Ying

      2015-03-12

      The identification of transcription units (TUs) encoded in a bacterial genome is essential to elucidation of transcriptional regulation of the organism. To gain a detailed understanding of the dynamically composed TU structures, we have used four strand-specific RNA-seq (ssRNA-seq) datasets collected under two experimental conditions to derive the genomic TU organization of Clostridium thermocellum using a machine-learning approach. Our method accurately predicted the genomic boundaries of individual TUs based on two sets of parameters measuring the RNA-seq expression patterns across the genome: expression-level continuity and variance. A total of 2590 distinct TUs are predicted based on the four RNA-seq datasets. Moreover, among the predicted TUs, 44% have multiple genes. We assessed our prediction method on an independent set of RNA-seq data with longer reads. The evaluation confirmed the high quality of the predicted TUs. Functional enrichment analyses on a selected subset of the predicted TUs revealed interesting biology. To demonstrate the generality of the prediction method, we have also applied the method to RNA-seq data collected on Escherichia coli and achieved high prediction accuracies. The TU prediction program named SeqTU is publicly available athttps://code.google.com/p/seqtu/. We expect that the predicted TUs can serve as the baseline information for studying transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in C. thermocellum and other bacteria.

    6. Search for Anomalous Kinematics of Top Dilepton Events in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich

      2004-12-01

      The author presents a search for anomalous kinematics of t{bar t} dilepton events in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 193 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector. They developed a new a priori technique designed to silate the subset in a data sample revealing the largest deviation from Standard Model expectations and to quantify the significance of this departure. In the four-variable space considered, no particular subset shows a significant discrepancy and they find that the probability to obtain a data sample less consistent with the Standard Model than what is observed is 1.0-4.5%.

    7. A Mobile Motion Analysis System Using Intertial Sensors for Analysis of Lower Limb Prosthetics

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Mueller, John Kyle P; Ericson, Milton Nance; Farquhar, Ethan; Lind, Randall F; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen

      2011-01-01

      Soldiers returning from the global war on terror requiring lower leg prosthetics generally have different concerns and requirements than the typical lower leg amputee. These subjects are usually young, wish to remain active and often desire to return to active military duty. As such, they demand higher performance from their prosthetics, but are at risk for chronic injury and joint conditions in their unaffected limb. Motion analysis is a valuable tool in assessing the performance of new and existing prosthetic technologies as well as the methods in fitting these devices to both maximize performance and minimize risk of injury for the individual soldier. We are developing a mobile, low-cost motion analysis system using inertial measurement units (IMUs) and two custom force sensors that detect ground reaction forces and moments on both the unaffected limb and prosthesis. IMUs were tested on a robot programmed to simulate human gait motion. An algorithm which uses a kinematic model of the robot and an extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used to convert the rates and accelerations from the gyro and accelerometer into joint angles. Compared to encoder data from the robot, which was considered the ground truth in this experiment, the inertial measurement system had a RMSE of <1.0 degree. Collecting kinematic and kinetic data without the restrictions and expense of a motion analysis lab could help researchers, designers and prosthetists advance prosthesis technology and customize devices for individuals. Ultimately, these improvements will result in better prosthetic performance for the military population.

    8. THE KMOS{sup 3D} SURVEY: DESIGN, FIRST RESULTS, AND THE EVOLUTION OF GALAXY KINEMATICS FROM 0.7 ? z ? 2.7

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Wisnioski, E.; Frster Schreiber, N. M.; Wuyts, S.; Wuyts, E.; Bandara, K.; Genzel, R.; Bender, R.; Davies, R.; Lang, P.; Mendel, J. T.; Beifiori, A.; Chan, J.; Fabricius, M.; Fudamoto, Y.; Kulkarni, S.; Kurk, J.; Lutz, D.; Wilman, D.; Fossati, M.; Brammer, G.; and others

      2015-02-01

      We present the KMOS{sup 3D} survey, a new integral field survey of over 600 galaxies at 0.7 < z < 2.7 using KMOS at the Very Large Telescope. The KMOS{sup 3D} survey utilizes synergies with multi-wavelength ground- and space-based surveys to trace the evolution of spatially resolved kinematics and star formation from a homogeneous sample over 5Gyr of cosmic history. Targets, drawn from a mass-selected parent sample from the 3D-HST survey, cover the star formation-stellar mass (M {sub *}) and rest-frame (U V) M {sub *} planes uniformly. We describe the selection of targets, the observations, and the data reduction. In the first-year of data we detect H? emission in 191 M {sub *} = 3 10{sup 9}-7 10{sup 11} M {sub ?}galaxies at z = 0.7-1.1 and z = 1.9-2.7. In the current sample 83% of the resolved galaxies are rotation dominated, determined from a continuous velocity gradient and v {sub rot}/?{sub 0} > 1, implying that the star-forming ''main sequence'' is primarily composed of rotating galaxies at both redshift regimes. When considering additional stricter criteria, the H? kinematic maps indicate that at least ?70% of the resolved galaxies are disk-like systems. Our high-quality KMOS data confirm the elevated velocity dispersions reported in previous integral field spectroscopy studies at z ? 0.7. For rotation-dominated disks, the average intrinsic velocity dispersion decreases by a factor of two from 50 km s{sup 1}at z ? 2.3 to 25 km s{sup 1}at z ? 0.9. Combined with existing results spanning z ? 0-3, we show that disk velocity dispersions follow an evolution that is consistent with the dependence of velocity dispersion on gas fractions predicted by marginally stable disk theory.

    9. Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for...

      Office of Environmental Management (EM)

      Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for ...

    10. THE LUMINOSITY PROFILE AND STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Courteau, Stephane; Widrow, Lawrence M.; McDonald, Michael; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Zhu Yucong

      2011-09-20

      structural parameters of the M31 bulge, disk, and halo amount to 20%. If M31 and the Milky Way are at all typical, faint stellar halos should be routinely detected in galaxy surveys reaching below {mu}{sub i} {approx_equal} 27 mag arcsec{sup -2}. We stress that our results rely on this photometric analysis alone. Structural parameters may change when other fundamental constraints, such as those provided by abundance gradients and stellar kinematics, are considered simultaneously.

    11. Analysis of structure and deformation behavior of AISI 316L tensile specimens from the second operational target module at the Spallation Neutron Source

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Gussev, Maxim N.; McClintock, David A.; Garner, Frank

      2015-08-05

      In an earlier publication, tensile testing was performed on specimens removed from the first two operational targets of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). There were several anomalous features in the results. First, some specimens had very large elongations (up to 57%) while others had significantly smaller values. Second, there was a larger than the usual amount of data scatter in the elongation results. Third, the stress-strain diagrams of nominally similar specimens spanned a wide range of behavior ranging from expected irradiation-induced hardening to varying levels of force drop after yield point and indirect signs of "traveling deformation wave" behavior associated with strain-induced martensite formation. To investigate the cause(s) of such variable tensile behavior, several specimens from Target 2, spanning the range of observed tensile behavior, were chosen for detailed microstructural examination using electron backscattering analysis (EBSD). It was also shown that the steel employed in the construction of the target contained an unexpected bimodal grain size distribution, containing very large out-of-specification grains surrounded by necklaces of grains of within-specification sizes. The large grains were frequently comparable to the width of the gauge section of the tensile specimen. Moreover, the propensity to form martensite during deformation was shown to be accelerated by radiation but also to be very sensitive to the relative orientation of the grains with respect to the tensile axis. Specimens having large grains in the gauge that were most favorably oriented for production of martensite strongly exhibited the traveling deformation wave phenomenon, while those specimens with less favorably oriented grains had lesser or no degree of the wave effect, thereby accounting for the larger than expected data scatter.

    12. Analysis of structure and deformation behavior of AISI 316L tensile specimens from the second operational target module at the Spallation Neutron Source

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Gussev, Maxim N.; McClintock, David A.; Garner, Frank

      2015-08-05

      In an earlier publication, tensile testing was performed on specimens removed from the first two operational targets of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). There were several anomalous features in the results. First, some specimens had very large elongations (up to 57%) while others had significantly smaller values. Second, there was a larger than the usual amount of data scatter in the elongation results. Third, the stress-strain diagrams of nominally similar specimens spanned a wide range of behavior ranging from expected irradiation-induced hardening to varying levels of force drop after yield point and indirect signs of "traveling deformation wave" behavior associatedmore » with strain-induced martensite formation. To investigate the cause(s) of such variable tensile behavior, several specimens from Target 2, spanning the range of observed tensile behavior, were chosen for detailed microstructural examination using electron backscattering analysis (EBSD). It was also shown that the steel employed in the construction of the target contained an unexpected bimodal grain size distribution, containing very large out-of-specification grains surrounded by necklaces of grains of within-specification sizes. The large grains were frequently comparable to the width of the gauge section of the tensile specimen. Moreover, the propensity to form martensite during deformation was shown to be accelerated by radiation but also to be very sensitive to the relative orientation of the grains with respect to the tensile axis. Specimens having large grains in the gauge that were most favorably oriented for production of martensite strongly exhibited the traveling deformation wave phenomenon, while those specimens with less favorably oriented grains had lesser or no degree of the wave effect, thereby accounting for the larger than expected data scatter.« less

    13. Organizational Structure | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Organizational Structure Organizational Structure

    14. Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980. Volume III. Data repository and reports published during fiscal year 1979-1980: production, unsponsored research

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Negus-De Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

      1980-10-01

      This document consists of the following papers: inorganic geochemistry studies of the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field; lithology studies of upper Devonian well cuttings in the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field; possible effects of plate tectonics on the Appalachian Devonian black shale production in eastern Kentucky; preliminary depositional model for upper Devonian Huron age organic black shale in the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field; the anatomy of a large Devonian black shale gas field; the Cottageville (Mount Alto) Gas Field, Jackson County, West Virginia: a case study of Devonian shale gas production; the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field: a geological study of the relationships of Ohio Shale gas occurrences to structure, stratigraphy, lithology, and inorganic geochemical parameters; and a statistical analysis of geochemical data for the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field.

    15. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural...

      Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

      Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems presentation at the April 2013 peer ...

    16. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      In the third part, they discuss a threading method based on the correlation between amino ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL ...

    17. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      RESIDUES; SENSITIVITY; SPECIFICITY In this work, they try to understand the protein folding problem using pair-wise hydrophobic interaction as the dominant interaction for...

    18. Structure-Soil-Structure Interaction Effects: Seismic Analysis...

      Office of Environmental Management (EM)

      24 Conclusions Response at EFB nodes immediately adjacent to PB is de-amplified - (matches lower response of PB) Response at EFB nodes further (20 feet) away at EFB grade level...

    19. Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS Candidate and Conventional...

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      ... studied in detail - Comparative analysis paper - Geothermal exploration course - Infusion of techniques (structural analysis, 3D modeling, etc.) into industry with training of ...

    20. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, and thermal analysis of 2-chloro-N-(1,5-dimethyl-3-oxo-2-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-4-yl) acetamide

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Sharma, R.; Nayak, P. S.; Narayana, B.; Kant, R.

      2015-12-15

      The title compound, C{sub 13}H{sub 14}O{sub 2}N{sub 3}Cl, has been synthesized by the reaction of chloroacetyl chloride with 4-aminoantipyrine in basic media and characterized by FT-IR, CHN elemental analysis, UV-Vis, TGA, DTA, DSC and single crystal X-ray diffraction. crystals are monoclinic, sp. gr. P2{sub 1}/c, a = 6.9994(6), b = 12.4035(13), c = 15.836(2) Å, β = 100.367(9)°, Z = 4. The crystal structure is stabilized by N–H···O and C–H···O interactions, the former interactions result in the formation of dimers corresponding to R{sub 2}{sup 2} (10) graphset motif and the dimers are further connected by C–H···O hydrogen bonding forming chains. In addition, the thermal stability of the compound was determined by TGA, DTA, DSC analysis, and absorption at λ{sub max} = 298 nm was determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometer.

    1. Structural design considerations

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Marshall, P.; Chang, B.

      1996-12-31

      This paper is one of seven presented at a special OTC session on international standards for the design of offshore platforms for earthquakes. Companion papers describe an overview of proposed ISO provisions, seismic exposure, foundation design, performance characteristics, a site-specific example, and probability-based LRFD. The focus of this paper is upon results of interest to structural designers, such as: simplified load and resistance factors; lifetime reliability estimates; ductility analysis using API jolts; and example North Sea application.

    2. Structural Health Monitoring Tools

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Example Usages LANL/UCSD Engineering Institute LA-CC-14-046 LA-UR-14-21093 c Copyright 2014, Los Alamos National Security, LLC All rights reserved. May 30, 2014 Example Usages Contents Data Set Descriptions Integrating Examples Modal Analysis Condition-Based Monitoring Active Sensing Outlier Detection Data Set Descriptions Experimental Procedure Description of the 3-Story Structure Experimental Procedure Description of the Condition-Based Monitoring Example Data Integrating Examples Example

    3. Structural Code Considerations for Solar Rooftop Installations.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Dwyer, Stephen F.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Sanchez, Alfred

      2014-12-01

      Residential rooftop solar panel installations are limited in part by the high cost of structural related code requirements for field installation. Permitting solar installations is difficult because there is a belief among residential permitting authorities that typical residential rooftops may be structurally inadequate to support the additional load associated with a photovoltaic (PV) solar installation. Typical engineering methods utilized to calculate stresses on a roof structure involve simplifying assumptions that render a complex non-linear structure to a basic determinate beam. This method of analysis neglects the composite action of the entire roof structure, yielding a conservative analysis based on a rafter or top chord of a truss. Consequently, the analysis can result in an overly conservative structural analysis. A literature review was conducted to gain a better understanding of the conservative nature of the regulations and codes governing residential construction and the associated structural system calculations.

    4. Nanocrystal structures

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

      2008-12-30

      A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II-VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

    5. Nanocrystal structures

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

      2006-12-19

      A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II–VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

    6. Nanocrystal structures

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

      2006-12-19

      A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group IIVI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

    7. Terminal structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Schmidt, Frank; Allais, Arnaud; Mirebeau, Pierre; Ganhungu, Francois; Lallouet, Nicolas

      2009-10-20

      A terminal structure (2) for a superconducting cable (1) is described. It consists of a conductor (2a) and an insulator (2b) that surrounds the conductor (2a), wherein the superconducting cable (1) has a core with a superconducting conductor (5) and a layer of insulation that surrounds the conductor (5), and wherein the core is arranged in such a way that it can move longitudinally in a cryostat. The conductor (2a) of the terminal structure (2) is electrically connected with the superconducting conductor (5) or with a normal conductor (6) that is connected with the superconducting conductor (5) by means of a tubular part (7) made of an electrically conductive material, wherein the superconducting conductor (5) or the normal conductor (6) can slide in the part (7) in the direction of the superconductor.

    8. Superconducting structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

      2003-04-01

      A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

    9. Superconducting Structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

      2005-09-13

      A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

    10. Crystal Structure and Functional Analysis Identify Evolutionary...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      domains are considered to be markers for tRNA synthetase-associated functions beyond translation (1). Although their appearance correlates with the increase of biological...

    11. Role of plate kinematics and plate-slip-vector partitioning in continental magmatic arcs: Evidence from the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      McNulty, B.A.; Farber, D.L.; Wallace, G.S.; Lopez, R.; Palacios, O.

      1998-09-01

      New structural and geochronological data from the Cordillera Blanca batholith in the Peruvian Andes, coupled with Nazca-South American plate-slip-vector data, indicate that oblique convergence and associated strike-slip partitioning strongly influenced continental magmatic arc evolution. Both the strain field and mode of magmatism (plutonism vs. volcanism) in the late Miocene Peruvian Andes were controlled by the degree to which the arc-parallel component of the plate slip vector was partitioned into the arc. Strong strike-slip partitioning at ca. 8 Ma produced arc-parallel sinistral shear, strike-slip intercordilleran basins and east-west-oriented tension fractures that facilitated emplacement of the Cordillera Blanca batholith (ca. 8.2 {+-} 0.2 Ma). Periods during which the strike-slip component was not partitioned into the arc (ca. 10 and ca. 7 Ma) were associated with roughly arc-normal contraction and ignimbrite volcanism. The data thus support the contention that contraction within continental magmatic arcs favors volcanism, whereas transcurrent shear favors plutonism. The tie between oblique convergence and batholith emplacement in late Miocene Peruvian Andes provides a modern analogue for batholiths emplaced as the result of transcurrent shear in ancient arcs.

    12. The dependence of C IV broad absorption line properties on accompanying Si IV and Al III absorption: relating quasar-wind ionization levels, kinematics, and column densities

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R.; Hall, P. B.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; York, Don

      2014-08-20

      We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line of sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines of sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.

    13. Airfoil structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Frey, Gary A.; Twardochleb, Christopher Z.

      1998-01-01

      Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally "C" configuration of the airfoil. The generally "C" configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion.

    14. Airfoil structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Frey, G.A.; Twardochleb, C.Z.

      1998-01-13

      Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally ``C`` configuration of the airfoil. The generally ``C`` configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion. 6 figs.

    15. Armor structures

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Chu, Henry Shiu-Hung [Idaho Falls, ID; Lacy, Jeffrey M [Idaho Falls, ID

      2008-04-01

      An armor structure includes first and second layers individually containing a plurality of i-beams. Individual i-beams have a pair of longitudinal flanges interconnected by a longitudinal crosspiece and defining opposing longitudinal channels between the pair of flanges. The i-beams within individual of the first and second layers run parallel. The laterally outermost faces of the flanges of adjacent i-beams face one another. One of the longitudinal channels in each of the first and second layers faces one of the longitudinal channels in the other of the first and second layers. The channels of the first layer run parallel with the channels of the second layer. The flanges of the first and second layers overlap with the crosspieces of the other of the first and second layers, and portions of said flanges are received within the facing channels of the i-beams of the other of the first and second layers.

    16. Sierra Structural Dynamics User's Notes

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Reese, Garth M.

      2015-10-19

      Sierra/SD provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of weapons systems. This document provides a users guide to the input for Sierra/SD. Details of input specifications for the different solution types, output options, element types and parameters are included. The appendices contain detailed examples, and instructions for running the software on parallel platforms.

    17. Synthesis, crystal structure, resistivity, and electronic structure...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Synthesis, crystal structure, resistivity, and electronic structure of the U(V) quaternary ... and electronic structure of the U(V) quaternary polyselenide Ba8PdU2Se12(Se2)2 ...

    18. Stormwater Control Structures

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater control structures are engineered to control run-on and runoff water from suspected contaminated sites. ...

    19. Structural Health Monitoring

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Structural Health Monitoring Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring Structural Health Monitoring is the process of implementing a damage detection strategy for...

    20. Improved structural systems for earth sheltered housing. Structural supplement to the design program

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Behr, R.

      1981-10-01

      Additional engineering information is provided with regard to the structural analysis and design of thin shell concrete structures. The design program has tentatively demonstrated the overall architectural and marketing feasibility of curved, thin shell structural systems for earth sheltered housing. This supplement will address the structural feasibility question by presenting a complete manual analysis and structural design of an earth sheltered dome/tension ring/wall structural system, and also by presenting the results of a parametric sensitivity study of the dome/ring/wall configuration with respect to variations in span and rise for a three foot soil loading condition. Double curvature dome configurations are emphasized in this structural supplement because their analysis is not extensively addressed in earth sheltered housing literature.

    1. Structure identification methods for atomistic simulations of crystalline materials

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Stukowski, Alexander

      2012-05-28

      Here, we discuss existing and new computational analysis techniques to classify local atomic arrangements in large-scale atomistic computer simulations of crystalline solids. This article includes a performance comparison of typical analysis algorithms such as common neighbor analysis (CNA), centrosymmetry analysis, bond angle analysis, bond order analysis and Voronoi analysis. In addition we propose a simple extension to the CNA method that makes it suitable for multi-phase systems. Finally, we introduce a new structure identification algorithm, the neighbor distance analysis, which is designed to identify atomic structure units in grain boundaries.

    2. Magnetic multilayer structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Herget, Philipp; O'Sullivan, Eugene J.; Romankiw, Lubomyr T.; Wang, Naigang; Webb, Bucknell C.

      2016-07-05

      A mechanism is provided for an integrated laminated magnetic device. A substrate and a multilayer stack structure form the device. The multilayer stack structure includes alternating magnetic layers and diode structures formed on the substrate. Each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure is separated from another magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure by a diode structure.

    3. Structural acceptance criteria Remote Handling Building Tritium Extraction Facility

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Mertz, G.

      1999-12-16

      This structural acceptance criteria contains the requirements for the structural analysis and design of the Remote Handling Building (RHB) in the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF). The purpose of this acceptance criteria is to identify the specific criteria and methods that will ensure a structurally robust building that will safely perform its intended function and comply with the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) structural requirements.

    4. PROBABILISTIC STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF STRUCTURE UNDER COLLAPSE LOADING

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      J. PEPIN; E. RODRIGUEZ; ET AL

      2001-01-05

      Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are currently developing the capability to provide a reliability-based structural evaluation technique for performing weapon reliability assessments. To enhance the analyst's confidence with these new methods, an integrated experiment and analysis project has been developed. The uncertainty associated with the collapse response of commercially available spherical marine float is evaluated with the aid of the non-linear explicit dynamics code DYNA3D (Whirley and Engelmann 1988) coupled with the probabilistic code NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) (Thacker et al. 1998). Variations in geometric shape parameters and uncertainties in material parameters are characterized and included in the probabilistic model.

    5. Polarized structure functions in nuclear matter

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Tehrani, S. Atashbar; Khorramian, A. N.; Monfared, S. Taheri; Arbabifar, F.

      2011-10-24

      We present a comprehensive analysis of the structure functions for the polarized nuclei {sup 3}He, and focus on the polarized distribution functions and light-cone momentum distributions of protons and neutrons. We demonstrate that the first moment of the {sup 3}He structure function can provide an incisive test of the Bjorken sum rule.

    6. Structure-Soil-Structure Interaction Effects: Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Collocated Structures

      Office of Environmental Management (EM)

      Emergence of WBG Based Power Electronics and System Level Needs / Opportunities for Advances in Passives, Packaging, and Peripherals with Emphasis on HF Magnetics Electrochemical and Magnetic Materials Team Functional Materials Development Division NETL Office of Research and Development Dr. Paul Ohodnicki, Materials Scientist / Team Lead Nanocrystals Intergranular Phase 2 Overview of Presentation * Historic Thrust in Active Components for WBG-Based Power Electronics - Promise of WBG-Based

    7. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Mathies, Richard A.; Grover, William H.; Skelley, Alison; Lagally, Eric; Liu, Chung N.

      2008-11-04

      Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

    8. Sandia Energy - Structural and Mechanical Adaptive Rotor Technology...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      and Mechanical Adaptive Rotor Technology (SMART) Final Project Reports Published Home Renewable Energy Energy News Wind Energy News & Events Systems Analysis Structural and...

    9. Sierra Structural Dynamics Theory Manual

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Reese, Garth M.

      2015-10-19

      Sierra/SD provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of structural systems. This manual describes the theory behind many of the constructs in Sierra/SD. For a more detailed description of how to use Sierra/SD , we refer the reader to Sierra/SD, User's Notes . Many of the constructs in Sierra/SD are pulled directly from published material. Where possible, these materials are referenced herein. However, certain functions in Sierra/SD are specific to our implementation. We try to be far more complete in those areas. The theory manual was developed from several sources including general notes, a programmer notes manual, the user's notes and of course the material in the open literature. This page intentionally left blank.

    10. Variably porous structures

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Braun, Paul V.; Yu, Xindi

      2011-01-18

      A method of making a monolithic porous structure, comprises electrodepositing a material on a template; removing the template from the material to form a monolithic porous structure comprising the material; and electropolishing the monolithic porous structure.

    11. Finite Element Analysis Code

      Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

      2005-06-26

      Exotxt is an analysis code that reads finite element results data stored in an exodusII file and generates a file in a structured text format. The text file can be edited or modified via a number of text formatting tools. Exotxt is used by analysis to translate data from the binary exodusII format into a structured text format which can then be edited or modified and then either translated back to exodusII format or tomore » another format.« less

    12. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Workshops & Summer Schools Summer Students Structural Molecular Biology Illuminating ... major experimental driver for structural biology research, serving the needs of a large ...

    13. Modeling & Analysis

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Facilities, Modeling, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, Modeling & Analysis, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Wind Energy, Wind News Virtual LIDAR Model Helps Researchers ...

    14. Incommensurate Structure of Phosphorus Phase IV

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Mami; Takeya, Satoshi; Honda, Kazumasa; Akahama, Yuichi; Kawamura, Haruki; Ohishi, Yasuo

      2007-04-27

      There are six known phases for phosphorus at room temperature under high pressure. Only the structure of phase IV, which exists from 107 GPa to 137 GPa, remains unsolved. We performed a powder x-ray diffraction experiment and a Rietveld analysis and successfully determined its structure to be an incommensurately modulated structure by only 1 site of atomic position. High-pressure phases of halogens and chalcogens have previously been shown to have a similar modulated structure; however, phosphorus phase IV is different from them and was shown to be the third case.

    15. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Forming and Springback Behavior and the Resulting Effects on Industrial Application on a Structural Part in Mass Production

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Prexl, A.; Hoffmann, H. [Institute of Metal Forming and Casting, Technische Universitaet Muenchen D-85747 Garching (Germany); Golle, M. [Institute of Metal Forming and Casting, Technische Universitaet Muenchen D-85747 Garching (Germany); Institute of Punching and Blanking, Pforzheim University, D-75175 Pforzheim (Germany); Kudrass, S.; Wahl, M. [AUDI AG, D-85045 Ingolstadt (Germany)

      2011-01-17

      Springback prediction and compensation is nowadays a widely recommended discipline in finite element modeling. Many researches have shown an improvement of the accuracy in prediction of springback using advanced modeling techniques, e.g. by including the Bauschinger effect. In this work different models were investigated in the commercial simulation program AutoForm for a large series production part, manufactured from the dual phase steel HC340XD. The work shows the differences between numerical drawbead models and geometrically modeled drawbeads. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis was made for a reduced kinematic hardening model, implemented in the finite element program AutoForm.

    16. Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information

      Open Energy Info (EERE)

      Information Provided by Technique Lithology: StratigraphicStructural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Data Analysis: No definition has been provided for...

    17. coherent-structures-html

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Role of Coherent Structures in Scour Process Around Bridge Piers and Abutments

    18. Synthesis and X-ray structure analysis of a new binuclear Schiff base Co(II) complex with the ligand N,N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-butanediamine

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Nasr-Esfahani, M.

      2009-12-15

      The title binuclear complex, tris[N,N-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-diaminobutane] dicobalt(II), C{sub 60}H{sub 70}Co{sub 2}N{sub 6}O{sub 15}, was prepared by the reaction of the tetradentate Schiff base ligand bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-diaminobutane and Co(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} . 4H{sub 2}O in a ethanol solution and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. This complex has a dinuclear structure where two Co(II) ions are bridged by one N{sup 0},N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-diaminobutane. The two Co(II) ions, have two distorted octahedral coordination involving two O and two N atoms.

    19. Three Dimensional Response Spectrum Soil Structure Modeling Versus Conceptual Understanding To Illustrate Seismic Response Of Structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Touqan, Abdul Razzaq

      2008-07-08

      Present methods of analysis and mathematical modeling contain so many assumptions that separate them from reality and thus represent a defect in design which makes it difficult to analyze reasons of failure. Three dimensional (3D) modeling is so superior to 1D or 2D modeling, static analysis deviates from the true nature of earthquake load which is 'a dynamic punch', and conflicting assumptions exist between structural engineers (who assume flexible structures on rigid block foundations) and geotechnical engineers (who assume flexible foundations supporting rigid structures). Thus a 3D dynamic soil-structure interaction is a step that removes many of the assumptions and thus clears reality to a greater extent. However such a model cannot be analytically analyzed. We need to anatomize and analogize it. The paper will represent a conceptual (analogical) 1D model for soil structure interaction and clarifies it by comparing its outcome with 3D dynamic soil-structure finite element analysis of two structures. The aim is to focus on how to calculate the period of the structure and to investigate effect of variation of stiffness on soil-structure interaction.

    20. Structural model of uramarsite

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Sidorenko, G. A.; Ivanova, A. G.; Chukanov, N. V.

      2008-09-15

      The structural model of uramarsite, a new mineral of the uran-mica family from the Bota-Burum deposit (South Kazakhstan), is determined using a single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The parameters of the triclinic unit cell are as follows: a = 7.173(2) A, b = 7.167(5) A, c = 9.30(1) A, {alpha} = 90.13(7){sup o}, {beta} = 90.09(4){sup o}, {gamma} = 89.96(4){sup o}, and space group P1. The crystal chemical formula of uramarsite is: (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}[AsO{sub 4}][PO{sub 4},AsO{sub 4}][NH{sub 4}][H{sub 3}O] . 6H{sub 2}O (Z = 1). Uramarsite is the second ammonium-containing mineral of uranium and an arsenate analogue of uramphite. In the case of uramarsite, the lowering of the symmetry from tetragonal to triclinic, which is accompanied by a triclinic distortion of the tetragonal unit cell, is apparently caused by the ordering of the As and P atoms and the NH{sub 4}, H{sub 3}O, and H{sub 2}O groups.

    1. Probing the Influence of Stereoelectronic Effects on the Biophysical Properties of Oligonucleotides: Comprehensive Analysis of the RNA Affinity, Nuclease Resistance, and Crystal Structure of Ten 2'-O-Ribonucleic Acid Modifications

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Egli, Martin; Minasov, George; Tereshko, Valentina; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Teplova, Marianna; Inamati, Gopal B.; Lesnik, Elena A.; Owens, Steve R.; Ross, Bruce S.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Manoharan, Muthiah

      2010-03-05

      The syntheses of 10 new RNA 2'-O-modifications, their incorporation into oligonucleotides, and an evaluation of their properties such as RNA affinity and nuclease resistance relevant to antisense activity are presented. All modifications combined with the natural phosphate backbone lead to significant gains in terms of the stability of hybridization to RNA relative to the first-generation DNA phosphorothioates (PS-DNA). The nuclease resistance afforded in particular by the 2'-O-modifications carrying a positive charge surpasses that of PS-DNA. However, small electronegative 2'-O-substituents, while enhancing the RNA affinity, do not sufficiently protect against degradation by nucleases. Similarly, oligonucleotides containing 3'-terminal residues modified with the relatively large 2'-O-[2-(benzyloxy)ethyl] substituent are rapidly degraded by exonucleases, proving wrong the assumption that steric bulk will generally improve protection against nuclease digestion. To analyze the factors that contribute to the enhanced RNA affinity and nuclease resistance we determined crystal structures of self-complementary A-form DNA decamer duplexes containing single 2'-O-modified thymidines per strand. Conformational preorganization of substituents, favorable electrostatic interactions between substituent and sugar-phosphate backbone, and a stable water structure in the vicinity of the 2'-O-modification all appear to contribute to the improved RNA affinity. Close association of positively charged substituents and phosphate groups was observed in the structures with modifications that protect most effectively against nucleases. The promising properties exhibited by some of the analyzed 2'-O-modifications may warrant a more detailed evaluation of their potential for in vivo antisense applications. Chemical modification of RNA can also be expected to significantly improve the efficacy of small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Therefore, the 2'-O-modifications introduced here may benefit the

    2. Hydrogen Analysis

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Presentation on Hydrogen Analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

    3. Oxygen chemisorption on Cu(19 19 1) studied by spot profile analysis low-energy electron diffraction

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Brandstetter, T.; Draxler, M.; Hohage, M.; Zeppenfeld, P.

      2007-12-15

      Cu(110) and the vicinal Cu(19 19 1) surfaces were characterized by recording maps of the reciprocal space by means of spot profile analysis low-energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED). For both surfaces, kinematic simulations were performed to get insight into the main features of the experimental data. Furthermore, it is shown that chemisorption of oxygen and subsequent annealing lead to the formation of a Cu-CuO stripe phase and induce faceting of the Cu(19 19 1) surface. The evolution from the clean Cu(19 19 1) surface to the coexistence of the (110) and (111) facets with increasing oxygen exposure was characterized by SPA-LEED.

    4. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang -Peng

      2015-07-15

      The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitope peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.

    5. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang -Peng

      2015-07-15

      The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitopemore » peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.« less

    6. Structural health monitoring for ship structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Farrar, Charles; Park, Gyuhae; Angel, Marian; Bement, Matthew; Salvino, Liming

      2009-01-01

      Currently the Office of Naval Research is supporting the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology for U.S. Navy ship structures. This application is particularly challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with these ships missions, lack of data from known damage conditions, limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, and the management of the vast amounts of data that can be collected during a mission. This paper will first define a statistical pattern recognition paradigm for SHM by describing the four steps of (1) Operational Evaluation, (2) Data Acquisition, (3) Feature Extraction, and (4) Statistical Classification of Features as they apply to ship structures. Note that inherent in the last three steps of this process are additional tasks of data cleansing, compression, normalization and fusion. The presentation will discuss ship structure SHM challenges in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum multi-hull high-speed ship, the HSV-2 Swift. To conclude, the paper will discuss several outstanding issues that need to be addressed before SHM can make the transition from a research topic to actual field applications on ship structures and suggest approaches for addressing these issues.

    7. VCAT: Visual Crosswalk Analysis Tool

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Cleland, Timothy J.; Forslund, David W.; Cleland, Catherine A.

      2012-08-31

      VCAT is a knowledge modeling and analysis tool. It was synthesized from ideas in functional analysis, business process modeling, and complex network science. VCAT discovers synergies by analyzing natural language descriptions. Specifically, it creates visual analytic perspectives that capture intended organization structures, then overlays the serendipitous relationships that point to potential synergies within an organization or across multiple organizations.

    8. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Wood, James L.

      1992-01-01

      An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

    9. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Wood, J.L.

      1992-12-01

      An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

    10. Stormwater Control Structures

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater control structures are engineered to control run-on and runoff water from suspected contaminated sites. Structures trap sediment, keep water on-site, slow water flow and redirect water around problem areas. Rock check dams Rock check dams Silt tence Silt fence Sediment trap Sediment trap Wood mulch and native seed Wood mulch and native seed Gabion Gabion Concrete lined swales Concrete lined swales Hydroseeding Hydroseeding

    11. Catalytic distillation structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

      1984-01-01

      Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

    12. Vitrified underground structures

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Murphy, Mark T.; Buelt, James L.; Stottlemyre, James A.; Tixier, Jr., John S.

      1992-01-01

      A method of making vitrified underground structures in which 1) the vitrification process is started underground, and 2) a thickness dimension is controlled to produce substantially planar vertical and horizontal vitrified underground structures. Structures may be placed around a contaminated waste site to isolate the site or may be used as aquifer dikes.

    13. NREL: Energy Analysis: Geospatial Analysis

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis This study summarizes the ... (tools, maps, data): Dynamic Maps, GIS Data and Analysis Tools website provides ...

    14. NREL: Energy Analysis - Sustainability Analysis

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      ... Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Sustainable Biomass Resource Development and Use Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands Technology Systems Analysis Geospatial Analysis Key ...

    15. Measurement of the Deuteron Spin Structure Function g{sub 1}{sup d}(x) for 1 (GeV/c){sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 40 (GeV/c){sup 2}

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Perry Anthony; R.G. Arnold; Todd Averett; H.R. Band; M.C. Berisso; H. Borel; Peter Bosted; Stephen Bueltmann; M. Buenerd; T. Chupp; Steve Churchwell; G.R. Court; Donald Crabb; Donal Day; Piotr Decowski; P. DePietro; R. Erbacher; R. Erickson; Andrew Feltham; Helene Fonvieille; Emil Frlez; R. Gearhart; V. Ghazikhanian; Javier Gomez; Keith Griffioen; C. Harris; M.A. Houlden; E.W. Hughes; Charles Hyde-Wright; G. Igo; Sebastien Incerti; John Jensen; J.R. Johnson; Paul King; Yu.G. Kolomensky; Sebastian Kuhn; Richard Lindgren; R.M. Lombard-Nelsen; Jacques Marroncle; James Mccarthy; Paul McKee; W. Meyer; G.S. Mitchell; Joseph Mitchell; Michael Olson; S. Penttila; Gerald Peterson; Gerassimos Petratos; R. Pitthan; Dinko Pocanic; R. Prepost; C. Prescott; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; D. Reyna; L.S. Rochester; Stephen Rock; Oscar Rondon-Aramayo; Franck Sabatie; Ingo Sick; T. Smith; L. Sorrell; F. Staley; S. St. Lorant; L.M. Stuart; Z. Szalata; Y. Terrien; William Tobias; Luminita Todor; T. Toole; S. Trentalange; Dieter Walz; Robert Welsh; Frank Wesselmann; T.R. Wright; C.C. Young; Markus Zeier; Hong Guo Zhu; Benedikt Zihlmann

      1999-09-30

      New measurements are reported on the deuteron spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup d}. These results were obtained from deep inelastic scattering of 48.3 GeV electrons on polarized deuterons in the kinematic range 0.01 < x < 0.9 and 1 < Q{sup 2} < 40 (GeV/c){sup 2}. These are the first high dose electron scattering data obtained using lithium deuteride ({sup 6}Li{sup 2}H) as the target material. Extrapolations of the data were performed to obtain moments of g{sub 1}{sup d}, including {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup d}, and the net quark polarization {Delta} {Sigma}.

    16. Structural characterization of thin film photonic crystals

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Subramania, G.; Biswas, R.; Constant, K.; Sigalas, M. M.; Ho, K. M.

      2001-06-15

      We quantitatively analyze the structure of thin film inverse-opal photonic crystals composed of ordered arrays of air pores in a background of titania. Ordering of the sphere template and introduction of the titania background were performed simultaneously in the thin film photonic crystals. Nondestructive optical measurements of backfilling with high refractive index liquids, angle-resolved reflectivity, and optical spectroscopy were combined with band-structure calculations. The analysis reveals a thin film photonic crystal structure with a very high filling fraction (92{endash}94%) of air and a substantial compression along the c axis ({similar_to}22{endash}25%).

    17. Energy Sector Market Analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

      2006-10-01

      This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

    18. STORM IN A {sup T}EACUP{sup :} A RADIO-QUIET QUASAR WITH ≈10 kpc RADIO-EMITTING BUBBLES AND EXTREME GAS KINEMATICS

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Harrison, C. M.; Thomson, A. P.; Alexander, D. M.; Edge, A. C.; Hogan, M. T.; Swinbank, A. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Mullaney, J. R.

      2015-02-10

      We present multi-frequency (1-8 GHz) Very Large Array data, combined with VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph integral field unit data and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, of a z = 0.085 radio-quiet type 2 quasar (with L {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} ≈ 5 × 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup –1} and L {sub AGN} ≈ 2 × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup –1}). Due to the morphology of its emission-line region, the target (J1430+1339) has been referred to as the ''Teacup'' active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the literature. We identify ''bubbles'' of radio emission that are extended ≈10-12 kpc to both the east and west of the nucleus. The edge of the brighter eastern bubble is co-spatial with an arc of luminous ionized gas. We also show that the ''Teacup'' AGN hosts a compact radio structure, located ≈0.8 kpc from the core position, at the base of the eastern bubble. This radio structure is co-spatial with an ionized outflow with an observed velocity of v = –740 km s{sup –1}. This is likely to correspond to a jet, or possibly a quasar wind, interacting with the interstellar medium at this position. The large-scale radio bubbles appear to be inflated by the central AGN, which indicates that the AGN can also interact with the gas on ≳ 10 kpc scales. Our study highlights that even when a quasar is formally ''radio-quiet'' the radio emission can be extremely effective for observing the effects of AGN feedback.

    19. BOMB STABILIZING STRUCTURE

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Kelley, J.L.; Runyan, C.E.

      1963-12-10

      A stabilizinig structure capable of minimizing deviations of a falling body such as a bomb from desired trajectory is described. The structure comprises a fin or shroud arrangement of double-wedge configuration, the feeding portion being of narrow wedge shape and the after portion being of a wider wedge shape. The structure provides a force component for keeping the body on essentially desired trajectory throughout its fall. (AEC)

    20. Undergraduate Program Salary Structure

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Salary Structure Undergraduate Program Salary Structure Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-0964 Email Undergraduate salary determination process Salaries are evaluated from students' current transcripts based on college academic progression and hours completed in a degree program. Professional Salary Structure Years

    1. Catalytic distillation structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Smith, L.A. Jr.

      1984-04-17

      Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

    2. STRUCTURAL CONTROLS OF THE EMERSON PASS GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, NORTHWESTERN NEVADA: CHARACTERIZATION OF A "BLIND" SYSTEM

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Anderson, Ryan B; Faulds, James E

      2012-12-03

      Detailed geologic analyses have elucidated the kinematics, stress state, structural controls, and past surface activity of a blind geothermal system in Emerson Pass on the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation, western Nevada. The Emerson Pass area resides near the boundary of the Basin and Range and Walker Lane provinces and at the western edge of a broad left step or relay ramp between the north- to north-northeast-striking, west-dipping, Fox and Lake Range normal faults. The step-over provides a structurally favorable setting for deep circulation of meteoric fluids. Strata in the area are comprised of late Miocene to Pliocene sedimentary rocks and the middle Miocene Pyramid sequence mafic to intermediate volcanic rocks, all overlying Mesozoic metasedimentary and intrusive rocks. A thermal anomaly was discovered in Emerson Pass by use of 2-m temperature surveys deployed within a structurally favorable setting and proximal to surface features indicative of geothermal activity. The 2-m temperature surveys define a north-south elongate thermal anomaly that has a maximum recorded temperature of ~60°C and resides on a north- to north-northeast-striking normal fault. Although the active geothermal system is expressed solely as a soil heat anomaly, late Pleistocene travertine and tufa mounds, chalcedonic silica/calcite veins, and silica cemented Pleistocene lacustrine gravels indicate a robust geothermal system was active at the surface in the recent past. The geothermal system is controlled primarily by the broad step-over between two major range-bounding normal faults. In detail, the system likely results from enhanced permeability generated by the intersection of two oppositely dipping, southward terminating north- to north-northwest-striking (Fox Range fault) and north-northeast-striking normal faults. Structural complexity and spatial heterogeneities of the strain and stress field have developed in the step-over region, but kinematic data suggest a west

    3. Effective Incentive Structures

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Presents an in-depth look at effective incentive structures, how to clarify your program goals, and tips to plan for the long term.

    4. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in...

    5. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Our Mission Our Mission The SSRL Structural Molecular Biology program operates as a integrated resource and has three primary areas (or cores) of technological research and ...

    6. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Wood, James L.

      1992-01-01

      An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

    7. Structural Health Monitoring

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Time Reversal Acoustics LANL also investigates the applicability of time reversal concept in modern acoustics to structural damage identification. In the time reversal...

    8. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      spectroscopy (ARPES) at ALS Beamline 7.0.1, a team of scientists from the ALS and Germany characterized the electronic band structure and successfully controlled the gap...

    9. Hazard Analysis Database Report

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      GAULT, G.W.

      1999-10-13

      The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved TWRS Authorization Basis (AB). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the TWRS FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The TWRS Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The database supports the preparation of Chapters 3,4, and 5 of the TWRS FSAR and the USQ process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Evaluation Database--Data from the results of the hazard evaluations; and (2) Hazard Topography Database--Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

    10. Hierarchical Analysis of the Omega Ontology

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Joslyn, Cliff A.; Paulson, Patrick R.

      2009-12-01

      Initial delivery for mathematical analysis of the Omega Ontology. We provide an analysis of the hierarchical structure of a version of the Omega Ontology currently in use within the US Government. After providing an initial statistical analysis of the distribution of all link types in the ontology, we then provide a detailed order theoretical analysis of each of the four main hierarchical links present. This order theoretical analysis includes the distribution of components and their properties, their parent/child and multiple inheritance structure, and the distribution of their vertical ranks.

    11. Mesh Morphing Pier Analysis

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Application of Mesh Morphing in STAR-CCM+ to Analysis of Scour at Cylindrical Piers Mesh morphing is a fluid structure interaction capability in STAR-CCM+ to move vertices in the computational mesh in a way that preserves mesh quality when a boundary moves. The equations being solved include terms that account for the motion of the mesh maintaining mass and property balances during the solution process. Initial work on leveraging the mesh morphing FSI capability for efficient application to

    12. TWO-DIMENSIONAL MAPPING OF YOUNG STARS IN THE INNER 180 pc OF NGC 1068: CORRELATION WITH MOLECULAR GAS RING AND STELLAR KINEMATICS

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Riffel, Rogerio; Vale, Tiberio Borges; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Diniz, Marlon R.; McGregor, Peter J.

      2012-08-20

      We report the first two-dimensional mapping of the stellar population and non-stellar continua within the inner 180 pc (radius) of NGC 1068 at a spatial resolution of 8 pc, using integral field spectroscopy in the near-infrared. We have applied the technique of spectral synthesis to data obtained with the instrument NIFS and the adaptive optics module ALTAIR at the Gemini North Telescope. Two episodes of recent star formation are found to dominate the stellar population contribution: the first occurred 300 Myr ago, extending over most of the nuclear region; the second occurred just 30 Myr ago, in a ring-like structure at Almost-Equal-To 100 pc from the nucleus, where it is coincident with an expanding ring of H{sub 2} emission. Inside the ring, where a decrease in the stellar velocity dispersion is observed, the stellar population is dominated by the 300 Myr age component. In the inner 35 pc, the oldest age component (age {>=} 2 Gyr) dominates the mass, while the flux is dominated by blackbody components with temperatures in the range 700 K {<=} T {<=} 800 K which we attribute to the dusty torus. We also find some contribution from blackbody and power-law components beyond the nucleus which we attribute to dust emission and scattered light.

    13. Tapered structure construction

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Smith, Eric D.; Takata, Rosalind K.; Slocum, Alexander H.; Nayfeh, Samir A.

      2016-04-05

      Feeding stock used to form a tapered structure into a curving device such that each point on the stock undergoes rotational motion about a peak location of the tapered structure; and the stock meets a predecessor portion of stock along one or more adjacent edges.

    14. Calcium silicate insulation structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

      1995-01-01

      An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

    15. Ceramic tubesheet design analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Mallett, R.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

      1996-06-01

      A transport combustor is being commissioned at the Southern Services facility in Wilsonville, Alabama to provide a gaseous product for the assessment of hot-gas filtering systems. One of the barrier filters incorporates a ceramic tubesheet to support candle filters. The ceramic tubesheet, designed and manufactured by Industrial Filter and Pump Manufacturing Company (EF&PM), is unique and offers distinct advantages over metallic systems in terms of density, resistance to corrosion, and resistance to creep at operating temperatures above 815{degrees}C (1500{degrees}F). Nevertheless, the operational requirements of the ceramic tubesheet are severe. The tubesheet is almost 1.5 m in (55 in.) in diameter, has many penetrations, and must support the weight of the ceramic filters, coal ash accumulation, and a pressure drop (one atmosphere). Further, thermal stresses related to steady state and transient conditions will occur. To gain a better understanding of the structural performance limitations, a contract was placed with Mallett Technology, Inc. to perform a thermal and structural analysis of the tubesheet design. The design analysis specification and a preliminary design analysis were completed in the early part of 1995. The analyses indicated that modifications to the design were necessary to reduce thermal stress, and it was necessary to complete the redesign before the final thermal/mechanical analysis could be undertaken. The preliminary analysis identified the need to confirm that the physical and mechanical properties data used in the design were representative of the material in the tubesheet. Subsequently, few exploratory tests were performed at ORNL to evaluate the ceramic structural material.

    16. Optoelectronic Mounting Structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Baca, Johnny R. F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Chu, Dahwey; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.; Peterson, Gary D.; Reber, Cathleen A.; Reysen, Bill H.

      2004-10-05

      An optoelectronic mounting structure is provided that may be used in conjunction with an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module. The mounting structure may be a flexible printed circuit board. Thermal vias or heat pipes in the head region may transmit heat from the mounting structure to the heat spreader. The heat spreader may provide mechanical rigidity or stiffness to the heat region. In another embodiment, an electrical contact and ground plane may pass along a surface of the head region so as to provide an electrical contact path to the optoelectronic devices and limit electromagnetic interference. In yet another embodiment, a window may be formed in the head region of the mounting structure so as to provide access to the heat spreader. Optoelectronic devices may be adapted to the heat spreader in such a manner that the devices are accessible through the window in the mounting structure.

    17. Precise determination of the deuteron spin structure at low to moderate Q2 with CLAS and extraction of the neutron contribution

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Guler, N.; Fersch, R. G.; Kuhn, S. E.; Bosted, P.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keith, C.; Minehart, R.; Prok, Y.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; et al

      2015-11-02

      In this study, we present the final results for the deuteron spin structure functions obtained from the full data set collected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2 and 5.8 GeV were scattered from deuteron (15ND3) targets, dynamically polarized along the beam direction, and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetry, the virtual photon absorption asymmetry Ad1 and the polarized structure function gd1 were extracted over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV2 < Q2 < 5 GeV2 and 0.9 GeV < W < 3 GeV). We use an unfolding procedure andmore » a parametrization of the corresponding proton results to extract from these data the polarized structure functions An1 and g1n of the (bound) neutron, which are so far unknown in the resonance region, W < 2 GeV. We compare our final results, including several moments of the deuteron and neutron spin structure functions, with various theoretical models and expectations as well as parametrizations of the world data. The unprecedented precision and dense kinematic coverage of these data can aid in future extractions of polarized parton distributions, tests of perturbative QCD predictions for the quark polarization at large x, a better understanding of quark-hadron duality, and more precise values for higher-twist matrix elements in the framework of the Operator Product Expansion.« less

    18. Relativistic jet properties of GeV-TeV blazars and possible implications for the jet formation, composition, and cavity kinematics

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Zhang, Jin; Lu, Ye; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Sun, Xiao-Na; Liang, En-Wei; Lu, Rui-Jing E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn

      2014-06-20

      We fit the spectral energy distributions of a GeV-TeV flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) sample with the leptonic model. Their ?{sub min} of the relativistic electron distributions, which significantly affect the estimate of the jet properties, are constrained, with a typical value of ?48. Their jet power, magnetized parameter, radiation efficiency, and jet production and radiation rates per central black hole (BH) mass are derived and compared with those of BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects. We show that the FSRQ jets may be dominated by the Poynting flux and have a high radiation efficiency, whereas the BL Lac object jets are likely dominated by particles and have a lower radiation efficiency than FSRQs. Being different from BL Lac objects, the jet powers of FSRQs are proportional to their central BH masses. The jet production and radiation rates of the FSRQs distribute in narrow ranges and are correlated with each other, whereas no similar feature is found for the BL Lac objects. We also show that the jet power is correlated with the cavity kinetic power: the magnetic field energy in the jets may provide the cavity kinetic energy of FSRQs, and the kinetic energy of cold protons in the jets may be crucial for the cavity kinetic energy of BL Lac objects. We suggest that the dominating formation mechanism of FSRQ jets may be the Blandford-Znajek process, but BL Lac object jets may be produced via the Blandford-Payne and/or Blandford-Znajek processes, depending on the structures and accretion rates of accretion disks.

    19. GAS KINEMATICS AND THE DRAGGED MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE HIGH-MASS MOLECULAR OUTFLOW SOURCE G192.16-3.84: AN SMA VIEW

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Liu Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P.; Qiu Keping; Zhang Qizhou; Girart, Josep M.

      2013-07-01

      We report Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of polarized 0.88 mm thermal dust emission and various molecular line transitions toward the early B-type (L{sub *} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} L{sub Sun }) star-forming region G192.16-3.84 (IRAS 05553+1631). The peak of the continuum Stokes-I emission coincides with a hot rotating disk/envelope (SO{sub 2} rotational temperature T{sub rot}{sup SO{sub 2}}{approx}84{sup +18}{sub -13} K), with a north-south velocity gradient. Joint analysis of the rotation curve traced by HCO{sup +} 4-3 and SO{sub 2} 19{sub 1,19}-18{sub 0,18} suggests that the dense molecular gas is undergoing a spinning-up rotation, marginally bound by the gravitational force of an enclosed mass M{sub *+gas+dust} {approx} 11.2-25.2 M{sub Sun }. Perpendicular to the rotational plane, a {approx}>100/cos (i) km s{sup -1} (i {approx} 63 Degree-Sign ) high velocity molecular jet and a {approx}15-20 km s{sup -1} expanding biconical cavity were revealed in the CO 3-2 emission. The polarization percentage of the 0.88 mm continuum emission decreases toward the central rotating disk/envelope. The polarization angle in the inner {approx}2'' (0.015 pc) disk/envelope is perpendicular to the plane of the rotation. The magnetic field lines, which are predominantly in the toroidal direction along the disk plane, are likely to be dragged by the gravitationally accelerated rotation.

    20. Structural Health Monitoring Tools

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      May 30, 2014 Example Usages Contents Data Set Descriptions Integrating Examples Modal Analysis Condition-Based Monitoring Active Sensing Outlier Detection Data Set Descriptions ...

    1. Simple surface structure determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Zheng, Y. |; Shirley, D.A.

      1995-02-01

      The authors show by Fourier analyses of experimental data, with no further treatment, that the positions of all the strong peaks in Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) from adsorbed surfaces can be explicitly predicted from a trial structure with an accuracy of about {+-} 0.3 {angstrom} based on a single-scattering cluster model together with the concept of a strong backscattering cone, and without any additional analysis. This characteristic of ARPEFS Fourier transforms can be developed as a simple method for determining the structures of adsorbed surfaces to an accuracy of about {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}.

    2. Microalgae Analysis

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Microalgae Analysis March 24, 2015 Algal Feedstocks Review Mark Wigmosta Pacific Northwest National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or ...

    3. Modeling & Analysis

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      News & Events, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Systems Analysis, Water Power Wave-Energy-Device Modeling: Developing A 1:17 Scaled Model Many theoretical studies show ...

    4. Environmental Analysis

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Environmental Analysis is used by the Program to quantify the environmental impacts of hydrogen technologies. Specifically, life cycle assessment is used to identify and evaluate the emissions,...

    5. Structural Health Monitoring Tools

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      ... LA-UR-14-21085 16 Parameter name: Mode Shapes * Description: Structural modes of vibration computed using the modal residues according to a user-selected method. * Type: - ...

    6. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Molecular Biology Group hosted a 3-day comprehensive workshop on the use of non-crystalline small-angle x-ray scattering and diffraction techniques in structural biology research. ...

    7. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Science Highlights Science Highlights Structure of Chinese Herbal-based Medicine Captured by ATP on a Human tRNA Synthetase For approximately 2,000 years, the Chinese have been ...

    8. Structured Innovation Initiative Workshop

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Following Water Power Week in Washington, D.C, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct a workshop on the Structured Innovation Initiative, similar to the workshop recently held in Edinburgh, Scotland during ICOE 2016.

    9. Graduate Program Salary Structure

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Salary Structure Graduate Program Salary Structure Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-0987 Email GRA salary determination process Salaries are determined by evaluating students' current transcripts using the following criteria: Salaries for graduate students are based on completion of 12 credit hours annually for the

    10. REACTOR MODERATOR STRUCTURE

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Greenstreet, B.L.

      1963-12-31

      A system for maintaining the alignment of moderator block structures in reactors is presented. Integral restraining grids are placed between each layer of blocks in the moderator structure, at the top of the uppermost layer, and at the bottom of the lowermost layer. Slots are provided in the top and bottom surfaces of the moderator blocks so as to provide a keying action with the grids. The grids are maintained in alignment by vertical guiding members disposed about their peripheries. (AEC)

    11. Structured luminescence conversion layer

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

      2012-12-11

      An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

    12. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's

    13. DETERMINING THE NATURE OF THE EXTENDED H I STRUCTURE AROUND LITTLE THINGS DWARF GALAXY NGC 1569

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Johnson, Megan

      2013-06-15

      This work presents an extended, neutral hydrogen emission map around Magellanic-type dwarf irregular galaxy (dIm) NGC 1569. In the spring of 2010, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope was used to map a 9 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 2 Degree-Sign region in H I line emission that includes NGC 1569 and IC 342 as well as two other dwarf galaxies. The primary objective for these observations was to search for structures potentially connecting NGC 1569 with IC 342 group members in order to trace previous interactions and thus, provide an explanation for the starburst and peculiar kinematics prevalent in NGC 1569. A large, half-degree diameter H I cloud was detected that shares the same position and velocity as NGC 1569. Also, two long structures were discovered that are reminiscent of intergalactic filaments extending out in a V-shaped manner from NGC 1569 toward UGCA 92, a nearby dwarf galaxy. These filamentary structures extend for about 1. Degree-Sign 5, which is 77 kpc at NGC 1569. There is a continuous velocity succession with the 0. Degree-Sign 5 H I cloud, filaments, and main body of the galaxy. The 0. Degree-Sign 5 H I cloud and filamentary structures may be foreground Milky Way, but are suggestive as possible remnants of an interaction between NGC 1569 and UGCA 92. The data also show two tidal tails extending from UGCA 86 and IC 342, respectively. These structures may be part of a continuous H I bridge but more data are needed to determine if this is the case.

    14. NREL: Energy Analysis - Market Analysis

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Market Analysis The laboratory's market analysis helps increase the use of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) technologies in the marketplace by providing strategic information to stakeholders interested in rapidly changing electricity markets. Our high-quality and objective crosscutting assessments and analysis support informed decision making. Primary focuses include: Energy Technology/Program Cost, Performance, and Market Data The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    15. Structural assessment of accident loads

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Wagenblast, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

      1996-05-28

      Structural assessments were made for specific accident loads for specific catch, receiver, and storage tanks. The evaluation herein represents level-of-effort order-of-magnitude estimates of limiting loads that would lead to collapse or rupture of the tank and unmitigated loss of confinement for the waste. Structural capacities were established using failure criteria. Compliance with codes such as ACI, ASCE, ASME, RCRA, UBC, WAC, and DOE Orders was `NOT` maintained. Normal code practice is to prevent failure with margins consistent with expected variations in loads and strengths and confidence in analysis techniques. The evaluation herein represent estimates of code limits without code load factors or code strength reduction factors, and loading beyond such a limit is considered as an onset of some failure mode. The exact nature of the failure mode and its relation to a safe condition is a judgment of the analyst. Consequently, these `RESULTS SHALL NOT BE USED TO ESTABLISH OPERATING OR SAFETY LOAD LIMITS FOR THESE TANKS`.

    16. Structural Controls of the Emerson Pass Geothermal System, Washoe County, Nevada

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Anderson, Ryan B; Faulds, James E

      2012-09-30

      We have conducted a detailed geologic study to better characterize a blind geothermal system in Emerson Pass on the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe Reservation, western Nevada. A thermal anomaly was discovered in Emerson Pass by use of 2 m temperature surveys deployed within a structurally favorable setting and proximal to surface features indicative of geothermal activity. The anomaly lies at the western edge of a broad left step at the northeast end of Pyramid Lake between the north- to north-northeast-striking, west-dipping, Fox and Lake Range normal faults. The 2-m temperature surveys have defined a N-S elongate thermal anomaly that has a maximum recorded temperature of ~60°C and resides on a north- to north-northeaststriking fault. Travertine mounds, chalcedonic silica veins, and silica cemented Pleistocene lacustrine gravels in Emerson Pass indicate a robust geothermal system active at the surface in the recent past. Structural complexity and spatial heterogeneities of the strain and stress field have developed in the step-over region, but kinematic data suggest a WNW-trending (~280° azimuth) extension direction. The geothermal system is likely hosted in Emerson Pass as a result of enhanced permeability generated by the intersection of two oppositely dipping, southward terminating north- to north-northwest-striking (Fox Range fault) and northnortheast- striking faults.

    17. A Top-Down Approach to Determining Global RNA Structures in Solution...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Resource Relation: Related Information: RNA 3D Structure Analysis and Prediction Publisher: 2012; Springer;NA;N. Leontis, E. Westhof;335-359 Research Org: Advanced Photon Source ...

    18. NREL: Energy Analysis - Policy Analysis

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      The laboratory's policy analysis evaluates policies that can advance-or provide alternatives to-renewable energy technologies in meeting national goals. Federal Policy NREL's ...

    19. K West integrated water treatment system subproject safety analysis document

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      SEMMENS, L.S.

      1999-02-24

      This Accident Analysis evaluates unmitigated accident scenarios, and identifies Safety Significant and Safety Class structures, systems, and components for the K West Integrated Water Treatment System.

    20. X-ray crystallographic analysis of adipocyte fatty acid binding...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      X-ray crystallographic analysis of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2) modified ... LIFE SCIENCES; ALDEHYDES; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; IN VIVO; INFLAMMATION; ...

    1. Advance Seismic Data Analysis Program: (The "Hot Pot Project...

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      method for interpreting seismic data to locate deep geothermal structures. validationmoorehotpot.pdf (263.32 KB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Seismic Data Analysis ...

    2. Radiation Effects on Spacecraft Structural Materials

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Wang, Jy-An J.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Hunter, Hamilton T.; Singleterry, Robert C. Jr.

      2002-07-01

      Research is being conducted to develop an integrated technology for the prediction of aging behavior for space structural materials during service. This research will utilize state-of-the-art radiation experimental apparatus and analysis, updated codes and databases, and integrated mechanical and radiation testing techniques to investigate the suitability of numerous current and potential spacecraft structural materials. Also included are the effects on structural materials in surface modules and planetary landing craft, with or without fission power supplies. Spacecraft structural materials would also be in hostile radiation environments on the surface of the moon and planets without appreciable atmospheres and moons around planets with large intense magnetic and radiation fields (such as the Jovian moons). The effects of extreme temperature cycles in such locations compounds the effects of radiation on structural materials. This paper describes the integrated methodology in detail and shows that it will provide a significant technological advance for designing advanced spacecraft. This methodology will also allow for the development of advanced spacecraft materials through the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of material degradation in the space radiation environment. Thus, this technology holds a promise for revolutionary advances in material damage prediction and protection of space structural components as, for example, in the development of guidelines for managing surveillance programs regarding the integrity of spacecraft components, and the safety of the aging spacecraft. (authors)

    3. Band structure anisotropy in semiconductor quantum wells

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Novotny, S.J.

      1999-03-01

      The focus of this research is an investigation of energy band anisotropy in simple quantum well structures. This anisotropy results from the asymmetry of the periodic potential within the crystal lattice. For sufficiently high doping levels, band structure anisotropy is expected to play an important role in the evaluation of the electronic and optical properties of the quantum well structures. The analysis uses a model based on a 6x6 Luttinger-Kohn k.p approach for bulk material valence band structure together with the Envelope Function Approximation. The model is used to analyze Si/SiGe, AlGaAs/GaAs, and GaAs/InGaAs quantum wells for the 001 and the 110 growth directions. The resulting band structures show significant anisotropy for materials grown in both the 110 and 001 directions. In all cases the materials grown in the 110 direction show a more pronounced anisotropy than the materials grown in the 001 directions. For the 001 growth directions, the band structures were effectively isotropic for values of k-parallel less than 0.4 inverse angstrom for Si/SiGe, 0.6 inverse angstrom for GaAs/AlGaAs, and 0.5 inverse angstrom for InGaAs/GaAs.

    4. Stochastic Consequence Analysis for Waste Leaks

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      HEY, B.E.

      2000-05-31

      This analysis evaluates the radiological consequences of potential Hanford Tank Farm waste transfer leaks. These include ex-tank leaks into structures, underneath the soil, and exposed to the atmosphere. It also includes potential misroutes, tank overflow

    5. Microporous metal organic framework [M{sub 2}(hfipbb){sub 2}(ted)] (M=Zn, Co; H{sub 2}hfipbb=4,4-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)-bis(benzoic acid); ted=triethylenediamine): Synthesis, structure analysis, pore characterization, small gas adsorption and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation properties

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Xu, William W.; Pramanik, Sanhita; Zhang, Zhijuan; Emge, Thomas J.; Li, Jing

      2013-04-15

      Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas that is a major contributor to global warming. Developing methods that can effectively capture CO{sub 2} is the key to reduce its emission to the atmosphere. Recent research shows that microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are emerging as a promising family of adsorbents that may be promising for use in adsorption based capture and separation of CO{sub 2} from power plant waste gases. In this work we report the synthesis, crystal structure analysis and pore characterization of two microporous MOF structures, [M{sub 2}(hfipbb){sub 2}(ted)] (M=Zn (1), Co (2); H{sub 2}hfipbb=4,4-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)-bis(benzoic acid); ted=triethylenediamine). The CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} adsorption experiments and IAST calculations are carried out on [Zn{sub 2}(hfipbb){sub 2}(ted)] under conditions that mimic post-combustion flue gas mixtures emitted from power plants. The results show that the framework interacts with CO{sub 2} strongly, giving rise to relatively high isosteric heats of adsorption (up to 28 kJ/mol), and high adsorption selectivity for CO{sub 2} over N{sub 2}, making it promising for capturing and separating CO{sub 2} from CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures. - Graphical abstract: Microporous [Zn{sub 2}(hfipbb){sub 2}(ted)] demonstrates high adsorption selectivity for CO{sub 2} over N{sub 2} under conditions that mimic flue gas mixtures. Highlights: ► Two new porous MOFs were synthesized and characterized by rational design. ► The small pore size leads to greatly enhanced CO{sub 2}–MOF interaction. ► High adsorption selectivity of the Zn–MOF for CO{sub 2} over N{sub 2} is achieved.

    6. Battery structures, self-organizing structures and related methods...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Title: Battery structures, self-organizing structures and related methods An energy storage device includes a first electrode comprising a first material and a second electrode ...

    7. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thick Concrete Structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Clayton, Dwight A

      2015-01-01

      Materials issues are a key concern for the existing nuclear reactor fleet in the United States as material degradation can lead to increased maintenance, increased downtime, and increased risk. Extending reactor life to 60 years and beyond will likely increase susceptibility and severity of both known and new forms of degradation. A multitude of concrete-based structures are typically part of a light water reactor plant to provide foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. The size and complexity of nuclear power plant containment structures and the heterogeneity of Portland cement concrete make characterization of the degradation extent a difficult task. This paper examines the benefits of using time-frequency analysis with Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT). By using wavelet packet decomposition, the original ultrasound signals are decomposed into various frequency bands that facilitates highly selective analysis of the signal’s frequency content and can be visualized using the familiar SAFT image reconstruction algorithm.

    8. Analysis of Lipoplex Structure and Lipid Phase Changes (Book...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      used as delivery vehicles for nucleic acids and are now considered the most promising nonviral gene carriers. They form complexes (lipoplexes) with the polyanionic nucleic acids. ...

    9. Structural and functional analysis of FIP2 binding to theendosome...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Language: ENGLISH Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Journal Articles DOI: 10.1016j.bbapap.2013.09.005 Select the DOI to obtain a copy of this journal article from the publisher. ...

    10. Solution Structure Analysis of Cytoplasmic Domain of Podocyte...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Biological Chemistry; Journal Volume: 287; Journal Issue: 12 Research Org: BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY ...

    11. Structural and Biochemical Analysis of DNA Helix Invasion by...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      (Harvard-Med) ( Publication Date: 2013-07-26 OSTI Identifier: 1087764 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: J. Biol. Chem.; Journal Volume: ...

    12. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      three-dimensional shape. Although x-ray crystallography yields higher-resolution images, SAXS makes up for what it lacks in precision by providing fast, accurate...

    13. Risk Informed Design and Analysis Criteria for Nuclear Structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Salmon, Michael W.

      2015-06-17

      Target performance can be achieved by defining design basis ground motion from results of a probabilistic seismic hazards assessment, and introducing known levels of conservatism in the design above the DBE. ASCE 4, 43, DOE-STD-1020 defined the DBE at 4x10-4 and introduce only slight levels of conservatism in response. ASCE 4, 43, DOE-STD-1020 assume code capacities shoot for about 98% NEP. There is a need to have a uniform target (98% NEP) for code developers (ACI, AISC, etc.) to aim for. In considering strengthening options, one must also consider cost/risk reduction achieved.

    14. Structural Analysis for Subsidence of Stacked B-25 Boxes

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Jones, W.E.

      2003-06-25

      The Savannah River Site (SRS) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites use shallow land burial facilities (i.e., trenches) to dispose low-level radioactive waste. However, at SRS and other DOE sites, waste containers with up to 90 percent void space are disposed in the shallow land burial facilities. Corrosion and degradation of these containers can result in significant subsidence over time, which can compromise the integrity of the long-term cover. This in turn can lead to increased water infiltration through the long-term cover into the waste and subsequent increased radionuclide transport into the environment. Understanding and predicting shallow-buried, low-level waste subsidence behavior is necessary for evaluating cost-effective and appropriate stabilization required to maintain cover system long-term stability and viability, and to obtain stakeholder acceptance of the long-term implications of waste disposal practices. Two methods (dynamic compaction and static surcharge) have been used at SRS to accelerate waste and container consolidation and reduce potential subsidence prior to long term cover construction. Dynamic compaction comprises repeatedly dropping a heavy (20 ton) weight from about a 40-ft height to consolidate the waste and containers. Static surcharge is the use of a thick (15 ft to 30 ft) soil cover to consolidate the underlying materials over a longer time period (three to six months in this case). Quasi-static modeling of a stack of four B-25 boxes at various stags of corrosion with an applied static surcharge has been conducted and is presented herein.

    15. Electrogalvanic finite element analysis of partially protected marine structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kasper, R.G.; April, M.G.

      1983-05-01

      A general finite element modeling (FEM) procedure for calculating electrogalvanic field responses due to multiple anodic/cathodic interactions has been developed. Within any defined electrolytic continuum the exact geometry and location of anodes, cathodes, and paint surfaces can now be realistically incorporated in the mathematical model formulation. The anodic/cathodic interactions in the conductive electrolyte are predicted by the application of classical d.c. electric field theory for conductive continuums in conjunction with widely accepted laboratory oxidation/reduction responses for the electrodes. The electrogalvanic fields in the electrolyte are calculated using the scalar Poisson equation whereby traditional boundary conditions are prescribed in the far field of the electrolyte. In the near field of the anodes, cathodes, and the painted metallic substrate, complex boundary conditions are enforced based on empirical polarization curves and paint impedance values. The ionic current in the electrolyte leaving the anode and arriving at the cathodes are mathematically constrained to sum to zero over the metallic surface (spatial Kirchoff's law). Three example problems (three dimensional) of an iron bar in salt water will demonstrate the electrochemical field effects due to relative anodic/cathodic spacing, anodic/cathodic geometries, and infinite paint impedance. A fourth boundary value problem (two dimensional) will illustrate the effect of a paint discontinuity (unprotected area) in the center of the otherwise painted (finite impedance) metallic substrate. The proposed electrochemical modeling procedure has the advantage of concurrently treating numerous essential electrochemical parameters for any geometric anodic/cathodic configurations consistent with the physical laws of electrochemistry.

    16. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      that require genomic-scale information, such as Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and cancer biology studies. Artist's abstract depiction of high-throughput SAXS combining...

    17. Genetic and structural analysis of the essential fission yeast...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      DOI: 10.1261rna.050286.115 Select the DOI to obtain a copy of this journal article from the publisher. Find in Google Scholar Find in Google Scholar Search WorldCat Search ...

    18. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      is sufficient to address key biological questions. For example, future synthetic biology efforts may involve taking a useful protein, or a network of proteins, from one...

    19. Structural Analysis of Novel Lignin-derived Carbon Composite...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      and allows for the development of a mapping between the defining characteristics of the PDF and the material properties of interest. Authors: McNutt, Nicholas W 1 ; Rios,...

    20. Analysis Procedures to Estimate Seismic Demands of Structures | Department

      Office of Environmental Management (EM)

      Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs | Department of Energy An Overview of the DOE's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs An Overview of the DOE's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs overview of SBIR and STTR An Overview of the DOE's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology TRansfer (STTR) Programs (1.75 MB) More Documents &

    1. Moisture and Structural Analysis for High Performance Hybrid Wall Assemblies

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Grin, A.; Lstiburek, J.

      2012-09-01

      This report describes the work conducted by the Building Science Corporation (BSC) Building America Research Team's 'Energy Efficient Housing Research Partnerships' project. Based on past experience in the Building America program, they have found that combinations of materials and approaches---in other words, systems--usually provide optimum performance. No single manufacturer typically provides all of the components for an assembly, nor has the specific understanding of all the individual components necessary for optimum performance.

    2. Structural power flow measurement

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

      1988-12-01

      Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

    3. Underground waste barrier structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Saha, Anuj J.; Grant, David C.

      1988-01-01

      Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

    4. Seismic design technology for breeder reactor structures. Volume 2. Special topics in soil/structure interaction analyses

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Reddy, D.P.

      1983-04-01

      This volume is divided into six chapters: definition of seismic input ground motion, review of state-of-the-art procedures, analysis guidelines, rock/structure interaction analysis example, comparison of two- and three-dimensional analyses, and comparison of analyses using FLUSH and TRI/SAC Codes. (DLC)

    5. Fire protection for relocatable structures

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      1995-06-01

      This standard supersedes DOE/EV-0043, ``Standard on Fire Protection for Portable Structures.`` It was revised to address the numerous types of relocatable structures, such as trailers, tension-supported structures, and tents being used by DOE and contractors.

    6. Real time analysis under EDS

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Schneberk, D.

      1985-07-01

      This paper describes the analysis component of the Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) developed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Four different types of analysis are performed on data acquired through EDS: (1) absorption spectroscopy on laser-generated spectral lines, (2) mass spectrometer analysis, (3) general purpose waveform analysis, and (4) separation performance calculations. The information produced from this data includes: measures of particle density and velocity, partial pressures of residual gases, and overall measures of isotope enrichment. The analysis component supports a variety of real-time modeling tasks, a means for broadcasting data to other nodes, and a great degree of flexibility for tailoring computations to the exact needs of the process. A particular data base structure and program flow is common to all types of analysis. Key elements of the analysis component are: (1) a fast access data base which can configure all types of analysis, (2) a selected set of analysis routines, (3) a general purpose data manipulation and graphics package for the results of real time analysis. Each of these components are described with an emphasis upon how each contributes to overall system capability. 3 figs.

    7. Program Analysis

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      and abate nearly 20,000 mmt of CO2 through 2050. EE portfolio analysis wNEMS+MARKAL (Frances Wood, OnLocation, and Chip Friley, BNL) Heavily leverages ANL's Autonomie Tool...

    8. Financial Analysis

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      The first step in financing a street lighting retrofit is a detailed financial analysis. Because street lighting systems are designed to last ten or twenty years, or even longer, all aspects of first costs, ongoing expenses, and long-term savings are important. While a preliminary or first-level analysis can be used to determine such things as simple payback, rate of return, and cost of light, the results may neglect a number of important economic considerations, such as the time value of money, additional savings and expenses and their relative timing, and future energy price escalations. Hence a first-level analysis does not typically provide the end user with sufficient details to make a fully informed decision. For this reason, the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) recommends a full life cycle cost/benefit analysis (LCCBA).

    9. Rectangular Dielectric-lined Accelerator Structure

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Wang Changbiao; Yakovlev, V.P.; Hirshfield, J.L.

      2004-12-07

      Results are reported from analysis of a rectangular X-band dielectric-lined accelerator structure operating in the symmetric LSM-11 mode that has a number of favorable attributes, by comparison with dielectric-lined cylindrical structures. These attributes include use of two planar one-piece precision-ground TiN coated dielectric slabs free of joints, open slots along two opposing metallic faces to suppress all anti-symmetric higher-order modes and to facilitate high-speed pumping, and significant reduction of wall losses by use of evanescent vacuum gaps beyond the dielectric slabs. It is shown that a structure operating at 11.424 GHz can be built with a shunt impedance > 60 M{omega}/m using low-loss alumina as the dielectric.

    10. Supplement Analysis

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Supplement Analysis to the LCLS-ll Environmental Assessment, July. 2014 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Office of *ENERGY 1 Science SLAG Site Office SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS-8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 DATE: September 15, 2015 MEMORANDUM FOR: Paul Golan, Site Manager, SLAC Site Office THROUGH: James Elmore, ISC-OR NEPA Compliance Officer, Oak Ridge Office FROM: Mitzi Heard, NEPA Coornator, SLAC Site Office SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis to SLAC LCLS-I1 Environmental Assessment.

    11. Module 2- Work Breakdown Structure

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      This module defines and illustrates the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), WBS dictionary, Organizational Breakdown Structure (OBS) and Responsibility Assignment Matrix (RAM).

    12. Structural Genomics: Expectations and Reality

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      ... TB Structural Genomics Consortium, http:www.doe-mbi.ucla.eduTB (TB) Structures of M. tuberculosis proteome, with emphasis on functionally important proteins. Non-PSI ...

    13. Housing And Mounting Structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Baca, Johnny R.F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Miller, Gregory V.; Peterson, David W.; Smith, Terrance T.

      2005-03-08

      This invention relates to an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module, and more particularly, to an apparatus for connecting a first optical connector to a second optical connector. The apparatus comprises: (1) a housing having at least a first end and at least a second end, the first end of the housing capable of receiving the first optical connector, and the second end of the housing capable of receiving the second optical connector; (2) a longitudinal cavity extending from the first end of the housing to the second end of the housing; and (3) an electromagnetic shield comprising at least a portion of the housing. This invention also relates to an apparatus for housing a flexible printed circuit board, and this apparatus comprises: (1) a mounting structure having at least a first surface and a second surface; (2) alignment ridges along the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure, the alignment ridges functioning to align and secure a flexible printed circuit board that is wrapped around and attached to the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure; and (3) a series of heat sink ridges adapted to the mounting structure, the heat sink ridges functioning to dissipate heat that is generated from the flexible printed circuit board.

    14. Acicular photomultiplier photocathode structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Craig, Richard A.; Bliss, Mary

      2003-09-30

      A method and apparatus for increasing the quantum efficiency of a photomultiplier tube by providing a photocathode with an increased surface-to-volume ratio. The photocathode includes a transparent substrate, upon one major side of which is formed one or more large aspect-ratio structures, such as needles, cones, fibers, prisms, or pyramids. The large aspect-ratio structures are at least partially composed of a photoelectron emitting material, i.e., a material that emits a photoelectron upon absorption of an optical photon. The large aspect-ratio structures may be substantially composed of the photoelectron emitting material (i.e., formed as such upon the surface of a relatively flat substrate) or be only partially composed of a photoelectron emitting material (i.e., the photoelectron emitting material is coated over large aspect-ratio structures formed from the substrate material itself.) The large aspect-ratio nature of the photocathode surface allows for an effective increase in the thickness of the photocathode relative the absorption of optical photons, thereby increasing the absorption rate of incident photons, without substantially increasing the effective thickness of the photocathode relative the escape incidence of the photoelectrons.

    15. Dynamic cable analysis models

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Palo, P.A.; Meggitt, D.J.; Nordell, W.J.

      1983-05-01

      This paper presents a summary of the development and validation of undersea cable dynamics computer models by the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory (NCEL) under the sponsorship of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command. These models allow for the analysis of both small displacement (strumming) and large displacement (static and dynamic) deformations of arbitrarily configured cable structures. All of the large displacement models described in this paper are available to the public. This paper does not emphasize the theoretical development of the models (this information is available in other references) but emphasizes the various features of the models, the comparisons between model output and experimental data, and applications for which the models have been used.

    16. Viscous potential flow analysis of electrified miscible finitely conducting fluid through porous media

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Obied Allah, M. H.

      2013-04-15

      In this work, a viscous potential flow analysis is used to investigate capillary surface waves between two horizontal finite fluid layers. The two layers have finite conductivities and admit mass and heat transfer. A general dispersion relation is derived. The presence of finite conductivities together with the dielectric permeabilities makes the horizontal electric field play a dual role in the stability criterion. The phenomenon of negative viscosity is observed. A new growth rate parameter, depending on the kinematical viscosity of the lower fluid layer, is found and has a stabilizing effect on the unstable modes. The growth rates and neutral stability curve are given and applied to air-water interface. The effects of various parameters are discussed for the Kelvin-Helmholtz and the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities.

    17. Weld defect distributions in offshore structures and their influence on structural reliability

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Rogerson, J.H.; Wong, W.K.

      1982-01-01

      Failure by fracture is a serious possible fracture mode of steel offshore structures particularly in hostile, low-temperature environments. Such fracture usually initiates from flaws in regions of stress concentration. For any probabilistic failure analysis to be credible, it is necessary to have a good estimate of the flaw size and distribution. For fixed steel platforms the important flaw size distribution is the distribution of defect height in welds in node connections. Previous work has shown that different structures have similar defect distributions which suggests that a function can be derived for the generality of such structures. Data has been analyzed relating to > 1000 m of weld in one North Sea structure. From this can be seen that a Weibull distribution is the appropriate function to use for defect height. Conclusions also are drawn about the required reliability of even an imperfect inspection and repair technique to significantly reduce failure probability.

    18. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      E Structural Analyses and Quaternary Investigations in Support of the Hanford PSHA Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 iii Structural Analyses and Quaternary Investigations in Support of the Hanford PSHA Mr. Ryan Coppersmith Coppersmith Consulting, Inc. Ms. Kathryn Hanson AMEC Environment & Infrastructure, Inc. Dr. Jeff Unruh Lettis Consultants International, Inc. Mr. Christopher Slack AMEC Environment & Infrastructure, Inc. September 2014 Hanford Sitewide

    19. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S.; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H.

      1997-08-01

      Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

    20. Extending and automating a Systems-Theoretic hazard analysis for requirements generation and analysis.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Thomas, John

      2012-05-01

      Systems Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) is a powerful new hazard analysis method designed to go beyond traditional safety techniques - such as Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) - that overlook important causes of accidents like flawed requirements, dysfunctional component interactions, and software errors. While proving to be very effective on real systems, no formal structure has been defined for STPA and its application has been ad-hoc with no rigorous procedures or model-based design tools. This report defines a formal mathematical structure underlying STPA and describes a procedure for systematically performing an STPA analysis based on that structure. A method for using the results of the hazard analysis to generate formal safety-critical, model-based system and software requirements is also presented. Techniques to automate both the analysis and the requirements generation are introduced, as well as a method to detect conflicts between the safety and other functional model-based requirements during early development of the system.

    1. NREL: Energy Analysis - Manufacturing Analysis

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Recent Publications "Economic Measurements of Polysilicon for the Photovoltaic Industry: Market Competition and Manufacturing Competitiveness" IEEE Journal of Photovoltaics Supply Chain and Blade Manufacturing Considerations in the Global Wind Industry Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas Manufacturing Analysis With world-class manufacturing analysis capabilities, NREL analyzes clean energy industry trends; cost, price, and performance trends; market and

    2. Uncertainty quantification in kinematic wave models (Journal...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Report Number(s): PNNL-SA-84180 KJ0401000 DOE Contract Number: AC05-76RL01830 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Computational Physics, ...

    3. Shot loading trainer analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Peterson, T.K.

      1995-02-15

      This document presents the results from the analysis of the shot loading trainer (SLT). This device will be used to test the procedure for installing shot into the annulus of the Project W-320 shipping container. To ensure that the shot is installed uniformly around the container, vibrators will be used to settle the shot. The SLT was analyzed to ensure that it would not jeopardize worker safety during operation. The results from the static analysis of the SLT under deadweight and vibrator operating loads show that the stresses in the SLT are below code allowables. The results from the modal analysis show that the natural frequencies of the SLT are far below the operating frequencies of the vibrators, provided the SLT is mounted on pneumatic tires. The SLT was also analyzed for wind, seismic, deadweight, and moving/transporting loads. Analysis of the SLT is in accordance with SDC-4.1 for safety class 3 structures (DOE-RL 1993) and the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of Steel Construction (AISC 1989).

    4. Multi-functional composite structures

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

      2010-04-27

      Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

    5. Multi-functional composite structures

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

      2004-10-19

      Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

    6. Air cathode structure manufacture

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Momyer, William R.; Littauer, Ernest L.

      1985-01-01

      An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

    7. Core assembly storage structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

      1988-01-01

      A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

    8. Portable solar heater structure

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Holley, D.; Holley, D.E.

      1981-09-08

      Portable solar heater structure is described. A substantially rectangular frame has a back with openings therethrough for permitting air to be drawn into the solar heater. A layer of insulating materials is in contact with the back. A plurality of cupshaped solar collectors open toward the front of the solar heater structure are positioned adjacent the insulating material. A cover is over the front of the solar heater having openings therein adjacent the top thereof through which air heated by the solar heater is passed. A passage is between the openings in the back and cover of the solar heater through which relatively cool air is drawn through the openings in the back over the collectors to be heated for subsequent withdrawal through the openings in the cover.

    9. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Mattingly, J.T.

      1962-09-25

      A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

    10. NEUTRON-IRRADIATED STRUCTURES

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Ashley, E.L.; Ashley, J.W.; Bowker, H.W.; Hall, R.H.; Kendall, J.W.

      1959-02-01

      A moderator structure is described for a nuclear reactor of the heterogensous type wherein a large mass of moderator is provided with channels therethrough for the introduction of uranium serving as nuclear fuel and for the passage of a cooling fluid. The structure is comprised of blocks of moderator material in superposed horizontal layers, the blocks of each layer being tied together with spaces between them and oriented to have horizontal Wigner growth. The ties are strips of moderator material, the same as the blocks, with transverse Wigner growth, disposed horizontally along lines crossing at vertical axes of the blocks. The blocks are preferably rectangular with a larger or length dimension transverse to the directions of Wiguer growth and are stood on end to provide for horizontal growth.

    11. REACTOR MODERATOR STRUCTURE

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Fraas, A.P.; Tudor, J.J.

      1963-08-01

      An improved moderator structure for nuclear reactors consists of moderator blocks arranged in horizontal layers to form a multiplicity of vertically stacked columns of blocks. The blocks in each vertical column are keyed together, and a ceramic grid is disposed between each horizontal layer of blocks. Pressure plates cover- the lateral surface of the moderator structure in abutting relationship with the peripheral terminal lengths of the ceramic grids. Tubular springs are disposed between the pressure plates and a rigid external support. The tubular springs have their axes vertically disposed to facilitate passage of coolant gas through the springs and are spaced apart a selected distance such that at sonae preselected point of spring deflection, the sides of the springs will contact adjacent springs thereby causing a large increase in resistance to further spring deflection. (AEC)

    12. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

    13. Structural Health Monitoring

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Structural Health Monitoring - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

    14. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

    15. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

    16. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

    17. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

    18. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

    19. Proton structure functions at small x

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Hentschinski, Martin

      2015-01-01

      Proton structure functions are measured in electron-proton collision through inelastic scattering of virtual photons with virtuality Q on protons; x denotes the momentum fraction carried by the struck parton. Proton structure functions are currently described with excellent accuracy in terms of scale dependent parton distribution functions, defined in terms of collinear factorization and DGLAP evolution in Q. With decreasing x however, parton densities increase and are ultimately expected to saturate. In this regime DGLAP evolution will finally break down and non-linear evolution equations w.r.t x are expected to take over. In the first part of the talk we present recent result on an implementation of physical DGLAP evolution. Unlike the conventional description in terms of parton distribution functions, the former describes directly the Q dependence of the measured structure functions. It is therefore physical insensitive to factorization scheme and scale ambiguities. It therefore provides a more stringent test of DGLAP evolution and eases the manifestation of (non-linear) small x effects. It however requires a precise measurement of both structure functions F2 and FL, which will be only possible at future facilities, such as an Electron Ion Collider. In the second part we present a recent analysis of the small x region of the combined HERA data on the structure function F2. We demonstrate that (linear) next-to-leading order BFKL evolution describes the effective Pomeron intercept, determined from the combined HERA data, once a resummation of collinear enhanced terms is included and the renormalization scale is fixed using the BLM optimal scale setting procedure. We also provide a detailed description of the Q and x dependence of the full structure functions F2 in the small x region, as measured at HERA. As a result, predictions for the structure function FL are found to be in agreement with the existing HERA

    20. Proton structure functions at small x

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Hentschinski, Martin

      2015-01-01

      Proton structure functions are measured in electron-proton collision through inelastic scattering of virtual photons with virtuality Q on protons; x denotes the momentum fraction carried by the struck parton. Proton structure functions are currently described with excellent accuracy in terms of scale dependent parton distribution functions, defined in terms of collinear factorization and DGLAP evolution in Q. With decreasing x however, parton densities increase and are ultimately expected to saturate. In this regime DGLAP evolution will finally break down and non-linear evolution equations w.r.t x are expected to take over. In the first part of the talk we present recentmore » result on an implementation of physical DGLAP evolution. Unlike the conventional description in terms of parton distribution functions, the former describes directly the Q dependence of the measured structure functions. It is therefore physical insensitive to factorization scheme and scale ambiguities. It therefore provides a more stringent test of DGLAP evolution and eases the manifestation of (non-linear) small x effects. It however requires a precise measurement of both structure functions F2 and FL, which will be only possible at future facilities, such as an Electron Ion Collider. In the second part we present a recent analysis of the small x region of the combined HERA data on the structure function F2. We demonstrate that (linear) next-to-leading order BFKL evolution describes the effective Pomeron intercept, determined from the combined HERA data, once a resummation of collinear enhanced terms is included and the renormalization scale is fixed using the BLM optimal scale setting procedure. We also provide a detailed description of the Q and x dependence of the full structure functions F2 in the small x region, as measured at HERA. As a result, predictions for the structure function FL are found to be in agreement with the existing HERA data.« less