Sample records for kilometers square kilometers

  1. Square Kilometer Array Telescope - Precision Reference Frequency Synchronisation via 1f-2f Dissemination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, B; Gao, C; Bai, Y; Dong, J W; Wang, L J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) is an international effort to build the world's largest radio telescope, with one square kilometer collecting area. Besides its ambitious scientific objectives, such as probing the cosmic dawn and cradle of life, SKA also demands several revolutionary technological breakthroughs, with ultra-high precision synchronisation of the frequency references for thousands of antennas being one of them. In this report, aimed at applications to SKA, we demonstrate a frequency reference synchronization and dissemination scheme with the phase noise compensation function placed at the client site. Hence, one central hub can be linked to a large number of client sites, forming a star-shaped topology. As a performance test, the 100 MHz reference signal from a Hydrogen maser clock is disseminated and recovered at two remote sites. Phase noise characteristics of the recovered reference frequency signal coincides with that of the hydrogen-maser source and satisfies SKA requirement.

  2. Power Challenges of Large Scale Research Infrastructures: the Square Kilometer Array and Solar Energy Integration; Towards a zero-carbon footprint next generation telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Domingos; Ruiz, Valeriano; Silva, Manuel; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Santander-Vela, Juande; Maia, Dalmiro; Antón, Sonia; van Ardenne, Arnold; Vetter, Matthias; Kramer, Michael; Keller, Reinhard; Pereira, Nuno; Silva, Vitor

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will be the largest Global science project of the next two decades. It will encompass a sensor network dedicated to radioastronomy, covering two continents. It will be constructed in remote areas of South Africa and Australia, spreading over 3000Km, in high solar irradiance latitudes. Solar Power supply is therefore an option to power supply the SKA and contribute to a zero carbon footprint next generation telescope. Here we outline the major characteristics of the SKA and some innovation approaches on thermal solar energy Integration with SKA prototypes.

  3. The Square Kilometer Array Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Braun

    1995-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific motivation is reviewed for a next generation radio observatory operating at frequencies between about 200 MHz and 2 GHz with about 2 orders of magnitude greater sensitivity than that which is currently available, together with sub-arcsecond angular resolution. Instrumental concepts for the telescope are discussed, highlighting the role of mass produced receiver elements and digital electronics in increasing cost-effectiveness while actively reducing the instrument's sensitivity to radio frequency interference.

  4. High Energy Neutrino Astronomy: Towards Kilometer-Scale Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Of all high-energy particles, only neutrinos can directly convey astronomical information from the edge of the universe---and from deep inside the most cataclysmic high-energy processes. Copiously produced in high-energy collisions, travelling at the velocity of light, and not deflected by magnetic fields, neutrinos meet the basic requirements for astronomy. Their unique advantage arises from a fundamental property: they are affected only by the weakest of nature's forces (but for gravity) and are therefore essentially unabsorbed as they travel cosmological distances between their origin and us. Many of the outstanding mysteries of astrophysics may be hidden from our sight at all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum because of absorption by matter and radiation between us and the source. For example, the hot dense regions that form the central engines of stars and galaxies are opaque to photons. In other cases, such as supernova remnants, gamma ray bursters, and active galaxies, all of which may involve compact objects or black holes at their cores, the precise origin of the high-energy photons emerging from their surface regions is uncertain. Therefore, data obtained through a variety of observational windows---and especially through direct observations with neutrinos---may be of cardinal importance. In this talk, the scientific goals of high energy neutrino astronomy and the technical aspects of water and ice Cherenkov detectors are examined, and future experimental possibilities, including a kilometer-square deep ice neutrino telescope, are explored.

  5. Modeling temporal variations of electrical resistivity associated with pore pressure change in a kilometer-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (hautot@univ-brest.fr) [1] From 1995 to 1998 the natural electric field was monitored with an array of 20 role of fluids in the distortion of the induced electric fields. Electromagnetic methods could provide in a kilometer-scale natural system Sophie Hautot School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

  6. Topology of neutral hydrogen distribution with the Square Kilometer Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yougang; Wu, Fengquan; Chen, Xuelei; Wang, Xin; Kim, Juhan; Park, Changbom; Lee, Khee-Gan; Cen, Renyue

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Morphology of the complex HI gas distribution can be quantified by statistics like the Minkowski functionals, and can provide a way to statistically study the large scale structure in the HI maps both at low redshifts, and during the epoch of reionization (EoR). At low redshifts, the 21cm emission traces the underlying matter distribution. Topology of the HI gas distribution, as measured by the genus, could be used as a "standard ruler". This enables the determination of distance-redshift relation and also the discrimination of various models of dark energy and of modified gravity. The topological analysis is also sensitive to certain primordial non-Gaussian features. Compared with two-point statistics, the topological statistics are more robust against the nonlinear gravitational evolution, bias, and redshift-space distortion. The HI intensity map observation naturally avoids the sparse sampling distortion, which is an important systematic in optical galaxy survey. The large cosmic volume accessible to SKA w...

  7. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers UC Davis Water Management Research Group Aplication Efficiency: Dry Beans 2001 Developed as a cooperative project between University of California, Davis United States Geological Survey and California Department of Water Resources Map prepared

  8. Status of aeromagnetic survey coverage of Yucca Mountain and vicinity to a radius of about 140 kilometers, southwestern Nevada and southeastern California, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikora, R.F.; Ponce, D.A.; Oliver, H.W.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifty aeromagnetic surveys in the southwestern part of Nevada and the southeastern part of California have been evaluated to assess the quality and coverage of aeromagnetic data within 140 kilometers (km) of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The compilation shows that all the study area is covered by aeromagnetic surveys, but in some areas, particularly in the Death Valley region, new surveys flown with closer flight line spacing and lower elevations than the existing coverage are needed. In addition, the California part of the study area needs to be analytically continued downward to 305 meters (m) above ground level to provide a consistent data set for interpretation of subsurface geologic structures.

  9. Powder River 0 20 40 KILOMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. coal basins. The Powder River Basin (PRB) in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana (fig. 1 tons (MST), some 42 percent of the total coal pro- duction in the United States, making the PRB the single most important coal-producing basin in the Nation. About 426 MST (92 percent of total PRB coal

  10. 1000 2000 3000 4000 .5 0 1 KILOMETER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    Rocks, Including Interbedded Limestone, Ordovician Black Shale/Slate Green Shale/Slate Bedded Limestone Quartz Arenite or Quartz Rich Wacke Brown/Tan/Olive DrabShale/Slate, Mudstone, and Sandstone Red Shale/Slate

  11. Status of Neutrino Astronomy: The Quest for Kilometer-Scale Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a (very) personal attempt to summarize the status of neutrino astronomy: its scientific motivations, our understanding of natural water and ice as particle detectors and, finally, the detector technology.

  12. Adaptive Selective Learning for Automatic Identification of Sub-Kilometer Craters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    Martian terrain characterized by heterogeneous surface morphology. The experimental results demonstrate and present geological processes and provide the only tool for measuring rela- tive ages of observed geologic. Geologic stratigraphy based on manually collected databases has coarse spatial resolutions. Finer spatial

  13. Semi-supervised based Active Class Selection for Automatic Identification of Sub-Kilometer Craters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    characterized by heterogeneous surface morphology. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed about the past and present geological processes and provide the only tool to measuring relative ages of observed geologic formations. The size distribution of craters conforms to the power-law as large craters

  14. Fabric Analysis of Survivor Clasts in the Southwest Deforming Zone of the San Andreas Fault at Three Kilometers Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loftin, Aileen

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    -frequency and shape-size distributions of survivor clasts from the SDZ were characterized through 3D analysis of X-Ray Computed Tomography (XCT) images of SDZ core samples. A number of processing techniques were employed to calibrate, remove artifacts, filter...

  15. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    a specific amount of water. AE express- es how well an irrigation system can potential- ly distributes 1 shows the AE values used for different irrigation systems (Canessa et al. 2011). Re- gional AE estimates in Table 2 were esti- mated using a weighted average of AE and irrigation system's crop acreage

  16. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    is operated to de- liver a specific amount of water. AE express- es how well an irrigation system can as the target water depth. Table 1 shows the AE values used for different irrigation systems (Canessa et al and irrigation system's crop acreage for each region (Tindula et al. 2013). The main assu- mptions is that every

  17. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    - liver a specific amount of water. AE express- es how well an irrigation system can potential- ly depth. Table 1 shows the AE values used for different irrigation systems (Canessa et al. 2011). Re- gional AE estimates in Table 2 were esti- mated using a weighted average of AE and irrigation system

  18. A l u m n i C a m p u sE N E R G I E (89 Kilometer nordwestlich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vollmer, Heribert

    Referenzprojekt für die Ent- wicklung der Offshore-Wind- energie besondere Bedeutung zu. Derzeit laufen in der Aus und 15 Insti- Einleitung Ziel der Bundesregierung ist es, bis zum Jahr 2030 Offshore- Windparks mit- wicklung fiel im Herbst 2008 mit dem Bau des Umspann- werks für das Offshore-Test- feld alpha ventus

  19. Johnson(-like)-Noise-Kirchhoff-Loop Based Secure Classical Communicator Characteristics, for Ranges of Two to Two Thousand Kilometers, via Model-Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Mingesz; Zoltan Gingl; Laszlo B. Kish

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A pair of Kirchhoff-Loop-Johnson(-like)-Noise communicators, which is able to work over variable ranges, was designed and built. Tests have been carried out on a model-line performance characteristics were obtained for ranges beyond the ranges of any known direct quantum communication channel and they indicate unrivalled signal fidelity and security performance of the exchanged raw key bits. This simple device has single-wire secure key generation and sharing rates of 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 bit/second for corresponding copper wire diameters/ranges of 21 mm / 2000 km, 7 mm / 200 km, 2.3 mm / 20 km, and 0.7 mm / 2 km, respectively and it performs with 0.02% raw-bit error rate (99.98 % fidelity). The raw-bit security of this practical system significantly outperforms raw-bit quantum security. Current injection breaking tests show zero bit eavesdropping ability without triggering the alarm signal, therefore no multiple measurements are needed to build an error statistics to detect the eavesdropping as in quantum communication. Wire resistance based breaking tests of Bergou-Scheuer-Yariv type give an upper limit of eavesdropped raw bit ratio of 0.19 % and this limit is inversely proportional to the sixth power of cable diameter. Hao's breaking method yields zero (below measurement resolution) eavesdropping information.

  20. Neotectonics, geodesy, and seismic hazard in the Northern Walker Lane of Western North America: Thirty kilometers of crustal shear and no strike-slip?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , University of Nevada, Reno 89557, United States b Nevada Geodetic Laboratory, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 89557, United States c Nevada Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno 89557, United States a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 2 January 2012 Received in revised

  1. 22LRO Explores the Apollo 12 Landing Area on the Moon NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) from a lunar orbit of 21 kilometers (13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    22LRO Explores the Apollo 12 Landing Area on the Moon NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO of the Apollo 12 landing site. Images show the twists and turns of the paths made when the astronauts explored the lunar surface. One of the details that shows up is a bright L-shape in the Apollo 12 image. It marks

  2. DOE/EA-0978 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT SLUDGE STABILIZATION AT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of chemistry and Physics, Robert C. Weast, Ph.D., 70th Ed., 1989-1990, CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Florida. square 0.39 square miles square kilometers centimeters G-3 October...

  3. Determining Home Range and Preferred Habitat of Feral Horses on the Nevada National Security Site Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Ashley V. [NSTec

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Feral horses (Equus caballus) are free-roaming descendants of domesticated horses and legally protected by the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, which mandates how feral horses and burros should be managed and protected on federal lands. Using a geographic information system to determine the home range and suitable habitat of feral horses on the federally managed Nevada National Security Site can enable wildlife biologists in making best management practice recommendations. Home range was estimated at 88.1 square kilometers. Site suitability was calculated for elevation, forage, slope, water presence and horse observations. These variables were combined in successive iterations into one polygon. Suitability rankings established that 85 square kilometers are most suitable habitat, with 2,052 square kilometers of good habitat 1,252 square kilometers of fair habitat and 122 square kilometers of least suitable habitat.

  4. Simulated Interdiction: Proliferation Security Initiative 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gassam, Geraldine; Jacob, Savio; Jenecka, Bobby; Lanzing, Kevin; Lee, Jeonghoon; Reves, Nick; Slanker, Julie; Trojan, Anthony; Wismer, Ryan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the European Union. Terrain: Vast central plains, mountains in West, hills and low mountains in east; rugged mountains and broad river valleys in Alaska, rugged volcanic topography in Hawaii. Border Length: Canada 8,893 kilometers, Mexico 3,141 kilometers... Area: approximately 17 million square kilometers. Terrain: broad plains with low hills west of primary mountain range; vast coniferous forest and tundra in central northern territory; uplands and mountains along southern border regions Border Length...

  5. Cornell University, Office of Sponsored Programs Awards Received in June 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    : NOVEL X-RAY SCATTERING STUDIES $120,000 DBW CALICCHIA, MARCIA ILR-EXT OCFS HUMAN SERVICES LEADERSHIP FOR THE SQUARE KILOMETER ARRAY $500,064 BMT CORDES, JAMES M CRSR NSF NEUTRON STARS, ELECTRON DENSITY TURBULENCE

  6. DATA TRANSMISSION OPTIONS FOR VMT DATA AND FEE COLLECTION CENTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    , VMT fee, data processing, fuel tax alternatives, fee collection center, customer service center 18.59 kilometers squared km2 VOLUME VOLUME mL milliliters 0.034 fluid ounces fl oz fl oz fluid ounces 29

  7. EA-0534-FEA-1991.pdf

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Carolina and Georgia. The LANL site encompasses approximately 111 square kilometers in north-central New Mexico. It is located on the Pajarito Plateau, a series of mesas and...

  8. Fish population and behavior revealed by instantaneous continental-shelf scale imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symonds, Deanelle T

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of a technique to instantaneously image and continuously monitor the abundance, spatial distribution, and behavior of fish populations over thousands of square kilometers using Ocean Acoustic Waveguide ...

  9. The Masdar Development - Climate Engineering for a Carbon-neutral City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuler, M.; Fiedler, T.; Lauster, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approach of defining sustainable urban development: The six square kilometer city, designed by Foster and Partner for the Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company, is eventually to house 50,000 people in accordance with WWF One Planet Living sustainability standards...

  10. Comment on "Aptian faulting in the Haushi-Huqf (Oman) and the tectonic evolution of the southeast Arabian platform-margin"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    exposures of the Wadi Sha'bat al Tawraq from which this conclusion has been drawn (location in Figure 1a. Geological setting In an area of about 10 square kilometers encompassing the Wadi Sha'bat al Tawraq, two

  11. Artificial ozone holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. N. Dolya

    2014-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This article considers an opportunity of disinfecting a part of the Earth surface, occupying a large area of ten thousand square kilometers. The sunlight will cause dissociation of molecular bromine into atoms; each bromine atom kills thirty thousand molecules of ozone. Each bromine plate has a mass of forty milligrams grams and destroys ozone in the area of hundred square meters. Thus, to form the ozone hole over the area of ten thousand square kilometers, it is required to have the total mass of bromine equal to the following four tons.

  12. Copley Square : realizing its full potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haque, Reaz

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to form a basis for realizing the full potential of Copley Square, and also to establish an approach to the issues of preservation and revitalization of historic urban squares. The objective ...

  13. An algorithm for recognising the exterior square of a matrix Keywords: matrix, exterior square, algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenhill, Catherine

    vector space, with respect to a canonical basis, is called the exterior square of X. Note that all vectorAn algorithm for recognising the exterior square of a matrix Keywords: matrix, exterior square the exterior square of a matrix. The approach involves manipulation of the equations which relate the entries

  14. Asymptotics for GARCH Squared Residual Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokoszka, Piotr

    Asymptotics for GARCH Squared Residual Correlations Istv'an Berkes \\Lambda A. R'enyi Institute a GARCH(p; q) model. Denoting by â?? r n (k); k â?? 1; these autocorrelations computed from a realization words and phrases: GARCH(p; q) sequence, quasi--maximum likelihood esti­ mator, squared residuals

  15. Policy Iteration / Optimistic Policy Iteration Least-Squares Policy Iteration Experiments Least Squares Policy Iteration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherrer, Bruno

    Policy Iteration / Optimistic Policy Iteration Least-Squares Policy Iteration Experiments Least Squares Policy Iteration Bias-Variance Trade-o in Control Problems Christophe Thiéry and Bruno Scherrer/27 #12; Policy Iteration / Optimistic Policy Iteration Least-Squares Policy Iteration Experiments Markov

  16. Elmo bumpy square plasma confinement device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owen, L.W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an Elmo bumpy type plasma confinement device having a polygonal configuration of closed magnet field lines for improved plasma confinement. In the preferred embodiment, the device is of a square configuration which is referred to as an Elmo bumpy square (EBS). The EBS is formed by four linear magnetic mirror sections each comprising a plurality of axisymmetric assemblies connected in series and linked by 90/sup 0/ sections of a high magnetic field toroidal solenoid type field generating coils. These coils provide corner confinement with a minimum of radial dispersion of the confined plasma to minimize the detrimental effects of the toroidal curvature of the magnetic field. Each corner is formed by a plurality of circular or elliptical coils aligned about the corner radius to provide maximum continuity in the closing of the magnetic field lines about the square configuration confining the plasma within a vacuum vessel located within the various coils forming the square configuration confinement geometry.

  17. 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Purpose and Scope of MARSSIM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --ranging in size from Federal weapons- production facilities covering hundreds of square kilometers to the nuclear Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Department of Energy (DOE) are responsible radioactive contamination. The decommissioning that follows remediation will normally require a demonstration

  18. COLOMBIA GUYANA VENEZUELA FR.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    PERU CHILE ARGENTINA PARAGUAY BOLIVIA COLOMBIA GUYANA SURINAME URUGUAY VENEZUELA FR. GUIANA POPULATION DENSITY, 2000 Population density measures the number of persons per square kilometer of land area the population grids and thus may appear coarse. Lambert Azimuthal Equal Area Projection ´ 0 500 1,000 km

  19. http://bos.sagepub.com/ Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    of the Atomic Scientists Timothy A. Mousseau and Anders P. Møller Chernobyl's wildlife Landscape portrait contaminants on Chernobyl's wildlife Timothy A. Mousseau and Anders P. Møller Abstract The Chernobyl accident,000 square kilometers of land. The Chernobyl Forum Report, an initiative of the International Atomic Energy

  20. Wednesday, March 26, 2008 Celebrating IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    of interest (for example, the appearance of exotic dark matter particles, or even miniature black holes) from 80 strings suspended in holes drilled in the ice by hot water and spaced over a square kilometer in place by pouring water into the hole, which then freezes, they are utterly inaccessible. In fact

  1. Multi-Messenger Astronomy: Cosmic Rays, Gamma-Rays, and Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Although cosmic rays were discovered a century ago, we do not know where or how they are accelerated. There is a realistic hope that the oldest problem in astronomy will be solved soon by ambitious experimentation: air shower arrays of 10,000 kilometer-square area, arrays of air Cerenkov telescopes and kilometer- scale neutrino observatories. Their predecessors are producing science. We will review the highlights: - Cosmic rays: the highest energy particles and the GZK cutoff, the search for cosmic accelerators and the the Cygnus region, top-down mechanisms: photons versus protons? - TeV-energy gamma rays: blazars, how molecular clouds may have revealed proton beams, first hints of the diffuse infrared background? - Neutrinos: first results and proof of concept for technologies to construct kilometer-scale observatories.

  2. Quantum Latin squares and unitary error bases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Musto; Jamie Vicary

    2015-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we introduce quantum Latin squares, combinatorial quantum objects which generalize classical Latin squares, and investigate their applications in quantum computer science. Our main results are on applications to unitary error bases (UEBs), basic structures in quantum information which lie at the heart of procedures such as teleportation, dense coding and error correction. We present a new method for constructing a UEB from a quantum Latin square equipped with extra data. Developing construction techniques for UEBs has been a major activity in quantum computation, with three primary methods proposed: shift-and-multiply, Hadamard, and algebraic. We show that our new approach simultaneously generalizes the shift-and-multiply and Hadamard methods. Furthermore, we explicitly construct a UEB using our technique which we prove cannot be obtained from any of these existing methods.

  3. The Group of symmetries of a square There are eight symmetries of a square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Karen E.

    The Group of symmetries of a square There are eight symmetries of a square: e = no motion r1) a product of two of its subgroups? 5. How many different (non-isomorphic) groups of order eight can you) a = reflection over anti-diagonal (the line y = -x) Complete the Cayley Table for the dihedral group D4: e r1 r2

  4. Toward a Unique UnderstandingToward a Unique Understanding Washington SquareWashington Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    ;LagniappeLagniappe 1837 Map of Nacogdoches1837 Map of Nacogdoches 1846 Map of Nacogdoches1846 Map #12;The Sanborn MapsThe Sanborn Maps #12;Georeferenced RepresentationGeoreferenced Representation #12 excavations atbelow from the 1979 excavations at Washington Square.Washington Square. #12;The GridThe Grid #12

  5. ROBOT CALIBRATION USING LEAST-SQUARES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanagan, Randy

    ROBOT CALIBRATION USING LEAST-SQUARES AND P OLAR-DEC OMP O SITION FILTERING Gregory Ioannldes 1 This paper reports the experimental results of a novel method to calibrate geometric errors of multi of the Yaskawa Motoman Robot was calibrated. The measurements of the Cartesian coordinates of points were

  6. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    Public Safety Funding). RESOLVED That the San José State University (SJSU) commend the CSU BoardSAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE SAN JOSE, CA 95192 SS-F12-2, Sense of the Senate Resolution, Urging that California Voters Become Well Informed About the Current State of Funding

  7. Robust Least Square Semidefinite Programming with Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 13, 2013 ... In this paper, we consider a least square semidefinite programming problem .... and handling uncertainty, and has natural statistical interpretation. On .... of the paper, we use B(X, r) ? Sn to denote the closed ball centered at X ...

  8. David Hume Tower George Square, Edinburgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    David Hume Tower George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JX 0131 650 8295 http://www.ed.ac.uk/maps THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH DAVID HUME TOWER A GUIDE TO ACCESS AND FACILITIES #12;If you require this document the evacuation arrangements". #12;Disabled Access Guide for David Hume Tower Introduction DAVID HUME TOWER

  9. INVERSE-SQUARE LAW TESTS 1 TESTS OF THE GRAVITATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    INVERSE-SQUARE LAW TESTS 1 TESTS OF THE GRAVITATIONAL INVERSE-SQUARE LAW E.G.Adelberger, B-1560 KEYWORDS: gravitation, experimental tests of inverse-square law, quantum gravity, extra dimensions ABSTRACT: We review recent experimental tests of the gravitational inverse-square law, and the wide variety

  10. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "hybrid" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  11. The Spanish Square Kilometre Array White Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulido, J A Acosta; Alberdi, A; Alcolea, J; Alfaro, E J; Alonso-Herrero, A; Anglada, G; Arnalte-Mur, P; Ascasibar, Y; Ascaso, B; Azulay, R; Bachiller, R; Baez-Rubio, A; Battaner, E; Blasco, J; Brook, C B; Bujarrabal, V; Busquet, G; Caballero-Garcia, M D; Carrasco-Gonzalez, C; Casares, J; Castro-Tirado, A J; Colina, L; Colomer, F; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; del Olmo, A; Desmurs, J-F; Diego, J M; Dominguez-Tenreiro, R; Estalella, R; Fernandez-Soto, A; Florido, E; Font, J; Font, J A; Fuente, A; Garcia-Burillo, S; Garcia-Benito, R; Garcia-Lorenzo, B; de Paz, A Gil; Girart, J M; Goicoechea, J R; Gomez, J F; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Gonzalez-Martin, O; Gonzalez-Serrano, J I; Gorgas, J; Gorosabel, J; Guijarro, A; Guirado, J C; Hernandez-Garcia, L; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Herrero-Illana, R; Hu, Y-D; Huelamo, N; Huertas-Company, M; Iglesias-Paramo, J; Jeong, S; Jimenez-Serra, I; Knapen, J H; Lineros, R A; Lisenfeld, U; Marcaide, J M; Marquez, I; Marti, J; Marti, J M; Martinez-Gonzalez, E; Martin-Pintado, J; Marti-Vidal, I; Masegosa, J; Mayen-Gijon, J M; Mezcua, M; Mimica, S/ Migliari P; Moldon, J; Morata, O; Negueruela, I; Oates, S R; Osorio, M; Palau, A; Paredes, J M; Perea, J; Perez-Gonzalez, P G; Perez-Montero, E; Perez-Torres, M A; Perucho, M; Planelles, S; Pons, J A; Prieto, A; Quilis, V; Ramirez-Moreta, P; Almeida, C Ramos; Rea, N; Ribo, M; Rioja, M J; Espinosa, J M Rodriguez; Ros, E; Rubiño-Martin, J A; Ruiz-Granados, B; Sabater, J; Sanchez, M A P; Usero, A; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Vidal-Garcia, A; Vielva, P; Vilchez, J; Zhang, B-B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is called to revolutionise essentially all areas of Astrophysics. With a collecting area of about a square kilometre, the SKA will be a transformational instrument, and its scientific potential will go beyond the interests of astronomers. Its technological challenges and huge cost requires a multinational effort, and Europe has recognised this by putting the SKA on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). The Spanish SKA White Book is the result of the coordinated effort of 119 astronomers from 40 different research centers. The book shows the enormous scientific interest of the Spanish astronomical community in the SKA and warrants an optimum scientific exploitation of the SKA by Spanish researchers, if Spain enters the SKA project.

  12. Application Prospect Analysis of the Surface Water Source Heat-Pump in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Zhuang, Z.; Huang, L.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drainage area (They are Changjiang River basin, Yellow River basin, Songhuajiang River basin, Huaihe River basin, Liaohe River basin, Haihe River basin, Zhujiang River basin.), the five large lakes(They are Poyanghu Lake area, Dongtinghu Lake area..., Taihu Lake area, Hongzehu Lake area, Caohu Lake area), there are about more than 50000 rivers whose basin area is bigger than 100 square-kilometers, there are about more than 1500 rivers whose basin area is bigger than 1000 square...

  13. Y-12 Lease Summary Address* (Description) Square Footage Lease...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y-12 Lease Summary Address* (Description) Square Footage Lease Term Expiration Date Onsite Leases 602 Scarboro Rd (New Hope Center) 137,758 square feet Five years 05042012 301...

  14. Square Engineering Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern IL Elec Coop, IncSouthwesternSparkSpringSquare Engineering

  15. 1Machine Learning, to appear. Least-Squares Independence Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugiyama, Masashi

    1Machine Learning, to appear. Least-Squares Independence Regression for Non-Linear Causal Inference of Technology, Japan. sesejun@cs.titech.ac.jp Abstract The discovery of non-linear causal relationship under Causal inference, Non-Linear, Non-Gaussian, Squared-loss mutual information, Least-Squares Independence

  16. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  17. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  18. Augmented classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  19. Submerged Stories from the Sidelines of Archaeological Science: The History and Politics of the Keban Dam Rescue Project (1967-1975) in Eastern Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dissard, Laurent

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sits among trees beside a wadi, about one kilometer East ofvillage. Erosion by the wadi and a small irrigation ditch

  20. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.

    2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The hybrid method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  1. Classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis method that adds spectral shapes describing non-calibrated components and system effects (other than baseline corrections) present in the analyzed mixture to the prediction phase of the method. These improvements decrease or eliminate many of the restrictions to the CLS-type methods and greatly extend their capabilities, accuracy, and precision. One new application of PACLS includes the ability to accurately predict unknown sample concentrations when new unmodeled spectral components are present in the unknown samples. Other applications of PACLS include the incorporation of spectrometer drift into the quantitative multivariate model and the maintenance of a calibration on a drifting spectrometer. Finally, the ability of PACLS to transfer a multivariate model between spectrometers is demonstrated.

  2. 2-D weighted least-squares phase unwrapping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Placitas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weighted values of interferometric signals are unwrapped by determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for unweighted values of the interferometric signals; and then determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals by preconditioned conjugate gradient methods using the unweighted solutions as preconditioning values. An output is provided that is representative of the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals.

  3. ON LEAST SQUARES EUCLIDEAN DISTANCE MATRIX APPROXIMATION AND COMPLETION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in biological or engineering applications, including molecular structure analysis, protein folding problem. distance geometry, least squares approximation, matrix completion, molecular structure, protein folding

  4. LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR OPTIMALITY SYSTEMS ARISING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bochev, Pavel

    LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR OPTIMALITY SYSTEMS ARISING IN OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL control problems for systems governed by linear, elliptic partial differential equations is considered modern least-squares finite element methods for the solution of the optimality systems. The matrix equa

  5. Extended Kalman Filter Using a Kernel Recursive Least Squares Observer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Extended Kalman Filter Using a Kernel Recursive Least Squares Observer Pingping Zhu, Badong Chen estimation problem combining the extended Kalman filter (EKF) with a kernel recursive least squares (KRLS Kalman filter, EKF and KRLS algorithms. Results demonstrate that the performance of the EKF

  6. JITTER COMPENSATION IN SAMPLING VIA POLYNOMIAL LEAST SQUARES ESTIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Vivek K

    JITTER COMPENSATION IN SAMPLING VIA POLYNOMIAL LEAST SQUARES ESTIMATION Daniel S. Weller and Vivek Science Email: {dweller, vgoyal}@mit.edu ABSTRACT Sampling error due to jitter, or noise in the sample independent jitter and additive noise, as an alternative to the linear least squares (LLS) estimator. After

  7. Random Disease on the Square Grid J ozsef Balogh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balogh, Jozsef

    a disease process. The initial configuration is called contagious or successful if the corresponding) squares in a contagious configuration. The solution of the initial exercise is the following: Fact. [Folklore] G(n) = n. Proof. If we paint the squares of a diagonal black, it will be a contagious

  8. The distribution of prime numbers on the square root spiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry K. Hahn; Robert Sachs

    2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Prime Numbers clearly accumulate on defined spiral graphs,which run through the Square Root Spiral. These spiral graphs can be assigned to different spiral-systems, in which all spiral-graphs have the same direction of rotation and the same -second difference- between the numbers, which lie on these spiral-graphs. A mathematical analysis shows, that these spiral graphs are caused exclusively by quadratic polynomials. For example the well known Euler Polynomial x2+x+41 appears on the Square Root Spiral in the form of three spiral-graphs, which are defined by three different quadratic polynomials. All natural numbers,divisible by a certain prime factor, also lie on defined spiral graphs on the Square Root Spiral (or Spiral of Theodorus, or Wurzelspirale). And the Square Numbers 4, 9, 16, 25, 36 even form a highly three-symmetrical system of three spiral graphs, which divides the square root spiral into three equal areas. Fibonacci number sequences also play a part in the structure of the Square Root Spiral. With the help of the Number-Spiral, described by Mr. Robert Sachs, a comparison can be drawn between the Square Root Spiral and the Ulam Spiral. The shown sections of his study of the number spiral contain diagrams, which are related to my analysis results, especially in regards to the distribution of prime numbers.

  9. Application of the 2-D Continuous Wavelet Transforms for Characterization of Geological and Geophysical Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuong, Au K

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    continuous wavelet transforms to imag- ing of Shatsky Rise plateau using marine seismic data . . . . . 3 1.1.3 Multi-scale analysis the surface roughness of the minerals . . . 6 1.2 Dissertation structure... evolution. Oceanic plateaus are very large igneous provinces in the deep 3 oceans and are generally a result of massive basaltic volcanism. Observations show that the size of these plateaus ranges up to millions of square kilometers, suggest- ing they must...

  10. A Program Evaluation of a Rwandan Milk Collection Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balinas, Melanie Elizabeth

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    inhabitants per square kilometer. Land scarcity issues will increase with a growing population. Currently, 46% of Rwanda is cultivated (TechnoServe Rwanda, 2008). Of that land, the average farm household cultivates plots of one and a quarter acres (World Food...) revealed that 85% of the households were agriculturally based. Those households cultivate land and rely on agriculture as the primary or only source of income (World Food Programme, 2012). Food security and poverty issues persist with the current levels...

  11. Memory-efficient w-projection with the fast Gauss transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bannister, Keith W

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a method performing w-projection using the fast Gauss transform of Strain (1991). We derive the theoretical performance, and simulate the actual performance for a range of w for a canonical array. While our implementation is dominated by overheads, we argue that this approach could for the basis of a higher-performing algorithms with particular application to the Square Kilometer Array.

  12. U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.; Roberts, B.; Heimiller, D.; Blair, N.; Porro, G.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the state-level results of a spatial analysis effort calculating energy technical potential, reported in square kilometers of available land, megawatts of capacity, and gigawatt-hours of generation, for six different renewable technologies. For this analysis, the system specific power density (or equivalent), efficiency (capacity factor), and land-use constraints were identified for each technology using independent research, published research, and professional contacts. This report also presents technical potential findings from previous reports.

  13. Optimal and efficient semi-Latin squares Leonard H. Soicher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soicher, Leonard H.

    Optimal and efficient semi-Latin squares Leonard H. Soicher School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen permutation, a column permutation, Email address: L.H.Soicher@qmul.ac.uk (Leonard H. Soicher) Preprint

  14. An improved method for weighted least squares IIR filter design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davila-Pazmino, Javier

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, a new method for IIR weighted least squares filter design has been proposed. In this method, the problem of approximating a desired frequency response using a rational function is solved using an iterative approach. After studying...

  15. Community, space, and performance : a public stage in Central Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Sola, David Theodore

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I strive to explore the question, "what is good architecture?" through the design of a facility for formal and informal musical and theatrical performance. The site for this project is in Central Square, ...

  16. Jitter compensation in sampling via polynomial least squares estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weller, Daniel Stuart

    Sampling error due to jitter, or noise in the sample times, affects the precision of analog-to-digital converters in a significant, nonlinear fashion. In this paper, a polynomial least squares (PLS) estimator is derived ...

  17. Lumenhaus Shows Off Solar in Times Square | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    West Potomac Park in Washington, D.C. Virginia Tech's Lumenhaus - a net-zero energy, solar-powered, 650-square-foot home - made a stop in New York on its tour, right in the...

  18. EFFICIENT ALGORITHMS FOR SOLUTION OF REGULARIZED TOTAL LEAST SQUARES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    EFFICIENT ALGORITHMS FOR SOLUTION OF REGULARIZED TOTAL LEAST SQUARES ROSEMARY A. RENAUT AND HONGBIN-1804 (renaut@asu.edu, hb guo@asu.edu). 457 #12;458 ROSEMARY A. RENAUT AND HONGBIN GUO Here · denotes the 2-norm

  19. Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. G. Adelberger; B. R. Heckel; A. E. Nelson

    2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent experimental tests of the gravitational inverse-square law and the wide variety of theoretical considerations that suggest the law may break down in experimentally accessible regions.

  20. A Least-Squares Transport Equation Compatible with Voids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Hansen; Jacob Peterson; Jim Morel; Jean Ragusa; Yaqi Wang

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard second-order self-adjoint forms of the transport equation, such as the evenparity, odd-parity, and self-adjoint angular flux equation, cannot be used in voids. Perhaps more important, they experience numerical convergence difficulties in near-voids. Here we present a new form of a second-order self-adjoint transport equation that has an advantage relative to standard forms in that it can be used in voids or near-voids. Our equation is closely related to the standard least-squares form of the transport equation with both equations being applicable in a void and having a nonconservative analytic form. However, unlike the standard least-squares form of the transport equation, our least-squares equation is compatible with source iteration. It has been found that the standard least-squares form of the transport equation with a linear-continuous finite-element spatial discretization has difficulty in the thick diffusion limit. Here we extensively test the 1D slab-geometry version of our scheme with respect to void solutions, spatial convergence rate, and the intermediate and thick diffusion limits. We also define an effective diffusion synthetic acceleration scheme for our discretization. Our conclusion is that our least-squares Sn formulation represents an excellent alternative to existing second-order Sn transport formulations

  1. Organic light-emitting diodes from homoleptic square planar complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Omary, Mohammad A

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Homoleptic square planar complexes [M(N.LAMBDA.N).sub.2], wherein two identical N.LAMBDA.N bidentate anionic ligands are coordinated to the M(II) metal center, including bidentate square planar complexes of triazolates, possess optical and electrical properties that make them useful for a wide variety of optical and electrical devices and applications. In particular, the complexes are useful for obtaining white or monochromatic organic light-emitting diodes ("OLEDs"). Improved white organic light emitting diode ("WOLED") designs have improved efficacy and/or color stability at high brightness in single- or two-emitter white or monochrome OLEDs that utilize homoleptic square planar complexes, including bis[3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazolato]platinum(II) ("Pt(ptp).sub.2").

  2. Majority-vote model with heterogeneous agents on square lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lima, F W S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a nonequilibrium model with up-down symmetry and a noise parameter $q$ known as majority-vote model of M.J. Oliveira 1992 with heterogeneous agents on square lattice. By Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling relations the critical exponents $\\beta/\

  3. Rectilinear Glass-Cut Dissections of Rectangles to Squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urrutia, Jorge

    Rectilinear Glass-Cut Dissections of Rectangles to Squares Jurek Czyzowicz§ czyzowic is made using only rectilinear glass-cuts, i.e., vertical or horizontal straight-line cuts separating pieces into two. 1 Introduction A glass-cut of a rectangle is a cut by a straight-line segment

  4. Subspace Segmentation with A Minimal Squared Frobenius Norm Representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Yizhou

    Minimal Squared Frobenius Norm Representa- tion (MSFNR). MSFNR performs data clustering by solving benchmark [9]. However, LRR in- volves nuclear norm1 minimization. Solving LRR re- quires computing multiple Representation (MSFNR). It employs convex optimization to perform subspace clustering. The method minimizes

  5. Proton root-mean-square radii and electron scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingo Sick; Dirk Trautmann

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard procedure of extracting the proton root-mean-square radii from models for the Sachs form factors $G_e (q)$ and $G_m (q)$ fitted to elastic electron-proton scattering data %has a serious flaw. is more uncertain than traditionally assumed. The extrapolation of $G(q)$, from the region $q_{min} reliable $rms$-radii be determined.

  6. Fast Bootstrap for Least-square Support Vector Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verleysen, Michel

    Fast Bootstrap for Least-square Support Vector Machines A. Lendasse1 , G. Simon2 , V. Wertz3 , M, CESAME, 4 av. G. Lemaître B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, wertz@auto.ucl.ac.be. Abstract. The Bootstrap of the Bootstrap implies a high computational load. In this paper we present a simple procedure to obtain a fast

  7. CONTRACTION AND SUM OF SQUARES ANALYSIS OF HCCI ENGINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaver, Gregory M.

    CONTRACTION AND SUM OF SQUARES ANALYSIS OF HCCI ENGINES Gregory M. Shaver , Aleksandar Koji´c , J ignition (HCCI), requires not only precise valve control but also a combustion control strategy, HCCI has no specific event that initiates combustion. Since exhaust gas is re-inducted from

  8. An Efficient SquareRoot Algorithm for BLAST Babak Hassibi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassibi, Babak

    antennas, BLAST first decodes the ``strongest'' signal, then cancels the effect of this strongest transmitAn Efficient Square­Root Algorithm for BLAST Babak Hassibi Mathematics of Communications Research­Time (BLAST) is a scheme for transmitting information over a rich­scattering wireless environment using

  9. Environmental Report 1994, Volume No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, K.S. [ed.; Harrach, R.J.; Gallegos, G.M.; Failor, R.A. [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility operated by the University of California, serves as a national resource of scientific, technical, and engineering capability. The Laboratory`s mission focuses on nuclear weapons and national security, and over the years has been broadened to include areas such as strategic defense, energy, the environment, biomedicine, technology transfer, the economy, and education. The Laboratory carries out this multifaceted mission in compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulatory requirements. It does so with the support of the Environmental Protection Department, which is responsible for environmental monitoring and analysis, hazardous waste management, environmental restoration, and ensuring compliance with environmental laws and regulations. LLNL comprises two sites: the Livermore site and Site 300. The Livermore site occupies an area of 3.28 square kilometers on the eastern edge of Livermore, California. Site 300, LLNL`s experimental testing site, is located 24 kilometers to the east in the Altamont Hills, and occupies an area of 30.3 square kilometers. Environmental monitoring activities are conducted at both sites as well as in surrounding areas. This summary provides an overview of LLNL`s environmental activities in 1994, including radiological and nonradiological sampling and surveillance monitoring, remediation, assessment of radiological releases and doses, and determination of the impact of LLNL operations on the environment and public health.

  10. Three-state majority-vote model on square lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lima, F W S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, the model of non-equilibrium model with two states ($-1,+1$) and a noise $q$ on simple square lattices proposed for M.J. Oliveira (1992) following the conjecture of up-down symmetry of Grinstein and colleagues (1985) is studied and generalized. This model is well-known, today, as Majority-Vote Model. They showed, through Monte Carlo simulations, that their obtained results fall into the universality class of the equilibrium Ising model on a square lattice. In this work, we generalize the Majority-Vote Model for a version with three states, now including the zero state, ($-1,0,+1$) in two dimensions. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we showed that our model falls into the universality class of the spin-1 ($-1,0,+1$) and spin-1/2 Ising model and also agree with Majority-Vote Model proposed for M.J. Oliveira (1992) . The exponents ratio obtained for our model was $\\gamma/\

  11. The 160 Square Degree ROSAT Survey - Revised Catalog & Cluster Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullis, C; Quintana, H; Vikhlinin, A; Henry, P; Gioia, I; Hornstrup, A; Forman, W; Jones, C; Mullis, Christopher; Namara, Brian Mc; Quintana, Hernan; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Henry, Patrick; Gioia, Isabella; Hornstrup, Allan; Forman, William; Jones, Christine

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have constructed a large, statistically complete sample of galaxy clusters serendipitously detected as extended X-ray sources in 647 ROSAT PSPC pointed observations. The survey covers 158 square degrees with a median sample flux limit of 1.2 x 10^-13 erg cm^-2 s^-1 (0.5-2.0 keV). Our sample consists of 201 clusters of galaxies characterized by a median redshift of z=0.25 and a maximum of z=1.26. With 22 clusters at z > 0.5, the 160 Square Degree ROSAT Survey is the largest high-redshift sample of X-ray-selected clusters published to date. Here we describe the revised sample which features spectroscopic redshifts for 99.5% of the clusters and discuss the implications for evolution in the cluster abundance.

  12. Optimization of the geometrical stability in square ring laser gyroscopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Santagata; A. Beghi; J. Belfi; N. Beverini; D. Cuccato; A. Di Virgilio; A. Ortolan; A. Porzio; S. Solimeno

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra sensitive ring laser gyroscopes are regarded as potential detectors of the general relativistic frame-dragging effect due to the rotation of the Earth: the project name is GINGER (Gyroscopes IN GEneral Relativity), a ground-based triaxial array of ring lasers aiming at measuring the Earth rotation rate with an accuracy of 10^-14 rad/s. Such ambitious goal is now within reach as large area ring lasers are very close to the necessary sensitivity and stability. However, demanding constraints on the geometrical stability of the laser optical path inside the ring cavity are required. Thus we have started a detailed study of the geometry of an optical cavity, in order to find a control strategy for its geometry which could meet the specifications of the GINGER project. As the cavity perimeter has a stationary point for the square configuration, we identify a set of transformations on the mirror positions which allows us to adjust the laser beam steering to the shape of a square. We show that the geometrical stability of a square cavity strongly increases by implementing a suitable system to measure the mirror distances, and that the geometry stabilization can be achieved by measuring the absolute lengths of the two diagonals and the perimeter of the ring.

  13. Tested by Fire - How two recent Wildfires affected Accelerator Operations at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickermann, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a little more than a decade two large wild fires threatened Los Alamos and impacted accelerator operations at LANL. In 2000 the Cerro Grande Fire destroyed hundreds of homes, as well as structures and equipment at the DARHT facility. The DARHT accelerators were safe in a fire-proof building. In 2011 the Las Conchas Fire burned about 630 square kilometers (250 square miles) and came dangerously close to Los Alamos/LANL. LANSCE accelerator operations Lessons Learned during Las Conchas fire: (1) Develop a plan to efficiently shut down the accelerator on short notice; (2) Establish clear lines of communication in emergency situations; and (3) Plan recovery and keep squirrels out.

  14. The banana industry in Costa Rica: the effects of a single European market for bananas in 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esquivel, Mario

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and to make available a broader base of common knowledge. Caaha Bim Costa Rica is a small country located in Central America between Panama and Nicaragua (10 degrees North Latitude and 84 degrees west longitude). It borders to the North with Nicaragua..., to the South with Panama, to the East with the Atlantic Ocean, and to the West with the Pacific Ocean (Figure 2). Its land area is 19, 730 square miles (51, 100 square kilometers) which is about the size of West Virginia. Its population was estimated...

  15. Density anomalies in the crust and upper mantle below the Tonga-Kermadec trench and below the Rio Grande Rift: implied magnitude and orientation of maximum shear stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mecham, Brent Bradshaw

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kilometers. A third model assumes partial isostatic compensation of the bathymetry, but adds a superimposed lithospheric slab sub- ducting into the trench, and suggests an oceanic crust thickness of 8 kilometers. A complete Bouguer gravity anomaly over... are presented, which successfully account for the observed gravity anomaly across the rift. The first model assumes a heat source, below a 35 kilometer thick continental crust, which promotes regular lateral changes in density due to the horizontal geothermal...

  16. Salt Tolerant Succulents -Grand CaymanSalt Tolerant Succulents -Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 50.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands National Biodiversity Action Plan wwwPonds, Pools and Mangrove Lagoons - Cayman Brac 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands NationalPools, Ponds and Mangrove Lagoons - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands National

  17. A square root analog to digital converter to optimally convert photonic signals for computed tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieniosek, Matthew (Matthew F.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The arrival of photons at a given location is a Poisson process with an associated shot noise which rises with the square root of the number of photons received. An analog-to-digital converter (ADC) with a square root ...

  18. Parallel Variable Distribution for Total Least Squares Hongbin Guo1, and Rosemary A. Renaut1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    Parallel Variable Distribution for Total Least Squares Hongbin Guo1, and Rosemary A. Renaut1 1 Variable Distribution for Total Least Squares Hongbin Guo1, and Rosemary A. Renaut1§ 1Department

  19. Control and Optimization of Vapor Compression Cycles Using Recursive Least Squares Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rani, Avinash

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ....................................................................................................... 22 Data Acquisition .............................................................................................. 25 III DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF WATER CHILLER SYSTEM ........................ 26 System Identification Theory... ......................................................................... 26 Frequency Response of Experimental System. ............................................ 31 IV RECURSIVE LEAST SQUARES THEORY ................................................ 34 Application of Recursive Least Squares Algorithm...

  20. Positive Scattering Cross Sections using Constrained Least Squares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahl, J.A.; Ganapol, B.D.; Morel, J.E.

    1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method which creates a positive Legendre expansion from truncated Legendre cross section libraries is presented. The cross section moments of order two and greater are modified by a constrained least squares algorithm, subject to the constraints that the zeroth and first moments remain constant, and that the standard discrete ordinate scattering matrix is positive. A method using the maximum entropy representation of the cross section which reduces the error of these modified moments is also presented. These methods are implemented in PARTISN, and numerical results from a transport calculation using highly anisotropic scattering cross sections with the exponential discontinuous spatial scheme is presented.

  1. 15 Squares mod p Fix a prime p.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Dinakar

    15 Squares mod p Fix a prime p. Basic question: Given a, how can we determine if #b # Z such that a # b 2 (mod p)? Trivial case if p|a, take b # 0. So from now on take (a, p) = 1. p=3 p=5 p=7 x x 2 x x 2 x x 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 ­1 2 4 3 ­1 4 2 ­1=4 1 5 4 6 1 1 # d p 1, 4 as mod 5 1, 2, 4 as mod p 2

  2. 15 Squares mod p Fix a prime p.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Dinakar

    15 Squares mod p Fix a prime p. Basic question: Given a, how can we determine if b Z such that a b2 (mod p)? Trivial case if p|a, take b 0. So from now on take (a, p) = 1. p=3 p=5 p=7 x x2 x x2 x x2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 -1 2 4 3 -1 4 2 -1=4 1 5 4 6 1 1 dp 1, 4 as mod 5 1, 2, 4 as mod p 2 2, 3 3

  3. A Least-Squares Transport Equation Compatible with Voids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Jon

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . DERIVATION OF EQUATION Let us begin the derivation of our least-squares equation with the first-order monoenergetic transport equation, L? = S? + q 4pi = ?s?+ q 4pi = Q , (2.1) where ? (n/cm2-s-str) is the angular flux, ? (n/cm2-s) is the scalar flux defined... by ? = ? 4pi ? d?, q (n/cm 3-s) is the distributed source, and L is the streaming plus removal operator, L = ?? ? · ?? ? + ?t , (2.2) S is the scattering operator, S = ?s 4pi ? 4pi d? , (2.3) ?t (cm?1) denotes the macroscopic total cross section and ?s...

  4. Numerical solution of the linear least squares problem for splines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonderhaar, Thomas Jerome

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Ci?. . &: , i ~ '(8'??. (Member) (Member) May 1975 ABSTRACT Numerical Solution of the Linear Least Squares Problem for Splines. (May 1975) Thomas Jerome Vonderhaar B. A. , Lewis University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Philip W. Smith... in the preparation of this thesis. I would also like to thank Dr. C. K. Chui and Dr. R. D. Larsen for serving on my committee. My sincere gratitude goes to Myra McWatt for her understanding and moral support during the completion of this paper. TABLE OF CONTENTS...

  5. An algorithm for recognising the exterior square of a Catherine Greenhill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenhill, Catherine

    the motivating case of multisets of eigenvalues of matrices. 1 Introduction The exterior square of a vector space of X on the exterior square of the underlying vector space. This relationship is fully determinedAn algorithm for recognising the exterior square of a multiset Catherine Greenhill School

  6. A maximum entropy-least squares estimator for elastic origin-destination trip matrix estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    A maximum entropy-least squares estimator for elastic origin- destination trip matrix estimation propose a combined maximum entropy-least squares (ME-LS) estimator, by which O- D flows are distributed-destination trip table; elastic demand; maximum entropy; least squares; subnetwork analysis; convex combination

  7. Faraday rotation data analysis with least-squares elliptical fitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Adam D.; McHale, G. Brent; Goerz, David A.; Speer, Ron D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing Faraday rotation data from pulsed magnetic field measurements is described. The method uses direct least-squares elliptical fitting to measured data. The least-squares fit conic parameters are used to rotate, translate, and rescale the measured data. Interpretation of the transformed data provides improved accuracy and time-resolution characteristics compared with many existing methods of analyzing Faraday rotation data. The method is especially useful when linear birefringence is present at the input or output of the sensing medium, or when the relative angle of the polarizers used in analysis is not aligned with precision; under these circumstances the method is shown to return the analytically correct input signal. The method may be pertinent to other applications where analysis of Lissajous figures is required, such as the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) diagnostics. The entire algorithm is fully automated and requires no user interaction. An example of algorithm execution is shown, using data from a fiber-based Faraday rotation sensor on a capacitive discharge experiment.

  8. Recent Results From The Daya Bay Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao Zhang; for the Daya Bay Collaboration

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has observed the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors at $\\sim$kilometer baselines. The relative measurement of the $\\bar\

  9. Recent Results From The Daya Bay Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has observed the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors at $\\sim$kilometer baselines. The relative measurement of the $\\bar\

  10. A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the vents, being flanked or covered with volcaniclastic flow deposits. Each volcanic pile is several kilometers wide and several hundred meters thick, and overlaps one after...

  11. U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Technology and Engineering...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and incomplete understanding of the coupled processes related to fluid flow, geomechanics and geochemistry over scales from nanometers to kilometers. Activities proposed for...

  12. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for California Natural Gas Vehicles Partnership. ShanghaiReport for California Natural Gas Vehicles Partnership. CISfor compressed natural gas cars. 14 The vehicle kilometers

  13. ~ 15206 Station 7 Stat io 6 A 15415 } ~ 15455 ". ~ '15405

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    ;N t o.51 ,II KILOMETER olM0CRATER _6STATIONr-PHYSIOGRAPHIC BOUNDARY _-6 6A SPUR~7 ()DEX 8-0 -3 MARE

  14. achala sierras pampeanas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a kilometers-thick Paleozoic fault zone in the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, central Argentina Geosciences Websites Summary: . There are relatively few documented examples of...

  15. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KILOMETERS () = FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT NUMBER WITHIN PLANTKaupo o () = FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT NUMBER WITHIN PLANTSea o = o FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT HYDROELECTRIC GENERATING

  16. EUREKA WHITE PINE LYONCARSON CITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    DOUGLAS STOREY ESMERALDA 1 3 2 Geologic Mapping Digital 0 0 20 40 60 80 kilometers North 20 40 60 miles 1

  17. NERSC Supercomputers Help Explain the Last Big Freeze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic, where ocean currents would have transported it to the North Atlantic (near Greenland), allowing it to disrupt the ocean's heat engine. "With 18 kilometers between each...

  18. america project newsletter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equal Area 0 500 Kilometers. Ramankutty, et al. (2010). Global Fertilizer Application and Manure Production. Data distributed by the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center...

  19. ORNL part of new project to study how tropical forests worldwide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    better than ten kilometers. This is the resolution that next-generation Earth system models will achieve during the project's lifetime. The team will take advantage of...

  20. analog fiber-optic links: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meter to kilometer scales. Laboratory results demonstrate the feasibility of the heat pulse method implemented with fiber optic temperature sensing to obtain accurate distributed...

  1. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998 white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake River between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. A total of 13,785 hours of setline effort and 389 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1998. Of the 278 white sturgeon captured in the Snake River, 238 were marked for future identification. Three sturgeon were captured in the Salmon River and none were captured in the Clearwater River. Since 1997, 6.9% of the tagged fish have been recovered. Movement of recaptured white sturgeon ranged from 98.5 kilometers downstream to 60.7 kilometers upstream, however, less than 25% of the fish moved more than 16 kilometers (10 miles). In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 51.5 cm to 286 cm and averaged 118.9 cm. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). In addition, the proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 37% since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River.

  2. Square Turing patterns in reaction-diffusion systems with coupled layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jing [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Hongli, E-mail: hlwang@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: qi@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Quantitative Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ouyang, Qi, E-mail: hlwang@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: qi@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Quantitative Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); The Peking-Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Square Turing patterns are usually unstable in reaction-diffusion systems and are rarely observed in corresponding experiments and simulations. We report here an example of spontaneous formation of square Turing patterns with the Lengyel-Epstein model of two coupled layers. The squares are found to be a result of the resonance between two supercritical Turing modes with an appropriate ratio. Besides, the spatiotemporal resonance of Turing modes resembles to the mode-locking phenomenon. Analysis of the general amplitude equations for square patterns reveals that the fixed point corresponding to square Turing patterns is stationary when the parameters adopt appropriate values.

  3. Quantum root-mean-square error and measurement uncertainty relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Busch; Pekka Lahti; Reinhard F Werner

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent years have witnessed a controversy over Heisenberg's famous error-disturbance relation. Here we resolve the conflict by way of an analysis of the possible conceptualizations of measurement error and disturbance in quantum mechanics. We discuss two approaches to adapting the classic notion of root-mean-square error to quantum measurements. One is based on the concept of noise operator; its natural operational content is that of a mean deviation of the values of two observables measured jointly, and thus its applicability is limited to cases where such joint measurements are available. The second error measure quantifies the differences between two probability distributions obtained in separate runs of measurements and is of unrestricted applicability. We show that there are no nontrivial unconditional joint-measurement bounds for {\\em state-dependent} errors in the conceptual framework discussed here, while Heisenberg-type measurement uncertainty relations for {\\em state-independent} errors have been proven.

  4. Least Squares Shadowing sensitivity analysis of chaotic limit cycle oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiqi, E-mail: qiqi@mit.edu; Hu, Rui, E-mail: hurui@mit.edu; Blonigan, Patrick, E-mail: blonigan@mit.edu

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The adjoint method, among other sensitivity analysis methods, can fail in chaotic dynamical systems. The result from these methods can be too large, often by orders of magnitude, when the result is the derivative of a long time averaged quantity. This failure is known to be caused by ill-conditioned initial value problems. This paper overcomes this failure by replacing the initial value problem with the well-conditioned “least squares shadowing (LSS) problem”. The LSS problem is then linearized in our sensitivity analysis algorithm, which computes a derivative that converges to the derivative of the infinitely long time average. We demonstrate our algorithm in several dynamical systems exhibiting both periodic and chaotic oscillations.

  5. The ordered distribution of natural numbers on the square root spiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry K. Hahn; Kay Schoenberger

    2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural numbers divisible by the same prime factor lie on defined spiral graphs which are running through the Square Root Spiral (also named as the Spiral of Theodorus or Wurzel Spirale or Einstein Spiral). Prime Numbers also clearly accumulate on such spiral graphs. And the square numbers 4, 9, 16, 25, 36,... form a highly three-symmetrical system of three spiral graphs, which divides the square-root-spiral into three equal areas. A mathematical analysis shows that these spiral graphs are defined by quadratic polynomials. Fibonacci number sequences also play a part in the structure of the Square Root Spiral. Fibonacci Numbers divide the Square Root Spiral into areas and angle sectors with constant proportions. These proportions are linked to the golden mean (or golden section), which behaves as a self-avoiding-walk-constant in the lattice-like structure of the square root spiral.

  6. (522)revision:2004-09-14modified:2005-06-17 BOREL SETS WITH LARGE SQUARES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelah, Saharon

    (522)revision:2004-09-14modified:2005-06-17 BOREL SETS WITH LARGE SQUARES SAHARON SHELAH Abstract;(522)revision:2004-09-14modified:2005-06-17 2 SAHARON SHELAH but no µ+-square. Lastly (in 1.15) assuming MA one is #12;(522)revision:2004-09-14modified:2005-06-17 BOREL SETS WITH LARGE SQUARES 3 ()1

  7. Science With The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Johnston

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The future of cm and m-wave astronomy lies with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a telescope under development by a consortium of 17 countries that will be 50 times more sensitive than any existing radio facility. Most of the key science for the SKA will be addressed through large-area imaging of the Universe at frequencies from a few hundred MHz to a few GHz. The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is a technology demonstrator aimed in the mid-frequency range, and achieves instantaneous wide-area imaging through the development and deployment of phased-array feed systems on parabolic reflectors. The large field-of-view makes ASKAP an unprecedented synoptic telescope that will make substantial advances in SKA key science. ASKAP will be located at the Murchison Radio Observatory in inland Western Australia, one of the most radio-quiet locations on the Earth and one of two sites selected by the international community as a potential location for the SKA. In this paper, we outline an ambitious science program for ASKAP, examining key science such as understanding the evolution, formation and population of galaxies including our own, understanding the magnetic Universe, revealing the transient radio sky and searching for gravitational waves.

  8. Measuring the Neutron's Mean Square Charge Radius Using Neutron Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. E. Wietfeldt; M. Huber; T. C. Black; H. Kaiser; M. Arif; D. L. Jacobson; S. A. Werner

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron is electrically neutral, but its substructure consists of charged quarks so it may have an internal charge distribution. In fact it is known to have a negative mean square charge radius (MSCR), the second moment of the radial charge density. In other words the neutron has a positive core and negative skin. In the first Born approximation the neutron MSCR can be simply related to the neutron-electron scattering length b_ne. In the past this important quantity has been extracted from the energy dependence of the total transmission cross-section of neutrons on high-Z targets, a very difficult and complicated process. A few years ago S.A. Werner proposed a novel approach to measuring b_ne from the neutron's dynamical phase shift in a perfect crystal close to the Bragg condition. We are conducting an experiment based on this method at the NIST neutron interferometer which may lead to a five-fold improvement in precision of b_ne and hence the neutron MSCR.

  9. The Square Kilometre Array: A new probe of cosmic magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan M. Gaensler

    2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic fields are a fundamental part of many astrophysical phenomena, but the evolution, structure and origin of magnetic fields are still unresolved problems in physics and astrophysics. When and how were the first fields generated? Are present-day magnetic fields the result of standard dynamo action, or do they represent rapid or recent field amplification through other processes? What role do magnetic fields play in turbulence, cosmic ray acceleration and structure formation? I explain how the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a next-generation radio telescope, can deliver stunning new data-sets that will address these currently unanswered issues. The foundation for these experiments will be an all-sky survey of rotation measures, in which Faraday rotation toward >10^7 background sources will provide a dense grid for probing magnetism in the Milky Way, nearby galaxies, and in distant galaxies, clusters and protogalaxies. Using these data, we can map out the evolution of magnetized structures from redshifts z > 3 to the present, can distinguish between different origins for seed magnetic fields in galaxies, and can develop a detailed model of the magnetic field geometry of the intergalactic medium and of the overall Universe. In addition, the SKA will certainly discover new magnetic phenomena beyond what we can currently predict or imagine.

  10. Attractive Inverse Square Potential, U(1) Gauge, and Winding Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristiano Nisoli; Alan. R. Bishop

    2014-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The inverse square potential arises in a variety of different quantum phenomena, yet notoriously it must be handled with care: it suffers from pathologies rooted in the mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics. We show that its recently studied conformality-breaking corresponds to an infinitely smooth winding-unwinding topological transition for the {\\it classical} statistical mechanics of a one-dimensional system: this describes the the tangling/untangling of floppy polymers under a biasing torque. When the ratio between torque and temperature exceeds a critical value the polymer undergoes tangled oscillations, with an extensive winding number. At lower torque or higher temperature the winding number per unit length is zero. Approaching criticality, the correlation length of the order parameter---the extensive winding number---follows a Kosterlitz-Thouless type law. The model is described by the Wilson line of a (0+1) $U(1)$ gauge theory, and applies to the tangling/untangling of floppy polymers and to the winding/diffusing kinetics in diffusion-convection-reactions.

  11. Finding a Minimally Informative Dirichlet Prior Distribution Using Least Squares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana Kelly; Corwin Atwood

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a Bayesian framework, the Dirichlet distribution is the conjugate distribution to the multinomial likelihood function, and so the analyst is required to develop a Dirichlet prior that incorporates available information. However, as it is a multiparameter distribution, choosing the Dirichlet parameters is less straight-forward than choosing a prior distribution for a single parameter, such as p in the binomial distribution. In particular, one may wish to incorporate limited information into the prior, resulting in a minimally informative prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data. In the case of binomial p or Poisson, the principle of maximum entropy can be employed to obtain a so-called constrained noninformative prior. However, even in the case of p, such a distribution cannot be written down in closed form, and so an approximate beta distribution is used in the case of p. In the case of the multinomial model with parametric constraints, the approach of maximum entropy does not appear tractable. This paper presents an alternative approach, based on constrained minimization of a least-squares objective function, which leads to a minimally informative Dirichlet prior distribution. The alpha-factor model for common-cause failure, which is widely used in the United States, is the motivation for this approach, and is used to illustrate the method. In this approach to modeling common-cause failure, the alpha-factors, which are the parameters in the underlying multinomial aleatory model for common-cause failure, must be estimated from data that is often quite sparse, because common-cause failures tend to be rare, especially failures of more than two or three components, and so a prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data is needed.

  12. Finding A Minimally Informative Dirichlet Prior Using Least Squares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana Kelly

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a Bayesian framework, the Dirichlet distribution is the conjugate distribution to the multinomial likelihood function, and so the analyst is required to develop a Dirichlet prior that incorporates available information. However, as it is a multiparameter distribution, choosing the Dirichlet parameters is less straightforward than choosing a prior distribution for a single parameter, such as p in the binomial distribution. In particular, one may wish to incorporate limited information into the prior, resulting in a minimally informative prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data. In the case of binomial p or Poisson \\lambda, the principle of maximum entropy can be employed to obtain a so-called constrained noninformative prior. However, even in the case of p, such a distribution cannot be written down in the form of a standard distribution (e.g., beta, gamma), and so a beta distribution is used as an approximation in the case of p. In the case of the multinomial model with parametric constraints, the approach of maximum entropy does not appear tractable. This paper presents an alternative approach, based on constrained minimization of a least-squares objective function, which leads to a minimally informative Dirichlet prior distribution. The alpha-factor model for common-cause failure, which is widely used in the United States, is the motivation for this approach, and is used to illustrate the method. In this approach to modeling common-cause failure, the alpha-factors, which are the parameters in the underlying multinomial model for common-cause failure, must be estimated from data that are often quite sparse, because common-cause failures tend to be rare, especially failures of more than two or three components, and so a prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data is needed.

  13. Recursive Total Least Squares: An Alternative to the Discrete Kalman Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boley, Daniel

    Recursive Total Least Squares: An Alternative to the Discrete Kalman Filter Daniel L. Boley The discrete Kalman lter, which is becoming a common tool for reducing uncertainty in robot navigation, su ers total least squares estimator (RTLS) as an alternative to the Kalman lter, and compare

  14. Recursive Total Least Squares: An Alternative to Using the Discrete Kalman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boley, Daniel

    Recursive Total Least Squares: An Alternative to Using the Discrete Kalman Filter in Robot to ob- tain the best estimate of the robot position. The discrete Kalman filter, com- monly used the Kalman filter. To this end, we propose the use of a Recursive Total Least Squares Filter. This filter

  15. Higher-Order Partial Least Squares (HOPLS): A Generalized Multi-Linear Regression Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cichocki, Andrzej

    1 Higher-Order Partial Least Squares (HOPLS): A Generalized Multi-Linear Regression Method Qibin Regression (PLSR) - a multivariate method which, in contrast to Multiple Linear Regression (MLR. A standard way to optimize the model parameters is the Non- linear Iterative Partial Least Squares (NIPALS

  16. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF AXISYMMETRIC INSTABILITY OF INVERSE DEE AND SQUARE TOKAMAK EQUILIBRIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF AXISYMMETRIC INSTABILITY OF INVERSE DEE AND SQUARE TOKAMAK EQUILIBRIA COO Study ofAxi.symmetric !nsta bUity of Inverse Dee and Square Tokamak Equilibria B. Lipschultz, S as a function of time in a tokamak with a 4-null poloidal d ivertor. Inverse dee equilibria are observed

  17. Efficient and Robust Non-Rigid Least-Squares Rectification of Medical Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orchard, Jeffery J.

    imaging, robust statistics, least-squares. 1 Introduction Advances in medical imaging techniques haveEfficient and Robust Non-Rigid Least-Squares Rectification of Medical Images A. Wong Department of the major problems facing medical imaging is the presence of geometric distortions inherent in an imaging

  18. SKA SA -SQUARE KILOMETRE ARRAY PROJECT TENDER SKA ROACH03/ 012014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    SKA SA - SQUARE KILOMETRE ARRAY PROJECT TENDER SKA ROACH03/ 012014 DESIGN, MANUFACTURE, SUPPLY AND DELIVERY OF 300 ROACH3 LRUs TENDER NOTICE The South African Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project, which, manufacture, supply and delivery of 300 ROACH3 LRUs to the Cape Town SKA offices. The scope of services

  19. The power and in uence in some Youden squares and secret sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seberry, Jennifer

    The power and in uence in some Youden squares and secret sharing Lakoa Fitina, Kenneth G Russell subsets of critical sets of some Youden squares in the context of secret sharing schemes. A subset C is inaccessible to subsets of a critical set C of Y , called the strongbox of C, may be thought to contain secret

  20. PROGRESS ON A NEW EXPERIMENTAL TEST OF THE GRAVITATIONAL INVERSE-SQUARE LAW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Riley D.

    1 PROGRESS ON A NEW EXPERIMENTAL TEST OF THE GRAVITATIONAL INVERSE-SQUARE LAW R.M. BONICALZI, P from an oscillating torsion-pendulum experiment searching for gravitational inverse square law Relativity, i.e. Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation. The experiment reported here is designed

  1. Time-independent square patterns in surface-tension-driven Benard convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    Time-independent square patterns in surface-tension-driven Be´nard convection Michael F. Schatza The transition between hexagonal and square patterns is investigated in laboratory experiments on surface-tension, the transition from hexagons to other patterns was unexplored for the surface-tension-driven regime of Be

  2. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we will show results of seismic and well log derived attenuation attributes from a deep water Gulf of Mexico data set. This data was contributed by Burlington Resources and Seitel Inc. The data consists of ten square kilometers of 3D seismic data and three well penetrations. We have computed anomalous seismic absorption attributes on the seismic data and have computed Q from the well log curves. The results show a good correlation between the anomalous absorption (attenuation) attributes and the presence of gas as indicated by well logs.

  3. Surface water transport and distribution of uranium in contaminated sediments near a nuclear weapons processing facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batson, Vicky Lynn

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , such as the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRSl, Aiken, South Carolina, is a major environmental concern. At SRS, the contamination of soil and rivers was compounded by inadequate regulations during early years of facility operation. As our knowledge...-Steed Pond System Tims Branch is a second-order stream located in the A/M-area of the northwestern section of SRS (Fig. 1). It drains an area of approximately sixteen square kilometers of the drainage basin of the Savannah River and its tributaries. Tims...

  4. Towards radio astronomical imaging using an arbitrary basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petschow, Matthias

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new generation of radio telescopes, such as the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), requires dramatic advances in computer hardware and software, in order to process the large amounts of produced data efficiently. In this document, we explore a new approach to wide-field imaging. By generalizing the image reconstruction, which is performed by an inverse Fourier transform, to arbitrary transformations, we gain enormous new possibilities. In particular, we outline an approach that might allow to obtain a sky image of size P times Q in (optimal) O(PQ) time. This could be a step in the direction of real-time, wide-field sky imaging for future telescopes.

  5. Cooperative sentry vehicles and differential GPS leapfrog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FEDDEMA,JOHN T.; LEWIS,CHRISTOPHER L.; LAFARGE,ROBERT A.

    2000-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a project for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Sandia National Laboratories Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center is developing and testing the feasibility of using a cooperative team of robotic sentry vehicles to guard a perimeter, perform a surround task, and travel extended distances. This paper describes the authors most recent activities. In particular, this paper highlights the development of a Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) leapfrog capability that allows two or more vehicles to alternate sending DGPS corrections. Using this leapfrog technique, this paper shows that a group of autonomous vehicles can travel 22.68 kilometers with a root mean square positioning error of only 5 meters.

  6. Human-Made Climate Change: A Moral, Political and Legal Issue Dr. James E. Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    kilometers deep, and the ice sheets, which are two to three kilometers thick, the climate system responds. #12;Climate Tipping Points 1. Ice Sheet Disintegration - Ocean Warming Ice Shelves Melt Ice Streams Interdependencies 3. Methane Hydrate ,,frozen methane - In Tundra & On Continental Shelves - Depends On Ocean & Ice

  7. 36Super-fast solar flares ! NASA's Ramaty High Energy Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    36Super-fast solar flares ! NASA's Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite has been studying solar flares since 2002. The sequence of figures to the left shows a flaring region hr/3600 sec = 0.98 kilometers/sec. The solar flare blob was traveling at 207 kilometers per second

  8. EYE SQUARE GMBH | SCHLESISCHE STR. 29-30 | D-10997 BERLIN | FON +49 30 69 81 44-0 | FAX +49 30 69 81 44-10 | WWW.EYE-SQUARE.COM Stellenangebot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    EYE SQUARE GMBH | SCHLESISCHE STR. 29-30 | D-10997 BERLIN | FON +49 30 69 81 44-0 | FAX +49 30 69 81 44-10 | WWW.EYE-SQUARE.COM Stellenangebot Wer wir sind eye square ist einer der weltweit führenden Bewerbung mit Anschreiben, Lebenslauf und Zeugnissen (als ein pdf-Dokument, max. 2 MB) an: jobs@eye

  9. Pendulum with a square-wave modulated length Eugene I. Butikov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butikov, Eugene

    active optimal control of pumping and damping is analyzed. Phase locking between the drive: parametric resonance, autoresonance, phase locking, bifurcations, instabil- ity ranges 1 Introduction. Petersburg, Russia Abstract Parametric excitation of a rigid planar pendulum caused by a square

  10. The Murchison Widefield Array: The Square Kilometre Array Precursor at Low Radio Frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goeke, Robert F.

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is one of three Square Kilometre Array Precursor telescopes and is located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in the Murchison Shire of the mid-west of Western Australia, a ...

  11. Predicting Turbulence using Partial Least Squares Regression and an Artificial Neural Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakshmanan, Valliappa

    Predicting Turbulence using Partial Least Squares Regression and an Artificial Neural Network in the dataset. Then, the transformed data are pre- sented to a neural network whose output node has a sigmoid

  12. Hydrothermal syntheses, structures and magnetic properties of two transition metal coordination polymers with a square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Song

    ; Square grid structure; 1,4-Naphthalenedicarb- oxylic acid 1. Introduction In recent years, great.1. Measurements Elemental analyses were performed with an Elemen- tar Vario EL analyzer. The IR spectrum

  13. Load Forecasting using Fixed-Size Least Squares Support Vector Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -SVM formulation, on the other hand, solves a linear sys- tem in dual space under a least-squares cost function [13 series comes from a local low voltage substation in Belgium and it contains 28,000 hourly values

  14. Risk Bounds for Regularized Least-squares Algorithm with Operator-valued kernels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vito, Ernesto De

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that recent results in [3] on risk bounds for regularized least-squares on reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces can be straightforwardly extended to the vector-valued regression setting. We first briefly introduce ...

  15. Photon electroproduction from hydrogen at backward angles and momentum transfer squared of $Q^{2}=1.0Gev^{2}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laveissière, G; Jaminion, S; Jutier, C; Todor, L; Di Salvo, R; Van Hoorebeke, L; Alexa, L C; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K A; Arundell, K; Audit, G; Auerbach, L; Baker, F T; Baylac, M; Berthot, J; Bertin, P Y; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Böglin, W; Brash, E J; Breton, V; Breuer, H; Burtin, E; Calarco, J R; Cardman, L S; Cavata, C; Chang, C C; Chen, J P; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Dale, D S; De Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deur, A; D'Hose, N; Dodge, G E; Domingo, John J; Elouadrhiri, L; Epstein, M B; Ewell, L A; Finn, J M; Fissum, K G; Fonvieille, H; Fournier, G; Frois, B; Frullani, S; Furget, C; Gao, H; Gao, J; Garibaldi, F; Gasparian, A; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Glashausser, C; Gómez, J; Gorbenko, V; Grenier, P; Guichon, P A M; Hansen, J O; Holmes, R; Holtrop, M; Howell, C; Huber, G M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Incerti, S; Iodice, M; Jardillier, J; Jones, M K; Kahl, W; Kamalov, S; Kato, S; Katramatou, A T; Kelly, J J; Kerhoas, S; Ketikyan, A; Khayat, M; Kino, K; Kox, S; Kramer, L H; Kumar, K S; Kumbartzki, G; Kuss, M; Leone, A; Le Rose, J J; Liang, M; Lindgren, R A; Liyanage, N K; Lolos, G J; Lourie, R W; Madey, R; Maeda, K; Malov, S; Manley, D M; Marchand, C; Marchand, D; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marroncle, J; Martino, J; McCormick, K; McIntyre, J; Mehrabyan, S S; Merchez, F; Meziani, Z E; Michaels, R; Miller, G W; Mougey, J Y; Nanda, S K; Neyret, D; Offermann, E; Papandreou, Z; Perdrisat, C F; Perrino, R; Petratos, G G; Platchkov, S; Pomatsalyuk, R I; Prout, D L; Punjabi, V A; Pussieux, T; Quéméner, G; Ransome, R D; Ravel, O; Real, J S; Renard, F; Roblin, Y; Rowntree, D; Rutledge, G; Rutt, P M; Saha, A; Saitô, T; Sarty, A J; Serdarevic, A; Smith, T; Smirnov, G; Soldi, K; Sorokin, P; Souder, P A; Suleiman, R; Templon, J A; Terasawa, T; Tiator, L; Tieulent, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Tsubota, H; Ueno, H; Ulmer, P E; Urciuoli, G M; Van De Vyver, R; Van, R L J; der Meer; Vernin, P; Vlahovic, B; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wijesooriya, K; Wilson, R; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Zainea, D G; Zhang, W M; Zhao, J; Zhou, Z L

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon electroproduction from hydrogen at backward angles and momentum transfer squared of $Q^{2}=1.0Gev^{2}$

  16. Turbulent heat transfer and friction in a square channel with discrete rib turbulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillin, Robert Dale

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TURBULENT HEAT TRANSFER AND FRICTION IN A SQUARE CHANNEL WITH DISCRETE RIB TURBULATORS A Thesis by ROBERT DALE iXIGMILLIN Subniitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AK. M L niversrty in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SGIE IGE Deceinber 1989 Major Subject' Mechanical Engineering TURBULENT HEAT TRANSFER AND FRICTION IN A SQUARE CHANNEL WITH DISCRETE RIB TURBULATORS A Thesrs by ROBERT DALE MCMILLI'V Approverl as to style and content...

  17. PIV flow measurements for heat transfer characterization in two-pass square channels with smooth and 90 ribbed walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    -pass square channel with a smooth wall and a 90° rib-roughened wall. Detailed averaged velocity distributions enhancements for both smooth and ribbed wall two-pass square channels. The rib-induced flow turbulence distribution in two-pass square channels with smooth and 90° ribbed walls. Han and Zhang [3] studied the effect

  18. Peculiarities of squaring method applied to construct solutions of the Dirac, Majorana, and Weyl equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. V. Veko; V. M. Red'kov

    2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the known method to solve the Dirac equation by means of the squaring method, when relying on the scalar function of the form \\Phi = e^{-i\\epsilon t} e^{ik_{1} x} e^{ik_{2} y} \\sin (kz + \\alpha) leads to a 4-dimensional space of the Dirac solutions. It is shown that so constructed basis is equivalent to the space of the Dirac states relied on the use of quantum numbers k_{1}, k_{2}, \\pm k and helicity operator; linear transformations relating these two spaces are found. Application of the squaring method substantially depends on the choice of representation for the Dirac matrices, some features of this are considered. Peculiarities of applying the squaring method in Majorana representation are investigated as well. The constructed bases are relevant to describe the Casimir effect for Dirac and Weyl fields in the domain restricted by two planes.

  19. More on the Asymmetric Infinite Square Well: Energy Eigenstates with Zero Curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. P. Gilbert; M. Belloni; M. A. Doncheski; R. W. Robinett

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the standard treatment of the asymmetric infinite square well to include solutions that have zero curvature over part of the well. This type of solution, both within the specific context of the asymmetric infinite square well and within the broader context of bound states of arbitrary piecewise-constant potential energy functions, is not often discussed as part of quantum mechanics texts at any level. We begin by outlining the general mathematical condition in one-dimensional time-independent quantum mechanics for a bound-state wave function to have zero curvature over an extended region of space and still be a valid wave function. We then briefly review the standard asymmetric infinite square well solutions, focusing on zero-curvature solutions as represented by energy eigenstates in position and momentum space.

  20. Vector meson dominance and deep inelastic scattering at low and medium Q squared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar Bugaev; Boris Mangazeev

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We argued that deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at small values of Q squared is an essentially nonperturbative process and can be described, partially at least, by the vector meson dominance (VMD) model. We showed by the straightforward calculation that VMD model alone can successfully explain data on structure functions of DIS in a broad interval of x (5e-2 - 1e-4) for the region Q squared < 1 GeV squared. For a description of data at larger Q squared we used the two-component (VMD + perturbative QCD) approach. We showed that these two components can be separated if VMD is used in the aligned jet version. We took into account, in calculations of VMD component of structure functions, the excited states of the rho-meson and nondiagonal transitions between different members of the rho-meson family. Amplitudes of these transitions were obtained using a formalism of the light-front Bethe-Salpeter equation and the method of diffraction-scattering eigenstates. The perturbative QCD component was calculated using a framework of the colour dipole model with the dipole cross section having a Regge-type energy dependence. We presented results of the detailed comparison of our predictions with experimental data for structure functions of the nucleon. We obtained also approximate predictions for the structure functions in the region of very small x, up to 1e-9, and showed that nonperturbative component at such values of x is still relatively large and must be taken into account if Q squared is about few GeV squared or less.

  1. Advanced Online Flux Mapping of CANDU PHWR by Least-Squares Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, In Seob [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Hyo [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A least-squares method that solves both the core neutronics design equations and the in-core detector response equations on the least-squares principle is presented as a new advanced online flux-mapping method for CANada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). The effectiveness of the new flux-mapping method is examined in terms of online flux-mapping calculations with numerically simulated true flux distribution and detector signals and those with the actual core-follow data for the Wolsong CANDU PHWRs in Korea. The effects of core neutronics models as well as the detector failures and uncertainties of measured detector signals on the effectiveness of the least-squares flux-mapping calculations are also examined.The following results are obtained. The least-squares method predicts the flux distribution in better agreement with the simulated true flux distribution than the standard core neutronics calculations by the finite difference method (FDM) computer code without using the detector signals. The adoption of the nonlinear nodal method based on the unified nodal method formulation instead of the FDM results in a significant improvement in prediction accuracy of the flux-mapping calculations. The detector signals estimated from the least-squares flux-mapping calculations are much closer to the measured detector signals than those from the flux synthesis method (FSM), the current online flux-mapping method for CANDU reactors. The effect of detector failures is relatively small so that the plant can tolerate up to 25% of detector failures without seriously affecting the plant operation. The detector signal uncertainties aggravate accuracy of the flux-mapping calculations, yet the effects of signal uncertainties of the order of 1% standard deviation can be tolerable without seriously degrading the prediction accuracy of the least-squares method. The least-squares method is disadvantageous because it requires longer CPU time than the existing FSM. Considering ever-increasing computer speed and the improved operational safety margin of CANDU reactors gained by accurate flux-mapping calculations, however, it is concluded that the least-squares method presents an effective alternative to the existing flux-mapping method for CANDU reactors.

  2. Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law below the Dark-Energy Length Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Kapner; T. S. Cook; E. G. Adelberger; J. H. Gundlach; B. R. Heckel; C. D. Hoyle; H. E. Swanson

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We conducted three torsion-balance experiments to test the gravitational inverse-square law at separations between 9.53 mm and 55 micrometers, probing distances less than the dark-energy length scale $\\lambda_{\\rm d}=\\sqrt[4]{\\hbar c/\\rho_{\\rm d}}\\approx 85 \\mu$m. We find with 95% confidence that the inverse-square law holds ($|\\alpha| \\leq 1$) down to a length scale $\\lambda = 56 \\mu$m and that an extra dimension must have a size $R \\leq 44 \\mu$m.

  3. Kinetic theory for dilute cohesive granular gases with a square well potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satoshi Takada; Kuniyasu Saitoh; Hisao Hayakawa

    2015-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the kinetic theory of dilute cohesive granular gases in which the attractive part is described by a square well potential. We derive the hydrodynamic equations from the kinetic theory with the microscopic expressions for the dissipation rate and the transport coefficients. We check the validity of our theory by performing the direct simulation Monte Carlo.

  4. * 2048 by 2048 pixel format * 13.5 mm square pixels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEATURES * 2048 by 2048 pixel format * 13.5 mm square pixels * Image area 27.6 x 27.6 mm * Back protection * Very low noise output amplifiers * Dual responsivity output amplifiers * Gated dump drain of the CCD42 family of CCD sensors has full-frame architecture. Back illumination technology, in combination

  5. WCOM'2009/MATH Defeng Sun/NUS 1 A Proximal Point Method for Matrix Least Squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Defeng

    WCOM'2009/MATH Defeng Sun/NUS 1 ' & $ % A Proximal Point Method for Matrix Least Squares Problem with Nuclear Norm Regularization Defeng Sun Department of Mathematics National University of Singapore May 2, 2009 Joint work with Kaifeng Jiang and Kim Chuan Toh #12;WCOM'2009/MATH Defeng Sun/NUS 2 ' & $ % Let Sn

  6. Nanjing, July 26, 2008 Defeng Sun 1 Calibrating Least Squares Covariance Matrix Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Defeng

    Nanjing, July 26, 2008 Defeng Sun 1 ' & $ % Calibrating Least Squares Covariance Matrix Problems with Equality and Inequality Constraints Defeng Sun Department of Mathematics National University of Singapore to Professor Bingsheng He #12;Nanjing, July 26, 2008 Defeng Sun 2 ' & $ % Let Sn be the set of all real

  7. A Generalized Formula for Converting Chi-Square Tests to Effect Sizes for Meta-Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael S.

    A Generalized Formula for Converting Chi-Square Tests to Effect Sizes for Meta-Analysis Michael S Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, United States of America Abstract The common formula of the effect size. A corrected formula is provided. Citation: Rosenberg MS (2010) A Generalized Formula

  8. Circular and Square Concrete Columns Externally Confined by CFRP Composite: Experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    testing of the FRP composite. In existing models for FRP-confined concrete, it is commonly assumedChapter 6 Circular and Square Concrete Columns Externally Confined by CFRP Composite: Experimental limited. This field remains in its developmental stages and more testing and analysis are needed

  9. Bulk, surface and corner free energy series for the chromatic polynomial on the square and triangular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Bulk, surface and corner free energy series for the chromatic polynomial on the square, surface and corner free energies of the chromatic polynomial. This extends the existing series expression for the bulk free energy (to order q-40 ), and we are able to conjecture exact product formulae

  10. Canonical Correlation Analysis for Multilabel Classification: A Least-Squares Formulation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Jieping

    --Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) is a well-known technique for finding the correlations between two sets1 Canonical Correlation Analysis for Multilabel Classification: A Least-Squares Formulation, Extensions, and Analysis Liang Sun, Shuiwang Ji, Student Member, IEEE, and Jieping Ye, Member, IEEE Abstract

  11. Least Squares Linear Discriminant Analysis Jieping Ye jieping.ye@asu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Huan

    Analysis (LDA) is a well-known method for dimensionality reduc- tion and classification. LDA in the binaryLeast Squares Linear Discriminant Analysis Jieping Ye jieping.ye@asu.edu Department of Computer stud- ies have shown certain relationship between multivariate linear regression and LDA for the multi

  12. Speech enhancement using a minimum mean-square error short-time spectral modulation magnitude estimator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speech enhancement using a minimum mean-square error short-time spectral modulation magnitude In this paper we investigate the enhancement of speech by applying MMSE short-time spectral magnitude estimation on the quality of enhanced speech, and find that this method works better with speech uncertainty. Finally we

  13. Levy path integral approach to the solution of the fractional Schrödinger equation with infinite square well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong Jianping

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The solution to the fractional Schr\\"odinger equation with infinite square well is obtained in this paper, by use of the L\\'evy path integral approach. We obtain the even and odd parity wave functions of this problem, which are in accordance with those given by Laskin in [Chaos 10 (2000), 780--790].

  14. Radio Number for Square of Cycles Daphne Der-Fen Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Daphne Der-Fen

    Radio Number for Square of Cycles Daphne Der-Fen Liu Melanie Xie Department of Mathematics and v. A radio labelling for G is a function f that assigns to each vertex a non- negative integer. The span of f is the difference of the maximum and the minimum labels assigned. The radio number of G

  15. 7. Biharmonic equation The biharmonic equation is the \\square of the Laplace equation",

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trefethen, Nick

    .824 kHz Fig. 1: Chladni gures for a square plate The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the biharmonic of such a plate. The physicist and astronomer Ernst Chladni (1756{1827) carried out a famous series of ex in various modes. The resulting patterns are known as Chladni gures and some results from an experiment

  16. Gene Feature Extraction Using T-Test Statistics and Kernel Partial Least Squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok, James Tin-Yau

    Gene Feature Extraction Using T-Test Statistics and Kernel Partial Least Squares Shutao Li1 , Chen Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong shutao li@yahoo.com.cn, lc337199@sina.com, jamesk@cs.ust.hk Abstract. In this paper, we propose a gene extraction method by us- ing two standard feature extraction methods, namely

  17. SD-Squared: On the Association Between Semantic Dementia and Surface Dyslexia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaut, David C.

    SD-Squared: On the Association Between Semantic Dementia and Surface Dyslexia Anna M. Woollams, which compromises semantic knowledge, should be accompanied by surface dyslexia, a frequency of semantic degradation and the severity of surface dyslexia. The authors evaluated these claims

  18. All proper normal extensions of S5{square have the polynomial size model property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amsterdam, University of

    All proper normal extensions of S5{square have the polynomial size model property Nick extensions of the bi-modal system S5 2 have the poly-size model property. In fact, every normal proper extension L of S5 2 is complete with respect to a class of #12;nite frames FL . To each such class

  19. Predicting Turbulence Using Partial Least Squares Regression and an Artificial Neural Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakshmanan, Valliappa

    Predicting Turbulence Using Partial Least Squares Regression and an Artificial Neural Network #12;Neural Network Neural Network Architecture 6 inputs (the 6 transformed components) 1 output (0 Lakshmanan et. al (OU/NSSL) PLS and NN 8th Conf. on AI, Atlanta, GA 9 / 15 #12;Neural Network Validation

  20. "Least Squares Fitting" Using Artificial Neural Networks YARON DANON and MARK J. EMBRECHTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    "Least Squares Fitting" Using Artificial Neural Networks YARON DANON and MARK J. EMBRECHTS process changes the internal parameters (weights) of the network such that the neural net can represent a backpropagation fit to various continuous functions will be presented, showing properties of neural network fitted

  1. FIRST-ORDER SYSTEM LEAST SQUARES (FOSLS) FOR GEOMETRICALLY NONLINEAR ELASTICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormick, Steve

    and a consti- tutive equation. The equilibrium equation and associated boundary conditions relate a balance of nonlinearity into the equations of elasticity. The constitutive equation, or material law as it is sometimes-squares (FOSLS) method to approximate the solution to the equations of geometrically nonlinear elasticity in two

  2. 1128 volume 27 number 12 december 2009 nature biotechnology square meter per day of algae containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    1128 volume 27 number 12 december 2009 nature biotechnology square meter per day of algae, such as triglycerides from algae or cellulosic biomass from higher plants, as feedstocks for biofuel production. The algal program sought to develop high-oil-content algae that grow at very fast rates. In our report

  3. Transport of bubbles in square microchannels Thomas Cubaud and Chih-Ming Ho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubaud, Thomas

    for portable microfluidic devices where two-phase flow is involved such as in a microdirect methanol fuel cell- cal, petroleum, and power generation industries (such as nuclear power plants and micro-fuel cellsTransport of bubbles in square microchannels Thomas Cubaud and Chih-Ming Ho Mechanical

  4. Penalized Weighted Least-Squares Approach for Low-Dose X-Ray Computed Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penalized Weighted Least-Squares Approach for Low-Dose X- Ray Computed Tomography Jing Wang*1, noise-resolution tradeoff, ROC curve. 1. INTRODUCTION Low-dose X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032, China ABSTRACT The noise of low-dose computed

  5. Use of Least Means Squares Filter in Control of Optical Beam Jitter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Use of Least Means Squares Filter in Control of Optical Beam Jitter R. Joseph Watkins U.S. Naval 93943 DOI: 10.2514/1.26778 Meeting optical beam jitter requirements is becoming a challenging problem for several space programs. A laser beam jitter control test bed has been developed at the Naval Postgraduate

  6. A new quasi-Monte Carlo technique based on nonnegative least squares and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Marchi, Stefano

    A new quasi-Monte Carlo technique based on nonnegative least squares and approximate Fekete points Claudia Bittantea , Stefano De Marchia, , Alvise Sommarivaa aUniversity of Padova, Department of the quasi-Monte Carlo method. The method, simple in its formulation, be- comes computationally inefficient

  7. Application of Least Squares MPE technique in the reduced order modeling of electrical circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    fast analysis of the circuit designs and reduce the manufacturing cost and time. Typical dimensions models [12]. Due to the growing complexities in circuit designs, linear models are often inadequateApplication of Least Squares MPE technique in the reduced order modeling of electrical circuits

  8. Particle Physics Implications of a Recent Test of the Gravitational Inverse Square Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. G. Adelberger; B. R. Heckel; S. Hoedl; C. D. Hoyle; D. J. Kapner; A. Upadhye

    2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We use data from our recent search for violations of the gravitational inverse-square law to constrain dilaton, radion and chameleon exchange forces as well as arbitrary vector or scalar interactions. We test the interpretation of the PVLAS effect and a conjectured ``fat graviton'' scenario and constrain the $\\gamma_5$ couplings of pseuodscalar bosons and arbitrary power-law interactions.

  9. Inertial Particle Dispersion in the Lagrangian Wake of a Square Cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Gustaaf "Guus"

    in Fluent at a Reynolds number of 150 ensuring a periodic Karman street in the cylinder's wake. The traces, inertial particle transport and entrainment in the vortex-dominated wake of a square cylinder placed between large coherent vortex structures. With increased blockage, transport barriers form of the walls

  10. An assessment of least squares finite element models with applications to problems in heat transfer and solid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Brittan Sheldon

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    the residual. The least squares method is a technique that deter- mines ?j such that the integral of the square of the residual is a minimum. The integral of the square of the residual as given by I(?j) = integraldisplay L 0 R2 dx (1.4) 3 which is called... the least squares functional. The necessary condition for a minimum of I is that its first derivative with respect to ?1, ?2, ··· , ?n is zero: 0 = ?I(?j) ? ?I?? i = 2 integraldisplay L 0 R ?R?? i dx, for i= 1,2,···,n (1.5) C. Present Study The primary...

  11. DOI 10.1007/s10994-013-5423-y Least-squares independence regression for non-linear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Mach Learn DOI 10.1007/s10994-013-5423-y Least-squares independence regression for non-linear 2011 / Accepted: 9 November 2013 © The Author(s) 2013 Abstract The discovery of non-linear causal method. Keywords Causal inference · Non-linear · Non-Gaussian · Squared-loss mutual information · Least

  12. Speech Enhancement of Spectral Magnitude Bin Trajectories using Gaussian Mixture-Model based Minimum Mean-Square Error Estimators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speech Enhancement of Spectral Magnitude Bin Trajectories using Gaussian Mixture-Model based mean-square error es- timators have been applied to speech enhancement in the tem- poral, transform (e estimator for 8 kHz telephone-quality speech. Index Terms: Speech enhancement, minimum mean-square er- ror

  13. The distribution of natural numbers divisible by 2,3,5,11,13 and 17 on the Square Root Spiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry K. Hahn

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The natural numbers divisible by the Prime Factors 2, 3, 5, 11, 13 and 17 lie on defined spiral graphs, which run through the Square Root Spiral. A mathematical analysis shows, that these spiral graphs are defined by specific quadratic polynomials. Basically all natural number which are divisible by the same prime factor lie on such spiral graphs. And these spiral graphs can be assigned to a certain number of Spiral Graph Systems, which have a defined spatial orientation to each other. This document represents a supplementation to my detailed introduction study to the Square Root Spiral, and it contains the missing diagrams and analyses, showing the distribution of the natural numbers divisible by 2, 3, 5, 11, 13 and 17 on the Square Root Spiral. My introduction study to the Square Root Spiral can be found in the arxiv-archive. The title of this study : The ordered distribution of the natural numbers on the Square Root Spiral.

  14. Method for exploiting bias in factor analysis using constrained alternating least squares algorithms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Bias plays an important role in factor analysis and is often implicitly made use of, for example, to constrain solutions to factors that conform to physical reality. However, when components are collinear, a large range of solutions may exist that satisfy the basic constraints and fit the data equally well. In such cases, the introduction of mathematical bias through the application of constraints may select solutions that are less than optimal. The biased alternating least squares algorithm of the present invention can offset mathematical bias introduced by constraints in the standard alternating least squares analysis to achieve factor solutions that are most consistent with physical reality. In addition, these methods can be used to explicitly exploit bias to provide alternative views and provide additional insights into spectral data sets.

  15. Pragmatic SAE procedure in the Schrodinger equation for the inverse-square-like potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadareishvili, Teimuraz

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Self-Adjoint Extension in the Schrodinger equation for potentials behaved as an attractive inverse square at the origin is critically reviewed. Original results are also presented. It is shown that the additional non-regular solutions must be retained for definite interval of parameters, which requires a necessity of performing a Self-Adjoint Extension (SAE) procedure of radial Hamiltonian.The Pragmatic approach is used and some of its consequences are considered for wide class of transitive potentials. Our consideration is based on the established earlier by us a boundary condition for the radial wave function and the corresponding consequences are derived. Various relevant applications are presented as well. They are: inverse square potential in the Schrodinger equation is solved when the additional non-regular solution is retained. Valence electron model and the Klein-Gordon equation with the Coulomb potential is considered and the hydrino -like levels are discussed.

  16. Pragmatic SAE procedure in the Schrodinger equation for the inverse-square-like potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teimuraz Nadareishvili; Anzor Khelashvili

    2012-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Self-Adjoint Extension in the Schrodinger equation for potentials behaved as an attractive inverse square at the origin is critically reviewed. Original results are also presented. It is shown that the additional non-regular solutions must be retained for definite interval of parameters, which requires a necessity of performing a Self-Adjoint Extension (SAE) procedure of radial Hamiltonian.The Pragmatic approach is used and some of its consequences are considered for wide class of transitive potentials. Our consideration is based on the established earlier by us a boundary condition for the radial wave function and the corresponding consequences are derived. Various relevant applications are presented as well. They are: inverse square potential in the Schrodinger equation is solved when the additional non-regular solution is retained. Valence electron model and the Klein-Gordon equation with the Coulomb potential is considered and the hydrino -like levels are discussed.

  17. An aerial radiological survey of the Central Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 194-square- kilometer (75-square-mile) area encompassing the central portion of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The survey was flown during February 10--27, 1987. These radiological measurements were used as baseline data for the central area and for determining the extent of man-made radionuclide distribution. Previous SRS surveys included small portions of the area; the 1987 survey was covered during the site- wide survey conducted in 1979. Man-made radionuclides (including cobalt-60, cesium-137, protactinium-234m, and elevated levels of uranium-238 progeny) that were detected during the survey were typical of those produced by the reactor operations and material processing activities being conducted in the area. The natural terrestrial radiation levels were consistent with those measured during prior surveys of other SRS areas. 1 refs., 4 figs.

  18. t s + t w m 2D Square Mesh with Wraparound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun

    t s + t w m 2D Square Mesh with Wraparound: 3.5 All­to­All Personalized Communication 0 1 2 3 4 7 5 of the messages t s 3.5 All­to­All Personalized Communication the all­to­all broadcast on a hypercube 3.5 All­to­All Personalized Communication ( t s + ­ 1 2 t w ) mp ( p ­ 1 ) 3.5.2. Cut

  19. Domain wall displacement in Py square ring for single nanometric magnetic bead detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vavassori, P; Gobbi, M; Donolato, M; Cantoni, M; Bertacco, R

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach based on the domain wall displacement in confined ferromagnetic nanostructures for attracting and sensing a single nanometric magnetic particles is presented. We modeled and experimentally demonstrated the viability of the approach using an anisotropic magnetoresistance device made by a micron-size square ring of Permalloy designed for application in magnetic storage. This detection concept can be suitable to biomolecular recognition, and in particular to single molecule detection.

  20. Coherent and generalized intelligent states for infinite square well potential and nonlinear oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. H. El Kinani; M. Daoud

    2003-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is an illustration of the construction of coherent and generalized intelligent states which has been recently proposed by us for an arbitrary quantum system $[ 1] $. We treat the quantum system submitted to the infinite square well potential and the nonlinear oscillators. By means of the analytical representation of the coherent states \\`{a} la Gazeau-Klauder and those \\`{a} la Klauder-Perelomov, we derive the generalized intelligent states in analytical ways.

  1. Complete Set of Inner Products for a Discrete PT-symmetric Square-well Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miloslav Znojil

    2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A discrete $N-$point Runge-Kutta version $H^{(N)}({\\lambda})$ of one of the simplest non-Hermitian square-well Hamiltonians with real spectrum is studied. A complete set of its possible hermitizations (i.e., of the eligible metrics $\\Theta^{(N)}({\\lambda})$ defining its non-equivalent physical Hilbert spaces of states) is constructed, in closed form, for any coupling ${\\lambda}\\in (-1,1)$ and any matrix dimension $N$.

  2. On F-Squares and their Critical Sets L F Fitina, Jennifer Seberry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seberry, Jennifer

    (F ) will denote the size of a critical set. We denote by scr(F (n; #11; 0 ; #11; 1 ; : : : ; #11; v 1 )) the size; : : : ; 1; n i)) where there are i zeroes satis#12;es scr(F (n; 1; : : : ; n i)) #20; scr(F (n; 1; : : : ; 1; n i + 1)) #20; scr(F (n; 1; 1; : : : ; 1)) = scs(n): Critical sets of latin squares were #12;rst

  3. Fast Combinatorial Algorithm for the Solution of Linearly Constrained Least Squares Problems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Benthem, Mark H. (Middletown, DE); Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast combinatorial algorithm can significantly reduce the computational burden when solving general equality and inequality constrained least squares problems with large numbers of observation vectors. The combinatorial algorithm provides a mathematically rigorous solution and operates at great speed by reorganizing the calculations to take advantage of the combinatorial nature of the problems to be solved. The combinatorial algorithm exploits the structure that exists in large-scale problems in order to minimize the number of arithmetic operations required to obtain a solution.

  4. Semi-flexible interacting self-avoiding trails on the square lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Bedini; A L Owczarek; T Prellberg

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-avoiding walks self-interacting via nearest neighbours (ISAW) and self-avoiding trails interacting via multiply-visited sites (ISAT) are two models of the polymer collapse transition of a polymer in dilute solution. On the square lattice it has been established numerically that the collapse transition of each model lies in a different universality class. It has been shown that by adding stiffness to the ISAW model a second low temperature phase eventuates and a more complicated phase diagram ensues with three types of transition that meet at a multi-critical point. For large enough stiffness the collapse transition becomes first-order. Interestingly, a phase diagram of a similar structure has been seen to occur in an extended ISAT model on the triangular lattice without stiffness. It is therefore of interest to see the effect of adding stiffness to the ISAT model. We have studied by computer simulation a generalised model of self-interacting self-avoiding trails on the square lattice with a stiffness parameter added. Intriguingly, we find that stiffness does not change the order of the collapse transition for ISAT on the square lattice for a very wide range of stiffness weights. While at the lengths considered there are clear bimodal distributions for very large stiffness, our numerical evidence strongly suggests that these are simply finite-size effects associated with a crossover to a first-order phase transition at infinite stiffness.

  5. Sum--of--squares results for polynomials related to the Bessis--Moussa--Villani conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit Collins; Kenneth J. Dykema; Francisco Torres-Ayala

    2010-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the polynomial S_{m,k}(A,B), that is the sum of all words in noncommuting variables A and B having length m and exactly k letters equal to B, is not equal to a sum of commutators and Hermitian squares in the algebra R where X^2=A and Y^2=B, for all even values of m and k with 6 Bessis--Moussa--Villani conjecture, which asks whether the trace of S_{m,k}(A,B)) is nonnegative for all positive semidefinite matrices A and B. These results eliminate the possibility of using "descent + sum-of-squares" to prove the BMV conjecture. We also show that S_{m,4}(A,B) is equal to a sum of commutators and Hermitian squares in R when m is even and not a multiple of 4, which implies that the trace of S_{m,4}(A,B) is nonnegative for all Hermitian matrices A and B, for these values of m.

  6. Streamlining the OU3 RI/FS process to accommodate decontamination and dismantlement at Fernald

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampshire, L.H.; Dalga, D.G.; Clark, T.R.; Throckmorton, J.D. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Janke, R.J. [USDOE Fernald Field Office, OH (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of a proper and complete assessment of data needs, relative to the characterization of a site, can never be understated. Not only will this assessment assure that the appropriate types, levels, and numbers of samples are taken, but as evidenced by the subject project, can lead to significant time and cost savings. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), formerly known as the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), covers an area measuring 4.25 square kilometers (1,050 acres) and is located in a rural agricultural area about 28 kilometers (17 miles) northwest of downtown Cincinnati, Ohio. The site is near the villages of Fernald, New Haven, Ross, and Shandon, Ohio. After providing some general background information on the site, and the subject RI/FS, the remainder of this presentation will focus on how the sampling approach was changed to reflect a reassessment of data needs, and the resultant benefits of that change. Specifically, discussion will be provided relative to the initial approach proposed for characterizing the contamination at the site, the revised, improved sampling approach contained in the approved RI/FS Work Plan Addendum, and the benefits derived from this change in the sampling approach.

  7. An interdisciplinary approach to reservoir management: The Malu Field, West Niger Delta, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, B.A.; Bluhm, C.T. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum, San Ramon, CA (United States); Adokpaye, E.U. [Chevron Nigeria Limited, Lekki (Nigeria)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Malu Field is 175 kilometers southeast of Lagos, offshore Nigeria. The field was discovered in 1967 and brought on stream in 1971. Peak production reached 31,300 barrels per day in 1972. Twenty-six wells have been drilled in the thirty-six square kilometer size field. In 1990 original-oil-in-place was estimated at 345 million barrels with cumulative production of 109 million barrels and an estimated 40 million barrels of remaining reserves. The Main Field review was initiated in 1994 to resolve structural and production inconsistencies and therefore improve reservoir performance. The tools used include reprocessed three-dimensional seismic, oil chemistry (primarily gas chromatography), and production data. The complexly faulted field is subdivided into seven different fault blocks. Growth faults generally trend northwest to southeast and are downthrown to the west. Twenty-five different hydrocarbon-bearing sands have been identified within the field. These sands are separated into sixty-three different reservoirs by the series of southeast trending growth faults. Most sands are laterally continuous within mapped fault blocks except in east Malu. Cross-fault communication of oils occurs among several of the shallow reservoirs in west Malu allowing wells to deplete unintended horizons. In addition, three of the dual string completions are producing oil only from only the upper sands. The integration of seismic, oil chemistry, and production data allows more efficient management of production by providing accurate structure maps, reserve estimates, drainage pathways, and justification for workovers and future development drilling.

  8. Lepers and Ludwig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: This is not a postcard about South Korea. It is a postcard about compassion and connection that just happens to take place in South Korea on Sorok Island, located one kilometer off the southwest coast. ...

  9. Open to the public! : a new network of communal recreation waterfront space in Bangkok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srirojanapinyo, Apichart

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physically and historically, Bangkok has been shaped by its relationship to its waterfront. Flowing 370 kilometers through Thailand, the Chao Phraya River is more than the nation's lifeline. It was a principal waterway ...

  10. Tunable micro-cavities in photonic band-gap yarns and optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit, Gilles, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vision behind this work is the fabrication of high performance innovative fiber-based optical components over kilometer length-scales. The optical properties of these fibers derive from their multilayer dielectric ...

  11. Facies architecture of the Upper Sego member of the Mancos Shale Formation, Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Eric D.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    1, dominantly highly marine bioturbated sandstones which thin landward over kilometers, is cut locally by an erosion surface overlain by tidal bed sets. It is capped by a localized transgressive shell lag and then a thin continuous marine shale...

  12. Toll road public-private partnerships in Malaysia : using the CLIOS process for policy improvements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, John L., 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Malaysia has relied on private sector provision of toll roads for over twenty years using public- private partnerships (PPPs). While the program has been successful in providing close to 1,800 kilometers of highway in that ...

  13. altmark north german: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in...

  14. anapodaris gorge south: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in...

  15. area south eastern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in...

  16. area south china: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in...

  17. Section 2.3 (cont.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 19, 2014 ... kilometers. a. Derive a formula expressing the acceleration of the car as a function of time. b. At what rate is the velocity of the car changing with.

  18. Rediscovering the River Bièvre : the feasibility of restoring ecological functions in an urban stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Jacob T., 1978-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bièvre's 36-kilometer course stretches from the southwest of Paris near Satin-Quentin-en- Yvelines through numerous towns before disappearing into the urban hydraulic network upon its approach to Paris's dense urban ...

  19. From a deep and daunting research lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, Sally

    tank... How many measurements would you need to make to find the temperature of the water everywhere in the tank? heater 10 inches 20 inches 15 inchesthermometer #12;Measuring the ocean > Thousands of kilometers

  20. LLNL Conducts First Plutonium Shot Using the JASPER Gas Gun ...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    kilometers per second at a plutonium target. The impact produces a high-pressure shock wave that passes through the plutonium in a fraction of a microsecond while diagnostic...

  1. In-Situ Control of BaZrO3 and BaSnO3 Nanorod Alignment and Microstructure in YBa2Cu3O7-x Thin Films by Strain Modulated Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baca, Francisco Javier A.

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    With the ability to carry very high electrical currents per unit area in kilometer length wires, high temperature superconductors (HTS) are especially promising candidates for applications where size and weight constraints ...

  2. Eurographics Conference on Visualization (EuroVis) 2012 S. Bruckner, S. Miksch, and H. Pfister

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Bernd

    mesoscale eddies, that are believed to have a role in the transport and redistribution of salt, heat Mesoscale eddies are vortices with diameters on the order of a hundred kilometers and typical lifetimes

  3. 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting AIAA-2007-0874 January 8-11, 2007 Reno, NV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhixiong "James"

    size of the resonator (usually the order of 1m for meso-scale CRDS) to several kilometers. Through limitations on the meso-scale CRDS technique. The intensity of the light coupled into and out of the cavity

  4. Path-Loss Characteristics of Urban Wireless Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herring, Keith T.

    Wireless channel data was collected in Cambridge, Massachusetts for diverse propagation environments over distances ranging from tens of meters to several kilometers using mobile 2.4-GHz transmitters and receivers. The ...

  5. Digital outcrop mapping of a reservoir-scale incised valley fill, Sego Sandstone, Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fey, Matthew F.

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    methodologies are demonstrated by mapping rock variations and stratal geometries within several kilometers-long, sub-parallel exposures of the Lower Sego Sandstone in San Arroyo Canyon, Book Cliffs, Utah. The digital outcrop model of the Lower Sego Sandstone...

  6. Sensitivity and noise analysis of 4 km laser interferometric gravitational wave antennae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adhikari, Rana, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Around the world, efforts are underway to commission several kilometer-scale laser interferometers to detect gravitational radiation. In the United States, there are two collocated interferometers in Hanford, Washington ...

  7. 32 computer Published by the IEEE Computer Society 0018-9162/14/$31.00 2014 IEEE Cover Feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    device is stationary or mobile. With existing RF transmission power levels, it is feasible to harvest power several kilometers from TV towers and several hundred meters from cellular base stations.3

  8. Stratal architecture and sedimentology of a portion of the Upper Cambrian Hickory Sandstone, central Texas, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Teran, Isaac Antonio

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    in central Texas provide an exceptional opportunity to examine the sedimentology of deposits of this age in order to interpret sedimentary environments. During quarrying, vertical walls, one half-kilometer long and several tens of meters high, are blasted...

  9. Hydrodynamic and transport phenomena at the interface between flow and aquatic vegetation : from the forest to the blade scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From the canopy scale to the blade scale, interactions between fluid motion and kelp produce a wide array of hydrodynamic and scalar transport phenomena. At the kilometer scale of the kelp forest, coastal currents transport ...

  10. Oceanographic Controls on Coral Reef Habitats in Present and Future Climates /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Lauren Amelia

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-wide variation in coral reef communities. MarineJA and Yates KK (2009) Coral reefs and ocean acidification.impacts, and global change on coral reefs. PLoS biology 6(

  11. Going Home? The Failed Myth of Return in Eddy L. Harris’s Native Stranger: A Black American’s Journey into the Heart of Africa and Caryl Phillips’s The Atlantic Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Zara

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    themselves by please, my Zara Bennett coded question. AreDiop(IFAN), 1997. Zara Bennett Zara Bennett is a doctoralThe Atlantic Sound Zara Bennett Located a few kilometers off

  12. Capturing the impacts of land use on travel behavior : comparison of modeling approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannan, Veronica Adelle

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most urban planning literature suggests that compact and mixed-use neighborhoods correlate with lower vehicle kilometers traveled (VKT), and accordingly, lower energy consumption and transportation-related emissions. ...

  13. IceCube: Neutrino Physics from GeV - PeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An update on recent discoveries by the IceCube project, which transforms approximately one cubic kilometer of natural Antarctic ice into a Cherenkov detector. This paper will be submitted to SLAC for inclusion in the Snowmass2013 proceedings

  14. Leveraging infrastructure : sustainable bus rapid transit route planning in Beirut, Lebanon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabti, Jumana M., 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis applies the concepts of urban design, public transportation planning, economic development, and sustainability, to the routing and site plan of a two-kilometer bus rapid transit (BRT) line segment into downtown ...

  15. Rice Field Geochemistry and Hydrology: An Explanation for Why Groundwater Irrigated Fields in Bangladesh are Net Sinks of Arsenic from Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Rebecca B.

    Irrigation of rice fields in Bangladesh with arsenic-contaminated groundwater transfers tens of cubic kilometers of water and thousands of tons of arsenic from aquifers to rice fields each year. Here we combine observations ...

  16. The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Investigation of the Settler Mortality Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albouy, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seen in their rate of 16.3 for Malta (70 kilometers east ofnineteenth centuries, and Malta, resettled at the turn ofAJR consists of Australia, Malta, and New Zealand. Minimum

  17. Open Issues in the search for gravitational wave transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackburn, Lindy L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LIGO-Virgo network of kilometer-scale laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors reached a major milestone with the successful operation of LIGO's fifth (S5) and Virgo's first (VSR1) science runs during 2005-2007. ...

  18. SPARSE REPRESENTATIONS WITH DATA FIDELITY TERM VIA AN ITERATIVELY REWEIGHTED LEAST SQUARES ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WOHLBERG, BRENDT [Los Alamos National Laboratory; RODRIGUEZ, PAUL [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Basis Pursuit and Basis Pursuit Denoising, well established techniques for computing sparse representations, minimize an {ell}{sup 2} data fidelity term subject to an {ell}{sup 1} sparsity constraint or regularization term on the solution by mapping the problem to a linear or quadratic program. Basis Pursuit Denoising with an {ell}{sup 1} data fidelity term has recently been proposed, also implemented via a mapping to a linear program. They introduce an alternative approach via an iteratively Reweighted Least Squares algorithm, providing greater flexibility in the choice of data fidelity term norm, and computational advantages in certain circumstances.

  19. FREQFIT: Computer program which performs numerical regression and statistical chi-squared goodness of fit analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofland, G.S.; Barton, C.C.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computer program FREQFIT is designed to perform regression and statistical chi-squared goodness of fit analysis on one-dimensional or two-dimensional data. The program features an interactive user dialogue, numerous help messages, an option for screen or line printer output, and the flexibility to use practically any commercially available graphics package to create plots of the program`s results. FREQFIT is written in Microsoft QuickBASIC, for IBM-PC compatible computers. A listing of the QuickBASIC source code for the FREQFIT program, a user manual, and sample input data, output, and plots are included. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Lower bound on the mean square displacement of particles in the hard disk model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Richthammer

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The hard disk model is a 2D Gibbsian process of particles interacting via pure hard core repulsion. At high particle density the model is believed to show orientational order, however, it is known not to exhibit positional order. Here we investigate to what extent particle positions may fluctuate. We consider a finite volume version of the model in a box of dimensions $2n \\times 2n$ with arbitrary boundary configuration,and we show that the mean square displacement of particles near the center of the box is bounded from below by $c \\log n$. The result generalizes to a large class of models with fairly arbitrary interaction.

  1. Sum--of--squares results for polynomials related to the Bessis--Moussa--Villani conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Benoit; Torres-Ayala, Francisco

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the polynomial S_{m,k}(A,B), that is the sum of all words in noncommuting variables A and B having length m and exactly k letters equal to B, is not equal to a sum of commutators and Hermitian squares in the algebra R where X^2=A and Y^2=B, for all even values of m and k with 6 when m is even and not a multiple of 4, which implies that the trace of S_{m,4}(A,B) is nonnegative for all Hermitian matrices A and B, for these values of m.

  2. Heat transfer and pressure drop in square duct with two opposite repeated rib-roughened walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei, Chiang-Kuo

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were on ribbed sur- faces. All thermocouples were constructed of 0. 05 cm copper-constantant wire. Five pressure taps along the test section were used for the static pressure drop measurements across the test duct. Three were on the smooth surface...HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP IN SQUARE DUCT WITH TWO OPPOSITE REPEATED RIB-ROUGHENED WALLS A Thesis CHIANG-KUO LEI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  3. ODEs, Homework #3 1. Suppose A, B are constant square matrices such that etA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karageorgis, Paschalis

    ODEs, Homework #3 Solutions 1. Suppose A, B are constant square matrices such that etA etB = et identity with respect to t, we find that etA etB = et(A+B) = AetA etB + etA BetB = (A + B)et(A+B) . Differentiating once again, we now get A2 etA etB + AetA BetB + AetA BetB + etA B2 etB = (A + B)2 et(A+B) so we

  4. Sub-mm tests of the gravitational inverse-square law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. G. Adelberger

    2002-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Sub-mm tests of the gravitational inverse-square law are interesting from several quite different perspectives. This paper discusses work by the Eot-Wash group performed since the publication of our initial result in February 2001. We find no evidence for short-range Yukawa interactions. Our results provide an upper limit of 200 micrometers on the size of the largest ``extra'' dimension, and for the unification scenario with 2 large extra dimensions, set an upper limit of 150 micrometers on the size of those dimensions.

  5. Least-squares variational principles and the finite element method: theory, formulations, and models for solid and fluid mechanics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontaza, Juan Pablo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the application of least-squares variational principles and the finite element method to the numerical solution of boundary value problems arising in the fields of solidand fluidmechanics.For manyof these ...

  6. Measurement of the Isolated Prompt Photon Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at [square root] s=7??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, Burak Han

    The differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons has been measured as a function of the photon transverse energy ET? [E subscript Tau superscript gamma] in pp collisions at ?s=7??[square ...

  7. Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations in pp Collisions at ?s=7? [square root of s=7]?TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, Burak Han

    Measurements of dijet azimuthal decorrelations in pp collisions at ?s=7??[square root of s=7] TeV using the CMS detector at the CERN LHC are presented. The analysis is based on an inclusive dijet event sample corresponding ...

  8. Pion femtoscopy in p?+?p collisions at ?s=200 [square root of s = 200] GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    The STAR Collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured two-pion correlation functions from p+p collisions at ?s=200 [square root of s = 200] GeV. Spatial scales are extracted via a femtoscopic ...

  9. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop Measurement for Square Channels with V-shape Ribs at High Reynolds Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkhamis, Nawaf Yahya

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP MEASUREMENT FOR SQUARE CHANNELS WITH V-SHAPE RIBS AT HIGH REYNOLDS NUMBERS A Thesis by NAWAF YAHYA ALKHAMIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2009 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP MEASUREMENT FOR SQUARE CHANNELS WITH V-SHAPE RIBS AT HIGH REYNOLDS NUMBERS A Thesis...

  10. Finding elementary formulas for theta functions associated to even sums of squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varma, Ila

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the classical problem of how to calculate $r_n(m)$, the number of ways to represent an integer $m$ by a sum of $n$ squares from a computational efficiency viewpoint. Although this problem has been studied in great detail, there are very few formulas given for the purpose of computing $r_n(m)$ quickly. More precisely, for fixed $n$, we want a formula for $r_n(m)$ that computes in log-polynomial time (with respect to $m$) when the prime factorization of $m$ is given. Restricting to even $n$, we can view $\\theta_n(q)$, the theta function associated to sums of $n$ squares, as a modular form of weight $n/2$ on $\\Gamma_1(4)$. In particular, we show that for only a small finite list of $n$ can $\\theta_n$ be written as a linear combination consisting entirely of Eisenstein series and cusp forms with complex multiplication. These are the only $n$ that give rise to "elementary" formulas for $r_n(m)$, i.e. formulas such that for a prime $p$, $r_n(p)$ can be calculated in $\\cO(\\log(p))$-time. Viewi...

  11. Augmented heat transfer in square channels with parallel, crossed, and V-shaped angled ribs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, J.C.; Zhang, Y.M. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States)); Lee, C.P. (General Electric Co., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the rib angle orientation on the local heat transfer distributions and pressure drop in a square channel with two opposite in-line ribbed walls was investigated for Reynolds numbers from 15,000 to 90,000. The square channel composed of ten isolated copper sections has a length-to-hydraulic diameter ratio of 20; the rib height-to-hydraulic diameter ratio is 0.0625; the rib pitch-to-height ratio equals 10. Nine rib configurations were studied: 90 deg rib, 60 and 45 deg parallel ribs, 60 and 45 deg crossed ribs, 60 and 45 deg V-shaped ribs, and 60 and 45 deg {Lambda}-shaped ribs. The results show that the 60 deg (or 45 deg) V-shaped rib performs better than the 60 deg (or 45 deg) parallel rib and, subsequently, better than the 60 deg (or 45 deg) crossed rib and the 90 deg rib. The V-shaped rib produces the highest heat transfer augmentation, while the {Lambda}-shaped rib generates the greatest pressure drop. The crossed rib has the lowest heat transfer enhancement and the smallest pressure drop penalty.

  12. Solar-energy-system performance evaluation, Cathedral Square, Burlington, Vermont, July-December 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, K.M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cathedral Square solar site is a 10-story multiunit apartment building in Vermont. Its active solar energy system is designed to supply 51% of the hot water load, and consists of 1798 square feet of flat plate collectors, 2699-gallon water tank in an enclosed mechanical room on the roof, and two auxiliary natural gas boilers to supply hot water to immersed heat exchanger in an auxiliary storage tank. The measured solar fraction was only 28%, not 51%, which, it is concluded, is an unreasonable expectation. Other performance data include the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and solar system coefficient of performance. Monthly performance data are given for the solar system overall, and for the collector, storage, and hot water subsystems. Also included are insolation data, typical storage fluid temperatures, domestic hot water consumption, and solar heat exchangers inlet/outlet temperatures, and typical domestic hot water subsystem temperatures. In addition, the system operating sequence and solar energy utilization are given. Appended are a system description, performance evaluation techniques, long-term weather data. (LEW)

  13. The Infinite Square Well with a Point Interaction: A Discussion on the Different Parametrizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel Gadella; M. Ángeles García-Ferrero; Sergio González-Martín; Félix H. Maldonado-Villamizar

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Dirac delta type potentials has been achieved with the use of the theory of self adjoint extensions of non-self adjoint formally Hermitian (symmetric) operators. The application of this formalism to investigate the possible self adjoint extensions of the one dimensional kinematic operator $K=-d^2/dx^2$ on the infinite square well potential is quite illustrative and has been given elsewhere. This requires the definition and use of four independent real parameters, which relate the boundary values of the wave functions at the walls. By means of a different approach, that fixes matching conditions at the origin for the wave functions, it is possible to define a perturbation of the type $a\\delta(x)+b\\delta'(x)$, thus depending on two parameters, on the infinite square well. The objective of this paper is to investigate whether these two approaches are compatible in the sense that perturbations like $a\\delta(x)+b\\delta'(x)$ can be fixed and determined using the first approach.

  14. Maritime Cliffs and Ironshore -Grand CaymanMaritime Cliffs and Ironshore -Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 50.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    CaymanMaritime Cliffs and Ironshore - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands National Biodiversity Action Plan www Mosaic #12;Sandy Beach and Cobble - Little CaymanSandy Beach and Cobble - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2

  15. Seasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand CaymanSeasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 50.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands National Biodiversity;Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Cayman BracSeasonally Flooded Grasslands - Cayman Brac 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2-Modified Areas - Little CaymanUrban and Man-Modified Areas - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers

  16. Optical pattern recognition architecture implementing the mean-square error correlation algorithm

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Molley, Perry A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical architecture implementing the mean-square error correlation algorithm, MSE=.SIGMA.[I-R].sup.2 for discriminating the presence of a reference image R in an input image scene I by computing the mean-square-error between a time-varying reference image signal s.sub.1 (t) and a time-varying input image signal s.sub.2 (t) includes a laser diode light source which is temporally modulated by a double-sideband suppressed-carrier source modulation signal I.sub.1 (t) having the form I.sub.1 (t)=A.sub.1 [1+.sqroot.2m.sub.1 s.sub.1 (t)cos (2.pi.f.sub.o t)] and the modulated light output from the laser diode source is diffracted by an acousto-optic deflector. The resultant intensity of the +1 diffracted order from the acousto-optic device is given by: I.sub.2 (t)=A.sub.2 [+2m.sub.2.sup.2 s.sub.2.sup.2 (t)-2.sqroot.2m.sub.2 (t) cos (2.pi.f.sub.o t] The time integration of the two signals I.sub.1 (t) and I.sub.2 (t) on the CCD deflector plane produces the result R(.tau.) of the mean-square error having the form: R(.tau.)=A.sub.1 A.sub.2 {[T]+[2m.sub.2.sup.2.multidot..intg.s.sub.2.sup.2 (t-.tau.)dt]-[2m.sub.1 m.sub.2 cos (2.tau.f.sub.o .tau.).multidot..intg.s.sub.1 (t)s.sub.2 (t-.tau.)dt]} where: s.sub.1 (t) is the signal input to the diode modulation source: s.sub.2 (t) is the signal input to the AOD modulation source; A.sub.1 is the light intensity; A.sub.2 is the diffraction efficiency; m.sub.1 and m.sub.2 are constants that determine the signal-to-bias ratio; f.sub.o is the frequency offset between the oscillator at f.sub.c and the modulation at f.sub.c +f.sub.o ; and a.sub.o and a.sub.1 are constant chosen to bias the diode source and the acousto-optic deflector into their respective linear operating regions so that the diode source exhibits a linear intensity characteristic and the AOD exhibits a linear amplitude characteristic.

  17. Least Squares Temporal Difference Actor-Critic Methods with Applications to Robot Motion Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estanjini, Reza Moazzez; Lahijanian, Morteza; Wang, Jing; Belta, Calin A; Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of finding a control policy for a Markov Decision Process (MDP) to maximize the probability of reaching some states while avoiding some other states. This problem is motivated by applications in robotics, where such problems naturally arise when probabilistic models of robot motion are required to satisfy temporal logic task specifications. We transform this problem into a Stochastic Shortest Path (SSP) problem and develop a new approximate dynamic programming algorithm to solve it. This algorithm is of the actor-critic type and uses a least-square temporal difference learning method. It operates on sample paths of the system and optimizes the policy within a pre-specified class parameterized by a parsimonious set of parameters. We show its convergence to a policy corresponding to a stationary point in the parameters' space. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

  18. Quantum chaos of a kicked particle in a 1D infinite square potential well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baowen Li; Jie Liu; Yan Gu; Bambi Hu

    1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study quantum chaos in a non-KAM system, i.e. a kicked particle in a one-dimensional infinite square potential well. Within the perturbative regime the classical phase space displays stochastic web structures, and the diffusion coefficient D in the regime increases with the perturbative strength K giving a scaling $D \\propto K^{2.5}$, and in the large K regime D goes as K^2. Quantum mechanically, we observe that the level spacing statistics of the quasi eigenenergies changes from Poisson to Wigner distribution as the kick strength increases. The quasi eigenstates show power-law localization in the small K region, which become extended one at large K. Possible experimental realization of this model is also discussed.

  19. Multivariate analysis of remote LIBS spectra using partial least squares, principal component analysis, and related techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sklute, Elizabeth [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Dyare, Melinda D [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative analysis with LIBS traditionally employs calibration curves that are complicated by the chemical matrix effects. These chemical matrix effects influence the LIBS plasma and the ratio of elemental composition to elemental emission line intensity. Consequently, LIBS calibration typically requires a priori knowledge of the unknown, in order for a series of calibration standards similar to the unknown to be employed. In this paper, three new Multivariate Analysis (MV A) techniques are employed to analyze the LIBS spectra of 18 disparate igneous and highly-metamorphosed rock samples. Partial Least Squares (PLS) analysis is used to generate a calibration model from which unknown samples can be analyzed. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) are employed to generate a model and predict the rock type of the samples. These MV A techniques appear to exploit the matrix effects associated with the chemistries of these 18 samples.

  20. Tube vibration in industrial-size test heat exchanger (90/sup 0/ square layout)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halle, H.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tube vibrations in heat exchangers are being systematically investigated in a series of tests performed with an industrial-size test exchanger. Results from waterflow tests of eleven different tube bundles, in six- and eight-crosspass configurations on a 90/sup 0/ square layout with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.25 are reported. The test cases include full tube bundles, no-tubes-in-window bundles, finned tube bundles, and proposed field and design fixes. The testing focused on identification of the lowest critical flowrate to initiate fluidelastic instability (large amplitude tube motion) and the location within the bundle of the tubes which first experience instability. The test results are tabulated to permit comparison with results obtained from previous tests with a 30/sup 0/ triangular layout tube bundle. Instability criteria are evaluated preliminarily. Pressure drop data are also generated and reported.

  1. Classical systems can be contextual too: Analogue of the Mermin-Peres square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawel Blasiak

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Contextuality lays at the heart of quantum mechanics. In the prevailing opinion it is considered as a signature of 'quantumness' that classical theories lack. However, this assertion is only partially justified. Although contextuality is certainly true of quantum mechanics, it cannot be taken by itself as discriminating against classical theories. Here we consider a representative example of contextual behaviour, the so-called Mermin-Peres square, and present a discrete toy model of a bipartite system which reproduces the pattern of quantum predictions that leads to contradiction with the assumption of non-contextuality. This illustrates that quantum-like contextual effects have their analogues within classical models with epistemic constraints such as limited information gain and measurement disturbance.

  2. Nonzero Mean Squared Momentum of Quarks in the Non-Perturbative QCD Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Juan Zhou; Leonard S. Kisslinger; Wei-xing Ma

    2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-local vacuum condensates of QCD describe the distributions of quarks and gluons in the non-perturbative QCD vacuum. Physically, this means that vacuum quarks and gluons have nonzero mean-squared momentum, called virtuality. In this paper we study the quark virtuality which is given by the ratio of the local quark-gluon mixed vacuum condensate to the quark local vacuum condensate. The two vacuum condensates are obtained by solving Dyson-Schwinger Equations of a fully dressed quark propagator with an effective gluon propagator. Using our calculated condensates, we obtain the virtuality of quarks in the QCD vacuum state. Our numerical predictions differ from the other theoretical model calculations such as QCD sum rules, Lattice QCD and instanton models.

  3. Constraints on Light Pseudoscalars Implied by Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ephraim Fischbach; Dennis E. Krause

    1999-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The exchange of light pseudoscalars between fermions leads to a spin-independent potential in order g^4, where g is the Yukawa pseudoscalar-fermion coupling constant. This potential gives rise to detectable violations of both the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and the gravitational inverse-square law (ISL), even if g is quite small. We show that when previously derived WEP constraints are combined with those arisingfrom ISL tests, a direct experimental limit on the Yukawa coupling of light pseudoscalars to neutrons can be inferred for the first time (g_n^2/4pi < 1.6 \\times 10^-7), along with a new (and significantly improved) limit on the coupling of light pseudoscalars to protons.

  4. Heat transfer and friction in a square channel with one-wall or two-wall rib turbulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jie Joy

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT TRANSFER AND FRICTION IN A SQUARE CHANNEL WITH ONE-WAIL OR TWO-WAII RIB TURBULATORS A Thesis by JIE JOY HUANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8rM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of Commit tee) D. Rhode (Member) . A. Hassan (Member) I W. Bradley (Head of Department) December 1991 ABSTRACT Heat Transfer and Friction in a Square Channel with One-Wall or Two-Wall Rib Turbulators. (December 1991) Jie Joy Huang, B. S...

  5. A calculation of the inductance of 3-phase buses comprised of square tubular conductors with 120-degree-angle spacing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuch, Howard Weller

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY A g M COLLEGE OF TEXAS A CALCULATION OF THE INDUCI'ANCE OF 3 ? PHASE BUSES COh6$ ISED OF SqUARE TUBULAR CONDUCTORS WITH 120-DEGREE-ANGLE S PAC ING A Thesis By Howard Wailer Zuch Submitted to ths Graduate School of the Agricultural... and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1959 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering A CAICULAT ION OF THE IMDUCTANCL' OF 3-PIIASI BUSES COMPR ISED OF SQUARE TUBULAR CONDUCTORS...

  6. The 160 Square Degree ROSAT Survey: the Revised Catalog of 201 Clusters with Spectroscopic Redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullis, C R; Quintana, H; Vikhlinin, A; Henry, J P; Gioia, I M; Hornstrup, A; Forman, W; Jones, C

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the revised catalog of galaxy clusters detected as extended X-ray sources in the 160 Square Degree ROSAT Survey, including spectroscopic redshifts and X-ray luminosities for 200 of the 201 members. The median redshift is z~0.25 and the median X-ray luminosity is 4.2e+43 erg/s/h50^2 (0.5-2.0 keV). This is the largest high-redshift sample of X-ray selected clusters published to date. There are 73 objects at z>0.3 and 22 objects at z>0.5 drawn from a statistically complete flux-limited survey with a median object flux of 1.4d-13 erg/cm^2/s. We describe the optical follow-up of these clusters with an emphasis on our spectroscopy which has yielded 155 cluster redshifts, 110 of which are presented here for the first time. These measurements combined with 45 from the literature and other sources provide near-complete spectroscopic coverage for our survey. We discuss the final optical identifications for the extended X-ray sources in the survey region and compare our results to similar X-ray cluster search...

  7. Development of an analytic core flow approximation for a square duct in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, N.B.; Tillack, M.S.; Abdou, M.A.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The core flow approximation for liquid metal (LM), magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) duct flow is a method that ignores the contributions of viscous forces in the fluid. For a fully developed, steady state flow situation, this approximation leaves the magnetic forces to be balanced only by the pressure gradient and results in a greatly simplified momentum equation. The velocity field predicted by the core flow equations is obtained much more easily than that described by the full solution, which usually requires a numerical approach. For this reason it is desirable to use the core flow method for flow situations in which viscosity has little effect. Developed here is an analytic core flow solution for a square duct in an obliquely incident magnetic field which omits any special treatment of boundary layers. This solution is compared to the full solution method developed in the code MH2D and a parametric comparison is performed. This general analytic approach can be expanded to consider rectangular ducts or walls of different thickness and electrical conductivity. The latter, however, will greatly complicate the equations presented here.

  8. THE MADISON SQUARE GARDEN DISPERSION STUDY (MSG05) METEOROLOGICAL DATA DESCRIPTION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REYNOLDS, R.M.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MSG05 was a study of atmospheric transport and dispersion in the deep urban canyons of Midtown New York City, in the area of Madison Square Garden. This downtown area is considered to be a prime target for terrorist activities, and has one of the largest commuter populations in the world. Little is known about air flow and hazardous gas dispersion in such scenarios, since previous urban field experiments have focused on small to medium sized cities with much smaller street canyons. On March 10 and 14, 2005, a series of Perfluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) tracers were released and tracked with about 30 sampling stations at radial distances of about 0.2 and 0.4 km, with vertical profiles near a 250 m tall building (One Penn Plaza). Meteorological stations collected wind data in the MSG vicinity, at street level and rooftop level. MSG05 is expected to provide useful information on rapid vertical dispersion will assist in planning for more extensive studies. This data release is being made available to a restricted group of key scientists who have worked on the project. Part of the QA program involves feedback from scientists and modelers who are working on this study. This document describes the meteorological component of the project. The file organization and metadata are detailed so that a researcher can work with the data sets.

  9. Detailed heat transfer distributions in two-pass smooth and turbulated square channels with bleed holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekkad, S.V.; Huang, Y.; Han, J.C. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern gas turbine blades have internal serpentine passage for providing effective cooling. Rib turbulators are added periodically on the cooling passage surface to enhance heat transfer. Some of the cooling air is ejected out through bleed (or film) holes for external blade film cooling. The presence of periodic rib turbulators and bleed holes creates strong axial and spanwise variations in the heat transfer distributions on the passage surface. Detailed heat transfer coefficient distributions are presented in this study for a two-pass square channel with a 180{degree} turn. One wall of the channel has periodically placed bleed holes. Four different configurations of 90{degree} parallel, 60{degree} parallel, 60{degree} V ribs, and 60{degree} inverted V ribs are studied in conjunction with the effect of bleed holes on the same wall. The surface is coated with a thin layer of thermochromic liquid crystals and a transient test is run to obtain the detailed heat transfer distributions. The 60{degree} parallel, 60{degree} V, and 60{degree} inverted ribbed channels produce similar levels of heat transfer enhancement in the first pass. However, the 60{degree} inverted V ribbed channel produces higher enhancement in the second pass. Regional averaged heat transfer results indicate that a test surface with bleed holes provides similar heat transfer enhancement as that for a test surface without bleed holes although 20--25% of the inlet mass flow exits through the bleed holes.

  10. Self-avoiding trails with nearest neighbour interactions on the square lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bedini; A. L. Owczarek; T. Prellberg

    2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-avoiding walks and self-avoiding trails, two models of a polymer coil in dilute solution, have been shown to be governed by the same universality class. On the other hand, self-avoiding walks interacting via nearest-neighbour contacts (ISAW) and self-avoiding trails interacting via multiply-visited sites (ISAT) are two models of the coil-globule, or collapse transition of a polymer in dilute solution. On the square lattice it has been established numerically that the collapse transition of each model lies in a different universality class. The models differ in two substantial ways. They differ in the types of subsets of random walk configurations utilised (site self-avoidance versus bond self-avoidance) and in the type of attractive interaction. It is therefore of some interest to consider self-avoiding trails interacting via nearest neighbour attraction (INNSAT) in order to ascertain the source for the difference in the collapse universality class. Using the flatPERM algorithm, we have performed computer simulations of this model. We present numerical evidence that the singularity in the free energy of INNSAT at the collapse transition has a similar exponent to that of the ISAW model rather than the ISAT model. This would indicate that the type of interaction used in ISAW and ISAT is the source of the difference in universality class.

  11. Simulated Stochastic Approximation Annealing for Global Optimization with a Square-Root Cooling Schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Faming; Cheng, Yichen; Lin, Guang

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulated annealing has been widely used in the solution of optimization problems. As known by many researchers, the global optima cannot be guaranteed to be located by simulated annealing unless a logarithmic cooling schedule is used. However, the logarithmic cooling schedule is so slow that no one can afford to have such a long CPU time. This paper proposes a new stochastic optimization algorithm, the so-called simulated stochastic approximation annealing algorithm, which is a combination of simulated annealing and the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm. Under the framework of stochastic approximation Markov chain Monte Carlo, it is shown that the new algorithm can work with a cooling schedule in which the temperature can decrease much faster than in the logarithmic cooling schedule, e.g., a square-root cooling schedule, while guaranteeing the global optima to be reached when the temperature tends to zero. The new algorithm has been tested on a few benchmark optimization problems, including feed-forward neural network training and protein-folding. The numerical results indicate that the new algorithm can significantly outperform simulated annealing and other competitors.

  12. Widespread occurrence of the inverse square distribution in social sciences and taxonomy Guido Caldarelli,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caldarelli, Guido

    Widespread occurrence of the inverse square distribution in social sciences and taxonomy GuidoRevE.69.035101 PACS number s : 89.75.Fb, 89.75.Hc, 05.40. a, 05.65. b Taxonomy is one of the major

  13. Inclusive Electroweak measurements in the muon channel with pp collisions at [the square root of] s=7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Philip Coleman

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we perform the measurement of the production of W and Z bosons in proton-proton collisions at [the square root of]s = 7 TeV with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In the LHC, W and Z bosons are produced at ...

  14. Distributed multichannel speech enhancement with minimum mean-square error short-time spectral amplitude, log-spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael T.

    Distributed multichannel speech enhancement with minimum mean-square error short-time spectral Keywords: Acoustic arrays Speech enhancement Amplitude estimation Phase estimation Parameter estimation a b on the development and implementation of speech enhancement algorithms. Whereas the current state-of-the-art methods

  15. Recursive least squares with forgetting for online estimation of vehicle mass and road grade: theory and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    mass and road grade are important in automation of heavy duty vehicles, vehicle following manoeuvresRecursive least squares with forgetting for online estimation of vehicle mass and road grade, University of Michigan, G008 Lay Auto Lab, 1231 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA Good estimates of vehicle

  16. 898 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 36, NO. 3, MAY 1998 Least Squares Subspace Projection Approach to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chein-I

    be thought of as a priori OSP. In order to evaluate these three approaches, their associated least squares) analysis. All results are demonstrated by computer simulations and Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging classifier (TSC). I. INTRODUCTION THE ADVENT of high spatial resolution airborne and satellite sensors

  17. Reprint from RSC Advances, 4, 14962 (2014) Formation and dynamics of partially wetting droplets in square microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubaud, Thomas

    are generated by focusing water in a continuous phase of silicone oil using square microchannels. The shape and stability of the lubricating film between droplets and channel walls permit the classification of typical water hydrology,1-3 oil recovery,4-8 water-oil filtration,9-11 and fuel cells.12 Examples of basic flow

  18. 3D Least Squares Velocity from 3D Doppler Radial X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, John

    neighbourhoods to compute local 3D velocity. Radial velocity (measured by the Doppler effect) is the component3D Least Squares Velocity from 3D Doppler Radial Velocity X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer Dept. Radial velocity can be used to predict the motion of storms in sequences of Doppler radar datasets

  19. Cosmology from HI galaxy surveys with the SKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdalla, Filipe B; Camera, Stefano; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Joachimi, Benjamin; Kirk, Donnacha; Klöckner, Hans-Rainer; Maartens, Roy; Raccanelli, Alvise; Santos, Mario G; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) has the potential to produce galaxy redshift surveys which will be competitive with other state of the art cosmological experiments in the next decade. In this chapter we summarise what capabilities the first and the second phases of the SKA will be able to achieve in its current state of design. We summarise the different cosmological experiments which are outlined in further detail in other chapters of this Science Book. The SKA will be able to produce competitive Baryonic Oscillation (BAOs) measurements in both its phases. The first phase of the SKA will provide similar measurements as optical and IR experiments with completely different systematic effects whereas the second phase being transformational in terms of its statistical power. The SKA will produce very accurate Redshift Space Distortions (RSD) measurements, being superior to other experiments at lower redshifts, due to the large number of galaxies. Cross correlations of the galaxy redshift data from the SKA with ...

  20. Simulating the 21cm forest detectable with LOFAR and SKA in the spectra of high-z GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciardi, B; Abdalla, F B; Asad, K; Bernardi, G; Bolton, J S; Brentjens, M; de Bruyn, A G; Chapman, E; Daiboo, S; Fernandez, E R; Ghosh, A; Graziani, L; Harker, G J A; Iliev, I T; Jelic, V; Jensen, H; Kazemi, S; Koopmans, L V E; Martinez, O; Maselli, A; Mellema, G; Offringa, A R; Pandey, V N; Schaye, J; Thomas, R; Vedantham, H; Yatawatta, S; Zaroubi, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the feasibility of detecting 21cm absorption features in the afterglow spectra of high redshift long Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). This is done employing simulations of cosmic reionization, together with the instrumental characteristics of the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR). We find that absorption features could be marginally (with a S/N larger than a few) detected by LOFAR at z>7 if the GRB originated from PopIII stars, while the detection would be easier if the noise were reduced by one order of magnitude, i.e. similar to what is expected for the first phase of the Square Kilometer Array (SKA1-low). On the other hand, more standard GRBs are too dim to be detected even with ten times the sensitivity of SKA1-low, and only in the most optimistic case can a S/N larger than a few be reached at z>9.

  1. A 5 GHz LNA for a Radio-Astronomy Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergano, Miguel; Rocha, Armando; Barbosa, Domingos

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the project, implementation and test of a C-band (5GHz) Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) using new low noise Pseudomorphic High Electron Mobility Transistors (pHEMTS) from Avago. The amplifier was developed to be used as a cost effective solution in a receiver chain for Galactic Emission Mapping (GEM-P) project in Portugal with the objective of finding affordable solutions not requiring strong cryogenic operation, as is the case of massive projects like the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), in Earth Sensing projects and other niches like microwave reflectometry. The particular application and amplifier requirements are first introduced. Several commercially available low noise devices were selected and the noise performance simulated. An ultra-low noise pHEMT was used for an implementation that achieved a Noise Figure of 0.6 dB with 13 dB gain at 5 GHz. The design, simulation and measured results of the prototype are presented and discussed.

  2. Exploration of the El Hoyo-Monte Galan Geothermal Concession. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1996 Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation (TGC) was granted a geothermal concession of 114 square kilometers from the Instituto Nicaragueense de Energie (INE) for the purpose of developing between 50 and 150 MWe of geothermal electrical generating capacity. The Concession Agreement required TGC to perform geological, geophysical, and geochemical studies as part of the development program. TGC commenced the geotechnical studies in January 1996 with a comprehensive review of all existing data and surveys. Based on this review, TGC formulated an exploration plan and executed that plan commencing in April, 1996. The ground magnetic (GM), self potential (SP), magnetotelluric/controlled source audio magnetotelluric (MT/CSAMT) and one-meter temperature surveys, data integration, and synthesis of a hydrogeologic model were performed. The purpose of this report is to present a compilation of all data gathered from the geophysical exploration program and to provide an integrated interpretation of that data.

  3. Biodiversity Analysis of Vegetation on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler; D. J. Hansen

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) located in south central Nevada encompasses approximately 3,561 square kilometers and straddles two major North American deserts, Mojave and Great Basin. Transitional areas between the two desert types have been created by gradients in elevation, precipitation, temperature, and soils. From 1996-1998, more than 1,500 ecological landform units were sampled at the NTS for numerous biotic and abiotic parameters. These data provide a basis for spatial evaluations of biodiversity over landscape scales at the NTS. Species diversity maps (species richness vs. species abundance) have been produced. Differences in ecosystem diversity at the ecoregion, alliance, association, and ecological landform unit levels are presented. Spatial distribution maps of species presence and abundance provide evidence of where transition zones occur and the resulting impact on biodiversity. The influences of abiotic factors (elevation, soil, precipitation) and anthropogenic disturbance on biodiversity are assessed.

  4. Hanford 1999 Tier 2 Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act Section 312

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZALOUDEK, D.E.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site covers approximately 1,450 square kilometers (560 square miles) of land that is owned by the U.S. Government and managed by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). The Hanford Site is located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The city of Richland adjoins the southeastern portion of the Hanford Site boundary and is the nearest population center. Activities on the Hanford Site are centralized in numerically designated areas. The 100 Areas, located along the Columbia River, contain deactivated reactors. The processing units are in the 200 Areas, which are on a plateau approximately 11 kilometers (7 miles) from the Columbia River. The 300 Area, located adjacent to and north of Richland, contains research and development laboratories. The 400 Area, 8 kilometers (5 miles) northwest of the 300 Area, contains the Fast Flux Test Facility previously used for testing liquid metal reactor systems. Adjacent to the north of Richland, the 1100 Area contains offices associated with administration, maintenance, transportation, and materials procurement and distribution. The 600 Area covers all locations not specifically given an area designation. This Tier Two Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory report contains information pertaining to hazardous chemicals managed by DOE-RL and its contractors on the Hanford Site. It does not include chemicals maintained in support of activities conducted by others on lands covered by leases, use permits, easements, and other agreements whereby land is used by parties other than DOE-RL. For example, this report does not include chemicals stored on state owned or leased lands (including the burial ground operated by US Ecology, Inc.), lands owned or used by the Bonneville Power Administration (including the Midway Substation and the Ashe Substation), lands used by the National Science Foundation (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory), lands leased to the Washington Public Power Supply System, Johnson Controls, Inc. (boilers operated for steam production), and R. H. Smith Company (gas stations), or similarly leased lands not under the management of DOE-RL.

  5. Nevada Test Site 2007 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from three monitoring wells located near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, for calendar year 2007. The NTS is an approximately 3,561 square kilometer (1,375 square mile) restricted-access federal installation located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are used to monitor the groundwater at the Area 5 RWMS (Figure 2). In addition to groundwater monitoring results, this report includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 RWMS. The disposal of low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level radioactive waste at the Area 5 RWMS is regulated by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The disposal of mixed low-level radioactive waste is also regulated by the state of Nevada under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities' (CFR, 1999). The format of this report was requested by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 12, 1997. The appearance and arrangement of this document have been modified slightly since that date to provide additional information and to facilitate the readability of the document. The objective of this report is to satisfy any Area 5 RWMS reporting agreements between DOE and NDEP.

  6. Statistical CT noise reduction with multiscale decomposition and penalized weighted least squares in the projection domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang Shaojie; Tang Xiangyang [Imaging and Medical Physics, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Uppergate Dr., C-5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); School of Automation, Xi'an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710121 (China); Imaging and Medical Physics, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Uppergate Dr., C-5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purposes: The suppression of noise in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging is of clinical relevance for diagnostic image quality and the potential for radiation dose saving. Toward this purpose, statistical noise reduction methods in either the image or projection domain have been proposed, which employ a multiscale decomposition to enhance the performance of noise suppression while maintaining image sharpness. Recognizing the advantages of noise suppression in the projection domain, the authors propose a projection domain multiscale penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) method, in which the angular sampling rate is explicitly taken into consideration to account for the possible variation of interview sampling rate in advanced clinical or preclinical applications. Methods: The projection domain multiscale PWLS method is derived by converting an isotropic diffusion partial differential equation in the image domain into the projection domain, wherein a multiscale decomposition is carried out. With adoption of the Markov random field or soft thresholding objective function, the projection domain multiscale PWLS method deals with noise at each scale. To compensate for the degradation in image sharpness caused by the projection domain multiscale PWLS method, an edge enhancement is carried out following the noise reduction. The performance of the proposed method is experimentally evaluated and verified using the projection data simulated by computer and acquired by a CT scanner. Results: The preliminary results show that the proposed projection domain multiscale PWLS method outperforms the projection domain single-scale PWLS method and the image domain multiscale anisotropic diffusion method in noise reduction. In addition, the proposed method can preserve image sharpness very well while the occurrence of 'salt-and-pepper' noise and mosaic artifacts can be avoided. Conclusions: Since the interview sampling rate is taken into account in the projection domain multiscale decomposition, the proposed method is anticipated to be useful in advanced clinical and preclinical applications where the interview sampling rate varies.

  7. SMART-X, "Square Meter, Arcsecond Resolution X-ray Telescope" A. Vikhlinina, P. Reida, H. Tananbauma, D. A. Schwartza, W. R. Formana, C. Jonesa, J. Bookbindera,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SMART-X, "Square Meter, Arcsecond Resolution X-ray Telescope" A. Vikhlinina, P. Reida, HJohn Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street Baltimore, MD 21211 ABSTRACT SMART-X is a mission concept microcalorimeter, 22 FOV imager, and high-throughput gratings. 1. OVERVIEW We describe the Square Meter Arcsecond

  8. Local heat transfer in rotating smooth and ribbed two-pass square channels with three channel orientations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, S. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Han, J.C. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents experimental heat transfer results in a two-pass square channel with smooth and ribbed surfaces. The ribs are placed in a staggered half-V fashion with the rotation orthogonal to the channel axis. The channel orientation varies with respect to the rotation plane. A change in the channel orientation about the rotating frame causes a change in the secondary flow structure and associated flow and turbulence distribution. Consequently, the heat transfer coefficient from the individual surfaces of the two-pass square channel changes. The effects of rotation number on local Nusselt number ratio distributions are presented. Heat transfer coefficients with ribbed surfaces show different characteristics in rotation number dependency from those with smooth surfaces. Results show that staggered half-V ribs mostly have higher heat transfer coefficients than those with 90 and 60 deg continuous ribs. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Robust parallel iterative solvers for linear and least-squares problems, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saad, Yousef

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project is to study and develop robust iterative methods for solving linear systems of equations and least squares systems. The focus of the Minnesota team is on algorithms development, robustness issues, and on tests and validation of the methods on realistic problems. 1. The project begun with an investigation on how to practically update a preconditioner obtained from an ILU-type factorization, when the coefficient matrix changes. 2. We investigated strategies to improve robustness in parallel preconditioners in a specific case of a PDE with discontinuous coefficients. 3. We explored ways to adapt standard preconditioners for solving linear systems arising from the Helmholtz equation. These are often difficult linear systems to solve by iterative methods. 4. We have also worked on purely theoretical issues related to the analysis of Krylov subspace methods for linear systems. 5. We developed an effective strategy for performing ILU factorizations for the case when the matrix is highly indefinite. The strategy uses shifting in some optimal way. The method was extended to the solution of Helmholtz equations by using complex shifts, yielding very good results in many cases. 6. We addressed the difficult problem of preconditioning sparse systems of equations on GPUs. 7. A by-product of the above work is a software package consisting of an iterative solver library for GPUs based on CUDA. This was made publicly available. It was the first such library that offers complete iterative solvers for GPUs. 8. We considered another form of ILU which blends coarsening techniques from Multigrid with algebraic multilevel methods. 9. We have released a new version on our parallel solver - called pARMS [new version is version 3]. As part of this we have tested the code in complex settings - including the solution of Maxwell and Helmholtz equations and for a problem of crystal growth.10. As an application of polynomial preconditioning we considered the problem of evaluating f(A)v which arises in statistical sampling. 11. As an application to the methods we developed, we tackled the problem of computing the diagonal of the inverse of a matrix. This arises in statistical applications as well as in many applications in physics. We explored probing methods as well as domain-decomposition type methods. 12. A collaboration with researchers from Toulouse, France, considered the important problem of computing the Schur complement in a domain-decomposition approach. 13. We explored new ways of preconditioning linear systems, based on low-rank approximations.

  10. Effects of the Inverse Square Potential on Nucleon-Nucleon Elastic Scattering in the Bethe-Salpeter Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinpara, Susumu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bethe-Salpeter equation is applied to nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering at the intermediate energy. The differential cross section and the polarization are calculated in terms of the phase shift analysis method using the two-body potential derived from the Bethe-Salpeter equation. The lowest-order Born approximation for the K-matrix is corrected by including the inverse square part of the potential.

  11. BMUS PROGRAMME Each small square box represents 0.5 unit. The shaded areas are the core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    BMUS PROGRAMME Each small square box represents 0.5 unit. The shaded areas are the core component of each year. The optional component can be made up of 0.5 units or whole units of Intermediate (I unit) Core 1102 (1 unit) Core 1103 (0.5 unit) Core 1104 (0.5 unit) Core 1105 (0.5 unit) Core 1106 (0.5

  12. Inverse Square Law of Gravitation in (2+1)-Dimensional Space-Time as a Consequence of Casimir Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. H. Soleng

    1993-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The gravitational effect of vacuum polarization in space exterior to a particle in (2+1)-dimensional Einstein theory is investigated. In the weak field limit this gravitational field corresponds to an inverse square law of gravitational attraction, even though the gravitational mass of the quantum vacuum is negative. The paradox is resolved by considering a particle of finite extension and taking into account the vacuum polarization in its interior.

  13. Achieving Accelerated Cleanup of Cesium Contaminated Stream at the Savannah River Site; Collaboration between Stakeholders, Regulators, and the Federal Government - 13182

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, Chris; Flora, Mary; Socha, Ron; Burch, Joseph [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Freeman, Candice; Hennessey, Brian [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina that contains six primary stream/river systems. The Lower Three Runs Stream (LTR) is one of the primary streams within the site that is located in the southeast portion of the Savannah River Site and is a large black water stream system that originates in the northeast portion of SRS and follows a southerly direction before it enters the Savannah River. During reactor operations, secondary reactor cooling water, storm sewer discharges, and miscellaneous wastewater was discharged and contaminated a 36 kilometer stretch of Lower Three Runs Stream that narrows providing a limited buffer of US DOE property along the stream and flood plain. Based on data collected during 2009 and 2010 under Recover Act Funding, the stream was determined to be contaminated with cesium-137 at levels that exceeded acceptable risk based limits. As efficiencies were realized within the SRS Recovery Act Program, funding was made available to design, permit and execute remediation of the LTR. This accelerated Project allowed for the remediation of 36 kilometers of LTR in only nine months from inception to completion, contributing significantly to the Foot Print Reduction of SRS. The scope consisted of excavation and disposal of more than 2064 cubic meters of contaminated soil, and installing 11 kilometers of fence and 2,000 signs at 1000 locations. Confirmatory sampling and analysis, and radiological surveying were performed demonstrating that soil concentrations met the cleanup goals. The project completed with a very good safety record considering the harsh conditions including, excessive rain in the early stages of the project, high summer temperatures, swampy terrain, snakes, wild boar, insects and dense vegetation. The regulatory approval process was compressed by over 75% and required significant efforts from SRS's stakeholders including the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), and the public including local property owners and the SRS Citizens Advisory Board. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the up-front planning in order to achieve this challenging cleanup. (authors)

  14. On the generalization of linear least mean squares estimation to quantum systems with non-commutative outputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nina H. Amini; Zibo Miao; Yu Pan; Matthew R. James; Hideo Mabuchi

    2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to study the problem of generalizing the Belavkin-Kalman filter to the case where the classical measurement signal is replaced by a fully quantum non-commutative output signal. We formulate a least mean squares estimation problem that involves a non-commutative system as the filter processing the non-commutative output signal. We solve this estimation problem within the framework of non-commutative probability. Also, we find the necessary and sufficient conditions which make these non-commutative estimators physically realizable.

  15. WASHINGTON SQUARE HALL 118 ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Impact Assessment Rachel O'Malley Concentration in Environmental Restoration and Resource Management: (408) 924-5477 ENVIRONMENTAL-STUDIES@SJSU.EDU WWW.SJSU.EDU/ENVS SJSU DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL Mulvaney, Rachel O'Malley, and Will Russell BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES Bachelor

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS--II: ANALOG AND DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 46, NO. 8, AUGUST 1999 1035 An Improved Weighted Least-Squares Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wu-Sheng

    , AUGUST 1999 1035 An Improved Weighted Least-Squares Design for Variable Fractional Delay FIR Filters Wu, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3P6. T.-B. Deng is with the Department of Information

  17. Inclusive jet and dijet production in polarized proton-proton collisions at [the square root of sigma] =200 GeV at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakuma, Tai

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The inclusive jet cross section, the dijet cross section, and the dijet longitudinal double spin asymmetry ALL in polarized proton-proton collisions at [square root of sigma] = 200 GeV are measured with a data sample of ...

  18. Nonlinear Analysis of Beams Using Least-Squares Finite Element Models Based on the Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko Beam Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raut, Ameeta A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ..... 6 2.3 Summary............................................................................................ 8 3. THEORETICAL FORMULATION OF EBT AND TBT ............................ 9 3.1 Background... ......................................................... 30 5.4 Summary............................................................................................. 31 6. LEAST-SQUARES THEORY & FORMULATION .................................... 32 6.1 Introduction...

  19. Nonlinear Analysis of Beams Using Least-Squares Finite Element Models Based on the Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko Beam Theories 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raut, Ameeta A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ..... 6 2.3 Summary............................................................................................ 8 3. THEORETICAL FORMULATION OF EBT AND TBT ............................ 9 3.1 Background... ......................................................... 30 5.4 Summary............................................................................................. 31 6. LEAST-SQUARES THEORY & FORMULATION .................................... 32 6.1 Introduction...

  20. Lawn chairs in Times Square : an analysis of the Pilot Streets Program and the provisional project approach for New York City's Green Light in Midtown project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alexis (Alexis Abreu)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009 the New York City Department of Transportation (NYC DOT) initiated a Pilot Streets Program that called for the temporary closure of Broadway between 47th and 42nd Streets to all vehicular traffic. With Times Square ...

  1. Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law below the Dark-Energy Length Scale D. J. Kapner,* T. S. Cook, E. G. Adelberger, J. H. Gundlach, B. R. Heckel, C. D. Hoyle, and H. E. Swanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law below the Dark-Energy Length Scale D. J. Kapner,* T-balance experiments to test the gravitational inverse-square law at separations between 9.53 mm and 55 m, probing of the gravitational inverse-square law we report in this Letter. Our tests were made with a substantially upgraded ver

  2. Dark matter vs. modifications of the gravitational inverse-square law. Results from planetary motion in the solar system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sereno; Ph. Jetzer

    2006-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark matter or modifications of the Newtonian inverse-square law in the solar-system are studied with accurate planetary astrometric data. From extra-perihelion precession and possible changes in the third Kepler's law, we get an upper limit on the local dark matter density, rho_{DM} gravitational acceleration are really small. We examined the MOND interpolating function mu in the regime of strong gravity. Gradually varying mu suggested by fits of rotation curves are excluded, whereas the standard form mu(x)= x/(1+x^2)^{1/2} is still compatible with data. In combination with constraints from galactic rotation curves and theoretical considerations on the external field effect, the absence of any significant deviation from inverse square attraction in the solar system makes the range of acceptable interpolating functions significantly narrow. Future radio ranging observations of outer planets with an accuracy of few tenths of a meter could either give positive evidence of dark matter or disprove modifications of gravity.

  3. Finite element solution of multi-scale transport problems using the least squares based bubble function enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yazdani; V. Nassehi

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an optimum technique based on the least squares method for the derivation of the bubble functions to enrich the standard linear finite elements employed in the formulation of Galerkin weighted-residual statements. The element-level linear shape functions are enhanced with supplementary polynomial bubble functions with undetermined coefficients. The best least squares minimization of the residual functional obtained from the insertion of these trial functions into model equations results in an algebraic system of equations whose solution provides the unknown coefficients in terms of element-level nodal values. The normal finite element procedures for the construction of stiffness matrices may then be followed with no extra degree of freedom incurred as a result of such enrichment. The performance of the proposed method has been tested on a number of benchmark linear transport equations with the results compared against the exact and standard linear element solutions. It has been observed that low order bubble enriched elements produce more accurate approximations than the standard linear elements with no extra computational cost despite employing relatively crude mesh. However, for the solution of strongly convection or reaction dominated problems significantly higher order enrichments as well as extra mesh refinements will be required.

  4. LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP AT DOE HANFORD SITE - 12575

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOREN RJ; GRINDSTAFF KD

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is located in southeast Washington and consists of 1,518 square kilometers (586 square miles) of land. Established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, Hanford workers produced plutonium for our nation's nuclear defense program until the mid 1980's. Since then, the site has been in cleanup mode that is being accomplished in phases. As we achieve remedial objectives and complete active cleanup, DOE will manage Hanford land under the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program until completion of cleanup and the site becomes ready for transfer to the post cleanup landlord - currently planned for DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM). We define Hanford's LTS Program in the ''Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan,'' (DOE/RL-201 0-35)[1], which describes the scope including the relationship between the cleanup projects and the LTS Program. DOE designed the LTS Program to manage and provide surveillance and maintenance (S&M) of institutional controls and associated monitoring of closed waste sites to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. DOE's Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and Hanford cleanup and operations contractors collaboratively developed this program over several years. The program's scope also includes 15 key activities that are identified in the DOE Program Plan (DOE/RL-2010-35). The LTS Program will transition 14 land segments through 2016. The combined land mass is approximately 570 square kilometers (220 square miles), with over 1,300 active and inactive waste sites and 3,363 wells. Land segments vary from buffer zone property with no known contamination to cocooned reactor buildings, demolished support facilities, and remediated cribs and trenches. DOE-RL will transition land management responsibilities from cleanup contractors to the Mission Support Contract (MSC), who will then administer the LTS Program for DOE-RL. This process requires an environment of cooperation between the contractors and DOE-RL. Information Management (IM) is a key part of the LTS program. The IM Program identifies, locates, stores, protects and makes accessible Hanford LTS records and data to support the transfer of property ultimately to LM. As such, DOE-RL manages the Hanford LTS Program in a manner consistent with LM's goals, policies, and procedures.

  5. Bulk, surface and corner free energy series for the chromatic polynomial on the square and triangular lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesper Lykke Jacobsen

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an efficient algorithm for computing the partition function of the q-colouring problem (chromatic polynomial) on regular two-dimensional lattice strips. Our construction involves writing the transfer matrix as a product of sparse matrices, each of dimension ~ 3^m, where m is the number of lattice spacings across the strip. As a specific application, we obtain the large-q series of the bulk, surface and corner free energies of the chromatic polynomial. This extends the existing series for the square lattice by 32 terms, to order q^{-79}. On the triangular lattice, we verify Baxter's analytical expression for the bulk free energy (to order q^{-40}), and we are able to conjecture exact product formulae for the surface and corner free energies.

  6. Superconducting epitaxial thin films of CeNi{sub x}Bi{sub 2} with a bismuth square net structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckow, Alexander; Kupka, Katharina; Retzlaff, Reiner; Kurian, Jose; Alff, Lambert [Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have grown highly epitaxial and phase pure thin films of the arsenic-free pnictide compound CeNi{sub x}Bi{sub 2} on (100) MgO substrates by reactive molecular beam epitaxy (RMBE). X-ray diffraction and reflection high-energy electron diffraction of the films confirm the ZrCuSiAs structure with a Bi square net layer. Superconductivity was observed in magnetization and resistivity measurements for x= 0.75 to 0.93 in these CeNi{sub x}Bi{sub 2} thin films with the highest critical temperature of 4.05 K and a resistive transition width of 0.1 K for x= 0.86. Our results indicate that thin film deposition by RMBE provides a tool to synthesize high-quality pnictide superconductors of the novel 112 type.

  7. Width dependent transition of quantized spin-wave modes in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} square nanorings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Chandrima; Saha, Susmita; Barman, Saswati; Barman, Anjan, E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in [Thematic Unit of Excellence on Nanodevice Technology, Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Rousseau, Olivier [CEMS-RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Otani, YoshiChika [CEMS-RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated optically induced ultrafast magnetization dynamics in square shaped Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanorings with varying ring width. Rich spin-wave spectra are observed whose frequencies showed a strong dependence on the ring width. Micromagnetic simulations showed different types of spin-wave modes, which are quantized upto very high quantization number. In the case of widest ring, the spin-wave mode spectrum shows quantized modes along the applied field direction, which is similar to the mode spectrum of an antidot array. As the ring width decreases, additional quantization in the azimuthal direction appears causing mixed modes. In the narrowest ring, the spin-waves exhibit quantization solely in azimuthal direction. The different quantization is attributed to the variation in the internal field distribution for different ring width as obtained from micromagnetic analysis and supported by magnetic force microscopy.

  8. Heilougjiang adopts measures to strengthen land management-each square millimeter of land is utterly cherished and rationally used

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan Peiquan; Liu, Y.

    1983-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports on how a Chinese province with a large area of land and a small population has adopted a series of measures to strengthen land management, to stop the illegal occupying of land, and to protect land resources. Investigations of land resources and of the state of land use, as well as soil surveys, have been launched in order to determine the rights of land ownership and use. Many counties and cities have experimented with dividing farm areas into districts and comprehensive land planning, established land files, trained key personnel in land management skills, and have launched scientific land research. Illegal occupation, waste and destruction of land have risen with the increase in population and construction. Per capita cultivated acreage has declined to 4.1 mu. An effort has been made to reach the people in urban and rural areas with this message: ''Cherish every square millimeter of land utterly and use it rationally''.

  9. Inflection points of microcanonical entropy: Monte Carlo simulation of q state Potts model on a finite square lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Praveen, E., E-mail: svmstaya@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M., E-mail: svmstaya@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry-605014 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional definition of phase transition involves an infinitely large system in thermodynamic limit. Finite systems such as biological proteins exhibit cooperative behavior similar to phase transitions. We employ recently discovered analysis of inflection points of microcanonical entropy to estimate the transition temperature of the phase transition in q state Potts model on a finite two dimensional square lattice for q=3 (second order) and q=8 (first order). The difference of energy density of states (DOS) ? ln g(E) = ln g(E+ ?E) ?ln g(E) exhibits a point of inflexion at a value corresponding to inverse transition temperature. This feature is common to systems exhibiting both first as well as second order transitions. While the difference of DOS registers a monotonic variation around the point of inflexion for systems exhibiting second order transition, it has an S-shape with a minimum and maximum around the point of inflexion for the case of first order transition.

  10. Chromospheric Anemone Jets as Evidence of Ubiquitous Reconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazunari Shibata; Tahei Nakamura; Takuma Matsumoto; Kenichi Otsuji; Takenori J. Okamoto; Naoto Nishizuka; Tomoko Kawate; Hiroko Watanabe; Shin'ichi Nagata; Satoru UeNo; Reizaburo Kitai; Satoshi Nozawa; Saku Tsuneta; Yoshinori Suematsu; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Toshifumi Shimizu; Yukio Katsukawa; Theodore D. Tarbell; Thomas E. Berger; Bruce W. Lites; Richard A. Shine; Alan M. Title

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The heating of the solar chromosphere and corona is a long-standing puzzle in solar physics. Hinode observations show the ubiquitous presence of chromospheric anemone jets outside sunspots in active regions. They are typically 3 to 7 arc seconds = 2000 to 5000 kilometers long and 0.2 to 0.4 arc second = 150 to 300 kilometers wide, and their velocity is 10 to 20 kilometers per second. These small jets have an inverted Y-shape, similar to the shape of x-ray anemone jets in the corona. These features imply that magnetic reconnection similar to that in the corona is occurring at a much smaller spatial scale throughout the chromosphere and suggest that the heating of the solar chromosphere and corona may be related to small-scale ubiquitous reconnection.

  11. Status of the AMANDA South Pole Neutrino Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1996-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial deployment of optical modules near 1 and 2 kilometer depth indicate that deep polar ice is the most transparent known natural solid. Experience with early data has revealed that a detector, conceived to measure muons tracks, can also measure energy of high energy neutrinos as well as bursts of MeV neutrinos, e.g. produced by supernovae and gamma ray bursts. We plan to complete AMANDA this austral summer to form a detector of 11 deep strings instrumented over 400 meters height with 300 optical modules. We will argue that ice is the ideal medium to deploy a future kilometer-scale detector and discuss the first deployment of 10 strings of kilometer length.

  12. Three-dimensional geologic structures from inversion of gravity anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinson, Charles Alvin

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Parameters used were: Zo=7 km, R=l gm/cm , fr=0. 09 km-', fz=0. 125 km iterations=6 and final rms difference was 7. 6 10-4 km. . 42 12 Inversion Model 1. Parameters used were p = 0. 1 gm/cms, zo = 5. 4 km, f& = 0. 045 and fz = 0. 095. Contours... are in kilometers relative to sea level 56 13 Inversion Model 2. Parameters used were p = 0. 1 gm/cm zo = 5. 4 km, fq = 0. 001 and fz = 0. 002. Contours are in kilometers relative to sea level 58 14 Gravity difference between the anomaly produced by Inversion...

  13. Market Square SW MONTGOMERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I-405 To26W est SWPARKAVE Hoffmann Hall SW MARKET SW10th SW11th SW12th Parking Structure 3 Market Hall Blackstone Smith Memorial Student Union Cramer Hall Lincoln Hall SW MARKET SW CLAY SW CLAY Montgomery West Heating Plant SW COLUMBIA SW COLUMBIA Fourth Ave Building N S E W Urban Center Peter W. Stott

  14. LOGISTIC FUNCTION PROFILE FIT: A least-squares program for fitting interface profiles to an extended logistic function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchhoff, William H. [Surface and Microanalysis Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8370, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8370 (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The extended logistic function provides a physically reasonable description of interfaces such as depth profiles or line scans of surface topological or compositional features. It describes these interfaces with the minimum number of parameters, namely, position, width, and asymmetry. Logistic Function Profile Fit (LFPF) is a robust, least-squares fitting program in which the nonlinear extended logistic function is linearized by a Taylor series expansion (equivalent to a Newton-Raphson approach) with no apparent introduction of bias in the analysis. The program provides reliable confidence limits for the parameters when systematic errors are minimal and provides a display of the residuals from the fit for the detection of systematic errors. The program will aid researchers in applying ASTM E1636-10, 'Standard practice for analytically describing sputter-depth-profile and linescan-profile data by an extended logistic function,' and may also prove useful in applying ISO 18516: 2006, 'Surface chemical analysis-Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-determination of lateral resolution.' Examples are given of LFPF fits to a secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profile, an Auger surface line scan, and synthetic data generated to exhibit known systematic errors for examining the significance of such errors to the extrapolation of partial profiles.

  15. Evaluation of weld porosity in laser beam seam welds: optimizing continuous wave and square wave modulated processes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, Chad M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Perricone, Matthew; Faraone, Kevin M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Roach, Robert Allen; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nd:YAG laser joining is a high energy density (HED) process that can produce high-speed, low-heat input welds with a high depth-to-width aspect ratio. This is optimized by formation of a ''keyhole'' in the weld pool resulting from high vapor pressures associated with laser interaction with the metallic substrate. It is generally accepted that pores form in HED welds due to the instability and frequent collapse of the keyhole. In order to maintain an open keyhole, weld pool forces must be balanced such that vapor pressure and weld pool inertia forces are in equilibrium. Travel speed and laser beam power largely control the way these forces are balanced, as well as welding mode (Continuous Wave or Square Wave) and shielding gas type. A study into the phenomenon of weld pool porosity in 304L stainless steel was conducted to better understand and predict how welding parameters impact the weld pool dynamics that lead to pore formation. This work is intended to aid in development and verification of a finite element computer model of weld pool fluid flow dynamics being developed in parallel efforts and assist in weld development activities for the W76 and future RRW programs.

  16. Semiclassical analysis of low and zero energy scattering for one dimensional Schrödinger operators with inverse square potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovidiu Costin; Wilhelm Schlag; Wolfgang Staubach; Saleh Tanveer

    2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies the scattering matrix $\\Sigma(E;\\hbar)$ of the problem \\[ -\\hbar^2 \\psi''(x) + V(x) \\psi(x) = E\\psi(x) \\] for positive potentials $V\\in C^\\infty(\\R)$ with inverse square behavior as $x\\to\\pm\\infty$. It is shown that each entry takes the form $\\Sigma_{ij}(E;\\hbar)=\\Sigma_{ij}^{(0)}(E;\\hbar)(1+\\hbar \\sigma_{ij}(E;\\hbar))$ where $\\Sigma_{ij}^{(0)}(E;\\hbar)$ is the WKB approximation relative to the {\\em modified potential} $V(x)+\\frac{\\hbar^2}{4} \\la x\\ra^{-2}$ and the correction terms $\\sigma_{ij}$ satisfy $|\\partial_E^k \\sigma_{ij}(E;\\hbar)| \\le C_k E^{-k}$ for all $k\\ge0$ and uniformly in $(E,\\hbar)\\in (0,E_0)\\times (0,\\hbar_0)$ where $E_0,\\hbar_0$ are small constants. This asymptotic behavior is not universal: if $-\\hbar^2\\partial_x^2 + V$ has a {\\em zero energy resonance}, then $\\Sigma(E;\\hbar)$ exhibits different asymptotic behavior as $E\\to0$. The resonant case is excluded here due to $V>0$.

  17. Imprints of deviations from the gravitational inverse-square law on the power spectrum of mass fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sereno; J. A. Peacock

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Deviations from the gravitational inverse-square law would imprint scale-dependent features on the power spectrum of mass density fluctuations. We model such deviations as a Yukawa-like contribution to the gravitational potential and discuss the growth function in a mixed dark matter model with adiabatic initial conditions. Evolution of perturbations is considered in general non-flat cosmological models with a cosmological constant, and an analytical approximation for the growth function is provided. The coupling between baryons and cold dark matter across recombination is negligibly affected by modified gravity physics if the proper cutoff length of the long-range Yukawa-like force is > 10 h^{-1} Mpc. Enhancement of gravity affects the subsequent evolution, boosting large-scale power in a way that resembles the effect of a lower matter density. This phenomenon is almost perfectly degenerate in power-spectrum shape with the effect of a background of massive neutrinos. Back-reaction on density growth from a modified cosmic expansion rate should however also affect the normalization of the power spectrum, with a shape distortion similar to the case of a non-modified background.

  18. 26.1 / M. Doshi 26.1: Low-Frequency Square-Wave Drive for Large Screen LCD-TV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with accurate current control and regulation. The most common electronic ballasts, based on high frequency LCC and removes many of the drawbacks associated with a high frequency drive, including energy loss through26.1 / M. Doshi 26.1: Low-Frequency Square-Wave Drive for Large Screen LCD-TV Backlighting Systems

  19. Search for rare events in [the square root of sigma nu nu] = 200 GeV Au+Au PHOBOS data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mott, Alexander (Alexander Robert)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this analysis, we set an upper bound on the rate of rare events: events whose dN/dn distribution deviates more than statistically from the ensemble average dN/dn distribution for s [the square root of sigma nu nu] = 200 ...

  20. Area and Volume Problems 1. Given the formula for the area of a square, derive the formula for the area of a rectangle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    Area and Volume Problems 1. Given the formula for the area of a square, derive the formula for the area of a rectangle of dimensions a and b. 2. Given the formula for the area of a rectangle, derive the formula for the area of a parallelogram of base b and height h. 3. Use calculus to derive the formula

  1. W cross section measurement in the electron channel in pp collisions at [the square root of sigma]= 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everaerts, Pieter Bruno Bart

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From March until November 2010 the Compact Muon Solenoid 36 pb-1 of pp collisions at [the square root of sigma]= 7 TeV. One of the first precision Model that can be performed with this data is the measurement cross section ...

  2. South Africa is shortlisted to host a major scientific facility -the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The SKA is a next-generation radio telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    South Africa is shortlisted to host a major scientific facility - the Square Kilometre Array (SKA instrument in a radio-quiet area in the arid Karoo region of South Africa's Northern Cape Province. Further the fron- tiers of science and technology, South Africa's SKA project attracts the brightest and most

  3. Proton-? [Proton - lambda] correlations in central Pb + Pb collisions at ?sNN [square root of s subscript NN] =17.3 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roland, Christof E.

    The momentum correlation between protons and ? [lambda] particles emitted from central Pb+Pb collisions at ?sNN=17.3 [square root of s subscript NN = 17.3] GeV was studied by the NA49 experiment at the CERN Super Proton ...

  4. Measurement of the B+ [B superscript +] Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at ?s=7??[square root of s = 7] TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, Burak Han

    Measurements of the total and differential cross sections d?/dpTB [d delta / d p superscript B subscript T] and d?/dyB [d delta / d y superscript B] for B+ [B superscript +] mesons produced in pp collisions at ?s=7?[square ...

  5. Search for Quark Compositeness with the Dijet Centrality Ratio in pp Collisions at [square root of] s=7??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, Burak Han

    A search for quark compositeness in the form of quark contact interactions, based on hadronic jet pairs (dijets) produced in proton-proton collisions at ?s=7??[square root of s=7] TeV, is described. The data sample of the ...

  6. Local heat transfer distribution in a square channel with 90 continuous, 90 saw tooth profiled and 60 broken ribs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Abhishek; SriHarsha, V.; Prabhu, S.V.; Vedula, R.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal channel cooling is employed in advanced gas turbines blade to allow high inlet temperatures so as to achieve high thrust/weight ratios and low specific fuel consumption. The objective of the present study is to measure the local heat transfer distributions in a double wall ribbed square channel with 90 continuous, 90 saw tooth profiled and 60 V-broken ribs. Comparison is made between the 90 continuous ribs (P/e = 7 and 10 for a e/D = 0.15) and 90 saw tooth profiled rib configurations (P/e = 7 for an e/D = 0.15) for the same rib height to the hydraulic diameter ratio (e/D). The effect of pitch to rib height ratio (P/e = 7.5,10 and 12) of 60 V-broken ribbed channel with a constant rib height to hydraulic diameter ratio (e/D) of 0.0625 on the local heat transfer distribution is studied. The Reynolds number based on duct hydraulic diameter is ranging from 10,000 to 30,000. A thin stainless steel foil of 0.05 mm thickness is used as heater and infrared thermography technique is used to obtain the local temperature distribution on the surface. The images are captured in the periodically fully developed region of the channel. It is observed that the heat transfer augmentations in the channel with 90 saw tooth profiled ribs are comparable with those of 90 continuous ribs. The enhancements caused by 60 V-broken ribs are higher than those of 90 continuous ribs. The effect of pitch to the rib height ratio (P/e) is not significant for channel with 60 V-broken ribs for a given rib height to hydraulic diameter ratio (e/D = 0.0625). (author)

  7. Magnetic properties of the S=1/2 square lattice antiferromagnet CuF2(H2O)2(pyz)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Cuihuan [ORNL; Lumsden, Mark D [ORNL; Fishman, Randy Scott [ORNL; Ehlers, Georg [ORNL; Hong, Tao [ORNL; Tian, Wei [ORNL; Cao, Huibo [ORNL; Podlesnyak, Andrey A [ORNL; Dunmars, C [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Schlueter, J. A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Manson, J. L. [Eastern Washington University; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments on single crystal samples of the coordination polymer compound CuF{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(pyz) (pyz = pyrazine) to study the magnetic structure and excitations. The elastic neutron diffraction measurements indicate a collinear antiferromagnetic structure with moments oriented along the [0.7 0 1] real-space direction and an ordered moment of 0.60 {+-} 0.03 {micro}B/Cu. This value is significantly smaller than the single-ion magnetic moment, reflecting the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. The spin wave dispersion from magnetic zone center to the zone boundary points (0.5 1.5 0) and (0.5 0 1.5) can be described by a two-dimensional Heisenberg model with a nearest-neighbor magnetic exchange constant J{sub 2D} = 0.934 {+-} 0.0025 meV. The interlayer interaction J{sub perp} in this compound is less than 1.5% of J{sub 2D}. The spin excitation energy at the (0.5 0.5 0.5) zone boundary point is reduced when compared to the (0.5 1 0.5) zone boundary point by {approx}10.3% {+-} 1.4%. This zone boundary dispersion is consistent with quantum Monte Carlo and series expansion calculations for the S=1/2 Heisenberg square lattice antiferromagnet, which include corrections for quantum fluctuations to linear spin wave theory.

  8. An aerial radiological survey of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerial radiological survey of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) and surrounding area in Paducah, Kentucky, was conducted during May 15--25, 1990. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment at the PGDP and surrounding area for use in effective environmental management and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) along a series of parallel lines 107 meters (350 feet) apart. The survey encompassed an area of 62 square kilometers (24 square miles), bordered on the north by the Ohio River. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a gamma radiation contour map. Typical background exposure rates were found to vary from 5 to 12 microroentgens per hour ([mu]R/h). Protactinium-234m, a radioisotope indicative of uranium-238, was detected at several facilities at the PGDR. In support of the aerial survey, ground-based exposure rate and soil sample measurements were obtained at several sites within the survey perimeter. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within [plus minus]15%.

  9. Universal Quantification for Self-Organized Criticality in Atmospheric Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mary Selvam

    1997-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fluctuations on all scales(space-time) ranging from climate(kilometers/years) to turbulence(millimeters/seconds) manifested as fractal geometry to the global cloud cover pattern concomitant with inverse power law form for power spectra of temporal fluctuations. Selfsimilar fluctuations implying long-range correlations are ubiquitous to dynamical systems in nature and are identified as signatures of self-organized criticality in atmospheric flows. Also, mathematical models for simulation and prediction of atmospheric flows are nonlinear and computer realizations give unrealistic solutions because of deterministic chaos, a direct consequence of finite precision round-off error doubling for each iteration of iterative computations incorporated in long-term numerical integration schemes used for model solutions An alternative non-deterministic cell dynamical system model predicts, (a): the observed self organized criticality as a consequence of quantumlike mechanics governing flow dynamics,.(b):atmospheric flows trace an overall logarithmic spiral trajectory with the quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern for the internal structure,(c): eddy circulation structure follows Kepler's third law of planetary motion and results in inverse square law form for centripetal acceleration. The inertial masses representing the eddy circulation therefore follow laws analogous to the Newton's inverse square law for gravitation. The model is similar to a superstring model for subatomic dynamics which unifies quantum mechanical and classical concept and incorporates gravitational forces along with nuclear and electromagnetic forces.

  10. Do it yourself lighting power survey: lighting power audit for use with the Massachusetts type watts per square foot method of calculating a building's lighting power budget

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advantages of the self-audit approach to energy conservation are presented. These are that it is cheaper to do it yourself; the employees become part of the corporate conservation effect; and no one knows the building and its needs better than the occupant. Steps described in the lighting survey procedure are: (1) divide the building into categories; (2) determine the total square footage for each category; (3) assign a power allowance for each category; (4) multiply the total square footage for each category by the respective power allowances; (5) add the budget sub-totals for each category to determine total building budget; and (6) walk through the building room-by-room and calculate the connected lighting load fixture-by-fixture. Some worksheets are provided. (MCW)

  11. Effects of explicit atmospheric convection at high CO2 Nathan P. Arnolda,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tziperman, Eli

    in the climate system by reflecting incoming shortwave solar radiation (cooling), intercepting outgoing longwave impact at the surface is about -20 W/m2 cooling in the global mean, and regional impacts can approach 40 in climate science. Progress has been complicated by the hundred-kilometer horizontal grid spacing of most

  12. Neutrino Astronomy: Physics Goals, Detector Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. K. Gaisser

    1997-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a review of high energy neutrino astronomy that might be done with a kilometer-scale detector. The emphasis is on diffuse neutrinos of extragalactic origin and their relation to possible sources of the highest energy cosmic rays, such as active galaxies, cosmological gamma-ray burst sources and topological defects.

  13. Neutrino Physics with the IceCube Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kiryluk; for the IceCube Collaboration

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    IceCube is a cubic kilometer neutrino telescope under construction at the South Pole. The primary goal is to discover astrophysical sources of high energy neutrinos. We describe the detector and present results on atmospheric muon neutrinos from 2006 data collected with nine detector strings.

  14. Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , the medium starts deform- ing, with the onset of small-scale instabilities and pip- hal-00845894,version1 fluidization or liquefaction of the granular matrix. The shape of the fluidized zone, in- ferred from are encountered worldwide and at different scales, from kilometers (kimberlite pipes [5], mud volcanoes [6

  15. Forms and Distributions of Hurricane Ike Backflow and Scour Features: Bolivar Peninsula, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potts, Michael Killgore

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and backflow features in the beach and dune environments along Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. Using Ward?s cluster analysis, the 454 identified features were grouped according to shape and size characteristics generated by an object-oriented shape analysis... ............................................................................. 76 Analysis of Features per Kilometer of Shoreline ........................... 78 IV RESULTS ............................................................................................. 79 Size...

  16. Abstract--We investigated the use of otolith morphology to indicate the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of otolith shape. Variables were compared among four regions of the GBR separated by hundreds of kilometers in the southern parts of the GBR caused by a large tropical cyclone in March 1997. Results indicated the presence be defined as separate stocks. the stocks have spent some periods of Although the precise definition of

  17. Reducing False Alarms with Multi-modal Sensing for Pipeline Blockage (Extended)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidemann, John

    supported by CiSoft (Center for In- teractive Smart Oilfield Technologies), a Center of Research Ex in the context of a specific example: cold-oil blockages in flowlines in pro- ducing oilfields. A typical oilfield has many kilometers of distribution flowlines that collect crude oil extracted from wellhead

  18. Humboldt National Forest East Mormon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    14 16 Kilometers Carson City Ely Nevada Las Vegas Solar Energy Study Areas in Nevada Map Prepared Boundary Existing Designated Corridor (See Note 2) (As of 6/5/2009) Solar Energy Study Area (As of 6 Mead National Recreation Area Mojave National Preserve Death Valley National Park Arizona Nevada

  19. Southern California Edison's Evaluation of California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1 Publicly Available Publications and Data 5.2 Personal Communication 6.0 GLOSSARY APPENDIX, approximately 80 kilometers (km) northwest of the City of San Diego and 97 km southeast of Los Angeles Base (Base) near the northwest end of the Base's shoreline. Figure 11 also shows

  20. MAP TRANSFORMATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC SPACE WALDO RUDOLPH TOBLER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobler, Waldo

    MAP TRANSFORMATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC SPACE by WALDO RUDOLPH TOBLER A thesis submitted in partial. If the transformations were dependent only on a factor of proportionality, as in the conversion from miles to kilometers relations, just as isometric transformations of a spherical surface to a plane are not possible. Maps

  1. 73Working with Rates Because things change in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    years Problem 6 - 416 gamma-ray bursts spotted in 52 weeks Problem 7 - 3000 kilometers traveled in 200 in 800 years = 2 novas/year Problem 6 - 416 gamma-ray bursts spotted in 52 weeks = 8 gamma-ray bursts

  2. Continued on page 3 Graduate student Jarvis Caffrey worked as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    while testing seawater for concentrations of Cesium off the coast of Japan. Three hundred kilometers off deep inside the research vessel Kaimikai-o-Kanaloa. Caffrey is us- ing a purpose-built device to col isotope produced by fission and one of the contaminants released by the Fukushima nuclear plant disaster

  3. South Dakota North Platte R.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Dakota Nebraska Index map North Platte R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in cooperation with the NORTH PLATTE NATURAL RESOURCES DISTRICT SIGNIFICANT FINDINGS

  4. Using Strain Gauges to Detect Epoxy Debonding in Insulated Rail Joints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    within a control block. Adjacent circuits within the track are separated by insulated rail joints (alsoUsing Strain Gauges to Detect Epoxy Debonding in Insulated Rail Joints Daniel Peltier, Christopher mainline track. These require insulated rail joints every several kilometers in order to electrically

  5. CLOUD LIFE CYCLE OBSERVED DURING THE 2009 CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY FIELD CAMPAIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -month experiment, five scanning microwave radiometers were deployed along an eight-kilometer line and programmed cover conditions. The high-resolution tomographic retrievals provide a unique opportunity- 98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher by accepting the manuscript

  6. Lectures on Neutrino Astronomy: Theory and Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Overview of neutrino astronomy: multidisciplinary science. 2. Cosmic accelerators: the highest energy cosmic rays. 3. Neutrino beam dumps: supermassive black holes and gamma ray bursts. 4. Neutrino telescopes: water and ice. 5. Indirect dark matter detection. 6. Towards kilometer-scale detectors.

  7. Graellsia, 63(1): 135-142 (2007) * Department of Animal Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada (Spain) 18071, Granada. Spain. hormiga@ugr.es

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villemant, Claire

    of Granada (Spain) 18071, Granada. Spain. hormiga@ugr.es A. Tinaut* ABSTRACT A new species, Rossomyrmex of this genus were described: R. minuchae, found in Sierra Nevada (Granada, Spain) many kilometers away from represents a first clue to finding Rossomyrmex. Outside of Spain we have searched in Mongolia (2005

  8. 2012 Conference on Intelligent Data Understanding EddyScan: A Physically Consistent Ocean Eddy Monitoring Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    the Agulhas Current, which flows along the southeastern coast of Africa and around the tip of South Africa dynamics. In addition to dominating the ocean's kinetic energy, eddies play a significant role. The ocean's kinetic energy is dominated by mesoscale variability: scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers

  9. , T.V.Shymchuk , I.V.Stasyuk, T.S.Mysakovych

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and localized in such following places as object "Shelter", points of a burial of radioactive waste, temporary storages or remained imme- diately in an environment. In a 30-kilometer zone of alienation one of basic there is a utilization problem for waste which are formed after Chornobyl acci- dent

  10. An evaluation and comparison of current technologies for stocking rate management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haby, Travis Scott

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    30 kilometers east, southeast of the tow'n of Paducah. Annual precipitation is highly varied with an average of approximately 634. 5 mm. The average frost-free period is 220 days. The study site consisted of 4 pastures on the southern end...

  11. August 14, 2003 ---Home Site Index Site Search/Archive Help --Welcome, jmd@mit.edu Member Center Log Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    management of demand, smarter use of coal as well as renewable energy sources, and increased use of nuclear possible to dispose of spent fuel safely, the issue is actually doing it. Successful operation Yucca Mountain. For example, burying spent fuel several kilometers deep in a dry well, called a borehole

  12. 4/3/12 2:13 PMMantle Convection: Earth's Interior Page 1 of 3http://conman.geos.vt.edu/~sdk/mantle/interior.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    spherical shells: the crust, the mantle, and the core. The crust ranges from 6 to 70 kilometers thick minerals and the liquid iron outer core. #12;4/3/12 2:13 PMMantle Convection: Earth's Interior Page 2 of 3, O) in the Sun's outer corona and show no indication of chemical alteration since their formation

  13. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MEXICO TEXAS MEXICO 0 50 100 150 200 KILOMETERS EXPLANATION Rio Grande Basin Closed subbasin Basin Reservoirs Rio Grande above Amistad International Reservoir. COLORADO NEW MEXICO TEXAS MEXICO Figure 1. Rio of new contami- nants, and successful efforts in environmental pollution remedi- ation. Historical data

  14. Reprint draft October 8, 2003 Pliocene tephra correlations between East African

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deMenocal, Peter B.

    , University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Abstract A continuous record of Pliocene-Pleistocene East African volcanic tephra deposition has been developed from a marine sediment sequence at Ocean Drilling-Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) sites from the Gulf of Aden, nearly one thousand kilometers northeast of hominid

  15. Grays Harbor D e m o g r a p h i c a n d S o c i o e c o n o m i c C h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o f S e a t t l eD e m o g r a p h i c a n d S o c i o e c o n o m i c C h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o f S e a t t l e

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Jefferson Puget Sound L a k e Y o u n g s L a k e Y o u n g s King Pierce Snohomish Thurston Kitsap Kittitas-gridded area Puget Sound Puget Sound 0 30 6015 Miles 0 30 6015 Kilometers - Puget Sound Copyright 2006

  16. Laboratoire de Conception de Systmes Mcaniques Gnie mcanique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    chains were the cost-efficiency ratio and the service level. Nowadays, according to the new concerns suggest that for a same performance level, the second model shows: · 40% reduction in transport costs per pallet, · 20% reduction in handling costs per pallet, · 25% cut in total truck kilometers travelled

  17. Frank Breust, Governmental Affairs,BMW Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    kilometers ~1.100vehicles BMW i3 and BMW i8 BMW i is more than just an electric car. BMW i offers 360 + 95 hp electric motor #12;FULLY ELECTRIC CAR SHARING. DRIVENOW IN THE BAYAREA. On;FULLY ELECTRIC CAR SHARING. DRIVENOW IN THE BAYAREA. On-Street-Parking necessary for better visibility

  18. 542 American Scientist, Volume 94 2006 Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society. Reproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Robert J.

    Exclusion Zone, a region within a 30-kilometer radius of the Cher- nobyl Nuclear Power Plant. We were environment on the local wildlife. We have performed a variety of experiments in the Zone. In one of our earli- sion. The genetic impacts proved to be subtle and not likely to threaten the rodent's repro- ductive

  19. Spatial patterns of flow and their modification within and around a giant kelp forest Brian Gaylord1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Spatial patterns of flow and their modification within and around a giant kelp forest Brian Gaylord and over the full extent of a giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) forest located at Mohawk Reef, Santa reported for larger (kilometer-scale) kelp beds, suggesting that alongshore currents may play a greater

  20. The world's offshore continental margins contain vast reserves of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    The world's offshore continental margins contain vast reserves of gas hydrate, a frozen form of nat-seafloor geology. Increasing use of marine multicomponent seismic technol- ogy by oil and gas companies now allows seafloor strata over distances of several kilometers across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico

  1. EOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION Seismology is the study of the propaga-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    , and mineral resources at depths of meters to a few kilometers. Detailed knowledge of the Earth's near sur of seismology has emerged, including hydrocarbon and resource exploration, earth- quake detection and hazard, and reconstructing the twentieth- century history of global storm activity from ocean-generated seismic noise

  2. VOLUME 90 NUMBER 23 9 JUNE 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., 2004], but recent advances in the design, electronics, and reliability of the components of the seis accurately beneath ice-covered oceans, where ice poses significant risk to survey equipment, the preferred-Laurent. In 2008, the same equipment was used to collect approximately 1300 kilometers of seismic data in single

  3. Thesis development The following briefly summarizes the development of my project from the initial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    knew we wanted to try to date old moraine sequences in Patagonia, but we did not know exactly where travelled over 12,000 kilometers across the length and breadth of Argentine Patagonia and had a truck Patagonia in Esquel was willing to store the stones and arrange shipment to the UK. Back in Edinburgh, Steve

  4. Introduction 1.1 Layman's Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfister, Henry D.

    ,500 kilometers. In 1794, the first mechanical optical telegraph used a network of signal flags mounted on towers the sender may repeatedly transmit one message bit per channel use, uncertainty in the transmission due probable bit value. For example, if each message bit is transmitted q times, then the rate of transmission

  5. Introduction: The Evolving Landscape of 21st American Spaceflight. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Entrepreneurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Emerging Space Companies of the solar system. Today's space economy extends some 36,000 kilometers (22,369 miles) from the surface to bloom. As we expand our activities in the solar system over the next decades, NASA programs

  6. 16 IEEE Canadian Review -Spring / Printemps 2003 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Wai Tung

    power flow to the motor. There are cur- rently a number of companies specializing in e, approximately 300 companies sold over 1 million electric bikes in 2002 [1]. The efficiency of the e less energy per kilometer than a standard car. In addition, as solar panel technology becomes more

  7. Transmitter-induced modulation of subionospheric VLF signals: Ionospheric heating rather than electron precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    path lies thousands of kilometers from the heating VLF transmitter. The 21.4 kHz transmitter NPM that the observed perturbations, despite occurring on a probe signal pathway that is 1750 km away from NPM at its point of closest approach, are due to direct ionospheric heating by the keyed VLF transmitter NPM

  8. INTRODUCTION Thanks to advances in analytical chemistry and low-detec-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    facilities, platinum-group ele- ments (PGE) recently joined the panel of geochemical tracers of the Earth to extrapolate from the behavior of trace minerals to evolution at the planetary scale. PGE BUDGET OF THE EARTH to thousands of kilometers in diameter) within 107 to 108 years after the formation of the solar system. Due

  9. Architecture of the upper Sego Sandstone, Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkhead, Stanley Scott

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................................... 22 SEDIMENTOLOGY.................................................................................................... 26 Marine Shale with Wavy Sandstones............................................................... 26 Highly... surfaces. The cross-section defines an 8.5 kilometer section that begins in Sego Canyon outside of Thompson Springs, Figure 12-Bedding diagram of major facies transitions with sedimentary logs overlain. SEDIMENTOLOGY Upper Sego Sandstone deposits can...

  10. OBSERVATORY SNO INSTITUTE MEMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    neutrino telescope, the size of a ten-storey building, two kilometers underground in Inco's Creighton Mine their properties. For many years, the number of solar neutrinos measured by other underground detectors has been of the SNO detector to measure all three types of neutrinos to determine that solar neutrinos are changing

  11. Predicting Air Quality: Current Status and Future Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandu, Adrian

    Predicting Air Quality: Current Status and Future Directions Gregory R. Carmichael ,a Adrian Sandu, OR 97207, USA Abstract Air quality prediction plays an important role in the management of our envi can predict pollution in an urban air shed with spatial resolution less than a kilometer, and cover

  12. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 28792892, 2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/10/2879/2010/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    path lengths up to multi- ple kilometers in a compact absorption cell and has a signif- icantly higher sensitivity than conventional absorption spec- troscopy. This tool opens new prospects for study of gaseous a frequency-doubled, tuneable dye laser emitting pulses at 253.65 nm with a pulse repetition fre- quency of 50

  13. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Miller, John; Barsotti, Lisa; Martynov, Denis; Brooks, Aidan; Coyne, Dennis; Abbott, Rich; Adhikari, Rana; Arai, Koji; Bork, Rolf; Kells, Bill; Rollins, Jameson; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Vajente, Gabriele; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Derosa, Ryan; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Betzweiser, Joseph; Frolov, Valera; Mullavey, Adam; O`Reilly, Brian; Dwyer, Sheila; Izumi, Kiwamu; Kawabe, Keita; Landry, Michael; Sigg, Daniel; Ballmer, Stefan; Massinger, Thomas J; Staley, Alexa; Mueller, Chris; Grote, Hartmut; Ward, Robert; King, Eleanor; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chunnong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale interferometer. In this work we describe the first observation of parametric instability in an Advanced LIGO detector, and the means by which it has been removed as a barrier to progress.

  14. NuclearNuclear ""BurningBurning"" of Nuclearof Nuclear ""WasteWaste"" Constantine P. Tzanos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , total of about 66 kilometers long, to accommodate about 1100 waste packages, 70,000 tons of heavy metal 300 meters above water table. s Construction: 5 years s Operations: 50 years s Monitoring: 50 years failure, igneousigneous intrusion, volcanic eruption, seismic ground motion, and seismicintrusion

  15. Tracing global biogeochemical cycles and meridional overturning circulation using chromophoric dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    of the ocean, ultraviolet light penetration, and photochemical reactions that influence the cycling) within the top kilometer of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. However, a much weaker correspondence is found encompass all three ocean basins transecting the subtropics where satelliteretrieved surface ocean CDOM

  16. AFFILIATIONS: X. Li--GST, NOAA/NESDIS, College Park, Maryland; Zhang--Hurricane Research Division, AOML, NOAA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    at kilometer spa- tial resolution. However, the intense air­sea inter- action near the ocean surface cannot;radar that emits radar pulses that can penetrate through clouds. SAR then receives the radar back the ocean surface return--a process quite similar to the QuikSCAT scatterometer wind retrieval. As a result

  17. the continental crust or the over-lying sediments. Microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    of the University of Washington, Seattle. Just how massive this ocean crustal bio- sphere might be remains unclear,000 kilometers through the global ocean. For example, something seems to be nib- bling on the glass that makes up about 5% of ocean crustal rock; samples of the glass brought up by deep drilling are scarred with pits

  18. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 522:11901205, 1999 September 10 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    tens of thou- sands of kilometers in diameter and consist of a dark region, or umbra, with magnetic the umbra and penumbra are darker in white light than the quiet photosphere, and the Ðeld strengths in the umbra and penumbra are typically 2 orders of magnitude higher than the average Ðeld strengths

  19. 6 0 o p r a h . c o m o c t o b e r 2 0 1 1 LifeLive Your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    into their boat and affix a GPS-enabled satellite tag to its dorsal fin. When the 14-footer reenters the water're congenitally incapable." But she's got me up to five kilometers. Sometimes it's a relief just to focus

  20. Flashover vulnerability of transmission and distribution lines to high-altitude electromagnetic pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, V.J. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Advanced Systems Technology Div.); Tesche, F.M. (E-Systems, Inc., Greenville, TX (USA)); Liu, T.K. (Lutech, Inc., Oakland, CA (US)); Barnes, P.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper estimates the vulnerability of transmission and distribution lines to flashover from the electromagnetic pulse generated by a nuclear detonation 400 kilometers above the earth. The analysis consists of first determining the cumulative probability of induced-voltage on three-phase lines, including shield and neutral conductors, for four operating voltages and then comparing these stresses to estimates of line insulation strength.

  1. Moore, J. C, Mascle, A., et al., 1990 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 110

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scales of tens to tens of thousands of years. High heat flow in the vicinity of 15°30'N and not elsewhere. Surface heat-flow values from Leg110(calculated from geothermal gradients forced through the bottom forearc and trench sediments. Geothermal gradi ents in the upper kilometer of sediment that extrapolate

  2. Interactions between Oil-Spill Pollutants and Natural Stressors Can Compound Ecotoxicological Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, Andrew

    SYMPOSIUM Interactions between Oil-Spill Pollutants and Natural Stressors Can Compound productive habitats on earth, yet are at risk from human activities including marine oil spills. The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill contaminated hundreds of kilometers of coastal habitat, particularly

  3. The Last of the Wild ver. 2 The Last of the Wild represents the least influenced (most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    The Last of the Wild ver. 2 Oceania The Last of the Wild represents the least influenced (most wild) areas of major terrestrial biomes. Most wild in each biome are defined as areas with Human Footprint. The Last of the Wild Data set. Available at http://www.sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/wildareas 0 500 Kilometers

  4. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    , and monthly totals of precipitation, direct runoff, and evapotranspiration on 1-kilometer grid-cells of non of Agriculture (Digital General Soil Map of the United States); soil moisture relative to maximum AWC from recharge for grid-cells with irrigation will be estimated from nearby non- irrigated grid-cells to estimate

  5. Structural and Morphologic Study of Shatsky Rise Oceanic Plateau in the Northwest Pacific Ocean from 2D Multichannel Seismic Reflection and Bathymetry Data and Implications for Oceanic Plateau Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinchang

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    and shallow flank slopes (<0.5o-1.5o), characterized by lava flows emanating from the volcano center and extending hundreds of kilometers down smooth, shallow flanks to the surrounding seafloor. Ori Massif is another large volcano that is similar, but smaller...

  6. 105Lunar Crater Frequency Distributions This image of the 800-meter x 480-meter region near the Apollo-11 landing pad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Apollo-11 landing pad (arrow) was taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). It reveals hundreds of craters covering the landing area with sizes as small as 5 meters. The Apollo-11 landing pad is near and gives the surface density of craters near the Apollo-11 landing site in terms of craters per kilometer 2

  7. STRUCTURE OF A CARBONATE/HYDRATE MOUND IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    the mound. Keywords: carbonate/hydrate mound, seismic structures, gas migration, seafloor observatorySTRUCTURE OF A CARBONATE/HYDRATE MOUND IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO T. McGee1* , J. R. Woolsey1 of California, San Diego ABSTRACT A one-kilometer-diameter carbonate/hydrate mound in Mississippi Canyon Block

  8. IX. IMPACT OF AEROSOLS FROM THE ERUPTION OF EL CHICHN ON BEAM RADIATION IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    of 25 kilometers [1]. The effect of this dense cloud upon the atmosphere and climate in the Northern around the earth from 5 degrees to about 30 degrees north latitude. The cloud has had an effect upon in the Pacific Northwest due to the effects of the stratospheric cloud from El Chichón. By looking at quantities

  9. From chi-squared to Bayesian model comparison and Levy expansions of Bose-Einstein correlations in e+e- reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michiel B. De Kock; Hans C. Eggers; Tamás Csörg?

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The usual chi-squared method of fit quality assessment is a special case of the more general method of Bayesian model comparison which involves integrals of the likelihood and prior over all possible values of all parameters. We introduce new parametrisations based on systematic expansions around the stretched exponential or Fourier-transformed L\\'evy source distribution, and utilise the increased discriminating power of the Bayesian approach to evaluate the relative probability of these models to be true representations of a recently measured Bose-Einstein correlation data in e+e- annihilations at LEP.

  10. Two-dimensional equations of the surface harmonics method for solving problems of spatial neutron kinetics in square-lattice reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyarinov, V. F., E-mail: boyarinov@dhtp.kiae.ru; Kondrushin, A. E., E-mail: kondrushin@yahoo.com; Fomichenko, P. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional time-dependent finite-difference equations of the surface harmonics method (SHM) for the description of the neutron transport are derived for square-lattice reactors. These equations are implemented in the SUHAM-TD code. Verification of the derived equations and the developed code are performed by the example of known test problems, and the potential and efficiency of the SHM as applied to the solution of the time-dependent neutron transport equation in the diffusion approximation in two-dimensional geometry are demonstrated. These results show the substantial advantage of SHM over direct finite-difference modeling in computational costs.

  11. Low-rank approximations for large stationary covariance matrices, as used in the Bayesian and generalized-least-squares analysis of pulsar-timing data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutger van Haasteren; Michele Vallisneri

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Many data-analysis problems involve large dense matrices that describe the covariance of stationary noise processes; the computational cost of inverting these matrices, or equivalently of solving linear systems that contain them, is often a practical limit for the analysis. We describe two general, practical, and accurate methods to approximate stationary covariance matrices as low-rank matrix products featuring carefully chosen spectral components. These methods can be used to greatly accelerate data-analysis methods in many contexts, such as the Bayesian and generalized-least-squares analysis of pulsar-timing residuals.

  12. VOLUME 86, NUMBER 8 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 19 FEBRUARY 2001 Submillimeter Test of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law: A Search for "Large" Extra Dimensions C. D. Hoyle, U. Schmidt, B. R. Heckel, E-dimensional theories that predict new effects, we tested the gravitational 1 r2 law at separations ranging down to 218 ranges l 0.1 mm [11]. This Letter reports results of a test of gravitational inverse-square law at length

  13. Stability of critical bubble in stretched fluid of square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Iwamatsu; Yutaka Okabe

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy, that was used previously to study the homogeneous bubble nucleation [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 104508 (2008)], is used to study the stability of the critical bubble nucleated within the bulk under-saturated stretched fluid. The stability of the bubble is studied by solving the Schr\\"odinger equation for the fluctuation. The negative eigenvalue corresponds to the unstable growing mode of the fluctuation. Our results show that there is only one negative eigenvalue whose eigenfunction represents the fluctuation that corresponds to the isotropically growing or shrinking nucleus. In particular, this negative eigenvalue survives up to the spinodal point. Therefore the critical bubble is not fractal or ramified near the spinodal.

  14. The influence of bond-rigidity and cluster diffusion on the self-diffusion of hard spheres with square-well interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sujin Babu; Jean Christophe Gimel; Taco Nicolai; C. De Michele

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Hard spheres interacting through a square-well potential were simulated using two different methods: Brownian Cluster Dynamics (BCD) and Event Driven Brownian Dynamics (EDBD). The structure of the equilibrium states obtained by both methods were compared and found to be almost the identical. Self diffusion coefficients ($D$) were determined as a function of the interaction strength. The same values were found using BCD or EDBD. Contrary the EDBD, BCD allows one to study the effect of bond rigidity and hydrodynamic interaction within the clusters. When the bonds are flexible the effect of attraction on $D$ is relatively weak compared to systems with rigid bonds. $D$ increases first with increasing attraction strength, and then decreases for stronger interaction. Introducing intra-cluster hydrodynamic interaction weakly increases $D$ for a given interaction strength. Introducing bond rigidity causes a strong decrease of $D$ which no longer shows a maximum as function of the attraction strength.

  15. Constraints on the range lambda of Yukawa-like modifications to the Newtonian inverse-square law of gravitation from Solar System planetary motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we use the latest corrections to the Newton-Einstein secular perihelion rates of some planets of the Solar System, phenomenologically estimated with the EPM2004 ephemerides by the Russian astronomer E.V. Pitjeva, to put severe constraints on the range parameter lambda characterizing the Yukawa-like modifications of the Newtonian inverse-square law of gravitation. It turns out that the range cannot exceed about one tenth of an Astronomical Unit. We assumed neither equivalence principle violating effects nor spatial variations of $\\alpha$ and $\\lambda$. This finding may have important consequences on all the modified theories of gravity involving Yukawa-type terms with range parameters much larger than the Solar System size. However, caution is advised since we, currently have at our disposal only the periehlion extra-rates estimated by Pitjeva: if and when other groups will estimate their own corrections to the secular motion of perihelia, more robust and firm tests may be conducted.

  16. A preliminary reconstruction of the orbit of the Chelyabinsk Meteoroid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuluaga, Jorge I

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 15 2013 a medium-sized meteoroid impacted the atmosphere in the region of Chelyabinsk, Russia. After its entrance to the atmosphere and after travel by several hun- dred of kilometers the body exploded in a powerful event responsible for physical damages and injured people spread over a region enclosing several large cities. We present in this letter the results of a preliminary reconstruction of the orbit of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid. Using evidence gathered by one camera at the Revolution Square in the city of Chelyabinsk and other videos recorded by witnesses in the close city of Korkino, we calculate the trajectory of the body in the atmosphere and use it to reconstruct the orbit in space of the meteoroid previous to the violent encounter with our planet. In order to account for the uncertainties implicit in the determination of the trajectory of the body in the atmosphere, we use Monte Carlo methods to calculate the most probable orbital parameters. We use this result to classify the meteoroi...

  17. Abu Dhabi's Masdar project: dazzling? or Just a mirage?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Masdar project is to build a self-contained economic zone creating 70,000 jobs and eventually housing as many as 40,000 residents in the middle of the desert by 2016. The community, which is envisioned to house a science and technology park and housing, is designed to be carbon neutral and virtually waste-free. Two-thirds of the power is to come from a 10 MW solar farm, and nearly all water is to be recycled and reused. There will be virtually no waste, as all packaging and material are to be recycled, used for power generation or turned into compost. The car-free zone will be served by advanced personal rapid transit (PRT) vehicles that will zip residents around the 6.5-square-kilometer area. The problem with Masdar is not so much what goes inside it, but rather what is outside. Masdar is unlikely to change the image of Abu Dhabi as the most carbon-intensive place on earth.

  18. Detecting Radio Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers and Neutrinos with a Digital Radio Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcke, H; Falcke, Heino; Gorham, Peter

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibilities of measuring ultra-high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos with radio techniques. We review a few of the properties of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers and show how these properties can be explained by coherent ``geosynchrotron'' emission from electron-positron pairs in the shower as they move through the geomagnetic field. This should allow one to use the radio emission as a useful diagnostic tool for cosmic ray research. A new generation of digital telescopes will make it possible to study this radio emission in greater detail. For example, the planned Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), operating at 10-200 MHz, will be an instrument uniquely suited to study extensive air showers and even detect neutrino-induced showers on the moon. We discuss sensitivities, count rates and possible detection algorithms for LOFAR and a currently funded prototype station LOPES. This should also be applicable to other future digital radio telescopes such as the Square-Kilometer-Array (SKA). LOFAR...

  19. Radio astronomy in Africa: the case of Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asabere, Bernard Duah; Horellou, Cathy; Winkler, Hartmut; Jarrett, Thomas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    South Africa has played a leading role in radio astronomy in Africa with the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO). It continues to make strides with the current seven-dish MeerKAT precursor array (KAT-7), leading to the 64-dish MeerKAT and the giant Square Kilometer Array (SKA), which will be used for transformational radio astronomy research. Ghana, an African partner to the SKA, has been mentored by South Africa over the past six years and will soon emerge in the field of radio astronomy. The country will soon have a science-quality 32m dish converted from a redundant satellite communication antenna. Initially, it will be fitted with 5 GHz and 6.7 GHz receivers to be followed later by a 1.4 - 1.7 GHz receiver. The telescope is being designed for use as a single dish observatory and for participation in the developing African Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Network (AVN) and the European VLBI Network. Ghana is earmarked to host a remote station during a possible SKA Phase 2. The loca...

  20. The Radiometric Bode's Law and Extrasolar Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Lazio; W. M. Farrell; Jill Dietrick; Elizabeth Greenlees; Emily Hogan; Christopher Jones; L. A. Hennig

    2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We predict the radio flux densities of the extrasolar planets in the current census, making use of an empirical relation--the radiometric Bode's Law--determined from the five ``magnetic'' planets in the solar system (Earth and the four gas giants). Radio emission from these planets results from solar-wind powered electron currents depositing energy in the magnetic polar regions. We find that most of the known extrasolar planets should emit in the frequency range 10--1000 MHz and, under favorable circumstances, have typical flux densities as large as 1 mJy. We also describe an initial, systematic effort to search for radio emission in low radio frequency images acquired with the Very Large Array. The limits set by the VLA images (~ 300 mJy) are consistent with, but do not provide strong constraints on, the predictions of the model. Future radio telescopes, such as the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), should be able to detect the known extrasolar planets or place austere limits on their radio emission. Planets with masses much lower than those in the current census will probably radiate below 10 MHz and will require a space-based array.

  1. Solar panels as cosmic-ray detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stella, Carlo; Assis, Pedro; Brogueira, Pedro; Santo, Catarina Espirito; Goncalves, Patricia; Pimenta, Mario; De Angelis, Alessandro

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to fundamental limitations of accelerators, only cosmic rays can give access to centre-of- mass energies more than one order of magnitude above those reached at the LHC. In fact, extreme energy cosmic rays (1018 eV - 1020 eV) are the only possibility to explore the 100 TeV energy scale in the years to come. This leap by one order of magnitude gives a unique way to open new horizons: new families of particles, new physics scales, in-depth investigations of the Lorentz symmetries. However, the flux of cosmic rays decreases rapidly, being less than one particle per square kilometer per year above 1019 eV: one needs to sample large surfaces. A way to develop large-effective area, low cost, detectors, is to build a solar panel-based device which can be used in parallel for power generation and Cherenkov light detection. Using solar panels for Cherenkov light detection would combine power generation and a non-standard detection device.

  2. 3-D visualisation and interpretation of seismic attributes extracted from large 3-D seismic datasets: Subregional and prospect evaluation, deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sola, M.; Haakon Nordby, L.; Dailey, D.V.; Duncan, E.A. [BP and Statoil Alliance, Stavanger (Norway)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution 3-D visualization of horizon interpretation and seismic attributes from large 3-D seismic surveys in deepwater Nigeria has greatly enhanced the exploration team`s ability to quickly recognize prospective segments of subregional and prospect specific scale areas. Integrated workstation generated structure, isopach and extracted horizon consistent, interval and windowed attributes are particularly useful in illustrating the complex structural and stratigraphical prospectivity of deepwater Nigeria. Large 3-D seismic volumes acquired over 750 square kilometers can be manipulated within the visualization system with attribute tracking capability that allows for real time data interrogation and interpretation. As in classical seismic stratigraphic studies, pattern recognition is fundamental to effective depositions facies interpretation and reservoir model construction. The 3-D perspective enhances the data interpretation through clear representation of relative scale, spatial distribution and magnitude of attributes. In deepwater Nigeria, many prospective traps rely on an interplay between syndepositional structure and slope turbidite depositional systems. Reservoir systems in many prospects appear to be dominated by unconfined to moderately focused slope feeder channel facies. These units have spatially complex facies architecture with feeder channel axes separated by extensive interchannel areas. Structural culminations generally have a history of initial compressional folding with late in extensional collapse and accommodation faulting. The resulting complex trap configurations often have stacked reservoirs over intervals as thick as 1500 meters. Exploration, appraisal and development scenarios in these settings can be optimized by taking full advantage of integrating high resolution 3-D visualization and seismic workstation interpretation.

  3. 3-D visualisation and interpretation of seismic attributes extracted from large 3-D seismic datasets: Subregional and prospect evaluation, deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sola, M.; Haakon Nordby, L.; Dailey, D.V.; Duncan, E.A. (BP and Statoil Alliance, Stavanger (Norway))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution 3-D visualization of horizon interpretation and seismic attributes from large 3-D seismic surveys in deepwater Nigeria has greatly enhanced the exploration team's ability to quickly recognize prospective segments of subregional and prospect specific scale areas. Integrated workstation generated structure, isopach and extracted horizon consistent, interval and windowed attributes are particularly useful in illustrating the complex structural and stratigraphical prospectivity of deepwater Nigeria. Large 3-D seismic volumes acquired over 750 square kilometers can be manipulated within the visualization system with attribute tracking capability that allows for real time data interrogation and interpretation. As in classical seismic stratigraphic studies, pattern recognition is fundamental to effective depositions facies interpretation and reservoir model construction. The 3-D perspective enhances the data interpretation through clear representation of relative scale, spatial distribution and magnitude of attributes. In deepwater Nigeria, many prospective traps rely on an interplay between syndepositional structure and slope turbidite depositional systems. Reservoir systems in many prospects appear to be dominated by unconfined to moderately focused slope feeder channel facies. These units have spatially complex facies architecture with feeder channel axes separated by extensive interchannel areas. Structural culminations generally have a history of initial compressional folding with late in extensional collapse and accommodation faulting. The resulting complex trap configurations often have stacked reservoirs over intervals as thick as 1500 meters. Exploration, appraisal and development scenarios in these settings can be optimized by taking full advantage of integrating high resolution 3-D visualization and seismic workstation interpretation.

  4. Obstacle detection for autonomous navigation : an LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padilla, Denise D.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled 'Obstacle Detection for Autonomous Navigation'. The principal goal of this project was to develop a mathematical framework for obstacle detection. The framework provides a basis for solutions to many complex obstacle detection problems critical to successful autonomous navigation. Another goal of this project was to characterize sensing requirements in terms of physical characteristics of obstacles, vehicles, and terrain. For example, a specific vehicle traveling at a specific velocity over a specific terrain requires a sensor with a certain range of detection, resolution, field-of-view, and sufficient sensitivity to specific obstacle characteristics. In some cases, combinations of sensors were required to distinguish between different hazardous obstacles and benign terrain. In our framework, the problem was posed as a multidimensional, multiple-hypothesis, pattern recognition problem. Features were extracted from selected sensors that allow hazardous obstacles to be distinguished from benign terrain and other types of obstacles. Another unique thrust of this project was to characterize different terrain classes with respect to both positive (e.g., rocks, trees, fences) and negative (e.g., holes, ditches, drop-offs) obstacles. The density of various hazards per square kilometer was statistically quantified for different terrain categories (e.g., high desert, ponderosa forest, and prairie). This quantification reflects the scale, or size, and mobility of different types of vehicles. The tradeoffs between obstacle detection, position location, path planning, and vehicle mobility capabilities were also to be characterized.

  5. Floating intake reduces pump damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronig, A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The solution to a costly sand erosion problem at the Grande Dixence hydroelectric project in Switzerland turned out to be as simple as a floating pump. The 726-MW Grande Dixence project drains a 350-square-kilometer reach of the Zermatt and Herens valleys in the southwestern Swiss Alps. About half of the drainage area is covered by active glaciers. Because the glaciers in Zermatt Valley are so low in altitude, their water is collected in Z`mutt Reservoir at the base of the Matterhorn, then pumped up 500 meters for transport to the main Grande Disence Reservoir near Sion. The glacier water is heavily laden with sand. In spite of a gravel pass and a desilter, the 700,000-acubic-meter Z`mutt Reservoir receives large quantities of sand. The sand tends to remain in solution because of the low water temperatures (1 to 2 degrees Centigrade). In the original intake system, the sand would be sucked into the pump intakes, causing extensive erosion to the pump wheels and an expensive yearly program of repair. (Pump damage averaged 200,000 Swiss Francs ($284,000 U.S.) per year between 1980 and 1985.)

  6. K-25 D and D Challenges - 12170

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eidam, Greg [Bechtel National, Inc. (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the K-25 former gaseous diffusion plant provides lessons learned applicable to other D and D projects in the DOE Complex. The 175,000- square-meter, 1.6-kilometer-long building is contaminated with highly enriched uranium (HEU), Tc-99, trace quantities of other fission products, asbestos, PCBs, and other hazardous wastes. Safety challenges include deteriorated electrical systems, significant structural degradation, and criticality and exposure risks. The project completely revised the D and D approach after a worker fell through an operating floor and was seriously injured. For protection from deteriorated building conditions, the project reduced the number of workers in the facility, limited their hours in the building, and installed nets and barriers to protect them from falls through weakened floors and from falling material. The new plan involved removing high-risk components, removing motors and compressors, and demolishing the building from the outside with heavy equipment with most of the piping and components inside the building during demolition. The team provided temporary electrical power; reconfigured the criticality alarm system; upgraded security; performed sampling and analysis to locate and characterize HEU deposits and Tc-99; and, to establish 'criticality incredible' conditions, conducted a nondestructive assay program and injected foam into equipment and piping as a contamination fixative. (authors)

  7. White flight or flight from poverty?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jego, C; Jego, Charles; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenon of White flight is often illustrated by the case of Detroit whose population dropped from 1.80 million to 0.95 million between 1950 and 2000 while at the same time its Black and Hispanic component grew from 30 percent to 85 percent. But is this case really representative? The present paper shows that the phenomenon of White flight is in fact essentially a flight from poverty. As a confirmation, we show that the changes in White or Black populations are highly correlated which means that White flight is always paralleled by Black flight (and Hispanic flight as well). This broader interpretation of White flight accounts not only for the case of northern cities such as Cincinnati, Cleveland or Detroit, but for all population changes at county level, provided the population density is higher than a threshold of about 50 per square-kilometer which corresponds to moderately urbanized areas (as can be found in states like Indiana or Virginia for instance).

  8. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

  9. The changing face of Hanford security 1990--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thielman, J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meltdown of the Cold War was a shock to the systems built to cope with it. At the DOE`s Hanford Site in Washington State, a world-class safeguards and security system was suddenly out of step with the times. The level of protection for nuclear and classified materials was exceptional. But the cost was high and the defense facilities that funded security were closing down. The defense mission had created an umbrella of security over the sprawling Hanford Site. Helicopters designed to ferry special response teams to any trouble spot on the 1,456 square-kilometer site made the umbrella analogy almost literally true. Facilities were grouped into areas, fenced off like a military base, and entrance required a badge check for everyone. Within the fence, additional rings of protection were set up around security interests or targets. The security was effective, but costly to operate and inconvenient for employees and visitors alike. Moreover, the umbrella meant that virtually all employees needed a security clearance just to get to work, whether they worked on classified or unclassified projects. Clearly, some fundamental rethinking of safeguards and security was needed. The effort to meet that challenge is the story of transition at Hanford and documented here.

  10. CONSTRAINT ON THE PARAMETERS OF THE INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING MODEL FOR RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lv, M.; Wang, H. G. [Center for Astrophysics, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Lee, K. J. [Max-Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, Bonn 53121 (Germany); Qiao, G. J.; Xu, R. X., E-mail: hgwang@gzhu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model can explain various pulse profile shapes and the diversity of the pulse profile evolution based on the mechanism where the radio emission is generated through ICS between secondary relativistic particles and radio waves from polar gap avalanches. In this paper, we study the parameter space of the ICS model for 15 pulsars that share the common pulse profile evolution phenomenon, where the pulse profiles are narrower at higher observing frequencies. Two key parameters, the initial Lorentz factor and the energy loss factor of secondary particles, are constrained using the least-squares fitting method, where we fit the theoretical curve of the 'beam-frequency mapping' of the ICS model to the observed pulse widths at multiple frequencies. The uncertainty of the inclination and viewing angles are taken into account in the fitting process. It is found that the initial Lorentz factor is larger than 4000, and the energy loss factor is between 20 and 560. The Lorentz factor is consistent with the prediction of the inner vacuum gap model. Such high-energy loss factors suggest significant energy loss for secondary particles at altitudes of a few tens to hundreds of kilometers.

  11. Hydrogeologic evaluation and numerical simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.; Hill, M.C.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the ground-water system. The study area covers approximately 100,000 square kilometers between lat 35{degrees}N., long 115{degrees}W and lat 38{degrees}N., long 118{degrees}W and encompasses the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Hydrology in the region is a result of both the and climatic conditions and the complex described as dominated by interbasinal flow and may be conceptualized as having two main components: a series of relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper regional flow paths. A significant component of the regional ground-water flow is through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence. Throughout the regional flow system, ground-water flow is probably controlled by extensive and prevalent structural features that result from regional faulting and fracturing. Hydrogeologic investigations over a large and hydrogeologically complex area impose severe demands on data management. This study utilized geographic information systems and geoscientific information systems to develop, store, manipulate, and analyze regional hydrogeologic data sets describing various components of the ground-water flow system.

  12. Gigantic Ordovician volcanic ash fall in North America and Europe: Biological, tectonomagmatic, and event-stratigraphic significance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, W.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Bergstroem, S.M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States)); Kolata, D.R. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biostratigraphical, geochemical, isotopic, and paleogeographic data suggest that the Millbrig K-bentonite, one of the thickest and most widespread Ordovician volcanic ash beds in eastern North America, is the same as the so-called 'Big Bentonite' in Baltoscandia. This is the first time that the same K-bentonite has been identified in both North America and Europe, and it serves as a unique event-stratigraphic marker over a large portion of the Northern Hemisphere. This eruption produced at least 340 km[sup 3] of dense-rock-equivalent ash that was deposited in a layer up to 1-2 m thick over several million square kilometers. As much as 800 km[sup 3] of additional ash may have fallen into the Iapetus Ocean, for a total of 1,140 km[sup 3]. Trace element geochemistry shows that the ash was derived from a felsic calc-alkalic magmatic source characteristic of volcanism in a continental crust-based, destructive plate-margin setting. This is one of the largest, if not the largest, ash falls recorded in Earth's Phanerozoic stratigraphic record, but its recognizable effect on faunas and floras was minimal, and it did not result in a global extinction event. The Millbrig-Big Bentonite bed provides accurate time control for sedimentologic, paleoecologic, and paleogeographic reconstructions across plates positioned in tropical (Laurentia) and temperate (Baltica) latitudes during Middle Ordovician time.

  13. PRECISE TULLY-FISHER RELATIONS WITHOUT GALAXY INCLINATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreschkow, D.; Meyer, M. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Power-law relations between tracers of baryonic mass and rotational velocities of disk galaxies, so-called Tully-Fisher relations (TFRs), offer a wealth of applications in galaxy evolution and cosmology. However, measurements of rotational velocities require galaxy inclinations, which are difficult to measure, thus limiting the range of TFR studies. This work introduces a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method for recovering the TFR in galaxy samples with limited or no information on inclinations. The robustness and accuracy of this method is demonstrated using virtual and real galaxy samples. Intriguingly, the MLE reliably recovers the TFR of all test samples, even without using any inclination measurements—that is, assuming a random sin i-distribution for galaxy inclinations. Explicitly, this 'inclination-free MLE' recovers the three TFR parameters (zero-point, slope, scatter) with statistical errors only about 1.5 times larger than the best estimates based on perfectly known galaxy inclinations with zero uncertainty. Thus, given realistic uncertainties, the inclination-free MLE is highly competitive. If inclination measurements have mean errors larger than 10°, it is better not to use any inclinations than to consider the inclination measurements to be exact. The inclination-free MLE opens interesting perspectives for future H I surveys by the Square Kilometer Array and its pathfinders.

  14. A PILOT FOR A VERY LARGE ARRAY H I DEEP FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Ximena; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Hess, Kelley M. [Department of Astronomy, Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Pisano, D. J. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6315, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Kreckel, Kathryn [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Momjian, Emmanuel [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Popping, Attila [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Oosterloo, Tom [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, NL-7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Chomiuk, Laura [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Verheijen, M. A. W. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Postbus 800, NL-9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Henning, Patricia A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A.; Wilcots, Eric M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Scoville, Nick, E-mail: ximena@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution 21 cm H I deep fields provide spatially and kinematically resolved images of neutral hydrogen at different redshifts, which are key to understanding galaxy evolution across cosmic time and testing predictions of cosmological simulations. Here we present results from a pilot for an H I deep field done with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We take advantage of the newly expanded capabilities of the telescope to probe the redshift interval 0 < z < 0.193 in one observation. We observe the COSMOS field for 50 hr, which contains 413 galaxies with optical spectroscopic redshifts in the imaged field of 34' Multiplication-Sign 34' and the observed redshift interval. We have detected neutral hydrogen gas in 33 galaxies in different environments spanning the probed redshift range, including three without a previously known spectroscopic redshift. The detections have a range of H I and stellar masses, indicating the diversity of galaxies we are probing. We discuss the observations, data reduction, results, and highlight interesting detections. We find that the VLA's B-array is the ideal configuration for H I deep fields since its long spacings mitigate radio frequency interference. This pilot shows that the VLA is ready to carry out such a survey, and serves as a test for future H I deep fields planned with other Square Kilometer Array pathfinders.

  15. Radio-X-ray Synergy to discover and Study Jetted Tidal Disruption Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donnarumma, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational consequences of tidal disruption of stars (TDEs) by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) can enable us to discover quiescent SMBHs, constrain their mass function, study formation and evolution of transient accretion disks and jet formation. A couple of jetted TDEs have been recently claimed in hard X-rays, challenging jet models, previously applied to $\\gamma$-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei. It is therefore of paramount importance to increase the current sample. In this paper, we find that the best strategy is not to use up-coming X-ray instruments alone, which will yield between several (e-Rosita) and a couple of hundreds (Einstein Probe) events per year below redshift one. We rather claim that a more efficient TDE hunter will be the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) operating {\\it in survey mode} at 1.4 GHz. It may detect up to several hundreds of events per year below $z \\sim 2.5$ with a peak rate of a few tens per year at $z\\approx 0.5$. Therefore, even if the jet production efficiency is {\\it...

  16. Herald Square, Greeley Square, Bryant Park [PLACEMARK Award: Hugh Hardy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bressi, Todd W

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. Bressi PLACES 14:2 Bryant Park Kiosks, Cafe and Grill Angreatest open space. The Bryant Park Grill and cafe attractwas the restoration of Bryant Park, the largest open space

  17. The Cotton-Square Borer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhard, H. J. (Henry Jonathan)

    1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , President STATION STAFF! -- ADMINISTRATION: A. B CONNER M s Director R. E: KARPER: M: s:: Vice-Director CLARICE MIXSON Crcrefary M. P. I~OLLEMAN' 5; Chief Clerk J. K. FRANCKLO; ~;sisfanf Chief Clerk CHESTER HIGGS kzecutiue Assistant C. B. NERLETTE... S. Assistant Chemist JEANNE M. FUEG~ ~sS)iSfanf Chemist RAY TREICHLER M' S Assistant Chemist J. K. FARMER M A kssisfanf Chemist RALPH i. SCH~ARTZ, 3. S,. Assistant Chemist [ORTICULTURE: HAMILTON P. TRAUB, Ph. D., Chid Berry Breeder - RANGE...

  18. Radcliffe Square BrasenoseLane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    /1 Fellows' Guest Rooms (Red, Gold, Green, & Blue) Fire Muster Points Gerties Hulme Common Room (HCR

  19. From square-well to Janus: Improved algorithm for integral equation theory and comparison with thermodynamic perturbation theory within the Kern-Frenkel model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achille Giacometti; Christoph Gogelein; Fred Lado; Francesco Sciortino; Silvano Ferrari; Giorgio Pastore

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Building upon past work on the phase diagram of Janus fluids [Sciortino et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{103}, 237801 (2009)], we perform a detailed study of integral equation theory of the Kern-Frenkel potential with coverage that is tuned from the isotropic square-well fluid to the Janus limit. An improved algorithm for the reference hypernetted-chain (RHNC) equation for this problem is implemented that significantly extends the range of applicability of RHNC. Results for both structure and thermodynamics are presented and compared with numerical simulations. Unlike previous attempts, this algorithm is shown to be stable down to the Janus limit, thus paving the way for analyzing the frustration mechanism characteristic of the gas-liquid transition in the Janus system. The results are also compared with Barker-Henderson thermodynamic perturbation theory on the same model. We then discuss the pros and cons of both approaches within a unified treatment. On balance, RHNC integral equation theory, even with an isotropic hard-sphere reference system, is found to be a good compromise between accuracy of the results, computational effort, and uniform quality to tackle self-assembly processes in patchy colloids of complex nature. Further improvement in RHNC however clearly requires an \\emph{anisotropic} reference bridge function.

  20. From square-well to Janus: Improved algorithm for integral equation theory and comparison with thermodynamic perturbation theory within the Kern-Frenkel model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacometti, Achille, E-mail: achille.giacometti@unive.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Calle Larga S. Marta DD2137, I-30123 Venezia (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Calle Larga S. Marta DD2137, I-30123 Venezia (Italy); Gögelein, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.goegelein@ds.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Göttingen (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Göttingen (Germany); Lado, Fred, E-mail: lado@ncsu.edu [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States)] [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Sciortino, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNR-SOFT, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNR-SOFT, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Ferrari, Silvano, E-mail: silvano.ferrari@tuwien.ac.at [Institut für Theoretische Physik and Center for Computational Materials Science, Technische Universität Wien, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10/136, A-1040 Wien (Austria)] [Institut für Theoretische Physik and Center for Computational Materials Science, Technische Universität Wien, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10/136, A-1040 Wien (Austria); Pastore, Giorgio, E-mail: pastore@ts.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica dell’ Università di Trieste and CNR-IOM, Strada Costiera 11, 34151 Trieste (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica dell’ Università di Trieste and CNR-IOM, Strada Costiera 11, 34151 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Building upon past work on the phase diagram of Janus fluids [F. Sciortino, A. Giacometti, and G. Pastore, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 237801 (2009)], we perform a detailed study of integral equation theory of the Kern-Frenkel potential with coverage that is tuned from the isotropic square-well fluid to the Janus limit. An improved algorithm for the reference hypernetted-chain (RHNC) equation for this problem is implemented that significantly extends the range of applicability of RHNC. Results for both structure and thermodynamics are presented and compared with numerical simulations. Unlike previous attempts, this algorithm is shown to be stable down to the Janus limit, thus paving the way for analyzing the frustration mechanism characteristic of the gas-liquid transition in the Janus system. The results are also compared with Barker-Henderson thermodynamic perturbation theory on the same model. We then discuss the pros and cons of both approaches within a unified treatment. On balance, RHNC integral equation theory, even with an isotropic hard-sphere reference system, is found to be a good compromise between accuracy of the results, computational effort, and uniform quality to tackle self-assembly processes in patchy colloids of complex nature. Further improvement in RHNC however clearly requires an anisotropic reference bridge function.

  1. Critical cavity in the stretched fluid studied using square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Iwamatsu

    2009-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The generic square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy is used to study the stability of a cavity introduced into the stretched liquid. The various properties of the critical cavity, which is the largest stable cavity within the liquid, are compared with those of the critical bubble of the homogeneous bubble nucleation. It is found that the size of the critical cavity is always smaller than that of the critical bubble, while the work of formation of the former is always higher than the latter in accordance with the conjectures made by Punnathanam and Corti [J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 119}, 10224 (2003)] deduced from the Lennard-Jones fluids. Therefore their conjectures about the critical cavity size and the work of formation would be more general and valid even for other types of liquid such as metallic liquid or amorphous. However, the scaling relations they found for the critical cavity in the Lennard-Jones fluid are marginally satisfied only near the spinodal.

  2. A least-squares error minimization approach in the determination of ferric ion diffusion coefficient of Fricke-infused dosimeter gels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tseng, Y.J.; Huang, S.-C.; Chu, W.C. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University Systems of Taiwan-National Yang Ming University, Pei-Tou, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Institutes of Biomedical Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University Systems of Taiwan-National Yang Ming University, Pei-Tou, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A least-squares error minimization approach was adopted to assess ferric ion diffusion coefficient of Fricke-agarose gels. Ferric ion diffusion process was modeled as a Gaussian-shaped degradation kernel operating on an initial concentration distribution. Diffusion coefficient was iteratively determined by minimizing the error function defined as the difference between the theoretically calculated and the experimentally measured dose distributions. A rapid MR image-based differential gel dosimetry technique that time resolves the evolution of the ferric ion diffusion process minimizes smearing of the dose distribution. Our results showed that for a Fricke-agarose gel contained 1 mM ammonium ferrous sulfate, 1% agarose, 1 mM sodium chloride, and 50 mM sulfuric acid, its ferric ion diffusion coefficient is (1.59{+-}0.28)x10{sup -2} cm{sup 2} h{sup -1} at room temperature. This value falls within the 1.00-2.00x10{sup -2} cm{sup 2} h{sup -1} range previously reported under varying gelling ingredients and concentrations. This method allows a quick, nondestructive evaluation of the ferric ion diffusion coefficient that can be used in conjunction with the in situ gel dosimetry experiment to provide a practical diffusion characterization of the dosimeter gel.

  3. [Cu(pyrazine-2-carboxylate)2]2Cd4I8: unprecedented 1-D serpentine inorganic chains and regular 2-D metalorganic square grids in a 3-D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    different motifs within the same crystal structure. Some mixed-motif interpenetrating networks have been-dimensional square or rectangular grids.6­8 In these examples, purely covalent networks interpenetrate with either published as an Advance Article on the web 21st December 2001 A novel three-dimensional coordination polymer

  4. Evidence for a narrow Higgs-like diphoton resonance with a mass of 125 GeV in pp collisions at [square root of]s = 7 - 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bendavid, Joshua Lorne

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed a search for the production of the standard model Higgs boson decaying to diphotons in pp collisions at the LHC at [square root of]s = 7-8 TeV with the CMS detector. Having analyzed data corresponding to ...

  5. These guidelines were approved in June 2011 by the Williams College Board of Trustees. In 1991, the College's physical plant measured 1.9 million square feet; by 2007 it had grown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    These guidelines were approved in June 2011 by the Williams College Board of Trustees. Background In 1991, the College's physical plant measured 1.9 million square feet; by 2007 it had grown about 24 projects support emissions reduction goals. About the Building Guidelines These guidelines address

  6. Study of Z Boson Production in PbPb Collisions at ?sNN=2.76??[square root of S subscript NN = 2.76] TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, Burak Han

    A search for Z bosons in the ?+?- [mu superscript + mu superscript -] decay channel has been performed in PbPb collisions at ?sNN=2.76??[square root of S subscript NN = 2.76] TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC, in a ...

  7. Submillimeter tests of the gravitational inverse-square law C. D. Hoyle, D. J. Kapner, B. R. Heckel, E. G. Adelberger, J. H. Gundlach, U. Schmidt,* and H. E. Swanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Submillimeter tests of the gravitational inverse-square law C. D. Hoyle, D. J. Kapner, B. R. Heckel Motivated by a variety of theories that predict new effects, we tested the gravitational 1/r2 law these results as constraints on extensions of the standard model that predict Yukawa or power-law forces. We set

  8. Surface heating effect on local heat transfer in a rotating two-pass square channel with 60 deg angled rib turbulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.M.; Han, J.C.; Parsons, J.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Lee, C.P. [General Electric Co., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of uneven wall temperature on the local heat transfer coefficient in a rotating, two-pass, square channel with 60 deg ribs on the leading and trailing walls was investigated for Reynolds number from 2,500 to 25,000 and rotation numbers from 0 to 0.352. Each pass, composed of six isolated copper sections, had a length-to-hydraulic diameter ratio of 12. The mean rotating radius-to-hydraulic diameter ratio was 30. Three thermal boundary condition cases were studied: (A) all four walls at the same temperature, (B) all four walls at the same heat flux, and (C) trailing wall hotter than leading with side walls unheated and insulated. Results indicate that rotating ribbed wall heat transfer coefficients increase by a factor of 2 to 3 over the rotating smooth wall data and at reduced coefficient variation from inlet to exit. As rotation number (or buoyancy parameter) increases, the first pass (outflow) trailing heat transfer coefficients increase and the first pass leading heat transfer coefficients decrease, whereas the reverse is true for the second pass (inflow). The direction of the Coriolis force reverse from the outflow trailing wall to the inflow leading wall. Differences between the first pass leading and trailing heat transfer coefficients increase with rotation number. A similar behavior is seen for the second pass leading and trailing heat transfer coefficients, but the differences are reduced due to buoyancy changing from aiding to opposing the inertia force. The results suggest that uneven wall temperature has a significant impact on the local heat transfer coefficients. The heat transfer coefficients on the first pass leading wall for cases B and C are up to 70--100% higher than that for case A, while the heat transfer coefficients on the second pass trailing wall for cases B and C are up to 20--50% higher.

  9. The needle in the hundred square degree haystack: The hunt for binary neutron star mergers with LIGO and Palomar Transient Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leo P. Singer

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced LIGO and Virgo experiments are poised to detect gravitational waves (GWs) directly for the first time this decade. The ultimate prize will be joint observation of a compact binary merger in both gravitational and electromagnetic channels. However, GW sky locations that are uncertain by hundreds of square degrees will pose a challenge. I describe a real-time detection pipeline and a rapid Bayesian parameter estimation code that will make it possible to search promptly for optical counterparts in Advanced LIGO. Having analyzed a comprehensive population of simulated GW sources, we describe the sky localization accuracy that the GW detector network will achieve as each detector comes online and progresses toward design sensitivity. Next, in preparation for the optical search with the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), we have developed a unique capability to detect optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Its comparable error regions offer a close parallel to the Advanced LIGO problem, but Fermi's unique access to MeV-GeV photons and its near all-sky coverage may allow us to look at optical afterglows in a relatively unexplored part of the GRB parameter space. We present the discovery and broadband follow-up observations of eight GBM-iPTF afterglows. Two of the bursts are at low redshift, are sub-luminous with respect to "standard" cosmological bursts, and have spectroscopically confirmed broad-line type Ic supernovae. These two bursts are possibly consistent with mildly relativistic shocks breaking out from the progenitor envelopes rather than the standard mechanism of internal shocks within an ultra-relativistic jet. On a technical level, the GBM-iPTF effort is a prototype for locating and observing optical counterparts of GW events in Advanced LIGO with the Zwicky Transient Facility.

  10. An aerial radiological survey of the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and surrounding area, Tucson, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerial radiological survey, which was conducted from March 1 to 13, 1995, covered a 51-square-mile (132-square-kilometer) area centered on the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base (DMAFB) in Tucson, Arizona. The results of the survey are reported as contours of bismuth-214 ({sup 214}Bi) soil concentrations, which are characteristic of natural uranium and its progeny, and as contours of the total terrestrial exposure rates extrapolated to one meter above ground level. All data were scaled and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the DMAFB area. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from 9 to 20 microroentgens per hour at one meter above the ground. Elevated levels of terrestrial radiation due to increased concentrations of {sup 214}Bi (natural uranium) were observed over the Southern Pacific railroad yard and along portions of the railroad track bed areas residing both within and outside the base boundaries. No man-made, gamma ray-emitting radioactive material was observed by the aerial survey. High-purity germanium spectrometer and pressurized ionization chamber measurements at eight locations within the base boundaries were used to verify the integrity of the aerial results. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to be in agreement. However, the ground-based measurements were able to detect minute quantities of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) at six of the eight locations examined. The presence of {sup 137}Cs is a remnant of fallout from foreign and domestic atmospheric nuclear weapons testing that occurred in the 1950s and early 1960s. Cesium-137 concentrations varied from 0.1 to 0.3 picocuries per gram, which is below the minimum detectable activity of the aerial system.

  11. Pocatello 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area Idaho. Data report: National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This data report presents results of groundwater and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Pocatello 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle. Surface samples (sediment) were collected from 1701 sites. The target sampling density was one site per 16 square kilometers (six square miles). Ground water samples were collected at 381 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from sediment sites include: (1) stream water chemistry measurements where applicable (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements; U/Th, U/Hf, and U/La ratios; and scintillometer readings for sediment sample sites are included on the microfiche. Data from groundwater sites include: (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading); and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from stream water sites include: (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); and (2) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V).

  12. The Development of the Linac Coherent Light Source RF Gun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowell, David H; Lewandowski, James; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Li, Zenghai; Schmerge, John; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; Xiao, Liling

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first x-ray laser user facility based upon a free electron laser (FEL). In addition to many other stringent requirements, the LCLS XFEL requires extraordinary beam quality to saturate at 1.5 angstroms within a 100 meter undulator.[1] This new light source is using the last kilometer of the three kilometer linac at SLAC to accelerate the beam to an energy as high as 13.6 GeV and required a new electron gun and injector to produce a very bright beam for acceleration. At the outset of the project it was recognized that existing RF guns had the potential to produce the desired beam but none had demonstrated it. This paper describes the analysis and design improvements of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA s-band gun leading to achievement of the LCLS performance goals.

  13. The North Korean missile program: How advanced is it?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, D.; Kadyshev, T.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past three years there have been increasing numbers of reports that North Korea is developing a 1,000-1,300-kilometer range missile generally referred to as the NoDongg-1. Pyongyang`s missile program has generated international concern because of North Korea`s potential nuclear capabilities, its proximity to South Korea and Japan and its reported missile sales to Iran, Syria and Libya. In June 1993, Japanese and South Korean wire services reported that North Korea had test fired several missiles into the Sea of Japan in late May, at least two of which were though to be NoDong-1 missiles. A missile with a 1,300-kilometer range would give North Korea the capability to reach all of Japan, and give Iran and Libya the capability to reach all of Israel.

  14. Small space object imaging : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Valley, Michael T.; Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of an LDRD effort to investigate new technologies for the identification of small-sized (mm to cm) debris in low-earth orbit. This small-yet-energetic debris presents a threat to the integrity of space-assets worldwide and represents significant security challenge to the international community. We present a nonexhaustive review of recent US and Russian efforts to meet the challenges of debris identification and removal and then provide a detailed description of joint US-Russian plans for sensitive, laser-based imaging of small debris at distances of hundreds of kilometers and relative velocities of several kilometers per second. Plans for the upcoming experimental testing of these imaging schemes are presented and a preliminary path toward system integration is identified.

  15. Technology development for a neutrino astrophysical observatory. Letter of intent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  16. Technology Development for a Neutrino AstrophysicalObservatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.; He, Y.D.; Jackson, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Lai, K.W.; Learned, J.; Ling, J.; Liu, D.; Lowder, D.; Moorhead, M.; Morookian, J.M.; Nygren, D.R.; Price, P.B.; Richards, A.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.; Smoot, George F.; Stokstad, R.G.; VanDalen, G.; Wilkes, J.; Wright, F.; Young, K.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  17. Megaton Water Cerenkov Detectors and Astrophysical Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maury Goodman

    2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Although formal proposals have not yet been made, the UNO and Hyper-Kamiokande projects are being developed to follow-up the tremendously successful program at Super-Kamiokande using a detector that is 20-50 times larger. The potential of such a detector to continue the study of astrophysical neutrinos is considered and contrasted with the program for cubic kilometer neutrino observatories.

  18. 54X-rays from Hot Gases Near the SN1979C Black Hole The Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is in solar mass units, and R is in kilometers. Problem 1 - Combining these equations using the method-Newton and the German ROSAT observatory revealed a bright source of X-rays that has remained steady for the 12 years, or distribution of X-rays with energy, support the idea that the object in SN 1979C is a black hole being fed

  19. Biotic communities and brachiopod paleoecology of the Early Permian McCloud Formation, northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanger, Rex Alan

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    terrene, the shallow water carbonate build-ups are represented by the Early Permian McCloud Formation. Location of Study Area The McCloud Formation crops out discontinuously for about 60 kilometers within Shasta County, California (Figure 2). Effort...BIOTIC COMMUNITIES AND BRACHIOPOD PALEOECOLOGY OF THE EARLY PERMIAN McCLOUD FORMATION, NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. A Thesis by REX ALAN HANGER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  20. EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. The DOE NEPA process for this project has been canceled.

  1. Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    July 21, 2009 Berkeley Lab summer lecture: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

  2. Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M. (LBNL Earth Sciences Division) [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

  3. Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter.

  4. Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

  5. Infrasonic observations of the Northridge, California, earthquake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mutschlecner, J.P.; Whitaker, R.W.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrasonic waves from the Northridge, California, earthquake of 17 January 1994 were observed at the St. George, Utah, infrasound array of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The distance to the epicenter was 543 kilometers. The signal shows a complex character with many peaks and a long duration. An interpretation is given in terms of several modes of signal propagation and generation including a seismic-acoustic secondary source mechanism. A number of signals from aftershocks are also observed.

  6. A simulation model of Rio Grande wild turkey dynamics in the Edwards Plateau of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwertner, Thomas Wayne

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    long-term-data sets??.... 13 3.1 Ecological regions and climate divisions of Texas containing significant populations of Rio Grande wild turkey??????????????... 20 4.1 County map illustrating the central Texas study area?????????. 34... 4.2 Raccoon and gray fox abundance throughout central Texas, showing number observed per kilometer on spotlight surveys, 1978?2003????. 38 4.3 County- and local-level trends of raccoon, ringtail, opossum, skunk, and gray fox...

  7. Flashover vulnerability of transmission and distribution lines to high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, V.J.; Liu, T.K.; Tesche, F.M.; Barnes, P.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper estimates the vulnerability of transmission and distribution lines to flashover from the electromagnetic pulse generated by a nuclear detonation 400 kilometers above the earth. The analysis consists of first determining the cumulative probability of induced-voltage on three-phase lines, including shield and neutral conductors, for four operating voltages and then comparing these stresses to estimates of line insulation strength. 11 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. AB Space Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    On 4 January 2007 the author published the article Wireless Transfer of Electricity in Outer Space in http://arxiv.org wherein he offered and researched a new revolutionary method of transferring electric energy in space. In that same article, he offered a new engine which produces a large thrust without throwing away large amounts of reaction mass (unlike the conventional rocket engine). In the current article, the author develops the theory of this kind of impulse engine and computes a sample project which shows the big possibilities opened by this new AB-Space Engine. The AB-Space Engine gets the energy from ground-mounted power; a planet electric station can transfer electricity up to 1000 millions (and more) of kilometers by plasma wires. Author shows that AB-Space Engine can produce thrust of 10 tons (and more). That can accelerate a space ship to some thousands of kilometers/second. AB-Space Engine has a staggering specific impulse owing to the very small mass expended. The AB-Space Engine reacts not by expulsion of its own mass (unlike rocket engine) but against the mass of its planet of origin (located perhaps a thousand of millions of kilometers away) through the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen.

  9. Space nuclear power, propulsion, and related technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, Marshall

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is one of the nation's largest research and development (R&D) facilities, with headquarters at Albuquerque, New Mexico; a laboratory at Livermore, California; and a test range near Tonopah, Nevada. Smaller testing facilities are also operated at other locations. Established in 1945, Sandia was operated by the University of California until 1949, when, at the request of President Truman, Sandia Corporation was formed as a subsidiary of Bell Lab's Western Electric Company to operate Sandia as a service to the U.S. Government without profit or fee. Sandia is currently operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by AT&T Technologies, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of AT&T. Sandia's responsibility is national security programs in defense and energy with primary emphasis on nuclear weapon research and development (R&D). However, Sandia also supports a wide variety of projects ranging from basic materials research to the design of specialized parachutes. Assets, owned by DOE and valued at more than $1.2 billion, include about 600 major buildings containing about 372,000 square meters (m2) (4 million square feet [ft2]) of floor space, located on land totalling approximately 1460 square kilometers (km2) (562 square miles [mi]). Sandia employs about 8500 people, the majority in Albuquerque, with about 1000 in Livermore. Approximately 60% of Sandia's employees are in technical and scientific positions, and the remainder are in crafts, skilled labor, and administrative positions. As a multiprogram national laboratory, Sandia has much to offer both industrial and government customers in pursuing space nuclear technologies. The purpose of this brochure is to provide the reader with a brief summary of Sandia's technical capabilities, test facilities, and example programs that relate to military and civilian objectives in space. Sandia is interested in forming partnerships with industry and government organizations, and has already formed several cooperative alliances and agreements. Because of the synergism of multiple governmental and industrial sponsors of many programs, Sandia is frequently able to provide complex technical solutions in a relatively short time, and often at lower cost to a particular customer. They have listed a few ongoing programs at Sandia related to space nuclear technology as examples of the possible synergisms that could result from forming teams and partnerships with related technologies and objectives.

  10. Characterization of the antiferromagnetism in Ag(pyz)2(S2O8) with a two-dimensional square lattice of Ag 2+ ions (Ag=silver, Pyz-pyrdzine, S2O8=sulfate)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Donald, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sengupta, P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cox, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manson, J [E WASHINGTON U; Southerland, H [E WASHINGTON U; Warter, M [E WASHINGTON U; Stone, K [STATE UNIV OF NY; Stephens, P [STATE UNIV OF NY; Lancaster, T [OXFORD U; Steele, A [OXFORD U; Blundell, S [OXFORD U; Baker, P [OXFORD U; Pratt, F [RUTHERFORD-APPLETON LAB; Lee, C [NCSU; Whangbo, M [NCSU

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray powder diffraction and magnetic susceptibility measurements show that Ag(pyz){sub 2}(S{sub 2}O{sub 8}) consists of 2D square nets of Ag{sup 2+} ions resulting from the corner-sharing of axially elongated AgN{sub 4}O{sub 2} octahedra and exhibits characteristic 2D antiferromagnetism. Nevertheless, {mu}{sup +}Sr measurements indicate that Ag(pyz){sub 2}(S{sub 2}O{sub 8}) undergoes 3D magnetic ordering below 7.8(3) K.

  11. Physical Consequences of a Momenta-Transfering Particle Theory of Induced Gravity and New Measurements Indicating Variation from Inverse Square Law at Length Scale of .1 mm: Statistical Time Properties of Gravitational Interaction and Analysis Thereof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary Christopher Vezzoli

    2001-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents physical consequences of our theory of induced gravity (Ref.1) regarding: 1) the requirement to consider shape and materials properties when calculating graviton cross section collision area; 2) use of Special Relativity; 3) implications regarding the shape of cosmos; 4) comparison to explanations using General Relativity; 5) properties of black holes; 6) relationship to the strong force and the theorized Higgs boson; 7) the possible origin of magnetic attraction; 8) new measurements showing variation from gravitational inverse square behavior at length scales of 0.1 mm and relationship to the Cosmological constant, and proof of the statistical time properties of the gravitational interaction.

  12. Hanford's 100-HX Pump and Treat Project - a Successful Blend of Science, Technology, Construction, and Project Management - 12412

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albin, Kenneth A.; Bachand, Marie T.; Biebesheimer, Fred H.; Neshem, Dean O.; Smoot, John L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) recently completed construction and start-up of the $25 million 100-HX Groundwater Pump and Treat Project for the Department of Energy (DOE) at its Hanford Reservation site in Washington State. From the onset, the 100-HX Project Leadership Team was able to successfully blend the science and technology of a state-of-the-art groundwater pump and treat system with the principles, tools, and techniques of traditional industrial-type construction and project management. From the 1940's through most of the 1980's, the United States used the Hanford Site to produce nuclear material for national defense at reactor sites located along the Columbia River. While the reactors were operational, large volumes of river water were treated with sodium dichromate (to inhibit corrosion of the reactor piping) and used as a coolant for the reactors. After a single pass through the reactor and before being discharged back to the river, the coolant water was sent to unlined retention basins to cool and to allow the short-lived radioactive contaminants to decay. As a result of these operations, hexavalent chromium was introduced to the vadose zone, and ultimately into the groundwater aquifer and the adjacent Columbia River. In addition, numerous leaks and spills of concentrated sodium dichromate stock solution over the lifetime of reactor operations led to higher concentrations of chromate in the vadose zone and groundwater in localized areas. As a result, the 100 Area was included in the National Priorities List sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The mission of the 100-HX Project is to significantly reduce the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the groundwater by treating up to 3.8 billion gallons (14,300 mega-liters) of contaminated water over its first nine years of operations. In order to accomplish this mission, groundwater scientists and geologists using sophisticated scientific modeling optimized the 100-HX's approximately 0.7 square mile (181 hecto-meters) extraction and injection well field to support continuous operation of a maximum of 800 gallons (3,028 liters) per minute, 24 hours per day, and 7 days per week. The use of traditional resin technology for the plant's ion exchange system required a change out of the resin every 12 weeks and shipment to an offsite facility 1,500 miles (2,414 kilometers) away for regeneration. Instead, the project leadership pursued newer technology with a disposable resin that could be disposed of on-site and would require less frequent change outs, reducing the project's life cycle costs by more than $16 million. Constructing the facility had its own challenges. The well field location overlapped ecologically sensitive lands where bald eagles and native wildlife use the land for their mating habitat for nearly half of the year. Building locations had to be planned around historically and culturally sensitive areas, and around another contractor's remediation work zones. Also, the size of the well field required a transfer (pumping) facility and installation of more than 60 miles (97 kilometers) of high-density polypropylene pipe, 23 miles (38 kilometers) of power cable, and 28 miles (46 kilometers) of control cable. Along with schedule and budget constraints typical of any fast-track project, the project team dealt with severe resource constraints due to competing projects across the Hanford Site caused by the influx of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus funding. In addition, the project team itself was stretched between completing another $25 million dollar construction project while designing and constructing this project. In order to save money, the project schedule was compressed by three months from the original baseline schedule. This was made possible by the strong use of project management principles throughout the design, construction, and testing phases, as well as implementation of many lessons learned from a similar construction project. In summary, the 100-HX

  13. Detecting Radio Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers and Neutrinos with a Digital Radio Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heino Falcke; Peter Gorham

    2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibilities of measuring ultra-high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos with radio techniques. We review a few of the properties of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers and show how these properties can be explained by coherent ``geosynchrotron'' emission from electron-positron pairs in the shower as they move through the geomagnetic field. This should allow one to use the radio emission as a useful diagnostic tool for cosmic ray research. A new generation of digital telescopes will make it possible to study this radio emission in greater detail. For example, the planned Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), operating at 10-200 MHz, will be an instrument uniquely suited to study extensive air showers and even detect neutrino-induced showers on the moon. We discuss sensitivities, count rates and possible detection algorithms for LOFAR and a currently funded prototype station LOPES. This should also be applicable to other future digital radio telescopes such as the Square-Kilometer-Array (SKA). LOFAR will be capable of detecting air-shower radio emission from >2*10^14 eV to ~10^20 eV. The technique could be easily extended to include air shower arrays consisting of particle detectors (KASCADE, Auger), thus providing crucial additional information for obtaining energy and chemical composition of cosmic rays. It also has the potential to extend the cosmic ray search well beyond an energy of 10^21 eV if isotropic radio signatures can be found. Other issues that LOFAR can address are to determine the neutral component of the cosmic ray spectrum, possibly look for neutron bursts, and do actual cosmic ray astronomy.

  14. Final Technical Report: DOE-Biological Ocean Margins Program. Microbial Ecology of Denitrifying Bacteria in the Coastal Ocean.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Kerkhof

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of our research was to provide a comprehensive study of the bacterioplankton populations off the coast of New Jersey near the Rutgers University marine field station using terminal restriction fragment polymorphism analysis (TRFLP) coupled to 16S rRNA genes for large data set studies. Our three revised objectives to this study became: (1) to describe bacterioplankton population dynamics in the Mid Atlantic Bight using TRFLP analysis of 16S rRNA genes. (2) to determine whether spatial and temporal factors are driving bacterioplankton community dynamics in the MAB using monthly samping along our transect line over a 2-year period. (3) to identify dominant members of a coastal bacterioplankton population by clonal library analysis of 16S rDNA genes and sequencing of PCR product corresponding to specific TRFLP peaks in the data set. Although open ocean time-series sites have been areas of microbial research for years, relatively little was known about the population dynamics of bacterioplankton communities in the coastal ocean on kilometer spatial and seasonal temporal scales. To gain a better understanding of microbial community variability, monthly samples of bacterial biomass were collected in 1995-1996 along a 34-km transect near the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO-15) off the New Jersey coast. Surface and bottom sampling was performed at seven stations along a transect line with depths ranging from 1 to 35m (n=178). The data revealed distinct temporal patterns among the bacterioplankton communities in the Mid-Atlantic Bight rather than grouping by sample location or depth (figure 2-next page). Principal components analysis models supported the temporal patterns. In addition, partial least squares regression modeling could not discern a significant correlation from traditional oceanographic physical and phytoplankton nutrient parameters on overall bacterial community variability patterns at LEO-15. These results suggest factors not traditionally measured during oceanographic studies are structuring coastal microbial communities.

  15. Opportunities for renewable energy sources in Central Asia countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obozov, A.J. [Project KUN (Kyrgyzstan); Loscutoff, W.V. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overview of the state of conventional energy sources and the potential for development of renewable energy sources in the Central Asia countries of Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, and Tajikistan. The region has a population of about 50 million in an area of more than four million square kilometers. The per capita gross internal product is more than $2,500, although the economy has been declining the past five years. The area has substantial coal, oil, uranium, and natural gas reserves, although they are not distributed equally among the five countries. Energy production is such that the countries do not have to rely heavily on imports. One of the problems in Central Asia is that the energy prices are substantially below the world prices. This is a factor in development of renewable energy sources. The primary renewable energy resources available are wind in Kazakhstan, solar in the entire region, biomass in Kyrgyzstan, and micro-hydropower stations in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. All of these have the potential to provide a significant amount of the required energy for the region. However, all of the countries have an abundance of various renewable energy resources. To effectively use these resources, however, a number of barriers to their development and commercialization must be overcome. These include low prices of conventional energy sources, absence of legislative support, lack of financing for new technologies, and lack of awareness of renewable energy sources by the population. A number of specific actions are proposed to overcome these barriers. These include establishment of a Central Asia coordinating council for renewable energy, development of a regional renewable energy program, and setting up a number of large demonstration projects. 16 figs.

  16. KAT-7 SCIENCE VERIFICATION: USING H I OBSERVATIONS OF NGC 3109 TO UNDERSTAND ITS KINEMATICS AND MASS DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carignan, C.; Frank, B. S.; Hess, K. M.; Lucero, D. M.; Randriamampandry, T. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Goedhart, S.; Passmoor, S. S., E-mail: ccarignan@ast.uct.ac.za [SKA South Africa, The Park, Park Road, Pinelands, 7405 (South Africa)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    H I observations of the Magellanic-type spiral NGC 3109, obtained with the seven dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), are used to analyze its mass distribution. Our results are compared to those obtained using Very Large Array (VLA) data. KAT-7 is a pathfinder of the Square Kilometer Array precursor MeerKAT, which is under construction. The short baselines and low system temperature of the telescope make it sensitive to large-scale, low surface brightness emission. The new observations with KAT-7 allow the measurement of the rotation curve (RC) of NGC 3109 out to 32', doubling the angular extent of existing measurements. A total H I mass of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is derived, 40% more than what is detected by the VLA observations. The observationally motivated pseudo-isothermal dark matter (DM) halo model can reproduce the observed RC very well, but the cosmologically motivated Navarro-Frenk-White DM model gives a much poorer fit to the data. While having a more accurate gas distribution has reduced the discrepancy between the observed RC and the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) models, this is done at the expense of having to use unrealistic mass-to-light ratios for the stellar disk and/or very large values for the MOND universal constant a{sub 0}. Different distances or H I contents cannot reconcile MOND with the observed kinematics, in view of the small errors on these two quantities. As with many slowly rotating gas-rich galaxies studied recently, the present result for NGC 3109 continues to pose a serious challenge to the MOND theory.

  17. Marble Canyon 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area Arizona: data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, J.D.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of ground water and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance (HSSR) in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Marble Canyon 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle are presented. The target sampling density for all media collected was one site per 12 square kilometers. This resulted in 884 sediment samples being collected; however, dry conditions and sparse population resulted in the collection of only 2 ground water samples. Grand Canyon National Park, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and much Indian tribal land in the southern half of the quadrangle were not sampled. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements for sediment samples are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from ground water include: water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); physical measurements (water temperature, and scintillometer readings); and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: water chemistry measurements (where available) for pH, conductivity, and alkalinity; and elemental analyses(U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Histograms, cumulative frequency, and areal distribution plots for most elements; Log U/Th, Log U/Hf, and Log U/(Th + Hf) ratios; and scintillometer readings are included.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Manacapuru, Brazil for the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON) Field Campaign

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Amazon rain forest in Brazil is the largest broadleaf forest in the world, covering 7 million square kilometers of the Amazon Basin in South America. It represents over half of the planet’s remaining rain forests, and comprises the most biodiverse tract of tropical rain forest on the planet. Due to the sheer size of the Amazon rain forest, the area has a strong impact on the climate in the Southern Hemisphere. To understand the intricacies of the natural state of the Amazon rain forest, the Green Ocean Amazon, or GOAMAZON, field campaign is a two-year scientific collaboration among U.S. and Brazilian research organizations. They are conducting a variety of different experiments with dozens of measurement tools, using both ground and aerial instrumentation, including the ARM Aerial Facility's G-1 aircraft. For more information on the holistic view of the campaign, see the Department of Energy’s GOAMAZON website. As a critical component of GOAMAZON, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will obtain measurements near Manacapuru, south of Manaus, Brazil, from January to December 2014. The city of Manaus, with a population of 3 million, uses high-sulfur oil as their primary source of electricity. The AMF site is situated to measure the atmospheric extremes of a pristine atmosphere and the nearby cities’ pollution plume, as it regularly intersects with the site. Along with other instrument systems located at the Manacapuru site, this deployment will enable scientists to study how aerosol and cloud life cycles are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity.

  19. Representations as Sums of Squares Henri Cohen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Henri

    . 2 #12;Proof. Write a = bx2 1 + cx2 2. Generalizing the above example, we have the identity (bx2 1 + cx2 2)x2 + (b2 cx2 1 + bc2 x2 2)y2 = b(x1x - cx2y)2 + c(bx1y + x2x)2 , and since the determinant of the transformation matrix is bx2 1 + cx2 2 = a = 0, the lemma follows. Pfister's first theorem is the following

  20. Minimum Mean Squared Error Interference Alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    maximize sum utility, due to the associated loss in degrees of freedom. One approach to distributed¨unchen, 80290 Munich, Germany Email: {dschmidt,utschick}@tum.de Department of Electrical Engineering utility, where the utility depends on rate or SINR, a weighted sum MSE objective is used to compute

  1. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    -tenure Professional Renewal Retreat, the Pre-Retirement Base and Faculty Early Retirement Program Calculator, the SJSU; and Resolved, that the Academic Senate of San Jose State University wishes her a happy and healthy retirement

  2. A Square Root Process for Modelling Correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naturwissenschaften - der Bergischen Universit¨at Wuppertal vorgelegt von Cathrin van Emmerich Promotionsausschu�

  3. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    ; CSSA and the editorial board of the San José Mercury News. RATIONALE: In Education Code section 66602) five ex-officio members, including the Governor, three other elected officials and the Chancellor, (b code section 66602 specifically and explicitly requires that the Governor must appoint a faculty

  4. Office of the President One Washington Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    , and Administrative Heads FROM: Robert L. Caret President SUBJECT: Presidential Directive 01-01 SJSU "Time, Place be performed instantly or in the future), are subject to regulation and require obtaining a permit. #12

  5. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    -wide faculty awards. S00-9 consolidated the previously existing Outstanding Professor and Presidential Scholar to be reminded of the individual's contributions. Sadly, at that point it is too late. This policy would permit

  6. Office of the President One Washington Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    FROM: Don W. Kassing President SUBJECT: Presidential Directive 2007-01 Executive Order No. 970 Student to be present in all or some proceedings. San José State University does not permit attorneys to be present at 924-5985. DWK:ms Attachment #12;Presidential Directive Introduction San José State University

  7. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    Valley, One Hundred Most Influential Latinos in Silicon Valley, and the TWIN (Tribute to Women, that the Academic Senate of San José State University wishes her a happy, healthy and busy retirement. Approved: May

  8. Least-squares methods for computational electromagnetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolev, Tzanio Valentinov

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ............... 132 3. Eigenvalues of the Fichera corner . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 4. Eigenvalues of a linear accelerator cell . . . . . . . . . 137 D.Thetime-harmonicproblem ................. 137 VIII CONCLUSIONS ........................... 140 REFERENCES..., eigenmode 7. ......................... 160 B.11 Unit ball, eigenmode 8. ......................... 160 B.12 Unit ball, eigenmode 9. ......................... 160 B.13 Unit ball, eigenmode 10. ......................... 161 B.14 Linear accelerator cell...

  9. Office of the President One Washington Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    the people, property, resources, and legal obligations of the institution. The program will be administered within the guidelines of the CSU Systemwide Risk Management Program. It is incumbent upon all faculty for the improvement of risk management and well being of all people, property, and liability at the University

  10. square miles | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel'slinkedpolicyreviewland use

  11. Jackson Square | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation PeerNOON... No matter what chipJackJack

  12. OpenEI Community - square miles

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff<div/0Agency (DLA) RFP - Deadline -

  13. Solar Energy Squared, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformationSodaAtlas (PACA

  14. Square Butte Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern IL Elec Coop, IncSouthwesternSparkSpring

  15. Blue Square Energy BSE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotins Energia Jump to:Black RiverblogsBlue EnergyBlue

  16. Closure Plan for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 RWMS U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. M. Fitzmaurice

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Plan has been prepared for the Area 3 RWMS U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit Corrective Action Unit 110 in accordance with the Federal Facility and Consent Order (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP] et al., 1996). The U-3ax/bl is a historic disposal unit within the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The unit, which was formed by excavating the area between two subsidence craters (U-3ax and U-3bl), was operationally closed in 1987. The U-3ax/bl disposal unit is scheduled for permanent closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as a hazardous waste landfill. Existing records indicate that, from July 1968 to December 1987, U-3ax/bl received 2.3 x 10{sup 5} cubic meters (8.12 x 10{sup 6} cubic feet) of waste. NTS nuclear device testing generated approximately 95 percent of the total volume disposed of in U-3ax/bl, the majority of which came from the Waste Consolidation Project (80 percent of the total volume) (Elletson and Johnejack, 1995). Area 3 is located in Yucca Flat, within the northeast quadrant of the NTS. The Yucca Flat watershed is a structurally closed basin encompassing an area of approximately 780 square kilometers (300 square miles). The structural geomorphology of Yucca Flat is typical of the Basin and Range Physiographic Province. Yucca Flat lies in one of the most arid regions of the country. Water balance calculations for Area 3 indicate that it is continuously in a state of moisture deficit. The U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit will be closed in place by installing a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act equivalent cover. Following cover construction a fence will be installed around the cover to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring will consist of site inspections to determine the condition of the engineered cover and cover performance monitoring using Time-Domain Reflectometry arrays to monitor moisture migration in the cover. Any identified maintenance and repair requirements will be remedied within 60 working days of discovery and documented in writing at the time of repair. Results of all inspections/repairs for a given year will be addressed in a single report submitted annually to the NDEP. Soil moisture will be monitored within the cover for a period of at least two years prior to establishing performance criteria for NDEP regulatory purposes.

  17. Photon counting for quantum key distribution with Peltier cooled InGaAs/InP APD's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stucki, D; Stefanov, A; Zbinden, H; Rarity, J G; Wall, T; Stucki, Damien; Ribordy, Gr\\'{e}goire; Stefanov, Andr\\'{e}; Zbinden, Hugo; Rarity, John G.; Wall, Tom

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of three types of InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes is investigated for photon counting at 1550 nm in the temperature range of thermoelectric cooling. The best one yields a dark count probability of $% 2.8\\cdot 10^{-5}$ per gate (2.4 ns) at a detection efficiency of 10% and a temperature of -60C. The afterpulse probability and the timing jitter are also studied. The results obtained are compared with those of other papers and applied to the simulation of a quantum key distribution system. An error rate of 10% would be obtained after 54 kilometers.

  18. Mitigation of magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP) effects from commerical electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Tesche, F.M. (Tesche (F.M.), Dallas, TX (United States)); Vance, E.F. (Vance (E.F.), Fort Worth, TX (United States))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large nuclear detonation at altitudes of several hundred kilometers above the earth distorts the earth's magnetic field and produces a strong magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP). This can adversely affect electrical power systems. In this report, the effects of this nuclear environment on critical facilities connected to the commercial power system are considered. Methods of mitigating the MHD-EMP impacts are investigated, and recommended protection schemes are presented. Guidelines for testing facilities to determine the effects of MHD-EMP and to validate the mitigation methods also are discussed.

  19. Mitigation of magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP) effects from commerical electric power systems. Power Systems Technology Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tesche, F.M. [Tesche (F.M.), Dallas, TX (United States); Vance, E.F. [Vance (E.F.), Fort Worth, TX (United States)

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large nuclear detonation at altitudes of several hundred kilometers above the earth distorts the earth`s magnetic field and produces a strong magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP). This can adversely affect electrical power systems. In this report, the effects of this nuclear environment on critical facilities connected to the commercial power system are considered. Methods of mitigating the MHD-EMP impacts are investigated, and recommended protection schemes are presented. Guidelines for testing facilities to determine the effects of MHD-EMP and to validate the mitigation methods also are discussed.

  20. Response of a slotted plate flow meter to horizontal two phase flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muralidharan, Vasanth

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    there is a change in the pipeline geometry or 8 inclination. Severe riser slugging is an example of this effect and it can prevail for kilometers mainly in sea lines. When there are no transient effects or geometry/terrain effects the flow is steady... constant, a static differential pressure due to flow of the pure liquid is attained. 9 Therefore the static differential pressure lines of constant liquid flow rate become horizontal when the gas flow rate is reduced. 4. When the gas flow is increased...

  1. SCADA computer sytem controls major Saudi Aramco crude oil pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dempsey, J.; Al-Habib, R. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A replacement Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) computer system which monitors and controls two 1,100 kilometer pipelines and eleven associated pump stations is described. The SCADA system was designed to meet two objectives: (1) decentralize the overall control system and provide a distributed control system capable of regulatory control at each pump and pressure reducing station, and (2) provide system wide monitoring and supervisory control function during normal operations at the crude oil terminal. The SCADA computer system hardware (host computers and consoles), software modules, and applications are overviewed. A data flow diagram and a hardware configuration diagram are provided. 3 figs.

  2. Association of the threespot damelsfish (Stegastes planifrons) in ridge mortality of Diploria strigosa in the flower garden banks of the National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proppe, Darren Sean

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of ridge mortality, however, they do establish a relationship between S. planifrons and ridge mortality. Introduction: The East and West Hower Gardens banks, located in the Northwest Gulf of Mexico, about 180 km south southeast of Galveston, Texas... of the two banks are 19 km apart The banks occupy an area of over 300 acres and are sepamted from the neatest coral reefs off Tampico, Mexico, by more than 500 kilometers (Bright, Gittings, Rezak 90). Due to this isolauon, the Hower Gardens are rehtively...

  3. Application Prospect Analysis of the Surface Water Source Heat-Pump in China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Zhuang, Z.; Huang, L.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The lakes are closest in the East Plain and Qinghai-Xizang Plateau Land in China, and they form the two east and west opposite biggest lake cluster; The Chinese coastline begins with Yalu River at the border between China and Korea, end with Beilun... River at the border between China and Viet Nam, and the length is more than 18000 kilometers. The huge surface water system covers more than 60 percents area of China [6]. In this thesis we first investigate and analyze of the surface water...

  4. US Department of Energy (DOE)/Gosatomnadzor (GAN) of Russia project at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranov, I.A.; Konoplev, K.A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Hauser, G.C. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a summary of work accomplished within the scope of the DOE-Gosatomnadzor (GAN) Agreement to reduce vulnerability to theft of direct-use nuclear materials in Russia. The DOE-GAN agreement concerns the Russian Academy of Science B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI), located 45 kilometers from St. Petersburg. The PNPI operates facilities to research basic nuclear physics. Current world conditions require particular attention to the issue of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) of nuclear materials. The long-term plan to increase security at the facility is outlined, including training, physical protection upgrades, and material control and accountability. 4 figs.

  5. Cost-Effective Cementitious Material Compatible with Yucca Mountain Repository Geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dole, LR

    2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The current plans for the Yucca Mountain (YM) repository project (YMP) use steel structures to stabilize the disposal drifts and connecting tunnels that are collectively over 100 kilometers in length. The potential exist to reduce the underground construction cost by 100s of millions of dollars and improve the repository's performance. These economic and engineering goals can be achieved by using the appropriate cementitious materials to build out these tunnels. This report describes the required properties of YM compatible cements and reviews the literature that proves the efficacy of this approach. This report also describes a comprehensive program to develop and test materials for a suite of underground construction technologies.

  6. High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy: from AMANDA to Icecube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube.

  7. Stratigraphic Profiles for Selected Hanford Site Seismometer Stations and Other Locations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratigraphic profiles were constructed for eight selected Hanford Site seismometer stations, five Hanford Site facility reference locations, and seven regional three-component broadband seismometer stations. These profiles provide interpretations of the subsurface layers to support estimation of ground motions from past earthquakes, and the prediction of ground motions from future earthquakes. In most cases these profiles terminated at the top of the Wanapum Basalt, but at selected sites profiles were extended down to the top of the crystalline basement. The composite one-dimensional stratigraphic profiles were based primarily on previous interpretations from nearby boreholes, and in many cases the nearest deep borehole is located kilometers away.

  8. Geological control of springs and seeps in the Farmington Canyon Complex, Davis County, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skelton, Robyn Kaye

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Precambrian (Eardley, 1939). Hintze (1982) divided the Phanerozoic into six phases as illustrated in Figure 7. By the end of the Precambrian, the Northern Utah Highland was uplifted north and northwest of present day Salt Lake City (Figure 8). According... Ho ro tt lbrook Canyon 4 esslons e? Gt e. bbte ci o \\ Creek City SALT LAKE COUNTY Mrs Mill Creek I 5 10 KILOMETERS Figure 1. Geography of Wasatch Mountains (from Bryant, 1988). of the snowpack to remain high. Once melting started, high...

  9. Striped Bass Spawning in Non-Estuarine Portions of the Savannah River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, D.; Paller, M.

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, the estuarine portions of the Savannah River have been considered to be the only portion of the river in which significant amounts of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) spawning normally occur. A reexamination of data from 1983 through 1985 shows a region between River Kilometers 144 and 253 where significant numbers of striped bass eggs and larvae occur with estimated total egg production near that currently produced in the estuarine reaches. It appears possible that there are two separate spawning populations of striped bass in the Savannah River.

  10. Oahu Solar Measurement Grid (1-Year Archive): 1-Second Solar Irradiance; Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sengupta, M.; Andreas, A.

    Seventeen measurement stations in the south western region of the island of Oahu collected data at 1-second intervals over the course of a year. The sensors are located in a 1-kilometer grid and the information then can be used to predict what PV outputs might be at 1-second intervals for medium-sized and large PV systems. This DOE-funded study by NREL supports the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI), a multifaceted program to substantially increase the use of renewable energy in Hawaii.

  11. Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen; G. Jaczko

    1996-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the detection of neutrinos from a typical gamma ray burst requires a kilometer-scale detector. We argue that large bursts should be visible with the neutrino telescopes under construction. We emphasize the 3 techniques by which neutrino telescopes can perform this search: by triggering on i) bursts of muons from muon neutrinos, ii) muons from air cascades initiated by high energy gamma rays and iii) showers made by relatively low energy ($\\simeq 100\\,\\mev$) electron neutrinos. Timing of neutrino-photon coincidences may yield a measurement of the neutrino mass to order $10^{-5}$~eV, an interesting range in light of the solar neutrino anomaly.

  12. Photon counting for quantum key distribution with Peltier cooled InGaAs/InP APD's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damien Stucki; Grégoire Ribordy; André Stefanov; Hugo Zbinden; John G. Rarity; Tom Wall

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of three types of InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes is investigated for photon counting at 1550 nm in the temperature range of thermoelectric cooling. The best one yields a dark count probability of $% 2.8\\cdot 10^{-5}$ per gate (2.4 ns) at a detection efficiency of 10% and a temperature of -60C. The afterpulse probability and the timing jitter are also studied. The results obtained are compared with those of other papers and applied to the simulation of a quantum key distribution system. An error rate of 10% would be obtained after 54 kilometers.

  13. Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces the concept of constant Volt/Hz operation of offshore wind power plants. The deployment of offshore WPPs requires power transmission from the plant to the load center inland. Since this power transmission requires submarine cables, there is a need to use High-Voltage Direct Current transmission, which is economical for transmission distances longer than 50 kilometers. In the concept presented here, the onshore substation is operated at 60 Hz synced with the grid, and the offshore substation is operated at variable frequency and voltage, thus allowing the WPP to be operated at constant Volt/Hz.

  14. Threadleaf Groundsel and Forage Response to Herbicides in the Davis Mountains.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, R.D.; Ueckert, D.N.; Nelson J.T.; Cox, J.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    groundsel. MATERIALS AND METHODS Description of the Study Area The study was conducted on the Billy and Tommy Weston Ranch , 6.4 kilometers (km) southeast of Fort Davis , Texas in Jeff Davis County. Elevation of the study area is 1,524 m and average... to the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo for partial financial support of this research, to Billy and Tommy Weston for providing land for the research, to Dr. Charles E. Gates for assistance with statistical analyses , to Brad Lisenbee for assistance...

  15. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites: Methodology and data base. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, D.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual describes a dose assessment system used to estimate the population or collective dose commitments received via both airborne and waterborne pathways by persons living within a 2- to 80-kilometer region of a commercial operating power reactor for a specific year of effluent releases. Computer programs, data files, and utility routines are included which can be used in conjunction with an IBM or compatible personal computer to produce the required dose commitments and their statistical distributions. In addition, maximum individual airborne and waterborne dose commitments are estimated and compared to 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix 1, design objectives. This supplement is the last report in the NUREG/CR-2850 series.

  16. A two-dimensional finite difference model of the effects of erosion on the evolution of pore pressure within a moving thrust sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sales, James Gregory

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditions (see Table 2) where all niodcl layers are assigned R values representative of a) sandstone, b) shale, and c) limestone; shown at the 1'inal stage of thrust loading. H was held constant at 1. 2xl0'o Pa i 36 13 Excess pore pressure for thrust... tectonic style of orogens and individual thrust. sheets. Johnson (1981), for instance, suggested that the Keystone thrust of southeast Nevada traveled as much as eighty-eight kilometers facilitated by the removal of the lithostatic load. More generally...

  17. Cross-spectral study of the spatial relationships in the North Pacific sea-surface temperature anomaly field. Report No. 23

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, J.W.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross-spectral analysis is used to examine the dependence of the temporal covariation of sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies at pairs of spatially separated points in the North Pacific on (1) the time scale of the variations, (2) the relative displacement of the points and (3) their location within the North Pacific basin. Spatial scales considered here range from 1000 kilometers up to the width of the basin. The study focuses on cross-spectral estimates for the interannual frequency band, 0.125-0.75 yr/sup -1/ although estimates for three other bands spanning higher frequencies are also examined.

  18. The solar system mimics a hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Je-An Gu

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar system and the hydrogen atom are two well known systems on different scales and look unrelated: The former is a classical system on the scale of about billions of kilometers and the latter a quantum system of about tens of picometers. Here we show a connection between them. Specifically, we find that the orbital radii of the planets mimic the mean radii of the energy levels of a quantum system under the Coulomb-like potential. This connection might be explained by very light dark matter which manifests quantum behavior in the solar system, thereby hinting at a dark matter mass around $8 \\times 10^{-14}$ electron-volts.

  19. Life Cycle Assessment of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007: Ethanol - Global Warming Potential and Environmental Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G. A.; Hsu, D. D.; Inman, D.; Aden, A.; Mann, M. K.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to use life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the global warming potential (GWP), water use, and net energy value (NEV) associated with the EISA-mandated 16 bgy cellulosic biofuels target, which is assumed in this study to be met by cellulosic-based ethanol, and the EISA-mandated 15 bgy conventional corn ethanol target. Specifically, this study compares, on a per-kilometer-driven basis, the GWP, water use, and NEV for the year 2022 for several biomass feedstocks.

  20. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

    2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a