National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for kilowatt kwh kilowatt-hour

  1. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and amortization ERCOT Electric Reliability Council of Texas kW kilowatt kWh kilowatt-hour LCOE levelized cost

  2. Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-48267

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -conditioning KIUC Kauai Island Utility Cooperative kWh kilowatt-hour LCOE levelized cost of energy M&V measurement

  3. Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AEA Alaska Energy Authority Btu British thermal unit DOE U.S. Department of Energy EERE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy kW kilowatt kWh kilowatt-hour LCOE...

  4. Sustainable Energy in Remote Indonesian Grids: Accelerating Project...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rate of return kW kilowatt kWh kilowatt-hour LCOE levelized cost of energy LED light-emitting diode MW megawatt MWe megawatt electric NAL Nirmala Agro Lestari NGOs...

  5. Freescale Semiconductor Successfully Implements an Energy Management...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    projects at its Oak Hill Fab plant in Austin, Texas, that reduced annual plant-wide energy consumption by 28 million kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity and 26,000 million...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hawaii Energy The percentage of total utility revenue is used to establish a target budget for the PBF. The surcharge is set on a cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) basis to meet the...

  7. Energy Intensity Indicators: Electricity Generation Energy Intensity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electric energy delivered to the final user has an energy equivalent to 3,412 British thermal units (Btu). Figure E1, below, tracks how much energy was used by the various...

  8. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Net excess generation (NEG) is treated as a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit or other compensation on the customer's following bill.* When an annual period ends, a utility will purchase unused credits...

  9. LM to Meet Energy Metering Goals Through Enhanced Data Collection...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    water each day. The pumps used in these wells consumed 3,899,472 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity in FY 2013, causing the preserve site to account for more than 88 percent of...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Orcas Power & Light- MORE Green Power Program Incentive payments will be paid per kilowatt hour (kWh) of production, with a rate based on the year in which the system is...

  11. Arizona: Solar Panels Replace Inefficient Fossil Fuel-Powered...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    saving over 30,000 gallons of gasoline, 37,242 gallons of diesel, 9,820 gallons of propane, and producing 217,350 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity each year. The...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind (All), Biomass, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Net Metering Net excess generation (NEG) is treated as a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit or other compensation on the...

  13. Renewable Energy Production Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This annual corporate tax credit is equal to $0.01 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity produced and sold by the taxpayer to an unrelated party during a given tax year. For new facilities (plac...

  14. Fan System Optimization Improves Production and Saves Energy at Ash Grove Cement Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-05-01

    This case study describes an optimization project implemented on a fan system at Ash Grove Cement Company, which led to annual energy and maintenance savings of $16,000 and 175,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh).

  15. 1 KILOWATT = 1,000 WATTS 1 MEGAWATT = 1,000,000 WATTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    microwave for 1 hour uses 1.2 kW-h of energy. That's 4.3 megajoules or 4,300,000 joules. Power is how fast production of 150 hp. human body base metabolism 80 watts 1 kilowatt microwave 26 cu ft. refrigerator (annual solar panel array (peak production) 1.5 kilowatt ~10 m2 space shuttle lifto hand-cranked generator 10

  16. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Trinidad and Tobago; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-20

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Trinidad and Tobago, a two-island nation located off the coast of Venezuela. Trinidad and Tobago’s electricity rates are some of the lowest in the Caribbean at approximately $0.04 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), well below the regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  17. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Barbados; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Barbados, an independent nation in the Lesser Antilles island chain in the eastern Caribbean. Barbados’ electricity rates are approximately $0.28 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), below the Caribbean regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  18. Fact #822: May 26, 2014 Battery Capacity Varies Widely for Plug-In Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Battery-electric vehicles have capacities ranging from 12 kilowatt-hours (kWh) in the Scion iQ EV to 85 kWh in the Tesla Model S. Plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles typically have smaller battery...

  19. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Curacao; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Curacao, an autonomous member of the Kingdom of the Netherlands located off the coast of Venezuela. Curacao’s utility rates are approximately $0.26 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), below the Caribbean regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  20. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Bonaire; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Bonaire, a special municipality of the Kingdom of the Netherlands located off the coast of Venezuela. Bonaire’s utility rates are approximately $0.35 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  1. Reconciliation of Retailer Claims, 2005 CommissionReport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operator to also report generation (in kilowatt-hours), generator technology, and fuel type consumed (as

  2. William Lloyd Bircher Dissertation Committee for William Lloyd Bircher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    data center energy usage in the United States reached 61 billion kilowatt-hours (KWh) at an annual cost USD. The nature of energy usage in these systems provides an opportunity to reduce consumption.S.E.E.; M.S.E. Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of The University of Texas

  3. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Haiti; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Haiti, an independent nation that occupies the western portion of the island of Hispaniola in the northern Caribbean Sea. Haiti’s utility rates are roughly $0.35 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  4. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Palau; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Palau, an independent island nation geographically located in the Micronesia region. Palau’s residential electricity rates are approximately $0.28 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), more than twice the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  5. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - American Samoa; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of American Samoa, the southernmost territory of the United States. American Samoa’s residential electricity rates are approximately $0.29 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), more than twice the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  6. GreenCharge: Managing Renewable Energy in Smart Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    and changing environmental conditions. Since the energy consumption density, in kilowatt-hours (kWh) per square foot, is higher than the energy generation density of solar and wind deployments at most locations on both the total number of participating consumers and the total amount of energy contributed per

  7. Seventh Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan nwcouncil.org/7thplan O-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    credit kWh LCOE Kilowatt-hour Levelized cost of energy LED lighting Light-emitting diode - solid state Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 PV Photovoltaics REC RPM Renewable energy credit Regional resource cost VRF Variable refrigerant flow WECC Western Electricity Coordinating Council WEPT Web

  8. Sustainable Energy without the hot air David J.C. MacKay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    person in kilowatt-hours (kWh), the same units that appear on household energy bills; and powers1 Sustainable Energy ­ without the hot air David J.C. MacKay Synopsis We have an addiction energy from fossil fuels; Britain, 90%. And this is unsustainable for three reasons. First, easily

  9. Renewable Energy Production Tax Credit (Personal)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The maximum tax credit that can be claimed for a qualified system in any one year is $2 million. The tax credit for wind and biomass* systems equals $0.01 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for the first 200...

  10. Mathematics and Energy With the exception of humans and some chemosynthetic ecosystems powered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russo, Bernard

    an argument for the fol- lowing claim: The most economical (as in "cheapest"), fastest, and most reli- able various forms of energy: electric, mechanical, chemical, 151 #12;152 Mathematics for the Environment heat are no doubt familiar with is the kWh, i.e., the kilowatt-hour. For electric energy you pay about 10 cents

  11. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Guadeloupe; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-27

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Guadeloupe, an overseas region of France located in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Guadeloupe’s utility rates are approximately $0.18 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), below the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  12. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Antigua and Barbuda; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-20

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Antigua and Barbuda, an independent nation in the Leeward Islands in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Antigua and Barbuda’s utility rates are approximately $0.37 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), which is above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  13. Michael Klepinger, Extension Specialist Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity continues to rise. The aver- age end-user price of electricity in the United States was 8 cents projects are voicing concerns to township, city and county officials. The most common concerns are about per kilowatt hour (kWh) in 2005 (EIA, 2006a). Since the early 1980s, the price of wind-generated elec

  14. Renewable Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The maximum tax credit that can be claimed for a qualified system in any one year is $2 million. The tax credit for wind and biomass* systems equals $0.01 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for the first 200...

  15. Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunt, Robin J.

    2007-01-01

    $0.40/ kilowatt-hour, and wind power cost $0.60/ kilowatt-hour, then the marginal cost of wind power would be $. 0.20/subsidizes the marginal cost of wind power in the case of

  16. 2011 U.S. Small Wind Turbine Market Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    production is 100,000 to 130,000 kilowatt-hours per year, and the turbine offsets an energy rate of 10 cents to 12 cents per kilowatt-hour. The turbine is expected to generate...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: 88 Kilowatt Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    88 Kilowatt Automotive Inverter with New 900 Volt Silicon Carbide MOSFET Technology Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: 88 Kilowatt Automotive Inverter with New 900 Volt...

  18. Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A2-48318

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wh kilowatt-hour LED light emitting diode MECO Maui Electric Company MWh megawatt-hour NAECA National

  19. The Daily Gazette Sunday, February 8, 2015 http://www.dailygazette.com/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radke, Rich

    on electrical energy costs unless they can get them with rebates." Kilowatt-hour prices also have something

  20. max kwh | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data book Homefuelleasing Homemaps Home Jweers'smax kwh

  1. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Total Variable: Urban: Useful Energy Intensity (MegajouleUse Variable: Office: Useful Energy Intensity (Kilowatt-HourCooling Variable: Retail: Useful Energy Intensity (Kilowatt-

  2. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Guam; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Guam, an island territory of the United States located in the western Pacific Ocean. Guam’s electricity rates for residential customers start at $0.21 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the average U.S. rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.1,2 Like

  3. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Federated States of Micronesia; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Federated States of Micronesia, a sovereign nation and U.S.-associated state in the western Pacific Ocean. The Federated States of Micronesia’s electricity rates for residential customers exceed $0.48 U.S. dollars (USD)/per kilowatt-hour (kWh), nearly four times the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  4. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), a commonwealth in political union with the United States that is located in the northern Pacific Ocean. CNMI’s electricity rates for residential customers range from $0.19 to $0.33 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  5. Energy Unit Conversion Factors / 1Joule (J) equals 1 2.78 x lO-7 9.49 x 1o-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    kilowatt hour (kWh) equals 3.60 x lo6 1 3413 1 calorie (Cal) equals 4.184 1.19 x lO+j 3.97 x lo-3 1 British electron volt (eV) equals 1.60 x lo-l9 4.45 x lo-26 1.52 x 1o-22 Energy Equivalents Crude petroleum (42

  6. Kilowatts From Waste Wood In The Furniture Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nailen, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    recently, the Singer Furniture Co., Lenoir, N. Carolina, purchased a 450 kilowatt steam turbine/induction generator set to use extra steam - produced by 'free' waste wood fuel - in generating 15% of the plant's electrical energy demand. The turbine...

  7. DOE Office of Indian Energy Project Development and Finance Course...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    renewable energy based on the electrical output of the project in kilowatt hours 10 PV - photovoltaic. This is a solar resource converter to electricity. R Remaining Life - the...

  8. Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Philip Robert

    2012-01-01

    of energy are incident on the Earth per square foot persquare feet per square mile, translating to 12.2 billion kilowatt-hours of energy

  9. Oregon State Energy-Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program Helps...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    estimated 1,140,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per year-equivalent to the annual electricity consumption of more than 70 homes. The Building Technologies Office (BTO)...

  10. Lighting in the Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by your library lights E Kilowatt-hours consumed by your library lights F Annual cost of operating your library lights H Current lighting index for your library ...

  11. Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    lower system costs. Approach Existing thermal energy storage (TES) concepts cost about 27 per kilowatt hour thermal (kWht). The University of South Florida proposes a...

  12. Residential lighting: Use and potential savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) was the first to permit the estimation of annual kilowatt hours (kWh) used for lighting. The survey contained more detailed questions about the number of indoor lights used for specific amounts of time and more detailed questions about the use of outdoor lights than did previous surveys. In addition to these basic questions on the Household Questionnaire, the 1993 RECS also included a supplementary questionnaire, administered to a subset of households, that contained more detailed information about the types of lights used in the household, the rooms in which they were located, and the amount of time they were used.

  13. Freescale Semiconductor Successfully Implements an Energy Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-06-30

    Through the Superior Energy Performance (SEP) plant certification program, Freescale Semiconductor implemented projects at the company's Oak Hill Fab plant that reduced annual energy consumption by 28 million kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity and 26,000 million British thermal units (Btu) of natural gas between 2006 and 2009, saving more than $2 million each year. The plant is now certified at the SEP silver level, and has a management system in place to proactively manage the facility's energy resources in the future.

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    installed) as well as the operations-and-maintenance ("O&M") cost (¢ per kilowatt-hour generated spacing and injection rates that minimize the rate of decline in net generation with time. INTRODUCTION calls for minimizing the levelized cost of power (¢ per kilowatt-hour) over the project life. Minimizing

  15. ENERGY RECOVERY COUNCIL WEEKLY UPDATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    apply to calendar year 2009 sales of kilowatt hours of electricity produced in the United States or one-loop biomass, geothermal energy, and solar energy; and 1.1 cent per kilowatt hour on the sale of electricity the House Education and Labor Committee where he served as Senior Labor Policy Advisor for Health and Safety

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    that reduce energy usage through more efficient electrical commercial and industrial processes may qualify for an incentive that is the lesser of either 12 cents per kilowatt-hour...

  17. lighting in the library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plan: the number of watts (I); the number of kilowatt-hours (J); its annual electricity cost (K); the carbon dioxide greenhouse gas created by the electricity produced (L); and...

  18. Coeur Rochester, Inc.: Plant-Wide Assessment of Nevada Silver Mine Finds Opportunities to Improve Process Control and Reduce Energy Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-10-01

    The Coeur Rochester silver mine in Nevada would save almost 11 million kilowatt-hours and $813,000 annually by implementing the five energy efficiency projects described in this ITP case study.

  19. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -fired power plant using the least- expensive natural gas. The Council's Fish and Wildlife Program directed.8 cents per kilowatt-hour. That is about half the cost of power from the most efficient natural gas

  20. A Comparison of Demand Side Management Data Assessment Procedures for Small and Medium-Sized Manufacturing Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matheidas, M. T.; Heffington, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    Two methods of obtaining demand reduction data from industrial energy audits are compared. One very simple method calculates demand savings by dividing energy savings in kilowatt hours by the operating hours of the plant. Problems (some obvious...

  1. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative: Technology Research and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Motors' lightweight composite technology. DOE R&D has reduced the modeled, high-volume cost of advanced battery technology to 289 per kilowatt hour-40 percent lower than what it...

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Definition A PEV is defined as a vehicle that: Draws electricity from a battery with a capacity of at least four kilowatt-hours and is capable of being charged from an external...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Trust Fund The renewable energy fund, known as the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust Fund, is supported by a non-bypassable surcharge of 0.0005 per kilowatt-hour (0.5...

  4. Webinar: Award-Winning LEEP Campaign Sites Demonstrate Big Savings in High Efficiency Parking Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking (LEEP) Campaign is saving nearly 45 million kilowatt-hours and $4 million annually by upgrading its partners to high efficiency lighting in over 500,000 parking spaces.

  5. SunShot Initiative: Making Solar Energy Affordable for All Americans (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    Through SunShot, DOE supports efforts by private companies, universities, and national laboratories to drive down the cost of solar electricity to $0.06 per kilowatt-hour, making solar energy affordable for more American families and businesses.

  6. 6 Energy Saving Tips for Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    consume up to 38,000 kilowatt-hours, resulting in high energy bills. To help businesses save energy and money, the Energy Department today announced new standards aimed at making...

  7. Design and cost analysis of a 20-kWh bipolar zinc-bromine battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einstein, H.; Bellows, R.J.; Grimes, P.; Kantner, E.; Malachesky, P.; Newby, K.

    1981-01-01

    Zinc-Bromine secondary batteries are attractive systems for electric vehicles and energy storage (off-peak and photovoltaic) applications because of low cost raw materials, relatively high energy density, and ambient temperature operation. Exxon's approach to the system uses conductive carbon plastic electrodes in a bipolar configuration, separable bromine complexes, and selective membranes in a circulating electrolyte design. The 20 kWh battery design consists of two 10 kWh battery stacks placed back-to-back with a common center electrolyte feed block. Each of the two battery stacks consists of 78 cells for a system voltage of 120 volt output. Active electrode area per electrode is 12 dm/sup 2/. Cell-to-cell spacing is 0.25 cm. The two-stack module is assembled over a tray serving as a cover for the plastic electrolyte reservoir. Unit cells are comprised of alternating bipolar electrodes and separator assemblies. For various applications, accessories and controls are built into the system. The projected battery factory price of $28./kWh is discussed, along with the manufacturing, materials, and labor costs.

  8. CEMEX: Cement Manufacturer Saves 2.1 Million kWh Annually with a Motor Retrofit Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how the CEMEX cement manufacturing plant in Davenport, California, saves 2 million kWh and $168,000 in energy costs annually by replacing 13 worn-out motors with new energy-efficient ones.

  9. Development of zinc-bromine batteries for utility energy storage. First annual report, 1 September 1978-31 August 1979. [8-kWh submodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putt, R.; Attia, A.J.; Lu, P.Y.; Heyland, J.H.

    1980-05-01

    Development work on the Zn/Br battery is reported. A major improvement was the use of a bipolar cell design; this design is superior with respect to cost, performance, and simplicity. A cost and design study for an 80-kWh module resulted in a cost estimate of $54/kWh(1979$) for purchased materials and components, on the basis of 2500 MWh of annual production. A cell submodule (nominal 2 kWh) of full-sized electrodes (1 ft/sup 2/) accrued over 200 continuous cycles in a hands-off, automatic routine with efficiencies in the range of 53 to 56%. Initial testing of a full-sized 8-kWh submodule demonstrated energy efficiencies of 65 to 67%. 23 figures, 10 tables. (RWR)

  10. Development of 8 kWh Zinc bromide battery as a precursor of battery for electric power storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, T.; Ando, Y.; Fujii, E.; Hirotu, A.; Ito, H.; Kanazashi, M.; Misaki, H.; Yamamoto, A.

    1984-08-01

    Zinc bromide battery is characterized with its room temperature operation, simple construction and easy maintenance. After four years' research and development of electrode materials, electrolyte composition, battery stack construction and other components, we prepared 1 kW class (8 kWh) battery for the first interim official evaluation. This battery showed a good and stable energy efficiency of 80% after 130 cycles of 1.25 kW 8 hours charge and 1.0 kW 8 hours discharge.

  11. Influences of pump transitions on thermal effects of multi-kilowatt thulium-doped fiber lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jianlong; Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    Thermal effects are critical constrains for developing high-power thulium-doped fiber lasers (TDFLs). In this paper, we numerically investigate the lasing and thermal characteristics of the TDFLs under different pump transitions. Our results show, the widely-used pump transition $^3H_6\\rightarrow^3H_4$, taking advantages of high-power high-efficiency laser diodes at $\\sim$0.8 $\\mu$m, may not be a superior choice for directly outputting multi-kilowatt at 2 $\\mu$m because of severe thermal problems. Meanwhile, using other pump transitions resulting 2-$\\mu$m emissions, especially the in-band pump transition $^3H_6\\rightarrow^3F_4$, will decrease the generated heat to a large extent. By optimizing the power filling factor of the gain fiber, we find a 2-$\\mu$m TDFL cladding-pumped at 1.9 $\\mu$m will lead to the laser slope efficiency close to its quantum efficiency (95\\%). The induced ultra-low quantum defect would be of great importance for power scaling. We thus propose tandem-pumped TDFLs for reducing the heat ...

  12. DOE/NREL Advanced Wind Turbine Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Smith, B.; Laxson, A.; Thresher, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Goldman, P. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Wind/Hydro/Ocean Technologies Div.] [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Wind/Hydro/Ocean Technologies Div.

    1993-05-01

    The development of technologically advanced, high-efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high-priority activity of the US wind industry. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute), sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated the Advanced Wind Turbine Program to assist the wind industry in the development of a new class of advanced wind turbines. The initial phase of the program focused on developing conceptual designs for near-term and advanced turbines. The goal of the second phase of this program is to use the experience gained over the last decade of turbine design and operation combined with the latest existing design tools to develop a turbine that will produce energy at $0.05 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in a 5.8-m/s (13-mph) wind site. Three contracts have been awarded, and two more are under negotiation in the second phase. The third phase of the program will use new innovations and state-of-the-art wind turbine design technology to produce a turbine that will generate energy at $0.04/kWh in a 5.8-m/s wind site. Details of the third phase will be announced in early 1993.

  13. Integrated Testing, Simulation and Analysis of Electric Drive Options for Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramroth, L. A.; Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.

    2012-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory verified diesel-conventional and diesel-hybrid parcel delivery vehicle models to evaluate petroleum reduction and cost implications of plug-in hybrid gasoline and diesel variants. These variants are run on a field-data-derived design matrix to analyze the effects of drive cycle, distance, battery replacements, battery capacity, and motor power on fuel consumption and lifetime cost. Two cost scenarios using fuel prices corresponding to forecasted highs for 2011 and 2030 and battery costs per kilowatt-hour representing current and long-term targets compare plug-in hybrid lifetime costs with diesel conventional lifetime costs. Under a future cost scenario of $100/kWh battery energy and $5/gal fuel, plug-in hybrids are cost effective. Assuming a current cost of $700/kWh and $3/gal fuel, they rarely recoup the additional motor and battery cost. The results highlight the importance of understanding the application's drive cycle, daily driving distance, and kinetic intensity. For instances in the current-cost scenario where the additional plug-in hybrid cost is regained in fuel savings, the combination of kinetic intensity and daily distance travelled does not coincide with the usage patterns observed in the field data. If the usage patterns were adjusted, the hybrids could become cost effective.

  14. Using and Measuring the Combined Heat and Power Advantage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, T.

    2011-01-01

    compared to other power generation systems. Fuel Charged to Power (FCP) is the fuel, net of credit for thermal output, required to produce a kilowatt-hour of electricity. This provides a metric that is used for comparison to the heat rate of other types...

  15. BEFORE YOU START WRITING: Read the assignment. An excellent paper that does not cover the assigned topics will always be heavily

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    , and your approach! Don't waste space with unrelated facts. For example, if your focus is on LED lighting is bleeding. Its time we answered her call" OR "LED lighting will revolutionize the way we think of lighting by saving millions of kilowatt-hours of electricity and thousands of maintenance hours," (LED Lighting

  16. Media Release Dr. Larry Hughes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    in consumption patterns as there are no penalties associated with over-consumption." Changing the way we use, "Second, customers with low energy consumption can and do cross- subsidize customers with high energy per kilowatt-hour can be a mechanism to encourage customers to reduce energy consumption, since

  17. Schrepel, Eric From: Phillips, Kendra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    kilowatt hour range that we would have to pay under the Bush scheme, where the incremenatl capital cost crisis where the capital cost was financed entirely on the backs of rate payers here to move us be the model going forward. It will lift all boats here and lower rates, rates will be lower under your plan

  18. Modeling of Electric Power Supply Chain Networks with Fuel Suppliers Variational Inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    participants have, in turn, fundamentally changed not only electricity trading patterns but also the structure and associated algorithmic tools. Moreover, the availability of fuels for electric power generation is a topic kilowatt hours of electric power were generated, with United States being the largest producer and consumer

  19. Nuclear Power: "Made in China" Andrew C. Kadak, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity and energy for its huge population. At the moment, on a per capita basis, China's electricity consumption is still only 946 kilowatt-hours (kwhrs) per year, compared to 9,000 kwhrs per year for the developed world and 13,000 kwhrs per year for the United States.1 However, China's recent electricity growth

  20. Your Community With Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contractors and partners · Conducting community outreach and education · Pricing and financing projects. Also for utility-scale solar electricity to roughly 6 cents per kilowatt hour without subsidies will result in rapid, large- scale adoption of solar electricity across the United States. Reaching this goal will re

  1. MA 16010 - Exam 2 Practice Exam 2 1. Given f(x) = x2 sinx . Find f/(x ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-13

    The price of one kilowatt-hour of electricity is given by p(t)=(t2 + 2t)2, where p(t) is the price in dollars and t is years after 2014 (so 2015 corresponds to t = 1.).

  2. Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series 1 Wind energy is more expensive than conventional energy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    to an Xcel Energy solicitation bidding process (except for one small hydro plant). The commission also noted small hydro plant). #12;Top photo page 1: © GE Wind Energy All Rights Reserved/PIX12335 A Strong Energy engineers show these costs to be relatively small--less than about 2 mills/kilowatt-hour (k

  3. ENERGY RECOVERY COUNCIL WEEKLY UPDATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    , we have updated our website. Our new home on the web is located at www-loop biomass, geothermal energy, and solar energy; and 1.1 cent per kilowatt hour on the sale of electricity produced in open-loop biomass facilities, small irrigation #12;power facilities, landfill gas facilities

  4. Compressed Air Project Improves Efficiency and Production at Harland Publishing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-05-01

    Case study describing a project which configured a printing machine so that it consumes less compressed air and required lower pressure to operate effectively. Project replicated throughout the company, leading to energy cost savings of $200,000 per year, or 2.9 million kilowatt-hours.

  5. Sustainable Energy --without the hot air David J.C. MacKay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    units. Energies are expressed as quan­ CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION Wind: 20 kWh/d Wave: 4 kWh/d Solar heating units that appear on household energy bills; and powers are expressed in kilowatt­hours per day (k1 Sustainable Energy -- without the hot air David J.C. MacKay Synopsis We have an addiction

  6. IIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIII ll IIIIIIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apr 16, 2012 ... Maximum Cost: IFM - 65.00. Copyright ... This results in substantial differences in cost of owner- ship. ..... requires 50 kilowatt—hours per week}. In mobile deploy ... omy for up to three months, energy storage require- ments of ...

  7. Office of the President AGENDA ITEM 301 September 7, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    of 85 million kilowatt-hours of green electricity (green.) certified renewable energy and solar panel options: renewable energy certificates, onsite generation and utility green power products. 3 and helps biologists better explore the data they are generating. 6. Mayor Ralph Becker presented the Book

  8. Accepted for Presentation at IEEE PES 2000 Winter Meeting, Singapore, January 2000 Assessment of Transmission Constraint Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis, Power System Visualization 1. Introduction Electricity markets throughout the world continue to model the expected optimal behavior for these markets. Deregulation of electric power generation cost of electricity to residences in New York in 1995 was 11.1 cents a kilowatt hour but was only 6

  9. Policies supporting Heat Pump Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Policies supporting Heat Pump Technologies in Canada IEA Heat Pump Workshop London, UK November 13 in the world, with an average of 16,995 kilowatt-hours per annum. #12;Canada's Context for Heat Pumps Impacts avenues: Ground source heat pumps for cold climates (heating and cooling) Reversible air source heat

  10. August 14, 2003 ---Home Site Index Site Search/Archive Help --Welcome, jmd@mit.edu Member Center Log Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    power is 6.7 cents per kilowatt-hour, compared to 4.2 cents for coal and natural gas (when the price the costs of producing electricity from new nuclear, coal and natural gas plants. The model focuses the carbon dioxide product of coal and natural gas combustion, raises the cost of coal to 5.4 cents

  11. Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report. [50 kWh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalosh, R. G.; Bajpai, S. N.; Short, T. P.; Tsui, R. K.

    1980-04-01

    Hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries are evaluated. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based on both theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate (which is the form of chlorine storage in the charged battery). Six spill tests involving the chlorine hydrate equivalent of a 50-kWh battery indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm (30 to 38/sup 0/C) road surface. Other accidental chlorine release scenarios may also cause some distress, but are not expected to produce the type of life-threatening chlorine exposures that can result from large hydrate spills. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model was combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fataility rates are several times higher in a city such as Los Angeles with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city such as Boston. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatality rates due to fires and asphyxiations. 37 figures, 19 tables.

  12. Simple cost model for EV traction motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuenca, R.M.

    1995-02-01

    A simple cost model has been developed that allows the calculation of the OEM cost of electric traction motors of three different types, normalized as a function of power in order to accommodate different power and size. The model includes enough information on the various elements integrated in the motors to allow analysis of individual components and to factor-in the effects of changes in commodities prices. A scalable cost model for each of the main components of an electric vehicle (EV) is a useful tool that can have direct application in computer simulation or in parametric studies. For the cost model to have wide usefulness, it needs to be valid for a range of values of some parameter that determines the magnitude or size of the component. For instance, in the case of batteries, size may be determined by energy capacity, usually expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh), while in the case of traction motors, size is better determined by rated power, usually expressed in kilowatts (kW). The simplest case is when the cost of the component in question is a direct function of its size; then cost is simply the product of its specific cost ($/unit size) and the number of units (size) in the vehicle in question. Batteries usually fall in this category (cost = energy capacity x $/kWh). But cost is not always linear with size or magnitude; motors (and controllers), for instance, become relatively less expensive as power rating increases. Traction motors, one of the main components for EV powertrains are examined in this paper, and a simplified cost model is developed for the three most popular design variations.

  13. Reference Model 5 (RM5): Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y. H.; Jenne, D. S.; Thresher, R.; Copping, A.; Geerlofs, S.; Hanna, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    This report is an addendum to SAND2013-9040: Methodology for Design and Economic Analysis of Marine Energy Conversion (MEC) Technologies. This report describes an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter (OSWEC) reference model design in a complementary manner to Reference Models 1-4 contained in the above report. A conceptual design for a taut moored oscillating surge wave energy converter was developed. The design had an annual electrical power of 108 kilowatts (kW), rated power of 360 kW, and intended deployment at water depths between 50 m and 100 m. The study includes structural analysis, power output estimation, a hydraulic power conversion chain system, and mooring designs. The results were used to estimate device capital cost and annual operation and maintenance costs. The device performance and costs were used for the economic analysis, following the methodology presented in SAND2013-9040 that included costs for designing, manufacturing, deploying, and operating commercial-scale MEC arrays up to 100 devices. The levelized cost of energy estimated for the Reference Model 5 OSWEC, presented in this report, was for a single device and arrays of 10, 50, and 100 units, and it enabled the economic analysis to account for cost reductions associated with economies of scale. The baseline commercial levelized cost of energy estimate for the Reference Model 5 device in an array comprised of 10 units is $1.44/kilowatt-hour (kWh), and the value drops to approximately $0.69/kWh for an array of 100 units.

  14. Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-10-11

    A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the GREET model shows that fossil thermal plants have fossil energy use and GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output about one order of magnitude higher than renewable power systems, including geothermal power.

  15. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought by the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO? emissions by 10,686 tonnes.

  16. A reliability and availability sensitivity study of a large photovoltaic system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Granata, Jennifer E.; Mundt, Michael Joseph; Miller, Steven P.; Quintana, Michael A.; Collins, Elmer W.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2010-08-01

    A reliability and availability model has been developed for a portion of the 4.6 megawatt (MWdc) photovoltaic system operated by Tucson Electric Power (TEP) at Springerville, Arizona using a commercially available software tool, GoldSim{trademark}. This reliability model has been populated with life distributions and repair distributions derived from data accumulated during five years of operation of this system. This reliability and availability model was incorporated into another model that simulated daily and seasonal solar irradiance and photovoltaic module performance. The resulting combined model allows prediction of kilowatt hour (kWh) energy output of the system based on availability of components of the system, solar irradiance, and module and inverter performance. This model was then used to study the sensitivity of energy output as a function of photovoltaic (PV) module degradation at different rates and the effect of location (solar irradiance). Plots of cumulative energy output versus time for a 30 year period are provided for each of these cases.

  17. Commercialization of High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    The goal for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) technologies is to produce electricity at 15 cents/kilowatt-hour (kWh) with six hours of thermal storage in 2015 (intermediate power) and close to 10 cents/kWh with 12-17 hours of thermal storage in 2020 (baseload power). Cost reductions of up to 50% to the solar concentrator are targeted through technology advances. The overall solar-to-electric efficiency of parabolic-trough solar power plants can be improved and the cost of solar electricity can be reduced by improving the properties of the selective coating on the receiver and increasing the solar-field operating temperature to >450 degrees C. New, more-efficient selective coatings will be needed that have both high solar absorptance and low thermal emittance at elevated temperatures. Conduction and convection losses from the hot absorber surface are usually negligible for parabolic trough receivers. The objective is to develop new, more-efficient selective coatings with both high solar absorptance (..alpha.. > 0.95) and low thermal emittance (..epsilon.. < 0.08 @ 450 degrees C) that are thermally stable above 450 degrees C, ideally in air, with improved durability and manufacturability, and reduced cost.

  18. Bird Mortaility at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: March 1998--September 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smallwood, K. S.; Thelander, C. G.

    2005-09-01

    Over the past 15 years, research has shown that wind turbines in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) kill many birds, including raptors, which are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, and/or state and federal Endangered Species Acts. Early research in the APWRA on avian mortality mainly attempted to identify the extent of the problem. In 1998, however, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated research to address the causal relationships between wind turbines and bird mortality. NREL funded a project by BioResource Consultants to perform this research directed at identifying and addressing the causes of mortality of various bird species from wind turbines in the APWRA.With 580 megawatts (MW) of installed wind turbine generating capacity in the APWRA, wind turbines there provide up to 1 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of emissions-free electricity annually. By identifying and implementing new methods and technologies to reduce or resolve bird mortality in the APWRA, power producers may be able to increase wind turbine electricity production at the site and apply similar mortality-reduction methods at other sites around the state and country.

  19. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought bymore »the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO? emissions by 10,686 tonnes.« less

  20. Status report on a solar photovoltaic concentrating energy system for a hospital in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seki, A.; Curtis, G.; Yuen, P.

    1983-06-01

    The largest parabolic concentrating photovoltaic/solar thermal system in the U.S. began producing electricity and hot water for a hospital on the island of Kauai, Hawaii in November 1981. Each of the 80 parabolic collectors is 6 feet by 10 feet and concentrates incident sunlight on photovoltaic cells mounted on two faces of the receiver at the focus. Although the 35 kilowatt system has been designed to produce 22,000 net kilowatt-hours per year of electricity and 620,000 gallons of 180 F water, electrical output (12 to 15 kilowatt-hours per day) is only 20 percent of that expected, primarily because insolation at the site has been only 40 percent of predicted values. A second problem with fungal attack on the receivers has been solved by better sealing. The system has also withstood a hurricane with negligible damage.

  1. The Economic Effects of Electricity Deregulation: An Empricial Analysis of Indian States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, A; Jamasb, Tooraj

    with hydroelectricity could benefit from lesser coal dependency and higher efficiency levels; it may also affect the extent of deregulation, as hydroelectric reserves are state-controlled. Finally, state GDP per capita is used to control for effects relating... in a state Kilowatt Hours PWDF Percentage Energy Deficit in states Percentage HYDRO1 Hydroelectric generation capacity in a state Percentage PCGDP Per capita state GDP; adjusted for inflation at constant (1993-94) prices Million Rupees...

  2. American Indian Complex to Cool Off Using Ice Storage System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Oklahoma City, summer temperatures can get above 100 degrees, making cooling more of a necessity than a luxury. But the designers of the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum (AICCM) wanted to make cooling choices that reflect American Indian cultures' respect for the land. So, rather than using conventional air-conditioning, the museum's main complex will use an ice storage system estimated to save 644,000 kilowatt hours of electricity a year.

  3. GRIDS: Grid-Scale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    GRIDS Project: The 12 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s GRIDS Project, short for “Grid-Scale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage,” are developing storage technologies that can store renewable energy for use at any location on the grid at an investment cost less than $100 per kilowatt hour. Flexible, large-scale storage would create a stronger and more robust electric grid by enabling renewables to contribute to reliable power generation.

  4. Way Beyond Widgets: Delivering Integrated Lighting Design in Actionable Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Richman, Eric E.; Jones, Carol C.

    2008-08-17

    Previously, energy-efficiency strategies for commercial spaces have focused on using efficient equipment without providing specific detailed instructions. Designs by experts in their fields are an energy-efficiency product in its own right. A new national program has developed interactive application-specific lighting designs for widespread use in four major commercial sectors. This paper will describe the technical basis for the solutions, energy efficiency and cost-savings methodology, and installations and measurement/verification to-date. Lighting designs have been developed for five types of retail stores (big box, small box, grocery, specialty market, and pharmacy) and are planned for the office, healthcare, and education sectors as well. Nationally known sustainable lighting designers developed the designs using high-performance commercially available products, daylighting, and lighting controls. Input and peer review was received by stakeholders, including manufacturers, architects, utilities, energy-efficiency program sponsors (EEPS), and end-users (i.e., retailers). An interactive web tool delivers the lighting solutions and analyzes anticipated energy savings using project-specific inputs. The lighting solutions were analyzed against a reference building using the space-by-space method as allowed in the Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (ASHRAE 2004) co-sponsored by the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA). The results showed that the design vignettes ranged from a 9% to 28% reduction in the allowed lighting power density. Detailed control strategies are offered to further reduce the actual kilowatt-hour power consumption. When used together, the lighting design vignettes and control strategies show a modeled decrease in energy consumption (kWh) by 33% to 50% below the baseline design.

  5. Reference Model 6 (RM6): Oscillating Wave Energy Converter.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bull, Diana L; Smith, Chris; Jenne, Dale Scott; Jacob, Paul; Copping, Andrea; Willits, Steve; Fontaine, Arnold; Brefort, Dorian; Gordon, Margaret Ellen; Copeland, Robert; Jepsen, Richard A.

    2014-10-01

    This report is an addendum to SAND2013-9040: Methodology for Design and Economic Analysis of Marine Energy Conversion (MEC) Technologies. This report describes an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter reference model design in a complementary manner to Reference Models 1-4 contained in the above report. In this report, a conceptual design for an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter (WEC) device appropriate for the modeled reference resource site was identified, and a detailed backward bent duct buoy (BBDB) device design was developed using a combination of numerical modeling tools and scaled physical models. Our team used the methodology in SAND2013-9040 for the economic analysis that included costs for designing, manufacturing, deploying, and operating commercial-scale MEC arrays, up to 100 devices. The methodology was applied to identify key cost drivers and to estimate levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for this RM6 Oscillating Water Column device in dollars per kilowatt-hour (%24/kWh). Although many costs were difficult to estimate at this time due to the lack of operational experience, the main contribution of this work was to disseminate a detailed set of methodologies and models that allow for an initial cost analysis of this emerging technology. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program Office (WWPTO), within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE). Sandia National Laboratories, the lead in this effort, collaborated with partners from National Laboratories, industry, and universities to design and test this reference model.

  6. Beyond Kilowatts: Utility Business Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sharing Smart Grid Experiences Through Performance Feedback Joe Miller, Smart Grid Implementation Strategy Team September 15, 2011 Prepared by: National Energy Technology...

  7. Beyond Kilowatts: Utility Business Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERTWaterSharing Smart Grid Experiences

  8. Building opportunities for photovoltaics in the U.S. Final report [PV BONUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Nicklas

    1999-09-08

    The objective of the North Carolina's PV Bonus Team was to develop and demonstrate a commercially viable, building-integrated, photovoltaic system that, in addition to providing electricity, would capture and effectively utilize the thermal energy produced by the photovoltaic array. This project objective was successfully achieved by designing, testing, constructing, and monitoring two roof integrated photovoltaic systems--one on a Applebee's Restaurant in Salisbury, North Carolina and the second on a Central Carolina Bank in Bessemer City, North Carolina. The goal of Innovative Design is to now use these successful demonstrations to facilitate entry of building integrated, pv/thermal systems into the marketplace. The strategy was to develop the two systems that could be utilized in future applications. Both systems were designed and then constructed at the North Carolina Solar Center at North Carolina State University. After extensive testing at the North Carolina Solar Center, the systems were moved to the actual construction sites and implemented. The Applebee's Restaurant system was designed to substitute for the roof assembly of a low sloping, south-facing sunspace roof that typically incorporated clay tile. After monitoring the installed system for one year it was determined that the 1.2 kilowatt (peak) system produces an average peak reduction of 1 kilowatt (rated peak is 1.7 kiloWatts), saves 1,529 kilowatt-hours of electricity, and offsets 11,776 kilowatt-hours of thermal energy savings used to pre-heat water. A DC fan connected directly to eight of the thirty-two amorphous modules moves air through air passages mounted on the backside of the modules and into a closed loop duct system to a heat exchanger. This heat exchanger is, in turn, connected to a pre-heat hot water tank that is used to heat the water for the restaurant. The Central Carolina Bank system was designed to substitute for the roof assembly of the drive-in window area of the bank. The design featured a triangulated truss that incorporated ten crystalline photovoltaic modules on one side of the truss and a reflective panel on the opposite side. The system used a utility interactive, programmable inverter and a 18.9 kilowatt-hour battery bank. The system is designed so that a DC fan, connected to one of the modules, forces ambient air across the back side of the modules. In the summer this heat is vented to the outside but in the winter this heated, fresh air is introduced into the building as ventilation air. Like the Applebee's system, the design allowed the entire roof assembly to be constructed off-site, tested, and then shipped to the site in pie-assembled, large components. During the first full year of operation, the 2.2 kilowatt (rated peak is 2.7 kilowatts) system contributed to an average peak reduction of .9 kilowatts. The system, as designed, saves 2,576 kilowatt-hours of electricity and offsets 3,473 kilowatt hours (of a potential thermal benefit of 10,172 collected kWhs) of thermal energy savings that is used as fresh air make-up in the colder months. This report is a summary of their conclusions.

  9. KWhOURS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder atHills,New York:Just Hot ResourcesEnergy JumpKLDKSLKWhOURS

  10. OpenEI Community - max kwh

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid Data available for download onst,/0 enBigWater

  11. SunShot Initiative Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Office

    2015-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national effort launched in 2011 that aggressively drives innovation to make solar energy fully cost competitive with traditional energy sources before the end of the decade. The SunShot fact sheet outlines goals and successes of the program as it works with private companies, universities, non-profit organizations, state and local governments, and national laboratories to drive down the cost of solar electricity to $0.06 per kilowatt-hour, without incentives, by the year 2020.

  12. Engineering innovation to reduce wind power COE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Curtt Nelson

    2011-01-10

    There are enough wind resources in the US to provide 10 times the electric power we currently use, however wind power only accounts for 2% of our total electricity production. One of the main limitations to wind use is cost. Wind power currently costs 5-to-8 cents per kilowatt-hour, which is more than twice the cost of electricity generated by burning coal. Our Intelligent Wind Turbine LDRD Project is applying LANL's leading-edge engineering expertise in modeling and simulation, experimental validation, and advanced sensing technologies to challenges faced in the design and operation of modern wind turbines.

  13. SunShot Initiative Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national effort launched in 2011 that aggressively drives innovation to make solar energy fully cost competitive with traditional energy sources before the end of the decade. The SunShot fact sheet outlines goals and successes of the program as it works with private companies, universities, non-profit organizations, state and local governments, and national laboratories to drive down the cost of solar electricity to $0.06 per kilowatt-hour, without incentives, by the year 2020.

  14. Electric power monthly, February 1999 with data for November 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-02-01

    The Electric Power Monthly presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Statistics are provided for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt-hour of electricity sold.

  15. Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Low-Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Van Geet, O.; Pless, S.; Donovan, K.; Powers, C.

    2011-12-01

    This publication detailing the design, implementation strategies, and continuous performance monitoring of NREL's Research Support Facility data center. Data centers are energy-intensive spaces that facilitate the transmission, receipt, processing, and storage of digital data. These spaces require redundancies in power and storage, as well as infrastructure, to cool computing equipment and manage the resulting waste heat (Tschudi, Xu, Sartor, and Stein, 2003). Data center spaces can consume more than 100 times the energy of standard office spaces (VanGeet 2011). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported that data centers used 61 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) in 2006, which was 1.5% of the total electricity consumption in the U.S. (U.S. EPA, 2007). Worldwide, data centers now consume more energy annually than Sweden (New York Times, 2009). Given their high energy consumption and conventional operation practices, there is a potential for huge energy savings in data centers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is world renowned for its commitment to green building construction. In June 2010, the laboratory finished construction of a 220,000-square-foot (ft{sup 2}), LEED Platinum, Research Support Facility (RSF), which included a 1,900-ft{sup 2} data center. The RSF will expand to 360,000 ft{sup 2} with the opening of an additional wing December, 2011. The project's request for proposals (RFP) set a whole-building demand-side energy use requirement of a nominal 35 kBtu/ft{sup 2} per year. On-site renewable energy generation will offset the annual energy consumption. To support the RSF's energy goals, NREL's new data center was designed to minimize its energy footprint without compromising service quality. Several implementation challenges emerged during the design, construction, and first 11 months of operation of the RSF data center. This document highlights these challenges and describes in detail how NREL successfully overcame them. The IT settings and strategies outlined in this document have been used to significantly reduce data center energy requirements in the RSF; however, these can also be used in existing buildings and retrofits.

  16. Feasibility of Hybrid Retrofits to Off-Grid Diesel Power Plants in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, C. D.; Flowers, L. T.; Benavidez, P. J.; Abergas, R. L.; Barruela, R. B.

    1999-08-01

    The Strategic Power Utilities Group (SPUG) of the National Power Corporation (NPC) in the Philippines owns and operates about 100 power plants, mostly fueled by diesel, ranging in energy production from about 15 kilowatt-hours (kWh)/day to 106,000 kWh/day. Reducing the consumption of diesel fuel in these plants, along with the associated financial losses, is a priority for SPUG. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential fuel and cost savings that might be achieved by retrofitting hybrid power systems to these existing diesel plants. As used in this report, the term ''hybrid system'' refers to any combination of wind turbine generators (WTGs), photovoltaic (PV) modules, lead-acid batteries, and an AC/DC power converter (either an electronic inverter or a rotary converter), in addition to the existing diesel gensets. The resources available for this study did not permit a detailed design analysis for each of the plants. Instead, the following five-step process was used: (1) Tabulate some important characteristics of all the plants. (2) Group the plants into categories (six classes) with similar characteristics. (3) For each class of system, identify one plant that is representative of the class. (4) For each representative plant, perform a moderately detailed prefeasibility analysis of design options. (5) Summarize and interpret the results. The analysis of each representative plant involved the use of time-series computer simulation models to estimate the fuel usage, maintenance expenses, and cash flow resulting from various designs, and to search the domain of possible designs for the one leading to the lowest life-cycle cost. Cost items that would be unaffected by the retrofit, such as operator salaries and the capital cost of existing equipment, were not included in the analysis. Thus, the results are reported as levelized cost of energy (COE) savings: the difference between the cost of the existing diesel-only system and that of an optimized hybrid system, expressed in units of U.S. dollars per kWh (US$/kWh) of energy production. This analysis is one phase of a study entitled ''Analysis of Renewable Energy Retrofit Options to Existing Diesel Mini-Grids,'' funded by the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and performed jointly by NPC, the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sustainable Energy Solutions in New York, New York (Morris et al. 1998). A more detailed version of this paper is included in that report.

  17. Bonded Bracket Assmebly for Frameless Solar Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Todd

    2013-01-30

    In February 2011 the US Department of Energy announced their new Sunshot Initiative. The Sunshot goal is to reduce the total cost of solar energy systems by about 75 percent before the end of the decade. The DOE estimated that a total installed cost of $1 per watt for photovoltaic systems would be equivalent to 6���¢/kilowatt hour (kWh) for energy available from the grid. The DOE also estimated that to meet the $1 per watt goal, PV module costs would need to be reduced to $.50 per watt, balance of systems costs would need to be reduced to $.40 per watt, and power electronic costs would need to reach $.10 per watt. To address the BOS balance of systems cost component of the $1 per watt goal, the DOE announced a funding opportunity called (BOS-X) Extreme Balance of System Hardware Cost Reductions. The DOE identified eight areas within the total BOS costs: 1) installation labor, 2) installation materials, 3) installation overhead and profit, 4) tracker, 5) permitting and commissioning, 6) site preparation, 7) land acquisition, 8) sales tax. The BOS-X funding announcement requested applications in four specific topics: Topic 1: Transformational Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) Modules Topic 2: Roof and Ground Mount Innovations Topic 3: Transformational Photovoltaic System Designs Topic 4: Development of New Wind Load Codes for PV Systems The application submitted by ARaymond Tinnerman reflected the requirements listed in Topic #2, Roof and Ground Mount Innovations. The goal of topic #2 was to develop technologies that would result in the extreme reduction of material and labor costs associated with applications that require physical connections and attachments to roof and ground mount structures. The topics researched in this project included component cost reduction, labor reduction, weight reduction, wiring innovations, and alternative material utilization. The project objectives included: 1) The development of an innovative quick snap bracket assembly that would be bonded to frameless PV modules for commercial rooftop installations. 2) The development of a composite pultruded rail to replace traditional racking materials. 3) In partnership with a roofing company, pilot the certification of a commercial roof to be solar panel compliant, eliminating the need for structural analysis and government oversight resulting in significantly decreased permitting costs. 4) Reduce the sum of all cost impacts in topic #2 from a baseline total of $2.05/watt to $.34/watt.

  18. Energy-related inventions program invention 637. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The final technical report for the Pegasus plow, a stalk and root embedding apparatus, describes progress from the development stage to the product support stage. The US Department of Agriculture - Agriculture Research Service (ARS) is now in the second year of a three year study comparing the Pegasus to conventional tillage. So far, no downside has been with the Pegasus and the following benefits have been documented: (1) Energy savings of 65.0 kilowatt hours per hectare over conventional tillage. This is when the Pegasus plow is used to bury whole stalks, and represents a 70% savings over conventional tillage (92.5 kilowatt hours per hectare). (2) Four to seven fewer passes of tillage, depending on the particular situation. This represents a substantial time savings to farmers. (3) So far, no differences in cotton yields. Recent cotton boll counts in one study indicate a higher yield potential with the Pegasus. (4) No disease problems. (5) Significantly higher levels of organic matter in the soil. A hypothesis of the study is that whole stalk burial may reduce plant disease problems. This hypothesis has not yet been proven. (6) Significantly higher levels of nitrate nitrogen. Total nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen trended higher but were not significantly different. This shows that whole stalk burial does not adversely affect the nitrogen cycle in the soil and may actually improve it. The marketing support stage of the project is also described in the report.

  19. Manzanita Hybrid Power system Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trisha Frank

    2005-03-31

    The Manzanita Indian Reservation is located in southeastern San Diego County, California. The Tribe has long recognized that the Reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit, and in 1995 the Tribe established the Manzanita Renewable Energy Office. Through the U.S. Department of Energy's Tribal Energy Program the Band received funds to install a hybrid renewable power system to provide electricity to one of the tribal community buildings, the Manzanita Activities Center (MAC building). The project began September 30, 1999 and was completed March 31, 2005. The system was designed and the equipment supplied by Northern Power Systems, Inc, an engineering company with expertise in renewable hybrid system design and development. Personnel of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory provided technical assistance in system design, and continued to provide technical assistance in system monitoring. The grid-connected renewable hybrid wind/photovoltaic system provides a demonstration of a solar/wind energy hybrid power-generating project on Manzanita Tribal land. During the system design phase, the National Renewable Energy Lab estimated that the wind turbine is expected to produce 10,000-kilowatt hours per year and the solar array 2,000-kilowatt hours per year. The hybrid system was designed to provide approximately 80 percent of the electricity used annually in the MAC building. The project proposed to demonstrate that this kind of a system design would provide highly reliable renewable power for community uses.

  20. Assessment of SEAD Global Efficiency Medals for Televisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Park, Won

    2013-01-01

    cost IND India IEA International Energy Agency kWh kilowatt-Index (EEI) A, India 5 Stars, or ENERGY STAR Version 6India (IND) star rating requirements are based on annual energy

  1. kWh Analytics: Quality Ratings for PV

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This presentation summarizes the information given during the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Technology Forum, June 13-14, 2012.

  2. Property:Incentive/PVComFitDolKWh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, searchContDiv Jump to:FundSrc Jump to:MaxInc

  3. Property:Incentive/PVNPFitDolKWh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, searchContDiv Jump to:FundSrc Jump

  4. Property:Incentive/PVResFitDolKWh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, searchContDiv Jump to:FundSrc JumpPVPbiFitMaxKW

  5. Summary Report for Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage Workshop: New Concepts and Materials for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat-Transfer Fluids, May 20, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G.

    2011-08-01

    This document summarizes a workshop on thermal energy storage for concentrating solar power (CSP) that was held in Golden, Colorado, on May 20, 2011. The event was hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. The objective was to engage the university and laboratory research communities to identify and define research directions for developing new high-temperature materials and systems that advance thermal energy storage for CSP technologies. This workshop was motivated, in part, by the DOE SunShot Initiative, which sets a very aggressive cost goal for CSP technologies -- a levelized cost of energy of 6 cents per kilowatt-hour by 2020 with no incentives or credits.

  6. An Overview of Geothermal Development in Tiwi and Mak-Ban, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raasch, G.D.

    1980-12-16

    Commercial-scale geothermal development in the Philippines began i n 1972 with the completion of the discovery well in the southeastern portion of Luzon Island. A second geothermal anomaly was discovered i n 1975 on the southern flank of Mt . Makiling, forty miles south of Manila. Both fields are being developed and operated by Philippine Geothermal, Inc. (PGI) , a wholly-owned subsidiary of Union Oil Company of California. Currently the Philippines ranks second worldwide in installed geothermal-powered electrical generation capacity with 443 MW and PGI has developed 440 PW of the 443 MW country total. Additional generation capacity is planned or under construction in both fields. Over 1.9 billion kilowatt-hours of electrical power have been produced to date. This represents a savings of approximately three million barrels of imported fuel oil for power generation.

  7. Industrial demand side management: A status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, M.F.; Conger, R.L.; Foley, T.J.

    1995-05-01

    This report provides an overview of and rationale for industrial demand side management (DSM) programs. Benefits and barriers are described, and data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey are used to estimate potential energy savings in kilowatt hours. The report presents types and examples of programs and explores elements of successful programs. Two in-depth case studies (from Boise Cascade and Eli Lilly and Company) illustrate two types of effective DSM programs. Interviews with staff from state public utility commissions indicate the current thinking about the status and future of industrial DSM programs. A comprehensive bibliography is included, technical assistance programs are listed and described, and a methodology for evaluating potential or actual savings from projects is delineated.

  8. Soluble Lead Flow Battery: Soluble Lead Flow Battery Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    GRIDS Project: General Atomics is developing a flow battery technology based on chemistry similar to that used in the traditional lead-acid battery found in nearly every car on the road today. Flow batteries store energy in chemicals that are held in tanks outside the battery. When the energy is needed, the chemicals are pumped through the battery. Using the same basic chemistry as a traditional battery but storing its energy outside of the cell allows for the use of very low cost materials. The goal is to develop a system that is far more durable than today’s lead-acid batteries, can be scaled to deliver megawatts of power, and which lowers the cost of energy storage below $100 per kilowatt hour.

  9. Solar central receiver systems comparative economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eicker, P J

    1980-04-01

    Several major conceptual design studies of solar central receiver systems and components have been completed in the last year. The results of these studies are used to compare the projected cost of electric power generation using central receiver systems with that of more conventional power generation. The cost estimate for a molten salt central receiver system is given. Levelized busbar energy cost is shown as a function of annual capacity factor indicating the fraction of the cost due to each of the subsystems. The estimated levelized busbar energy cost for a central receiver (70 to 90 mills per kilowatt hour) is compared with the levelized busbar energy cost for a new coal fired Rankine cycle plant. Sensitivities to the initial cost of coal and the delta fuel escalation are shown. (WHK)

  10. Cost-Effective Silicon Wafers for Solar Cells: Direct Wafer Enabling Terawatt Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: 1366 is developing a process to reduce the cost of solar electricity by up to 50% by 2020—from $0.15 per kilowatt hour to less than $0.07. 1366’s process avoids the costly step of slicing a large block of silicon crystal into wafers, which turns half the silicon to dust. Instead, the company is producing thin wafers directly from molten silicon at industry-standard sizes, and with efficiencies that compare favorably with today’s state-of-the-art technologies. 1366’s wafers could directly replace wafers currently on the market, so there would be no interruptions to the delivery of these products to market. As a result of 1366’s technology, the cost of silicon wafers could be reduced by 80%.

  11. Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Battery: Hydrogen Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: LBNL is designing a flow battery for grid storage that relies on a hydrogen-bromine chemistry which could be more efficient, last longer and cost less than today’s lead-acid batteries. Flow batteries are fundamentally different from traditional lead-acid batteries because the chemical reactants that provide their energy are stored in external tanks instead of inside the battery. A flow battery can provide more energy because all that is required to increase its storage capacity is to increase the size of the external tanks. The hydrogen-bromine reactants used by LBNL in its flow battery are inexpensive, long lasting, and provide power quickly. The cost of the design could be well below $100 per kilowatt hour, which would rival conventional grid-scale battery technologies.

  12. Electric power monthly, September 1996, with data for June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  13. Electric power monthly: April 1996, with data for January 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 64 tabs.

  14. Electric power monthly, July 1999, with data for April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-01

    The Electric Power Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM). This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 1 fig., 64 tabs.

  15. Electric power monthly, December 1996 with data for September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The report presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  16. Design of cascaded low cost solar cell with CuO substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samson, Mil'shtein; Anup, Pillai; Shiv, Sharma; Garo, Yessayan

    2013-12-04

    For many years the main focus of R and D in solar cells was the development of high-efficiency solar convertors. However with solar technology beginning to be a part of national grids and stand-alone power supplies for variety of individual customers, the emphasis has changed, namely, the cost per kilowatt- hour (kW-hr) started to be an important figure of merit. Although Si does dominate the market of solar convertors, this material has total cost of kilowatt-hour much higher than what the power grid is providing presently to customers. It is well known that the cost of raw semiconductor material is a major factor in formulation of the final cost of a solar cell. That motivated us to search and design a novel solar cell using cheap materials. The new p-i-n solar cell consists of hetero-structure cascade of materials with step by step decreasing energy gap. Since the lattice constant of these three materials do differ not more than 2%, the more expensive epitaxial fabrication methods can be used as well. It should be emphasized that designed solar cell is not a cascade of three solar cells connected in series. Our market study shows that Si solar panel which costs $250–400 / m{sup 2} leads to a cost of $0.12–0.30 / kW-hr. To the contrary, CuO based solar cells with Cadmium compounds on top, would cost $100 / m{sup 2}. This will allow the novel solar cell to produce electricity at a cost of $0.06–0.08 / kW-hr.

  17. NREL Establishes a 1.5-MW Wind Turbine Test Platform for Research Partnerships (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) have worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and industry partners to advance wind energy technology, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic increases in performance and drops in the cost of wind energy-from $0.80 per kilowatt-hour to between $0.06 and $0.08 per kilowatt-hour-the goal of the DOE Wind Program is to further increase performance and reduce the cost of energy for land-based systems so that wind energy can compete with natural gas by 2020. In support of the program's research and development (R and D) efforts, NREL has constructed state-of-the-art facilities at the NWTC where industry partners, universities, and other DOE laboratories can conduct tests and experiments to further advance wind technology. The latest facility to come online is the DOE-GE 1.5-MW wind turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC in 2009. Since then, NREL engineers have extensively instrumented the machine, conducted power performance and full-system modal tests, and collected structural loads measurements to obtain baseline characterization of the turbine's power curve, vibration characteristics, and fatigue loads in the uniquely challenging NWTC inflow environment. By successfully completing a baseline for the turbine's performance and structural response, NREL engineers have established a test platform that can be used by industry, university, and DOE laboratory researchers to test wind turbine control systems and components. The new test platform will also enable researchers to acquire the measurements needed to develop and validate wind turbine models and improve design codes.

  18. Trace elements in coal by glow discharge mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, M.L.; Wilson, C.R.; Pestovich, J. Jr.

    1995-08-01

    A need and a demand exist for determining trace elements in coal and coal related by-products, especially those elements which may potentially be a health hazard. The provisions of the 1990 clean air act require that the EPA evaluate the emissions of electric utilities for trace elements and other potentially hazardous organic compounds. The coal fired electric utility industry supplies roughly 60% of the total generating capacity of 2,882,525 million kilowatt hours (nearly 3 trillion kilowatt hours) generated in the U.S. This is accomplished by 414 power plants scattered across the country that burned 813,508,000 short tons of coal in 1993. The relative volatility of some inorganic constituents in coal makes them more prone to be emitted to the atmosphere following combustion. The production of analytical data for trace elements is known to be a difficult task in coal and by-products of coal combustion (fly ash, bottom ash, gas streams, etc.), in terms of both sample collection and analytical determinations. There are several common analytical methods available to the analyst to determine trace elements in coal and coal by-products. In general analytical germs, the material to be analyzed can be totally solubilized (or extracted), or the elements analytes can be determined in the material as a solid. A relatively new elemental technique, Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry (GDMS) can be used with solids as well. This new analytical technique had never before been applied directly to coal. The radio frequency-glow discharge quadropole mass spectrometer was used to analyze coal directly for the first time ever by rf-GDMS. The rf-GDMS technique is described.

  19. City of Phoenix - Energize Phoenix Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laloudakis, Dimitrios J.

    2014-09-29

    Energize Phoenix (EPHX) was designed as an ambitious, large-scale, three-year pilot program to provide energy efficiency upgrades in buildings, along Phoenix’s new Light Rail Corridor – part of a federal effort to reduce energy consumption and stimulate job growth, while simultaneously reducing the country’s carbon footprint and promoting a shift towards a green economy. The program was created through a 2010 competitive grant awarded to the City of Phoenix who managed the program in partnership with Arizona State University (ASU), the state’s largest university, and Arizona Public Service (APS), the state’s largest electricity provider. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 provided $25M in funding for the EPHX program. The Light Rail Corridor runs through the heart of downtown Phoenix, making most high-rise and smaller commercial buildings eligible to participate in the EPHX program, along with a diverse mix of single and multi-family residential buildings. To ensure maximum impact and deeper market penetration, Energize Phoenix was subdivided into three unique parts: i. commercial rebate program, ii. commercial financing program, and iii. residential program Each component was managed by the City of Phoenix in partnership with APS. Phoenix was fortunate to partner with APS, which already operated robust commercial and residential rebate programs within its service territory. Phoenix tapped into the existing utility contractor network, provided specific training to over 100 contracting firms, and leveraged the APS rebate program structure (energy efficiency funding) to launch the EPHX commercial and residential rebate programs. The commercial finance program was coordinated and managed through a contract with National Bank of Arizona, NBAZ, which also provided project capital leveraging EPHX finance funds. Working in unison, approved contractors jointly produced more than 161,000 labor hours in pursuit of EPHX goals over the life of the project. Labor hours were spread among electricians, heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) technicians, marketing professionals, engineers, sales, and administrative support staff across the approved contractor workforce. Program participants received both the utility rebate along with the EPHX rebate, and depending on project size and utility rebate structure some projects resulted in low to no-cost upgrades for customers. Phoenix also partnered with ASU, a grant sub-recipient, to leverage the institution’s expertise in research and data analysis. In this partnership, ASU accepted marketing responsibilities for the grant and partnered with DRA Communications (DRA), a Phoenix-based marketing firm, to create and communicate the message out to the marketplace. The EPHX program has completed its energy upgrade activities. A review of the work completed by ASU revealed that the EPHX program substantially exceeded the program’s stated goals by retrofitting/upgrading over 33 million sq ft of commercial space (30 million sq ft goal exceeded by 11%) and 2,014 residential units (1,700 unit goal exceeded by 18%) along the Light Rail Corridor. The program helped stimulate economic growth by adding $31million to the local economy and enhanced an already robust energy efficiency contractor network. This contractor network will continue to promote utility energy incentives to sustain energy efficiency upgrade activities in the future. Finally, EPHX helped reduce participants annual energy consumption by 135 million kilowatt-hour (kWh) translating into over $12.5 million of annual energy cost avoidance for the community. This also resulted in projected payback period of 4.5 years for total investment by all parties and reduced greenhouse gas emissions by over 95,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e).

  20. Elk Valley Rancheria Energy Efficiency and Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ed Wait, Elk Valley Rancheria; Frank Ziano & Associates, Inc.

    2011-11-30

    Elk Valley Rancheria; Tribe; renewable energy; energy options analysis. The Elk Valley Rancheria, California ('Tribe') is a federally recognized Indian tribe located in Del Norte County, California, in the northwestern corner of California. The Tribe, its members and Tribal enterprises are challenged by increasing energy costs and undeveloped local energy resources. The Tribe currently lacks an energy program. The Tribal government lacked sufficient information to make informed decisions about potential renewable energy resources, energy alternatives and other energy management issues. To meet this challenge efficiently, the Tribe contracted with Frank Zaino and Associates, Inc. to help become more energy self-sufficient, by reducing their energy costs and promoting energy alternatives that stimulate economic development. Frank Zaino & Associates, Inc. provided a high level economic screening analysis based on anticipated electric and natural gas rates. This was in an effort to determine which alternative energy system will performed at a higher level so the Tribe could reduce their energy model by 30% from alternative fuel sources. The feasibility study will identify suitable energy alternatives and conservation methods that will benefit the Tribe and tribal community through important reductions in cost. The lessons learned from these conservation efforts will yield knowledge that will serve a wider goal of executing energy efficiency measures and practices in Tribal residences and business facilities. Pacific Power is the provider of electrical power to the four properties under review at $ 0.08 per Kilowatt-hour (KWH). This is a very low energy cost compared to alternative energy sources. The Tribe used baseline audits to assess current and historic energy usage at four Rancheria owned facilities. Past electric and gas billing statements were retained for review for the four buildings that will be audited. A comparative assessment of the various energy usages will determine the demand, forecast future need and identify the differences in energy costs, narrowing the focus of the work and defining its scope. The Tribe's peak demand periods will help determine the scope of need for alternative energy sources. The Tribe's Energy Efficiency and Alternatives Analysis report included several system investigations which include fuel cells, wind turbines, solar panels, hydro electric, ground source heat pumps, bio mass, cogeneration & energy conservation and implementation for the existing properties. The energy analysis included site visits to collect and analyze historical energy usage and cost. The analysis also included the study of the building systems for the Elk Valley Casino, Elk Valley Rancheria administration complex, United Indian Health Service/Small Community Center complex and the Tribal Gaming Commission Offices. The analysis involved identifying modifications, performing an engineering economic analysis, preparation of a rank ordered list of modifications and preparation of a report to provide recommendations and actions for the Tribe to implement.

  1. Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling TechnologY (KRUSTY) Demonstration...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the flight unit to be used by NASA to execute a deep space exploration mission. The reactor design will include heat pipes coupled to Stirling engines to demonstrate how one...

  2. Five Kilowatt Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Diesel Reformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson

    2008-12-31

    Reducing fossil fuel consumption both for energy security and for reduction in global greenhouse emissions has been a major goal of energy research in the US for many years. Fuel cells have been proposed as a technology that can address both these issues--as devices that convert the energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy, they offer low emissions and high efficiencies. These advantages are of particular interest to remote power users, where grid connected power is unavailable, and most electrical power comes from diesel electric generators. Diesel fuel is the fuel of choice because it can be easily transported and stored in quantities large enough to supply energy for small communities for extended periods of time. This projected aimed to demonstrate the operation of a solid oxide fuel cell on diesel fuel, and to measure the resulting efficiency. Results from this project have been somewhat encouraging, with a laboratory breadboard integration of a small scale diesel reformer and a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell demonstrated in the first 18 months of the project. This initial demonstration was conducted at INEEL in the spring of 2005 using a small scale diesel reformer provided by SOFCo and a fuel cell provided by Acumentrics. However, attempts to integrate and automate the available technology have not proved successful as yet. This is due both to the lack of movement on the fuel processing side as well as the rather poor stack lifetimes exhibited by the fuel cells. Commercial product is still unavailable, and precommercial devices are both extremely expensive and require extensive field support.

  3. Five Kilowatt Fuel Cell Demonstration for Remote Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Witmer; Tom Johnson; Jack Schmid

    2008-12-31

    While most areas of the US are serviced by inexpensive, dependable grid connected electrical power, many areas of Alaska are not. In these areas, electrical power is provided with Diesel Electric Generators (DEGs), at much higher cost than in grid connected areas. The reasons for the high cost of power are many, including the high relative cost of diesel fuel delivered to the villages, the high operational effort required to maintain DEGs, and the reverse benefits of scale for small utilities. Recent progress in fuel cell technologies have lead to the hope that the DEGs could be replaced with a more efficient, reliable, environmentally friendly source of power in the form of fuel cells. To this end, the University of Alaska Fairbanks has been engaged in testing early fuel cell systems since 1998. Early tests were conducted on PEM fuel cells, but since 2001, the focus has been on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. In this work, a 5 kW fuel cell was delivered to UAF from Fuel Cell Technologies of Kingston, Ontario. The cell stack is of a tubular design, and was built by Siemens Westinghouse Fuel Cell division. This stack achieved a run of more than 1 year while delivering grid quality electricity from natural gas with virtually no degradation and at an electrical efficiency of nearly 40%. The project was ended after two control system failures resulted in system damage. While this demonstration was successful, considerable additional product development is required before this technology is able to provide electrical energy in remote Alaska. The major issue is cost, and the largest component of system cost currently is the fuel cell stack cost, although the cost of the balance of plant is not insignificant. While several manufactures are working on schemes for significant cost reduction, these systems do not as yet provide the same level of performance and reliability as the larger scale Siemens systems, or levels that would justify commercial deployment.

  4. Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling TechnologY (KRUSTY) Demonstration. CEDT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy of aerosols in(JournalTechnicalConnect KPiXSciTechPhase 1

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: 88 Kilowatt Automotive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobsAdvanced Engine Combustion SimulationDepartment ofInverter

  6. Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling TechnologY (KRUSTY) Demonstration. CEDT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand Cubic Feet) SoldDepartmentGOES-10PV GridPhase 1 Preliminary

  7. Electric rate that shifts hourly may foretell spot-market kWh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, N.

    1985-11-25

    Four California industrial plants have cut their electricity bills up to 16% by shifting from the traditional time-of-use rates to an experimental real-time program (RTP) that varies prices hourly. The users receive a price schedule reflecting changing generating costs one day in advance to encourage them to increase power consumption during the cheapest time periods. Savings during the pilot program range between $11,000 and $32,000 per customer. The hourly cost breakdown encourages consumption during the night and early morning. The signalling system could be expanded to cogenerators and independent small power producers. If an electricity spot market develops, forecasters think a place on the stock exchanges for future-delivery contracts could develop in the future.

  8. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2AirCompressors | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,InformationAwardeeEnergy Information

  9. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2CirculationFans | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,InformationAwardeeEnergy InformationEnergy

  10. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2ElctrcEngineHeaters | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,InformationAwardeeEnergy InformationEnergyEnergy

  11. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2ElctrcHeating | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,InformationAwardeeEnergy

  12. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2HeatPumps | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,InformationAwardeeEnergyInformation HeatPumps

  13. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2LargeComputersServers |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,InformationAwardeeEnergyInformationOpen Energy

  14. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2LargeKitchens | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,InformationAwardeeEnergyInformationOpen

  15. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Laundry | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly

  16. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Misc | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformation Misc Jump to: navigation, search This is a property

  17. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Pcs | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformation Misc Jump to: navigation, search This is a

  18. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Printers | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformation Misc Jump to: navigation, search This is

  19. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Pumps | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformation Misc Jump to: navigation, search This

  20. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Total | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformation Misc Jump to: navigation, search

  1. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergy Information DigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation,

  2. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DstrtHeating | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergy Information DigesterLandfillGas Jump to:

  3. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrcHeating | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergy Information DigesterLandfillGas Jump to:Information

  4. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrtyTotal | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergy Information DigesterLandfillGas Jump

  5. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Oil-FiredBoiler | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergy Information DigesterLandfillGas JumpInformation

  6. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Other | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergy Information DigesterLandfillGas

  7. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2OtherElctrty | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergy Information DigesterLandfillGasInformation

  8. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Pellets | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergy Information

  9. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Total | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergy InformationInformation Total Jump to: navigation,

  10. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2WoodChips | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. PROJECT PROFILE: kWh Analytics (Incubator 10) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergy EEREPlateauFolsom LabsSunPower (IncubatorSunrunkWh

  12. Economizer Based Data Center Liquid Cooling with Advanced Metal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Chainer

    2012-11-30

    A new chiller-less data center liquid cooling system utilizing the outside air environment has been shown to achieve up to 90% reduction in cooling energy compared to traditional chiller based data center cooling systems. The system removes heat from Volume servers inside a Sealed Rack and transports the heat using a liquid loop to an Outdoor Heat Exchanger which rejects the heat to the outdoor ambient environment. The servers in the rack are cooled using a hybrid cooling system by removing the majority of the heat generated by the processors and memory by direct thermal conduction using coldplates and the heat generated by the remaining components using forced air convection to an air- to- liquid heat exchanger inside the Sealed Rack. The anticipated benefits of such energy-centric configurations are significant energy savings at the data center level. When compared to a traditional 10 MW data center, which typically uses 25% of its total data center energy consumption for cooling this technology could potentially enable a cost savings of up to $800,000-$2,200,000/year (assuming electricity costs of 4 to 11 cents per kilowatt-hour) through the reduction in electrical energy usage.

  13. Regulatory Considerations Associated with the Expanded Adoption of Distributed Solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; McLaren, J.; Heeter, J.; Linvill, C.; Shenot, J.; Sedano, R.; Migden-Ostrander, J.

    2013-11-01

    Increased adoption of distributed PV, and other forms of distributed generation, have the potential to affect utility-customer interactions, system costs recovery, and utility revenue streams. If a greater number of electricity customers choose to self-generate, demand for system power will decrease and utility fixed costs will have to be recovered over fewer kilowatt hours of sales. As such, regulators will need to determine the value and cost of additional distributed PV and determine the appropriate allocation of the costs and benefits among consumers. The potential for new business models to emerge also has implications for regulation and rate structures that ensure equitable solutions for all electricity grid users. This report examines regulatory tools and rate designs for addressing emerging issues with the expanded adoption of distributed PV and evaluates the potential effectiveness and viability of these options going forward. It offers the groundwork needed in order for regulators to explore mechanisms and ensure that utilities can collect sufficient revenues to provide reliable electric service, cover fixed costs, and balance cost equity among ratepayers -- while creating a value proposition for customers to adopt distributed PV.

  14. Hydroelectric power in Hawaii: a reconnaissance survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-02-01

    The major conclusion of this study is that hydropower resources in the State of Hawaii are substantial, and they offer the potential for major increases in hydropower generating capacity. Hydropower resources on all islands total about 50 megawatts of potential generating capacity. Combined with the 18 megawatts of existing hydropower capacity, hydropower resources potentially could generate about 307 million kilowatt-hours of electric energy annually. This represents about 28% of the present combined electricity needs of the Neighbor Islands - Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and the Big Island. Hydropower resources on Kauai equal 72% of that island's electricity needs; on Molokai, 40%; on the Big Island, 20%; and on Maui, 18%. The island of Oahu, however, has only small hydropower resources, and could only generate a negligible portion of its electricity needs from this energy source. Existing and future (potential) hydropower capacities are summarized, and annual outputs for each island are estimated. Future hydropower facilities are subdivided into two categories, which show how much of the potential capacity is being actively considered for development, and how much is only tentatively proposed at the time.

  15. Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) offers a utility-scale, firm, dispatchable renewable energy option that can help meet the nation's goal of making solar energy cost competitive with other energy sources by the end of the decade. The DOE SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national initiative to make solar energy technologies cost-competitive with other forms of energy by reducing the cost of solar energy systems by about 75% by the end of the decade. Reducing the total installed cost for utility-scale solar electricity to roughly 6 cents per kilowatt hour without subsidies will result in rapid, large-scale adoption of solar electricity across the United States. Reaching this goal will re-establish American technological leadership, improve the nation's energy security, and strengthen U.S. economic competitiveness in the global clean energy race. SunShot will work to bring down the full cost of solar - including the costs of solar cells and installation by focusing on four main pillars: (1) Technologies for solar cells and arrays that convert sunlight to energy; (2) Electronics that optimize the performance of the installation; (3) Improvements in the efficiency of solar manufacturing processes; and (4) Installation, design, and permitting for solar energy systems.

  16. Status of flow-battery research in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, R.P.; Chamberlin, J.L.; Saxton, H.J.; Symons, P.C.

    1982-01-01

    Flow batteries are defined as electrochemical energy storage devices in which at least one of the active materials is stored external to the power converting cell-stack, and in which this soluble active material is circulated via the electrolyte, through the cell-stack during system charge or discharge. Although intensive development of some of these systems has been underway for some time, they were only classified as a distinct category in the United States recently. Of the projects on flow batteries which are still being conducted, the work on the zinc/chlorine system (EDA) has been in progress since 1968; programs on zinc/bromine (Exxon, Gould), on iron/chromium Redox (NASA-Lewis Research Center), and on the iron/ferric-ferrous chloride system (NRG/GEL) have all been underway about seven years; research on the zinc/ferro-ferricyanide battery (Lockheed) has been conducted since 1978. The present paper, which reviews the 1982 status of these battery programs, appears timely since, except for the Lockheed system, the developments have all reached the stage where multi-kilowatt-hour batteries are under test.

  17. Market Transformation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Through the SunShot Initiative, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) works with manufacturers, communities, states, utilities, and other partners to enable the solar market by reducing non-hardware balance-of-system (BOS) costs, developing a skilled workforce, and eliminating market barriers to widespread adoption of solar technologies. The DOE SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national initiative to make solar energy technologies cost-competitive with other forms of energy by reducing the cost of solar energy systems by about 75% by the end of the decade. Reducing the total installed cost for utility-scale solar electricity to roughly 6 cents per kilowatt hour without subsidies will result in rapid, large-scale adoption of solar electricity across the United States. Reaching this goal will re-establish American technological leadership, improve the nation's energy security, and strengthen U.S. economic competitiveness in the global clean energy race. SunShot will work to bring down the full cost of solar - including the costs of solar cells and installation by focusing on four main pillars: (1) Technologies for solar cells and arrays that convert sunlight to energy; (2) Electronics that optimize the performance of the installation; (3) Improvements in the efficiency of solar manufacturing processes; and (4) Installation, design, and permitting for solar energy systems.

  18. Proceedings of the workshop on cool building materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Fishman, B.; Frohnsdorff, G.

    1994-04-01

    The Option 9, Cool Communities, of the Clinton-Gore Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) calls for mobilizing community and corporate resources to strategically plant trees and lighten the surfaces of buildings and roads in order to reduce cooling energy use of the buildings. It is estimated that Cool Communities Project will potentially save over 100 billion kilowatt-hour of energy per year corresponding to 27 million tons of carbon per year by the year 2015. To pursue the CCAP`s objectives, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on behalf of the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency, in cooperation with the Building and Fire Research Laboratory of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), organized a one-day meeting to (1) explore the need for developing a national plan to assess the technical feasibility and commercial potential of high-albedo (``cool``) building materials, and if appropriate, to (2) outline a course of action for developing the plan. The meeting took place on February 28, 1994, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The proceedings of the conference, Cool Building Materials, includes the minutes of the conference and copies of presentation materials distributed by the conference participants.

  19. Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 1, Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuchi, M.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

  20. Is combustion of plastics desirable?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piasecki, B.; Rainey, D.; Fletcher, K.

    1998-07-01

    Managing waste will always entail some tradeoffs. All of the three options--recycling, landfilling and combustion--have some disadvantages. Even landfilling, which produces no emissions, fails to take advantage of the energy value inherent in plastic. Waste combustion, on the other hand, recovers the energy in plastic materials and reduces the volume of disposed solid waste by up to 90% of its initial preburn volumes. However, this management option generates emissions and produces an ash residue that must be managed. As demonstrated by recent test burns, improvements in combustion and air-pollution-control technology have dramatically reduced the health risks from emissions and ash. Recent studies have shown that plastics--in quantities even higher than those normally found in municipal solid waste--do not adversely affect levels of emissions or the quality of ash from waste-to-energy facilities. In addition, waste-to-energy facilities may be a relatively economical source of fuel, and may be a more economic solution to waste management than the other available options. A waste-to-energy plant generally produces electricity that is sold to the electric utilities for approximately six cents per kilowatt-hour, a rate that is competitive with those offered by nuclear power plants and power plants that generate energy by burning fossil fuels.

  1. Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Energy and environmental impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Folga, S.; Gillette, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of the total steam electric generating capacity in the United States operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. No evidence exists that Section 316(a) variances have caused any widespread environmental problems. Conversion from once-through cooling to cooling towers would result in a loss of plant output of 14.7-23.7 billion kilowatt-hours. The cost to make up the lost energy is estimated at $12.8-$23.7 billion (in 1992 dollars). Conversion to cooling towers would increase emission of pollutants to the atmosphere and water loss through evaporation. The second report describes alternatives available to plants that currently operate under the variance and estimates the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Little justification has been found for removing the 316(a) variance from the CWA.

  2. A guide to geothermal energy and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kagel, Alyssa; Bates, Diana; Gawell, Karl

    2005-04-22

    Geothermal energy, defined as heat from the Earth, is a statute-recognized renewable resource. The first U.S. geothermal power plant, opened at The Geysers in California in 1960, continues to operate successfully. The United States, as the world's largest producer of geothermal electricity, generates an average of 15 billion kilowatt hours of power per year, comparable to burning close to 25 million barrels of oil or 6 million short tons of coal per year. Geothermal has a higher capacity factor (a measure of the amount of real time during which a facility is used) than many other power sources. Unlike wind and solar resources, which are more dependent upon weather fluctuations and climate changes, geothermal resources are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. While the carrier medium for geothermal electricity (water) must be properly managed, the source of geothermal energy, the Earth's heat, will be available indefinitely. A geothermal resource assessment shows that nine western states together have the potential to provide over 20 percent of national electricity needs. Although geothermal power plants, concentrated in the West, provide the third largest domestic source of renewable electricity after hydropower and biomass, they currently produce less than one percent of total U.S. electricity.

  3. Assessing the Battery Cost at Which Plug-In Hybrid Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Vehicles Become Cost-Effective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramroth, L. A.; Gonder, J. D.; Brooker, A. D.

    2013-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) validated diesel-conventional and diesel-hybrid medium-duty parcel delivery vehicle models to evaluate petroleum reductions and cost implications of hybrid and plug-in hybrid diesel variants. The hybrid and plug-in hybrid variants are run on a field data-derived design matrix to analyze the effect of drive cycle, distance, engine downsizing, battery replacements, and battery energy on fuel consumption and lifetime cost. For an array of diesel fuel costs, the battery cost per kilowatt-hour at which the hybridized configuration becomes cost-effective is calculated. This builds on a previous analysis that found the fuel savings from medium duty plug-in hybrids more than offset the vehicles' incremental price under future battery and fuel cost projections, but that they seldom did so under present day cost assumptions in the absence of purchase incentives. The results also highlight the importance of understanding the application's drive cycle specific daily distance and kinetic intensity.

  4. Assessing geothermal energy potential in upstate New York. Final report, Tasks 1, 3, and 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manger, K.C.

    1996-07-25

    New York State`s geothermal energy potential was evaluated based on a new resource assessment performed by the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY-Buffalo) and currently commercial technologies, many of which have become available since New York`s potential was last evaluated. General background on geothermal energy and technologies was provided. A life-cycle cost analysis was performed to evaluate the economics of using geothermal energy to generate electricity in upstate New York. A conventional rankine cycle, binary power system was selected for the economic evaluation, based on SUNY-Buffalo`s resource assessment. Binary power systems are the most technologically suitable for upstate New York`s resources and have the added advantage of being environmentally attractive. Many of the potential environmental impacts associated with geothermal energy are not an issue in binary systems because the geothermal fluids are contained in a closed-loop and used solely to heat a working fluid that is then used to generate the electricity Three power plant sizes were selected based on geologic data supplied by SUNY-Buffalo. The hypothetical power plants were designed as 5 MW modular units and sized at 5 MW, 10 MW and 15 MW. The life-cycle cost analysis suggested that geothermal electricity in upstate New York, using currently commercial technology, will probably cost between 14 and 18 cents per kilowatt-hour.

  5. Energy efficiency of electric vehicles at the 1994 American Tour de Sol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quong, S.; Duoba, M.; Buitrago, C.; LeBlanc, N.; Larsen, R.

    1994-11-01

    In 1994, the US Department of Energy, through Argonne National Laboratory`s Center for Transportation Research, sponsored energy-efficiency data collection from student, private, and professional electric vehicles during the American Tour de Sol (ATdS). The ATDS is a multiple-day road rally event, from New York City to Philadelphia. During each leg of the event, kilowatt-hour meters measured the efficiency of the electric vehicles (EVs), which averaged from 5.68 to 65.74 km/kWh. In addition to daily energy-usage measurements, some vehicles used a data-acquisition unit to collect second-by-second information. This showed, in one case, that 21% of the total energy was captured in regenerative braking. Some of the vehicles were also tested on a dynamometer for energy-efficiency, acceleration, and steady-state power ratings. This paper also compares the energy efficiency of the vehicles during the road rally to the dynamometer results. In almost all vehicles, there was an increase in energy efficiency when the vehicle was traveling over the road, due to the non-transient duty cycle and efficient driving techniques. The dynamometer testing also showed that some EVs are equal to or better than gasoline vehicles in performance and efficiency.

  6. Electric power monthly, May 1999, with data for February 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 64 tabs.

  7. White Paper Powering Sustainable Low-Carbon Economies: Some Fact and Figures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilles J. Youinou

    2015-04-01

    In 2011, the world production of electricity was about 22.1 trillion kilowatt-hour1 (kWhe): 9.1 from coal, 4.8 from gas, 2.6 from nuclear, 1.1 from oil, 3.5 from hydropower and 1.0 from other sources (geothermal, solar, wind, biofuels). With a world population of about 7 billion in 2011, it corresponds to an average of 3,160 kWhe/year/capita. While most industrialized countries enjoy a high standard of living with, at least, 8,000 kWhe per year and per person, most developing countries live with less than 3,000 kWhe per year per person. The need for electricity is growing fast, especially in developing countries, and by 2040 the world production of electricity is projected to reach about 40 trillion kWhe.2 Assuming a world population of 10 billion and an average consumption of 6,000 kWhe per year per person in 2100 the world annual production of electricity could reach 60 trillion kWhe.

  8. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2011. In FY 2011, Southwestern delivered over 4.1 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas, generating $167 million in revenue. In fulfilling its mission to market and reliably deliver renewable Federal hydroelectric power, Southwestern maintains 1,380 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites, contributing to the reliability of the regional and National electric grid. Southwestern also actively partners with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern’s customers, and other Federal power stakeholders to most effectively balance their diverse interests with Southwestern’s mission while continuing to maximize Federal assets to repay the Federal investment in the 24 hydropower facilities within Southwestern’s marketing region. Southwestern is proud of its past successes, and we look forward to continuing to serve the Nation’s energy needs in the future. Sincerely, Christopher M. Turner Administrator

  9. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    Dear Secretary Moniz: I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2012. In FY 2012, Southwestern delivered over 4.1 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas, generating $195 million in revenue. In fulfilling its mission to market and reliably deliver renewable Federal hydroelectric power, Southwestern maintains 1,380 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites, contributing to the reliability of the regional and National electric grid. Southwestern also actively partners with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern’s customers, and other Federal power stakeholders to most effectively balance their diverse interests with Southwestern’s mission while continuing to maximize Federal assets to repay the Federal investment in the 24 hydropower facilities within Southwestern’s marketing region. Southwestern is proud of its past successes, and we look forward to continuing to serve the Nation’s energy needs in the future. Sincerely, Christopher M. Turner Administrator

  10. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. In FY 2010, Southwestern delivered nearly 7.6 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Texas, and Oklahoma, generating $189 million in revenue. In fulfilling its mission to market and reliably deliver renewable Federal hydroelectric power, Southwestern maintains 1,380 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites, contributing to the reliability of the regional and National electric grid. Southwestern also actively partners with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern’s customers, and other Federal power stakeholders to most effectively balance their diverse interests with Southwestern’s mission while continuing to maximize Federal assets to repay the Federal investment in the 24 hydropower facilities within Southwestern’s marketing region. Southwestern is proud of its past successes, and we look forward to continuing to serve the Nation’s energy needs in the future. Sincerely, Christopher M. Turner Administrator

  11. Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Marilyn; Akbari, Hashem; Blumstein, Carl; Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard; Calwell, Chris; Carter, Sheryl; Cavanagh, Ralph; Chang, Audrey; Claridge, David; Craig, Paul; Diamond, Rick; Eto, Joseph H.; Fulkerson, William; Gadgil, Ashok; Geller, Howard; Goldemberg, Jose; Goldman, Chuck; Goldstein, David B.; Greenberg, Steve; Hafemeister, David; Harris, Jeff; Harvey, Hal; Heitz, Eric; Hirst, Eric; Hummel, Holmes; Kammen, Dan; Kelly, Henry; Laitner, Skip; Levine, Mark; Lovins, Amory; Masters, Gil; McMahon, James E.; Meier, Alan; Messenger, Michael; Millhone, John; Mills, Evan; Nadel, Steve; Nordman, Bruce; Price, Lynn; Romm, Joe; Ross, Marc; Rufo, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant; Schipper, Lee; Schneider, Stephen H; Sweeney, James L; Verdict, Malcolm; Vorsatz, Diana; Wang, Devra; Weinberg, Carl; Wilk, Richard; Wilson, John; Worrell, Ernst

    2009-03-01

    The growing investment by governments and electric utilities in energy efficiency programs highlights the need for simple tools to help assess and explain the size of the potential resource. One technique that is commonly used in this effort is to characterize electricity savings in terms of avoided power plants, because it is easier for people to visualize a power plant than it is to understand an abstraction such as billions of kilowatt-hours. Unfortunately, there is no standardization around the characteristics of such power plants. In this letter we define parameters for a standard avoided power plant that have physical meaning and intuitive plausibility, for use in back-of-the-envelope calculations. For the prototypical plant this article settles on a 500 MW existing coal plant operating at a 70percent capacity factor with 7percent T&D losses. Displacing such a plant for one year would save 3 billion kW h per year at the meter and reduce emissions by 3 million metric tons of CO2 per year. The proposed name for this metric is the Rosenfeld, in keeping with the tradition among scientists of naming units in honor of the person most responsible for the discovery and widespread adoption of the underlying scientific principle in question--Dr. Arthur H. Rosenfeld.

  12. Accelerating Acceptance of Fuel Cell Backup Power Systems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrecky, James; Ashley, Christopher

    2014-07-21

    Since 2001, Plug Power has installed more than 800 stationary fuel cell systems worldwide. Plug Power’s prime power systems have produced approximately 6.5 million kilowatt hours of electricity and have accumulated more than 2.5 million operating hours. Intermittent, or backup, power products have been deployed with telecommunications carriers and government and utility customers in North and South America, Europe, the United Kingdom, Japan and South Africa. Some of the largest material handling operations in North America are currently using the company’s motive power units in fuel cell-powered forklifts for their warehouses, distribution centers and manufacturing facilities. The low-temperature GenSys fuel cell system provides remote, off-grid and primary power where grid power is unreliable or nonexistent. Built reliable and designed rugged, low- temperature GenSys delivers continuous or backup power through even the most extreme conditions. Coupled with high-efficiency ratings, low-temperature GenSys reduces operating costs making it an economical solution for prime power requirements. Currently, field trials at telecommunication and industrial sites across the globe are proving the advantages of fuel cells—lower maintenance, fuel costs and emissions, as well as longer life—compared with traditional internal combustion engines.

  13. Fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon. Phase I final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennel, E.B.; Zondlo, J.W.; Cessna, T.J.

    1999-06-30

    This project involves the simultaneous production of clean fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon and sulfur, along with value-added carbon nanofibers. This can be accomplished because the nanofiber production process removes carbon via a catalyzed pyrolysis reaction, which also has the effect of removing 99.9% of the sulfur, which is trapped in the nanofibers. The reaction is mildly endothermic, meaning that net energy production with real reductions in greenhouse emissions are possible. In Phase I research, the feasibility of generating clean fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon was demonstrated by the successful design, construction and operation of a facility capable of utilizing coal as well as natural gas as an inlet feedstock. In the case of coal, for example, reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions can be as much as 70% (normalized according to kilowatts produced), with the majority of carbon safely sequestered in the form of carbon nanofibers or coke. Both of these products are value-added commodities, indicating that low-emission coal fuel can be done at a profit rather than a loss as is the case with most clean-up schemes. The main results of this project were as follows: (1) It was shown that the nanofiber production process produces hydrogen as a byproduct. (2) The hydrogen, or hydrogen-rich hydrocarbon mixture can be consumed with net release of enthalpy. (3) The greenhouse gas emissions from both coal and natural gas are significantly reduced. Because coal consumption also creates coke, the carbon emission can be reduced by 75% per kilowatt-hour of power produced.

  14. Orange County Government Solar Demonstration and Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Renee; Cunniff, Lori

    2015-05-12

    Orange County Florida completed the construction of a 20 kilowatt Solar Demonstration and Research Facility in March 2015. The system was constructed at the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center whose electric service address is 6021 South Conway Road, Orlando, Florida 32802. The Solar Demonstration and Research Facility is comprised of 72 polycrystalline photovoltaic modules and 3 inverters which convert direct current from the solar panels to alternating current electricity. Each module produces 270 watts of direct current power, for a total canopy production of just under 20,000 watts. The solar modules were installed with a fixed tilt of 5 degrees and face south, toward the equator to maximize the amount of sunlight captures. Each year, the electricity generated by the solar array will help eliminate 20 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions as well as provide covered parking for staff and visitors vehicles. The solar array is expected to generate 27,000 kilowatt hours of electricity annually equating to an estimated $266 savings in the monthly electric bill, or $3,180 annually for the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center. In addition to reducing the electric bill for the Extension Center, Orange County’s solar array also takes advantage of a rebate incentive offered by the local utility, Orlando Utility Commission, which provided a meter that measures the amount of power produced by the solar array. The local utility company’s Solar Photovoltaic Production Incentive will pay Orange County $0.05 per kilowatt hour for the power that is produced by the solar array. This incentive is provided in addition to Net Metering benefits, which is an effort to promote the use of clean, renewable energy on the electric grid. The Photovoltaic Solar Demonstration and Research Facility also serves an educational tool to the public; the solar array is tied directly into a data logger that provides real time power generation accessible for public viewing on an interactive kiosk located in the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center’s lobby where visitors can review “real time” power generation, cost savings and environmental benefits of the system. Site commissioning with the software program was delayed due to Internal Security Software issues within Orange County that needed to be resolved, therefore the “real time” capture of the production data for the solar array using the software program commenced on May 1, 2015. In addition an educational flyer was developed and is available in the Orange County Education Center’s main lobby. The project completed under this grant award assisted Orange County in demonstrating leadership by installing the application of a renewable energy technology combined with energy efficiency measures; resulting in reduced energy costs for the Orange County University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center, and helping Orange County citizens and visitors move towards the goals of greater energy independence and climate protection. The addition of the new Solar Demonstration and Research Facility has advanced the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center’s mission of extending, educating and providing research-based information to residents and visitors of Orange County by demonstrating the application of renewable energy technology combined with energy efficiency measures; resulting in reduced energy costs, and helping Orange County move towards the goal of greater energy independence and climate protection. In 2014, the Orange County Cooperative Extension Center hosted nearly 10,800 visitors to their on-site Exploration Gardens plus 12,686 walk-in visitors to their office plant clinic and other services. The Education Center held 2,217 educational events that were attended by 46,434 adults and youth, but about half of those events occurred off-site. Based on the visitation numbers in 2014 the Orange County Cooperative Extension Center Education is a vital partner to Orange County’s

  15. From comfort to kilowatts: An integrated assessment of electricity conservation in Thailand's commercial sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, J.F. Jr.

    1990-08-01

    Thailand serves as a case study of the potential to conserve electricity in the fast-growing commercial sectors of the tropical developing world. We performed a field study of over 1100 Thai office workers in which a questionnaire survey and simultaneous physical measurements were taken. Both air-conditioned and non-air-conditioned buildings were included. We analyzed Thai subjective responses on the ASHRAE, McIntyre and other rating scales, relating them to Effective Temperature, demographics, and to rational indices of warmth such as PMV and TSENS. These results suggest that without sacrificing comfort, significant energy conservation opportunities exist through the relaxation of upper space temperature limits. To investigate the potential for conserving energy in a cost-effective manner, we performed a series of parametric simulations using the DOE-2.1D computer program on three commercial building prototypes based on actual buildings in Bangkok; an office, a hotel, and a shopping center. We investigated a wide range of energy conservation measures appropriate for each building type, from architectural measures to HVAC equipment and control solutions. The best measures applied in combination into high efficiency cases can generate energy savings in excess of 50%. Economic analyses performed for the high efficiency cases, resulted in costs of conserved energy of less than and internal rates of return in excess of 40%. Thermal cool storage, cogeneration, and gas cooling technology showed promise as cost-effective electric load management strategies.

  16. A market and engineering study of a 3-kilowatt class gas turbine generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe, Mark A. (Mark Alan)

    2003-01-01

    Market and engineering studies were performed for the world's only commercially available 3 kW class gas turbine generator, the IHI Aerospace Dynajet. The objectives of the market study were to determine the competitive ...

  17. Heat pipe cooled reactors for multi-kilowatt space power supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranken, W.A.; Houts, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    Three nuclear reactor space power system designs are described that demonstrate how the use of high temperature heat pipes for reactor heat transport, combined with direct conversion of heat to electricity, can result in eliminating pumped heat transport loops for both primary reactor cooling and heat rejection. The result is a significant reduction in system complexity that leads to very low mass systems with high reliability, especially in the power range of 1 to 20 kWe. In addition to removing heat exchangers, electromagnetic pumps, and coolant expansion chambers, the heat pipe/direct conversion combination provides such capabilities as startup from the frozen state, automatic rejection of reactor decay heat in the event of emergency or accidental reactor shutdown, and the elimination of single point failures in the reactor cooling system. The power system designs described include a thermoelectric system that can produce 1 to 2 kWe, a bimodal modification of this system to increase its power level to 5 kWe and incorporate high temperature hydrogen propulsion capability, and a moderated thermionic reactor concept with 5 to 20 kWe power output that is based on beryllium modules that thermally couple cylindrical thermionic fuel elements (TFEs) to radiator heat pipes.

  18. The Development of a Control System for a 5 Kilowatt Free Piston Stirling Space Convertor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Raymond L.; Vitale, N.

    2008-01-21

    The new NASA Vision for Exploration, announced by President Bush in January 2004, proposes an ambitious program that plans to return astronauts to the moon by the 2018 time frame. A recent NASA study entitled 'Affordable Fission Surface Power Study' recommended a 40 kWe, 900 K, NaK-cooled, Stirling conversion for 2020 launch. Use of two of the nominal 5 kW converters allows the system to be dynamically balanced. A group of four dual-converter combinations that would yield 40 kWe can be tested to validate the viability of Stirling technology for space fission surface power systems. The work described in this paper deals specifically with the control system for the 5 kW convertor described in the preceding paragraph. This control system is responsible for maintaining piston stroke to a setpoint in the presence of various disturbances including electrical load variations. Pulse starting of the FSPE convertor is also an inherent part of such a control system. Finally, the ability to throttle the engine to match the required output power is discussed in terms of setpoint control. Several novel ideas have been incorporated into the piston stroke control strategy that will engender a stable response to disturbances in the presence of midpoint drift while providing useful data regarding the position of both the power piston and displacer.

  19. Progress in Developing a New 5 Kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Space Convertor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandhorst, Henry W. Jr.; Kirby, Raymond L.; Chapman, Peter A.

    2008-01-21

    The NASA Vision for Exploration of the Moon envisions a nuclear reactor coupled with a free-piston Stirling convertor at a power level of 30-40 kWe. In the 1990s, Mechanical Technology, Inc.'s Stirling Engine Systems Division (now a part of Foster-Miller, Inc.) developed a 25 kWe free piston Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine under the SP-100 program. This system consisted of two 12.5 kWe engines connected at their hot ends and mounted in tandem to cancel vibration. Recently, NASA and DoE have been developing dual 55 We and 80 We Stirling convertor systems for use with radioisotope heat sources. Total test times of all convertors in this effort exceed 120,000 hours. Recently, NASA began a new project with Auburn University to develop a 5 kWe, single convertor for use in the Lunar power system. Goals of this development program include a specific power in excess of 140 We/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and a control system that will safely manage the convertors in case of an emergency. Auburn University awarded a subcontract to Foster-Miller, Inc. to undertake development of the 5 kWe Stirling Convertor Assembly. The characteristics of the design along with progress in developing the system will be described.

  20. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2HeatPumpsUsedForColg | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,InformationAwardeeEnergyInformation

  1. Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagher, Habib; Viselli, Anthony; Goupee, Andrew; Thaler, Jeffrey; Brady, Damian; Browne, Peter; Browning, James; Chung, Jade; Coulling, Alexander; Deese, Heather; Fowler, Matthew; Holberton, Rebecca; Anant, Jain; Jalbert, Dustin; Johnson, Theresa; Jonkman, Jason; Karlson, Benjamin; Kimball, Richard; Koo, Bonjun; Lackner, Matthew; Lambrakos, Kostas; Lankowski, Matthew; Leopold, Adrienne; Lim, Ho-Joon; Mangum, Linda; Martin, Heather; Masciola, Marco; Maynard, Melissa; McCleave, James; Mizrahi, Robert; Molta, Paul; Pershing, Andrew; Pettigrew, Neal; Prowell, Ian; Qua, Andrew; Sherwood, Graham; Snape, Thomas; Steneck, Robert; Stewart, Gordon; Stockwell, Jason; Swift, Andrew H. P.; Thomas, Dale; Viselli, Elizabeth; Zydlewski, Gayle

    2013-06-11

    This is the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy-funded program, DE-0002981: DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. The project objective was the partial validation of coupled models and optimization of materials for offshore wind structures. The United States has a great opportunity to harness an indigenous abundant renewable energy resource: offshore wind. In 2010, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimated there to be over 4,000 GW of potential offshore wind energy found within 50 nautical miles of the US coastlines (Musial and Ram, 2010). The US Energy Information Administration reported the total annual US electric energy generation in 2010 was 4,120 billion kilowatt-hours (equivalent to 470 GW) (US EIA, 2011), slightly more than 10% of the potential offshore wind resource. In addition, deep water offshore wind is the dominant US ocean energy resource available comprising 75% of the total assessed ocean energy resource as compared to wave and tidal resources (Musial, 2008). Through these assessments it is clear offshore wind can be a major contributor to US energy supplies. The caveat to capturing offshore wind along many parts of the US coast is deep water. Nearly 60%, or 2,450 GW, of the estimated US offshore wind resource is located in water depths of 60 m or more (Musial and Ram, 2010). At water depths over 60 m building fixed offshore wind turbine foundations, such as those found in Europe, is likely economically infeasible (Musial et al., 2006). Therefore floating wind turbine technology is seen as the best option for extracting a majority of the US offshore wind energy resource. Volume 1 - Test Site; Volume 2 - Coupled Models; and Volume 3 - Composite Materials

  2. The New York Power Authority`s energy-efficient refrigerator program for the New York City Housing Authority -- 1997 savings evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, R.G.; Miller, J.D.

    1998-09-01

    This document describes the estimation of the annual energy savings achieved from the replacement of 20,000 refrigerators in New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) public housing with new, highly energy-efficient models in 1997. The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) pays NYCHA`s electricity bills, and agreed to reimburse NYCHA for the cost of the refrigerator installations. Energy savings over the lifetime of the refrigerators accrue to HUD. Savings were demonstrated by a metering project and are the subject of the analysis reported here. The New York Power Authority (NYPA) identified the refrigerator with the lowest life-cycle cost, including energy consumption over its expected lifetime, through a request for proposals (RFP) issued to manufacturers for a bulk purchase of 20,000 units in 1997. The procurement was won by Maytag with a 15-ft{sup 3} top-freezer automatic-defrost refrigerator rated at 437 kilowatt-hours/year (kWh/yr). NYCHA then contracted with NYPA to purchase, finance, and install the new refrigerators, and demanufacture and recycle materials from the replaced units. The US Department of Energy (DOE) helped develop and plan the project through the ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} Partnerships program conducted by its Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL designed the metering protocol and occupant survey used in 1997, supplied and calibrated the metering equipment, and managed and analyzed the data collected by NYPA. The objective of the 1997 metering study was to achieve a general understanding of savings as a function of refrigerator label ratings, occupant effects, indoor and compartment temperatures, and characteristics (such as size, defrost features, and vintage). The data collected in 1997 was used to construct models of refrigerator energy consumption as a function of key refrigerator and occupant characteristics.

  3. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

    2012-04-01

    This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

  4. ``White Land``...new Russian closed-cycle nuclear technology for global deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1996-07-01

    A Russian technology called ``White Land`` is being pursued which is based on their heavy-metal-cooled fast spectrum reactor technology developed to power their super-fast Alpha Class submarines. These reactors have important safety advantages over the more conventional sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors but preserve some of the attractive operational features of the fast spectrum systems. Perhaps chief among these advantages in the current political milieu is their ability to generate energy from any nuclide heavier than thorium including HEU, weapons plutonium, commercial plutonium, neptunium, americium, and curium. While there are several scenarios for deployment of these systems, the most attractive perhaps is containment in submarine-like enclosures to be placed underwater near a coastal population center. A Russian organization named the Alphabet Company would build the reactors and maintain title to them. The company would be paid on the basis of kilowatt-hours delivered. The reactors would not require refueling for 10--15 years and no maintenance violating the radiation containment would be required or would be carried out at the deployment site. The host country need not develop any nuclear technology or accept any nuclear waste. When the fuel load has been burned, the entire unit would be towed to Archangel, Russia for refueling. The fission product would be removed from the fuel by ``dry`` molten salt technology to minimize the waste stream and the fissile material would be returned to the reactor for further burning. The fission product waste would be stored at New Land Island, their current nuclear test site in the Arctic. If concerns over fission product justify it, the long-lived species will be transmuted in an accelerator-driven system. Apparently this project is backed at the highest levels of MINATOM and the Alphabet Company has the funding to proceed.

  5. Opportunities for Demand Response in California Agricultural Irrigation: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, Gary; Wilcox, Edmund; Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank

    2013-01-02

    California agricultural irrigation consumes more than ten billion kilowatt hours of electricity annually and has significant potential for contributing to a reduction of stress on the grid through demand response, permanent load shifting, and energy efficiency measures. To understand this potential, a scoping study was initiated for the purpose of determining the associated opportunities, potential, and adoption challenges in California agricultural irrigation. The primary research for this study was conducted in two ways. First, data was gathered and parsed from published sources that shed light on where the best opportunities for load shifting and demand response lie within the agricultural irrigation sector. Secondly, a small limited survey was conducted as informal face-to-face interviews with several different California growers to get an idea of their ability and willingness to participate in permanent load shifting and/or demand response programs. Analysis of the data obtained from published sources and the survey reveal demand response and permanent load shifting opportunities by growing region, irrigation source, irrigation method, grower size, and utility coverage. The study examines some solutions for demand response and permanent load shifting in agricultural irrigation, which include adequate irrigation system capacity, automatic controls, variable frequency drives, and the contribution from energy efficiency measures. The study further examines the potential and challenges for grower acceptance of demand response and permanent load shifting in California agricultural irrigation. As part of the examination, the study considers to what extent permanent load shifting, which is already somewhat accepted within the agricultural sector, mitigates the need or benefit of demand response for agricultural irrigation. Recommendations for further study include studies on how to gain grower acceptance of demand response as well as other related studies such as conducting a more comprehensive survey of California growers.

  6. U.S. Department of Energy -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort; Donald Karner; John G. Smart

    2009-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) tests plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in closed track, dynamometer and onroad testing environments. The onroad testing includes the use of dedicated drivers on repeated urban and highway driving cycles that range from 10 to 200 miles, with recharging between each loop. Fleet demonstrations with onboard data collectors are also ongoing with PHEVs operating in several dozen states and Canadian Provinces, during which trips- and miles-per-charge, charging demand and energy profiles, and miles-per-gallon and miles-per-kilowatt-hour fuel use results are all documented, allowing an understanding of fuel use when vehicles are operated in charge depleting, charge sustaining, and mixed charge modes. The intent of the PHEV testing includes documenting the petroleum reduction potential of the PHEV concept, the infrastructure requirements, and operator recharging influences and profiles. As of May 2008, the AVTA has conducted track and dynamometer testing on six PHEV conversion models and fleet testing on 70 PHEVs representing nine PHEV conversion models. A total of 150 PHEVs will be in fleet testing by the end of 2008, all with onboard data loggers. The onroad testing to date has demonstrated 100+ miles per gallon results in mostly urban applications for approximately the first 40 miles of PHEV operations. The primary goal of the AVTA is to provide advanced technology vehicle performance benchmark data for technology modelers, research and development programs, and technology goal setters. The AVTA testing results also assist fleet managers in making informed vehicle purchase, deployment and operating decisions. The AVTA is part of DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, with Argonne National Laboratory providing dynamometer testing support. The proposed paper and presentation will discuss PHEV testing activities and results. INL/CON-08-14333

  7. Southeastern Power Administration 2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    Dear Secretary Moniz: I am pleased to submit Southeastern Power Administration’s (Southeastern) fiscal year (FY) 2012 Annual Report for your review. This report reflects our agency’s programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2011, and ending September 30, 2012. This past year, Southeastern marketed approximately 5.4 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 487 wholesale customers in 10 southeastern states. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled about $263 million. With the financial assistance and support of Southeastern’s customers, funding for capitalized equipment purchases and replacements at hydroelectric facilities operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) continued in FY 2012. Currently, there are more than 214 customers participating in funding infrastructure renewal efforts of powerplants feeding the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina, Kerr-Philpott, and Cumberland Systems. This funding, which totaled more than $71 million, provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging projects in Southeastern’s marketing area. Drought conditions continued in the southeastern region of the United States this past year, particularly in the Savannah River Basin. Lack of rainfall strained our natural and financial resources. Power purchases for FY 2012 in the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System totaled approximately $29 million. About $8 million of this amount was for replacement power, which is purchased only during adverse water conditions in order to meet Southeastern’s customer contract requirements. Southeastern’s goal is to maximize the benefits of our region’s water resources. Competing uses of these resources will present another challenging year for Southeastern’s employees. With the cooperation and communication among the Department of Energy (DOE), preference customers, and Corps, I am certain Southeastern is positioned to meet these challenges in the future. We are committed to providing reliable hydroelectric power to preference customers, which ultimately serve more than 12 million consumers in the southeast. Sincerely, Kenneth E. Legg Administrator

  8. Southeastern Power Administration 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-12-29

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to submit Southeastern Power Administration’s (Southeastern’s) fiscal year (FY) 2008 Annual Report for your review. The information included in this document reflects our agency’s programs, accomplishments, operational and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2007 and ending September 30, 2008. Southeastern marketed more than 4.5 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 491 wholesale customers in ten southeastern states this past year. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled approximately $263 million. Drought conditions persisted in the southeastern region of the United States during FY 2008 placing strains on our natural and financial resources. Power purchases for FY 2008 totaled $91 million. Approximately $44 million of this amount was for replacement power which is paid only during adverse water conditions in order to meet our customers’ contract requirements. With the continued financial assistance and support of our Federal power customers, funding for capitalized equipment purchases and replacements at U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (Corps) hydroelectric projects provided much needed repairs and maintenance for these aging facilities. Southeastern’s cyber and physical security programs continued to be reviewed and updated to meet Department of Energy (DOE), Homeland Security, and North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) standards and requirements. In the coming year, Southeastern will continue open communication and cooperation with DOE, the Federal power customers, and the Corps to maximize the benefits of our region’s water resources. Although competing uses of water and the prolonged drought conditions will present another challenging year for our agency, Southeastern’s employees will meet these challenges and continue to provide reliable hydroelectric power to the people in the southeast. Sincerely, Kenneth E.Legg Administrator

  9. Southeastern Power Administration 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-12-28

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am proud to submit Southeastern Power Administration’s (Southeastern’s) fiscal year (FY) 2007 Annual Report for your review. The information included in this report reflects Southeastern’s programs, accomplishments, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2006 and ending September 30, 2007. Southeastern marketed more than 5 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 492 wholesale Federal power customers in an 11-state marketing area in FY 2007. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled approximately $219 million. Drought conditions continued to plague the southeast region of the United States during 2007 placing strains on our natural and financial resources. Southeastern purchased more than $40 million in replacement power to meet customer contract requirements to ensure the continued reliability of our nation’s power grid. With the financial assistance and support of our Federal power customers, continued funding for capitalized equipment replacements at various Corps of Engineers’ (Corps) hydroelectric projects provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging facilities. Southeastern’s cyber and physical security program continued to be reviewed and updated to meet Department of Energy (DOE), Homeland Security, and North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and requirements. Plans for the upcoming year include communication and cooperation with DOE, Federal power customers, and the Corps to maximize the benefits of our nation’s water resources. Competition for the use of water and the prolonged drought conditions will present another challenging year for our agency. The employees at Southeastern will be proactive in meeting these challenges and providing reliable hydroelectric power to the people in the southeast. Sincerely, Kenneth E. Legg Administrator

  10. Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raade, Justin; Roark, Thomas; Vaughn, John; Bradshaw, Robert

    2013-07-22

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are comprised of many miles of fluid-filled pipes arranged in large grids with reflective mirrors used to capture radiation from the sun. Solar radiation heats the fluid which is used to produce steam necessary to power large electricity generation turbines. Currently, organic, oil-based fluid in the pipes has a maximum temperature threshold of 400 °C, allowing for the production of electricity at approximately 15 cents per kilowatt hour. The DOE hopes to foster the development of an advanced heat transfer fluid that can operate within higher temperature ranges. The new heat transfer fluid, when used with other advanced technologies, could significantly decrease solar electricity cost. Lower costs would make solar thermal electricity competitive with gas and coal and would offer a clean, renewable source of energy. Molten salts exhibit many desirable heat transfer qualities within the range of the project objectives. Halotechnics developed advanced heat transfer fluids (HTFs) for application in solar thermal power generation. This project focused on complex mixtures of inorganic salts that exhibited a high thermal stability, a low melting point, and other favorable characteristics. A high-throughput combinatorial research and development program was conducted in order to achieve the project objective. Over 19,000 candidate formulations were screened. The workflow developed to screen various chemical systems to discover salt formulations led to mixtures suitable for use as HTFs in both parabolic trough and heliostat CSP plants. Furthermore, salt mixtures which will not interfere with fertilizer based nitrates were discovered. In addition for use in CSP, the discovered salt mixtures can be applied to electricity storage, heat treatment of alloys and other industrial processes.

  11. Southeastern Power Administration 2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-31

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to submit Southeastern Power Administration’s (Southeastern) fiscal year (FY) 2011 Annual Report for your review. This report reflects our agency’s programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2010, and ending September 31, 2011. This past year, Southeastern marketed approximately 6.2 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 489 wholesale customers in 10 southeastern states. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled more than $264 million. With the financial assistance and support of Southeastern’s customers, funding for capitalized equipment purchases and replacements at hydroelectric facilities operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) continued in FY 2011. This funding, which totaled more than $45 million, provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging projects in Southeastern’s marketing area. Currently, there are more than 214 customers participating in the funding efforts in the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina, Kerr-Philpott, and Cumberland Systems of projects. Drought conditions continued in the southeastern region of the United States this past year, particularly in the Savannah River Basin. Lack of rain placed strains on our natural and financial resources. Power purchases for FY 2011 totaled approximately $38 million. About $9 million of this amount was for replacement power, which is purchased only during adverse water conditions in order to meet Southeastern’s customer contract requirements. Southeastern’s goal is to maximize the benefits of our region’s water resources. Competing uses of these resources will present another challenging year for Southeastern’s employees. With the cooperation and communication among the Department of Energy (DOE), preference customers, and Corps, I am certain Southeastern is positioned to meet these challenges in the future. We are committed to providing reliable hydroelectric power to preference customers, which ultimately serve more than 12 million consumers in the southeast.

  12. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-12-01

    Dear Secretary Chu, I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2008. In FY 2008, Southwestern delivered over 7.3 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers – nearly 31% more than average due to numerous record rainfall amounts in the southwest region. These record amounts produced revenues which exceeded the average annual revenue requirement by nearly $20 million and resulted in over $200 million in economic benefits to the region. Yet even as Southwestern exceeded its goals of marketing and delivering Federal hydroelectric power to our customers, we stayed focused on safety, security, and reliability. For example, we maintained our nearly 1,400 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites while achieving a Recordable Accident Frequency Rate of 0.0, a record that reflects Southwestern’s safety achievement of no recordable injuries for every 200,000 hours worked. We kept our rights-of-way secure from vegetation and other obstacles, work that not only supports our mission but also promotes reliability of the regional and National grid. We exceeded all North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Control Performance Standards (CPS- 1 and CPS-2), and maintained regulation and reserve obligations and reactive reserve margins to ensure the reliability of the bulk electric system, even during extended periods of restricted hydro operations due to unusually high project inflows. Finally, we continued our partnerships with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, our customers, and other Federal power stakeholders, partnerships that are vital to our continued success in marketing and delivering carbon-free, renewable, and domestically produced energy to our customers and to the Nation. Sincerely, Jon Worthington Administrator

  13. Added Value of Reliability to a Microgrid: Simulations of Three California Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2009-01-01

    electric storage (kWh) thermal storage (kWh) annual costs (kelectric storage (kWh) thermal storage (kWh) annual costs (kelectric storage (kWh) thermal storage (kWh) annual costs (k

  14. From Comfort to Kilowatts: An Integrated Assessment of Electricity Conservation in Thailand's Commercial Sector. Volume 2: Technical Appendix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busch Jr., J.F.

    2010-01-01

    the misc. equipment energy use in the public space by taking36% of the total energy costs. The public space bill for the

  15. Note: Proton irradiation at kilowatt-power and neutron production from a free-surface liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Weissman, L.; Aviv, O.; Berkovits, D.; Dudovitch, O.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Haquin, G.; Hazenshprung, N.; Kreisel, A.; Mardor, I.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Yungrais, Z. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Paul, M., E-mail: paul@vms.huji.ac.il; Tessler, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2014-05-15

    The free-surface Liquid-Lithium Target, recently developed at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), was successfully used with a 1.9 MeV, 1.2 mA (2.3 kW) continuous-wave proton beam. Neutrons (?2 × 10{sup 10} n/s having a peak energy of ?27 keV) from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction were detected with a fission-chamber detector and by gold activation targets positioned in the forward direction. The setup is being used for nuclear astrophysics experiments to study neutron-induced reactions at stellar energies and to demonstrate the feasibility of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  16. Initial test results from the RedFlow 5 kW, 10 kWh zinc-bromide module, phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper the performance results of the RedFlow zinc-bromide module (ZBM) Gen 2.0 are reported for Phase 1 of testing, which includes initial characterization of the module. This included physical measurement, efficiency as a function of charge and discharge rates, efficiency as a function of maximum charge capacity, duration of maximum power supplied, and limited cycling with skipped strip cycles. The goal of this first phase of testing was to verify manufacturer specifications of the zinc-bromide flow battery. Initial characterization tests have shown that the ZBM meets the manufacturer's specifications. Further testing, including testing as a function of temperature and life cycle testing, will be carried out during Phase 2 of the testing, and these results will be issued in the final report, after Phase 2 testing has concluded.

  17. Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program: Program Overview and Philadelphia Project Highlight (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    Case Study with WIPP program overview, information regarding eligibility, and successes from Pennsylvania's Commission on Economic Opportunity (CEO) that demonstrate innovative approaches that maximize the benefit of the program. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) recently launched the Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP) to accelerate innovations in whole-house weatherization and advance DOE's goal of increasing the energy efficiency and health and safety of homes of low-income families. Since 2010, WIPP has helped weatherization service providers as well as new and nontraditional partners leverage non-federal financial resources to supplement federal grants, saving taxpayer money. WIPP complements the Weatherization Assistance program (WAP), which operates nation-wide, in U.S. territories and in three Native American tribes. 16 grantees are implementing weatherization innovation projects using experimental approaches to find new and better ways to weatherize homes. They are using approaches such as: (1) Financial tools - by understanding a diverse range of financing mechanisms, grantees can maximize the impact of the federal grant dollars while providing high-quality work and benefits to eligible low-income clients; (2) Green and healthy homes - in addition to helping families reduce their energy costs, grantees can protect their health and safety. Two WIPP projects (Connecticut and Maryland) will augment standard weatherization services with a comprehensive green and healthy homes approach; (3) New technologies and techniques - following the model of continuous improvement in weatherization, WIPP grantees will continue to use new and better technologies and techniques to improve the quality of work; (4) Residential energy behavior change - Two grantees are rigorously testing home energy monitors (HEMs) that display energy used in kilowatt-hours, allowing residents to monitor and reduce their energy use, and another is examining best-practices for mobile home energy efficiency; (5) Workforce development and volunteers - with a goal of creating a self-sustaining weatherization model that does not require future federal investment, three grantees are adapting business models successful in other sectors of the home performance business to perform weatherization work. Youthbuild is training youth to perform home energy upgrades to eligible clients and Habitat for Humanity is developing a model for how to incorporate volunteer labor in home weatherization. These innovative approaches will improve key weatherization outcomes, such as: Increasing the total number of homes that are weatherized; Reducing the weatherization cost per home; Increasing the energy savings in each weatherized home; Increasing the number of weatherization jobs created and retained; and Reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. Assessing Internet energy intensity: A review of methods and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coroama, Vlad C.; Hilty, Lorenz M.; Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstr. 5, 9014 St. Gallen; Centre for Sustainable Communications, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Lindstedtsvägen 5, 100 44 Stockholm

    2014-02-15

    Assessing the average energy intensity of Internet transmissions is a complex task that has been a controversial subject of discussion. Estimates published over the last decade diverge by up to four orders of magnitude — from 0.0064 kilowatt-hours per gigabyte (kWh/GB) to 136 kWh/GB. This article presents a review of the methodological approaches used so far in such assessments: i) top–down analyses based on estimates of the overall Internet energy consumption and the overall Internet traffic, whereby average energy intensity is calculated by dividing energy by traffic for a given period of time, ii) model-based approaches that model all components needed to sustain an amount of Internet traffic, and iii) bottom–up approaches based on case studies and generalization of the results. Our analysis of the existing studies shows that the large spread of results is mainly caused by two factors: a) the year of reference of the analysis, which has significant influence due to efficiency gains in electronic equipment, and b) whether end devices such as personal computers or servers are included within the system boundary or not. For an overall assessment of the energy needed to perform a specific task involving the Internet, it is necessary to account for the types of end devices needed for the task, while the energy needed for data transmission can be added based on a generic estimate of Internet energy intensity for a given year. Separating the Internet as a data transmission system from the end devices leads to more accurate models and to results that are more informative for decision makers, because end devices and the networking equipment of the Internet usually belong to different spheres of control. -- Highlights: • Assessments of the energy intensity of the Internet differ by a factor of 20,000. • We review top–down, model-based, and bottom–up estimates from literature. • Main divergence factors are the year studied and the inclusion of end devices. • We argue against extending the Internet system boundary beyond data transmission. • Decision-makers need data that differentiates between end devices and transmission.

  19. Energy Storage/Conservation and Carbon Emissions Reduction Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Erik

    2012-10-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the Center for Transportation and the Environment (CTE) federal assistance for the management of a project to develop and test a prototype flywheel-­?based energy recovery and storage system in partnership with Test Devices, Inc. (TDI). TDI specializes in the testing of jet engine and power generation turbines, which uses a great deal of electrical power for long periods of time. In fact, in 2007, the company consumed 3,498,500 kW-­?hr of electricity in their operations, which is equivalent to the electricity of 328 households. For this project, CTE and TDI developed and tested a prototype flywheel-­?based energy recovery and storage system. This technology is being developed at TDI’s facilities to capture and reuse the energy necessary for the company’s core process. The new technology and equipment is expected to save approximately 80% of the energy used in the TDI process, reducing total annual consumption of power by approximately 60%, saving approximately two million kilowatt-­?hours annually. Additionally, the energy recycling system will allow TDI and other end users to lower their peak power demand and reduce associated utility demand charges. The use of flywheels in this application is novel and requires significant development work from TDI. Flywheels combine low maintenance costs with very high cycle life with little to no degradation over time, resulting in lifetimes measured in decades. All of these features make flywheels a very attractive option compared to other forms of energy storage, including batteries. Development and deployment of this energy recycling technology will reduce energy consumption during jet engine and stationary turbine development. By reengineering the current inefficient testing process, TDI will reduce risk and time to market of efficiency upgrades of gas turbines across the entire spectrum of applications. Once in place the results from this program will also help other US industries to utilize energy recycling technology to lower domestic energy use and see higher net energy efficiency. The prototype system and results will be used to seek additional resources to carry out full deployment of a system. Ultimately, this innovative technology is expected to be transferable to other testing applications involving energy-­?based cycling within the company as well as throughout the industry.

  20. Katech (Lithium Polymer) 4-Passenger NEV - Range and Battery Testing Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2005-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) received a Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) from the Korea Automotive Technology Institute (KATECH) for vehicle and battery characterization testing. The KATECH NEV (called the Invita) was equipped with a lithium polymer battery pack from Kokam Engineering. The Invita was to be baseline performance tested by AVTA’s testing partner, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA), at ETA’s contract testing facilities and test track in Phoenix, Arizona, to AVTA’s NEVAmerica testing specifications and procedures. Before and during initial constant speed range testing, the Invita battery pack experienced cell failures, and the onboard charger failed. A Kokamsupplied off-board charger was used in place of the onboard charger to successfully perform a constant speed range test on the Invita. The Invita traveled a total of 47.9 miles in 1 hour 47 minutes, consuming 91.3 amp-hours and 6.19 kilowatt-hours. The Kokam Engineering lithium polymer battery was also scheduled for battery pack characterization testing, including the C/3 energy capacity, dynamic stress, and peak power tests. Testing was stopped during the initial C/3 energy capacity test, however, because the battery pack failed to withstand cycling without cell failures. After the third discharge/charge sequence was completed, it was discovered that Cell 6 had failed, with a voltage reading of 0.5 volts. Cell 6 was replaced, and the testing sequence was restarted. After the second discharge/charge sequence was complete, it was discovered that Cell 1 had failed, with its voltage reading 0.2 volts. At this point it was decided to stop all battery pack testing. During the discharge cycles, the battery pack supplied 102.21, 94.34, and 96.05 amp-hours consecutively before Cell 6 failed. After replacing Cell 6, the battery pack supplied 98.34 and 98.11 amp-hours before Cell 1 failed. The Idaho National Laboratory managed these testing activities for the AVTA, as part of DOE’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  1. Savings estimates for the ENERGY STAR (registered trademark) voluntary labeling program: 2001 status report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Mahajan, Akshay; Koomey, Jonathan G.

    2002-01-01

    Electricity Price Price 1998$/kWh 1998$/kWh Carbon Emissionsenergy price in year t (in $/kWh or $/MBtu) C t ? The carbon

  2. 2004 status report: Savings estimates for the Energy Star(R) voluntarylabeling program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla

    2004-01-01

    Electricity Price Price 2000$/kWh 2000$/kWh Carbon Electricenergy price in year t (in $/kWh or $/MBtu) C t = The carbon

  3. 2003 status report savings estimates for the energy star(R) voluntary labeling program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla

    2004-01-01

    Electricity Price Price 2000$/kWh 2000$/kWh Carbon Electricenergy price in year t (in $/kWh or $/MBtu) C t = The carbon

  4. 2005 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) Voluntary Labeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla

    2006-01-01

    Electricity Price Price 2003$/kWh 2003$/kWh Carbon Electricenergy price in year t (in $/kWh or $/MBtu) C t = The carbon

  5. 2002 status report: Savings estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) voluntary labeling program

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    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla; Koomey, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Price Price 2000$/kWh 2000$/kWh Electric Carbon Emissionsenergy price in year t (in $/kWh or $/MBtu) C t = The carbon

  6. TRANSPORTATION ENERGY DATA BOOK: EDITION 34--2015 Acceleration power Measured in kilowatts. Pulse power obtainable from a battery used to accelerate a

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    Pennycook, Steve

    G­1 TRANSPORTATION ENERGY DATA BOOK: EDITION 34--2015 GLOSSARY Acceleration power ­ Measured TRANSPORTATION ENERGY DATA BOOK: EDITION 34--2015 Anthropogenic ­ Human made. Usually used in the context

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Benjamin Daniel

    2013-08-01

    , gas analyses can be adapted to estimate RQ values. The LNB was modified and cofiring experiments were performed at various equivalence ratios (phi) with pure coal and blends of PRB-DB. Standard emissions from solid fuel combustion were measured...

  8. C10DIV.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh) per Worker (thousand kWh) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per kWh (dollars) NEW ENGLAND...

  9. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6222015 14:27 SLCAIP Hydro Generation Estimates Month Forecast Generation less losses (kWh) Less Proj. Use (kWh) Net Generation (kWh) SHP Deliveries (kWh) Firming Purchases...

  10. Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2008-01-01

    7¢/kWh Gas Turbine 5¢/kWh Combined-Cycle Oil Baseload Coal7¢/kWh Gas Turbine 5¢/kWh Combined-Cycle Oi Baseload Coalof Supply Technologies CT Combined- Cycle Oil Baseload Coal

  11. Bright Future NW Energy Coalition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as coal or natural-gas generation. Wind and biomass nearly twice as many. Solar PV job potential is huge on natural gas. Energy Efficiency 3¢/kWh Energy Efficiency 3¢/kWh RPS 2020 10¢/kWh RPS 2020 10¢/kWh New Natural Gas 10¢/kWh Repower Existing Coal Plants 6¢/kWh New Renewables 2020-2050 10¢/kWh Repower

  12. Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Goncalo

    2014-01-01

    0.11 $/kWh, as in San Francisco, Baltimore, Phoenix and Lask) l) Phoenix, AZ Minneapolis, MN Energy ($/kWh) Power ($/Phoenix and Miami, where the average electricity price is 0.05 $/kWh,

  13. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh)...

  14. Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

    2003-01-01

    per kWh) i f a $10 per metric ton carbon allowance priceper kWh) i f a $100 per metric ton carbon allowance price

  15. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Electricity (million |Electricity Energy Intensity | | | (billion kWh) | square feet | (kWhsquare foot) | | |---+---...

  16. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01

    price ($/kWh) Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs carbon (

  17. An Estimate of Energy Use in Laboratories, Cleanrooms, and Data Centers in New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathew, Paul

    2010-01-01

    cost ($/MCF) NY - Labs - Electricty expenditures (Million $)kWh) NY - Data Centers - Electricty expenditures (Million $)

  18. Guidelines for Company Reporting on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Annexes updated July 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    0.32 LPG kWh x 0.214 therms x 6.27 litres x 1.49 Coking Coal tonnes x 2736 kWh x 0.331 Aviation.63 Petrol tonnes x 3135 kWh x 0.24 litres x 2.30 Fuel Oil tonnes x 3223 kWh x 0.27 Coal2 tonnes x 2548 kWh xWh x 0.25 Petroleum Coke tonnes x 3410 kWh x 0.34 Refinery Miscellaneous kWh x 0.24 therms x 7

  19. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power Multifamily Performance Program-- Sea Park East 150 kW CHP System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of Sea Park East 150 kilowatt (kW) Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System in Brooklyn, New York

  20. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    kilowatt LCOE levelized cost of energy MECO Maui Electric Company MSW municipal solid waste MW megawatt MWh

  1. Vertical Farrning in the Windy City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saniie, Jafar

    vegetable and fish waste into fertilizer and biogas to power a heating, cooling, and 280-kilowatt electrical

  2. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti-...

  3. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti- lation","Water...

  4. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light-...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    melded rate for this site was 0.056 per kWh for electricity. However, if the national electricity rate of 0.1022kWh was used the payback would change to between four and five...

  6. Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Residential Renewable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Efficient Solar PV: 1.25kWh x estimated first year output Standard Solar PV: 0.75kWh x estimated first...

  7. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01

    and in the latter, its PV of cost savings is per kWh. NoteDG unit, then it obtains the PV of cost savings relative toremaining terms comprise the PV of cost savings per kWh from

  8. South Carolina Municipalities- Green Power Purchasing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Participating residential customers are able to purchase this green power for $3 per 100 kWh block. Commercial participants are able to purchase the power for $6 per 200 kWh block.

  9. Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for U.S. EPA Energy Star Labeled Products: Expanded Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Marla

    2010-01-01

    energy price in year t (in $/kWh or $/MBtu) C t = The carbonenergy price in year t (in $/kWh or $/MBtu) C t = The carbon

  10. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    cost per kWh than current energy efficiency procurement programs in California.Energy Down The Drain: The Hidden Costs of California’sCost of Procurement of Electricity Efficiency (Ratio of respective $/Annual KWh) California Energy

  11. Funding Opportunity: Geothermal Technologies Program Seeks Technologie...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of electricity from new hydrothermal development to 6 kWh by 2020 and Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) to 6 kWh by 2030. For more information, see this funding...

  12. China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Ed., David

    2008-01-01

    Central Changchun East China Energy Databook 7.0 Table 8C.2.Total scoProvRegion East Chapter 4, Energy Consumption kwh/Total scoProvRegion East Chapter 4, Energy Consumption kwh/

  13. PROCEEDINGS OF 1976 SUMMER WORKSHOP ON AN ENERGY EXTENSION SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    Hydrologic Area: East Branch Energy 2,97 x 3,25 x 108 KWH =Energy conservation: Family values, household practices, and contextual values, East1974 energy costs were 3,249 KWH/AF for the East Branch and

  14. Compressed Air Energy Savings: SAV-AIR Monitor and Control System and the PNW Compressed Air Challenge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, K. J.; Annen, B.; Scott, S.

    2003-01-01

    capital upgrades. As of the end of 2002 the program has saved 16 million kWh annually and by 2010 the region expects to save 320 million kWh a year....

  15. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01

    kwh/gallon X 10- 3 a Waste Water Treatment kwh/gallon X 10-3re- requirements for waste water treatment. This year,requirements for residential waste water treatment have also

  16. Distributed Energy Resource Optimization Using a Software as Service (SaaS) Approach at the University of California, Davis Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael, Stadler

    2011-01-01

    $/yr) Battery Capacity Installed (kWh) Flow Battery PowerInstalled (kW) Flow Battery Energy Installed (kWh) PV326.7 kW as well as a flow battery with a rated peak power

  17. Modeling of Plug-in Electric Vehicles Interactions with a Sustainable Community Grid in the Azores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Goncalo

    2013-01-01

    electrical stationary storage. An amount of 371kWh of EV batteries energy, corresponding to around 23 employee cars

  18. Investigation of the Role of Trap States in Solar Cell Reliability using Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezryadina, Anna Sergeyevna

    2012-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar panels which generate electricity directly currently cost around $0.24 per kWh in Central

  19. Energy Storage for Long Endurance AUVs Gwyn Griffiths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    energy batteries · Manganese alkaline 110 Wh.kg-1 £71 per kWh Rayovac · Lithium ion & Lithium polymer 100 - 195 Wh.kg-1 ~£1400 per kWh Capital cost · Lithium manganese dioxide 270 Wh.kg-1 £667 per kWh SAFT LM Eagle Pitcher LCF111 r=6.4 r=108 · Energy & cost for 700 kg energy payload Manganese alkaline: 77 kWh £5

  20. A database of window annual energy use in typical North American residences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arasteh, Dariush; Huang, Joe; Mitchel, Robin; Clear, Bob; Kohler, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Kwh) Maximum Minimum Madison, WI Denver, CO Washington, DC Seattle, WA Raleigh, NC San Francisco, CA Phoenix,

  1. Selecting Thermal Storage Systems for Schools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, C. L.

    1990-01-01

    per meter + KWH charge. On peak monthly average (June 89 thru September 89) $.0676/KWH. Off peak monthly average (October 89 thru May 90) $.0481/KWH. Natural Gas - Lone Star Gas Company - September 88 thru August 89 monthly average $4.41 MCF...

  2. Added Value of Reliability to a Microgrid: Simulations of Three California Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2009-01-01

    kW elec. ) solar thermal (kW) electric storage (kWh) thermalkW elec. ) solar thermal (kW) electric storage (kWh) thermalkW elec. ) solar thermal (kW) electric storage (kWh) thermal

  3. Cooling season study and economic analysis of a desiccant cooling system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, James Howard

    1992-01-01

    10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Gas Cost (3/GJ) Figure 4. 4 Gas Price vs DINC Cycle Payback Period at Various Electricity Prices SEER = 12 35 20 18 16 ~ 14 ~ 12 D o 10 8 6 o 4 $0. 06/Kwh $0. 09/Kwh $0. 12/Kwh $0. 15/Kwh $0. 'I 8/Kwh 10 20... IV ECONOMIC ANALYSIS V CONCLUSIONS 28 36 NOMENCLATURE 39 REFERENCES 46 APPENDIX A - HOUSE CONSTRUCTION DATA . . APPENDIX B - SECOND LAW COMPARISON 48 53 APPENDIX C - COOLING SEASON AND DINC CYCLE PROGRAM LISTING 72 APPENDIX D - ECONOMIC...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission's (PUC) rules for net metering distinguish between small customer-generators (up to 100 kilowatts) and large customer-generators...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Net Metering The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission's (PUC) rules for net metering distinguish between small customer-generators (up to 100 kilowatts) and large...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Metering The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission's (PUC) rules for net metering distinguish between small customer-generators (up to 100 kilowatts) and large...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

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    Interconnection Standards The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission's (PUC) rules for net metering, which distinguish between small customer-generators (up to 100 kilowatts)...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission's (PUC) rules for net metering, which distinguish between small customer-generators (up to 100 kilowatts) and large customer-generators...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Commission (PSC), applies to renewable-energy systems and combined heat and power (CHP) systems up to 100 kilowatts... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial, Residential...

  10. PowerSaver Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    utility rebates. Ms. Kidder's upgrades included: solar PV (2 kilowatts), an air source heat pump for space heating, an electric hot water heater, LED lighting replacement kits for...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Income Residential Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Orcas Power & Light- MORE Green Power Program Incentive payments will be paid per kilowatt...

  12. Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin RFP | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    proposals (RFP) seeking installer and investor for 700 kilowatts of roof-mounted photovoltaic systems on multiple Oneida tribal facilities. The installation firm and its...

  13. Making Strides to Boost the Use of Solar Energy | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    12, 2012 - 11:04am Addthis This photograph features the 6-kilowatt (kw) rooftop photovoltaic system that Mercury Solar Systems installed in the Lower Kensington neighborhood of...

  14. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    kW and 300 kW Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (MCFC), four 200kilovolt kilowatt molten carbonate fuel cell megawatt

  15. Kenergy- Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kenergy offers commercial and industrial customers rebates for energy-efficient lighting and other energy efficient improvements. Customers can receive rebates of $350 per kilowatt of energy...

  16. St. Regis Mohawk Tribe Paves the Way to a Sustainable Future...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 12, 2015 - 1:51pm Addthis Six photovoltaic arrays generate 32 kilowatts of energy to power 20 units at the Akwesasne Housing Authoritys (AHA) Sunrise Acres...

  17. Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: 88 Kilowatt Automotive Inverter with New 900 Volt Silicon Carbide MOSFET Technology Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review -...

  18. 2001 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    trombe walls, direct solar gain, thermal mass, high efficiency lights, and 7 kilowatts of photovoltaics all work together to nearly eliminate loads. The project resulted in cost...

  19. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    well a molten salt thermal storage system could be utilizedof Solar Two [2] Thermal storage in these plants is anper kilowatt goes towards thermal storage[3]. Considering a

  20. Inauguration of Headquarters' Solar Energy System | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    us here today. In partnership with the General Services Administration, the Department of Energy has installed this 205 kilowatt photovoltaic solar array here on our main...

  1. Legislative Developments in Solar Energy during 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krueger, Robert B.; Hoffman, Peter C.

    1981-01-01

    L. REP. 267 (1979). SOLAR ENERGY DEVELOPMENTS kilowattsIn particular, the Solar Energy and Energy Conservation Bankthermal sytems is the Solar Energy and En- ergy Conservation

  2. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2010-01-01

    50 Effluent Hydropower- Kilowatt Output as Function of HeadDepartment of Energy (2003). Hydropower Setting a Course forEnergy Commission). Hydropower: Hydropower turbines for low-

  3. IMPROVING THE EFFICIENCY OF AN EXISTING GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Took advantage of available rebates to install solar panels ­ Southern Solar Array: 60 panel system (11.7 kilowatt total) 13 #12;GROUNDWATER SYSTEM ENERGY IMPROVEMENTS ­ Northern Solar Array: 56 panel system (10.9 kilowatt total) 14 #12;ENERGY IMPROVEMENT BENEFITS 15 #12;RETURN ON INVESTMENT: SOLAR PANELS 16 #12

  4. Cost vs. performance ... Gwyn Griffiths email: gxg@noc.soton.ac.uk http://www.noc.soton.ac.uk/OED/gxg/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    ) Specific energy (Wh.kg-1 ) Cell cost per kWh (£) Cost per kWh inc. assembly & disposal. (£) Mn Alkaline 0@noc.soton.ac.uk http://www.noc.soton.ac.uk/OED/gxg/ Chemistry Cost per cell in quantity (£) Energy per cell (Wh://www.noc.soton.ac.uk/OED/gxg/ Cost & performance of Li-Po secondary batteries Component Capital cost Amortised cost per kWh Cost per

  5. Samuel Sandoval Solis, PhD Assistant Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Samuel Sandoval Solis, PhD Assistant Professor University of California, Davis Department of Land of 10 #12;Hoover Dam 158 m 35.2 Km3 4.2 bill. KWh $49M - 1936 Oroville Dam 230 m 4.4 Km3 2.2 bill. KWh Shasta Dam 159 m 5.6 Km3 1.8 bill. KWh $36M - 1945 #12;· Masonry - Arch Dams · Gravity Dams · Embankment

  6. J.Ongena Our Energy Future Bochum, 18 November 2012 How to shape our future energy supply ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerwert, Klaus

    ­ 5kWh One liter of petrol ­ 10kWh One aluminum can for coke, water,... (15g) ­ 0.6kWh Energy : Some: There are only 3 different methods to produce energy 1. Burning Fossil Fuels : Coal, Oil, Gas ? Enormous in the world (2007) Energy source Power [TW] Contribution [%] Oil 4.6 36.6 Coal 3.12 24.9 Gas 3.02 24.1 Hydro

  7. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    1969. "Scrubber Survey: a Lime/Limestone Trend," ElectricalMills/Kwh Process Limestone Lime Magnesia Cat-Ox Sodium Tonsto Unsaturated Operation of Lime and Limestone Scrubbers,"

  8. Zero-Emission Vehicle Scenario Cost Analysis Using A Fuzzy Set-Based Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy E.

    1999-01-01

    Residential Sector Electricity Prices in CaliforniaResidential electricity prices in the Los Angeles area are currently about $0.10 per kWh, but the California

  9. Flow of mantle fluids through the ductile lower crust: Helium isotope trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, B. Mack; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2008-01-01

    particularly for geothermal energy development. Mantlex 10 kWh of accessible geothermal energy. This is a sizableBasic Energy Sciences and Office of Geothermal Technologies

  10. Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1996-01-01

    36.5 SCF of natural gas per square foot (Energy Information2.5 kWh per square foot for lighting (Energy Information

  11. Water, Neighborhoods and Urban Design: Micro-Utilities and the Fifth Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmer, Vicki; Fraker, Harrison

    2011-01-01

    the very aggressive “passive house” standard of 15 Kwh/m2-yplus energy houses”) which combine a passive solar direct

  12. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  13. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  14. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  15. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  16. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  17. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  18. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  19. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  20. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  1. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  2. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot...

  3. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  4. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  5. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace...

  6. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    for 90% of household electricity consumption in China. Usinggives an annual electricity consumption of 12kWh assumingto look at is electricity consumption at the household

  7. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  8. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electric system more options for solutions and resources, from home energy management and demand response to participating in the energy market using its KWH, KW, and ancillary...

  9. Atmosphere to Electrons Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    opportunity remains .... * Achieve parity with natural gas @5-6 kWh * Establish offshore wind deployment * Provide foundational R&D to facilitate wind as a principal...

  10. Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2008-01-01

    $0.05 to $0.075/kWh, diesel fuel price increases from $2 toin energy prices (electricity and diesel fuel), and storage

  11. Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2007-01-01

    to $0.075/kWh, the diesel fuel price increases from $2 to $in energy prices (electricity and diesel fuel), and storage

  12. ReRack: Power Simulation for Data Centers with Renewable Energy Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renau, Jose

    -voltaic capacity, 250kW of wind turbine capacity, 400kWh of vanadium redox flow battery storage, and local grid

  13. Value and Technology Assessment to Enhance the Business Case for the CERTS Microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasseter, Robert

    2010-01-01

    electric storage thermal storage decoupling by Figure ES 1.by decoupling by thermal storage representative exampleor $/kWh) lifetime (a) thermal storage 1 absorption chiller

  14. Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    residences (homes) for EV charging: $0.138/kWh EnvironmentalStorage conclusions EV Charging / discharging pattern mainlythe healthcare facility EV battery charging efficiency EV

  15. Catalog of DC Appliances and Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbesi, Karina

    2012-01-01

    battery storage.grid, the cost of battery storage per unit of load servedalong with 22 kWh of battery storage. This study claims only

  16. Separating myths from reality in PV inverter reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    . · This is based upon a LCOE of 5 cents per kWh, so reliability is critical · MTBF of string inverters in 2006: 5

  17. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2011-01-01

    6. Solar Power Dish Engine for Wastewater Plant Electricitytreatment plant 4 MGD with 1 MW Solar power generation kWh

  18. Renewable Energy Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind): * Innovation Concepts and Emerging Technologies detail designs to reduce the cost of wind to compete unsubsidized with fossil-based alternatives (projected as .06kWh)....

  19. Following electron flow: From a Gram-positive community to mechanisms of electron transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wrighton, Kelly Catherine

    2010-01-01

    annually to treat food processing waste (3, 4). Moreover,waste alone contains 34 billion kWh of energy (3), while food

  20. Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun

    2014-01-01

    C. McParland, "Open Automated Demand Response Communications2011. Utility & Demand Response Programs Energy ProviderAnnual Consumption (kWh) Demand Response Program Curtailment

  1. Optimal investment and scheduling of distributed energy resources with uncertainty in electric vehicles driving schedules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, Goncalo

    2014-01-01

    price of electric vehicle electricity exchange at home, $/kWh marginal carboncarbon emissions rate from generation technology j, kg/kWh price

  2. 2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) Voluntary Labeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla; Homan, Gregory K.

    2006-01-01

    Price Source Carbon Emissions Factor for Electricity kg C/kWh Carbonenergy price in year t (in $/kWh or $/MBtu) C t = The carbon

  3. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Washing Machines Fluorescent Ballasts Electric Water HeatersRoom AC Washing Machines $/kWh Electric Water HeatersWashing Machine) Cooking Products (Electric Induction

  4. The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    SAS-PAS Electric Water Heating UEC (kWh) 13 Reference (Jannuzzi G. 2005) (SAS+PAS Other Average Efficiency Base Case Reference Voice Mag. (oct 2005) (

  5. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Energy and Demand Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US DOE 1999. Marginal Energy Prices Report U.S. Departmentmarginal price Marginal energy price in cper kwh Marginal

  6. Development of Energy Models for Production Systems and Processes to Inform Environmentally Benign Decision-Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz-Elsayed, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    price of electricity charged to industrial customers per kWh was the greatest in Japan ($0.154), followed by Germany (

  7. Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    demand savings, each kWh saved with this efficiency measuresavings with peak demand. Previous analysis indicates that the ClF of efficiency measures

  8. Guidelines to Defra's GHG conversion factors for company reporting Annexes updated June 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .498 Coking Coal tonnes x 2810 x 2810 kWh x 0.349 x 0.332 Aviation Spirit tonnes x 3128 x 3128 kWh x 0.250 x 0.281 x 0.267 Burning Oil1 tonnes x 3150 x 3150 kWh x 0.258 x 0.245 litres x 2.518 x 2.518 Coal 2 tonnes xWh x 0.249 x 0.237 Lubricants tonnes x 3171 x 3171 kWh x 0.263 x 0.250 Petroleum Coke tonnes x 3410 x

  9. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Expenditures (million dollars) Electricity Expenditures (dollars) per kWh per Square...

  10. Peak CO2? China's Emissions Trajectories to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2012-01-01

    kWh) in 2050 Installed capacity of wind, solar, and biomassTWh in 2050 Installed capacity of wind, solar, and biomass

  11. China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2013-01-01

    kWh) in 2020 Installed capacity of wind, solar, and biomassgce/kWh) in Installed capacity of wind, solar, and biomass

  12. Restoring Detroits Street Lighting System

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    once completed in 2016. Table ES.1. Annual savings a from Detroit street lighting transition Annual Energy Savings (kWh) Annual Electric Cost Savings () Annual...

  13. Golden Valley Electric Association - Sustainable Natural Alternative...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Gas Tidal Wave Wind (Small) Hydroelectric (Small) Maximum Rebate 1.50kWh Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Golden Valley Electric Association Website http:...

  14. Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2007-01-01

    house in a Marine climate. Annual Energy Consumptionmarine climate has very little air conditioning - compressor energyEnergy Consumption Relative to Unvented House, kWh Marine -

  15. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    gas-fired genset, solar thermal collectors, an absorptionchiller, 722 kW of solar thermal collectors, 1100 kWh of

  16. Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Firestone, Ryan; Chandran, Bala

    2008-01-01

    chiller (kW) solar thermal collector (kW) electricalchiller, 722 kW of solar thermal collectors, 1100 kWh of

  17. How Much Can a Campus Save on Utility Bills by Turning a 5-Workday Week Into a 4­Workday Week 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J.; Giebler, T.; Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.

    2003-01-01

    average electricity price during this period is $0.0457/kWh from Monday to Friday, and $0.0359/kWh for Saturday and Sunday, based on the current electricity utility contract between the university and the utility company. TAMUCC Whole Campus...) consumption (daily) profiles for weekdays, weekends and holidays. Daily WCE difference between a typical weekday and a typical weekend is around 20,000 kWh; Daily WCE difference between a typical weekend and a typical holiday is around 10,000 kWh; Daily...

  18. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    electric load thermal storage solar thermal storage chargingcombustion solar thermal CHP heat storage charging generateof solar thermal collectors, 1100 kWh of electrical storage,

  19. SunShot Incubator Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    funding rounds. Awardees CURRENT PROJECTS PAST PROJECTS Soft Costs Aurora Solar, Inc. Clean Energy Collective Demeter Power Group EnergySage Faraday Genability kWh Analytics...

  20. Expressive Power-Based Resource Allocation for Data Centers Benjamin Lubin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    Expressive Power-Based Resource Allocation for Data Centers Benjamin Lubin Harvard University David C. Parkes Harvard University Abstract As data-center energy consumption continues to rise billion kWh; that is, 1.5% of the 4 trillion kWh consumed in total. This is the amount of energy used by 5

  1. China's March on the 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    ,523/3,299 5,250/10,581 25,028/43,676 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Oil Natural Gas Electricity Nuclear Electricity Coal CO/day (oil); trillion cu feet (natural gas); billion kWh (electricity); billion kWh (nuclear electricity COORDINATOR NATIONAL SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL POLICY CENTER FOR AMERICAN PROGRESS China's remarkable

  2. Energy in the Developing World Physics of Sustainable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    wellbeing (prosperity) 2. Life expectancy, public heath, health care 3. Literacy and education UN publishes Development Index (HDI) vs. Electricity ConsumpPon (kWh) Human Development Index (HDI) vs. Electricity ConsumpPon (kWh) Human Development Index (HDI) vs. Electricity

  3. Project Profile: Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Infinia, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing a thermal energy storage (TES) system that, when combined with Infinia's dish-Stirling system, can achieve DOE's CSP cost goals of $0.07/kWh by 2015 for intermediate power and 5¢/kWh by 2020 for baseload power.

  4. Project Profile: Maintenance-Free Stirling Engine for High-Performance Dish CSP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Infinia, under the CSP R&D FOA, is developing a 30 kW CSP system that utilizes a multi-cylinder, free-piston Stirling engine to achieve the goal LCOE of $0.07–$0.10/kWh by 2015 and $0.05–$0.07/kWh by 2020.

  5. Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    the ownership cost for clean energy technologies, bringingcosts of fuel cells fall in between. The clean energycost of 6.9 cents/kwh before incentives and 4.1 cents/kwh after incentives, is the most economical clean energy

  6. What does a negawatt really cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    1991-01-01

    We use data from ten utility conservation programs to calculate the cost per kWh of electricity saved -- the cost of a "negawatthour" -- resulting from these programs. We first compute the life-cycle cost per kWh saved ...

  7. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Harlingen Irrigation District Cameron County No. 1 Canal Meters and Telemetry Equipment, Impervious-Lining of Delivery Canals, Pipelines Replacing Delivery Canals, and On-Farm Delivery-Site Meters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.; Ellis, John R.

    2002-01-01

    initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $26.87 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001603 per BTU ($0.547 per kwh). The amount of initial construction...

  8. secondary purpose was to alert people to the relative size of the different resources avail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the price (12 ¢/kWh) California utilities are willing to pay for any daytime electricity ­ and the rest. Driven by rising carbon dioxide and oil prices, these are big changes in the handful of years since like those being made by First Solar, 16 ¢/kWh PV (Figure 1) and CSP right now in the US Southwestern

  9. THE ECONOMICS OF CO2 SEPARATION AND CAPTURE Howard J. Herzog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for CO2 sequestration could be less than 1 ¢/kWh from advanced coal plants and less than 1.5 ¢/kWh from Laboratory Cambridge, MA 02139 USA #12;3 Abstract Carbon management and sequestration offers an opportunity and increasing the use of non-fossil energy resources. When most people think of sequestering carbon, they think

  10. 1 Copyright 2010 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2010 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    fall below $460/kWh (below $300/kWh for a 10% discount rate) for PHEVs to be cost competitive with ordinary hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Carbon allowance prices have marginal impact on optimal design the greatest reduction in lifecycle GHG emissions. At today's average US energy prices, battery pack cost must

  11. www.advmat.de www.MaterialsViews.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    and small, in the USA alone, accounts for nearly 750 billion kWh or, at an average price of $0.06 per kWh of millions of dollars and a reduction in CO2 emissions of nearly 2.2 million metric tons of carbon equivalent

  12. 2008 Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2457 x 2457 kWh x 0.347 x 0.330 Domestic Coal 3 tonnes x 2523 x 2523 kWh x 0.313 x 0.298 Wood Pellets 4 stations or for industrial purposes have different emission factors. Wood pellets are used in domestic

  13. Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01

    Cost of Energy ($/kWh) State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas CaliforniaCost of Energy ($/kWh) State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas Californiaenergy crisis, California increased the rebate level to $4.50/Watt with a maximum cap of 50 percent system cost.

  14. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8.3 miles 27.1 miles 15 miles 2.2 kWh 5.7 kWh 13 Both vehicles can drive a UDDS cycle in electric mode, but not the aggressive US06 cycle EV power...

  15. On the Use of Agent-Based Simulation for Efficiency Analysis of Domestic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treur, Jan

    Photovoltaic Solar Energy Production Combined with a Heatpump Jan Treur Abstract In this paper agent with photovoltaic (PV) solar energy production. A simulation model for the cost (in terms of required kWh per day of a PV production agent estimating the produced solar energy (in kWh per day). In particular

  16. A U.S. and China Regional Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    0.11 $/kWh, as in San Francisco, Baltimore, Phoenix, and Lasl) Phoenix, AZ Minneapolis, MN Energy Charge Energy ($/kWh)Phoenix and Miami are in this category; all have average electricity prices of 0.05 $/kWh.

  17. Metering Air Compressor Systems for Efficiency: A Progress Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, B.

    2005-01-01

    was termed CASE Index, which varies from 0 to about 320, and has the units of SCF/KWH. The procedure we developed, involved metering of input (KWH) and output (SCFM), in and out of the central plant. After the initial beta testing of the procedure, as more...

  18. Value and Technology Assessment to Enhance the Business Case for the CERTS Microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasseter, Robert

    2010-01-01

    a) thermal storage 1 absorption chiller solar thermal flowSolar thermal (kW) PV (kW) lead-acid batteries (kWh) thermal storage (solar thermal (kW) PV (kW) lead-acid batteries (kWh) thermal storage (

  19. Energy Department Announces $5 Million to Develop Clean Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Foundation (Arctic Program at Thule Air Base in Greenland)-This 30 kilowatt (kW) CHP system will serve as a model for NSF facilities and assist agencies in evaluating the...

  20. How to Improve Productivity with Energy-Efficient Motors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curley, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    productivity is to reduce costs, particularly those which are rising faster than others such as electricity. Today's new energy efficient motors reduce the kilowatts consumed, thus reducing electric bills and improving productivity. This paper will discuss...

  1. Tips: Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    use them efficiently. What's a Kilowatt? When you use electricity to power a 1000-watt vacuum for 1 hour, you use 1,000 watt-hours (1,000 Wh) of electricity One thousand...

  2. Spinning with the Sun | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program What does this project do? Patrick Yarn Mills installed a 105-kilowatt rooftop solar array that produces enough energy to power 14 homes. Since the array was installed...

  3. DTE Energy- Solar Currents Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DTE Energy offers incentives through the Solar Currents program to its electric customers that install photovoltaic systems with a capacity of 1 kilowatt (kW) to 20 kW. For residential customers,...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Power Program Black Hills Energy has a performance-based incentive (PBI) for photovoltaic (PV) systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. In exchange for these...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    North Dakota also offers a property tax reduction for centrally-assessed* wind turbines larger than 100 kilowatts (kW). These systems are not eligible for the exemption...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Net Metering With these regulations, renewable energy systems with a capacity up to 25 kilowatts (kW) are eligible for net metering. Overall enrollment is limited to 1.5% of a...

  7. Net Metering

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    With these regulations, renewable energy systems with a capacity up to 25 kilowatts (kW) are eligible for net metering. Overall enrollment is limited to 1.5% of a utility's retail sales from the...

  8. Central Georgia EMC- Photovoltaic Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In June 2008, Central Georgia Electric Membership Corporation (CGEMC) began offering a rebate of $450 per kilowatt (kW) to residential members who install photovoltaic (PV) systems that are...

  9. Farmington Electric Utility System- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Farmington Electric, a municipal utility, offers net metering to residential customers with systems up to 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. This option is available for photovoltaic (PV), wind, hydro...

  10. OG&E- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OG&E offers lighting and custom rebates to commercial customers in Oklahoma to improve the energy efficiency of facilities. A rebate of $250 per kilowatt (kW) reduced is available for a wide...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Self-Generation Incentive Program Systems less than 30 kW will receive their full incentive upfront. Systems with a capacity of 30 kilowatts (kW) or greater will receive half the...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Salem Electric offers a rebate to residential customers who install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The rebate offered is 600 for the first three kilowatts (kWs) installed and...

  13. Snohomish County PUD No 1- Solar Express Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rebate program provides $300 per kilowatt (kW) of installed PV, up to a cap of $2,000 for residential premises and $8,000 for commercial premises (as determined by the PUD rate class). A flat...

  14. Green Supercomputing at Argonne

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Pete Beckman

    2010-01-08

    Pete Beckman, head of Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) talks about Argonne National Laboratory's green supercomputing?everything from designing algorithms to use fewer kilowatts per operation to using cold Chicago winter air to cool the machine more efficiently.

  15. DOE Announces Energy Assistance for New Orleans Public Schools...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    P.A. Capdau is also one of many local schools vying to install 25-kilowatt (kW) solar panel systems. These installations are expected to offset a sizable portion of schools'...

  16. Reduced gravity rankine cycle design and optimization with passive vortex phase separation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supak, Kevin Robert

    2009-05-15

    turbo machinery, require kilowatts of power and are untested for high vapor flow conditions. The Interphase Transport Phenomena (ITP) laboratory has developed a low-power, passive microgravity vortex phase separator (MVS) which has already proven...

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tax Exemption North Dakota also offers a property tax reduction for centrally-assessed* wind turbines larger than 100 kilowatts (kW). These systems are not eligible for the...

  18. Practices of Ecological Citizenship: Global Dreams for a Chinese Village

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Shannon Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    of a BP 1 Kilowatt photovoltaic system, Dai would explainonly one house had a BP photovoltaic system on the roof. Andsystem and BP photovoltaic system were only installed on the

  19. Utilizing Supplemental Ultra-Low-NO

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technology into a 65-kilowatt (kW) microturbine and 100-horsepower (HP) heat recovery boiler. Introduction A combined heat and power (CHP) system can be a financially attractive...

  20. Tax Credits for Renewable Energy Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A renewable energy facility is defined as one that generates at least 50 kilowatts (kW) of electricity from solar power or at least 1 megawatt (MW) from wind power, biomass resources, landfill ga...

  1. Fact #823: June 2, 2014 Hybrid Vehicles use more Battery Packs but Plug-in Vehicles use More Battery Capacity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Of the battery packs used for electrified vehicle powertrains in model year 2013, the greatest number went into conventional hybrid vehicles which use battery packs that average about 1.3 kilowatt...

  2. Large Commercial Wind Exemption and Alternative Taxes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The alternative taxation method has two components. The first component is an annual tax equal to $3 per kilowatt (kW) of capacity of the wind farm, prorated according to when the wind farm begins...

  3. Workplace Charging Challenge Mid-Program Review: Employees Plug...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    one of the campus' four charging stations are offset by the four kilowatts of dedicated solar photovoltaic capacity elsewhere on campus-creating a net-zero installation. 10...

  4. Reuse of hybrid car power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkby, Nicholas (Nicholas J.)

    2015-01-01

    Used hybrid car power systems are inexpensive and capable of tens of kilowatts of power throughput. This paper documents a process for using the second generation Toyota Prius inverter module to drive a three phase permanent ...

  5. SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Small Power Producers Program accommodates customers who wish to generate up to 100 kilowatts (kW) of electricity for the purpose of offsetting power that would otherwise be purchased from...

  6. America's Wind Industry Reaches Record Highs | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hardware costs are spurring near-record low prices for wind power. In 2011 and 2012 the price of wind under long-term power purchase contracts averaged just 4 cents per kilowatt...

  7. Green Supercomputing at Argonne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pete Beckman

    2009-11-18

    Pete Beckman, head of Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) talks about Argonne National Laboratory's green supercomputing—everything from designing algorithms to use fewer kilowatts per operation to using cold Chicago winter air to cool the machine more efficiently.

  8. OTEC- Residential Photovoltaic Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Customers of Oregon Trail Electric Consumers Cooperative (OTEC) who install photovoltaic systems are eligible for a rebate of $500 for the first kilowatt (kW) of installed capacity per year. ...

  9. Expedited Permitting Process for Solar Photovoltaic Systems (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vermont has established an expedited permitting process for solar photovoltaic systems that are 10 kilowatts-AC (kW) or less. In order to interconnect and net meter, electric customers in Vermont...

  10. Sawnee EMC- Solar Photovoltaic Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sawnee EMC offers a rebate of $300 per kilowatt (kW) to residential customers who install photovoltaic (PV) systems that meet the cooperative's [http://www.sawnee.com/Rate%20Pdfs/NEM%20Rider.pdf...

  11. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2014 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC), in collaboration with a selected contractor, will install and operate approximately 875 kilowatts (kW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems at a minimum of eight tribal facilities in Milwaukee and Forest Counties.

  12. Greywater heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmberg, D.

    1983-11-21

    A kilowatt meter and water meter were installed to monitor pregreywater usage. The design considerations, the heat exchanger construction and installation, and the monitoring of usage levels are described.

  13. Market Potential for Advanced Thermally Activated BCHP in Five...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    heat and power (CHP) applications in the United States cover a broad spectrum of market segments, from nursing homes requiring a few hundred kilowatts (kW) of power and an...

  14. Biomass Energy Production Incentive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In 2007 South Carolina enacted the Energy Freedom and Rural Development Act, which provides production incentives for certain biomass-energy facilities. Eligible systems earn $0.01 per kilowatt-h...

  15. Plumas-Sierra REC- PV Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plumas-Sierra REC offers an incentive for its customers to install photovoltaic (PV) systems on homes and businesses. Rebates are available for qualifying systems between one kilowatt (kW) and 25...

  16. CX-003979: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tuscola North Plant 100 Kilowatt Wind Turbine InstallationCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 09/22/2010Location(s): Tuscola, IllinoisOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  17. CX-002814: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    City of Arcola 40 Kilowatt Wind Turbine ProjectCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 06/23/2010Location(s): Arcola, IllinoisOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  18. Temperature-Dependent Electron Transport in Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padilla, Derek

    2013-01-01

    that a kilowatt of potential solar power is incident on eachleading to a solar cell’s potential efficiency under suchpotential to address both costs and efficiencies of solar

  19. State-Level Comparison of Processes and Timelines for Distributed Photovoltaic Interconnection in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardani, K.; Davidson, C.; Margolis, R.; Nobler, E.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents results from an analysis of distributed photovoltaic (PV) interconnection and deployment processes in the United States. Using data from more than 30,000 residential (up to 10 kilowatts) and small commercial (10-50 kilowatts) PV systems, installed from 2012 to 2014, we assess the range in project completion timelines nationally (across 87 utilities in 16 states) and in five states with active solar markets (Arizona, California, New Jersey, New York, and Colorado).

  20. MUNI Ways and Structures Building Integrated Solar Membrane Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Randall

    2014-07-03

    The initial goal of the MUNI Ways and Structures Building Integrated Solar Membrane Installation Project was for the City and County of San Francisco (CCSF) to gain experience using the integrated higher efficiency solar photovoltaic (PV) single-ply membrane product, as it differs from the conventional, low efficiency, thin-film PV products, to determine the feasibility of success of larger deployment. As several of CCSF’s municipal rooftops are constrained with respect to weight restrictions, staff of the Energy Generation Group of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) proposed to install a solar PV system using single-ply membrane The installation of the 100 kW (DC-STC) lightweight photo voltaic (PV) system at the MUNI Ways and Structures Center (700 Pennsylvania Ave., San Francisco) is a continuation of the commitment of the City and County of San Francisco (CCSF) to increase the pace of municipal solar development, and serve its municipal facilities with clean renewable energy. The fourteen (14) solar photovoltaic systems that have already been installed at CCSF municipal facilities are assisting in the reduction of fossil-fuel use, and reduction of greenhouse gases from fossil combustion. The MUNI Ways & Structures Center roof has a relatively low weight-bearing capacity (3.25 pounds per square foot) and use of traditional crystalline panels was therefore rejected. Consequently it was decided to use the best available highest efficiency Building-Integrated PV (BIPV) technology, with consideration for reliability and experience of the manufacturer which can meet the low weight-bearing capacity criteria. The original goal of the project was to provide an opportunity to monitor the results of the BIPV technology and compare these results to other City and County of San Francisco installed PV systems. The MUNI Ways and Structures Center was acquired from the Cookson Doors Company, which had run the Center for many decades. The building was renovated in 1998, but the existing roof had not been designed to carry a large load. Due to this fact, a complete roofing and structural analysis had to be performed to match the available roof loading to the existing and/or new solar PV technology, and BIPV was considered an excellent solution for this structure with the roof weight limitations. The solar BIPV system on the large roof area was estimated to provide about 25% of the total facility load with an average of 52,560 kWh per month. In order to accomplish the goals of the project, the following steps were performed: 1. SFPUC and consultants evaluated the structural capability of the facility roof, with recommendations for improvements necessary to accommodate the solar PV system and determine the suitable size of the system in kilowatts. The electrical room and switchgear were evaluated for any improvements necessary and to identify any constraints that might impede the installation of necessary inverters, transformers or meters. 2. Development of a design-build Request for Proposal (RFP) to identify the specifications for the solar PV system, and to include SFPUC technical specifications, equipment warranties and performance warranties. Due to potential labor issues in the local solar industry, SFPUC adjusted the terms of the RFP to more clearly define scope of work between electricians, roofers and laborers. 3. Design phase of project included electrical design drawings, calculations and other construction documents to support three submittals: 50% (preliminary design), 90% (detailed design) and 100% (Department of Building Inspection permit approved). 4. Installation of solar photovoltaic panels, completion of conduit and wiring work, connection of inverters, isolation switches, meters and Data Acquisition System by Contractor (Department of Public Works). 5. Commissioning of system, including all necessary tests to make the PV system fully functional and operational at its rated capacity of 100 kW (DC-STC). Following completion of these steps, the solar PV system was installed and fully integrated by la

  1. Recent technology improvements in Exxon's circulating zinc-bromine battery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellows, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent electrode and electrolyte performance on 500 wH and 3 kWh units indicates that Exxon's circulating zinc-bromine battery in 20 kWh designs will be capable of high energy density (65 to 70 wH/kg), and turn-around efficiency (65 to 70%). This performance, coupled with recent factory cost projections of $28/kWh (exclusive of R.O.I. and various indirect overheads), makes zinc/bromine an attractive advanced battery candidate for not only photovoltaic, but also electric vehicle and bulk energy storage applications. Recent technical developments in this program may be generally useful in other circulating electrolyte systems.

  2. Recent progress on Exxon's circulating zinc bromine battery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellows, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The design, performance, and factory cost of Exxon's circulating zinc bromine batteries are described. The Exxon system has demonstrated stable performance in scale-ups to 3- and 10-kWh sub-modules. Cost studies based on recently demonstrated extrusion and injection molding techniques, have shown that this battery, with plastic electrodes, bipolar stacks, Br/sub 2/ complexation, and circulating electrolytes, could be produced (20 kWh units, 100,000 units/year) at a factory cost of $28/kWh (excluding R.O.I., and various indirect overheads).

  3. Plug-In Electric Vehicles' Charging Dr. Alireza Khaligh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    type Price Battery On-Board Charger E-Range Connector type Level 2 Nissan leaf EV $21,300 24kWh LiWh Li-ion 3.3 kW OBC 68 mi SAE J1772 6 hrs Tesla Model S 60kWh EV $71,000 60 kWh Li-ion 10 kW OBC 208 mi battery voltage 320 V ~ 420 V Maximum output power 1 kW Output voltage ripple

  4. Impact of Energy Disaggregation on Consumer Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakravarty, Prateek; Gupta, Abahy

    2013-01-01

    engagement and reduced energy usage. This paper highlightsnumber of participants, energy usage, HDD and CDD Figure 4Sacramento CA Figure 4: Energy usage (kWh) and HDD/CDD

  5. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    155,000 kWh of electric energy per year, totaling savings ofnatural gas/electric boilers and found energy savings of $varying energy savings results. The Tokyo Electric Power

  6. Development of the Supply Chain Optimization and Planning for the Environment (SCOPE) Tool - Applied to Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Fletcher, Tristan; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

    2008-01-01

    USA) Panel (Germany) Panel (China) indicates the number of years a technology must produce electricity,Electricity (kg-CO2/kWh) Circularity Production Distribution Circularity Production Germany Hungary Italy Finland Spain USA

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    in Exeter, New Hampshire, identified electricity savings ofNew Hampshire, opportunities were identified for saving 1.7 million kWh of electricityelectricity use at OSRAM Sylvania’s glass plant in Exeter, New Hampshire,

  8. Furnace Blower Performance Improvements - Building America Top...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    who install high-performance furnace blowers with well-designed and installed ducts can achieve annual savings of 45% of fan energy or about 300 kWh per home. Read about...

  9. DIVERSAS MANERAS DE GENERAR ENERGIA CON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    DE OLAS #12;PAISES CON MAYOR CAPACIDAD HIDROELECTRICA Country Annual Hydroelectric Energy Production hydroelectric generating system. Three Gorges Dam Gezhouba Dam #12;COSTO PROMEDIO DE PRODUCCION (KWH) #12;U

  10. Zero-Emission Vehicle Scenario Cost Analysis Using A Fuzzy Set-Based Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy Edward

    1999-01-01

    Residential Sector Electricity Prices in California Table 2-Residential Sector Electricity Prices in California (1995$)Residential electricity prices in the Los Angeles area are currently about $0.10 per kWh, but the California

  11. National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research and Development...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    receivers, and thermal storage-are necessary to achieve the cost goal of producing solar energy for 0.06kWh. cspnatllabrdfactsheet.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  12. AEP Ohio - Commercial New Construction Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0.02 - 0.04kWh annualized savings Interior Controls: 0.08Watt controlled Lighting Power Density Incentive: 400kW below ASHRAE 90.1-2004 allowed wattage Unitary and Split...

  13. The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2010-01-01

    wall switches. Lighting power density equals 0.88 watts/switching only. Lighting power density is 1.4 watts/squareMaximum Installed Lighting Power Density (w/sf) Total kWh

  14. Utility Rate Structures and the Impact of Energy Efficiency and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FL Energy Efficiency Calculations * Rates: most common are energy only rates, or a demand rate (kVa or kW) * Demand Rate - Can't use the average cost per kWh for calculations -...

  15. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  16. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, S.

    2010-01-01

    generated by the Nevada Solar One plant is about $0.18/kWh (SEGS IX APS Saguaro Nevada Solar One Total Location Daggett,I - IX APS Saguaro Nevada Solar One PS10 Puertollano Plant

  17. Interpreting human activity from electrical consumption data through non-intrusive load monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillman, Mark Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Non-intrusive load monitoring (NILM) has three distinct advantages over today's smart meters. First, it offers accountability. Few people know where their kWh's are going. Second, it is a maintenance tool. Signs of wear ...

  18. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expenditures (million dollars) Electricity Expenditures (dollars) per kWh per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west...

  19. Healthcare Energy Efficiency Research and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanzisera,, Judy Lai, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    can’t be judged on energy per square foot in a meaningfulmedian energy intensity of 470 kBtu per square foot per yearequipment energy use intensity, e.g. as kWh per square foot

  20. Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram

    2008-01-01

    production level from small hydro as recorded in 2006.  kWH Geothermal Biomass Small Hydro 830 est Wind Solar TotalRPS Geothermal Biomass Small Hydro 830 est Wind Solar Total

  1. Glendale Water and Power- Large Business Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glendale Water and Power (GWP) offers a rebate to its medium and large business customers with electric bills of more than $3000 per month (electric usage of 250,000 kWh annually ~ $36,000 per year...

  2. Onondaga County Department of Water Environment Protection: Process Optimization Saves Energy at Metropolitan Syracuse Wastewater Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how Onondaga County, New York, is saving nearly 3 million kWh and 270 million Btu annually at a wastewater treatment plant after replacing inefficient motors and upgrading pumps.

  3. Kodak: MotorMaster+ Is the Foundation for Energy Efficiency at a Chemical and Imaging Technologies Plant (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-02-01

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how Kodak is saving 5.8 million kWh and $664,000 annually after upgrading or replacing inefficient motors in its Rochester, New York, plant.

  4. Kodak: MotorMaster+ is the Foundation for Energy Efficiency at a Chemical and Imaging Technologies Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-10-01

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how Kodak is saving 5.8 million kWh and $664,000 annually after upgrading or replacing inefficient motors in its Rochester, New York, plant.

  5. Multi-sensor Wireless System for Fault Detection in Induction Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarkesh Esfahani, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities As- sessment,” US DOE, Washington DC, 1998. [6] “California Energyindustrial motors in California consume about 70 billion kWh. 95% of this energy (

  6. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01

    100 Table 33. LPG allocation and intensity by buildingIRR ISP ISP Kg Kt kWh kWh/t LPG MBN MDEA MOS MOSPI MRPL Mtto run equipment and lights, LPG used for water heating and

  7. PIANO DI RIQUALIFICAZIONE AMBIENTALE E PAESAGGISTICA DEL TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO (MI) BRIANZA ENERGIA E AMBIENTE SPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO (MI) ­ BRIANZA ENERGIA E AMBIENTE SPA Impianto di costruito negli anni '70 per lo. · Energia elettrica prodotta: 13.000.000 KWh/anno. LAND S.r.l. Landscape Architecture Nature Development

  8. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E6. Electricity Consumption (kWh) Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Electricity Energy Intensity (kWhsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool-...

  9. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption (kWh) Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Electricity Energy Intensity (kWhsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti-...

  10. Impacts of Electric Vehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum Displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; Delucchi, Mark A.

    1991-01-01

    These studiesprojected electricity consumption EVs and theMPG) and EV electricity consumption (in Kwh per mile).weight of increases. 3.2. Electricity Consumption EVs of To

  11. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption (kWh) Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Energy Intensity (kWhsquare foot) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water...

  12. Energy-Efficiency Technologies and Benchmarking the Energy Intensity for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    tonne yarn) Annual Electricity consumption (kWh) Annual fuelis equal to the electricity consumption at the end-use. Inshows that specific electricity consumption in plant C is

  13. Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    outside pump circulating heat transfer fluid air make-up inside exhaust 24 Cogged V Belts A major N.C. Manufacturer Tested 2-17 Months (yr 1985) .052KWH (.13 EP) 2700 Hours...

  14. Residential Customer Response to Real-time Pricing: The Anaheim Critical Peak Pricing Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolak, Frank A.

    2007-01-01

    The consumption reductions paid rebates during CPP days area CPP rate with a rebate mechanism as the default rate forthese customers received a rebate of 35 cents/KWh for the

  15. Rural electrification, climate change, and local economies: Facilitating communication in development policy and practice on Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casillas, Christian E.

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide Status of Wind/Diesel Applications.  Proceedings Elliot, G.  (1994).  Wind?Diesel Systems: A Guide to the cost 2010 $/kWh Wind turbine Diesel marginal generation cost

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Renewable Energy Cost Recovery Incentive Payment Program These multipliers result in production incentives ranging from 0.12 to 0.54kWh, capped at 5,000 per year. Ownership of...

  17. November 2012 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    and district heating scheme* data. Year Energy Consumption (KWh) Percentage Change 2005/06 65,916,243 N/A 2006 buildings are connected to the Nottingham District Heating Scheme. This service meets all the heating

  18. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    FERC GE GW G&T HTS ICE IOU IPP IREC IRS ISO ITC kW kWh LADWPwind Source: EIA, Ventyx, AWEA, IREC, Berkeley Lab Figure 2.Renewable Energy Council (IREC) and Berkeley Lab. Data on

  19. Microgrid Selection and Operation for Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2008-01-01

    of 2.5US$/W & low solar thermal costs (minus 10% of originalIncluding low-cost storage of US$50/kWh for solar thermalsolar photo- storage storage battery chiller thermal voltaics intercept costs (

  20. A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norwood, Zachary Mills

    2011-01-01

    Performance-Cost analysis of solar combined heat and powerCHP system where the solar field cost is split between thea predicted levelized solar thermal cost of $0.03/kWh, this

  1. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-01-01

    DG unit, then it obtains the PV of cost savings relative toterms comprise the PV of cost savings per kWh e from usingstate, the microgrid’s PV of cost savings reflects the

  2. Optimization and integration of renewable energy sources on a community scale using Artificial Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Bron

    2011-01-01

    section, the relative cost of PV fluctuations is estimated,of electricity (/kWh) the cost of PV is the price of energyof a PV system; but rather, represent the costs of having

  3. Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Beaini, S.

    2010-01-01

    Incentive Program: Solar PV Costs and Incentive Factors, £0.20 /kWh)  to find PV cost  effective at £4/Wp  before Model for the Projection of PV Module Costs and Its  Policy 

  4. Implementation of electric vehicle system based on solar energy in Singapore assessment of flow batteries for energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yaliang

    2009-01-01

    For large-scale energy storage application, flow battery has the advantages of decoupled power and energy management, extended life cycles and relatively low cost of unit energy output ($/kWh). In this thesis, an overview ...

  5. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies”, ACEEE 2008DER-CAM decoupling by thermal storage decoupling by electricor $/kWh) lifetime (a) thermal storage 1 flow battery 220$/

  6. Research, development, and demonstration of lead-acid batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The initial phase of work comprises three factorial experiments to evaluate a variety of component combinations. Goals to be met by these batteries include the following: capacity at 3 h discharge, 20 to 30 kWh; specific energy, 40 Wh/kg; specific power, 1000 W/kg for 15 s; cycle life, 800 cycles to 80% depth; price, $50/kWh. The status of the factorial experiments is reviewed. The second phase of work, design of an advanced battery, has the following goals: 30 to 40 kWh; 60 Wh/kg; 150 W/kg for 15 s; 1000 cycles to 80% depth; $40/kWh. It is not yet possible to say whether these goals can be met. Numerous approaches are under study to increase the utilization of battery chemicals. A battery design with no live electrical connection above the battery is being developed. 52 figures, 52 tables. (RWR)

  7. Energy dispatch schedule optimization and cost benefit analysis for grid-connected, photovoltaic-battery storage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nottrott, A.; Kleissl, J.; Washom, B.

    2013-01-01

    show that Lithium- ion batteries can be a financially viablethe price at which Lithium-ion batteries become financiallyinstalled cost for Lithium-ion batteries of a) $600/kWh, $

  8. Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Division Conclusions EV Charging / discharging patternresidences (homes) for EV charging: $0.138/kWh Environmental8am – 5pm 7pm – 7am EV battery charging efficiency EV

  9. Electrochemical Capacitors as Energy Storage in Hybrid-Electric Vehicles: Present Status and Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy; Miller, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    to assist the energy storage battery (12 kWh) in providingbattery and ultracapacitors in the vehicles when the characteristics of the energy storageBattery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium the energy storage

  10. Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbesi, Karina

    2012-01-01

    along with 22 kWh of battery storage. This study by Baek etpower, but the cost of battery storage per unit of loadMargolis [37], local battery storage for building-sited PV,

  11. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    photovoltaics (PV), and battery storage, are considered forStorage Heat Storage Flow Battery Energy Flow Battery PowerkW) Battery Capacity (kWh) Photo voltaic (kW) Heat Storage (

  12. Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    30 RTUs with advanced controls, resulting in over 100 kWh of energy savings; Walmart Stores Inc. completed over 10,000 high-efficiency RTU installations in new and...

  13. Drivers of Success in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (n 54) VARIABLE MODEL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Constraints on energy use and savings opportunities index - 1.43 b 1.06 - - - - State-level average electricity cost (cents per kWh) - - -...

  14. Artificial Neural Network for Optimized Power System Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OLeary, Daniel Albert

    2015-01-01

    to improve solar and wind forecasts. Further, weather dataone-third of a kWh. Wind data forecasts based on wind speedwind power models presented here, with the potential of improving forecast

  15. Residential electricity rates for the United States for Solcost Data Bank cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L. E.

    1981-05-01

    Electricity rates are given for selected cities in each state, first of the Southern Solar Energy Center region and then of the rest of the US, for an average residence that uses 1000 kWh a month. (LEW)

  16. Parameter variation and scenario analysis in impact assessments of emerging energy technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna Marie

    2015-01-01

    from a natural gas power plant (0.635 kgCO 2 /kWh). 53 We2 , such as natural gas power plants, captured CO 2 in thecoal- and natural gas- fired power plants, and are often

  17. Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    between a coal/steam power plant and a nuclear/ Brayton power plant. Electrical power produced (kWh) Coal reactors, space reactors, concentrated solar power, gas turbines, and fossil energy. advanced

  18. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01

    kW kWh IEPR IOU IPCC ITC LADWP LCOE LSE LTEESP MASH Assemblylevelized cost of energy (LCOE) for PV-based electricitygeneration systems. The LCOE for each system is calculated

  19. New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    be adjusted to meet plant requirements. As a result, the company reduced pumping system energy consumption by 80 percent (225,100 kWh per year), saving an annual 11,255 in...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    TVA- Solar Solutions Initiative The program offers performance based incentive of 0.04kWh for the first 10 years after the project is operational. This incentive is additional to...

  1. Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Firestone, Ryan; Chandran, Bala

    2008-01-01

    kW) 9 hour CHP heat solar thermal thermal storage Fig. 3.is replaced by storage and solar thermal collection, but thechiller, 722 kW of solar thermal collectors, 1100 kWh of

  2. Value and Technology Assessment to Enhance the Business Case for the CERTS Microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasseter, Robert

    2010-01-01

    DER available include solar thermal, photovoltaics (PV) and1 absorption chiller solar thermal flow battery 220$/kWh andabsorption chiller (kW) Solar thermal (kW) PV (kW) lead-acid

  3. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    1962, PP• 427-435. Heat Transmission," Jour. Petrol. Tech. ,production, when the heat transmission distance is 15 miles,for 15 miles of heat transmission, or 5.3 million kWh (3.2

  4. UESC Project Overview: NASA Ames Research Center

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Challenges High energy intensity at many of the center's key buildings * Median energy intensity for typical bldg. similar to ARC's (mix of lab and office) is 21.2 kWh...

  5. Collecting Occupant Presence Data for Use in Energy Management of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Benjamin Tarr

    2012-01-01

    item/1pz2528w If energy consumption data are not availablewith both energy consumption data (in kWh or kBtu) andaffects energy consumption, and use occupant data to

  6. Delmarva- Green Energy Fund

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Prior to July 2007, the Delmarva fund collected $0.000178 per kWh (0.178 mills/kWh) to fund renewable energy and energy efficiency incentive programs. The collections were increased to $0.000356...

  7. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01

    option, especially as lithium ion battery costs decline. ItkW electric motor, a lithium-ion battery pack and a 6- speedkw electrical, 31 kWh lithium ion battery, 6-speed automatic

  8. Maximum output at minimum cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Gamesa G90-2.0 MW #12;Maximum output at minimum cost per kWh for low wind sites ®® Class IIIA mast and the electrical substation. This innovative modular design based on TCP/IP architecture has

  9. Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to thethe levelized cost of gas-fired generation by 0.25¢/kWh (the levelized cost of gas-fired generation (assuming 7,000

  10. Assessment of the Impacts of Standards and Labeling Programs in Mexico (four products).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Itha; Pulido, Henry; McNeil, Michael A.; Turiel, Isaac; della Cava, Mirka

    2007-01-01

    MW avoided Avoided cost by generation Cost by MW avoidedapplying the annualized cost of generation capacity. RevenueConsiderations: Cost of generation of one kWh considering a

  11. Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2008-01-01

    or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to thethe levelized cost of gas-fired generation by 0.33¢/kWh (the levelized cost of gas-fired generation (assuming 7,000

  12. Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2009-01-01

    rate Variable cost Demand/Generation (MW) Figure 1:rate (CO 2 -eq/kWh) Cost of generation (¢/kWh) NGST+NGCTrelatively low-cost coal and hydro generation that comprise

  13. Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2012) for a unit operating continuously (8,760 hours per year). The assumed electricity price is 0.09 per kWh, the federal average electricity price. Lifetime energy cost is the...

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Near Zero Maine Home II, Vassalboro...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an R-20 insulated slab, R-70 cellulose in the attic, extensive air sealing, a mini-split heat pump, an heat recovery ventilator, solar water heating, LED lighting, 3.9 kWh PV, and...

  15. Advancing PEVs and the Future of PEV R&D and Deployment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PHEVs and EREVs Future Next Generation Li-ion or Li-metal Chemistry with 3x energy density Battery Cost (kWh) Energy Density (WhL) 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2014 2013...

  16. Energy Smart Industrial: five years of enormous savings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.5 million kWh a year. JD Hisey, the plant's continuous improvement manager, says Energy Smart Industrial did more than just cut Fitesa's energy costs. "The new equipment reduced...

  17. Energy Department's Hospital Energy Alliance Helps Partner Save...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    bills. Gundersen is investing in renewable energy solutions, including a biogas generator that uses methane from a local landfill to produce over 8 million kWh of electricity...

  18. Orlando Utilities Commission- Solar Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) also offers incentive for solar hot water heating systems. Commercial solar hot water heating systems receive a $0.03 per kWh equivalent. Residential...

  19. A Review of the 2011 and 2013 Digital Television Energy Efficiency Regulations Developed and Adopted by the California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wazzan, C. Paul; Eash, Dawn E.

    2011-01-01

    8: Column L. Annual Energy Prices were not explicitly givenr)^( a - 2011) Annual Energy Prices ($/kWh) 3 Present Value1: Column J. Annual Energy Prices were not explicitly given

  20. An Analysis of Residential PV System Price Differences Between the United States and Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seel, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    electricity prices over time (similar to the new reality in GermanyGermany $/W German system price $ 2011/W FiT $/kWh Electricityprice differences between Germany and the United States affect the associated electricity

  1. Energy Efficiency in Buildings as an Air Quality Compliance Approach: Opportunities for the U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vine, Edward

    2002-01-01

    greenhouse gas GWh HERS HVAC IPMVP kW kWh MW MWh NASEOand Verification Protocol (IPMVP) for quantifying emissionsand Verification Protocol (IPMVP) was listed as one of the

  2. Optimizing Distributed Energy Resources and Building Retrofits with the Strategic DER-CAModel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    p, €/kW volumetric demand response costs, €/kWh thickness ofof end-use u removed by demand response measures in month m,measures such as demand response are also included, as well

  3. J.R. Simplot: Burner Upgrade Project Improves Performance and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in annual energy costs * Saves 52,000 MMBtu of natural gas annually * Improves boiler performance * Saves 526,000 kWh per year * Achieves a simple payback of less than 14...

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF 1976 SUMMER WORKSHOP ON AN ENERGY EXTENSION SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    countries over time, with hydro power counted at 3 kWh t / 1e The large amount of hydro- power available in Sweden hasplentiful while little hydro- power was available. Higher

  5. Efficient Energy Use and Well-Being: The Swedish Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee; Lichtenberg, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    countries over time, with hydro power counted at 3 kWh / 1electricity has been hydro- power (66). In 1971, electricitysupply came from hydro- power, Sweden's most important

  6. Study of Energy and Demand Savings on a High Efficiency Hydraulic Pump System with Infinite Turn Down Technology (ITDT) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sfeir, R. A.; Kanungo, A.; Liou, S.

    2005-01-01

    Detailed field measurement and verification of electrical energy (kWh) and demand (kW) savings is conducted on an injection molding machine used in typical plastic manufacturing facility retrofitted with a high ...

  7. imulation und Optimierung der Standort- und Kapazit¨atsauswahl in der Planung von Ladeinfrastruktur fur batterieelektrische Fahrzeug?otten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefen, Kostja

    2012-01-01

    sich auch die Technik der Energiespeicher in den letzten 20Batterie als singul¨ aren Energiespeicher f¨ ur die gesamtewird f¨ ur elektrische Energiespeicher in kWh pro 100 km

  8. Fact #823: June 2, 2014 Hybrid Vehicles use more Battery Packs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    lower volume, their battery packs are much larger with capacities as high as 85 kWh - a battery offering for the Tesla Model S. Number of Batteries Sold and Battery Capacity Sold...

  9. Energy Storage Systems 2009 Peer Review | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2009 Peer Review - Development of a 5kWh Flywheel ESS Using a High Tem Superconducting Magnetic Bearing (Phase III) - Make Strasik, Boeing.pdf ESS 2009 Peer Review - Large Area...

  10. TVA- Solar Solutions Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The program offers performance based incentive of $0.04/kWh for the first 10 years after the project is operational. This incentive is additional to the seasonal and time-of-day price for electri...

  11. What's on your Roof? Rooftop Unit (RTU) Efficiency Advice and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    an average of 50% installed efficiency gain at 40 stores and were able to reduce capacity on some units from 8% to 41%. That is big savings - over an estimated 12, 000 kWh...

  12. Pennsylvania's Comprehensive, Statewide, Pro-Active Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    project saved 6,300,000 kWh per year with upgrades to its hydrogen burners on an annealing furnace. This reduction saved the company 150,000 per year. The company also...

  13. Performance Analysis of XCPC Powered Solar Cooling Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widyolar, Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Electrical (kWh) Electrical COP 3.8 Economic Evaluation Asimple economic evaluation of the system was performed using47 3.8 Economic Evaluation…………………………………………………………….49 4. A

  14. Energy Department's Hospital Energy Alliance Helps Partner Save...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on its energy bills. Gundersen is investing in renewable energy solutions, including a biogas generator that uses methane from a local landfill to produce over 8 million kWh of...

  15. Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2008-01-01

    market-based forward price projections argues for furtherAEO 2008 and NYMEX price projections. Nominal ¢/kWh (at 7000that exceed the AEO price projection) described above. If

  16. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    impacts We converted other cost metrics to ¢/kWh retail ratePower System Operating Costs: Summary and Perspective onA. Bibliography of RPS Cost Studies Studies listed in

  17. SEP Success Story: Library Patrons in New York Check-Out Renewable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    library in Esopus, New York, used Recovery Act funds to install two photovoltaic arrays expected to generate 31,200 kWh of electricity annually -- approximately 30 percent of the...

  18. 2.1E Sample Run Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelmann, F.C.

    2010-01-01

    iS RESVVT UNIT LOAD ENERGY USE SUN (I_TU) (KWH) MONTH PEAK (HOUR. WITH SUN UP . PERCENT bIGHTING ENERGYHOURS WITH SUN UP . PERCENT LIGHTING ENERGY

  19. NREL: Awards and Honors - Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of power and produce as much as 86.3 kWh of electricity during a typical year under a Phoenix, AZ sun. This means that 100 to 150 of these cells could produce enough electricity...

  20. Abstract--This paper describes a spreadsheet model for estimating the impact of High Temperature Supercon-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -576-2733, e-mail:mcconnellbw@ornl.gov). J. W. Mulholland is with the Arizona Power Authority, Phoenix AZ 85007 into the grid. The output results are explicit numbers of kWh and dollars; however, the real intent