National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for kilowatthour kwh joules

  1. Joule Unlimited previously Joule Biotechnologies | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Joule Unlimited (previously Joule Biotechnologies) Place: Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip: 2142 Product: Massachusetts-based industrial biotechnology...

  2. Green Joules | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Joules Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Joules Place: Park City, Utah Zip: 80460 Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: Project developer focussing on wind farms larger than...

  3. PROJECT PROFILE: kWh Analytics (Incubator 10) | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    APPROACH kWh Analytics will create the solar industry's largest database of financial payment history for solar financing contracts. This data set would serve as a crucial ...

  4. Average Price (Cents/kilowatthour) by State by Provider, 1990-2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Average Price (Cents/kilowatthour) by State by Provider, 1990-2014" "Year","State","Industry Sector Category","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Other","Total" 2014,"AK","Total Electric Industry",19.14,17.09,15.66,0,"NA",17.46 2014,"AL","Total Electric Industry",11.48,10.79,6.15,0,"NA",9.27

  5. Joules Energy Efficiency Services Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Joules Energy Efficiency Services Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Joules Energy Efficiency Services Ltd Address: 10 Edenderry Rd Place: Belfast Zip: BY8 8LD Region: Ireland...

  6. PROJECT PROFILE: kWh Analytics (Phase 3) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    kWh Analytics (Phase 3) PROJECT PROFILE: kWh Analytics (Phase 3) Funding Opportunity: Orange Button (SB-DATA) SunShot Subprogram: Soft Costs Location: San Francisco, CA Amount Awarded: $1,000,000 Awardee Cost Share: $1,000,000 kWh Analytics will support the adoption of industry-led data standards, including the development of a data format translation software tool, Solar BabelFish, which will instantly translate original data formats into data standards. This will significantly reduce the time

  7. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Oil-FiredBoiler...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oil-FiredBoiler Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Oil-fired boiler Pages using the property "BuildingSPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Oil-FiredBoiler"...

  8. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2LargeComputersServers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Large computers servers Pages using the property "BuildingSPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2LargeComp...

  9. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Other | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingSPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Other Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Other Pages using the property...

  10. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2ElctrcEngineHeaters...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingSPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2ElctrcEngineHeaters Jump to: navigation, search This is...

  11. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2HeatPumpsUsedForColg...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingSPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2HeatPumpsUsedForColg Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Heat pumps used...

  12. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Printers | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rcityUseKwhM2Printers" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.928422444931 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 1.42372881356 + Sweden...

  13. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2ElctrcHeating...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UseKwhM2ElctrcHeating" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.915704329247 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building...

  14. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Total | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EngyPerAreaKwhM2Total" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 221.549575215 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 213.701117318 + Sweden...

  15. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Misc | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ElctrcityUseKwhM2Misc" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 9.09953195331 + Sweden Building...

  16. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Pcs | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fElctrcityUseKwhM2Pcs" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 26.0998626444 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 22.2888135593 + Sweden...

  17. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2LargeKitchens...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UseKwhM2LargeKitchens" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.763086941039 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building...

  18. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2CirculationFans...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    eKwhM2CirculationFans" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 13.3422495258 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building...

  19. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrcHeating |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reaKwhM2ElctrcHeating" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.915704329247 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building...

  20. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2AirCompressors...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    seKwhM2AirCompressors" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1.33591087145 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building...

  1. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Pumps | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lctrcityUseKwhM2Pumps" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 6.37190900733 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 6.03888185355 + Sweden...

  2. text in "Max kWh" fields | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it should as we are trying to prevent users from writing "less than X", "greater than Y", etc. and follow the intention of the "Max kWh" field. Also there should be a warning...

  3. The Joule Centre for Energy Research | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Joule Centre for Energy Research Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Joule Centre for Energy Research Place: Manchester, United Kingdom Zip: M60 1QD Product: A USD 18.2m energy...

  4. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2WoodChips | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PerAreaKwhM2WoodChips" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0...

  5. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Laundry | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    trcityUseKwhM2Laundry" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0...

  6. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Pellets | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    gyPerAreaKwhM2Pellets" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0...

  7. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, J.G.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-07-05

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating is disclosed. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  8. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G.; Daily, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  9. Joules of Wisdom: Top Things You Didn't Know About Energy | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Joules of Wisdom: Top Things You Didn't Know About Energy Explore the world of energy through our blog series, Joules of Wisdom: Top Things You Didn't Know About Energy. From the...

  10. Fully Kinetic Simulations of MegaJoule-Scale Dense Plasma Focus...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Fully Kinetic Simulations of MegaJoule-Scale Dense Plasma Focus Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fully Kinetic Simulations of MegaJoule-Scale Dense ...

  11. CEMEX: Cement Manufacturer Saves 2.1 Million kWh Annually with a Motor Retrofit Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-11-01

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how the CEMEX cement manufacturing plant in Davenport, California, saves 2 million kWh and $168,000 in energy costs annually by replacing 13 worn-out motors with new energy-efficient ones.

  12. CEMEX: Cement Manufacturer Saves 2.1 Million kWh Annually with a Motor Retrofit Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how the CEMEX cement manufacturing plant in Davenport, California, saves 2 million kWh and $168,000 in energy costs annually by replacing 13 worn-out motors with new energy-efficient ones.

  13. Joules of Wisdom: Top Things You Didn't Know About Energy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Joules of Wisdom: Top Things You Didn't Know About Energy Joules of Wisdom: Top Things You Didn't Know About Energy Joules of Wisdom: Top Things You Didn't Know About Energy Explore the world of energy through our blog series, Joules of Wisdom: Top Things You Didn't Know About Energy. From the lifespan of an LED to how electricity gets to your home -- learn little known facts about key technologies that are vital to America's energy sector and how we use energy in our everyday lives.

  14. Development of zinc-bromine batteries for utility energy storage. First annual report, 1 September 1978-31 August 1979. [8-kWh submodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putt, R.; Attia, A.J.; Lu, P.Y.; Heyland, J.H.

    1980-05-01

    Development work on the Zn/Br battery is reported. A major improvement was the use of a bipolar cell design; this design is superior with respect to cost, performance, and simplicity. A cost and design study for an 80-kWh module resulted in a cost estimate of $54/kWh(1979$) for purchased materials and components, on the basis of 2500 MWh of annual production. A cell submodule (nominal 2 kWh) of full-sized electrodes (1 ft/sup 2/) accrued over 200 continuous cycles in a hands-off, automatic routine with efficiencies in the range of 53 to 56%. Initial testing of a full-sized 8-kWh submodule demonstrated energy efficiencies of 65 to 67%. 23 figures, 10 tables. (RWR)

  15. Development of 8 kWh Zinc bromide battery as a precursor of battery for electric power storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, T.; Ando, Y.; Fujii, E.; Hirotu, A.; Ito, H.; Kanazashi, M.; Misaki, H.; Yamamoto, A.

    1984-08-01

    Zinc bromide battery is characterized with its room temperature operation, simple construction and easy maintenance. After four years' research and development of electrode materials, electrolyte composition, battery stack construction and other components, we prepared 1 kW class (8 kWh) battery for the first interim official evaluation. This battery showed a good and stable energy efficiency of 80% after 130 cycles of 1.25 kW 8 hours charge and 1.0 kW 8 hours discharge.

  16. Refractory electrodes for joule heating and methods of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamar, D.A.; Chapman, C.C.; Elliott, M.L.

    1998-05-12

    A certain group of electrically conductive refractory materials presently known for use in high temperature applications as throat constructions, melter sidewalls, forehearth, stacks, port sills, hot face lining for slagging coal gasifiers, slag runners, and linings for nuclear waste encapsulation furnaces may be used as electrodes permitting joule heating at temperatures in excess of 1,200 C in excess of about 4400 hours even in the presence of transition group element(s). More specifically, the invention is an electrode for melting earthen materials, wherein the electrode is made from an electrically conductive refractory material, specifically at least one metal oxide wherein the metal is selected from the group consisting of chrome, ruthenium, rhodium, tin and combinations thereof. 2 figs.

  17. Refractory electrodes for joule heating and methods of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamar, David A.; Chapman, Chris C.; Elliott, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    A certain group of electrically conductive refractory materials presently known for use in high temperature applications as throat constructions, melter sidewalls, forehearth, stacks, port sills, hot face lining for slagging coal gasifiers, slag runners, and linings for nuclear waste encapsulation furnaces may be used as electrodes permitting joule heating at temperatures in excess of 1200 C. in excess of about 4400 hours even in the presence of transition group element(s). More specifically, the invention is an electrode for melting earthen materials, wherein the electrode is made from an electrically conductive refractory material, specifically at least one metal oxide wherein the metal is selected from the group consisting of chrome, ruthenium, rhodium, tin and combinations thereof.

  18. Super-Joule heating in graphene and silver nanowire network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maize, Kerry; Das, Suprem R.; Sadeque, Sajia; Mohammed, Amr M. S.; Shakouri, Ali E-mail: alam@purdue.edu; Janes, David B.; Alam, Muhammad A. E-mail: alam@purdue.edu

    2015-04-06

    Transistors, sensors, and transparent conductors based on randomly assembled nanowire networks rely on multi-component percolation for unique and distinctive applications in flexible electronics, biochemical sensing, and solar cells. While conduction models for 1-D and 1-D/2-D networks have been developed, typically assuming linear electronic transport and self-heating, the model has not been validated by direct high-resolution characterization of coupled electronic pathways and thermal response. In this letter, we show the occurrence of nonlinear super-Joule self-heating at the transport bottlenecks in networks of silver nanowires and silver nanowire/single layer graphene hybrid using high resolution thermoreflectance (TR) imaging. TR images at the microscopic self-heating hotspots within nanowire network and nanowire/graphene hybrid network devices with submicron spatial resolution are used to infer electrical current pathways. The results encourage a fundamental reevaluation of transport models for network-based percolating conductors.

  19. Final Report on the Joule-Scale Experimental Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shverdin, M

    2008-10-01

    We describe the final results of the High Power Laser Pulse Recirculation project. We have developed and implementing a novel technique for picosecond, Joule-class laser pulse recirculation inside a passive cavity. The aim of this project was to develop technology compatible with increasing the efficiency of Compton based light sources by more than an order of magnitude. In year 1 of the project, we achieved a greater than 40 times average power enhancement of the mJ-scale laser pulses inside a passive cavity with internal focus. In year 2, we demonstrated recirculation of lasers pulses with energies up to 191 mJ at 532 nm, at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, and a pulse duration of 20 ps. In this high energy regime, we achieved up to 14 times average power enhancement inside the cavity. This enhancement factor is compatible with the new X-band based mono-energetic gamma-ray machine, Velociraptor, being constructed at LLNL. The demonstrated cavity enhancement is primarily limited by the poor spatial beam quality of the high power laser beam. We expect a nearly diffraction limited laser beam to achieve 40 times or better cavity enhancement, as demonstrated in low energy experiments in FY-07. The two primary obstacles to higher average brightness and conversion efficiency of laser pulse energy to gamma-rays are the relatively small Compton scattering cross-section and the typically low repetition rates of Joule-class interaction lasers (10 Hz). Only a small fraction (10{sup -10}) of the available laser photons is converted to gamma-rays, while the rest is discarded. To significantly reduce the average power requirements of the laser and increase the overall system efficiency, we can recirculate laser light for repeated interactions with electron bunches. Our pulse recirculation scheme is based on nonlinear frequency conversion, termed recirculation injection by nonlinear gating (RING), inside a passive cavity. The main objectives of the two year project were: (1) Validate

  20. Electro-osmotic infusion for joule heating soil remediation techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Electro-osmotic infusion of ground water or chemically tailored electrolyte is used to enhance, maintain, or recondition electrical conductivity for the joule heating remediation technique. Induced flows can be used to infuse electrolyte with enhanced ionic conductivity into the vicinity of the electrodes, maintain the local saturation of near-electrode regions and resaturate a partially dried out zone with groundwater. Electro-osmotic infusion can also tailor the conductivity throughout the target layer by infusing chemically modified and/or heated electrolyte to improve conductivity contrast of the interior. Periodic polarity reversals will prevent large pH changes at the electrodes. Electro-osmotic infusion can be used to condition the electrical conductivity of the soil, particularly low permeability soil, before and during the heating operation. Electro-osmotic infusion is carried out by locating one or more electrodes adjacent the heating electrodes and applying a dc potential between two or more electrodes. Depending on the polarities of the electrodes, the induced flow will be toward the heating electrodes or away from the heating electrodes. In addition, electrodes carrying a dc potential may be located throughout the target area to tailor the conductivity of the target area.

  1. Coherent radar estimates of average high-latitude ionospheric Joule heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosch, M.J.; Nielsen, E.

    1995-07-01

    The Scandinavian Twin Auroral Radar Experiment (STARE) and Sweden and Britain Radar Experiment (SABRE) bistatic coherent radar systems have been employed to estimate the spatial and temporal variation of the ionospheric Joule heating in the combined geographic latitude range 63.8 deg - 72.6 deg (corrected geomagnetic latitude 61.5 deg - 69.3 deg) over Scandinavia. The 173 days of good observations with all four radars have been analyzed during the period 1982 to 1986 to estimate the average ionospheric electric field versus time and latitude. The AE dependent empirical model of ionospheric Pedersen conductivity of Spiro et al. (1982) has been used to calculate the Joule heating. The latitudinal and diurnal variation of Joule heating as well as the estimated mean hemispherical heating of 1.7 x 10(exp 11) W are in good agreement with earlier results. Average Joule heating was found to vary linearly with the AE, AU, and AL indices and as a second-order power law with Kp. The average Joule heating was also examined as a function of the direction and magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field. It has been shown for the first time that the ionospheric electric field magnitude as well as the Joule heating increase with increasingly negative (southward) Bz.

  2. Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report. [50 kWh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalosh, R. G.; Bajpai, S. N.; Short, T. P.; Tsui, R. K.

    1980-04-01

    Hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries are evaluated. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based on both theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate (which is the form of chlorine storage in the charged battery). Six spill tests involving the chlorine hydrate equivalent of a 50-kWh battery indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm (30 to 38/sup 0/C) road surface. Other accidental chlorine release scenarios may also cause some distress, but are not expected to produce the type of life-threatening chlorine exposures that can result from large hydrate spills. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model was combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fataility rates are several times higher in a city such as Los Angeles with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city such as Boston. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatality rates due to fires and asphyxiations. 37 figures, 19 tables.

  3. Hybrid joule heating/electro-osmosis process for extracting contaminants from soil layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    2003-06-10

    Joule (ohmic) heating and electro-osmosis are combined in a hybrid process for removal of both water-soluble contaminants and non-aqueous phase liquids from contaminated, low-permeability soil formations that are saturated. Central to this hybrid process is the partial desaturation of the formation or layer using electro-osmosis to remove a portion of the pore fluids by induction of a ground water flow to extraction wells. Joule heating is then performed on a partially desaturated formation. The joule heating and electro-osmosis operations can be carried out simultaneously or sequentially if the desaturation by electro-osmosis occurs initially. Joule heating of the desaturated formation results in a very effective transfer or partitioning of liquid state contaminants to the vapor phase. The heating also substantially increases the vapor phase pressure in the porous formation. As a result, the contaminant laden vapor phase is forced out into soil layers of a higher permeability where other conventional removal processes, such as steam stripping or ground water extraction can be used to capture the contaminants. This hybrid process is more energy efficient than joule heating or steam stripping for cleaning low permeability formations and can share electrodes to minimize facility costs.

  4. A JOULE-HEATED MELTER TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KELLY SE

    2011-04-07

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of joule-heated ceramic lined melters and their application to Hanford's low-activity waste.

  5. Joule heat generation in thermionic cathodes of high-pressure arc discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benilov, M. S.; Cunha, M. D.

    2013-02-14

    The nonlinear surface heating model of plasma-cathode interaction in high-pressure arcs is extended to take into account the Joule effect inside the cathode body. Calculation results are given for different modes of current transfer to tungsten cathodes of different configurations in argon plasmas of atmospheric or higher pressures. Special attention is paid to analysis of energy balances of the cathode and the near-cathode plasma layer. In all the cases, the variation of potential inside the cathode is much smaller than the near-cathode voltage drop. However, this variation can be comparable to the volt equivalent of the energy flux from the plasma to the cathode and then the Joule effect is essential. Such is the case of the diffuse and mixed modes on rod cathodes at high currents, where the Joule heating causes a dramatic change of thermal and electrical regimes of the cathode. The Joule heating has virtually no effect over characteristics of spots on rod and infinite planar cathodes.

  6. Incorporating Cold Cap Behavior in a Joule-heated Waste Glass Melter Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varija Agarwal; Donna Post Guillen

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, an overview of Joule-heated waste glass melters used in the vitrification of high level waste (HLW) is presented, with a focus on the cold cap region. This region, in which feed-to-glass conversion reactions occur, is critical in determining the melting properties of any given glass melter. An existing 1D computer model of the cold cap, implemented in MATLAB, is described in detail. This model is a standalone model that calculates cold cap properties based on boundary conditions at the top and bottom of the cold cap. Efforts to couple this cold cap model with a 3D STAR-CCM+ model of a Joule-heated melter are then described. The coupling is being implemented in ModelCenter, a software integration tool. The ultimate goal of this model is to guide the specification of melter parameters that optimize glass quality and production rate.

  7. Micro-scale heat-exchangers for Joule-Thomson cooling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, Andrew John

    2014-01-01

    This project focused on developing a micro-scale counter flow heat exchangers for Joule-Thomson cooling with the potential for both chip and wafer scale integration. This project is differentiated from previous work by focusing on planar, thin film micromachining instead of bulk materials. A process will be developed for fabricating all the devices mentioned above, allowing for highly integrated micro heat exchangers. The use of thin film dielectrics provides thermal isolation, increasing efficiency of the coolers compared to designs based on bulk materials, and it will allow for wafer-scale fabrication and integration. The process is intended to implement a CFHX as part of a Joule-Thomson cooling system for applications with heat loads less than 1mW. This report presents simulation results and investigation of a fabrication process for such devices.

  8. In situ transmission electron microscopy of individual carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structures in Joule heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masuda, Yusuke; Yoshida, Hideto; Takeda, Seiji; Kohno, Hideo

    2014-08-25

    Collapse of a carbon nanotube results in the formation of a nanoribbon, and a switching of the collapse direction yields a nanotetrahedron in the middle of a nanoribbon. Here, we report in-situ transmission electron microscopy observations of the behavior of carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structures during Joule heating to reveal their thermal stability. In addition, we propose that the observed process is related to the formation process of the structure.

  9. Magnetospheric structure and atmospheric Joule heating of habitable planets orbiting M-dwarf stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Garraffo, C.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Glocer, A.; Ridley, A. J.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2014-07-20

    We study the magnetospheric structure and the ionospheric Joule Heating of planets orbiting M-dwarf stars in the habitable zone using a set of magnetohydrodynamic models. The stellar wind solution is used to drive a model for the planetary magnetosphere, which is coupled with a model for the planetary ionosphere. Our simulations reveal that the space environment around close-in habitable planets is extreme, and the stellar wind plasma conditions change from sub- to super-Alfvnic along the planetary orbit. As a result, the magnetospheric structure changes dramatically with a bow shock forming in the super-Alfvnic sectors, while no bow shock forms in the sub-Alfvnic sectors. The planets reside most of the time in the sub-Alfvnic sectors with poor atmospheric protection. A significant amount of Joule Heating is provided at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the intense stellar wind. For the steady-state solution, the heating is about 0.1%-3% of the total incoming stellar irradiation, and it is enhanced by 50% for the time-dependent case. The significant Joule Heating obtained here should be considered in models for the atmospheres of habitable planets in terms of the thickness of the atmosphere, the top-side temperature and density, the boundary conditions for the atmospheric pressure, and particle radiation and transport. Here we assume constant ionospheric Pedersen conductance similar to that of the Earth. The conductance could be greater due to the intense EUV radiation leading to smaller heating rates. We plan to quantify the ionospheric conductance in future study.

  10. Literature review of arc/plasma, combustion, and joule-heated melter vitrification systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, C.J.; Abrigo, G.P.; Shafer, P.J.; Merrill, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides reviews of papers and reports for three basic categories of melters: arc/plasma-heated melters, combustion-heated melters, and joule-heated melters. The literature reviewed here represents those publications which may lend insight to phase I testing of low-level waste vitrification being performed at the Hanford Site in FY 1995. For each melter category, information from those papers and reports containing enough information to determine steady-state mass balance data is tabulated at the end of each section. The tables show the composition of the feed processed, the off-gas measured via decontamination factors, gross energy consumptions, and processing rates, among other data.

  11. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trosseille, C. Aubert, D.; Auger, L.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Chollet, C.; Jasmin, S.; Maruenda, P.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Raimbourg, J.; Soullié, G.; Stemmler, P.; Zuber, C.; Beck, T.; Gazave, J.

    2014-11-15

    Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an “air-box” that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  12. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Introduction The 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) was the first to permit the estimation of annual kilowatthours (kWh) used for lighting. The survey contained more...

  13. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-29

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models.

  14. FY 2009 Annual Report of Joule Software Metric SC GG 3.1/2.5.2, Improve Computational Science Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kothe, Douglas B; Roche, Kenneth J; Kendall, Ricky A

    2010-01-01

    The Joule Software Metric for Computational Effectiveness is established by Public Authorizations PL 95-91, Department of Energy Organization Act, and PL 103-62, Government Performance and Results Act. The U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) oversees the preparation and administration of the President s budget; evaluates the effectiveness of agency programs, policies, and procedures; assesses competing funding demands across agencies; and sets the funding priorities for the federal government. The OMB has the power of audit and exercises this right annually for each federal agency. According to the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA), federal agencies are required to develop three planning and performance documents: 1.Strategic Plan: a broad, 3 year outlook; 2.Annual Performance Plan: a focused, 1 year outlook of annual goals and objectives that is reflected in the annual budget request (What results can the agency deliver as part of its public funding?); and 3.Performance and Accountability Report: an annual report that details the previous fiscal year performance (What results did the agency produce in return for its public funding?). OMB uses its Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) to perform evaluations. PART has seven worksheets for seven types of agency functions. The function of Research and Development (R&D) programs is included. R&D programs are assessed on the following criteria: Does the R&D program perform a clear role? Has the program set valid long term and annual goals? Is the program well managed? Is the program achieving the results set forth in its GPRA documents? In Fiscal Year (FY) 2003, the Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE SC-1) worked directly with OMB to come to a consensus on an appropriate set of performance measures consistent with PART requirements. The scientific performance expectations of these requirements reach the scope of work conducted at the DOE national laboratories. The Joule system

  15. High-performance batteries for electric-vehicle propulsion and stationary energy storage. Progress report, October 1978-September 1979. [40 kWh, Li-Al and Li-Si anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barney, D. L.; Steunenberg, R. K.; Chilenskas, A. A.; Gay, E. C.; Battles, J. E.; Hornstra, F.; Miller, W. E.; Vissers, D. R.; Roche, M. F.; Shimotake, H.; Hudson, R.; Askew, B. A.; Sudar, S.

    1980-03-01

    The research, development, and management activities of the programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and at contractors' laboratories on high-temperature batteries during the period October 1978 to September 1979 are reported. These batteries are being developed for electric-vehicle propulsion and for stationary energy-storage applications. The present cells, which operate at 400 to 500/sup 0/C, are of a vertically oriented, prismatic design with one or more inner positive electrodes of FeS or FeS/sub 2/, facing negative electrodes of lithium-aluminum or lithium-silicon alloy, and molten LiCl-KC1 electrolyte. During this reporting period, cell and battery development work has continued at ANL and contractors' laboratories. A 40 kWh electric-vehicle battery (designated Mark IA) was fabricated and delivered to ANL for testing. During the initial heat-up, one of the two modules failed due to a short circuit. A failure analysis was conducted, and the Mark IA program completed. Development work on the next electric-vehicle battery (Mark II) was initiated at Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc. and Gould, Inc. Work on stationary energy-storage batteries during this period has consisted primarily of conceptual design studies. 107 figures, 67 tables.

  16. KWhOURS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    South Hamilton, Massachusetts Zip: 1982 Sector: Services Product: Massachusetts software maker which provides mobile data collection, calculation, and report generation...

  17. max kwh | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is likely due to users not understanding the meaning of "Max kWh"--often I see things like: "300, 700, 1000" (derived from "first 300, next 700, greater than 1000") which...

  18. Highly lead-loaded red plastic scintillators as an X-ray imaging system for the Laser Mega Joule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, M.; Normand, S.; Turk, G.; Darbon, S.

    2011-07-01

    The scope of this project intends to record spatially resolved images of core shape and size of a DT micro-balloon during Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments at Laser Mega Joule facility (LMJ). We need to develop an X-ray imaging system which can operate in the radiative background generated by an ignition shot of ICF. The scintillator is a part of the imaging system and has to gather a compromise of scintillating properties (scintillating efficiency, decay time, emission wavelength) so as to both operate in the hard radiative environment and to allow the acquisition of spatially resolved images. Inorganic scintillators cannot be used because no compromise can be found regarding the expected scintillating properties, most of them are not fast enough and emit blue light. Organic scintillators are generally fast, but present low X-ray absorption in the 10 to 40 keV range, that does not permit the acquisition of spatially resolved images. To this aim, we have developed highly lead-loaded and red-fluorescent fast plastic scintillators. Such a combination is not currently available via scintillator suppliers, since they propose only blue-fluorescent plastic scintillators doped with up to 12%w Pb. Thus, incorporation ratio up to 27%w Pb has been reached in our laboratory, which can afford a plastic scintillator with an outstanding Z{sub eff} close to 50. X-rays in the 10 to 40 keV range can thus be detected with a higher probability of photoelectric effect than for classic organic scintillators, such as NE102. The strong orange-red fluorescence can be filtered, so that we can eliminate residual Cerenkov light, generated by {gamma}-ray absorption in glass parts of the imaging system. Decay times of our scintillators evaluated under UV excitation were estimated to be in the range 10 to 13 ns. (authors)

  19. Renewable Energy Production Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This annual corporate tax credit is equal to $0.01 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity produced and sold by the taxpayer to an unrelated party during a given tax year. For new facilities (plac...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by a surcharge on electric and gas customers' bills. Initially, the surcharge was was set at 0.0023 per kilowatt-hour (2.3 mills per kWh) and applied only to... Eligibility:...

  1. TVA - Green Power Providers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Power Providers program contract term is 20 years. For years 1-10, TVA will purchase 100% of the output from qualifying systems at a premium of 0.02** per kilowatt-hour (kWh)...

  2. Chelan County PUD - Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on the system's production. The PUD distributes SNAP payments annually, on or around Earth Day. The amount paid per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to SNAP Producers is determined by...

  3. Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island's PBF is supported by a surcharge on electric and gas customers' bills. Initially, the surcharge was was set at $0.0023 per kilowatt-hour (2.3 mills per kWh) and applied only to...

  4. Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Connecticut electricity customers that install energy efficiency equipment and reduce their energy use during peak hours may be eligible for a rebate based on the amount of kilowatt-hours (kWh) s...

  5. Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All energy prices vary from month to month and year to year. However, when comparing the national average retail price for a gallon of regular gasoline and a kilowatt-hour (kWh) for residential...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hawaii Energy The percentage of total utility revenue is used to establish a target budget for the PBF. The surcharge is set on a cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) basis to meet the...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    customers' bills. Initially, the surcharge was was set at 0.0023 per kilowatt-hour (2.3 mills per kWh) and applied only to... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial, Investor-Owned...

  8. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Net excess generation (NEG) is treated as a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit or other compensation on the customer's following bill.* At the beginning of the calendar year, a utility will purchase any...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... the development and testing of a 10 kilowatt-hour (kWh) prototype battery system. ... performance advantages of its technology for use in grid-tied energy storage applications. ...

  10. Fan System Optimization Improves Production and Saves Energy at Ash Grove Cement Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-05-01

    This case study describes an optimization project implemented on a fan system at Ash Grove Cement Company, which led to annual energy and maintenance savings of $16,000 and 175,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh).

  11. Tips: Kitchen Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    you how much electricity in kilowatt-hours (kWh) a particular model uses in one year. ... Recommended temperatures are 35-38F for the fresh food compartment and 0 F for ...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Estimate If the customer has a ratio of estimated monthly kilowatt-hour (kWh) usage to line extension mileage that is less than or equal to...

  13. Hawaii Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The percentage of total utility revenue is used to establish a target budget for the PBF. The surcharge is set on a cents per kilowatt-hour ($/kWh) basis to meet the target budget. The surcharge ...

  14. Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Btu British thermal unit DOE U.S. Department of Energy EERE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy kW kilowatt kWh kilowatt-hour LCOE levelized cost of energy NSEDC ...

  15. Energy Efficiency Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Efficiency Fund is funded by a surcharge of $0.003 per kilowatt-hour (3 mills per kWh) on Connecticut Light and Power (CL&P) and United Illuminating (UI) customers' electric bills....

  16. EEI DOE QER Comments and Resources

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... With more than 85 billion in annual capital expenditures, the electric power industry ... based on their individual kilowatt-hour (KWH) usage. We refer to this as a volumetric charge. ...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    538,800 35 Average retail price (centskWh) 33.43 1 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    684,481 33 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.68 39 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    20,316,681 2 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.09 46 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    28,310 49 Average retail price (centskWh) 15.41 5 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,576,943 20 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.17 33 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    34,883,315 1 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.94 37 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,255,974 22 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.18 43 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3,151,592 10 Average retail price (centskWh) 12.65 11 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    33,870 48 Average retail price (centskWh) 12.11 12 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    696,6330 32 Average retail price (centskWh) 7.65 50 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,763,652 19 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.60 27 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2,364,746 13 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.15 44 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,181,447 24 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.73 23 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    138,573,884 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.44 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,227,421 23 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.35 42 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    253,513 39 Average retail price (centskWh) 17.46 2 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    201,071 40 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.18 19 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    11,180,448 3 Average retail price (centskWh) 15.15 8 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    60,865 47 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.16 20 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,388,386 21 Average retail price (centskWh) 7.76 49 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    844,760 29 Average retail price (centskWh) 12.10 13 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2,463,339 11 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.40 29 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    944,590 27 Average retail price (centskWh) 7.13 51 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1,123,692 25 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.52 28 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    use 7,958,621 4 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.06 35 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    89 51 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.05 36 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4,565,846 8 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.03 22 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2,117,420 17 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.57 17 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    83,636 46 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.06 21 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    391,720 37 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.15 45 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5,462 50 Average retail price (centskWh) 14.57 9 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5,375,185 5 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.77 16 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3,439,427 9 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.36 30 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  10. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... when evaluating investments in new coal-fired power plants, new coal-to-liquids (CTL) ...kilowatthour (kWh) for electricity produced in the first 10 years of plant operation. ...

  11. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Barbados; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Barbados, an independent nation in the Lesser Antilles island chain in the eastern Caribbean. Barbados’ electricity rates are approximately $0.28 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), below the Caribbean regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  12. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Curacao; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Curacao, an autonomous member of the Kingdom of the Netherlands located off the coast of Venezuela. Curacao’s utility rates are approximately $0.26 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), below the Caribbean regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  13. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Trinidad and Tobago; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-20

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Trinidad and Tobago, a two-island nation located off the coast of Venezuela. Trinidad and Tobago’s electricity rates are some of the lowest in the Caribbean at approximately $0.04 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), well below the regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  14. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Bonaire; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Bonaire, a special municipality of the Kingdom of the Netherlands located off the coast of Venezuela. Bonaire’s utility rates are approximately $0.35 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  15. NREL: Technology Deployment - Field Demonstrations of Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    heads-showed promising cost and energy savings, with an estimated annual savings of 4,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) in air-conditioning use and 1,400 kWh in water heating use per home. ...

  16. NREL Finds Up to 6-cent per Kilowatt-Hour Extra Value with Concentrate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the relative value of CSP. CSP could also allow greater penetration of PV by making the grid more flexible and reducing curtailment of PV by generating energy after the sun sets. ...

  17. Property:Incentive/PVNPFitDolKWh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy (Wisconsin Power and Light) - Advanced Renewables Tariff (Wisconsin) + 0.25 + C CPS Energy - Solartricity Producer Program (Texas) + 0.27 + N NC GreenPower Production...

  18. Property:Incentive/PVResFitDolKWh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy (Wisconsin Power and Light) - Advanced Renewables Tariff (Wisconsin) + 0.25 + C CPS Energy - Solartricity Producer Program (Texas) + 0.27 + N NC GreenPower Production...

  19. Property:Incentive/PVComFitDolKWh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy (Wisconsin Power and Light) - Advanced Renewables Tariff (Wisconsin) + 0.25 + C CPS Energy - Solartricity Producer Program (Texas) + 0.27 + N NC GreenPower Production...

  20. kWh Analytics: Quality Ratings for PV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation summarizes the information given during the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Technology Forum, June 13-14, 2012.

  1. Property:PotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    areas of a particular place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http:...

  2. Property:PotentialRooftopPVGeneration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PV for a particular place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http:...

  3. Property:PotentialHydropowerGeneration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for a particular place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http:...

  4. Property:PotentialOnshoreWindGeneration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    onshore wind in a place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http:...

  5. Property:PotentialBiopowerSolidGeneration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for a particular place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http:...

  6. Property:PotentialCSPGeneration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CSP for a particular place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http:...

  7. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Antigua and Barbuda; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-20

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Antigua and Barbuda, an independent nation in the Leeward Islands in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Antigua and Barbuda’s utility rates are approximately $0.37 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), which is above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  8. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Haiti; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Haiti, an independent nation that occupies the western portion of the island of Hispaniola in the northern Caribbean Sea. Haiti’s utility rates are roughly $0.35 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  9. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - American Samoa; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of American Samoa, the southernmost territory of the United States. American Samoa’s residential electricity rates are approximately $0.29 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), more than twice the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  10. Renewable Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The maximum tax credit that can be claimed for a qualified system in any one year is $2 million. The tax credit for wind and biomass* systems equals $0.01 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for the first 200...

  11. Renewable Energy Production Tax Credit (Personal)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The maximum tax credit that can be claimed for a qualified system in any one year is $2 million. The tax credit for wind and biomass* systems equals $0.01 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for the first 200...

  12. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Guadeloupe; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-27

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Guadeloupe, an overseas region of France located in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Guadeloupe’s utility rates are approximately $0.18 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), below the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  13. Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Estimate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    If the customer has a ratio of estimated monthly kilowatt-hour (kWh) usage to line extension mileage that is less than or equal to 1,000, the utility must provide the comparison at no cost. If the...

  14. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Palau; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Palau, an independent island nation geographically located in the Micronesia region. Palau’s residential electricity rates are approximately $0.28 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), more than twice the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  15. International Energy Outlook 2016-Electricity - Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration 5. Electricity print version Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, world net electricity generation increases 69% by 2040, from 21.6 trillion kilowatthours (kWh) in 2012 to 25.8 trillion kWh in 2020 and 36.5 trillion kWh in 2040. Electricity is the world's fastest-growing form of end-use energy consumption, as it has been for many decades. Power systems have continued to evolve from isolated, small grids to integrated national markets and

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Rebates The Driving Rhode Island to Vehicle Electrification (DRIVE) rebate program offers rebates of up to $2,500 for the purchase or lease of qualified PEVs. Rebates are offered on a sliding scale based on battery capacity, providing $2,500 for any vehicle with a battery capacity of 18 kilowatt-hours (kWh) or greater, $1,500 for any vehicle with a battery capacity between 7 and 18 kWh, and $500 for any vehicle with a battery capacity less than 7 kWh. Applicants

  17. Chapter 5 - Individuals and Agencies Contacted

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Chapter 5 Electricity Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, world net electricity generation increases 69% by 2040, from 21.6 trillion kilowatthours (kWh) in 2012 to 25.8 trillion kWh in 2020 and 36.5 trillion kWh in 2040. Electricity is the world's fastest-growing form of end-use energy consumption, as it has been for many decades. Power systems have continued to evolve from

  18. Chapter 5 - Electricity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Chapter 5 Electricity Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, world net electricity generation increases 69% by 2040, from 21.6 trillion kilowatthours (kWh) in 2012 to 25.8 trillion kWh in 2020 and 36.5 trillion kWh in 2040. Electricity is the world's fastest-growing form of end-use energy consumption, as it has been for many decades. Power systems have continued to evolve from

  19. Tax Incentives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tax Incentives of 1992, allows owners of qualified over a 10-year period. Qualified wind wind turbines (indexed for inflation). - The federal Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit (PTC), established by the Energy Policy Act renewable energy facilities to receive tax credits for each kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity generated by the facility power projects are eligible to receive 2.3 cents per kWh for the produc - tion of electricity from utility-scale dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.

  20. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Federated States of Micronesia; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Federated States of Micronesia, a sovereign nation and U.S.-associated state in the western Pacific Ocean. The Federated States of Micronesia’s electricity rates for residential customers exceed $0.48 U.S. dollars (USD)/per kilowatt-hour (kWh), nearly four times the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  1. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Guam; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Guam, an island territory of the United States located in the western Pacific Ocean. Guam’s electricity rates for residential customers start at $0.21 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the average U.S. rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.1,2 Like

  2. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), a commonwealth in political union with the United States that is located in the northern Pacific Ocean. CNMI’s electricity rates for residential customers range from $0.19 to $0.33 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  3. Recovery Act Incentives for Wind Energy Equipment Manufacturing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2009, the U.S. had 29,440 MW of installed wind power capacity. continued > Tax incentives The federal government uses several tax-based policy incentives to stimulate the deployment of wind power. The Department of the Treasury's Internal Revenue Service administers these incentives. The federal renewable energy Production Tax Credit (PTC), established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992, allows owners of qualified renewable energy facilities to receive tax credits for each kilowatt-hour (kWh)

  4. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California San Francisco VA Medical Center The San Francisco VA Medical Center is saving more than $500,000 and almost 3 million kWh every year through a retrofit financed by FEMP's Super ESPC Program. Overview The Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in San Francisco is saving almost 3 million kilowatt-hours of electricity, more than

  5. Voltage-matched multijunction solar cell architectures for integrating PV

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technologies - Energy Innovation Portal Find More Like This Return to Search Voltage-matched multijunction solar cell architectures for integrating PV technologies National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary The U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative aims to reduce the total installed cost of solar energy systems to $.06 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) by the year 2020. Reducing the cost of solar electricity requires that solar cell

  6. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California San Francisco VA Medical Center The San Francisco VA Medical Center is saving more than $500,000 and almost 3 million kWh every year through a retrofit financed by FEMP's Super ESPC Program. Overview The Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in San Francisco is saving almost 3 million kilowatt-hours of electricity, more than

  7. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2OtherElctrty | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 53.5026548673 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 58.7608028994 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 61.5607534672 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 40.3846153846 + Sweden Building 05K0009 +...

  8. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Total | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 65.5403331042 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 41.6418235453 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 56.5413268466 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 150.269021739 + Sweden Building 05K0011 +...

  9. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrtyTotal | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 54.2477876106 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 58.7608028994 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 61.5607534672 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 40.3846153846 + Sweden Building 05K0009 +...

  10. Electric rate that shifts hourly may foretell spot-market kWh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, N.

    1985-11-25

    Four California industrial plants have cut their electricity bills up to 16% by shifting from the traditional time-of-use rates to an experimental real-time program (RTP) that varies prices hourly. The users receive a price schedule reflecting changing generating costs one day in advance to encourage them to increase power consumption during the cheapest time periods. Savings during the pilot program range between $11,000 and $32,000 per customer. The hourly cost breakdown encourages consumption during the night and early morning. The signalling system could be expanded to cogenerators and independent small power producers. If an electricity spot market develops, forecasters think a place on the stock exchanges for future-delivery contracts could develop in the future.

  11. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DstrtHeating | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 49.0472118426 + Sweden Building 05K0023 + 125.55033781 + Sweden Building 05K0024 + 100.666666667 + Sweden Building 05K0025 + 99.0384615385 + (previous 25) (next 25)...

  12. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    M2DigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0...

  13. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2HeatPumps | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building...

  14. A 1-Joule laser for a 16-fiber injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honig, J

    2004-04-06

    A 1-J laser was designed to launch light down 16, multi-mode fibers (400-{micro}m-core dia.). A diffractive-optic splitter was designed in collaboration with Digital Optics Corporation (DOC), and was delivered by DOC. Using this splitter, the energy injected into each fiber varied <1%. The spatial profile out of each fiber was such that there were no ''hot spots,'' a flyer could successfully be launched and a PETN pellet could be initiated. Preliminary designs of the system were driven by system efficiency where a pristine TEM{sub 00} laser beam would be required. The laser is a master oscillator, power amplifier (MOPA) consisting of a 4-mm-dia. Nd:YLF rod in the stable, q-switched oscillator and a 9.5-mm-dia. Nd:YLF rod in the double-passed amplifier. Using a TEM{sub 00} oscillator beam resulted in excellent transmission efficiencies through the fibers at lower energies but proved to be quite unreliable at higher energies, causing premature fiber damage, flyer plate rupture, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). Upon further investigation, it was found that both temporal and spatial beam formatting of the laser were required to successfully initiate the PETN. Results from the single-mode experiments, including fiber damage, SRS and SBS losses, will be presented. In addition, results showing the improvement that can be obtained by proper laser beam formatting will also be presented.

  15. Preliminary Results Of A 600 Joules Small Plasma Focus Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. H.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2009-07-07

    Preliminary results of a 600 J (3.7 muF, 18 kV) Mather type plasma focus device operated at low pressure will be presented. The discharge is formed between a solid anode with length of 6 cm and six symmetrically and coaxially arranged cathode rods of same lengths. The cathode base is profiled in a knife-edge design and a set of coaxial plasma gun are attached to it in order to initiate the breakdown and enhance the current sheath formation. The experiments have been performed in argon gas under a low pressure condition of several microbars. The discharge current and the voltage across the electrodes during the discharge are measured with high voltage probe and current coil. The current and voltage characteristics are used to determine the possible range of operating pressure that gives good focusing action. At a narrow pressure regime of 9.0+-0.5 mubar, focusing action is observed with good reproducibility. Preliminary result of ion beam energy is presented. More work will be carried out to investigate the radiation output.

  16. Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4 cents per kWh- Without New Dams

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    $30.6 million Recovery Act investment by the Department of Energy highlights the additional potential of hydro power

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Qualified Plug-In Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Tax Credit A tax credit is available for the purchase of a new qualified plug-in electric drive motor vehicle that draws propulsion using a traction battery that has at least five kilowatt-hours (kWh) of capacity, uses an external source of energy to recharge the battery, has a gross vehicle weight rating of up to 14,000 pounds, and meets specified emission standards. The minimum credit amount is $2,500, and the credit may be up to $7,500, based on

  18. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Unit of Measure Equivalents Unit Equivalent Kilowatt (kW) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watts Megawatt (MW) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watts Gigawatt (GW) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watts Terawatt (TW) 1,000,000,000,000 (One Trillion) Watts Gigawatt 1,000,000 (One Million) Kilowatts Thousand Gigawatts 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Kilowatts Kilowatthours (kWh) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watthours Megawatthours (MWh) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watthours Gigawatthours (GWh) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watthours

  19. High-Efficiency Parking Lighting in Federal Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Efficiency Parking Lighting in Federal Facilities FEdEraL EnErgy ManagEMEnt PrograM MC Realty Group Saving Energy and Money with the IRS MC Realty Group, LLC, won a 2014 LEEP Award for cutting energy use by 76% at the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Facility Parking Garage in Kansas City, Missouri. MC Realty replaced 1,500 metal halide fxtures with an equal number of T8 fuorescent fxtures in the fve-story parking structure to cut energy use by 2 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) annually, which

  20. Explore Solar Careers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Careers Explore Solar Careers The Solar Energy Technologies Office, through the national effort of the SunShot Initiative funds research and development, striving to make solar energy technologies fully cost-competitive with traditional energy sources by 2020. Through SunShot, DOE supports efforts by private companies, universities, and national laboratories to drive down the cost of solar electricity to $0.06 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). Since SunShot’s inception, the average price per

  1. Critical-fluid extraction of organics from water. Volume I. Engineering analysis. Final report, 1 October 1979-30 November 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, J.M.; de Filippi, R.P.

    1984-06-01

    Critical-fluid extraction of several organic solutes from water was investigated analytically and experimentally to determine the energy conservation potential of the technology relative to distillation. This Volume gives the results of an engineering analysis. The process uses condensed or supercritical carbon dioxide as an extracting solvent to separate aqueous solutions of common organics such as ethanol, isopropanol and sec-butanol. Energy input to the systems is electric power to drive compressors. A detailed process analysis included evaluation and correlation of thermophysical properties and phase equilibria for the two- and three-component systems involved. The analysis showed that a plant fed with 10 weight percent ethanol feed would consume 0.65 kilowatt-hours (kwh) of power for compression energy per gallon of alcohol. This energy consumption would be 5300 Btu of steam-equivalent, or 6500 Btu of fossil-fuel-equivalent energy. The extraction product, however, would require additional energy to produce high-purity alcohol. Doubling the ethanol feed concentration to 20 weight percent would reduce the energy required to about 0.30 kwh per gallon. Halving the ethanol feed concentration to 5 weight percent would increase the energy required to about 1.35 kwh per gallon. For the same feed composition, isopropanol can be separated with 48% of the energy required for ethanol. The same separation of sec-butanol can be done with 25% of the ethanol energy requirement.

  2. Economic Competitiveness of U.S. Utility-Scale Photovoltaics Systems in 2015: Regional Cost Modeling of Installed Cost ($/W) and LCOE ($/kWh)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Ran; James, Ted L.; Chung, Donald; Gagne, Douglas; Lopez, Anthony; Dobos, Aron

    2015-06-14

    Utility-scale photovoltaics (PV) system growth is largely driven by the economic metrics of total installed costs and levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), which differ by region. This study details regional cost factors, including environment (wind speed and snow loads), labor costs, material costs, sales taxes, and permitting costs using a new system-level bottom-up cost modeling approach. We use this model to identify regional all-in PV installed costs for fixed-tilt and one-axis tracker systems in the United States with consideration of union and non-union labor costs in 2015. LCOEs using those regional installed costs are then modeled and spatially presented. Finally, we assess the cost reduction opportunities of increasing module conversion efficiencies on PV system costs in order to indicate the possible economic impacts of module technology advancements and help future research and development (R&D) effects in the context of U.S. SunShot targets.

  3. Initial test results from the RedFlow 5 kW, 10 kWh zinc-bromide module, phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper the performance results of the RedFlow zinc-bromide module (ZBM) Gen 2.0 are reported for Phase 1 of testing, which includes initial characterization of the module. This included physical measurement, efficiency as a function of charge and discharge rates, efficiency as a function of maximum charge capacity, duration of maximum power supplied, and limited cycling with skipped strip cycles. The goal of this first phase of testing was to verify manufacturer specifications of the zinc-bromide flow battery. Initial characterization tests have shown that the ZBM meets the manufacturer's specifications. Further testing, including testing as a function of temperature and life cycle testing, will be carried out during Phase 2 of the testing, and these results will be issued in the final report, after Phase 2 testing has concluded.

  4. Itaipu: never underestimate the Latins. [Paraguay/Brazil binational project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-06

    The Itaipu hydroelectric project, a joint effort of Brazil and Paraguay (with a cost of US $16 to 18 billion), will be finished in December 1989. The project is situated on the Parana River, 14 km beyond the Puente de da Amistad (Friendship Bridge), which connects the city Presidente Stroessner, in Paraguay, with Foz do Iguacu, in Brazil. It is considered today not only the biggest hydroelectric plant in the world, but also a great socio-economic boom in the making. Itaipu will add a total of 12.6-million kilowatt-hours (kWh) of hydroelectricity to the region, an equivalent of 600,000 barrels of oil daily (b/d). This issue of Energy Detente reviews the progress of Itaipu. Also appearing in this issue is the fuel price/tax series and the principal industrial fuel prices for April 1983 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  5. Technology Advances Needed for Photovoltaics to Achieve Widespread Grid Price Parity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To quantify the potential value of technological advances to the photovoltaics (PV) sector, this paper examines the impact of changes to key PV systems parameters on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The parameters selected include module manufacturing cost, efficiency, degradation rate, and service lifetime. NREL’s System Advisor Model (SAM) is used to calculate the lifecycle cost per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for residential, commercial, and utility-scale PV systems within the contiguous United States, with a focus on utility-scale. Different technological pathways to the Department of Energy’s SunShot goal of PV electricity that is at grid price parity with conventional electricity sources are illustrated. In addition, the impact of independent changes to individual parameters on 2015 baseline costs is shown. These results may be used to identify research directions with the greatest potential to impact the cost of PV electricity.

  6. Fully Kinetic Simulations of MegaJoule-Scale Dense Plasma Focus...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Authors: Schmidt, A ; Link, ...

  7. Modelling of the internal dynamics and density in a tens of joules plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marquez, Ariel; Gonzalez, Jose; Tarifeno-Saldivia, Ariel; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo; Clausse, Alejandro

    2012-01-15

    Using MHD theory, coupled differential equations were generated using a lumped parameter model to describe the internal behaviour of the pinch compression phase in plasma focus discharges. In order to provide these equations with appropriate initial conditions, the modelling of previous phases was included by describing the plasma sheath as planar shockwaves. The equations were solved numerically, and the results were contrasted against experimental measurements performed on the device PF-50J. The model is able to predict satisfactorily the timing and the radial electron density profile at the maximum compression.

  8. Integrated Testing, Simulation and Analysis of Electric Drive Options for Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramroth, L. A.; Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.

    2012-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory verified diesel-conventional and diesel-hybrid parcel delivery vehicle models to evaluate petroleum reduction and cost implications of plug-in hybrid gasoline and diesel variants. These variants are run on a field-data-derived design matrix to analyze the effects of drive cycle, distance, battery replacements, battery capacity, and motor power on fuel consumption and lifetime cost. Two cost scenarios using fuel prices corresponding to forecasted highs for 2011 and 2030 and battery costs per kilowatt-hour representing current and long-term targets compare plug-in hybrid lifetime costs with diesel conventional lifetime costs. Under a future cost scenario of $100/kWh battery energy and $5/gal fuel, plug-in hybrids are cost effective. Assuming a current cost of $700/kWh and $3/gal fuel, they rarely recoup the additional motor and battery cost. The results highlight the importance of understanding the application's drive cycle, daily driving distance, and kinetic intensity. For instances in the current-cost scenario where the additional plug-in hybrid cost is regained in fuel savings, the combination of kinetic intensity and daily distance travelled does not coincide with the usage patterns observed in the field data. If the usage patterns were adjusted, the hybrids could become cost effective.

  9. Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-10-11

    A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the GREET

  10. C10DIV.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh) per Worker (thousand kWh) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per kWh (dollars) NEW ENGLAND...

  11. Entergy Arkansas - Small Business Energy Efficiency Programs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting and Lighting Controls: 0.21 per kWh Window Film: .35 per kWh Duct Sealing:.35 per kWh Ceiling Insulation: .35 per kWh Refrigeration:...

  12. Microsoft Word - 1.6.1.2.J.ML.2_Qrt 2 Joule Final.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology will be capable of handling the variability experienced within raw biomass feedstocks. DOE has identified eight biofuel conversion pathways that the Bioenergy...

  13. Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Megawatthour Gigawatt hours - 0.000001 GWh, Gigawatt hour, Gigawatthour Joules - 3600000 J, Joules, joules Pages using the property "PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration" Showing 25...

  14. Willow firing in retrofitted Irish peat plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broek, R. van den; Faaij, A.; Kent, T.

    1995-11-01

    Interest in biomass electricity in Ireland is being re-awakened by environmental concerns about CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation and the potential of biomass production to provide an alternative agricultural enterprise. The technical and economical feasibility of wood-fuelled power production using willow from energy farming in existing peat-fired plants in Ireland is being studied within the framework of the EU JOULE II+ programme. These options are compared with new combustion plants and a biomass integrated gasifier with combined cycle (BIG/CC). Background studies supplied data for yields of willow farming, establishment of willow plantations, harvesting methods, logistics and costs and efficiencies for different retrofit options at Irish peat plants. All technologies considered are currently available or are expected to be available in the near future. Neither agricultural subsidies nor possible CO{sub 2} taxes have been included. In the least cost supply scenario storage and chipping of wood is done at the power station. In this case wood is only stored in the form of sticks and wood harvested by a chips harvester is supplied to the plant directly during the harvesting season. Fuel costs at the plant gate were estimated between 3.3 and 11 EGU/GJ{sub LHV}. This wide range resulted in a wide range of kWh costs. For the lowest cost option they ranged between 5.4 and 15 ECUcents/kWh. The cheapest proven retrofit option is the conversion of the existing milled peat Lanesborough unit 3 into a bubbling fluidized bed with kWh costs ranging from 5.6 up to 16 ECUcents/kWh. For this plant, costs per tonne of avoided CO{sub 2} emissions varied between 1 and 70 ECU. It is noteworthy that the kWh costs for all options considered were very close. Especially in the high costs scenario a BIG/CC appeared to have lower kWh cost than all biomass combustion plants. Mainly for the retrofitted plants the fuel costs were by far the largest kWh cost component.

  15. Simple cost model for EV traction motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuenca, R.M.

    1995-02-01

    A simple cost model has been developed that allows the calculation of the OEM cost of electric traction motors of three different types, normalized as a function of power in order to accommodate different power and size. The model includes enough information on the various elements integrated in the motors to allow analysis of individual components and to factor-in the effects of changes in commodities prices. A scalable cost model for each of the main components of an electric vehicle (EV) is a useful tool that can have direct application in computer simulation or in parametric studies. For the cost model to have wide usefulness, it needs to be valid for a range of values of some parameter that determines the magnitude or size of the component. For instance, in the case of batteries, size may be determined by energy capacity, usually expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh), while in the case of traction motors, size is better determined by rated power, usually expressed in kilowatts (kW). The simplest case is when the cost of the component in question is a direct function of its size; then cost is simply the product of its specific cost ($/unit size) and the number of units (size) in the vehicle in question. Batteries usually fall in this category (cost = energy capacity x $/kWh). But cost is not always linear with size or magnitude; motors (and controllers), for instance, become relatively less expensive as power rating increases. Traction motors, one of the main components for EV powertrains are examined in this paper, and a simplified cost model is developed for the three most popular design variations.

  16. Reference Model 5 (RM5): Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y. H.; Jenne, D. S.; Thresher, R.; Copping, A.; Geerlofs, S.; Hanna, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    This report is an addendum to SAND2013-9040: Methodology for Design and Economic Analysis of Marine Energy Conversion (MEC) Technologies. This report describes an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter (OSWEC) reference model design in a complementary manner to Reference Models 1-4 contained in the above report. A conceptual design for a taut moored oscillating surge wave energy converter was developed. The design had an annual electrical power of 108 kilowatts (kW), rated power of 360 kW, and intended deployment at water depths between 50 m and 100 m. The study includes structural analysis, power output estimation, a hydraulic power conversion chain system, and mooring designs. The results were used to estimate device capital cost and annual operation and maintenance costs. The device performance and costs were used for the economic analysis, following the methodology presented in SAND2013-9040 that included costs for designing, manufacturing, deploying, and operating commercial-scale MEC arrays up to 100 devices. The levelized cost of energy estimated for the Reference Model 5 OSWEC, presented in this report, was for a single device and arrays of 10, 50, and 100 units, and it enabled the economic analysis to account for cost reductions associated with economies of scale. The baseline commercial levelized cost of energy estimate for the Reference Model 5 device in an array comprised of 10 units is $1.44/kilowatt-hour (kWh), and the value drops to approximately $0.69/kWh for an array of 100 units.

  17. From medium-sized to megawatt turbines...

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dongen, W. van

    1996-12-31

    One of the world`s first 500 kW turbines was installed in 1989 in the Netherlands. This forerunner of the current NedWind 500 kW range also represents the earliest predesign of the NedWind megawatt turbine. After the first 500 kW turbines with steel rotor blades and rotor diameter of 34 m, several design modifications followed, e.g. the rotor diameter was increased to 35 m and a tip brake was added. Later polyester blades were introduced and the rotor diameter was increased with 5 in. The drive train was also redesigned. Improvements on the 500 kW turbine concept has resulted in decreased cost, whereas annual energy output has increased to approx. 1.3 million kWh. Wind energy can substantially contribute to electricity supply. Maximum output in kiloWatthours is the target. Further improvement of the existing technology and implementation of flexible components may well prove to be a way to increase energy output, not only in medium or large sized wind turbines. 7 figs.

  18. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought bymore » the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO₂ emissions by 10,686 tonnes.« less

  19. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought by the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO₂ emissions by 10,686 tonnes.

  20. Bird Mortaility at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: March 1998--September 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smallwood, K. S.; Thelander, C. G.

    2005-09-01

    Over the past 15 years, research has shown that wind turbines in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) kill many birds, including raptors, which are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, and/or state and federal Endangered Species Acts. Early research in the APWRA on avian mortality mainly attempted to identify the extent of the problem. In 1998, however, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated research to address the causal relationships between wind turbines and bird mortality. NREL funded a project by BioResource Consultants to perform this research directed at identifying and addressing the causes of mortality of various bird species from wind turbines in the APWRA.With 580 megawatts (MW) of installed wind turbine generating capacity in the APWRA, wind turbines there provide up to 1 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of emissions-free electricity annually. By identifying and implementing new methods and technologies to reduce or resolve bird mortality in the APWRA, power producers may be able to increase wind turbine electricity production at the site and apply similar mortality-reduction methods at other sites around the state and country.

  1. Major challenges loom for natural gas industry, study says

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Driscoll, M.

    1994-01-28

    The 1994 edition of Natural Gas Trends, the annual joint study by Cambridge Energy Research Associates and Arthur Anderson Co., says that new oil-to-gas competition, price risks and the prospect of unbundling for local distribution companies loom as major challenges for the natural gas industry. With a tighter supply-demand balance in the past two years compounded by the fall in oil prices, gas is in head-to-head competition with oil for marginal markets, the report states. And with higher gas prices in 1993, industrial demand growth slowed while utility demand for gas fell. Some of this was related to fuel switching, particularly in the electric utility sector. Total electric power demand for gas has risen slightly due to the growth in industrial power generation, but there has yet to be a pronounced surge in gas use during the 1990s - a decade in which many had expected gas to make major inroads into the electric power sector, the report states. And while utilities still have plans to add between 40,000 and 45,000 megawatts of gas-fired generating capacity, gas actually has lost ground in the utility market to coal and nuclear power: In 1993, electricity output from coal and nuclear rose, while gas-fired generation fell to an estimated 250 billion kilowatt-hours - the lowest level since 1986, when gas generated 246 billion kwh.

  2. Orange & Rockland Utils Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    kWh Commercial: 0.1230kWh Industrial: 0.0580kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Orange & Rockland Utils Inc (New York). Scroll leftright to...

  3. City of Fort Collins, Colorado (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Average Rates Residential: 0.0926kWh Commercial: 0.0737kWh Industrial: 0.0562kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Fort Collins City...

  4. Cumberland Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Residential: 0.1060kWh Commercial: 0.1120kWh Industrial: 0.0733kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data...

  5. PHEVs Component Requirements and Efficiencies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Consumption l100km Electrical Consumption Whkm Conventional Split HEV PHEV 8kWh Split Optimum Engine Power PHEV 12 kWh Series Thermostat Control PHEV 16 kWh Series ...

  6. Presidential Permit Holders - Annual Reports | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Utility A arranged for the purchase of 200,000,000 kwh for its own use and wheeled 100,000,000 kwh to neighboring utility B. Utility A must report 300,000,000 kwh of imports over ...

  7. City of Sidney, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Average Rates Residential: 0.1070kWh Commercial: 0.0878kWh Industrial: 0.0555kWh References "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a" Retrieved from...

  8. City of Seward, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Residential: 0.2030kWh Commercial: 0.2160kWh Industrial: 0.1730kWh References "EIA Form EIA-861...

  9. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh)...

  10. Latest in Village Scale Clean Energy Technology

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... * Generally calculated on monthly or annual basis * Total energy savings * Loading on ... Power Wind n Penetratio ous Instantane (kWh) Demand Energy Primary (kWh) Produced ...

  11. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Electricity (million |Electricity Energy Intensity | | | (billion kWh) | square feet | (kWhsquare foot) | | |---+---...

  12. Upright Vacuum Sweeps Up the Competition in #EnergyFaceoff Round...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vacuum: 297 W (297 x 1)1000 .297 kWh per week (weekly consumption) .297 kWhweek x 52 weeks 15.44 kWh (annual energy consumption) 15.44 kWh x 0.11kWh 1.70 per year Hair ...

  13. DOE Challenge Home Case Study: Near Zero Maine Home II, Vassalboro...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... without PV 15,218 kWh, with PV 19,536 kWh; 393 gallons of oil * Annual PV production: projected 4,204 kWh, actual 5,400 kWh DOE CHALLENGE HOME Near Zero Maine Home 2 (Most ...

  14. Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 2009 United States Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Mohit; Grape, Ulrik

    2014-07-29

    The purpose of this project was for Seeo to deliver the first ever large-scale or grid-scale prototype of a new class of advanced lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. The technology combines unprecedented energy density, lifetime, safety, and cost. The goal was to demonstrate Seeo’s entirely new class of lithium-based batteries based on Seeo’s proprietary nanostructured polymer electrolyte. This technology can enable the widespread deployment in Smart Grid applications and was demonstrated through the development and testing of a 10 kilowatt-hour (kWh) prototype battery system. This development effort, supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) enabled Seeo to pursue and validate the transformational performance advantages of its technology for use in grid-tied energy storage applications. The focus of this project and Seeo’s goal as demonstrated through the efforts made under this project is to address the utility market needs for energy storage systems applications, especially for residential and commercial customers tied to solar photovoltaic installations. In addition to grid energy storage opportunities Seeo’s technology has been tested with automotive drive cycles and is seen as equally applicable for battery packs for electric vehicles. The goals of the project were outlined and achieved through a series of specific tasks, which encompassed materials development, scaling up of cells, demonstrating the performance of the cells, designing, building and demonstrating a pack prototype, and providing an economic and environmental assessment. Nearly all of the tasks were achieved over the duration of the program, with only the full demonstration of the battery system and a complete economic and environmental analysis not able to be fully completed. A timeline over the duration of the program is shown in figure 1.

  15. Reference Model 6 (RM6): Oscillating Wave Energy Converter.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bull, Diana L; Smith, Chris; Jenne, Dale Scott; Jacob, Paul; Copping, Andrea; Willits, Steve; Fontaine, Arnold; Brefort, Dorian; Gordon, Margaret Ellen; Copeland, Robert; Jepsen, Richard A.

    2014-10-01

    This report is an addendum to SAND2013-9040: Methodology for Design and Economic Analysis of Marine Energy Conversion (MEC) Technologies. This report describes an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter reference model design in a complementary manner to Reference Models 1-4 contained in the above report. In this report, a conceptual design for an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter (WEC) device appropriate for the modeled reference resource site was identified, and a detailed backward bent duct buoy (BBDB) device design was developed using a combination of numerical modeling tools and scaled physical models. Our team used the methodology in SAND2013-9040 for the economic analysis that included costs for designing, manufacturing, deploying, and operating commercial-scale MEC arrays, up to 100 devices. The methodology was applied to identify key cost drivers and to estimate levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for this RM6 Oscillating Water Column device in dollars per kilowatt-hour (%24/kWh). Although many costs were difficult to estimate at this time due to the lack of operational experience, the main contribution of this work was to disseminate a detailed set of methodologies and models that allow for an initial cost analysis of this emerging technology. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program Office (WWPTO), within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE). Sandia National Laboratories, the lead in this effort, collaborated with partners from National Laboratories, industry, and universities to design and test this reference model.

  16. Electric $ales and revenue 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This publication provides information on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers in the United States.

  17. NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Southwest Concentrating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of deployment, combined with research and development to reduce technology component costs, could help reduce concentrating solar power electricity costs to 0.07kilowatt-hour. ...

  18. System Advisor Model (SAM) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    total electricity production in kilowatt-hours for the first year based on hourly weather data for a particular location, and physical specifications of the power system...

  19. Word Pro - S10

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 U.S. Energy Information Administration Monthly Energy Review August 2016 Table 10.6 Solar Electricity Net Generation (Million Kilowatthours) Distributed a Solar Generation b ...

  20. Table 4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Mean Annual Electricity Consumption for Lighting, by Number of Household Members by Number of Rooms, 1993 (Kilowatthours) Number of Rooms Number of Household Members All...

  1. Table 4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9. Mean Annual Electricity Consumption for Lighting, by Family Income by Number of Household Members, 1993 (Kilowatthours) Number of Household Members Family Income All Households...

  2. Table 4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Mean Annual Electricity Consumption for Lighting, by Family Income by Number of Rooms, 1993 (Kilowatthours) Number of Rooms Family Income Total Households One to Three Four Five...

  3. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix G

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production ......Btu per kilowatthour 3,412 1 Conversion factor varies from year to year. ...

  4. Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ...

  5. Fuel Tables.indd

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6: Geothermal Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 State Geothermal Energy Electric Power Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Million Kilowatthours Trillion Btu ...

  6. Doing Business at PNNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PNNL's vanadium redox flow battery technology licensed by WattJoule Read this

  7. Energy Incentive Programs, New Hampshire | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    What public-purpose-funded energy efficiency programs are available in my state? In 2002, the New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission allocated 1.8 mills per kWh (0.0018kWh) of ...

  8. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … High...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Each home's 2.2-kW photovoltaic system produced about 3,330 kWh during the 12 months studied, about half the average consumption of each household (7,007 kWh). Premier Homes chose ...

  9. TVA - Green Power Providers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Years 11-20: retail electric rate 2014 Premium Rates: Solar: 0.04kWh Wind, Biomass, and Hydro: 0.03kWh Summary Note: Enrollment for 2015 was conducted from January 26th to...

  10. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    . Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing...

  11. Pacific Power - Energy FinAnswer | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Name Utility Administrator Pacific Power Website http:www.pacificpower.netbusseepi.html State California Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount 0.12kWh-0.18kWh...

  12. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti-...

  13. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti- lation","Water...

  14. Building America Case Study: Community-Scale Energy Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PERFORMANCE DATA Annual Energy Consumption: Average: 15,459 kWh Median: 15,252 kWh ... To that end, the U.S. Department of Energy Building America team IBACOS analyzed ...

  15. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by state Percent Change Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent...

  16. NV Energy (Southern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    25 Window Film: 0.50sq. ft. Variable Speed Drives: 45HP Hotel Room Occupancy Sensor: 55unit Commercial Custom Retrofit: 0.10kWh on peak; 0.05kWh off peak New...

  17. NV Energy (Northern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    25 Window Film: 0.50sq. ft. Variable Speed Drives: 45HP Hotel Room Occupancy Sensor: 55unit Commercial Custom Retrofit: 0.10kWh on peak; 0.05kWh off peak New...

  18. South Carolina Municipalities- Green Power Purchasing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Participating residential customers are able to purchase this green power for $3 per 100 kWh block. Commercial participants are able to purchase the power for $6 per 200 kWh block.

  19. SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Estimated annual energy* (millions kWh) actual net energy (millions kWh) Beaver 1965 112,000 172 161 Blakely Mountain 1956 75,000 169 119 Broken Bow 1970 100,000 129 186 Bull ...

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - Stockton Update_SWPA Conf_Rev 1 (Jun...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vertical axis Kaplan unit Peaking plant Peaking plant Average annual energy production of 55 000 000 KWH 55,000,000 KWH Plant placed in service in 1973 Remote operated from ...

  1. Nyseg non-residential adjustment fees? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MFC on Nyseg's site and each is less than 0.005kWh. That being said, the posted value matches my expectations more for high New York electricity rates (0.16kWh). Am I missing...

  2. U.S. Virgin Islands Feed-In Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May of 2014, AB 7586 created a feed-in-tariff that would allow owners of solar photovotaic systems ranging between 10 kWh and 500 kWh to sell their energy for approximately 26 cents per kWh. Two...

  3. Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Low-Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Van Geet, O.; Pless, S.; Donovan, K.; Powers, C.

    2011-12-01

    This publication detailing the design, implementation strategies, and continuous performance monitoring of NREL's Research Support Facility data center. Data centers are energy-intensive spaces that facilitate the transmission, receipt, processing, and storage of digital data. These spaces require redundancies in power and storage, as well as infrastructure, to cool computing equipment and manage the resulting waste heat (Tschudi, Xu, Sartor, and Stein, 2003). Data center spaces can consume more than 100 times the energy of standard office spaces (VanGeet 2011). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported that data centers used 61 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) in 2006, which was 1.5% of the total electricity consumption in the U.S. (U.S. EPA, 2007). Worldwide, data centers now consume more energy annually than Sweden (New York Times, 2009). Given their high energy consumption and conventional operation practices, there is a potential for huge energy savings in data centers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is world renowned for its commitment to green building construction. In June 2010, the laboratory finished construction of a 220,000-square-foot (ft{sup 2}), LEED Platinum, Research Support Facility (RSF), which included a 1,900-ft{sup 2} data center. The RSF will expand to 360,000 ft{sup 2} with the opening of an additional wing December, 2011. The project's request for proposals (RFP) set a whole-building demand-side energy use requirement of a nominal 35 kBtu/ft{sup 2} per year. On-site renewable energy generation will offset the annual energy consumption. To support the RSF's energy goals, NREL's new data center was designed to minimize its energy footprint without compromising service quality. Several implementation challenges emerged during the design, construction, and first 11 months of operation of the RSF data center. This document highlights these challenges and describes in detail how NREL successfully overcame them. The IT

  4. Feasibility of Hybrid Retrofits to Off-Grid Diesel Power Plants in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, C. D.; Flowers, L. T.; Benavidez, P. J.; Abergas, R. L.; Barruela, R. B.

    1999-08-01

    The Strategic Power Utilities Group (SPUG) of the National Power Corporation (NPC) in the Philippines owns and operates about 100 power plants, mostly fueled by diesel, ranging in energy production from about 15 kilowatt-hours (kWh)/day to 106,000 kWh/day. Reducing the consumption of diesel fuel in these plants, along with the associated financial losses, is a priority for SPUG. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential fuel and cost savings that might be achieved by retrofitting hybrid power systems to these existing diesel plants. As used in this report, the term ''hybrid system'' refers to any combination of wind turbine generators (WTGs), photovoltaic (PV) modules, lead-acid batteries, and an AC/DC power converter (either an electronic inverter or a rotary converter), in addition to the existing diesel gensets. The resources available for this study did not permit a detailed design analysis for each of the plants. Instead, the following five-step process was used: (1) Tabulate some important characteristics of all the plants. (2) Group the plants into categories (six classes) with similar characteristics. (3) For each class of system, identify one plant that is representative of the class. (4) For each representative plant, perform a moderately detailed prefeasibility analysis of design options. (5) Summarize and interpret the results. The analysis of each representative plant involved the use of time-series computer simulation models to estimate the fuel usage, maintenance expenses, and cash flow resulting from various designs, and to search the domain of possible designs for the one leading to the lowest life-cycle cost. Cost items that would be unaffected by the retrofit, such as operator salaries and the capital cost of existing equipment, were not included in the analysis. Thus, the results are reported as levelized cost of energy (COE) savings: the difference between the cost of the existing diesel-only system and that of an optimized hybrid

  5. Science & Technology - 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system produced 71 joules of infrared laser energy and 41 joules of second-harmonic (green) energy. The pump laser is a main component of the HAPLS system, and energizes the...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... in switching energy, which overall cannot sufficiently delay the approaching downscaling limit. Alternative ... heat equation including Joule heating sources. ...

  7. Renewable Energy Trust Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The renewable energy fund, known as the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust Fund, is supported by a non-bypassable surcharge of $0.0005 per kilowatt-hour (0.5 mill/kWh), imposed on customers of...

  8. Webinar: Award-Winning LEEP Campaign Sites Demonstrate Big Savings in High Efficiency Parking Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking (LEEP) Campaign is saving nearly 45 million kilowatt-hours and $4 million annually by upgrading its partners to high efficiency lighting in over 500,000 parking spaces.

  9. SunShot Initiative: Making Solar Energy Affordable for All Americans (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    Through SunShot, DOE supports efforts by private companies, universities, and national laboratories to drive down the cost of solar electricity to $0.06 per kilowatt-hour, making solar energy affordable for more American families and businesses.

  10. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    value of 1 hour. Modeling Kilowatthours by Using Lighting Supplement Data The regression analysis of the Lighting Supplement data was done in two steps. In both steps, a stepwise...

  11. Fuel Tables.indd

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8: Solar Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 State Electric Power Residential a Commercial b Industrial b Electric Power Total Million Kilowatthours Trillion Btu Alabama 0 0.2 0.0 ...

  12. US SoAtl FL Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    FL Site Consumption kilowatthours 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 US SoAtl FL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY ... CONSUMPTION BY END USE More than a quarter (27%) of the ...

  13. Electric power monthly, July 1995 - with data for April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This publication provides statistical data on net generation, fuel consumption, fossil fuel stocks, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on fossil fuel stocks and costs are also included.

  14. Microsoft Word - 2003-A B OS_v3.DOC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE that requires the DOE to accept title and dispose of spent nuclear fuel. For this future service, Energy Northwest pays a quarterly fee based on one mill per kilowatt-hour...

  15. New AMO Consortium Focuses on Energy Efficient and Environmentally Friendly Materials for Cooling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At least one out of every five kilowatt-hours of energy in the U.S. is used by cooling systems. Cooling technologies are a vital part of everyday life for Americans including food storage,...

  16. CBECS 1992 - C&E Detailed Table Word Definitions

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in the Northeast that used electricity as an energy source used 9.3 kilowatthours of electricity per square foot." Demand-Metered Buildings--Buildings that have meters to...

  17. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Customer net excess generation (NEG) is carried forward at the utility's retail rate (i.e., as a kilowatt-hour credit) to a customer's next bill for up to 12 months. At the end of a 12-month...

  18. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California (CAISO) due to very low natural gas prices. Hawaii's retail electricity revenue per kilowatthour fell the most of any state for the fifth month in a row, down 24%...

  19. Fuel Tables.indd

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    State Nuclear Electric Power Nuclear Fuel Consumption Prices Expenditures Million Kilowatthours Trillion Btu Dollars per Million Btu Million Dollars Alabama 41,244 431.4 0.80 344.2 ...

  20. Facilities | Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The structure's estimated energy use is 42 kilowatt-hours per parking stall, which is below the contract goal and represents a 90% reduction from an ASHRAE 90.1 2007 baseline. ...

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Trust Fund The renewable energy fund, known as the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust Fund, is supported by a non-bypassable surcharge of 0.0005 per kilowatt-hour (0.5 mill...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Trust Fund The renewable energy fund, known as the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust Fund, is supported by a non-bypassable surcharge of 0.0005 per kilowatt-hour (0.5...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fund, is supported by a non-bypassable surcharge of 0.0005 per kilowatt-hour (0.5 millkWh), imposed on customers of... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial, Investor-Owned...

  4. Solar Volumetric Incentive and Payments Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In June 2009, Oregon established a pilot solar volumetric incentive rate and payment program.* Under this incentive program, systems of up to 500 kilowatts (kW) are paid for the kilowatt-hours (k...

  5. Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monthly Flash Estimates Format: html xls Go Highlights: July 2014 July 2014 was the 20th month in a row where the average U.S. revenue per kilowatthour was higher than the same...

  6. Word Pro - S7

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total g Coal c Petro- leum d Natural Gas e Other Gases h Hydro- electric Power i Biomass ... and 5,024 million kilowatthours in 2015. h Blast furnace gas, and other manufactured ...

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Rebate - JEA JEA offers rebates for new PEVs purchased or leased on or after September 18, 2014. PEVs with a battery less than 15 kilowatt-hours ...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Customer net excess generation (NEG) is carried forward at the utility's retail rate (i.e., as a kilowatt-hour credit) to a customer's next bill for up to 12 months. At the end of...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metering Customer net excess generation (NEG) is carried forward at the utility's retail rate (i.e., as a kilowatt-hour credit) to a customer's next bill for up to 12 months. At...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Customer net excess generation (NEG) is carried forward at the utility's retail rate (i.e., as a kilowatt-hour credit) to a customer's next bill for up to 12 months. At the...