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Sample records for kilometers square kilometers

  1. ExaScale High Performance Computing in the Square Kilometer Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Nieuwpoort, Rob V.

    ExaScale High Performance Computing in the Square Kilometer Array P. Chris Broekema, broekema project requires active and intensive involve- ment from both the high performance computing researchScale Computing, Square Kilometer Array, High Performance Computing, Streaming Computing 1. INTRODUCTION

  2. Square Kilometer Array Telescope - Precision Reference Frequency Synchronisation via 1f-2f Dissemination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, B; Gao, C; Bai, Y; Dong, J W; Wang, L J

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) is an international effort to build the world's largest radio telescope, with one square kilometer collecting area. Besides its ambitious scientific objectives, such as probing the cosmic dawn and cradle of life, SKA also demands several revolutionary technological breakthroughs, with ultra-high precision synchronisation of the frequency references for thousands of antennas being one of them. In this report, aimed at applications to SKA, we demonstrate a frequency reference synchronization and dissemination scheme with the phase noise compensation function placed at the client site. Hence, one central hub can be linked to a large number of client sites, forming a star-shaped topology. As a performance test, the 100 MHz reference signal from a Hydrogen maser clock is disseminated and recovered at two remote sites. Phase noise characteristics of the recovered reference frequency signal coincides with that of the hydrogen-maser source and satisfies SKA requirement.

  3. Power Challenges of Large Scale Research Infrastructures: the Square Kilometer Array and Solar Energy Integration; Towards a zero-carbon footprint next generation telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Domingos; Ruiz, Valeriano; Silva, Manuel; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Santander-Vela, Juande; Maia, Dalmiro; Antón, Sonia; van Ardenne, Arnold; Vetter, Matthias; Kramer, Michael; Keller, Reinhard; Pereira, Nuno; Silva, Vitor

    2012-01-01

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will be the largest Global science project of the next two decades. It will encompass a sensor network dedicated to radioastronomy, covering two continents. It will be constructed in remote areas of South Africa and Australia, spreading over 3000Km, in high solar irradiance latitudes. Solar Power supply is therefore an option to power supply the SKA and contribute to a zero carbon footprint next generation telescope. Here we outline the major characteristics of the SKA and some innovation approaches on thermal solar energy Integration with SKA prototypes.

  4. IceCube: A Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, S.; IceCube Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector The IceCube CollaborationA Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector Spencer R. Klein, forlarge detector is to search for optical Cherenkov radiation

  5. The Era of Kilometer-Scale Neutrino Detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Halzen, Francis; Katz, Uli

    2013-01-01

    Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first imagined in the late 1950s; by the 1970s, it was realized that kilometer-scale neutrino detectors were required. The first such instrument, IceCube, transforms a cubic kilometer of deep and ultra-transparent Antarctic ice into a particle detector. KM3NeT, an instrument that aims to exploit several cubic kilometers of the deep Mediterranean sea as its detector medium, is in its final design stages. The scientific missions of these instruments include searching for sources of cosmic rays and for dark matter, observing Galactic supernova explosions, and studying the neutrinos themselves. Identifying the accelerators that produce Galacticmore »and extragalactic cosmic rays has been a priority mission of several generations of high-energy gamma-ray and neutrino telescopes; success has been elusive so far. Detecting the gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes associated with cosmic rays reaches a new watershed with the completion of IceCube, the first neutrino detector with sensitivity to the anticipated fluxes. In this paper, we will first revisit the rationale for constructing kilometer-scale neutrino detectors. We will subsequently recall the methods for determining the arrival direction, energy and flavor of neutrinos, and will subsequently describe the architecture of the IceCube and KM3NeT detectors.« less

  6. Topology of neutral hydrogen distribution with the Square Kilometer Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yougang; Wu, Fengquan; Chen, Xuelei; Wang, Xin; Kim, Juhan; Park, Changbom; Lee, Khee-Gan; Cen, Renyue

    2015-01-01

    Morphology of the complex HI gas distribution can be quantified by statistics like the Minkowski functionals, and can provide a way to statistically study the large scale structure in the HI maps both at low redshifts, and during the epoch of reionization (EoR). At low redshifts, the 21cm emission traces the underlying matter distribution. Topology of the HI gas distribution, as measured by the genus, could be used as a "standard ruler". This enables the determination of distance-redshift relation and also the discrimination of various models of dark energy and of modified gravity. The topological analysis is also sensitive to certain primordial non-Gaussian features. Compared with two-point statistics, the topological statistics are more robust against the nonlinear gravitational evolution, bias, and redshift-space distortion. The HI intensity map observation naturally avoids the sparse sampling distortion, which is an important systematic in optical galaxy survey. The large cosmic volume accessible to SKA w...

  7. MEASURING THE ABUNDANCE OF SUB-KILOMETER-SIZED KUIPER BELT OBJECTS USING STELLAR OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlichting, Hilke E. [Department of Earth and Space Science, UCLA, 595 Charles East Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Ofek, Eran O.; Gal-Yam, Avishay [Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, P.O. Box 26, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sari, Re'em [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Nelan, Edmund P.; Livio, Mario [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wenz, Michael [Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Muirhead, Philip [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 130-33, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Javanfar, Nikta, E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Physics, Physics Engineering and Astronomy, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2012-12-20

    We present here the analysis of about 19,500 new star hours of low ecliptic latitude observations (|b| {<=} 20 Degree-Sign ) obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope's Fine Guidance Sensors over a time span of more than nine years, which is in addition to the {approx}12, 000 star hours previously analyzed by Schlichting et al. Our search for stellar occultations by small Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) yielded one new candidate event corresponding to a body with a 530 {+-} 70 m radius at a distance of about 40 AU. Using bootstrap simulations, we estimate a probability of Almost-Equal-To 5% that this event is due to random statistical fluctuations within the new data set. Combining this new event with the single KBO occultation reported by Schlichting et al. we arrive at the following results: (1) the ecliptic latitudes of 6. Degree-Sign 6 and 14. Degree-Sign 4 of the two events are consistent with the observed inclination distribution of larger, 100-km-sized KBOs. (2) Assuming that small, sub-kilometer-sized KBOs have the same ecliptic latitude distribution as their larger counterparts, we find an ecliptic surface density of KBOs with radii larger than 250 m of N(r > 250 m) = 1.1{sup +1.5}{sub -0.7} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} deg{sup -2}; if sub-kilometer-sized KBOs have instead a uniform ecliptic latitude distribution for -20 Degree-Sign < b < 20 Degree-Sign then N(r > 250 m) = 4.4{sup +5.8}{sub -2.8} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} deg{sup -2}. This is the best measurement of the surface density of sub-kilometer-sized KBOs to date. (3) Assuming the KBO size distribution can be well described by a single power law given by N(> r){proportional_to}r{sup 1-q}, where N(> r) is the number of KBOs with radii greater than r, and q is the power-law index, we find q = 3.8 {+-} 0.2 and q = 3.6 {+-} 0.2 for a KBO ecliptic latitude distribution that follows the observed distribution for larger, 100-km-sized KBOs and a uniform KBO ecliptic latitude distribution for -20 Degree-Sign < b < 20 Degree-Sign , respectively. (4) Regardless of the exact power law, our results suggest that small KBOs are numerous enough to satisfy the required supply rate for the Jupiter family comets. (5) We can rule out a single power law below the break with q > 4.0 at 2{sigma}, confirming a strong deficit of sub-kilometer-sized KBOs compared to a population extrapolated from objects with r > 45 km. This suggests that small KBOs are undergoing collisional erosion and that the Kuiper Belt is a true analog to the dust producing debris disks observed around other stars.

  8. The Case for a Kilometer-Scale High-Energy Neutrino Detector: 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1996-05-02

    The objective of neutrino astronomy, born with the identification of thermonuclear fusion in the sun and the particle processes controlling the fate of a nearby supernova, is to build instruments which reach throughout and far beyond our Galaxy and make measurements relevant to cosmology, astrophysics, cosmic-ray and particle physics. These telescopes will push astronomy to wavelengths smaller than $10^{-14}$~cm by mapping the sky in high-energy neutrinos instead of high-energy photons to which the Universe is partially opaque. While a variety of collaborations are pioneering complementary methods by building neutrino detectors with effective area in excess of 0.01~km$^2$, we show here that the science dictates 1~km$^2$, or a 1~km$^3$ instrumented volume, as the natural scale of a high-energy neutrino telescope. The construction of a high-energy neutrino telescope therefore requires a huge volume of very transparent, deeply buried material such as ocean water or ice, which acts as the medium for detecting the particles. We will speculate on its architecture. The field is immersed in technology in the domain of particle physics to which many of its research goals are intellectually connected. With several thousand optical modules the scope of constructing a kilometer-scale instrument is similar to that of experiments presently being commissioned such as the SNO neutrino observatory in Canada and the Superkamiokande experiment in Japan.

  9. The Case for a Kilometer-Scale High Energy Neutrino Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1994-10-26

    Doing astronomy with photons of energies in excess of a GeV has turned out to be extremely challenging. Efforts are underway to develop instruments that may push astronomy to wavelengths smaller than $10^{-14}$~cm by mapping the sky in high energy neutrinos instead. Neutrino astronomy, born with the identification of thermonuclear fusion in the sun and the particle processes controlling the fate of a nearby supernova, will reach outside the galaxy and make measurements relevant to cosmology. The field is immersed in technology in the domains of particle physics to which many of its research goals are intellectually connected. To mind come the search for neutrino mass, cold dark matter (supersymmetric particles?) and the monopoles of the Standard Model. While a variety of collaborations are pioneering complementary methods by building telescopes with effective area in excess of 0.01~km$^2$, we show here that the natural scale of a high energy neutrino telescope is 1~km$^2$. With several thousand optical modules and a price tag unlikely to exceed 100 million dollars, the scope of a kilometer-scale instrument is similar to that of experiments presently being commissioned such as the SNO neutrino observatory in Canada and the Superkamiokande experiment in Japan.

  10. ALMA Observations of Asteroid 3 Juno at 60 Kilometer Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partnership, ALMA; Kneissl, R; Moullet, A; Brogan, C L; Fomalont, E B; Vlahakis, C; Asaki, Y; Barkats, D; Dent, W R F; Hills, R; Hirota, A; Hodge, J A; Impellizzeri, C M V; Liuzzo, E; Lucas, R; Marcelino, N; Matsushita, S; Nakanishi, K; Perez, L M; Phillips, N; Richards, A M S; Toledo, I; Aladro, R; Broguiere, D; Cortes, J R; Cortes, P C; Dhawan, V; Espada, D; Galarza, F; Garcia-Appadoo, D; Guzman-Ramirez, L; Hales, A S; Humphreys, E M; Jung, T; Kameno, S; Laing, R A; Leon, S; Marconi, G; Nikolic, B; Nyman, L -A; Radiszcz, M; Remijan, A; Rodon, J A; Sawada, T; Takahashi, S; Tilanus, R P J; Vilaro, B Vila; Watson, L C; Wiklind, T; de Gregorio, I; Di Francesco, J; Mangum, J; Francke, H; Gallardo, J; Garcia, J; Gonzalez, S; Hill, T; Kaminski, T; Kurono, Y; Lopez, C; Morales, F; Plarre, K; Randall, S; van kempen, T; Videla, L; Villard, E; Andreani, P; Hibbard, J E; Tatematsu, K

    2015-01-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 1.3 mm continuum images of the asteroid 3 Juno obtained with an angular resolution of 0.042 arcseconds (60 km at 1.97 AU). The data were obtained over a single 4.4 hr interval, which covers 60% of the 7.2 hr rotation period, approximately centered on local transit. A sequence of ten consecutive images reveals continuous changes in the asteroid's profile and apparent shape, in good agreement with the sky projection of the three-dimensional model of the Database of Asteroid Models from Inversion Techniques. We measure a geometric mean diameter of 259pm4 km, in good agreement with past estimates from a variety of techniques and wavelengths. Due to the viewing angle and inclination of the rotational pole, the southern hemisphere dominates all of the images. The median peak brightness temperature is 215pm13 K, while the median over the whole surface is 197pm15 K. With the unprecedented resolution of ALMA, we find that the brightness temperature varies ...

  11. 0 25 50 Miles 25 50 Kilometers0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Cedar R. Lake Washington SnoqualmieR. Skykomish R. Stillaguamish R. Skagit R. Lake Whatcom Baker Lake

  12. Adaptive Selective Learning for Automatic Identification of Sub-Kilometer Craters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    Martian terrain characterized by heterogeneous surface morphology. The experimental results demonstrate and present geological processes and provide the only tool for measuring rela- tive ages of observed geologic. Geologic stratigraphy based on manually collected databases has coarse spatial resolutions. Finer spatial

  13. Semi-supervised based Active Class Selection for Automatic Identification of Sub-Kilometer Craters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    characterized by heterogeneous surface morphology. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed about the past and present geological processes and provide the only tool to measuring relative ages of observed geologic formations. The size distribution of craters conforms to the power-law as large craters

  14. The ASNA formula : a new concept -- cost per passenger mile (kilometer)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasr, Asad

    1978-01-01

    The demand for air transport is affected by the usual extraneous factors, demographic, social and economic, as well as those falling properly within the sphere of the industry itself such as the quality of service, safety, ...

  15. Deformation processes involve systems of tens to hundreds of kilometers moving at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galland, Olivier

    presentations were threefold: to list the state-of-the-art image analysis tech- niques used in the laboratory-button "black boxes." Second, the group agreed to write a meth- odological review paper listing the main image for funding support. --kaRen leeveR,GeoForschungsZentrum,Pots- dam,Germany; olivieR galland,Physics of Geo

  16. Fabric Analysis of Survivor Clasts in the Southwest Deforming Zone of the San Andreas Fault at Three Kilometers Depth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loftin, Aileen

    2014-09-24

    The mechanisms responsible for aseismic creep along the central section of the San Andreas Fault are not well understood. Evidence for both pressure- and chemical-dependent microprocesses of creep have been reported. Here, the kinematics...

  17. High strain-rate deformation fabrics characterize a kilometers-thick Paleozoic fault zone in the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, central Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitmeyer, Steven J.

    in the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, central Argentina Steven J. Whitmeyer*, Carol Simpson Department of Earth´rdoba, central Argentina. The NNW-striking, east-dipping `Tres Arboles' fault zone extends for at least 250 km

  18. A l u m n i C a m p u sE N E R G I E (89 Kilometer nordwestlich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nejdl, Wolfgang

    und 15 Insti- Einleitung Ziel der Bundesregierung ist es, bis zum Jahr 2030 Offshore- Windparks mit- wicklung fiel im Herbst 2008 mit dem Bau des Umspann- werks für das Offshore-Test- feld alpha ventus- tioniert ist (Bild 2). Ab Frühjahr 2009 startet hier der Bau von sechs Offshore- Windenergieanlagen (OWEA

  19. Johnson(-like)-Noise-Kirchhoff-Loop Based Secure Classical Communicator Characteristics, for Ranges of Two to Two Thousand Kilometers, via Model-Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Mingesz; Zoltan Gingl; Laszlo B. Kish

    2012-03-14

    A pair of Kirchhoff-Loop-Johnson(-like)-Noise communicators, which is able to work over variable ranges, was designed and built. Tests have been carried out on a model-line performance characteristics were obtained for ranges beyond the ranges of any known direct quantum communication channel and they indicate unrivalled signal fidelity and security performance of the exchanged raw key bits. This simple device has single-wire secure key generation and sharing rates of 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 bit/second for corresponding copper wire diameters/ranges of 21 mm / 2000 km, 7 mm / 200 km, 2.3 mm / 20 km, and 0.7 mm / 2 km, respectively and it performs with 0.02% raw-bit error rate (99.98 % fidelity). The raw-bit security of this practical system significantly outperforms raw-bit quantum security. Current injection breaking tests show zero bit eavesdropping ability without triggering the alarm signal, therefore no multiple measurements are needed to build an error statistics to detect the eavesdropping as in quantum communication. Wire resistance based breaking tests of Bergou-Scheuer-Yariv type give an upper limit of eavesdropped raw bit ratio of 0.19 % and this limit is inversely proportional to the sixth power of cable diameter. Hao's breaking method yields zero (below measurement resolution) eavesdropping information.

  20. Neotectonics, geodesy, and seismic hazard in the Northern Walker Lane of Western North America: Thirty kilometers of crustal shear and no strike-slip?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , University of Nevada, Reno 89557, United States b Nevada Geodetic Laboratory, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 89557, United States c Nevada Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno 89557, United States a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 2 January 2012 Received in revised

  1. Determining Home Range and Preferred Habitat of Feral Horses on the Nevada National Security Site Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Ashley V.

    2014-05-30

    Feral horses (Equus caballus) are free-roaming descendants of domesticated horses and legally protected by the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, which mandates how feral horses and burros should be managed and protected on federal lands. Using a geographic information system to determine the home range and suitable habitat of feral horses on the federally managed Nevada National Security Site can enable wildlife biologists in making best management practice recommendations. Home range was estimated at 88.1 square kilometers. Site suitability was calculated for elevation, forage, slope, water presence and horse observations. These variables were combined in successive iterations into one polygon. Suitability rankings established that 85 square kilometers are most suitable habitat, with 2,052 square kilometers of good habitat 1,252 square kilometers of fair habitat and 122 square kilometers of least suitable habitat.

  2. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 71 Modeling the Delivery of Large Wood to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 71 Modeling the Delivery of Large Wood forest structure and predict the delivery of wood to over 55 stream kilometers in a 28-square kilometer = 0.45). The model predicted that 83 percent of wood delivered to streams originated within 20 meters

  3. Compost marketing guidelines for solid municipal waste management in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ellen, M. Eng. (Ellen C.). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    India has a waste problem. With the world's second largest population at 1.252 billion individuals, a population density of 382 persons per square kilometer and consumer behavior demanding a higher standard of life and ...

  4. Fish population and behavior revealed by instantaneous continental-shelf scale imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symonds, Deanelle T

    2008-01-01

    The application of a technique to instantaneously image and continuously monitor the abundance, spatial distribution, and behavior of fish populations over thousands of square kilometers using Ocean Acoustic Waveguide ...

  5. arXiv:1012.3507v1 [astroph.IM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford III, Fronefield

    arXiv:1012.3507v1 [astro­ph.IM] 16 Dec 2010 Pulsars with the Australian Square Kilometre Array of Amsterdam, 1098 SJ Amsterdam, Netherlands #12; Abstract. The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) is currently being built at the proposed site for the Square Kilometer

  6. Artificial ozone holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. N. Dolya

    2014-10-18

    This article considers an opportunity of disinfecting a part of the Earth surface, occupying a large area of ten thousand square kilometers. The sunlight will cause dissociation of molecular bromine into atoms; each bromine atom kills thirty thousand molecules of ozone. Each bromine plate has a mass of forty milligrams grams and destroys ozone in the area of hundred square meters. Thus, to form the ozone hole over the area of ten thousand square kilometers, it is required to have the total mass of bromine equal to the following four tons.

  7. Eric J. Korpela Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korpela, Eric J.

    for Extraterrestrial Intelligence with the Square Kilometre Array," in [Astronomy and Astrophsics with the Square Kilometer Array], Proc. Sci. 116 (Dec. 2014) arXiv:1412.4867 ADS:2014arXiv1412.4867S . 111. Pingel, N. M

  8. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . With Louisianas coastal wetlands converting to open water at a rate of 25-35 square miles (65-91 square kilometers to provide a new fur resource and to control problem plants such as the water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes in the 1950s, the Louisiana legislature promoted fur harvest by offering a $0.25 bounty in 16 parishes

  9. Redevelopment and smart growth at Assembly Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, Alice (Alice Augusta)

    2006-01-01

    The story of Assembly Square is not yet finished. To tell the complete story of Assembly Square would require much more time to write than I had, and more time to read than the reader would likely care to devote. An earlier ...

  10. ROBOT CALIBRATION USING LEAST-SQUARES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanagan, Randy

    ROBOT CALIBRATION USING LEAST-SQUARES AND P OLAR-DEC OMP O SITION FILTERING Gregory Ioannldes 1-axis robotic manipulators. The method proposed by the authors is based on a least-square estimation of the Yaskawa Motoman Robot was calibrated. The measurements of the Cartesian coordinates of points were

  11. Hidden Risks In The CDO - Squared Market 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Andrew T; Clunie, James; Bhatt, Rajiv

    2005-01-01

    We show that there are risks (default location risk and overlap risk) unique to CDO-squared structures. These risks may not be well-understood by investors and credit rating agencies. As a result, the tranche of a CDO-squared ...

  12. Elmo bumpy square plasma confinement device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owen, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an Elmo bumpy type plasma confinement device having a polygonal configuration of closed magnet field lines for improved plasma confinement. In the preferred embodiment, the device is of a square configuration which is referred to as an Elmo bumpy square (EBS). The EBS is formed by four linear magnetic mirror sections each comprising a plurality of axisymmetric assemblies connected in series and linked by 90/sup 0/ sections of a high magnetic field toroidal solenoid type field generating coils. These coils provide corner confinement with a minimum of radial dispersion of the confined plasma to minimize the detrimental effects of the toroidal curvature of the magnetic field. Each corner is formed by a plurality of circular or elliptical coils aligned about the corner radius to provide maximum continuity in the closing of the magnetic field lines about the square configuration confining the plasma within a vacuum vessel located within the various coils forming the square configuration confinement geometry.

  13. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Collingwood CFB Borden 0 10 20 Kilometers Area = 521,900 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Population

  14. BIOTROPICA 35(1): 125130 2003 Benthic Community Structure and Invertebrate Drift in a Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benstead, Jon

    island systems and continental landmasses (often involving distances of hundreds of kilometers) results

  15. Tsukuba -February 2007G.Vali What will the doctor prescribe ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vali, Gabor

    Mountain landslide, located 5 kilometers above the Ertan hydroelectric power station along Yalong River

  16. The Individualist Court: Naked Public School, Clothed Public Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weissenberg, Brian Michael

    2012-01-01

    Bradley, G. V. (2009). The Public Square: Naked No More? InC. Wolfe, The Naked Public Square Reconsidered (pp. 1-31).56. Glendon, M. A. (2009). The Naked Public Square Today: A

  17. The Square Root Depth Wave Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin C. Cotter; Darryl D. Holm; James R. Percival

    2009-12-11

    We introduce a set of coupled equations for multilayer water waves that removes the ill-posedness of the multilayer Green-Naghdi (MGN) equations in the presence of shear. The new well-posed equations are Hamiltonian and in the absence of imposed background shear they retain the same travelling wave solutions as MGN. We call the new model the Square Root Depth equations, from the modified form of their kinetic energy of vertical motion. Our numerical results show how the Square Root Depth equations model the effects of multilayer wave propagation and interaction, with and without shear.

  18. Least Squares : MotivationLeast Squares : Motivation SDA/LMS assume a probabilistic model underlying the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santhanam, Balu

    Least Squares : MotivationLeast Squares : Motivation SDA/LMS assume a probabilistic model underlying the optimal filtering problem. SDA/LMS assume access to ensemble statistics and multiple realizations. SDA/LMS assume ergodicity in the absence of multiple realizations. SDA/LMS speed of convergence

  19. The Group of symmetries of a square There are eight symmetries of a square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Karen E.

    The Group of symmetries of a square There are eight symmetries of a square: e = no motion r1) a product of two of its subgroups? 5. How many different (non-isomorphic) groups of order eight can you) a = reflection over anti-diagonal (the line y = -x) Complete the Cayley Table for the dihedral group D4: e r1 r2

  20. Least square fitting with one parameter less

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernd A. Berg

    2015-05-28

    It is shown that whenever the multiplicative normalization of a fitting function is not known, least square fitting by $\\chi^2$ minimization can be performed with one parameter less than usual by converting the normalization parameter into a function of the remaining parameters and the data.

  1. Robust Least Square Semidefinite Programming with Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-07-14

    Jul 13, 2013 ... In this paper, we consider a least square semidefinite programming problem .... and handling uncertainty, and has natural statistical interpretation. On .... of the paper, we use B(X, r) ? Sn to denote the closed ball centered at X ...

  2. Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations Residuals Correlation and Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations Residuals Topic 3 Correlation and Regression Linear Regression I 1 / 15 #12;Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations Residuals Outline Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations Residuals 2 / 15 #12;Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations

  3. INVERSE-SQUARE LAW TESTS 1 TESTS OF THE GRAVITATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    INVERSE-SQUARE LAW TESTS 1 TESTS OF THE GRAVITATIONAL INVERSE-SQUARE LAW E.G.Adelberger, B-1560 KEYWORDS: gravitation, experimental tests of inverse-square law, quantum gravity, extra dimensions ABSTRACT: We review recent experimental tests of the gravitational inverse-square law, and the wide variety

  4. Ordering and Dynamics of Vibrated Hard Squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Walsh; Narayanan Menon

    2015-10-02

    We study an experimental system of hard granular squares in two dimensions, energized by vibration. The interplay of order in the orientations and positions of anisotropic particles allows for a rich set of phases. We measure the structure and dynamics of steady states as a function of particle density. This allows us to identify a progression of phases in which a low density isotropic fluid gives way to a phase with tetratic orientational order, short-range translational correlations, and slowed rotational dynamics. In this range of density we also observe a coupling between the orientational order and bond-orientational order. At higher densities, the particles freeze into a translationally and orientationally ordered square crystalline phase in which translational diffusion is suppressed.

  5. The Spanish Square Kilometre Array White Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulido, J A Acosta; Alberdi, A; Alcolea, J; Alfaro, E J; Alonso-Herrero, A; Anglada, G; Arnalte-Mur, P; Ascasibar, Y; Ascaso, B; Azulay, R; Bachiller, R; Baez-Rubio, A; Battaner, E; Blasco, J; Brook, C B; Bujarrabal, V; Busquet, G; Caballero-Garcia, M D; Carrasco-Gonzalez, C; Casares, J; Castro-Tirado, A J; Colina, L; Colomer, F; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; del Olmo, A; Desmurs, J-F; Diego, J M; Dominguez-Tenreiro, R; Estalella, R; Fernandez-Soto, A; Florido, E; Font, J; Font, J A; Fuente, A; Garcia-Burillo, S; Garcia-Benito, R; Garcia-Lorenzo, B; de Paz, A Gil; Girart, J M; Goicoechea, J R; Gomez, J F; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Gonzalez-Martin, O; Gonzalez-Serrano, J I; Gorgas, J; Gorosabel, J; Guijarro, A; Guirado, J C; Hernandez-Garcia, L; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Herrero-Illana, R; Hu, Y-D; Huelamo, N; Huertas-Company, M; Iglesias-Paramo, J; Jeong, S; Jimenez-Serra, I; Knapen, J H; Lineros, R A; Lisenfeld, U; Marcaide, J M; Marquez, I; Marti, J; Marti, J M; Martinez-Gonzalez, E; Martin-Pintado, J; Marti-Vidal, I; Masegosa, J; Mayen-Gijon, J M; Mezcua, M; Mimica, S/ Migliari P; Moldon, J; Morata, O; Negueruela, I; Oates, S R; Osorio, M; Palau, A; Paredes, J M; Perea, J; Perez-Gonzalez, P G; Perez-Montero, E; Perez-Torres, M A; Perucho, M; Planelles, S; Pons, J A; Prieto, A; Quilis, V; Ramirez-Moreta, P; Almeida, C Ramos; Rea, N; Ribo, M; Rioja, M J; Espinosa, J M Rodriguez; Ros, E; Rubiño-Martin, J A; Ruiz-Granados, B; Sabater, J; Sanchez, M A P; Usero, A; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Vidal-Garcia, A; Vielva, P; Vilchez, J; Zhang, B-B

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is called to revolutionise essentially all areas of Astrophysics. With a collecting area of about a square kilometre, the SKA will be a transformational instrument, and its scientific potential will go beyond the interests of astronomers. Its technological challenges and huge cost requires a multinational effort, and Europe has recognised this by putting the SKA on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). The Spanish SKA White Book is the result of the coordinated effort of 119 astronomers from 40 different research centers. The book shows the enormous scientific interest of the Spanish astronomical community in the SKA and warrants an optimum scientific exploitation of the SKA by Spanish researchers, if Spain enters the SKA project.

  6. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "hybrid" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  7. Optical inverse-square displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howe, R.D.; Kychakoff, G.

    1989-09-12

    This invention comprises an optical displacement sensor that uses the inverse-square attenuation of light reflected from a diffused surface to calculate the distance from the sensor to the reflecting surface. Light emerging from an optical fiber or the like is directed onto the surface whose distance is to be measured. The intensity I of reflected light is angle dependent, but within a sufficiently small solid angle it falls off as the inverse square of the distance from the surface. At least a pair of optical detectors are mounted to detect the reflected light within the small solid angle, their ends being at different distances R and R + [Delta]R from the surface. The distance R can then be found in terms of the ratio of the intensity measurements and the separation length as given in an equation. 10 figs.

  8. The Low-Frequency ArrayThe Low-Frequency Array HeinoHeino FalckeFalcke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    LOFARLOFAR The Low-Frequency ArrayThe Low-Frequency Array HeinoHeino FalckeFalcke LOFAR of the Netherlands plus Germany · Frequencies: 30 - 240 MHz · 10% Square Kilometer Array (SKA) prototype at low Falcke et al. (2005), Nature, Vol. 435, p. 313 #12;Low-Frequency Observations of the Moon · Lunar radio

  9. Author's personal copy Model-based control of multiphase flow in subsurface oil reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    of meters. They are typically in the order of tens of meters thick and cover sev- eral square kilometers this primary recovery phase ends, and it will be necessary to inject water or gas into the reservoir in the oil industry under various names, such as `smart fields', `intelligent fields', `real-time reservoir

  10. Modeling Sediment and Wood Storage and Dynamics in Small Mountainous Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    85 Modeling Sediment and Wood Storage and Dynamics in Small Mountainous Watersheds Stephen T controls on supply and transport of sediment and wood in a small (approximately two square kilometers) basin in the Oregon Coast Range, typical of streams at the interface between episodic sediment and wood

  11. 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Purpose and Scope of MARSSIM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Department of Energy (DOE) are responsible--ranging in size from Federal weapons- production facilities covering hundreds of square kilometers to the nuclear specific regulatory limit) was met. In MARSSIM, this demonstration is given the name "final status survey

  12. Arctic Whale Ecology Study (ARCWEST)/ Chukchi Acoustics, Oceanography, and Zooplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (AKC 108) November 2014 #12;ARCWEST 2014 Cruise Report M12PG00021 (AKC 108) 2 of 51 This report set in 2007 (4.30 million square kilometers). This area was more than 50% less than that of two information on the year-round presence of large whales is needed in the Chukchi Sea planning area. Timing

  13. (ARCTIC WHALE ECOLOGY STUDY) 2013 Cruise Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of 51 This report was prepared by the ARCWEST principal investigators: Nancy A. Friday1 , Ph.D., Phillip.30 million square kilometers). This area was more than 50% less than that of two decades ago. The speed-round presence of large whales is needed in the Chukchi Sea planning area. Timing and location of whale

  14. WORLD RIVERS REVIEW June 2014 5 or over 200 consecutive days, indigenous Penan, Kenyah and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of Renewable Energy ("SCORE") is a component of Malaysia's nation- al development plan that proposes buildingBaramDam,inSarawak,Malaysia. They have successfully stalled the construction of this project, which would flood 400 square kilometers and environmental groups in Sarawak, argue that there is no need for such a destructive project when the nearby

  15. REVISED DRAFT September, 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    building an island of about 5 square kilometers (actually 511 hectares or 1308 acres) in an average at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the author of Airport Systems Planning as well as three other texts on engineering systems analysis. As the Chairman of M.I.T.'s Technology and Policy Program, he spent his 1990

  16. Topography of the Lunar Poles from Radar Interferometry: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margot, Jean-Luc

    Topography of the Lunar Poles from Radar Interferometry: A Survey of Cold Trap Locations J. L. Margot,1 * D. B. Campbell,1 R. F. Jurgens,2 M. A. Slade2 Detailed topographic maps of the lunar poles are 1030 and 2550 square kilometers for the north and south poles, respectively. Topographic depressions

  17. Transient Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fender, Rob; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Murphy, Tara; Deller, Adam; Paragi, Zsolt; Chatterjee, Shami

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the possibilities for transient and variable-source astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array. While subsequent chapters focus on the astrophysics of individual events, we focus on the broader picture, and how to maximise the science coming from the telescope. The SKA as currently designed will be a fantastic and ground-breaking facility for radio transient studies, but the scientifc yield will be dramatically increased by the addition of (i) near-real-time commensal searches of data streams for events, and (ii) on occasion, rapid robotic response to Target-of-Opprtunity style triggers.

  18. Solar Energy Squared, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH JumpSlough HeatMccoyProject-EnergySquared, LLC Jump

  19. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01

    and James B. Greenberg. "Fight for the West: A PoliticalEvery Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert AEvery Square Inch: A Fight for the California Desert by

  20. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-01-11

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  1. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-07-26

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  2. Augmented classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2004-02-03

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  3. March 2, 2015 Lecture 9 Least Square Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sleijpen, Gerard

    -inverse of A. In particular, the minimal norm minimal residual solution exists. (d) Damped least squares: b to the ones of the original matrix? (b) Explain why the damped least squares problem is less sensitive to noise. (c) The error in x in the damped least square problem (with noise on b) has two components, one

  4. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.

    2004-03-23

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The hybrid method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  5. Classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An improved classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis method that adds spectral shapes describing non-calibrated components and system effects (other than baseline corrections) present in the analyzed mixture to the prediction phase of the method. These improvements decrease or eliminate many of the restrictions to the CLS-type methods and greatly extend their capabilities, accuracy, and precision. One new application of PACLS includes the ability to accurately predict unknown sample concentrations when new unmodeled spectral components are present in the unknown samples. Other applications of PACLS include the incorporation of spectrometer drift into the quantitative multivariate model and the maintenance of a calibration on a drifting spectrometer. Finally, the ability of PACLS to transfer a multivariate model between spectrometers is demonstrated.

  6. HI Science with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be a formidable instrument for the detailed study of neutral hydrogen (HI) in external galaxies and in our own Galaxy and Local Group. The sensitivity of the SKA, its wide receiver bands, and the relative freedom from radio frequency interference at the SKA sites will allow the imaging of substantial number of high-redshift galaxies in HI for the first time. It will also allow imaging of galaxies throughout the Local Volume at resolutions of <100 pc and detailed investigations of galaxy disks and the transition between disks, halos and the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the Milky Way and external galaxies. Together with deep optical and millimetre/sub-mm imaging, this will have a profound effect on our understanding of the formation, growth and subsequent evolution of galaxies in different environments. This paper provides an introductory text to a series of nine science papers describing the impact of the SKA in the field of HI and galaxy evolution. We propose a nested...

  7. 2-D weighted least-squares phase unwrapping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Placitas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    Weighted values of interferometric signals are unwrapped by determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for unweighted values of the interferometric signals; and then determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals by preconditioned conjugate gradient methods using the unweighted solutions as preconditioning values. An output is provided that is representative of the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals.

  8. 2-D weighted least-squares phase unwrapping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ghiglia, D.C.; Romero, L.A.

    1995-06-13

    Weighted values of interferometric signals are unwrapped by determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for unweighted values of the interferometric signals; and then determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals by preconditioned conjugate gradient methods using the unweighted solutions as preconditioning values. An output is provided that is representative of the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals. 6 figs.

  9. FIRST-ORDER SYSTEM LEAST SQUARES FOR SECOND-ORDER ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    convection–diffusion–reaction equations in a unified way and also admits an efficient. multilevel solver, historically a missing ingredient in least-squares ...

  10. Derivation of the coefficient squared probability law in quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey Blood

    2013-06-02

    If one assumes there is probability of perception in quantum mechanics, then unitarity dictates that it must have the coefficient squared form, in agreement with experiment.

  11. Cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Blake; Filipe Abdalla; Sarah Bridle; Steve Rawlings

    2004-09-13

    We argue that the Square Kilometre Array has the potential to make both redshift (HI) surveys and radio continuum surveys that will revolutionize cosmological studies, provided that it has sufficient instantaneous field-of-view that these surveys can cover a hemisphere in a timescale ~1 yr. Adopting this assumption, we focus on two key experiments which will yield fundamental new measurements in cosmology, characterizing the properties of the mysterious dark energy which dominates the dynamics of today's Universe. Experiment I will map out ~10^9 HI galaxies to redshift z~1.5, providing the premier measurement of the clustering power spectrum of galaxies: accurately delineating the acoustic oscillations and the `turnover'. Experiment II will quantify the cosmic shear distortion of ~10^10 radio continuum sources, determining a precise power spectrum of the dark matter, and its growth as a function of cosmic epoch. We contrast the performance of the SKA in precision cosmology with that of other facilities which will, probably or possibly, be available on a similar timescale. We conclude that data from the SKA will yield transformational science as the direct result of four key features: (i) the immense cosmic volumes probed, exceeding future optical redshift surveys by more than an order of magnitude; (ii) well-controlled systematic effects such as the narrow `k-space window function' for Experiment I and the accurately-known `point-spread function' for Experiment II; (iii) the ability to measure with high precision large-scale modes in the clustering power spectra, for which nuisance effects such as non-linear structure growth, peculiar velocities and `galaxy bias' are minimised; and (iv) different degeneracies between key parameters to those which are inherent in the CMB.

  12. Characterization of some binary words with few squares Golnaz Badkobeha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochem, Pascal

    Characterization of some binary words with few squares Golnaz Badkobeha , Pascal Ochemb a smaller morphisms to define these two square-free morphic words and we give such characterizations for six of patterns, and a finite set F of factors over k, we say that P F characterizes a morphic word w over k if w

  13. TheSquareKilometreArray ProjectDescriptionforAstro2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    TheSquareKilometreArray ProjectDescriptionforAstro2010 ResponsetoProgramPrioritizationPanels 1Campbell,Director,NAIC FredLo,Director,NRAO #12;1 Summary The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a revolutionary telescope for phased deployment. Phase 1 comprising low-and-mid frequency arrays will be funding-ready early next

  14. The Parents of Jacobi's Four Squares Theorem Are Unique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Kenneth Stuart

    The Parents of Jacobi's Four Squares Theorem Are Unique Kenneth S. Williams Abstract. Jacobi's four-to-sum identities in a single complex variable q from which Jacobi's four squares formula can be deduced by equating such identities are known. Perhaps the most famous product-to-sum identity was given by Jacobi in 1829, in his

  15. Random Disease on the Square Grid J ozsef Balogh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balogh, Jozsef

    a disease process. The initial configuration is called contagious or successful if the corresponding) squares in a contagious configuration. The solution of the initial exercise is the following: Fact. [Folklore] G(n) = n. Proof. If we paint the squares of a diagonal black, it will be a contagious

  16. Modeling Suburban and Rural-Residential Development Beyond the Urban Fringe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newburn, David A.; Berck, Peter

    2006-01-01

    1 kilometer ring around the sewer and water service areas (SWSA) boundaries. FIGURE 2: Sewer and Water Service Area1 kilometer ring around the sewer and water service areas (

  17. The distribution of prime numbers on the square root spiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry K. Hahn; Robert Sachs

    2008-01-09

    Prime Numbers clearly accumulate on defined spiral graphs,which run through the Square Root Spiral. These spiral graphs can be assigned to different spiral-systems, in which all spiral-graphs have the same direction of rotation and the same -second difference- between the numbers, which lie on these spiral-graphs. A mathematical analysis shows, that these spiral graphs are caused exclusively by quadratic polynomials. For example the well known Euler Polynomial x2+x+41 appears on the Square Root Spiral in the form of three spiral-graphs, which are defined by three different quadratic polynomials. All natural numbers,divisible by a certain prime factor, also lie on defined spiral graphs on the Square Root Spiral (or Spiral of Theodorus, or Wurzelspirale). And the Square Numbers 4, 9, 16, 25, 36 even form a highly three-symmetrical system of three spiral graphs, which divides the square root spiral into three equal areas. Fibonacci number sequences also play a part in the structure of the Square Root Spiral. With the help of the Number-Spiral, described by Mr. Robert Sachs, a comparison can be drawn between the Square Root Spiral and the Ulam Spiral. The shown sections of his study of the number spiral contain diagrams, which are related to my analysis results, especially in regards to the distribution of prime numbers.

  18. TEXT THOMAS BHRKE Foto:SPLAgenturFocus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falge, Eva

    200000 Kilometer unter der Oberflä- che. Anders als bei der Erde, wo es hauptsächlich an den beiden Polen

  19. SQUARE SUMMABLE POWER SERIES Louis de Branges Preface ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1911-01-10

    The space C(z) of square summable power series is the set of power series ...... model of the linear system is constructed in a Hilbert space of power series with ...

  20. Recollecting history : songs, flags and a Syrian square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergie, Lina, 1974-

    2003-01-01

    Symbols have played a major role in the development of a Syrian national identity since the beginning of the 20th century. These representations are national, official, and/or public (flag, song, and square), that are ...

  1. An improved method for weighted least squares IIR filter design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davila-Pazmino, Javier

    1999-01-01

    Recently, a new method for IIR weighted least squares filter design has been proposed. In this method, the problem of approximating a desired frequency response using a rational function is solved using an iterative approach. ...

  2. Square Root of Metric: The Geometry Background of Unified Theory?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-Sheng Li

    2015-09-29

    We use the square root of inverse metric described by $l=u^{\\dagger} \\gamma^{a} u \\theta_{a}$ construct an $U(4)$ gauge invariant, locally Lorentz invariant and generally covariant Lagrangian $\\mathcal{L}=\

  3. Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. G. Adelberger; B. R. Heckel; A. E. Nelson

    2003-07-22

    We review recent experimental tests of the gravitational inverse-square law and the wide variety of theoretical considerations that suggest the law may break down in experimentally accessible regions.

  4. Least Soft-thresold Squares Tracking Dalian University of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    Least Soft-thresold Squares Tracking Dong Wang Dalian University of Technology wangdong.ice@gmail.com Huchuan Lu Dalian University of Technology lhchuan@dlut.edu.cn Ming-Hsuan Yang University of California

  5. Community, space, and performance : a public stage in Central Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Sola, David Theodore

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis I strive to explore the question, "what is good architecture?" through the design of a facility for formal and informal musical and theatrical performance. The site for this project is in Central Square, ...

  6. 2D barrier in a superconducting niobium square

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joya, Miryam R. Barba-ortega, J.; Sardella, Edson

    2014-11-05

    The presence of barriers changes the vortex structure in superconducting Nb square in presence of a uniform applied magnetic field. The Cooper pair configurations in a mesoscopics superconducting square of Nb with a barrier are calculated within the nonlinear Ginzburg Landau equations. We predict the nucleation of multi-vortex states into the sample and a soft entry of the magnetic field inside and around into the barrier. A novel and non-conventional vortex configurations occurs at determined magnetic field.

  7. A Least-Squares Transport Equation Compatible with Voids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Jon [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Peterson, Jacob [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Morel, Jim [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Ragusa, Jean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Wang, Yaqi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Standard second-order self-adjoint forms of the transport equation, such as the even-parity, odd-parity, and self-adjoint angular flux equation, cannot be used in voids. Perhaps more important, they experience numerical convergence difficulties in near-voids. Here we present a new form of a second-order self-adjoint transport equation that has an advantage relative to standard forms in that it can be used in voids or near-voids. Our equation is closely related to the standard least-squares form of the transport equation with both equations being applicable in a void and having a nonconservative analytic form. However, unlike the standard least-squares form of the transport equation, our least-squares equation is compatible with source iteration. It has been found that the standard least-squares form of the transport equation with a linear-continuous finite-element spatial discretization has difficulty in the thick diffusion limit. Here we extensively test the 1D slab-geometry version of our scheme with respect to void solutions, spatial convergence rate, and the intermediate and thick diffusion limits. We also define an effective diffusion synthetic acceleration scheme for our discretization. Our conclusion is that our least-squares Sn formulation represents an excellent alternative to existing second-order Sn transport formulations

  8. Organic light-emitting diodes from homoleptic square planar complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omary, Mohammad A

    2013-11-12

    Homoleptic square planar complexes [M(N.LAMBDA.N).sub.2], wherein two identical N.LAMBDA.N bidentate anionic ligands are coordinated to the M(II) metal center, including bidentate square planar complexes of triazolates, possess optical and electrical properties that make them useful for a wide variety of optical and electrical devices and applications. In particular, the complexes are useful for obtaining white or monochromatic organic light-emitting diodes ("OLEDs"). Improved white organic light emitting diode ("WOLED") designs have improved efficacy and/or color stability at high brightness in single- or two-emitter white or monochrome OLEDs that utilize homoleptic square planar complexes, including bis[3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazolato]platinum(II) ("Pt(ptp).sub.2").

  9. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  10. Quantum dynamics of relativistic bosons through nonminimal vector square potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Oliveira, Luiz P

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of relativistic scalar bosons through nonminimal vector square (well and barrier) potentials is studied in the Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau (DKP) formalism. We show that the problem can be mapped in effective Schrodinger equations for a component of the DKP spinor. An oscillatory transmission coefficient is found and there is total reflection. Additionally, the energy spectrum of bound states is obtained and reveals the Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect, for specific conditions the potential lodges bound states of particles and antiparticles. Comments about the vector bosons problem subject to square potentials are present.

  11. Surface Mean-Square Amplitudes of Vibration for Nacl 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEN, TS; Alldredg, GP; Allen, Roland E.; WETTE, FWD.

    1972-01-01

    " in low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). In the present paper we report calculations of the mean-square ampli- tudes and mean-square velocities for the (100) surface of NaC1. We will distinguish the Na' and Cl ions by a la- bel w and use a label... expressions coth[If&o, (j)/2ks T] ~,(q) x coth h'tc (q) 'l B M? is the mass of an ion labeled by w, N is the number of values of the two-dimensional wave vec- tor q in the summation, P is a label which distin- guishes the different vibrational modes...

  12. Digitally controlled low frequency square wave electronic ballast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and the Boost converter is commonly used. However the boost output DC voltage has to be set to be greater tha and the second is a full-bridge converter (FB) used for both ignition and square wave drive. Ignition is achieved as a resonant inverter. After ignition the converter operates as a LFSW inverter by controlling the FB to act

  13. An Oblivious Transfer Protocol with Log-Squared Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    An Oblivious Transfer Protocol with Log-Squared Communication Helger Lipmaa 1 Cybernetica AS, Lai 6-computation and communication (k · log2 n + · log n), where k is a possibly non-constant security parameter. The new proto- col communication and is private in the standard complexity-theoretic model. Keywords. Computationally

  14. An Oblivious Transfer Protocol with LogSquared Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    An Oblivious Transfer Protocol with Log­Squared Communication Helger Lipmaa 1 Cybernetica AS, Lai 6­computation and communication #(k · log 2 n + # · log n), where k is a possibly non­constant security parameter. The new proto the same asymptotic communication and is private in the standard complexity­theoretic model. Keywords

  15. Kronecker Square Roots and The Block vec Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignacio Ojeda

    2013-11-09

    Using the block vec matrix, I give a necessary and sufficient condition for factorization of a matrix into the Kronecker product of two other matrices. As a consequence, I obtain an elementary algorithmic procedure to decide whether a matrix has a square root for the Kronecker product.

  16. Rectilinear Glass-Cut Dissections of Rectangles to Squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urrutia, Jorge

    Rectilinear Glass-Cut Dissections of Rectangles to Squares Jurek Czyzowicz§ czyzowic is made using only rectilinear glass-cuts, i.e., vertical or horizontal straight-line cuts separating pieces into two. 1 Introduction A glass-cut of a rectangle is a cut by a straight-line segment

  17. On efficient estimation of densities for sums of squared observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schick, Anton

    On efficient estimation of densities for sums of squared observations Anton Schick and Wolfgang for each i = 1, . . . , m. Under appropriate functional versions of these conditions, Schick and Wefelmeyer function spaces. The research of Anton Schick was partially supported by NSF Grant DMS 0906551. 1 #12

  18. Latin-square three-dimensional gage master

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, L.

    1981-05-12

    A gage master for coordinate measuring machines has an nxn array of objects distributed in the Z coordinate utilizing the concept of a Latin square experimental design. Using analysis of variance techniques, the invention may be used to identify sources of error in machine geometry and quantify machine accuracy.

  19. LEAST-SQUARES METHODS FOR LINEAR ELASTICITY 1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SIAM (#1) 1035 2001 Apr 10 12:32:38

    2004-06-03

    not degrade when the material properties approach the incompressible limit. Least-squares ..... the energy norm is equivalent to the H1 norm for a fixed ?. ... of the displacement has a different scale from the displacement itself for large ?. 3. ..... Nevertheless, there may be a possible reluctance in the engineering community.

  20. Least-Squares Analysis of Short-Term Selection Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Bruce

    statistical machinery for evaluating selec- tion experiments and then assesses the success (or failure and design (use of control populations, optimal least-squares designs, BLUP/REML estimation, Bayesian the breeders' equation predicts selection response. The statistical machinery developed in the first part

  1. SQUARE ROOTS WITH MANY GOOD APPROXIMANTS Andrej Dujella1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dujella, Andrej

    of Zagreb, Bijenicka cesta 30, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia duje@math.hr Vinko Petricevi´c Dinarski put 1i, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia vinko@vip.hr Abstract Let d be a positive integer that is not a perfect square The first author was supported by the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports, Republic of Croatia, grant

  2. Morphology and seismic stratigraphy of the Toyama deep sea fan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, David Barton

    1990-01-01

    with a surface area greater than 108, 000 square kilometers. Deposits of this Quaternary turbidite system range in thickness from less than 150 m to more than 750 m. The meandering Toyama Deep Sea Channel extends northward from the central coast.... The Toyama Deep Sea Channel is a remarkable feature, extending 550 km in a northerly direction from the central coast of Honshu. Seismic and bathymetry data collected over the past two decades are used to provide the most accurate description to date...

  3. Application of the 2-D Continuous Wavelet Transforms for Characterization of Geological and Geophysical Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuong, Au K

    2014-05-05

    continuous wavelet transforms to imag- ing of Shatsky Rise plateau using marine seismic data . . . . . 3 1.1.3 Multi-scale analysis the surface roughness of the minerals . . . 6 1.2 Dissertation structure... evolution. Oceanic plateaus are very large igneous provinces in the deep 3 oceans and are generally a result of massive basaltic volcanism. Observations show that the size of these plateaus ranges up to millions of square kilometers, suggest- ing they must...

  4. U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials. A GIS-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Anthony; Roberts, Billy; Heimiller, Donna; Blair, Nate; Porro, Gian

    2012-07-01

    This report presents the state-level results of a spatial analysis effort calculating energy technical potential, reported in square kilometers of available land, megawatts of capacity, and gigawatt-hours of generation, for six different renewable technologies. For this analysis, the system specific power density (or equivalent), efficiency (capacity factor), and land-use constraints were identified for each technology using independent research, published research, and professional contacts. This report also presents technical potential findings from previous reports.

  5. U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.; Roberts, B.; Heimiller, D.; Blair, N.; Porro, G.

    2012-07-01

    This report presents the state-level results of a spatial analysis effort calculating energy technical potential, reported in square kilometers of available land, megawatts of capacity, and gigawatt-hours of generation, for six different renewable technologies. For this analysis, the system specific power density (or equivalent), efficiency (capacity factor), and land-use constraints were identified for each technology using independent research, published research, and professional contacts. This report also presents technical potential findings from previous reports.

  6. Biclique Cryptanalysis of the Block Cipher SQUARE Department of Information Technology, University of Isfahan, Isfahan, Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    , University of Isfahan, Isfahan, Iran Abstract. SQUARE, an 8-round substitution-permutation block cipher

  7. 15 Squares mod p Fix a prime p.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Dinakar

    15 Squares mod p Fix a prime p. Basic question: Given a, how can we determine if #b # Z such that a # b 2 (mod p)? Trivial case if p|a, take b # 0. So from now on take (a, p) = 1. p=3 p=5 p=7 x x 2 x x 2 x x 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 ­1 2 4 3 ­1 4 2 ­1=4 1 5 4 6 1 1 # d p 1, 4 as mod 5 1, 2, 4 as mod p 2

  8. 15 Squares mod p Fix a prime p.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Dinakar

    15 Squares mod p Fix a prime p. Basic question: Given a, how can we determine if b Z such that a b2 (mod p)? Trivial case if p|a, take b 0. So from now on take (a, p) = 1. p=3 p=5 p=7 x x2 x x2 x x2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 -1 2 4 3 -1 4 2 -1=4 1 5 4 6 1 1 dp 1, 4 as mod 5 1, 2, 4 as mod p 2 2, 3 3

  9. R-SQUARE IMPEDANCES OF ERL FERRITE HOM ABSORBER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAHN, H.; BURRILL, A.; CALAGA,R.; KAYRAN, D.; ZHAO, Y.

    2005-07-10

    An R&D facility for an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) intended as part of an electron-cooling project for RHIC is, being constructed at this laboratory. The center piece of the facility is a 5-cell 703.75 MHz super-conducting RF linac. Successful operation will depend on effective HOM damping. It is planned to achieve HOM damping exclusively with ferrite absorbers. The performance of a prototype absorber was measured by transforming it into a resonant cavity and alternatively by a conventional wire method. The results expressed as a surface or R-square impedance are presented in this paper.

  10. Frankfort Square, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistar LLC Jumpwells, Raft RiverNewFrankfort Square,

  11. Least squares based finite element formulations and their applications in fluid mechanics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prabhakar, Vivek

    2009-05-15

    In this research, least-squares based finite element formulations and their applications in fluid mechanics are presented. Least-squares formulations offer several computational and theoretical advantages for Newtonian as well as non-Newtonian fluid...

  12. Spatial autocorrelation approaches to testing residuals from least squares regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yanguang

    2015-01-01

    In statistics, the Durbin-Watson test is always employed to detect the presence of serial correlation of residuals from a least squares regression analysis. However, the Durbin-Watson statistic is only suitable for ordered time or spatial series. If the variables comprise cross-sectional data coming from spatial random sampling, the Durbin-Watson will be ineffectual because the value of Durbin-Watson's statistic depends on the sequences of data point arrangement. Based on the ideas from spatial autocorrelation, this paper presents two new statistics for testing serial correlation of residuals from least squares regression based on spatial samples. By analogy with the new form of Moran's index, an autocorrelation coefficient is defined with a standardized residual vector and a normalized spatial weight matrix. Then on the analogy of the Durbin-Watson statistic, a serial correlation index is constructed. As a case, the two statistics are applied to the spatial sample of 29 China's regions. These results show th...

  13. Science with ASKAP - the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Johnston; R. Taylor; M. Bailes; N. Bartel; C. Baugh; M. Bietenholz; C. Blake; R. Braun; J. Brown; S. Chatterjee; J. Darling; A. Deller; R. Dodson; P. Edwards; R. Ekers; S. Ellingsen; I. Feain; B. Gaensler; M. Haverkorn; G. Hobbs; A. Hopkins; C. Jackson; C. James; G. Joncas; V. Kaspi; V. Kilborn; B. Koribalski; R. Kothes; T. Landecker; A. Lenc; J. Lovell; J. -P. Macquart; R. Manchester; D. Matthews; N. McClure-Griffiths; R. Norris; U. -L. Pen; C. Phillips; C. Power; R. Protheroe; E. Sadler; B. Schmidt; I. Stairs; L. Staveley-Smith; J. Stil; S. Tingay; A. Tzioumis; M. Walker; J. Wall; M. Wolleben

    2008-10-29

    [ABRIDGED VERSION] The future of cm and m-wave astronomy lies with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a telescope under development by a consortium of 17 countries. The SKA will be 50 times more sensitive than any existing radio facility. A majority of the key science for the SKA will be addressed through large-area imaging of the Universe at frequencies from 300 MHz to a few GHz. The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is aimed squarely in this frequency range, and achieves instantaneous wide-area imaging through the development and deployment of phase-array feed systems on parabolic reflectors. This large field-of-view makes ASKAP an unprecedented synoptic telescope poised to achieve substantial advances in SKA key science. The central core of ASKAP will be located at the Murchison Radio Observatory in inland Western Australia, one of the most radio-quiet locations on the Earth and one of the sites selected by the international community as a potential location for the SKA. Following an introductory description of ASKAP, this document contains 7 chapters describing specific science programmes for ASKAP. The combination of location, technological innovation and scientific program will ensure that ASKAP will be a world-leading radio astronomy facility, closely aligned with the scientific and technical direction of the SKA. A brief summary chapter emphasizes the point, and considers discovery space.

  14. Faraday rotation data analysis with least-squares elliptical fitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Adam D.; McHale, G. Brent; Goerz, David A.; Speer, Ron D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A method of analyzing Faraday rotation data from pulsed magnetic field measurements is described. The method uses direct least-squares elliptical fitting to measured data. The least-squares fit conic parameters are used to rotate, translate, and rescale the measured data. Interpretation of the transformed data provides improved accuracy and time-resolution characteristics compared with many existing methods of analyzing Faraday rotation data. The method is especially useful when linear birefringence is present at the input or output of the sensing medium, or when the relative angle of the polarizers used in analysis is not aligned with precision; under these circumstances the method is shown to return the analytically correct input signal. The method may be pertinent to other applications where analysis of Lissajous figures is required, such as the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) diagnostics. The entire algorithm is fully automated and requires no user interaction. An example of algorithm execution is shown, using data from a fiber-based Faraday rotation sensor on a capacitive discharge experiment.

  15. QED for fields obeying a square root operator equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Gleim

    2008-02-25

    Instead of using local field equations - like the Dirac equation for spin-1/2 and the Klein-Gordon equation for spin-0 particles - one could try to use non-local field equations in order to describe scattering processes. The latter equations can be obtained by means of the relativistic energy together with the correspondence principle, resulting in equations with a square root operator. By coupling them to an electromagnetic field and expanding the square root (and taking into account terms of quadratic order in the electromagnetic coupling constant e), it is possible to calculate scattering matrix elements within the framework of quantum electrodynamics, e.g. like those for Compton scattering or for the scattering of two identical particles. This will be done here for the scalar case. These results are then compared with the corresponding ones based on the Klein-Gordon equation. A proposal of how to transfer these reflections to the spin-1/2 case is also presented.

  16. Radio Continuum Surveys with Square Kilometre Array Pathfinders Ray P. Norris1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Ray

    Radio Continuum Surveys with Square Kilometre Array Pathfinders Ray P. Norris1,2 , J. Afonso3 , D,1 Accepted by PASA, 22 October 2012 Abstract: In the lead-up to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project & Background The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a proposed ma- jor internationally-funded radio telescope

  17. Synergy between the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEwen, Jason

    Synergy between the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array David Bacon1 waveband, and the time resolution of the SKA. Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array June 8 provide an overview of the science benefits of combining information from the Square Kilo- metre Array

  18. Accommodation Office Information Centre, Market Square Alcuin A and B Block A4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchener, Paul

    Accommodation Office · Information Centre, Market Square Alcuin A and B Block · A4 Alcuin C Block Services · Market Square Careers · Careers Building V8 Cash and Fees Office · Market Square Catalyst) Design Solutions · 5a Main Street D4 Development and Alumni Relations Office · Alumni House D4 Disability

  19. The matrix square root from a new functional perspective: theoretical results and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meini, Beatrice

    The matrix square root from a new functional perspective: theoretical results and computational issues Beatrice Meini #3; Abstract We give a new characterization of the matrix square root and a new algorithm for its computation. We show how the matrix square root is related to the constant block coe

  20. Environmental Report 1994, Volume No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, K.S.; Harrach, R.J.; Gallegos, G.M.; Failor, R.A.

    1995-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility operated by the University of California, serves as a national resource of scientific, technical, and engineering capability. The Laboratory`s mission focuses on nuclear weapons and national security, and over the years has been broadened to include areas such as strategic defense, energy, the environment, biomedicine, technology transfer, the economy, and education. The Laboratory carries out this multifaceted mission in compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulatory requirements. It does so with the support of the Environmental Protection Department, which is responsible for environmental monitoring and analysis, hazardous waste management, environmental restoration, and ensuring compliance with environmental laws and regulations. LLNL comprises two sites: the Livermore site and Site 300. The Livermore site occupies an area of 3.28 square kilometers on the eastern edge of Livermore, California. Site 300, LLNL`s experimental testing site, is located 24 kilometers to the east in the Altamont Hills, and occupies an area of 30.3 square kilometers. Environmental monitoring activities are conducted at both sites as well as in surrounding areas. This summary provides an overview of LLNL`s environmental activities in 1994, including radiological and nonradiological sampling and surveillance monitoring, remediation, assessment of radiological releases and doses, and determination of the impact of LLNL operations on the environment and public health.

  1. ATLAS: Deep Radio Observations of Six Square Degrees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray P. Norris; Enno Middelberg; Brian J. Boyle

    2007-01-12

    We are using the Australia Telescope Compact Array to image about six square degrees surrounding the Chandra Deep Field South and European Large Area ISO Survey - South 1 regions, with the aim of producing the widest deep radio survey ever attempted, in fields with deep optical, infrared, and X-ray data. Our goal is to penetrate the heavy dust extinction which is found in active galaxies at all redshifts, and study the star formation activity and active galactic nuclei buried within. Although we are only about half-way through the survey, our data are proving remarkably fruitful. For example, we have discovered a new and unexpected class of object (the Infrared-Faint Radio Sources), we have found that the radio-FIR correlation extends to low flux densities, and we havefound powerful AGN-like radio objects in galaxies with a star-forming SED.

  2. Opportunities for maser studies with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Green; W. A. Baan

    2007-09-21

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is the radio telescope of the next generation, providing an increase in sensitivity and angular resolution of two orders of magnitude over existing telescopes. Currently, the SKA is expected to span the frequency range 0.1-25 GHz with capabilities including a wide field-of-view and measurement of polarised emission. Such a telescope has enormous potential for testing fundamental physical laws and producing transformational discoveries. Important science goals include using H2O megamasers to make precise estimates of H0, which will anchor the extragalactic distance scale, and to probe the central structures of accretion disks around supermassive black holes in AGNs, to study OH megamasers associated with extreme starburst activity in distant galaxies and to study with unprecedented precision molecular gas and star formation in our Galaxy.

  3. Square-well solution to the three-body problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Jensen; E. Garrido; D. V. Fedorov

    1996-08-15

    The angular part of the Faddeev equations is solved analytically for s-states for two-body square-well potentials. The results are, still analytically, generalized to arbitrary short-range potentials for both small and large distances. We consider systems with three identical bosons, three non-identical particles and two identical spin-1/2 fermions plus a third particle with arbitrary spin. The angular wave functions are in general linear combinations of trigonometric and exponential functions. The Efimov conditions are obtained at large distances. General properties and applications to arbitrary potentials are discussed. Gaussian potentials are used for illustrations. The results are useful for numerical calculations, where for example large distances can be treated analytically and matched to the numerical solutions at smaller distances. The saving is substantial.

  4. Classical and quantum dynamics in an inverse square potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guillaumín-España, Elisa; Núñez-Yépez, H. N.; Salas-Brito, A. L.

    2014-10-15

    The classical motion of a particle in a 3D inverse square potential with negative energy, E, is shown to be geodesic, i.e., equivalent to the particle's free motion on a non-compact phase space manifold irrespective of the sign of the coupling constant. We thus establish that all its classical orbits with E < 0 are unbounded. To analyse the corresponding quantum problem, the Schrödinger equation is solved in momentum space. No discrete energy levels exist in the unrenormalized case and the system shows a complete “fall-to-the-center” with an energy spectrum unbounded by below. Such behavior corresponds to the non-existence of bound classical orbits. The symmetry of the problem is SO(3) × SO(2, 1) corroborating previously obtained results.

  5. Tested by Fire - How two recent Wildfires affected Accelerator Operations at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickermann, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    In a little more than a decade two large wild fires threatened Los Alamos and impacted accelerator operations at LANL. In 2000 the Cerro Grande Fire destroyed hundreds of homes, as well as structures and equipment at the DARHT facility. The DARHT accelerators were safe in a fire-proof building. In 2011 the Las Conchas Fire burned about 630 square kilometers (250 square miles) and came dangerously close to Los Alamos/LANL. LANSCE accelerator operations Lessons Learned during Las Conchas fire: (1) Develop a plan to efficiently shut down the accelerator on short notice; (2) Establish clear lines of communication in emergency situations; and (3) Plan recovery and keep squirrels out.

  6. Cross correlation surveys with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, Donnacha; Abdalla, Filipe B; Bull, Philip; Joachimi, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    By the time that the first phase of the Square Kilometre Array is deployed it will be able to perform state of the art Large Scale Structure (LSS) as well as Weak Gravitational Lensing (WGL) measurements of the distribution of matter in the Universe. In this chapter we concentrate on the synergies that result from cross-correlating these different SKA data products as well as external correlation with the weak lensing measurements available from CMB missions. We show that the Dark Energy figures of merit obtained individually from WGL/LSS measurements and their independent combination is significantly increased when their full cross-correlations are taken into account. This is due to the increased knowledge of galaxy bias as a function of redshift as well as the extra information from the different cosmological dependences of the cross-correlations. We show that the cross-correlation between a spectroscopic LSS sample and a weak lensing sample with photometric redshifts can calibrate these same photometric re...

  7. The Square Kilometre Array: A new probe of cosmic magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan M. Gaensler

    2006-03-02

    Magnetic fields are a fundamental part of many astrophysical phenomena, but the evolution, structure and origin of magnetic fields are still unresolved problems in physics and astrophysics. When and how were the first fields generated? Are present-day magnetic fields the result of standard dynamo action, or do they represent rapid or recent field amplification through other processes? What role do magnetic fields play in turbulence, cosmic ray acceleration and structure formation? I explain how the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a next-generation radio telescope, can deliver stunning new data-sets that will address these currently unanswered issues. The foundation for these experiments will be an all-sky survey of rotation measures, in which Faraday rotation toward >10^7 background sources will provide a dense grid for probing magnetism in the Milky Way, nearby galaxies, and in distant galaxies, clusters and protogalaxies. Using these data, we can map out the evolution of magnetized structures from redshifts z > 3 to the present, can distinguish between different origins for seed magnetic fields in galaxies, and can develop a detailed model of the magnetic field geometry of the intergalactic medium and of the overall Universe. In addition, the SKA will certainly discover new magnetic phenomena beyond what we can currently predict or imagine.

  8. Galaxy Evolution and Cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Rawlings; F. B. Abdalla; S. L. Bridle; C. A. Blake; C. M. Baugh; L. J. Greenhill; J. M. van der Hulst

    2004-09-20

    The present-day Universe is seemingly dominated by dark energy and dark matter, but mapping the normal (baryonic) content remains vital for both astrophysics - understanding how galaxies form - and astro-particle physics - inferring properties of the dark components. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will provide the only means of studying the cosmic evolution of neutral Hydrogen (HI) which, alongside information on star formation from the radio continuum, is needed to understand how stars formed from gas within dark-matter over-densities and the roles of gas accretion and galaxy merging. `All hemisphere' HI redshift surveys to redshift 1.5 are feasible with wide-field-of-view realizations of the SKA and, by measuring the galaxy power spectrum in exquisite detail, will allow the first precise studies of the equation-of-state of dark energy. The SKA will be capable of other uniquely powerful cosmological studies including the measurement of the dark-matter power spectrum using weak gravitational lensing, and the precise measurement of H0 using extragalactic water masers. The SKA is likely to become the premier dark-energy-measuring machine, bringing breakthroughs in cosmology beyond those likely to be made possible by combining CMB (e.g. Planck), optical (e.g. LSST, SNAP) and other early-21st-century datasets.

  9. Science With The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Johnston

    2007-11-14

    The future of cm and m-wave astronomy lies with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a telescope under development by a consortium of 17 countries that will be 50 times more sensitive than any existing radio facility. Most of the key science for the SKA will be addressed through large-area imaging of the Universe at frequencies from a few hundred MHz to a few GHz. The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is a technology demonstrator aimed in the mid-frequency range, and achieves instantaneous wide-area imaging through the development and deployment of phased-array feed systems on parabolic reflectors. The large field-of-view makes ASKAP an unprecedented synoptic telescope that will make substantial advances in SKA key science. ASKAP will be located at the Murchison Radio Observatory in inland Western Australia, one of the most radio-quiet locations on the Earth and one of two sites selected by the international community as a potential location for the SKA. In this paper, we outline an ambitious science program for ASKAP, examining key science such as understanding the evolution, formation and population of galaxies including our own, understanding the magnetic Universe, revealing the transient radio sky and searching for gravitational waves.

  10. ORNL part of new project to study how tropical forests worldwide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    better than ten kilometers. This is the resolution that next-generation Earth system models will achieve during the project's lifetime. The team will take advantage of...

  11. Communications system using a mirror kept in outer space by electromagnetic radiation pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Csonka, Paul L. (Eugene, OR)

    1981-01-01

    A method and system are described for transmitting electromagnetic radiation by using a communications mirror located between about 100 kilometers and about 200 kilometers above ground. The communications mirror is kept aloft above the atmosphere by the pressure of the electromagnetic radiation which it reflects, and which is beamed at the communications mirror by a suitably constructed transmitting antenna on the ground. The communications mirror will reflect communications, such as radio, radar, or television waves up to about 1,100 kilometers away when the communications mirror is located at a height of about 100 kilometers.

  12. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01

    for California Natural Gas Vehicles Partnership. ShanghaiReport for California Natural Gas Vehicles Partnership. CISfor compressed natural gas cars. 14 The vehicle kilometers

  13. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    KILOMETERS () = FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT NUMBER WITHIN PLANTKaupo o () = FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT NUMBER WITHIN PLANTSea o = o FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT HYDROELECTRIC GENERATING

  14. January | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    or poorly estimated. To begin to resolve features such as narrow currents and mesoscale eddies (circular loop-like features with a diameter of less than 200 kilometers),...

  15. Microsoft Word - DOE-EA-1599 Draft 2008-06-11--rjk dc - accepted...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cave, Kentucky, 135 miles (217 kilometers) east of the site (DOE 1999b). The largest air pollution sources near the Paducah area include the United States Enrichment...

  16. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF AXISYMMETRIC INSTABILITY OF INVERSE DEE AND SQUARE TOKAMAK EQUILIBRIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF AXISYMMETRIC INSTABILITY OF INVERSE DEE AND SQUARE TOKAMAK EQUILIBRIA COO Study ofAxi.symmetric !nsta bUity of Inverse Dee and Square Tokamak Equilibria B. Lipschultz, S as a function of time in a tokamak with a 4-null poloidal d ivertor. Inverse dee equilibria are observed

  17. Regression Analysis Using Weighted Least Squares Robert Drucker, University of Washington (May 1996)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Regression Analysis Using Weighted Least Squares Robert Drucker, University of Washington (May 1996) 1. Theory The j­th order least­squares regression problem can be stated in matrix notation as Y = Xb regression analysis assumes that the residuals are independent identically dis­ tributed (iid) random

  18. Ordinary Least Square Regression, Orthogonal Regression, Geometric Mean Regression and their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordinary Least Square Regression, Orthogonal Regression, Geometric Mean Regression@notes.cc.sunysb.edu Abstract. Regression analysis, especially the ordinary least squares method which assumes that errors for both measurements. In this work, we examine two regression approaches available to accommodate

  19. Science With The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder S. JohnstonA,X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Ray

    Science With The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder S. JohnstonA,X , M. BailesB , N and m-wave astronomy lies with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a telescope under development and deployment of phased-array feed systems on parabolic reflectors. The large field-of-view makes ASKAP

  20. ISLAND COALESCENCE USING PARALLEL FIRST-ORDER SYSTEM LEAST-SQUARES ON INCOMPRESSIBLE RESISTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormick, Steve

    ISLAND COALESCENCE USING PARALLEL FIRST-ORDER SYSTEM LEAST-SQUARES ON INCOMPRESSIBLE RESISTIVE. This paper investigates the performance of a parallel Newton, first-order system least-squares (FOSLS) finite magnetohydrodynamics. In particular, an island coa- lescence test problem is studied that models magnetic reconnection

  1. Urban square as theater : issues of continuity and discontinuity in urban design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Buo-yuan

    1993-01-01

    This thesis tries to establish some criteria for designing a good urban square, with concern for the static and dynamic approaches. The former refers to aesthetic issues, and the latter refers to social and contextual ones. ...

  2. Massively parallel solver for the high-order Galerkin Least-Squares method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yano, Masayuki, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    A high-order Galerkin Least-Squares (GLS) finite element discretization is combined with massively parallel implicit solvers. The stabilization parameter of the GLS discretization is modified to improve the resolution ...

  3. Condensation heat transfer in square, triangular, and semi-circular mini-channels Melanie Derby a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peles, Yoav

    Condensation heat transfer in square, triangular, and semi-circular mini-channels Melanie Derby a , Hee Joon Lee a,b , Yoav Peles a , Michael K. Jensen a, a Department of Mechanical, Aerospace

  4. Spatial qualities of innovation districts : how Third Places are changing the innovation ecosystem of Kendall Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Minjee

    2013-01-01

    This thesis analyzes the spatial dimensions of an urban high-tech cluster in the changing socio-economic landscape of American cities. Using Kendall Square as the primary case study, I analyzed the spatial qualities and ...

  5. Quantum anomalous Hall effect with cold atoms trapped in a square lattice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiong-Jun; Liu, Xin; Wu, Congjun; Sinova, Jairo

    2010-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to realize the quantum anomalous Hall effect in an anisotropic square optical lattice which can be generated from available experimental setups of double-well lattices with minor modifications. A periodic gauge...

  6. Negative-norm least-squares methods for axisymmetric Maxwell equations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copeland, Dylan Matthew

    2006-08-16

    We develop negative-norm least-squares methods to solve the three-dimensional Maxwell equations for static and time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in the case of axial symmetry. The methods compute solutions in a ...

  7. Load Forecasting using Fixed-Size Least Squares Support Vector Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -SVM formulation, on the other hand, solves a linear sys- tem in dual space under a least-squares cost function [13 series comes from a local low voltage substation in Belgium and it contains 28,000 hourly values

  8. PLC-9 Non Rusting Stainless Steel Column 10" Square with Radius Corners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    PLC-9 Non Rusting Stainless Steel Column 10" Square with Radius Corners Unit includes two lights General Specifications of PLC-9 Column Non Rusting, Non Magnetic Stainless Steel - .125" Thick Dimensions

  9. The Murchison Widefield Array: The Square Kilometre Array Precursor at Low Radio Frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goeke, Robert F.

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is one of three Square Kilometre Array Precursor telescopes and is located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in the Murchison Shire of the mid-west of Western Australia, a ...

  10. Multivariate analysis of neuronal interactions in the generalized partial least squares framework: simulations and empirical studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multivariate analysis of neuronal interactions in the generalized partial least squares framework the brain. Multivariate analysis can explicitly test for multiple statistical models, including the designed paradigm, and allows for spatial and temporal model detection. Here, we investigate multivariate analysis

  11. High-performance MEMS square electrode quadrupole mass filters for chip-scale mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Kerry

    We report exciting experimental data from a low-cost, high-performance square electrode quadrupole mass filter with integrated ion optics intended for chips-cale mass spectrometry. The device showed a mass range of 650 amu ...

  12. Heat/mass transfer distribution in rotating two-pass square channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandis, Mouhyieldin

    1994-01-01

    The heat/mass trasfer distribution for turbulent flow in a rotating two-pass square channel having a sharp 180' turn were investigated via the naphthalene sublimation technique. The test section models the internal cooling passages of gas turbine...

  13. The application of small amplitude square root of time potential pulses in electrochemical trace analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cranston, Stacy Eugene

    1975-01-01

    THE APPLICATION OF SMALL AMPLITUDE SQUARE BOOT OF TIME POTENTIAL PULSES IN ELECTROCHEMICAL TRACE ANALYSIS A Thesis by STACY EUGENE CRANSTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Ma]or Sub)ect: Chemistry THE APPLICATION OF SMALL AMPLITUDE SQUARE ROOT OF TIME POTENTIAL PULSES IN ELECTROCHEMICAL TRACE ANALYSIS A Thesis STACY EUGENE CRANSTON Approved as to style and content by...

  14. Magnetic vortex crystal formation in the antidot complement of square artificial spin ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araujo, C. I. L. de Silva, R. C.; Ribeiro, I. R. B.; Nascimento, F. S.; Felix, J. F.; Ferreira, S. O.; Moura-Melo, W. A.; Pereira, A. R.; Mól, L. A. S.

    2014-03-03

    We have studied ferromagnetic nickel thin films patterned with square lattices of elongated antidots that are negative analogues of square artificial spin ice. Micromagnetic simulations and direct current magnetic moment measurements reveal in-plane anisotropy of the magnetic hysteresis loops, and the formation of a dense array of magnetic vortices with random polarization and chirality. These multiply-connected antidot arrays could be superior to lattices of disconnected nanodisks for investigations of vortex switching by applied electric current.

  15. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-04-01

    In this report we will show results of seismic and well log derived attenuation attributes from a deep water Gulf of Mexico data set. This data was contributed by Burlington Resources and Seitel Inc. The data consists of ten square kilometers of 3D seismic data and three well penetrations. We have computed anomalous seismic absorption attributes on the seismic data and have computed Q from the well log curves. The results show a good correlation between the anomalous absorption (attenuation) attributes and the presence of gas as indicated by well logs.

  16. Electron muon identification by atmospheric shower and electron beam in a new concept of an EAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iori, M; Yilmaz, A; Ferrarotto, F; Russ, J

    2015-01-01

    We present results demonstrating the time resolution and $\\mu$/e separation capabilities with a new concept of an EAS detector capable for measurements of cosmic rays arriving with large zenith angles. This kind of detector has been designed to be a part of a large area (several square kilometers) surface array designed to measure Ultra High Energy (10-200 PeV) $\\tau$ neutrinos using the Earth-skimming technique. A criteria to identify electron-gammas is also shown and the particle identification capability is tested by measurements in coincidence with the KASKADE-GRANDE experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany.

  17. UMass Amherst adalah kampus unggulan dari sistem Universi-tas Massachusetts. Universitas ini terletak di Western Massachu-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    UMass Amherst adalah kampus unggulan dari sistem Universi- tas Massachusetts. Universitas ini. Kampus ini mudah dijangkau dari banyak daerah metropolitan yang paling bersemangat dan menarik di negara ini. Sebagai contoh, UMass Amherst berada di 118 kilometer ke barat dari Boston, 219 kilometer ke

  18. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Construction, Inc.) for providing the drainage volumes from the Solid Waste Landfill Lysimeter. We wish the significant contributions of Randy Kirkham (Hydrology Group) to the conceptual design and construction-activity waste in. inch(es) km kilometer(s) m meter(s) mm millimeter(s) P+I precipitation plus irrigation PNNL

  19. Limits on deviations from the inverse-square law on megaparsec scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolyn Sealfon; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

    2005-06-29

    We present an attempt to constrain deviations from the gravitational inverse-square law on large-scale structure scales. A perturbed law modifies the Poisson equation, which implies a scale-dependent growth of overdensities in the linear regime and thus modifies the power spectrum shape. We use two large-scale structure surveys (the Sloan Digital Sky survey and the Anglo-Australian Two-degree field galaxy redshift survey) to constrain the parameters of two simple modifications of the inverse-square law. We find no evidence for deviations from normal gravity on the scales probed by these surveys (~ 10^(23) m.)

  20. Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law below the Dark-Energy Length Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Kapner; T. S. Cook; E. G. Adelberger; J. H. Gundlach; B. R. Heckel; C. D. Hoyle; H. E. Swanson

    2006-11-14

    We conducted three torsion-balance experiments to test the gravitational inverse-square law at separations between 9.53 mm and 55 micrometers, probing distances less than the dark-energy length scale $\\lambda_{\\rm d}=\\sqrt[4]{\\hbar c/\\rho_{\\rm d}}\\approx 85 \\mu$m. We find with 95% confidence that the inverse-square law holds ($|\\alpha| \\leq 1$) down to a length scale $\\lambda = 56 \\mu$m and that an extra dimension must have a size $R \\leq 44 \\mu$m.

  1. Acceleration Control in Nonlinear Vibrating Systems based on Damped Least Squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilipchuk, V N

    2011-01-01

    A discrete time control algorithm using the damped least squares is introduced for acceleration and energy exchange controls in nonlinear vibrating systems. It is shown that the damping constant of least squares and sampling time step of the controller must be inversely related to insure that vanishing the time step has little effect on the results. The algorithm is illustrated on two linearly coupled Duffing oscillators near the 1:1 internal resonance. In particular, it is shown that varying the dissipation ratio of one of the two oscillators can significantly suppress the nonlinear beat phenomenon.

  2. Justice Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deratany, Jay Paul

    2013-01-01

    footage of the REAL FOOTAGE OF NEDA on the ground, bleeding.OF SHOTS - REAL FOOTAGE OF NEDA's BODY IN THE STREET. THE

  3. Gene Feature Extraction Using T-Test Statistics and Kernel Partial Least Squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok, James Tin-Yau

    Gene Feature Extraction Using T-Test Statistics and Kernel Partial Least Squares Shutao Li1 , Chen Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong shutao li@yahoo.com.cn, lc337199@sina.com, jamesk@cs.ust.hk Abstract. In this paper, we propose a gene extraction method by us- ing two standard feature extraction methods, namely

  4. 1128 volume 27 number 12 december 2009 nature biotechnology square meter per day of algae containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    1128 volume 27 number 12 december 2009 nature biotechnology square meter per day of algae, such as triglycerides from algae or cellulosic biomass from higher plants, as feedstocks for biofuel production. The algal program sought to develop high-oil-content algae that grow at very fast rates. In our report

  5. Gravity as the square of Yang-Mills: implications for N=8 Supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudarshan Ananth

    2009-02-18

    The pure gravity Lagrangian can be written as the "square" of the pure Yang-Mills Lagrangian to second order in coupling constants. This paper uses this form of the gravity Lagrangian as a starting point to arrive at a compact light-cone superspace Lagrangian for N=8 Supergravity to order $\\kappa$^2.

  6. Partial least squares regression as an alternative to current regression methods used in ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    Partial least squares regression as an alternative to current regression methods used in ecology regression analysis (PLSR), and its potential utility in ecological studies. This statistical technique with multiple regression (MR) and with a combination of principal component analysis and multiple regression

  7. Low-frequency square-wave electronic ballast with resonant ignition using digital mode and power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low-frequency square-wave electronic ballast with resonant ignition using digital mode and power both the functions of a resonant circuit for lamp ignition and a current controlled low frequency of the FB converter according to the lamp requirements. I. INTRODUCTION The primary motivation for using low

  8. The BSHM -LMS 150th Anniversary De Morgan House, Russell Square, London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    The BSHM - LMS 150th Anniversary De Morgan House, Russell Square, London (nearest tube: Russell Fisher (lmsmeetings@lms.ac.uk) by Friday 1st May. Late registrations for places may still be accepted. +44 (0)20 7637 3686. www.lms.ac.uk. Registered Charity No. 252660. b s h m Date 9th May 2015 De Morgan

  9. A Generalized Formula for Converting Chi-Square Tests to Effect Sizes for Meta-Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael S.

    A Generalized Formula for Converting Chi-Square Tests to Effect Sizes for Meta-Analysis Michael S Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, United States of America Abstract The common formula of the effect size. A corrected formula is provided. Citation: Rosenberg MS (2010) A Generalized Formula

  10. Global Optimization of Polynomials Using Generalized Critical Values and Sums of Squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safey El Din, Mohab

    - ometrical problems and computation Feng Guo and Lihong Zhi are supported by the Chi- nese National Natural Science Foundation under grant NSFC60821002/F02 and 10871194. Feng Guo, Mohab Safey El Din and Lihong ZhiGlobal Optimization of Polynomials Using Generalized Critical Values and Sums of Squares Feng Guo

  11. Application of Least Squares MPE technique in the reduced order modeling of electrical circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    fast analysis of the circuit designs and reduce the manufacturing cost and time. Typical dimensions models [12]. Due to the growing complexities in circuit designs, linear models are often inadequateApplication of Least Squares MPE technique in the reduced order modeling of electrical circuits

  12. Passive tracer reconstruction as a least-squares problem with a semi-Lagrangian constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Passive tracer reconstruction as a least-squares problem with a semi-Lagrangian constraint-dimensional, nonstationary, passive tracer field in the ocean with open boundaries and a known velocity field. The observations, spatial smoothing terms and passive tracer conservation equation were included as weak

  13. Radio Number for Square of Cycles Daphne Der-Fen Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Daphne Der-Fen

    Radio Number for Square of Cycles Daphne Der-Fen Liu Melanie Xie Department of Mathematics and v. A radio labelling for G is a function f that assigns to each vertex a non- negative integer. The span of f is the difference of the maximum and the minimum labels assigned. The radio number of G

  14. Electric-field-driven magnetization reversal in square-shaped nanomagnet-based multiferroic heterostructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Electric-field-driven magnetization reversal in square-shaped nanomagnet-based multiferroic. Lett. 98, 222509 (2011); 10.1063/1.3597796 Electrically controlled magnetization switching://scitation.aip.org/termsconditions. Downloaded to IP: 128.118.37.128 On: Wed, 27 May 2015 18:58:21 #12;Electric-field-driven magnetization

  15. Bulk, surface and corner free energy series for the chromatic polynomial on the square and triangular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Bulk, surface and corner free energy series for the chromatic polynomial on the square, surface and corner free energies of the chromatic polynomial. This extends the existing series expression for the bulk free energy (to order q-40 ), and we are able to conjecture exact product formulae

  16. Particle Physics Implications of a Recent Test of the Gravitational Inverse Square Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. G. Adelberger; B. R. Heckel; S. Hoedl; C. D. Hoyle; D. J. Kapner; A. Upadhye

    2007-02-07

    We use data from our recent search for violations of the gravitational inverse-square law to constrain dilaton, radion and chameleon exchange forces as well as arbitrary vector or scalar interactions. We test the interpretation of the PVLAS effect and a conjectured ``fat graviton'' scenario and constrain the $\\gamma_5$ couplings of pseuodscalar bosons and arbitrary power-law interactions.

  17. NUMERICAL NULL CONTROLLABILITY OF THE HEAT EQUATION THROUGH A LEAST SQUARES AND VARIATIONAL APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUMERICAL NULL CONTROLLABILITY OF THE HEAT EQUATION THROUGH A LEAST SQUARES AND VARIATIONAL of null controls for the heat equation. The goal is to compute an approximation of controls that drives-space dimensional case. Key Words. Heat equation, Null controllability, Numerical approximation, Variational ap

  18. Numerical null controllability of semi-linear 1-D heat equations: fixed point, least squares and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sart, Remi

    Numerical null controllability of semi-linear 1-D heat equations: fixed point, least squares with the numerical computation of distributed null controls for semi- linear 1D heat equations, in the sublinear in [Fernandez-Cara & Zuazua, Null and approximate controllability for weakly blowing up semi-linear heat

  19. On the Lorentz invariance of the Square root Klein-Gordon Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Javad Kazemi; Mohammad H. Barati; Jafar Khodagholizadeh; Alireza Babazadeh

    2015-06-17

    We show that the Born's rule is incompatible with Lorentz symmetry of the Square Root Klein-Gordon equation (SRKG equation). It has been demonstrated that the Born rule must be modified in relativistic regime if one wishes to keep the SRKG equation as the correct equation for describing quantum behavior.

  20. WCOM'2009/MATH Defeng Sun/NUS 1 A Proximal Point Method for Matrix Least Squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Defeng

    WCOM'2009/MATH Defeng Sun/NUS 1 ' & $ % A Proximal Point Method for Matrix Least Squares Problem with Nuclear Norm Regularization Defeng Sun Department of Mathematics National University of Singapore May 2, 2009 Joint work with Kaifeng Jiang and Kim Chuan Toh #12;WCOM'2009/MATH Defeng Sun/NUS 2 ' & $ % Let Sn

  1. Nanjing, July 26, 2008 Defeng Sun 1 Calibrating Least Squares Covariance Matrix Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Defeng

    Nanjing, July 26, 2008 Defeng Sun 1 ' & $ % Calibrating Least Squares Covariance Matrix Problems with Equality and Inequality Constraints Defeng Sun Department of Mathematics National University of Singapore to Professor Bingsheng He #12;Nanjing, July 26, 2008 Defeng Sun 2 ' & $ % Let Sn be the set of all real

  2. Convergence of Common Proximal Methods for 1-Regularized Least Squares Shaozhe Tao, Daniel Boley, Shuzhong Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boley, Daniel

    ]ISTA ([fast] iterative shrinkage and thresholding algorithm) and CD (coordinate descent) methods on the model Introduction Many problems in machine learning and data fitting can be cast as a least squares problem of these methods: the Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM) [Boyd et al., 2011], Itera- tive Shrinkage

  3. NON-STANDARD BEHAVIOR OF DENSITY ESTIMATORS FOR SUMS OF SQUARED OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schick, Anton

    NON-STANDARD BEHAVIOR OF DENSITY ESTIMATORS FOR SUMS OF SQUARED OBSERVATIONS By Anton Schick;2 A. SCHICK AND W. WEFELMEYER with a kernel estimator ^f of f. This is a plug-in estimator which with functional central limit theorems in the corresponding spaces. Schick and Wefelmeyer (2004, 2007) prove

  4. Dos and don'ts of reduced chi-squared Rene Andrae1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    Dos and don'ts of reduced chi-squared Ren´e Andrae1 , Tim Schulze-Hartung1 & Peter Melchior2 1 Max, ZAH, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany e-mail: andrae@mpia-hd.mpg.de Reduced chi

  5. Impact Ionization Model Using Average Energy and Average Square Energy of Distribution Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Scott

    Impact Ionization Model Using Average Energy and Average Square Energy of Distribution Function Ken relaxation length, v sat ø h''i (¸ 0:05¯m), the energy distribution function is not well described calculation of impact ionization coefficient requires the use of a high energy distribution function because

  6. Cellular Computing and Least Squares for partial differential problems parallel solving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Fressengeas; Hervé Frezza-Buet

    2010-01-29

    This paper shows how partial differential problems can be solved thanks to cellular computing and an adaptation of the Least Squares Finite Elements Method. As cellular computing can be implemented on distributed parallel architectures, this method allows the distribution of a resource demanding differential problem over a computer network.

  7. arXiv:1103.0628v1[astro-ph.IM]3Mar2011 Bivariate least squares linear regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    arXiv:1103.0628v1[astro-ph.IM]3Mar2011 Bivariate least squares linear regression: towards a unified squares linear regression, the classical ap- proach pursued for functional models in earlier attempts are regression lines in the general case of correlated errors in X and in Y for heteroscedastic data

  8. Tilt Beam Characteristic by Changing Length of Finite-Sized Square Dielectric Substrate of One Arm Rectangular Spiral Antenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Flaviis, Franco

    Tilt Beam Characteristic by Changing Length of Finite-Sized Square Dielectric Substrate of One Arm by changing the length of finite-sized square dielectric substrate of one arm rectangular spiral antenna has). Horizontal spiral arm length (HL) is varied from HL=0.8o to HL=5.2o to choose the length that yields

  9. FREEZE-FRACTURE AND IMMUNOGOLD ANALYSIS OF AQUAPORIN-4 (AQP4) SQUARE ARRAYS, WITH MODELS OF AQP4 LATTICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rash, John E.

    FREEZE-FRACTURE AND IMMUNOGOLD ANALYSIS OF AQUAPORIN-4 (AQP4) SQUARE ARRAYS, WITH MODELS OF AQP4 proteins in a tetrameric IMP. Several struc- tural models are considered that incorporate freeze-fracture of AQP4 in "square arrays" of astrocytes and ependymocytes Early freeze-fracture studi

  10. Least Squares Pole Assignment by Memory-less Output Feedback* Dan-chi Jiang & J. B. Moore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John Barratt

    Least Squares Pole Assignment by Memory-less Output Feedback* Dan-chi Jiang & J. B. Moore In this paper, a pole assignmentproblem of lineartime invariantcontrol system by memory- less output feedback is posed as a least squares poles assignmentproblem and analysed. The coat functions are appropriately

  11. Ballistic electrons in an open square geometry: Selective probing of resonant-energy states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zozoulenko, I.V.; Schuster, R.; Berggren, K.-.; Ensslin, K.

    1997-04-01

    We report on the interplay between classical trajectories and quantum-mechanical effects in a square geometry. At low magnetic fields the four-terminal resistance is dominated by phenomena that depend on ballistic trajectories in a classical billiard. Superimposed on these classical effects are quantum interference effects manifested by highly periodic conductance oscillations. Numerical analysis shows that these oscillations are directly related to excitations of particular eigenstates in the square. In spite of open leads, transport through an open cavity is effectively mediated by just a few (or even a single) resonant-energy states. The leads injecting electrons into the cavity play a decisive role in a selection of the particular set of states excited in the dot. The above selection rule sets a specific frequency of the oscillations seen in the experiment. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Shot noise in an electron waveguide square root of NOT gate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linda E. Reichl; Michael G. Snyder

    2006-01-17

    We present a calculation of the shot noise in a ballistic electron waveguide square root of NOT gate. A general expression for the shot noise in the leads connected to these types of gates is shown. We then parameterize an S-matrix which qualitatively describes the action of a square root of NOT gate previously found through numerical methods for GaAs/Al_xGa_{1-x}As based waveguides systems. Using this S-matrix, the shot noise in a single output lead and across two output leads is calculated. We find that the measurement of the shot noise across two output leads allows for the determination of the fidelity of the gate itself.

  13. Non-perturbative and self-consistent models of neutron stars in R-squared gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Doneva, Daniela D.; Kokkotas, Kostas D.; Staykov, Kalin V. E-mail: daniela.doneva@uni-tuebingen.de E-mail: kalin.v.staikov@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper we investigate non-perturbatively and self-consistently the structure of neutron stars in R-squared gravity by simultaneously solving the interior and exterior problem. The mass-radius relations are obtained for several equations of state and for wide range of the R-squared gravity parameter a. Even though the deviation from general relativity for nonzero values of a can be large, they are still comparable with the variations due to different modern realistic equations of state. That is why the current observations of the neutron star masses and radii alone can not put constraints on the value of the parameter a. We also compare our results with those obtained within the perturbative method and we discuss the differences between them.

  14. Control protocol of finite dimensional quantum systems using alternating square pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianju Tang; H. C. Fu

    2013-12-18

    Control protocol to drive finite dimensional quantum systems to an arbitrary target state using square pulses is proposed explicitly. It is a multi-cycle control process and in each cycle we apply square pulses to cause single or a few transitions between energy levels. Systems with equal energy gaps except the first one, four dimensional system with equal first and third energy gaps and different second energy gap, and systems with all equal energy gaps of dimension three, are investigated in detail. The control parameters, the interaction time between systems and control fields and free evolution times between cycles, are connected with the probability amplitudes of target states via trigonometric functions and are determined analytically.

  15. Method for exploiting bias in factor analysis using constrained alternating least squares algorithms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-12-30

    Bias plays an important role in factor analysis and is often implicitly made use of, for example, to constrain solutions to factors that conform to physical reality. However, when components are collinear, a large range of solutions may exist that satisfy the basic constraints and fit the data equally well. In such cases, the introduction of mathematical bias through the application of constraints may select solutions that are less than optimal. The biased alternating least squares algorithm of the present invention can offset mathematical bias introduced by constraints in the standard alternating least squares analysis to achieve factor solutions that are most consistent with physical reality. In addition, these methods can be used to explicitly exploit bias to provide alternative views and provide additional insights into spectral data sets.

  16. The distribution of natural numbers divisible by 2,3,5,11,13 and 17 on the Square Root Spiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry K. Hahn

    2008-01-29

    The natural numbers divisible by the Prime Factors 2, 3, 5, 11, 13 and 17 lie on defined spiral graphs, which run through the Square Root Spiral. A mathematical analysis shows, that these spiral graphs are defined by specific quadratic polynomials. Basically all natural number which are divisible by the same prime factor lie on such spiral graphs. And these spiral graphs can be assigned to a certain number of Spiral Graph Systems, which have a defined spatial orientation to each other. This document represents a supplementation to my detailed introduction study to the Square Root Spiral, and it contains the missing diagrams and analyses, showing the distribution of the natural numbers divisible by 2, 3, 5, 11, 13 and 17 on the Square Root Spiral. My introduction study to the Square Root Spiral can be found in the arxiv-archive. The title of this study : The ordered distribution of the natural numbers on the Square Root Spiral.

  17. Travelling-waves consistent with turbulence-driven secondary flow in a square duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhlmann, Markus; Pinelli, Alfredo; 10.1063/1.3466661

    2010-01-01

    We present numerically determined travelling-wave solutions for pressure-driven flow through a straight duct with a square cross-section. This family of solutions represents typical coherent structures (a staggered array of counter-rotating streamwise vortices and an associated low-speed streak) on each wall. Their streamwise average flow in the cross-sectional plane corresponds to an eight vortex pattern much alike the secondary flow found in the turbulent regime.

  18. Coherent and generalized intelligent states for infinite square well potential and nonlinear oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. H. El Kinani; M. Daoud

    2003-12-13

    This article is an illustration of the construction of coherent and generalized intelligent states which has been recently proposed by us for an arbitrary quantum system $[ 1] $. We treat the quantum system submitted to the infinite square well potential and the nonlinear oscillators. By means of the analytical representation of the coherent states \\`{a} la Gazeau-Klauder and those \\`{a} la Klauder-Perelomov, we derive the generalized intelligent states in analytical ways.

  19. Complete Set of Inner Products for a Discrete PT-symmetric Square-well Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miloslav Znojil

    2009-11-02

    A discrete $N-$point Runge-Kutta version $H^{(N)}({\\lambda})$ of one of the simplest non-Hermitian square-well Hamiltonians with real spectrum is studied. A complete set of its possible hermitizations (i.e., of the eligible metrics $\\Theta^{(N)}({\\lambda})$ defining its non-equivalent physical Hilbert spaces of states) is constructed, in closed form, for any coupling ${\\lambda}\\in (-1,1)$ and any matrix dimension $N$.

  20. Realizing non-Abelian gauge potentials in optical square lattices: Application to atomic Chern insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Goldman; F. Gerbier; M. Lewenstein

    2013-04-19

    We describe a scheme to engineer non-Abelian gauge potentials on a square optical lattice using laser-induced transitions. We emphasize the case of two-electron atoms, where the electronic ground state g is laser coupled to a metastable state e within a state-dependent optical lattice. In this scheme, the alternating pattern of lattice sites hosting g and e states depict a checkerboard structure, allowing for laser-assisted tunneling along both spatial directions. In this configuration, the nuclear spin of the atoms can be viewed as a "flavor" quantum number undergoing non-Abelian tunneling along nearest-neighbor links. We show that this technique can be useful to simulate the equivalent of the Haldane quantum Hall model using cold atoms trapped in square optical lattices, offering an interesting route to realize Chern insulators. The emblematic Haldane model is particularly suited to investigate the physics of topological insulators, but requires, in its original form, complex hopping terms beyond nearest-neighboring sites. In general, this drawback inhibits a direct realization with cold atoms, using standard laser-induced tunneling techniques. We demonstrate that a simple mapping allows to express this model in terms of matrix hopping operators, that are defined on a standard square lattice. This mapping is investigated for two models that lead to anomalous quantum Hall phases. We discuss the practical implementation of such models, exploiting laser-induced tunneling methods applied to the checkerboard optical lattice.

  1. Interband magneto-spectroscopy in InSb square and parabolic quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasturiarachchi, T.; Edirisooriya, M.; Mishima, T. D.; Doezema, R. E.; Santos, M. B.; Saha, D.; Pan, X.; Sanders, G. D.; Stanton, C. J.

    2015-06-07

    We measure the magneto-optical absorption due to intersubband optical transitions between conduction and valence subband Landau levels in InSb square and parabolic quantum wells. InSb has the narrowest band gap (0.24?eV at low temperature) of the III–V semiconductors leading to a small effective mass (0.014 m{sub 0}) and a large g–factor (?51). As a result, the Landau level spacing is large at relatively small magnetic fields (<8?T), and one can observe spin-splitting of the Landau levels. We examine two structures: (i) a multiple-square-well structure and (ii) a structure containing multiple parabolic wells. The energies and intensities of the strongest features are well explained by a modified Pidgeon-Brown model based on an 8-band k•p model that explicitly incorporates pseudomorphic strain. The strain is essential for obtaining agreement between theory and experiment. While modeling the square well is relatively straight-forward, the parabolic well consists of 43 different layers of various thickness to approximate a parabolic potential. Agreement between theory and experiment for the parabolic well validates the applicability of the model to complicated structures, which demonstrates the robustness of our model and confirms its relevance for developing electronic and spintronic devices that seek to exploit the properties of the InSb band structure.

  2. Lower bound on the mean square displacement of particles in the hard disk model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Richthammer

    2015-04-30

    The hard disk model is a 2D Gibbsian process of particles interacting via pure hard core repulsion. At high particle density the model is believed to show orientational order, however, it is known not to exhibit positional order. Here we investigate to what extent particle positions may fluctuate. We consider a finite volume version of the model in a box of dimensions $2n \\times 2n$ with arbitrary boundary configuration,and we show that the mean square displacement of particles near the center of the box is bounded from below by $c \\log n$. The result generalizes to a large class of models with fairly arbitrary interaction.

  3. New self-assembly luminescent molecular triangle and square rhenium(I) complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, S.S.; Lees, A.J.

    1999-09-20

    The design and study of well-arranged metal-containing macrocycles is one of the major current research areas in modern supramolecular chemistry. Apart from their particular structural features, supramolecular species formed by self-assembly of transition metals introduce many special functional properties such as luminescence, redox activity, and magnetism into the structure. More recently, transition metal based molecular squares have been synthesized by utilizing self-assembly of preorganized metal centers and pyridine-based bridging ligands. The 90{degree} bonding angles between ligands in transition metal complexes provide an attractive feature for constructing macrocyclic structures.

  4. The effect of interelement dipole coupling in patterned ultrathin single crystal Fe square arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Li; Zhai Ya; Wong Pingkwanj; Zhang Wen; Xu Yongbing; Zou Xiao; Wu Jing; Luo Linqiang; Zhai Hongru

    2011-02-01

    The correlation between the magnetic properties and the interelement separation in patterned arrays of ultrathin single crystal Fe films of 12 monolayers (ML) grown on GaAs(100) has been studied. The critical condition to form single domain remanent states in the square elements was found to be 10 {mu}m in size and 20 {mu}m for the interelement separation. The coercivity was also found to increase with the increasing interelement separation in the patterned arrays. These results are attributed to the competition between the large in-plane uniaxial anisotropy, the demagnetizing field, and interelement dipole coupling as determined semiqualitatively by the ferromagnetic resonance measurements.

  5. Non-intersecting squared Bessel paths: critical time and double scaling limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. J. Kuijlaars; A. Martinez-Finkelshtein; F. Wielonsky

    2010-11-04

    We consider the double scaling limit for a model of $n$ non-intersecting squared Bessel processes in the confluent case: all paths start at time $t=0$ at the same positive value $x=a$, remain positive, and are conditioned to end at time $t=1$ at $x=0$. After appropriate rescaling, the paths fill a region in the $tx$--plane as $n\\to \\infty$ that intersects the hard edge at $x=0$ at a critical time $t=t^{*}$. In a previous paper (arXiv:0712.1333), the scaling limits for the positions of the paths at time $t\

  6. Sub-mm tests of the gravitational inverse-square law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. G. Adelberger

    2002-02-02

    Sub-mm tests of the gravitational inverse-square law are interesting from several quite different perspectives. This paper discusses work by the Eot-Wash group performed since the publication of our initial result in February 2001. We find no evidence for short-range Yukawa interactions. Our results provide an upper limit of 200 micrometers on the size of the largest ``extra'' dimension, and for the unification scenario with 2 large extra dimensions, set an upper limit of 150 micrometers on the size of those dimensions.

  7. Review of the Palisades pressure vessel accumulated fluence estimate and of the least squares methodology employed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides a review of the Palisades submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requesting endorsement of their accumulated neutron fluence estimates based on a least squares adjustment methodology. This review highlights some minor issues in the applied methodology and provides some recommendations for future work. The overall conclusion is that the Palisades fluence estimation methodology provides a reasonable approach to a {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes} of the accumulated pressure vessel neutron fluence and is consistent with the state-of-the-art analysis as detailed in community consensus ASTM standards.

  8. Squaring the Circle in Biofuels? | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC) RedefiningSign Up forDaktoaSquaring

  9. Multi-Scale Experiments in Turbulent Subcooled Boiling Flow Through a Square Channel with a Single Heated Wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada Perez, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-12-12

    flow through a square channel. The explored visualization techniques were: 1) Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV), which provides velocity measurements of the liquid phase, 2) High-speed shadowgraphy (HSS) which is used to study the dispersed phase...

  10. Measurement of the Isolated Prompt Photon Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at [square root] s=7??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, Burak Han

    The differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons has been measured as a function of the photon transverse energy ET? [E subscript Tau superscript gamma] in pp collisions at ?s=7??[square ...

  11. Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations in pp Collisions at ?s=7? [square root of s=7]?TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, Burak Han

    Measurements of dijet azimuthal decorrelations in pp collisions at ?s=7??[square root of s=7] TeV using the CMS detector at the CERN LHC are presented. The analysis is based on an inclusive dijet event sample corresponding ...

  12. The SQUARE-NURSE merger in Greater Manchester : the impact of social and spatial identity on phonological variation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barras, William

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the SQUARE/NURSE merger in three neighbouring locations in Greater Manchester. Several approaches are used to provide explanations for the geographical patterns of variation that are observed. These ...

  13. Pion femtoscopy in p?+?p collisions at ?s=200 [square root of s = 200] GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    The STAR Collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured two-pion correlation functions from p+p collisions at ?s=200 [square root of s = 200] GeV. Spatial scales are extracted via a femtoscopic ...

  14. Measurements of wall heat (mass) transfer for flow through blockages with round and square holes in a wide rectangular channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervantes, Joel

    2002-01-01

    Naphthalene sublimation and pressure measurement experiments were conducted to study heat (mass) transfer enhancement by blockages with staggered round and square holes for turbulent air flows through the holes in the blockages in an 8:1 rectangular...

  15. Least-squares variational principles and the finite element method: theory, formulations, and models for solid and fluid mechanics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontaza, Juan Pablo

    2004-09-30

    We consider the application of least-squares variational principles and the finite element method to the numerical solution of boundary value problems arising in the fields of solidand fluidmechanics.For manyof these ...

  16. Alternative Least-Squares Finite Element Models of Navier-Stokes Equations for Power-Law Fluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallala, Venkat

    2010-01-16

    -Squares formulations of the original partial differential equations (PDE's) in terms of primary variables require C1 continuity of the finite element spaces across inter-element boundaries. This higherorder continuity requirement for PDE's in primary variables is a...

  17. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop Measurement for Square Channels with V-shape Ribs at High Reynolds Numbers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkhamis, Nawaf Yahya

    2010-10-12

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2009 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP MEASUREMENT FOR SQUARE CHANNELS WITH V-SHAPE RIBS AT HIGH REYNOLDS NUMBERS A Thesis by NAWAF YAHYA ALKHAMIS... of Department, Dennis O?Neal August 2009 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering iii ABSTRACT Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop Measurement for Square Channels with V-shape Ribs at High Reynolds Numbers. (August 2009) Nawaf Yahya Alkhamis, B.Sc King...

  18. Heat transfer and friction in a square channel with one-wall or two-wall rib turbulators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jie Joy

    1991-01-01

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering HEAT TRANSFER AND FRICTION IN A SQUARE CHANNEI WITH ONE-WAIL OR TWO-WALL RIB TURBULATORS A Thesis by JIE JOY HUANG Approved as to style snd content by: J. C. Han (Chair.... , Shanghai Institute of Mechanical Engineering Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. J. C, Han This experimental program studies the effect of the wall heat flux ratio on the local heat transfer distributions and pressure drop in a square channel...

  19. Full lineup serves wide variety of processing needs DAD3220, 3230 or 3430 is a one-axis dicing saw for 6-inch (6-inch square)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for ø6-inch (6-inch square) workpieces. DAD3220, just 500 mm wide, helps conserve valuable cleanroom

  20. Self-assembly molecular squares with metal complexes as bridging ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, S.S.; Silva, A.S.; Brinn, I.M.; Lees, A.J.

    2000-04-03

    Polynuclear transition metal complexes containing multichromophoric units, such as metal polypyridyl complexes, are of considerable current interest. Much attention has been paid to the synthesis of multicomponent systems that exhibit photoinduced intercomponent electron and/or energy-transfer processes and to their potential applications for photonic and electronic devices. Systems incorporating Re(I)- Ru(II)-, and Os(II)-based polypyridyl chromophores are the most commonly studied because of their favorable redox and spectroscopic characteristics. In this communication, the authors combine the concepts of self-assembly and complexes as ligands and report the preparation of a series of molecular squares with the general molecular formula [fac-Br(CO){sub 3}Re({mu}-(pyterpy){sub 2}M)]{sub 4}(PF{sub 6}){sub 8}, where pyterpy is 4{prime}-(4{prime}{double_prime}-pyridyl)-2,2{prime}:6{prime}2{double_prime}-terpyridine and M = Fe, Ru, or Os. The spectroscopic properties and a preliminary anion binding study of these novel octanuclear molecular squares are also presented.

  1. Solar-energy-system performance evaluation, Cathedral Square, Burlington, Vermont, July-December 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, K.M.

    1981-01-01

    The Cathedral Square solar site is a 10-story multiunit apartment building in Vermont. Its active solar energy system is designed to supply 51% of the hot water load, and consists of 1798 square feet of flat plate collectors, 2699-gallon water tank in an enclosed mechanical room on the roof, and two auxiliary natural gas boilers to supply hot water to immersed heat exchanger in an auxiliary storage tank. The measured solar fraction was only 28%, not 51%, which, it is concluded, is an unreasonable expectation. Other performance data include the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and solar system coefficient of performance. Monthly performance data are given for the solar system overall, and for the collector, storage, and hot water subsystems. Also included are insolation data, typical storage fluid temperatures, domestic hot water consumption, and solar heat exchangers inlet/outlet temperatures, and typical domestic hot water subsystem temperatures. In addition, the system operating sequence and solar energy utilization are given. Appended are a system description, performance evaluation techniques, long-term weather data. (LEW)

  2. An aerial radiological survey of the Central Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1991-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 194-square- kilometer (75-square-mile) area encompassing the central portion of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The survey was flown during February 10--27, 1987. These radiological measurements were used as baseline data for the central area and for determining the extent of man-made radionuclide distribution. Previous SRS surveys included small portions of the area; the 1987 survey was covered during the site- wide survey conducted in 1979. Man-made radionuclides (including cobalt-60, cesium-137, protactinium-234m, and elevated levels of uranium-238 progeny) that were detected during the survey were typical of those produced by the reactor operations and material processing activities being conducted in the area. The natural terrestrial radiation levels were consistent with those measured during prior surveys of other SRS areas. 1 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Optical pattern recognition architecture implementing the mean-square error correlation algorithm

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Molley, Perry A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    An optical architecture implementing the mean-square error correlation algorithm, MSE=.SIGMA.[I-R].sup.2 for discriminating the presence of a reference image R in an input image scene I by computing the mean-square-error between a time-varying reference image signal s.sub.1 (t) and a time-varying input image signal s.sub.2 (t) includes a laser diode light source which is temporally modulated by a double-sideband suppressed-carrier source modulation signal I.sub.1 (t) having the form I.sub.1 (t)=A.sub.1 [1+.sqroot.2m.sub.1 s.sub.1 (t)cos (2.pi.f.sub.o t)] and the modulated light output from the laser diode source is diffracted by an acousto-optic deflector. The resultant intensity of the +1 diffracted order from the acousto-optic device is given by: I.sub.2 (t)=A.sub.2 [+2m.sub.2.sup.2 s.sub.2.sup.2 (t)-2.sqroot.2m.sub.2 (t) cos (2.pi.f.sub.o t] The time integration of the two signals I.sub.1 (t) and I.sub.2 (t) on the CCD deflector plane produces the result R(.tau.) of the mean-square error having the form: R(.tau.)=A.sub.1 A.sub.2 {[T]+[2m.sub.2.sup.2.multidot..intg.s.sub.2.sup.2 (t-.tau.)dt]-[2m.sub.1 m.sub.2 cos (2.tau.f.sub.o .tau.).multidot..intg.s.sub.1 (t)s.sub.2 (t-.tau.)dt]} where: s.sub.1 (t) is the signal input to the diode modulation source: s.sub.2 (t) is the signal input to the AOD modulation source; A.sub.1 is the light intensity; A.sub.2 is the diffraction efficiency; m.sub.1 and m.sub.2 are constants that determine the signal-to-bias ratio; f.sub.o is the frequency offset between the oscillator at f.sub.c and the modulation at f.sub.c +f.sub.o ; and a.sub.o and a.sub.1 are constant chosen to bias the diode source and the acousto-optic deflector into their respective linear operating regions so that the diode source exhibits a linear intensity characteristic and the AOD exhibits a linear amplitude characteristic.

  4. Synergy between the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacon, David; Abdalla, Filipe B; Brown, Michael; Bull, Philip; Camera, Stefano; Fender, Rob; Grainge, Keith; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jarvis, Matt; Jackson, Neal; Kirk, Donnacha; Mann, Bob; McEwen, Jason; McKean, John; Newman, Jeffrey A; Raccanelli, Alvise; Sahlen, Martin; Santos, Mario; Tyson, Anthony; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    We provide an overview of the science benefits of combining information from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We first summarise the capabilities and timeline of the LSST and overview its science goals. We then discuss the science questions in common between the two projects, and how they can be best addressed by combining the data from both telescopes. We describe how weak gravitational lensing and galaxy clustering studies with LSST and SKA can provide improved constraints on the causes of the cosmological acceleration. We summarise the benefits to galaxy evolution studies of combining deep optical multi-band imaging with radio observations. Finally, we discuss the excellent match between one of the most unique features of the LSST, its temporal cadence in the optical waveband, and the time resolution of the SKA.

  5. The Origin of Magnetic Fields in Galaxies: Observational Tests with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer Beck

    2006-04-07

    The all-sky survey of Faraday rotation, a Key Science Project of the planned Square Kilometre Array, will accumulate tens of millions of rotation measure measurements toward background radio sources and will provide a unique database for characterizing the overall magnetic geometry of magnetic fields in galaxies and in the intergalactic medium. Deep imaging of the polarized synchrotron emission from a large number of nearby galaxies, combined with Faraday rotation data, will allow us to test the primordial, flow and dynamo models for field origin and amplification. The SKA will find the first fields in young galaxies and determine the timescale for building up small-scale turbulent and large-scale coherent fields. The spectrum of dynamo modes, if existing, will be resolved. The direction of the present-day coherent field keeps memory of the direction of the seed field which can be used for mapping the structure of the seed field before galaxy formation.

  6. Time domain studies of Active Galactic Nuclei with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bignall, Hayley; Hovatta, Talvikki; Koay, Jun Yi; Lazio, Joseph; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Reynolds, Cormac

    2015-01-01

    Variability of radio-emitting active galactic nuclei can be used to probe both intrinsic variations arising from shocks, flares, and other changes in emission from regions surrounding the central supermassive black hole, as well as extrinsic variations due to scattering by structures in our own Galaxy. Such interstellar scattering also probes the structure of the emitting regions, with microarcsecond resolution. Current studies have necessarily been limited to either small numbers of objects monitored over long periods of time, or large numbers of objects but with poor time sampling. The dramatic increase in survey speed engendered by the Square Kilometre Array will enable precision synoptic monitoring studies of hundreds of thousands of sources with a cadence of days or less. Statistics of variability, in particular concurrent observations at multiple radio frequencies and in other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum, will probe accretion physics over a wide range of AGN classes, luminosities, and orientat...

  7. Chi-Square Discriminators for Transiting Planet Detection in Kepler Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seader, Shawn; Jenkins, Jon M; Burke, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    The Kepler spacecraft observes a host of target stars to detect transiting planets. Requiring a 7.1 sigma detection in twelve quarters of data yields over 100,000 detections, many of which are false alarms. After a second cut is made on a robust detection statistic, some 50,000 or more targets still remain. These false alarms waste resources as they propagate through the remainder of the software pipeline and so a method to discriminate against them is crucial in maintaining the desired sensitivity to true events. This paper describes a chi-square test which represents a novel application of the formalism developed by Allen for false alarm mitigation in searches for gravitational waves. Using this technique, the false alarm rate can be lowered to ~5%.

  8. Constraints on Light Pseudoscalars Implied by Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ephraim Fischbach; Dennis E. Krause

    1999-06-03

    The exchange of light pseudoscalars between fermions leads to a spin-independent potential in order g^4, where g is the Yukawa pseudoscalar-fermion coupling constant. This potential gives rise to detectable violations of both the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and the gravitational inverse-square law (ISL), even if g is quite small. We show that when previously derived WEP constraints are combined with those arisingfrom ISL tests, a direct experimental limit on the Yukawa coupling of light pseudoscalars to neutrons can be inferred for the first time (g_n^2/4pi < 1.6 \\times 10^-7), along with a new (and significantly improved) limit on the coupling of light pseudoscalars to protons.

  9. Multivariate analysis of remote LIBS spectra using partial least squares, principal component analysis, and related techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, Samuel M; Barefield, James E; Wiens, Roger C; Sklute, Elizabeth; Dyare, Melinda D

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis with LIBS traditionally employs calibration curves that are complicated by the chemical matrix effects. These chemical matrix effects influence the LIBS plasma and the ratio of elemental composition to elemental emission line intensity. Consequently, LIBS calibration typically requires a priori knowledge of the unknown, in order for a series of calibration standards similar to the unknown to be employed. In this paper, three new Multivariate Analysis (MV A) techniques are employed to analyze the LIBS spectra of 18 disparate igneous and highly-metamorphosed rock samples. Partial Least Squares (PLS) analysis is used to generate a calibration model from which unknown samples can be analyzed. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) are employed to generate a model and predict the rock type of the samples. These MV A techniques appear to exploit the matrix effects associated with the chemistries of these 18 samples.

  10. Spin-dependent Seebeck effects in a graphene nanoribbon coupled to two square lattice ferromagnetic leads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Benhu Zeng, Yangsu; Zhou, Benliang; Zhou, Guanghui; Ouyang, Tao

    2015-03-14

    We theoretically investigate spin-dependent Seebeck effects for a system consisting of a narrow graphene nanoribbon (GNR) contacted to square lattice ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes with noncollinear magnetic moments. Both zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) and armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) were considered. Compared with our previous work with two-dimensional honeycomb-lattice FM leads, a more realistic model of two-dimensional square-lattice FM electrodes is adopted here. Using the nonequilibrium Green's function method combining with the tight-binding Hamiltonian, it is demonstrated that both the charge Seebeck coefficient S{sub C} and the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient S{sub S} strongly depend on the geometrical contact between the GNR and the leads. In our previous work, S{sub C} for a semiconducting 15-AGNR system near the Dirac point is two orders of magnitude larger than that of a metallic 17-AGNR system. However, S{sub C} is the same order of magnitude for both metallic 17-AGNR and semiconducting 15-AGNR systems in the present paper because of the lack of a transmission energy gap for the 15-AGNR system. Furthermore, the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient S{sub S} for the systems with 20-ZGNR, 17-AGNR, and 15-AGNR is of the same order of magnitude and its maximum absolute value can reach 8??V/K. The spin-dependent Seebeck effects are not very pronounced because the transmission coefficient weakly depends on spin orientation. Moreover, the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient is further suppressed with increasing angle between the relative alignments of magnetization directions of the two leads. Additionally, the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient can be strongly suppressed for larger disorder strength. The results obtained here may provide valuable theoretical guidance in the experimental design of heat spintronic devices.

  11. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Alan; Soupir, Jim (US Forest Service, Prairie City Ranger District, Prairie City, OR); Schwabe, Lawrence (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

    2003-08-01

    The Malheur River is a 306-kilometer tributary to the Snake River, which drains 12,950 square kilometers. The Malheur River originates in the Blue Mountains and flows into the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C, and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 30 centimeters in the lower reaches. Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2002. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus are considered to be cold water species and are temperature-dependant. Due to the interest of bull trout from various state and Federal agencies, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. Table 1 lists individuals that participated in the 2002 work group. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power Administration contract period starting April 1, 2002, and ending March 31, 2003. All tasks were conducted within this timeframe, and a more detailed timeframe may be referred to in each individual report.

  12. Linear stability of magnetohydrodynamic flow in a square duct with thin conducting walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priede, J?nis; Bühler, Leo

    2015-01-01

    This study is concerned with numerical linear stability analysis of liquid metal flow in a square duct with thin electrically conducting walls subject to a uniform transverse magnetic field. We derive an asymptotic solution for the base flow which is valid not only for high but also moderate magnetic fields. This solution shows that for low wall conductance ratios $c\\ll1,$ an extremely strong magnetic field with the Hartmann number $Ha\\sim c^{-4}$ is required to attain the asymptotic flow regime considered in the previous studies. We use a vector stream function/vorticity formulation and a Chebyshev collocation method to solve the eigenvalue problem for three-dimensional small-amplitude perturbations in ducts with realistic wall conductance ratios $c=1,0.1,0.01$ and Hartmann numbers up to $10^{4}.$ As for similar flows, instability in a sufficiently strong magnetic field is found to occur in the side-wall jets with the characteristic thickness $\\delta\\sim Ha^{-1/2}.$ This results in the critical Reynolds numb...

  13. Formation mechanism of hairpin vortices in the wake of a truncated square cylinder in a duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dousset, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the laminar shedding of hairpin vortices in the wake of a truncated square cylinder placed in a duct, for Reynolds numbers around the critical threshold of the onset of vortex shedding. We single out the formation mechanism of the hairpin vortices by means of a detailed analysis of the flow patterns in the steady regime. We show that unlike in previous studies of similar structures, the dynamics of the hairpin vortices is entwined with that of the counter-rotating pair of streamwise vortices, which we found to be generated in the bottom part of the near wake (these are usually referred to as base vortices). In particular, once the hairpin structure is released, the base vortices attach to it, forming its legs, so these are streamwise, and not spanwise as previously observed in unconfined wakes or behind cylinders of lower aspect ratios. We also single out a trail of Omega-shaped vortices, generated between successive hairpin vortices through a mechanism that is analogous to that active in near-...

  14. Approximate l-fold cross-validation with Least Squares SVM and Kernel Ridge Regression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Richard E [ORNL] [ORNL; Zhang, Hao [ORNL] [ORNL; Parker, Lynne Edwards [ORNL] [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Kernel methods have difficulties scaling to large modern data sets. The scalability issues are based on computational and memory requirements for working with a large matrix. These requirements have been addressed over the years by using low-rank kernel approximations or by improving the solvers scalability. However, Least Squares Support VectorMachines (LS-SVM), a popular SVM variant, and Kernel Ridge Regression still have several scalability issues. In particular, the O(n^3) computational complexity for solving a single model, and the overall computational complexity associated with tuning hyperparameters are still major problems. We address these problems by introducing an O(n log n) approximate l-fold cross-validation method that uses a multi-level circulant matrix to approximate the kernel. In addition, we prove our algorithm s computational complexity and present empirical runtimes on data sets with approximately 1 million data points. We also validate our approximate method s effectiveness at selecting hyperparameters on real world and standard benchmark data sets. Lastly, we provide experimental results on using a multi-level circulant kernel approximation to solve LS-SVM problems with hyperparameters selected using our method.

  15. Stochastic earthquake source model: the omega-square hypothesis and the directivity effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molchan, G

    2015-01-01

    Recently A. Gusev suggested and numerically investigated the doubly stochastic earthquake source model. The model is supposed to demonstrate the following features in the far-field body waves: 1) the omega-square high-frequency (HF) behavior of displacement spectra; 2) lack of the directivity effect in HF radiation; and 3) a stochastic nature of the HF signal component. The model involves two stochastic elements: the local stress drop (SD) on a fault and the rupture time function (RT) with a linear dominant component. The goal of the present study is to investigate the Gusev model theoretically and to find conditions for (1, 2) to be valid and stable relative to receiver site. The models with smooth elements SD, RT are insufficient for these purposes. Therefore SD and RT are treated as realizations of stochastic fields of the fractal type. The local smoothness of such fields is characterized by the fractional (Hurst) exponent H, 0 < H < 1. This allows us to consider a wide class of stochastic functions ...

  16. Nanocluster building blocks of artificial square spin ice: Stray-field studies of thermal dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohlit, Merlin Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael; Müller, Jens

    2015-05-07

    We present measurements of the thermal dynamics of a Co-based single building block of an artificial square spin ice fabricated by focused electron-beam-induced deposition. We employ micro-Hall magnetometry, an ultra-sensitive tool to study the stray field emanating from magnetic nanostructures, as a new technique to access the dynamical properties during the magnetization reversal of the spin-ice nanocluster. The obtained hysteresis loop exhibits distinct steps, displaying a reduction of their “coercive field” with increasing temperature. Therefore, thermally unstable states could be repetitively prepared by relatively simple temperature and field protocols allowing one to investigate the statistics of their switching behavior within experimentally accessible timescales. For a selected switching event, we find a strong reduction of the so-prepared states' “survival time” with increasing temperature and magnetic field. Besides the possibility to control the lifetime of selected switching events at will, we find evidence for a more complex behavior caused by the special spin ice arrangement of the macrospins, i.e., that the magnetic reversal statistically follows distinct “paths” most likely driven by thermal perturbation.

  17. The Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koopmans, L V E; Mellema, G; Abdalla, F; Aguirre, J; Ahn, K; Barkana, R; van Bemmel, I; Bernardi, G; Bonaldi, A; Briggs, F; de Bruyn, A G; Chang, T C; Chapman, E; Chen, X; Ciardi, B; Datta, K K; Dayal, P; Ferrara, A; Fialkov, A; Fiore, F; Ichiki, K; Illiev, I T; Inoue, S; Jeli?, V; Jones, M; Lazio, J; Maio, U; Majumdar, S; Mack, K J; Mesinger, A; Morales, M F; Parsons, A; Pen, U -L; Santos, M; Schneider, R; Semelin, B; de Souza, R S; Subrahmanyan, R; Takeuchi, T; Trott, C; Vedantham, H; Wagg, J; Webster, R; Wyithe, S

    2015-01-01

    Concerted effort is currently ongoing to open up the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) ($z\\sim$15-6) for studies with IR and radio telescopes. Whereas IR detections have been made of sources (Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitters, quasars and drop-outs) in this redshift regime in relatively small fields of view, no direct detection of neutral hydrogen, via the redshifted 21-cm line, has yet been established. Such a direct detection is expected in the coming years, with ongoing surveys, and could open up the entire universe from $z\\sim$6-200 for astrophysical and cosmological studies, opening not only the EoR, but also its preceding Cosmic Dawn ($z\\sim$30-15) and possibly even the later phases of the Dark Ages ($z\\sim$200-30). All currently ongoing experiments attempt statistical detections of the 21-cm signal during the EoR, with limited signal-to-noise. Direct imaging, except maybe on the largest (degree) scales at lower redshifts, as well as higher redshifts will remain out of reach. The Square Kilometre Array(SKA) will revolu...

  18. Extending cosmological tests of General Relativity with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Bull

    2015-09-24

    Tests of general relativity (GR) are still in their infancy on cosmological scales, but forthcoming experiments promise to greatly improve their precision over a wide range of distance scales and redshifts. One such experiment, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will carry out several wide and deep surveys of resolved and unresolved neutral hydrogen (HI) 21cm line-emitting galaxies, mapping a significant fraction of the sky from $0 \\le z \\lesssim 6$. I present forecasts for the ability of a suite of possible SKA HI surveys to detect deviations from GR by reconstructing the cosmic expansion and growth history. SKA Phase 1 intensity mapping surveys can achieve sub-1% measurements of $f\\sigma_8$ out to $z\\approx 1$, with an SKA1-MID Band 2 survey out to $z \\lesssim 0.6$ able to surpass contemporary spectroscopic galaxy surveys such as DESI and Euclid in terms of constraints on modified gravity parameters if challenges such as foreground contamination can be tackled effectively. A more futuristic Phase 2 HI survey of $\\sim 10^9$ spectroscopic galaxy redshifts would be capable of detecting a $\\sim 2\\%$ modification of the Poisson equation out to $z\\approx 2$.

  19. Simulated Stochastic Approximation Annealing for Global Optimization with a Square-Root Cooling Schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Faming; Cheng, Yichen; Lin, Guang

    2014-06-13

    Simulated annealing has been widely used in the solution of optimization problems. As known by many researchers, the global optima cannot be guaranteed to be located by simulated annealing unless a logarithmic cooling schedule is used. However, the logarithmic cooling schedule is so slow that no one can afford to have such a long CPU time. This paper proposes a new stochastic optimization algorithm, the so-called simulated stochastic approximation annealing algorithm, which is a combination of simulated annealing and the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm. Under the framework of stochastic approximation Markov chain Monte Carlo, it is shown that the new algorithm can work with a cooling schedule in which the temperature can decrease much faster than in the logarithmic cooling schedule, e.g., a square-root cooling schedule, while guaranteeing the global optima to be reached when the temperature tends to zero. The new algorithm has been tested on a few benchmark optimization problems, including feed-forward neural network training and protein-folding. The numerical results indicate that the new algorithm can significantly outperform simulated annealing and other competitors.

  20. Odd-even effect of melting finite polymer film on square lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tieyan Si

    2015-03-24

    Two dimensional film system bears many exotic thermodynamics behaviors. We proposed a mathematical physics model to explore how the melting temperature of a two dimensional mathematical dimer film depends on the odd-eveness of the finite width of dimer film. A weak external bond between dimers is introduced into the classical dimer model in this dimer film. We derived a general equation of melting temperature and applied it for computing the melting temperature of a dimer film covering a finite square lattice. The melting temperature is proportional to the external bonding energy that we assume it binds neighboring dimers together and proportional to the inverse of entropy per site. Further more, it shows fusing two small rectangular dimer film with odd number of length into one big rectangular film gains more entropy than fusing two small rectangles with even number of length into the same big rectangle. Fusing two small toruses with even number of length into one big torus reduces entropy. Fusing two small toruses with odd number of length increases the entropy. Thus two dimer films with even number of length repel each other, two dimer films with odd length attract each other. The odd-even effect is also reflected on the correlation function of two topologically distinguishable loops in a torus surface. The entropy of finite system dominates odd-even effect. This model has straightforward extension to longer polymers and three dimensional systems.

  1. High order Fuchsian equations for the square lattice Ising model: $?^{(6)}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Boukraa; S. Hassani; I. Jensen; J. -M. Maillard; N. Zenine

    2009-12-25

    This paper deals with $\\tilde{\\chi}^{(6)}$, the six-particle contribution to the magnetic susceptibility of the square lattice Ising model. We have generated, modulo a prime, series coefficients for $\\tilde{\\chi}^{(6)}$. The length of the series is sufficient to produce the corresponding Fuchsian linear differential equation (modulo a prime). We obtain the Fuchsian linear differential equation that annihilates the "depleted" series $\\Phi^{(6)}=\\tilde{\\chi}^{(6)} - {2 \\over 3} \\tilde{\\chi}^{(4)} + {2 \\over 45} \\tilde{\\chi}^{(2)}$. The factorization of the corresponding differential operator is performed using a method of factorization modulo a prime introduced in a previous paper. The "depleted" differential operator is shown to have a structure similar to the corresponding operator for $\\tilde{\\chi}^{(5)}$. It splits into factors of smaller orders, with the left-most factor of order six being equivalent to the symmetric fifth power of the linear differential operator corresponding to the elliptic integral $E$. The right-most factor has a direct sum structure, and using series calculated modulo several primes, all the factors in the direct sum have been reconstructed in exact arithmetics.

  2. High order Fuchsian equations for the square lattice Ising model: $\\tilde?^{(5)}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bostan; S. Boukraa; A. J. Guttmann; S. Hassani; I. Jensen; J. -M. Maillard; N. Zenine

    2009-04-09

    We consider the Fuchsian linear differential equation obtained (modulo a prime) for $\\tilde{\\chi}^{(5)}$, the five-particle contribution to the susceptibility of the square lattice Ising model. We show that one can understand the factorization of the corresponding linear differential operator from calculations using just a single prime. A particular linear combination of $\\tilde{\\chi}^{(1)}$ and $\\tilde{\\chi}^{(3)}$ can be removed from $\\tilde{\\chi}^{(5)}$ and the resulting series is annihilated by a high order globally nilpotent linear ODE. The corresponding (minimal order) linear differential operator, of order 29, splits into factors of small orders. A fifth order linear differential operator occurs as the left-most factor of the "depleted" differential operator and it is shown to be equivalent to the symmetric fourth power of $L_E$, the linear differential operator corresponding to the elliptic integral $E$. This result generalizes what we have found for the lower order terms $\\tilde{\\chi}^{(3)}$ and $\\tilde{\\chi}^{(4)}$. We conjecture that a linear differential operator equivalent to a symmetric $(n-1)$-th power of $L_E$ occurs as a left-most factor in the minimal order linear differential operators for all $\\tilde{\\chi}^{(n)}$'s.

  3. Extending cosmological tests of General Relativity with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bull, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Tests of general relativity (GR) are still in their infancy on cosmological scales, but forthcoming experiments promise to greatly improve their precision over a wide range of distance scales and redshifts. One such experiment, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will carry out several wide and deep surveys of resolved and unresolved neutral hydrogen (HI) 21cm line-emitting galaxies, mapping a significant fraction of the sky from $0 \\le z \\lesssim 6$. I present forecasts for the ability of a suite of possible SKA HI surveys to detect deviations from GR by reconstructing the cosmic expansion and growth history. SKA Phase 1 intensity mapping surveys can achieve sub-1% measurements of $f\\sigma_8$ out to $z\\approx 1$, with an SKA1-MID Band 2 survey out to $z \\lesssim 0.6$ able to surpass contemporary spectroscopic galaxy surveys such as DESI and Euclid in terms of constraints on modified gravity parameters if challenges such as foreground contamination can be tackled effectively. A more futuristic Phase 2 HI survey...

  4. Lepers and Ludwig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2010-09-15

    Broadcast Transcript: This is not a postcard about South Korea. It is a postcard about compassion and connection that just happens to take place in South Korea on Sorok Island, located one kilometer off the southwest coast. Until last year...

  5. Rediscovering the River Bièvre : the feasibility of restoring ecological functions in an urban stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Jacob T., 1978-

    2005-01-01

    The Bièvre's 36-kilometer course stretches from the southwest of Paris near Satin-Quentin-en- Yvelines through numerous towns before disappearing into the urban hydraulic network upon its approach to Paris's dense urban ...

  6. Oelrichs folio, South Dakota-Nebraska 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darton, Nelson Horatio, 1865-1948.

    1902-01-01

    Results of previous investigations have indicated the possibility that recent deformation has occurred on the Criner fault of southern Oklahoma. The Criner fault is located in Carter and Love Counties, Oklahoma, approximately 100 kilometers...

  7. Novel approaches to Newtonian noise suppression in interferometric gravitational wave detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter-Jones, Nicholas R

    2011-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) attempts to detect ripples in the curvature of spacetime using two large scale interferometers. These detectors are several kilometer long Michelson interferometers ...

  8. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gras, Slawek

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale ...

  9. Levee Failures in the Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta: Characteristics and Perspectives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopf, Frank

    2012-02-14

    Between 1850 and 1922, agriculturalists built 1,700 kilometers of levees to convert 250,000 hectares of tidal marsh to farmland where the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers enter the San Francisco Bay (the Delta). Drained, ...

  10. January 21, 2000 Snowball Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catling, David C.

    escaping from the molten core prevents the oceans from freezing to the bottom, but ice grows a kilometer cryogenic slumber, the volcanoes slowly manufacture an escape from the chill: carbon dioxide

  11. EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations. This...

  12. Toll road public-private partnerships in Malaysia : using the CLIOS process for policy improvements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, John L., 1977-

    2005-01-01

    Malaysia has relied on private sector provision of toll roads for over twenty years using public- private partnerships (PPPs). While the program has been successful in providing close to 1,800 kilometers of highway in that ...

  13. 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting AIAA-2007-0874 January 8-11, 2007 Reno, NV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhixiong "James"

    size of the resonator (usually the order of 1m for meso-scale CRDS) to several kilometers. Through limitations on the meso-scale CRDS technique. The intensity of the light coupled into and out of the cavity

  14. Eurographics Conference on Visualization (EuroVis) 2012 S. Bruckner, S. Miksch, and H. Pfister

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Bernd

    mesoscale eddies, that are believed to have a role in the transport and redistribution of salt, heat Mesoscale eddies are vortices with diameters on the order of a hundred kilometers and typical lifetimes

  15. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly...

  16. Organization and Environmental Properties of Extreme-Rain-Producing Mesoscale Convective Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumacher, Russ

    -kilometer national composite radar reflectivity data are then used to examine the structure and evolution of each. Doswell et al. (1996, hereafter DBM96) note that the total precipitation at any point is directly pro

  17. A study of the characteristics of thunderstorm cessation at the NASA Kennedy Space Center 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinson, Michael Shawn

    1997-01-01

    A lightning summary was developed for a 100xlOO kilometer area centered at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. Spatial and temporal patterns, and first stroke peak currents were analyzed from 1986-1995, Three thunderstorms were chosen due...

  18. Hydrodynamic and transport phenomena at the interface between flow and aquatic vegetation : from the forest to the blade scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

    2014-01-01

    From the canopy scale to the blade scale, interactions between fluid motion and kelp produce a wide array of hydrodynamic and scalar transport phenomena. At the kilometer scale of the kelp forest, coastal currents transport ...

  19. APPENDIX 6 : ABBRE VIATIONS Abbreviations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    kilometer L liter LME large marine ecosystem LNG liquid natural gas m meter MAFMC Mid-Atlantic Fishery National Research Council NRCS Natural Resources Conservation Service NWFSC Northwest Fisheries Science

  20. Open to the public! : a new network of communal recreation waterfront space in Bangkok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srirojanapinyo, Apichart

    2009-01-01

    Physically and historically, Bangkok has been shaped by its relationship to its waterfront. Flowing 370 kilometers through Thailand, the Chao Phraya River is more than the nation's lifeline. It was a principal waterway ...

  1. Geophysical modeling of two willemite deposits, Vazante (Brazil) and Beltana (Australia) Richard A. Krahenbuhl* and Murray Hitzman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by conventional processing techniques and geophysical inversion. Vazante deposit in Brazil The Vazante willemite. The mineralized portion of the fault zone extends more than 5 kilometers along strike and is known from drilling

  2. Sensitivity and noise analysis of 4 km laser interferometric gravitational wave antennae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adhikari, Rana, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Around the world, efforts are underway to commission several kilometer-scale laser interferometers to detect gravitational radiation. In the United States, there are two collocated interferometers in Hanford, Washington ...

  3. Tunable micro-cavities in photonic band-gap yarns and optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit, Gilles, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    The vision behind this work is the fabrication of high performance innovative fiber-based optical components over kilometer length-scales. The optical properties of these fibers derive from their multilayer dielectric ...

  4. Rice Field Geochemistry and Hydrology: An Explanation for Why Groundwater Irrigated Fields in Bangladesh are Net Sinks of Arsenic from Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Rebecca B.

    Irrigation of rice fields in Bangladesh with arsenic-contaminated groundwater transfers tens of cubic kilometers of water and thousands of tons of arsenic from aquifers to rice fields each year. Here we combine observations ...

  5. Evaluating the national HIV counseling and testing (CT) program of St. Lucia: a study to determine coverage, utilization, successes, and gaps in service delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asrat, Anjabebu S.

    2010-01-01

    quot;“""°5 ‘ -M ~ Barbados 0 200 Kilometers ‘ .Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada,Tobago 2.6% Guyana 2.4% Barbados 1.5% Jamaica 1.5% Dominican

  6. Transition from geostrophic turbulence to inertia–gravity waves in the atmospheric energy spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    Midlatitude fluctuations of the atmospheric winds on scales of thousands of kilometers, the most energetic of such fluctuations, are strongly constrained by the Earth’s rotation and the atmosphere’s stratification. As a ...

  7. Stratal architecture and sedimentology of a portion of the Upper Cambrian Hickory Sandstone, central Texas, U.S.A. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Teran, Isaac Antonio

    2009-05-15

    in central Texas provide an exceptional opportunity to examine the sedimentology of deposits of this age in order to interpret sedimentary environments. During quarrying, vertical walls, one half-kilometer long and several tens of meters high, are blasted...

  8. Open Issues in the search for gravitational wave transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackburn, Lindy L

    2010-01-01

    The LIGO-Virgo network of kilometer-scale laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors reached a major milestone with the successful operation of LIGO's fifth (S5) and Virgo's first (VSR1) science runs during 2005-2007. ...

  9. Leveraging infrastructure : sustainable bus rapid transit route planning in Beirut, Lebanon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabti, Jumana M., 1976-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis applies the concepts of urban design, public transportation planning, economic development, and sustainability, to the routing and site plan of a two-kilometer bus rapid transit (BRT) line segment into downtown ...

  10. The San FranciscoVolcanic Field,which covers about 1,800 square miles, is part of northern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The San FranciscoVolcanic Field,which covers about 1,800 square miles, is part of northern Arizona at the high- est elevations.The varied forests and geologic features of the San FranciscoVolcanic Field offer young but extinct volcanoes of the San Francisco Volcanic Field.Without the volcanoes, this region would

  11. 898 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 36, NO. 3, MAY 1998 Least Squares Subspace Projection Approach to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chein-I

    be thought of as a priori OSP. In order to evaluate these three approaches, their associated least squares) analysis. All results are demonstrated by computer simulations and Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging classifier (TSC). I. INTRODUCTION THE ADVENT of high spatial resolution airborne and satellite sensors

  12. Bound state solutions of square root power law potential--Wavefunction ansatz method on $D$-dimensional Schrödinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tapas Das

    2015-03-25

    $D$-dimensional Schr\\"{o}dinger equation is addressed for square root power law potential. Bound state unnormalized eigenfunctions and the energy eigenvalues are obtained using wave function ansatz method. Some special cases are studied at the end to ensure the correctness of present work.

  13. Running head: PLSCA FOR BEHAVIORALAND GENETIC DATA 1 Partial Least Squares-Correspondence Analysis: A framework to simultaneously analyze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdi, Hervé

    : A framework to simultaneously analyze behavioral and genetic data Derek Beaton* School of Behavioral and BrainRunning head: PLSCA FOR BEHAVIORALAND GENETIC DATA 1 Partial Least Squares-Correspondence Analysis Sciences The University of Texas at Dallas MS: GR4.1 800 West Campbell Rd. Richardson, TX 75080 USA Joseph

  14. Storage and discharge estimation of Danube basin by least-squares prediction J. Zhang, M. J. Tourian, N. Sneeuw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    Storage and discharge estimation of Danube basin by least-squares prediction J. Zhang, M. J The total storage changes can be observed by GRACE. However, GRACE has already outlived its predicted water storage changes until GRACE Follow-On becomes operational in 2017. The variation in water storage

  15. A Fourth Order Hermitian Box-Scheme with Fast Solver for the Poisson Problem in a Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croisille, Jean-Pierre

    A Fourth Order Hermitian Box-Scheme with Fast Solver for the Poisson Problem in a Square Ali Abbas Metz, France email: croisil@poncelet.univ-metz.fr December 12, 2010 1 #12;Abstract A new fourth order the approximation of the gradient by the fourth order hermitian derivative, with a conservative discrete formulation

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 58, NO. 5, MAY 2012 2541 Least Squares Superposition Codes of Moderate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Edward L.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 58, NO. 5, MAY 2012 2541 Least Squares Superposition, IEEE, and Andrew R Barron, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--For the additive white Gaussian noise channel April 17, 2012. The material in this paper was presented in part at the 2010 IEEE International

  17. IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING LETTERS, VOL. 13, NO. 5, MAY 2006 265 A Square-Root Adaptive V-BLAST Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rontogiannis, Athanasios A.

    IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING LETTERS, VOL. 13, NO. 5, MAY 2006 265 A Square-Root Adaptive V-BLAST Algorithm for Fast Time-Varying MIMO Channels Athanasios A. Rontogiannis, Member, IEEE, Vassilis Kekatos, Student Member, IEEE, and Kostas Berberidis, Member, IEEE Abstract--Among the methods that have been

  18. Calculation of the Electric and Magnetic Root Mean Squared Radiuses of Proton Based on MIT Bag Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryam Momeni Feili; Mahvash Zandi

    2015-01-12

    The electric and magnetic bag radiuses of the proton can be determined by MIT bag model based on electric and magnetic form factors of the proton. Also we determined electric and magnetic root mean squared radiuses of the proton, using of bag radius and compared with other results suggests a suitable compatibility.

  19. Widespread occurrence of the inverse square distribution in social sciences and taxonomy Guido Caldarelli,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caldarelli, Guido

    Widespread occurrence of the inverse square distribution in social sciences and taxonomy GuidoRevE.69.035101 PACS number s : 89.75.Fb, 89.75.Hc, 05.40. a, 05.65. b Taxonomy is one of the major

  20. General series solution for finite square-well energy levels for use in wave-packet studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroud, Carlos R.

    General series solution for finite square-well energy levels for use in wave-packet studies David L solution is useful for local approximations of the energy spectrum which target a particular energy range. In Sec. III, we develop a general series solution for the energy spectrum that makes use of a ``height

  1. PIV flow measurements for heat transfer characterization in two-pass square channels with smooth and 90 ribbed walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    passages inside a turbine blade to convectively extract heat from the blade body. The coolant air Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Advanced gas turbine airfoils are subjected-pass square channel was reported using liquid crystal technique by Ekkad and Han [4]. Park and Lau [5] also

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 54, NO. 6, JUNE 2006 2155 A Minimum Squared-Error Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldar, Yonina

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 54, NO. 6, JUNE 2006 2155 A Minimum Squared processing entails representing a signal by a set of coefficients and relies on the existence of methods kernel. In practice, however, the input signal is never perfectly bandlimited, and the sampling process

  3. 80 IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING LE'ITERS, VOL. 1, NO. 5, MAY 1994 Using Least Squares to Improve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swindlehurst, A. Lee

    80 IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING LE'ITERS, VOL. 1, NO. 5, MAY 1994 Using Least Squares to Improve Blind Signal Copy Performance A. Swindlehurst, Member, IEEE, and J. Yang Abstract-Conventional methods for signal copy require one to estimate the directions of arrival (DOA's) of the signals prior to computing

  4. Inclusive Electroweak measurements in the muon channel with pp collisions at [the square root of] s=7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Philip Coleman

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we perform the measurement of the production of W and Z bosons in proton-proton collisions at [the square root of]s = 7 TeV with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In the LHC, W and Z bosons are produced at ...

  5. The Failure of Confidence Mechanism: Reflections on the 1990’s Social Change Movement in the Light of policy Measures Affecting Farming System in Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Tulsi Ram

    1993-01-01

    to external goods intensified after 1950s with the opening of rural interiors through transportation development. In 1951, Nepal only had a total of 376 kilometers of motorable roads of any kind. This increased to 6,306 kilometers in 1986 (CBS 1988: 119... of the 1964 Lands Act was able to raise an equivalent of USdoliar 15 million within four years of its implementation (Baskota and Lohani 1985: 101). Unfortunately the administrative machinary assigned to dispense credit was inelfecient in recording...

  6. Robust parallel iterative solvers for linear and least-squares problems, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saad, Yousef

    2014-01-16

    The primary goal of this project is to study and develop robust iterative methods for solving linear systems of equations and least squares systems. The focus of the Minnesota team is on algorithms development, robustness issues, and on tests and validation of the methods on realistic problems. 1. The project begun with an investigation on how to practically update a preconditioner obtained from an ILU-type factorization, when the coefficient matrix changes. 2. We investigated strategies to improve robustness in parallel preconditioners in a specific case of a PDE with discontinuous coefficients. 3. We explored ways to adapt standard preconditioners for solving linear systems arising from the Helmholtz equation. These are often difficult linear systems to solve by iterative methods. 4. We have also worked on purely theoretical issues related to the analysis of Krylov subspace methods for linear systems. 5. We developed an effective strategy for performing ILU factorizations for the case when the matrix is highly indefinite. The strategy uses shifting in some optimal way. The method was extended to the solution of Helmholtz equations by using complex shifts, yielding very good results in many cases. 6. We addressed the difficult problem of preconditioning sparse systems of equations on GPUs. 7. A by-product of the above work is a software package consisting of an iterative solver library for GPUs based on CUDA. This was made publicly available. It was the first such library that offers complete iterative solvers for GPUs. 8. We considered another form of ILU which blends coarsening techniques from Multigrid with algebraic multilevel methods. 9. We have released a new version on our parallel solver - called pARMS [new version is version 3]. As part of this we have tested the code in complex settings - including the solution of Maxwell and Helmholtz equations and for a problem of crystal growth.10. As an application of polynomial preconditioning we considered the problem of evaluating f(A)v which arises in statistical sampling. 11. As an application to the methods we developed, we tackled the problem of computing the diagonal of the inverse of a matrix. This arises in statistical applications as well as in many applications in physics. We explored probing methods as well as domain-decomposition type methods. 12. A collaboration with researchers from Toulouse, France, considered the important problem of computing the Schur complement in a domain-decomposition approach. 13. We explored new ways of preconditioning linear systems, based on low-rank approximations.

  7. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 56, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2008 5273 Improved Mean-Square Error Estimate for the LMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    -Square Error Estimate for the LMS Transversal Equalizer With Narrowband Interference Takeshi Ikuma and A. A. (Louis) Beex Abstract--When the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm is used to adapt an adaptive in such an environment. We have recently shown that the mean of the LMS weights in this adaptive equalizer problem shifts

  8. Inverse Square Law of Gravitation in (2+1)-Dimensional Space-Time as a Consequence of Casimir Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. H. Soleng

    1993-10-04

    The gravitational effect of vacuum polarization in space exterior to a particle in (2+1)-dimensional Einstein theory is investigated. In the weak field limit this gravitational field corresponds to an inverse square law of gravitational attraction, even though the gravitational mass of the quantum vacuum is negative. The paradox is resolved by considering a particle of finite extension and taking into account the vacuum polarization in its interior.

  9. Effects of the Inverse Square Potential on Nucleon-Nucleon Elastic Scattering in the Bethe-Salpeter Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susumu Kinpara

    2015-03-25

    Bethe-Salpeter equation is applied to nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering at the intermediate energy. The differential cross section and the polarization are calculated in terms of the phase shift analysis method using the two-body potential derived from the Bethe-Salpeter equation. The lowest-order Born approximation for the K-matrix is corrected by including the inverse square part of the potential.

  10. Observational constraints on light cosmic strings from photometry and pulsar timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Pshirkov; A. V. Tuntsov

    2009-11-25

    We constrain the cosmological density of cosmic string loops using two observational signatures -- gravitational microlensing and the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. Photometry from RXTE and CoRoT space missions and pulsar timing from Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, Arecibo and Green Bank radio telescopes allow us to probe cosmic strings in a wide range of tensions $G\\mu/c^2=10^{-16}\\div10^{-10}$. We find that pulsar timing data provide the most stringent constraints on the abundance of light strings at the level $\\Omega_s \\sim 10^{-3}$. Future observational facilities such as the Square Kilometer Array will allow one to improve these constraints by orders of magnitude.

  11. Air stripping of volatile organic chlorocarbons: System development, performance, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKillip, S.T.; Sibley, K.L.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-12-31

    The Savannah River Site, which has been in operation since the 1950`s, is a 780-square kilometer reservation that produces tritium for the national defense program. As a result of past waste handling practices, the ground water at several locations on the Site has become contaminated with solvents, metals, and radionuclides. In 1981, the ground water located under the Site`s fuel and target rod fabrication area (M-Area) was found to be contaminated with degreasing solvents, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). In 1983, a program was started to evaluate air stripping and determine its applicability to cleanup of M-Area contamination. Lessons learned regarding the efficiency and effectiveness of air stripping technology are presented.

  12. Air stripping of volatile organic chlorocarbons: System development, performance, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKillip, S.T.; Sibley, K.L.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Site, which has been in operation since the 1950's, is a 780-square kilometer reservation that produces tritium for the national defense program. As a result of past waste handling practices, the ground water at several locations on the Site has become contaminated with solvents, metals, and radionuclides. In 1981, the ground water located under the Site's fuel and target rod fabrication area (M-Area) was found to be contaminated with degreasing solvents, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). In 1983, a program was started to evaluate air stripping and determine its applicability to cleanup of M-Area contamination. Lessons learned regarding the efficiency and effectiveness of air stripping technology are presented.

  13. Monitoring biomass burning and aerosol loading and transport from a geostationary satellite perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prins, E.M.; Menzel, W.P.

    1996-12-31

    The topic of this paper is the use of geostationary operational environmental satellites (GOES) to monitor trends in biomass burning and aerosol production and transport in South America and through the Western Hemisphere. The GOES Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (ABBA) was developed to provide diurnal information concerning fires in South America; applications demonstrating the ability to document long-term trends in fire activity are described. Analyses of imagery collected by GOES-8 is described; six biomass burning seasons in South America revealed many examples of large-scale smoke transport extending over several million square kilometers. Four major transport regimes were identified. Case studies throughout South America, Canada, the United States, Mexico, Belize, and Guatemala have successfully demonstrated the improved capability of GOES-8 for fire and smoke monitoring in various ecosystems. Global geostationary fire monitoring will be possible with the launch of new satellites. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Simulating the 21cm forest detectable with LOFAR and SKA in the spectra of high-z GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciardi, B; Abdalla, F B; Asad, K; Bernardi, G; Bolton, J S; Brentjens, M; de Bruyn, A G; Chapman, E; Daiboo, S; Fernandez, E R; Ghosh, A; Graziani, L; Harker, G J A; Iliev, I T; Jelic, V; Jensen, H; Kazemi, S; Koopmans, L V E; Martinez, O; Maselli, A; Mellema, G; Offringa, A R; Pandey, V N; Schaye, J; Thomas, R; Vedantham, H; Yatawatta, S; Zaroubi, S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of detecting 21cm absorption features in the afterglow spectra of high redshift long Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). This is done employing simulations of cosmic reionization, together with the instrumental characteristics of the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR). We find that absorption features could be marginally (with a S/N larger than a few) detected by LOFAR at z>7 if the GRB originated from PopIII stars, while the detection would be easier if the noise were reduced by one order of magnitude, i.e. similar to what is expected for the first phase of the Square Kilometer Array (SKA1-low). On the other hand, more standard GRBs are too dim to be detected even with ten times the sensitivity of SKA1-low, and only in the most optimistic case can a S/N larger than a few be reached at z>9.

  15. Exploration of the El Hoyo-Monte Galan Geothermal Concession. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    In January 1996 Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation (TGC) was granted a geothermal concession of 114 square kilometers from the Instituto Nicaragueense de Energie (INE) for the purpose of developing between 50 and 150 MWe of geothermal electrical generating capacity. The Concession Agreement required TGC to perform geological, geophysical, and geochemical studies as part of the development program. TGC commenced the geotechnical studies in January 1996 with a comprehensive review of all existing data and surveys. Based on this review, TGC formulated an exploration plan and executed that plan commencing in April, 1996. The ground magnetic (GM), self potential (SP), magnetotelluric/controlled source audio magnetotelluric (MT/CSAMT) and one-meter temperature surveys, data integration, and synthesis of a hydrogeologic model were performed. The purpose of this report is to present a compilation of all data gathered from the geophysical exploration program and to provide an integrated interpretation of that data.

  16. Middle Eastern power systems; Present and future developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Middle Eastern Power systems have evolved independently of each other over many decades. The region covers a wide geographical area of over 4 million square kilometers with an estimated population in 1990 of over 120 million people. This paper discusses the present status and future power system developments in the Middle East with emphasis on the Mashrequ Arab Countries (MAC). MAC consists of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Yemen, and the six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, namely, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Interconnections within MAC and possible extensions to Turkey, Europe, and Central Africa are discussed. A common characteristic of the MAC power systems is that they are all operated by government or semi-government bodies. The energy resources in the region are varied. Countries such as Iraq, Egypt, and Syria have significant hydro power resources. On the other hand, the GCC countries and Iraq have abundant fossil fuel reserves.

  17. Design, Environmental and Sustainability Constraints of new African Observatories: The example of the Mozambique Radio Astronomy Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Domingos; Ribeiro, Valerio A R M; Loots, Anita; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L; Gaylard, Michael; van Ardenne, Arnold; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Bergano, Miguel; Amador, Jose Carlos; Maia, Rodrigo; Melo, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The Mozambique Radio Astronomy Observatory (MRAO) will be a first milestone towards development of radioastronomy in Mozambique. Development of MRAO will constitute a preparation step towards participation in the upcoming Africa VLBI Network and the Square Kilometer Array project. The MRAO first antenna is planned to serve as a capacitation and training facility and will be installed after the conversion of a 7-meter telecom dish in South Africa. Therefore, this first radiotelescope design has to comply with local spectral and environmental constraints. Furthermore, power availability and long term sustainability with potential inclusion of solar power and control of Radio Frequency Interference are analyzed. Here we outline some of the design, environmental and power sustainability constraints.

  18. Nevada Test Site 2007 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-01-01

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from three monitoring wells located near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, for calendar year 2007. The NTS is an approximately 3,561 square kilometer (1,375 square mile) restricted-access federal installation located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are used to monitor the groundwater at the Area 5 RWMS (Figure 2). In addition to groundwater monitoring results, this report includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 RWMS. The disposal of low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level radioactive waste at the Area 5 RWMS is regulated by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The disposal of mixed low-level radioactive waste is also regulated by the state of Nevada under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities' (CFR, 1999). The format of this report was requested by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 12, 1997. The appearance and arrangement of this document have been modified slightly since that date to provide additional information and to facilitate the readability of the document. The objective of this report is to satisfy any Area 5 RWMS reporting agreements between DOE and NDEP.

  19. Inclusive jet and dijet production in polarized proton-proton collisions at [the square root of sigma] =200 GeV at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakuma, Tai

    2010-01-01

    The inclusive jet cross section, the dijet cross section, and the dijet longitudinal double spin asymmetry ALL in polarized proton-proton collisions at [square root of sigma] = 200 GeV are measured with a data sample of ...

  20. Lawn chairs in Times Square : an analysis of the Pilot Streets Program and the provisional project approach for New York City's Green Light in Midtown project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alexis (Alexis Abreu)

    2011-01-01

    In 2009 the New York City Department of Transportation (NYC DOT) initiated a Pilot Streets Program that called for the temporary closure of Broadway between 47th and 42nd Streets to all vehicular traffic. With Times Square ...

  1. Dark matter vs. modifications of the gravitational inverse-square law. Results from planetary motion in the solar system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sereno; Ph. Jetzer

    2006-06-08

    Dark matter or modifications of the Newtonian inverse-square law in the solar-system are studied with accurate planetary astrometric data. From extra-perihelion precession and possible changes in the third Kepler's law, we get an upper limit on the local dark matter density, rho_{DM} gravitational acceleration are really small. We examined the MOND interpolating function mu in the regime of strong gravity. Gradually varying mu suggested by fits of rotation curves are excluded, whereas the standard form mu(x)= x/(1+x^2)^{1/2} is still compatible with data. In combination with constraints from galactic rotation curves and theoretical considerations on the external field effect, the absence of any significant deviation from inverse square attraction in the solar system makes the range of acceptable interpolating functions significantly narrow. Future radio ranging observations of outer planets with an accuracy of few tenths of a meter could either give positive evidence of dark matter or disprove modifications of gravity.

  2. Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law below the Dark-Energy Length Scale D. J. Kapner,* T. S. Cook, E. G. Adelberger, J. H. Gundlach, B. R. Heckel, C. D. Hoyle, and H. E. Swanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law below the Dark-Energy Length Scale D. J. Kapner,* T-balance experiments to test the gravitational inverse-square law at separations between 9.53 mm and 55 m, probing of the gravitational inverse-square law we report in this Letter. Our tests were made with a substantially upgraded ver

  3. Width dependent transition of quantized spin-wave modes in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} square nanorings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Chandrima; Saha, Susmita; Barman, Saswati; Barman, Anjan, E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in [Thematic Unit of Excellence on Nanodevice Technology, Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Rousseau, Olivier [CEMS-RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Otani, YoshiChika [CEMS-RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2014-10-28

    We investigated optically induced ultrafast magnetization dynamics in square shaped Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanorings with varying ring width. Rich spin-wave spectra are observed whose frequencies showed a strong dependence on the ring width. Micromagnetic simulations showed different types of spin-wave modes, which are quantized upto very high quantization number. In the case of widest ring, the spin-wave mode spectrum shows quantized modes along the applied field direction, which is similar to the mode spectrum of an antidot array. As the ring width decreases, additional quantization in the azimuthal direction appears causing mixed modes. In the narrowest ring, the spin-waves exhibit quantization solely in azimuthal direction. The different quantization is attributed to the variation in the internal field distribution for different ring width as obtained from micromagnetic analysis and supported by magnetic force microscopy.

  4. Bulk, surface and corner free energy series for the chromatic polynomial on the square and triangular lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesper Lykke Jacobsen

    2010-06-11

    We present an efficient algorithm for computing the partition function of the q-colouring problem (chromatic polynomial) on regular two-dimensional lattice strips. Our construction involves writing the transfer matrix as a product of sparse matrices, each of dimension ~ 3^m, where m is the number of lattice spacings across the strip. As a specific application, we obtain the large-q series of the bulk, surface and corner free energies of the chromatic polynomial. This extends the existing series for the square lattice by 32 terms, to order q^{-79}. On the triangular lattice, we verify Baxter's analytical expression for the bulk free energy (to order q^{-40}), and we are able to conjecture exact product formulae for the surface and corner free energies.

  5. Inflection points of microcanonical entropy: Monte Carlo simulation of q state Potts model on a finite square lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Praveen, E. Satyanarayana, S. V. M.

    2014-04-24

    Traditional definition of phase transition involves an infinitely large system in thermodynamic limit. Finite systems such as biological proteins exhibit cooperative behavior similar to phase transitions. We employ recently discovered analysis of inflection points of microcanonical entropy to estimate the transition temperature of the phase transition in q state Potts model on a finite two dimensional square lattice for q=3 (second order) and q=8 (first order). The difference of energy density of states (DOS) ? ln g(E) = ln g(E+ ?E) ?ln g(E) exhibits a point of inflexion at a value corresponding to inverse transition temperature. This feature is common to systems exhibiting both first as well as second order transitions. While the difference of DOS registers a monotonic variation around the point of inflexion for systems exhibiting second order transition, it has an S-shape with a minimum and maximum around the point of inflexion for the case of first order transition.

  6. Superconducting epitaxial thin films of CeNi{sub x}Bi{sub 2} with a bismuth square net structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckow, Alexander; Kupka, Katharina; Retzlaff, Reiner; Kurian, Jose; Alff, Lambert [Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    We have grown highly epitaxial and phase pure thin films of the arsenic-free pnictide compound CeNi{sub x}Bi{sub 2} on (100) MgO substrates by reactive molecular beam epitaxy (RMBE). X-ray diffraction and reflection high-energy electron diffraction of the films confirm the ZrCuSiAs structure with a Bi square net layer. Superconductivity was observed in magnetization and resistivity measurements for x= 0.75 to 0.93 in these CeNi{sub x}Bi{sub 2} thin films with the highest critical temperature of 4.05 K and a resistive transition width of 0.1 K for x= 0.86. Our results indicate that thin film deposition by RMBE provides a tool to synthesize high-quality pnictide superconductors of the novel 112 type.

  7. A novel variable-distance antenna test range and high spatial resolution corroboration of the inverse square law for 433.5 MHz radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Haën, Christoph; Erhardt, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    A novel, low-budget, open-air, slant-geometry antenna test range for UHF radiation is presented. It was designed primarily to facilitate variation of the distance between emitter and receiver antennas, but has also the potential for adaptation to simultaneous variation of distance and receiver antenna orientation. In support of the validity of the range the inverse square law for 433.5 MHz radiation between two naked half-wave dipole antennas was tested with high spatial resolution from close to the far field limit outward to 46 wavelengths. Sine amplitude input voltage at the receiver antenna varied with the distance to the power -0.9970 +/- 0.0051 (R^2 = 0.992), thus corroborating the inverse square law for transmission power at the lowest frequency for which thus far data have been published. Keywords: inverse square law; dipole antenna; test facility; electromagnetic propagation; UHF measurements; distance dependence.

  8. Achieving Accelerated Cleanup of Cesium Contaminated Stream at the Savannah River Site; Collaboration between Stakeholders, Regulators, and the Federal Government - 13182

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, Chris; Flora, Mary; Socha, Ron; Burch, Joseph [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Freeman, Candice; Hennessey, Brian [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina that contains six primary stream/river systems. The Lower Three Runs Stream (LTR) is one of the primary streams within the site that is located in the southeast portion of the Savannah River Site and is a large black water stream system that originates in the northeast portion of SRS and follows a southerly direction before it enters the Savannah River. During reactor operations, secondary reactor cooling water, storm sewer discharges, and miscellaneous wastewater was discharged and contaminated a 36 kilometer stretch of Lower Three Runs Stream that narrows providing a limited buffer of US DOE property along the stream and flood plain. Based on data collected during 2009 and 2010 under Recover Act Funding, the stream was determined to be contaminated with cesium-137 at levels that exceeded acceptable risk based limits. As efficiencies were realized within the SRS Recovery Act Program, funding was made available to design, permit and execute remediation of the LTR. This accelerated Project allowed for the remediation of 36 kilometers of LTR in only nine months from inception to completion, contributing significantly to the Foot Print Reduction of SRS. The scope consisted of excavation and disposal of more than 2064 cubic meters of contaminated soil, and installing 11 kilometers of fence and 2,000 signs at 1000 locations. Confirmatory sampling and analysis, and radiological surveying were performed demonstrating that soil concentrations met the cleanup goals. The project completed with a very good safety record considering the harsh conditions including, excessive rain in the early stages of the project, high summer temperatures, swampy terrain, snakes, wild boar, insects and dense vegetation. The regulatory approval process was compressed by over 75% and required significant efforts from SRS's stakeholders including the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), and the public including local property owners and the SRS Citizens Advisory Board. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the up-front planning in order to achieve this challenging cleanup. (authors)

  9. Inverse Square Law Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    due to the independent sources A and B with powers WZ and WB, taking advantage of the symmetryq2 (q2 +m2 ) and collecting together like powers of q produces a quartic equation, 4IDq4 + [4m2 ID intensity (I Wm-2 ) on distance (r m) from a source. For a single source of sound power W watts

  10. Concord Four Square Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-09

    This case study describes the retrofit of a home in West Concord, Massachusetts that proved that a 50% reduction in home energy use could be met today in existing housing.

  11. The Physics of the Cold Neutral Medium: Low-frequency Carbon Radio Recombination Lines with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oonk, J B R; Salgado, F; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Tielens, A G G M; Rottgering, H J A

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will transform our understanding of the role of the cold, atomic gas in galaxy evolution. The interstellar medium (ISM) is the repository of stellar ejecta and the birthsite of new stars and, hence, a key factor in the evolution of galaxies over cosmic time. Cold, diffuse, atomic clouds are a key component of the ISM, but so far this phase has been difficult to study, because its main tracer, the HI 21 cm line, does not constrain the basic physical information of the gas (e.g., temperature, density) well. The SKA opens up the opportunity to study this component of the ISM through a complementary tracer in the form of low-frequency (<350 MHz) carbon radio recombination lines (CRRL). These CRRLs provide a sensitive probe of the physical conditions in cold, diffuse clouds. The superb sensitivity, large field of view, frequency resolution and coverage of the SKA allows for efficient surveys of the sky, that will revolutionize the field of low-frequency recombination line studie...

  12. Imprints of deviations from the gravitational inverse-square law on the power spectrum of mass fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sereno; J. A. Peacock

    2006-05-19

    Deviations from the gravitational inverse-square law would imprint scale-dependent features on the power spectrum of mass density fluctuations. We model such deviations as a Yukawa-like contribution to the gravitational potential and discuss the growth function in a mixed dark matter model with adiabatic initial conditions. Evolution of perturbations is considered in general non-flat cosmological models with a cosmological constant, and an analytical approximation for the growth function is provided. The coupling between baryons and cold dark matter across recombination is negligibly affected by modified gravity physics if the proper cutoff length of the long-range Yukawa-like force is > 10 h^{-1} Mpc. Enhancement of gravity affects the subsequent evolution, boosting large-scale power in a way that resembles the effect of a lower matter density. This phenomenon is almost perfectly degenerate in power-spectrum shape with the effect of a background of massive neutrinos. Back-reaction on density growth from a modified cosmic expansion rate should however also affect the normalization of the power spectrum, with a shape distortion similar to the case of a non-modified background.

  13. Proton-? [Proton - lambda] correlations in central Pb + Pb collisions at ?sNN [square root of s subscript NN] =17.3 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roland, Christof E.

    The momentum correlation between protons and ? [lambda] particles emitted from central Pb+Pb collisions at ?sNN=17.3 [square root of s subscript NN = 17.3] GeV was studied by the NA49 experiment at the CERN Super Proton ...

  14. 26.1 / M. Doshi 26.1: Low-Frequency Square-Wave Drive for Large Screen LCD-TV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Boulder, Boulder, CO-80309 0425 Francisco J. Azcondo Electronics Technology, Systems and Automation, Spain Abstract This paper presents a low-frequency square-wave drive, consisting of a single high accurate lamp current regulation. Key to the architecture is a proposed capacitive coupling approach for ac

  15. MATHEMATICS PROMOTION UNIT DE MORGAN HOUSE 57-58 RUSSELL SQUARE LONDON WC1B 4HS 020 7927 0804 MPU@LMS.AC.UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    MATHEMATICS PROMOTION UNIT DE MORGAN HOUSE 57-58 RUSSELL SQUARE LONDON WC1B 4HS · 020 7927 0804 · MPU@LMS.AC.UK The Mathematics Promotion Unit is a joint venture between the London Mathematical Society and the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. It aims to raise awareness of mathematical

  16. Area and Volume Problems 1. Given the formula for the area of a square, derive the formula for the area of a rectangle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    Area and Volume Problems 1. Given the formula for the area of a square, derive the formula for the area of a rectangle of dimensions a and b. 2. Given the formula for the area of a rectangle, derive the formula for the area of a parallelogram of base b and height h. 3. Use calculus to derive the formula

  17. Search for Quark Compositeness with the Dijet Centrality Ratio in pp Collisions at [square root of] s=7??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, Burak Han

    A search for quark compositeness in the form of quark contact interactions, based on hadronic jet pairs (dijets) produced in proton-proton collisions at ?s=7??[square root of s=7] TeV, is described. The data sample of the ...

  18. 3180 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 55, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2008 Digital Control of a Low-Frequency Square-Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3180 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 55, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2008 Digital Control of a Low-Frequency Square-Wave Electronic Ballast With Resonant Ignition F. Javier Díaz, Francisco J) electronic ballast with digital control. The first stage of the ballast is a power factor correction (PFC

  19. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 58, NO. 5, MAY 2010 2911 Fig. 3 shows the mean square error as a function of the term N=w,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rontogiannis, Athanasios A.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 58, NO. 5, MAY 2010 2911 Fig. 3 shows the mean square. Mergen and L. Tong, "Type based estimation over multiaccess chan- nels," IEEE Trans. Signal Process., vol Trans. Signal Process., vol. 55, no. 11, pp. 5155­5166, Nov. 2007. [7] K. S. Gomadam and S. A. Jafar

  20. Anisotropic mean-square displacements in two-dimensional colloidal crystals of tilted dipoles V. A. Froltsov, C. N. Likos, and H. Lwen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Likos, Christos N.

    Anisotropic mean-square displacements in two-dimensional colloidal crystals of tilted dipoles V. A the crystal aniso- tropy or not. Here we study an anisotropic two-dimensional colloidal crystal composed; revised manuscript received 7 February 2005; published 31 March 2005 Superparamagnetic colloidal particles

  1. Search for rare events in [the square root of sigma nu nu] = 200 GeV Au+Au PHOBOS data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mott, Alexander (Alexander Robert)

    2009-01-01

    In this analysis, we set an upper bound on the rate of rare events: events whose dN/dn distribution deviates more than statistically from the ensemble average dN/dn distribution for s [the square root of sigma nu nu] = 200 ...

  2. Rate of deformation in the Pasco Basin during the Miocene as determined by distribution of Columbia River basalt flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.; Ledgerwood, R.K.; Myers, C.W.; Jones, M.G.; Landon, R.D.

    1980-03-01

    Detailed mapping of over 8000 square kilometers and logs from 20 core holes were used to determine the distribution and thickness of basalt flows and interbeds in the Pasco Basin. The data indicate the high-MgO Grande Ronde Basalt and Wanapum Basalt thicken from the northeast to the southwest. Deformation began in late Frenchman Springs time in the Saddle Mountains along a northwest-southeast trend and in Roza time along an east-west trend. By late Wanapum time, basalt flows were more restricted on the east side. Saddle Mountains Basalt flows spread out in the basin from narrow channels to the east. The Umatilla Member entered from the southeast and is confined to the south-central basin, while the Wilbur Creek, Asotin, Esquatzel, Pomona, and Elephant Mountain Members entered from the east and northeast. The distribution of these members is controlled by flow volume, boundaries of other flows, and developing ridges. The Wilbur Creek, Asotin, and Esquatzel flows exited from the basin in a channel along the northern margin of the Umatilla flow, while the Pomona and Elephant Mountain flows exited between Umtanum Ridge and Wallula Gap. The thickness of sedimentary interbeds and basalt flows indicated subsidence and/or uplift began in post-Grande Ronde time (14.5 million years before present) and continued through Saddle Mountains time (10.5 million years before present). Maximum subsidence occurred 40 kilometers (24 miles) north of Richland, Washington with an approximate rate of 25 meters (81 feet) per million years during the eruption of the basalt. Maximum uplift along the developing ridges was 70 meters (230 feet) per million years.

  3. LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP AT DOE HANFORD SITE - 12575

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOREN RJ; GRINDSTAFF KD

    2012-01-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is located in southeast Washington and consists of 1,518 square kilometers (586 square miles) of land. Established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, Hanford workers produced plutonium for our nation's nuclear defense program until the mid 1980's. Since then, the site has been in cleanup mode that is being accomplished in phases. As we achieve remedial objectives and complete active cleanup, DOE will manage Hanford land under the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program until completion of cleanup and the site becomes ready for transfer to the post cleanup landlord - currently planned for DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM). We define Hanford's LTS Program in the ''Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan,'' (DOE/RL-201 0-35)[1], which describes the scope including the relationship between the cleanup projects and the LTS Program. DOE designed the LTS Program to manage and provide surveillance and maintenance (S&M) of institutional controls and associated monitoring of closed waste sites to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. DOE's Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and Hanford cleanup and operations contractors collaboratively developed this program over several years. The program's scope also includes 15 key activities that are identified in the DOE Program Plan (DOE/RL-2010-35). The LTS Program will transition 14 land segments through 2016. The combined land mass is approximately 570 square kilometers (220 square miles), with over 1,300 active and inactive waste sites and 3,363 wells. Land segments vary from buffer zone property with no known contamination to cocooned reactor buildings, demolished support facilities, and remediated cribs and trenches. DOE-RL will transition land management responsibilities from cleanup contractors to the Mission Support Contract (MSC), who will then administer the LTS Program for DOE-RL. This process requires an environment of cooperation between the contractors and DOE-RL. Information Management (IM) is a key part of the LTS program. The IM Program identifies, locates, stores, protects and makes accessible Hanford LTS records and data to support the transfer of property ultimately to LM. As such, DOE-RL manages the Hanford LTS Program in a manner consistent with LM's goals, policies, and procedures.

  4. Observations of magnetic fields in the Milky Way and in nearby galaxies with a Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Beck; B. M. Gaensler

    2004-10-26

    The role of magnetic fields in the dynamical evolution of galaxies and of the interstellar medium (ISM) is not well understood, mainly because such fields are difficult to directly observe. Radio astronomy provides the best tools to measure magnetic fields: synchrotron radiation traces fields illuminated by cosmic-ray electrons, while Faraday rotation and Zeeman splitting allow us to detect fields in all kinds of astronomical plasmas, from lowest to highest densities. Here we describe how fundamental new advances in studying magnetic fields, both in our own Milky Way and in other nearby galaxies, can be made through observations with the proposed Square Kilometre Array. Underpinning much of what we propose is an all-sky survey of Faraday rotation, in which we will accumulate tens of millions of rotation measure measurements toward background radio sources. This will provide a unique database for studying magnetic fields in individual Galactic supernova remnants and HII regions, for characterizing the overall magnetic geometry of our Galaxy's disk and halo, and for understanding the structure and evolution of magnetic fields in galaxies. Also of considerable interest will be the mapping of diffuse polarized emission from the Milky Way in many narrow bands over a wide frequency range. This will allow us to carry out Faraday tomography of the Galaxy, yielding a high-resolution three-dimensional picture of the magnetic field within a few kpc of the Sun, and allowing us to understand its coupling to the other components of the ISM. Finally, direct synchrotron imaging of a large number of nearby galaxies, combined with Faraday rotation data, will allow us to determine the magnetic field structure in these sources, and to test both the dynamo and primordial field theories for field origin and amplification.

  5. Compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas as alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moussavi, M.; Al-Turk, M. . Civil Engineering Dept.)

    1993-12-01

    The use of alternative fuels in the transportation industry has gained a strong support in recent years. In this paper an attempt was made to evaluate the use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and compressed natural gas (NG) by 25 LPG-bifuel and 14 NG-bifuel vehicles that are operated by 33 transit systems throughout Nebraska. A set of performance measures such as average fuel efficiency in kilometers per liter, average fuel cost per kilometer, average oil consumption, and average operation and maintenance cost for alternatively fueled vehicles were calculated and compared with similar performance measures of gasoline powered vehicles. The results of the study showed that the average fuel efficiency of gasoline is greater than those of LPG and NG, and the average fuel costs (dollars per kilometer) for LPG and NG are smaller than those for gasoline for most of the vehicles under this study.

  6. Chromospheric Anemone Jets as Evidence of Ubiquitous Reconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazunari Shibata; Tahei Nakamura; Takuma Matsumoto; Kenichi Otsuji; Takenori J. Okamoto; Naoto Nishizuka; Tomoko Kawate; Hiroko Watanabe; Shin'ichi Nagata; Satoru UeNo; Reizaburo Kitai; Satoshi Nozawa; Saku Tsuneta; Yoshinori Suematsu; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Toshifumi Shimizu; Yukio Katsukawa; Theodore D. Tarbell; Thomas E. Berger; Bruce W. Lites; Richard A. Shine; Alan M. Title

    2008-10-22

    The heating of the solar chromosphere and corona is a long-standing puzzle in solar physics. Hinode observations show the ubiquitous presence of chromospheric anemone jets outside sunspots in active regions. They are typically 3 to 7 arc seconds = 2000 to 5000 kilometers long and 0.2 to 0.4 arc second = 150 to 300 kilometers wide, and their velocity is 10 to 20 kilometers per second. These small jets have an inverted Y-shape, similar to the shape of x-ray anemone jets in the corona. These features imply that magnetic reconnection similar to that in the corona is occurring at a much smaller spatial scale throughout the chromosphere and suggest that the heating of the solar chromosphere and corona may be related to small-scale ubiquitous reconnection.

  7. SU-F-18C-14: Hessian-Based Norm Penalty for Weighted Least-Square CBCT Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, T; Sun, N; Tan, S; Wang, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a Hessian-based norm penalty for cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction that has a similar ability in suppressing noise as the total variation (TV) penalty while avoiding the staircase effect and better preserving low-contrast objects. Methods: We extended the TV penalty to a Hessian-based norm penalty based on the Frobenius norm of the Hessian matrix of an image for CBCT reconstruction. The objective function was constructed using the penalized weighted least-square (PWLS) principle. An effective algorithm was developed to minimize the objective function using a majorization-minimization (MM) approach. We evaluated and compared the proposed penalty with the TV penalty on a CatPhan 600 phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom, each acquired at a low-dose protocol (10mA/10ms) and a high-dose protocol (80mA/12ms). For both penalties, contrast-to-noise (CNR) in four low-contrast regions-of-interest (ROIs) and the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of two point-like objects in constructed images were calculated and compared. Results: In the experiment of CatPhan 600 phantom, the Hessian-based norm penalty has slightly higher CNRs and approximately equivalent FWHM values compared with the TV penalty. In the experiment of the anthropomorphic head phantom at the low-dose protocol, the TV penalty result has several artificial piece-wise constant areas known as the staircase effect while in the Hessian-based norm penalty the image appears smoother and more similar to that of the FDK result using the high-dose protocol. Conclusion: The proposed Hessian-based norm penalty has a similar performance in suppressing noise to the TV penalty, but has a potential advantage in suppressing the staircase effect and preserving low-contrast objects. This work was supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NNSFC), under Grant Nos. 60971112 and 61375018, and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, under Grant No. 2012QN086.

  8. These guidelines were approved in June 2011 by the Williams College Board of Trustees. In 1991, the College's physical plant measured 1.9 million square feet; by 2007 it had grown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    , Williams must continue to find ways to reduce energy use and to ensure that new building and renovation of service. 2. The planning and design of a building or renovation program will establish energy goals% to 2.4 million square feet. At the same time, its energy use per square foot increased 20%. The student

  9. Search for Supersymmetry Using Final States with One Lepton, Jets, and Missing Transverse Momentum with the ATLAS Detector in ?s=7??[square root of s=7] TeV pp Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter presents the first search for supersymmetry in final states containing one isolated electron or muon, jets, and missing transverse momentum from ?s=7??[square root of s=7] TeV proton-proton collisions at the ...

  10. An aerial radiological survey of the Fernald Environmental Management Project and surrounding area, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phoenix, K.A.

    1997-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from May 17--22, 1994, over a 36 square mile (93 square kilometer) area centered on the Fernald Environmental Management Project located in Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the survey was to detect anomalous gamma radiation in the environment surrounding the plant. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) with a line spacing of 250 feet (76 meters). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter (3.3 feet) above ground was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the area. Analysis of the data for man made sources showed five sites within the boundaries of the Fernald Environmental Management Project having elevated readings. The exposure rates outside the plant boundary were typical of naturally occurring background radiation. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries to supplement the aerial data. It was concluded that although the radionuclides identified in the high-exposure-rate areas are naturally occurring, the levels encountered are greatly enhanced due to industrial activities at the plant.

  11. An Aerial Radiological survey of the Alvin W. Vogtle Nuclear Plant and surrounding area, Waynesboro, Georgia: Date of survey: August--September 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    An Aerial Radiological Survey was conducted during the period of August 24 to September 14, 1988 over an area of approximately 310 square kilometers (120 square miles) surrounding the Alvin W. Vogtle Nuclear Plant. The Vogtle Nuclear Plant is located near Augusta, Georgia, along the Savannah River and adjacent to the Savannah River Site (SRS). Several anomalous areas were identified in the portion of the survey extending into the SRS perimeter. The dominant isotopes found in these areas were cesium-137 and cobalt-60. All of these man-made anomalies identified by the aerial measurements were attributed to SRS processing. For the remainder of the survey area, the inferred radiation exposure rates generally varied from 6 to 10 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h), which was found to be due to naturally occurring uranium, thorium, and radioactive potassium gamma emitters. The reported exposure rate values included an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.6 {mu}R/h. Soils samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at three locations within the survey boundaries to support the aerial data. The exposure rate values obtained from these groundbased measurements were in agreement with the corresponding inferred aerial values. 6 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Pb{sub 5}Fe{sub 3}TiO{sub 11}Cl: A rare example of Ti(IV) in a square pyramidal oxygen coordination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batuk, Maria; Batuk, Dmitry; Abakumov, Artem M.; Hadermann, Joke

    2014-07-01

    A new oxychloride Pb{sub 5}Fe{sub 3}TiO{sub 11}Cl has been synthesized using the solid state method. Its crystal and magnetic structure was investigated in the 1.5–550 K temperature range using electron diffraction, high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, neutron and X-ray powder diffraction. At room temperature Pb{sub 5}Fe{sub 3}TiO{sub 11}Cl crystallizes in the P4/mmm space group with the unit cell parameters a=3.91803(3) Å and c=19.3345(2) Å. Pb{sub 5}Fe{sub 3}TiO{sub 11}Cl is a new n=4 member of the oxychloride perovskite-based homologous series A{sub n+1}B{sub n}O{sub 3n?1}Cl. The structure is built of truncated Pb{sub 3}Fe{sub 3}TiO{sub 11} quadruple perovskite blocks separated by CsCl-type Pb{sub 2}Cl slabs. The perovskite blocks consist of two layers of (Fe,Ti)O{sub 6} octahedra sandwiched between two layers of (Fe,Ti)O{sub 5} square pyramids. The Ti{sup 4+} cations are preferentially located in the octahedral layers, however, the presence of a noticeable amount of Ti{sup 4+} in a five-fold coordination environment has been undoubtedly proven using neutron powder diffraction and atomic resolution compositional mapping. Pb{sub 5}Fe{sub 3}TiO{sub 11}Cl is antiferromagnetically ordered below 450(10) K. The ordered Fe magnetic moments at 1.5 K are 4.06(4) ?{sub B} and 3.86(5) ?{sub B} on the octahedral and square-pyramidal sites, respectively. - Highlights: • Pb{sub 5}Fe{sub 3}TiO{sub 11}Cl has been synthesized using the solid state method. • The structure has been refined using neutron powder diffraction data at 1.5–550 K. • It is a new n=4 member of the perovskite-related homologous series A{sub n+1}B{sub n}O{sub 3n?1}Cl. • Ti{sup 4+} cations have both octahedral and square-pyramidal coordination environment. • Pb{sub 5}Fe{sub 3}TiO{sub 11}Cl is antiferromagnetically ordered below T{sub N}?450 K.

  13. Uncertainty in least-squares fits to the thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators with applications to the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sader, John E.; Yousefi, Morteza; Friend, James R.; Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Clayton, Victoria 3800

    2014-02-15

    Thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators are used widely to characterize their physical properties. These spectra typically exhibit a Lorentzian response, with additional white noise due to extraneous processes. Least-squares fits of these measurements enable extraction of key parameters of the resonator, including its resonant frequency, quality factor, and stiffness. Here, we present general formulas for the uncertainties in these fit parameters due to sampling noise inherent in all thermal noise spectra. Good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation of synthetic data and measurements of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever is demonstrated. These formulas enable robust interpretation of thermal noise spectra measurements commonly performed in the AFM and adaptive control of fitting procedures with specified tolerances.

  14. The needle in the hundred square degree haystack: The hunt for binary neutron star mergers with LIGO and Palomar Transient Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Leo P

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Virgo experiments are poised to detect gravitational waves (GWs) directly for the first time this decade. The ultimate prize will be joint observation of a compact binary merger in both gravitational and electromagnetic channels. However, GW sky locations that are uncertain by hundreds of square degrees will pose a challenge. I describe a real-time detection pipeline and a rapid Bayesian parameter estimation code that will make it possible to search promptly for optical counterparts in Advanced LIGO. Having analyzed a comprehensive population of simulated GW sources, we describe the sky localization accuracy that the GW detector network will achieve as each detector comes online and progresses toward design sensitivity. Next, in preparation for the optical search with the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), we have developed a unique capability to detect optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Its comparable error regi...

  15. Constraints on the range lambda of Yukawa-like modifications to the Newtonian inverse-square law of gravitation from Solar System planetary motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2007-09-25

    In this paper we use the latest corrections to the Newton-Einstein secular perihelion rates of some planets of the Solar System, phenomenologically estimated with the EPM2004 ephemerides by the Russian astronomer E.V. Pitjeva, to put severe constraints on the range parameter lambda characterizing the Yukawa-like modifications of the Newtonian inverse-square law of gravitation. It turns out that the range cannot exceed about one tenth of an Astronomical Unit. We assumed neither equivalence principle violating effects nor spatial variations of $\\alpha$ and $\\lambda$. This finding may have important consequences on all the modified theories of gravity involving Yukawa-type terms with range parameters much larger than the Solar System size. However, caution is advised since we, currently have at our disposal only the periehlion extra-rates estimated by Pitjeva: if and when other groups will estimate their own corrections to the secular motion of perihelia, more robust and firm tests may be conducted.

  16. Finite-Volume Energy Spectrum, Fractionalized Strings, and Low-Energy Effective Field Theory for the Quantum Dimer Model on the Square Lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, D; Hofmann, C P; Jiang, F -J; Widmer, P; Wiese, U -J

    2015-01-01

    We present detailed analytic calculations of finite-volume energy spectra, mean field theory, as well as a systematic low-energy effective field theory for the square lattice quantum dimer model. The analytic considerations explain why a string connecting two external static charges in the confining columnar phase fractionalizes into eight distinct strands with electric flux $\\frac{1}{4}$. An emergent approximate spontaneously broken $SO(2)$ symmetry gives rise to a pseudo-Goldstone boson. Remarkably, this soft phonon-like excitation, which is massless at the Rokhsar-Kivelson (RK) point, exists far beyond this point. The Goldstone physics is captured by a systematic low-energy effective field theory. We determine its low-energy parameters by matching the analytic effective field theory with exact diagonalization results and Monte Carlo data. This confirms that the model exists in the columnar (and not in a plaquette or mixed) phase all the way to the RK point.

  17. Stability of critical bubble in stretched fluid of square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Iwamatsu; Yutaka Okabe

    2010-06-11

    The square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy, that was used previously to study the homogeneous bubble nucleation [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 104508 (2008)], is used to study the stability of the critical bubble nucleated within the bulk under-saturated stretched fluid. The stability of the bubble is studied by solving the Schr\\"odinger equation for the fluctuation. The negative eigenvalue corresponds to the unstable growing mode of the fluctuation. Our results show that there is only one negative eigenvalue whose eigenfunction represents the fluctuation that corresponds to the isotropically growing or shrinking nucleus. In particular, this negative eigenvalue survives up to the spinodal point. Therefore the critical bubble is not fractal or ramified near the spinodal.

  18. EOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION Seismology is the study of the propaga-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    assessment, nuclear test monitoring and treaty verifica- tion, volcano and tsunami warning systems, and mineral resources at depths of meters to a few kilometers. Detailed knowledge of the Earth's near sur- face is therefore a crucial part of managing a sustainable environment for civilization. One

  19. Investigating transport pathways in the ocean Annalisa Griffa a,b,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgökmen, Tamay M.

    of kilometers to the dissipation scales. Transport by ocean currents plays an important role in many practical is relevant to a number of important applications. Ocean currents transport physical properties to understand and predict transport by ocean currents is crucial for climatic applications, for instance

  20. Seasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand CaymanSeasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 50.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Grand CaymanSeasonally Flooded Grasslands - Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 Protected Areas Seasonally Flooded Grasslands V.A.1.N.g. #12;Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Little CaymanSeasonally Flooded Grasslands - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands National Biodiversity

  1. Exploring the Earth from Mars David T. Sandwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    orthogonal ridge/transform patterns, and a magnetic field that reverses at just the right rate to be recorded of kilometers (miles) across the mantle of the Earth at rates that are too slow to be observed without the aid further to claim that it is the optimal mechanism for the Earth to shed excess radiogenic heat produced

  2. Crustal structure of the Gamburtsev Mountains, East Antarctica, from S-wave receiver functions and Rayleigh wave phase velocities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , USA c Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130 tectonic features on Earth. Buried beneath several kilometers of ice, the mountains are characterized large-scale ice sheets that formed in Antarctica as the Earth's climate cooled ~34 Ma (Bo et al., 2009

  3. Technische Universitt Mnchen Corporate Communications Center 80290 Mnchen www.tum.de Name Funktion Telefon E-Mail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemper, Gregor

    . "EVA" showcases a new super-fast charging system recharging the battery within 15 minutes, a range of 200 kilometers and an individual air conditioning. TUM CREATE is a common research project such as individualized overhead air- conditioning. "This new electric taxi for tropical mega cities, developed

  4. What does it take to earn a BS degree in Electrical Engineering? A BS degree in Electrical Engineering is earned through a 4-year program involving a fundamental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    the country ... or communications with deep space probes billions of kilometers out in space ... or anything people need to know," such as social science, artistic expression, writing, public speaking, history Details Signals and Systems Control Systems Electrical Power and Energy Conversion Telecommunications

  5. Humboldt National Forest East Mormon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Humboldt National Forest Humboldt National Forest Millers Delamar Valley Dry Lake Dry Lake Valley Boundary Existing Designated Corridor (See Note 2) (As of 6/5/2009) Solar Energy Study Area (As of 6 14 16 Kilometers Carson City Ely Nevada Las Vegas Solar Energy Study Areas in Nevada Map Prepared

  6. CTWatch Quarterly August 2005 Low Power Computing for Fleas, Mice, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as with a Formula One race car, where one gets only a little over one kilometer at almost any cost? Certainly it is fair to say that performance/power has always been an engineering Special? From an engineering point of view, it is obvious that one would want to save power to attain

  7. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - San Andres and Providencia (Fact Sheet); NREL(National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Archipelago of San Andres, Providencia, and Santa Catalina (unpopulated), also known as San Andres and Providencia, which is equidistant between Costa Rica and Jamaica and 775 kilometers northwest of Colombia. The archipelago is part of Colombia, though Nicaragua has also laid claim to it.

  8. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Miller, John; Barsotti, Lisa; Martynov, Denis; Brooks, Aidan; Coyne, Dennis; Abbott, Rich; Adhikari, Rana; Arai, Koji; Bork, Rolf; Kells, Bill; Rollins, Jameson; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Vajente, Gabriele; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Derosa, Ryan; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Betzweiser, Joseph; Frolov, Valera; Mullavey, Adam; O`Reilly, Brian; Dwyer, Sheila; Izumi, Kiwamu; Kawabe, Keita; Landry, Michael; Sigg, Daniel; Ballmer, Stefan; Massinger, Thomas J; Staley, Alexa; Mueller, Chris; Grote, Hartmut; Ward, Robert; King, Eleanor; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chunnong

    2015-01-01

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale interferometer. In this work we describe the first observation of parametric instability in an Advanced LIGO detector, and the means by which it has been removed as a barrier to progress.

  9. Convective-Resolving Regional Climate Simulations for the Amazon Basin: Comparison with TRMM Rainfall Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Nichole 1987-

    2012-08-21

    ), Clark and Peltier (1977), and Clark (1979). It is worth mentioning that the technology at the time limited their domain size to a few tens of kilometers and their runtimes to a few hours at the spatial and temporal resolutions required to simulate a...

  10. 2010 Annual Research Report www.osc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calyam, Prasad

    that a water filter may exist 440-660 kilometers beneath the surface. Alternatively, water may exist is covered with water, in the form of oceans, ice, rivers and lakes. However, even our brightest scientists know little about the distribution of water beneath the planet's surface or even how much total water

  11. Analytical and Numerical Investigation of 3D Multilayer Detachment Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaus, Boris

    of kilometers in places where upper crustal rocks are compressed as a result of tectonic plate convergence (such layer [4, 5] affected by gravity with three different material viscosities: lower detachment or salt wavelength () and growth rate (q) that accounts for all model parameters (salt viscosity s, competent layer

  12. Tracking deep mantle reservoirs with ultra-low velocity zones Allen K. McNamara a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    . Garnero a , Sebastian Rost b a Arizona State University, School of Earth and Space Exploration, PO Box exhibit anomalous seismic properties within a thin zone, less than tens of kilometers in thickness (ULVZs) due to their greater than 10% drop in seismic velocities. High resolution seismic array studies

  13. Establishing Public Policy as a Primary Cause of Engineering Failure: Did Market Deregulation Lead to the North American `Blackout', August 14th 2003?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, John

    some 3,700 utility organizations providing more than 320,000 kilometers of transmission lines and Ontario, Canada, experienced an electric power blackout on 14th August 2003. The outage affected an area to their power supplies. Losses have been estimated between $5-10 billion. It is, therefore, one of the most wide

  14. Southern California Edison's Evaluation of California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1 Publicly Available Publications and Data 5.2 Personal Communication 6.0 GLOSSARY APPENDIX, approximately 80 kilometers (km) northwest of the City of San Diego and 97 km southeast of Los Angeles Base (Base) near the northwest end of the Base's shoreline. Figure 11 also shows

  15. FastTIMES v. 15, no. 3, October 2010 43 0XOWL)UHTXHQF\\ (0 6XUYH\\V +HOS ,GHQWLI\\ 3RVVLEOH 1HDU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    Partnership (SWP) on Carbon Sequestration's San Juan Basin Fruitland Coal pilot test. The project was funded). The efforts reported on here were undertaken as part of the NETL Phase II Regional Partnership activities 70 line-kilometers of multi-frequency EM data were collected over a carbon sequestra- tion pilot site

  16. WHY SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL AND HOW TO DETECT ANOTHER 10 BILLION SMALL MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS. Henning Haack1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Anja C.

    WHY SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL ­ AND HOW TO DETECT ANOTHER 10 BILLION SMALL MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS. Henning. Introduction: Estimates of the size distribution of main belt asteroids suggest that there is a population- tant sub-kilometer asteroids in the main belt. Long intergration times cannot be used unless the object

  17. Deep-SeaResearch,Vo[ 33. No 8. pp. 1003 11)15. 198(3. qUg.s, 1)14~l/at~ $~ Illl ~ II !~ll Printed ill Grcal Britain. Pt2r~illlltlll .hltllllals lid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    ill Grcal Britain. Pt2r~illlltlll .hltllllals lid RAPID RESPONSE PAPER The geothermal heating characteristics in the deepest kilometer ol the water cohmm. Geothermal heat flux from the abyssal sediments can characteristics of the abyssal waters are gradually altered by vertical mixing with the warmer, less saline

  18. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 63916408, 2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/10/6391/2010/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    , such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, sulfur compounds, and particulate mat- ter kilometers. This activity emitted substantial amounts of fossil-fuel combustion prod- ucts within the upper latitudes, and 74.6% was burned above 7 km. This activity led to 162.25 Tg of carbon from CO2 emitted glob

  19. 1 Chemistry and Related Properties of Freshly Emitted Sea Spray 3 Patricia K. Quinn,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    combustion, biomass burning, dust, and biogenic emissions) 41can be transported great distances across ocean basins, either in 42the boundary layer or in the free troposphere. Marine vessel 43emissions also events that carry continental 49emissions thousands of kilometers downwind. While acknowl- 50edging

  20. Remotely forced nearshore upwelling in Southern California James M. Pringle1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    In Press JGR/oceans 1 jpringle@cisunix.unh.edu 142 Morse Hall, UNH 39 College Str. Durham, NH, 03824-3525 2 Alongshore winds in Baja California strongly influence nearshore temperatures hun- dreds of kilometers to the north at Pt. Loma, San Diego, California on timescales of a week to a year. The time lag between wind

  1. A nested grid model of the Oregon Coastal Transition Zone: Simulations and comparisons with observations during the 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    several hundred kilometers offshore where shelf flows interact with the northern California Current. A primitive-equation numerical ocean model is used to study the upwelling circulation in this region from 1 is realistic representation of coastal jet separation and eddy formation offshore of Cape Blanco. Three

  2. Units and unit conversions important for ENES 100 Handout prepared by Prof. Sheryl Ehrman, Fall 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Bruce

    Units and unit conversions important for ENES 100 Handout prepared by Prof. Sheryl Ehrman, Fall 2008 The objective of this handout is to review the topic of units and unit conversions. Measured combine units. 100 kilometers = 200 km 0.5 h h Unit Conversions: The equivalence between two expressions

  3. Observations of PKKP Precursors Used to Estimate Small-Scale Topography on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shearer, Peter

    Observations of PKKP Precursors Used to Estimate Small-Scale Topography on the Core-Mantle Boundary shows that scattering from random small-scale topography at the PKKP core-mantle­boundary reflection core-mantle­boundary topography of 250 to 350 meters and correlation length of 7 to 10 kilometers

  4. High Performance Computing Technologies Jack Dongarra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongarra, Jack

    Fundamental limits are being approached. ffl More cost effective solution Example: Weather Prediction (Navier pressure humidity 3 \\Gamma wind velocity ffl 1 Kilometer Cells ffl 10 slices ! 5 \\Theta 10 9 cells ffl each Industry ffl Huge users of HPC technology: Ford (US) is 25th largest user of HPC in the world ffl Main uses

  5. High Performance Computing Technologies Jack Dongarra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongarra, Jack

    limits are being approached. More cost e ective solution Example: Weather Prediction Navier-Stokes with 3D Grid around the Earth 6 variables 8 : temperature pressure humidity 3 ,wind velocity 1 Kilometer Huge users of HPC technology: Ford US is 25th largest user of HPC in the world Main uses of simulation

  6. Scattered waves from low-frequency earthquakes and plate boundary structure in northern Cascadia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowack, Robert L.

    et al., 2012], a region with generally low levels of regular seismicity, has afforded a new source of seismic energy with which to interro- gate plate boundary structure. We review constraints on plate to northern Vancouver Island, and from some tens of kilometers seaward of the coast to depths in excess of 40

  7. The Effect of Hurricane Hugo on Six Invertebrate Species in the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Ricol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    The Effect of Hurricane Hugo on Six Invertebrate Species in the Luquillo Experimental Forest,the consequencesof catastrophic events are poorly understood. On 18September 1787 Hurricane Hugo struck Puerto Rico, with the center of the hurricane passing within ten kilometers of the Luquillo Experimental Forest. This provided

  8. Reprint draft October 8, 2003 Pliocene tephra correlations between East African

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deMenocal, Peter B.

    , University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Abstract A continuous record of Pliocene-Pleistocene East African volcanic tephra deposition has been developed from a marine sediment sequence at Ocean Drilling-Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) sites from the Gulf of Aden, nearly one thousand kilometers northeast of hominid

  9. 1. Background What is the fate of the Amazon under climate change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    through forest transpiration significant cooling from forest latent heat fluxes #12;What will climate "transpiration services": $PDG Bolivia300 0 300 600 Kilometers 2 0 ° 2 0 ° 8 0 ° 7 5 ° 7 0 ° 6 5 ° 6 0 ° 5 5 ° 5 transpiration Ecophysiological feedbacks in Hadley ModelEcophysiological feedbacks in Hadley Model Amazon

  10. For JCLI CCSM Special Issue The influence of sea ice on ocean heat uptake in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    and the rate of ocean heat uptake. The warming rate in response to increasing green- house gases in models CO2 are investigated with CCSM3: A deep warming below 500 m and extending down several kilometers in the Southern Ocean and warming in a 200-m layer just below the surface in the Arctic Ocean. Ocean heat uptake

  11. Earth System Science at Cornell Earth system sciences looks at the integrated whole of the planet,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Earth System Science at Cornell Earth system sciences looks at the integrated whole of the planet for earth system science range from nm to 1000's of kilometers. Advancing earth system science requires whose work contributes to an understanding of earth system science. We think that organizing ourselves

  12. Pallickara, Plale, Jensen, Sun Structure, sharing and preservation of scientific experiment data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallickara, Sangmi

    with developments in sensors and instruments capable of monitoring the lower several kilometers of the atmosphere that we conducted. Keywords: Scientific Computing, Metadata, Grid Services, LEAD, Experiment data, OGSA solution is a metadata database for storing metadata about data products. A scientist, in the process

  13. Stochastic Programming Formulation for Integrating Renewables into the Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    #12;Distribution Networks Distribution networks had been designed to carry power from the transmis. The set of scenarios sizing the network infrastructure might not be frequent. Much more kilometers of electricity markets : .... Day-ahead market Intraday market Time ... Period 1 Period 2 Period T ... Real

  14. ASP Conference Series, Vol. **VOLUME**, **PUBLICATION YEAR** **EDITORS**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffery, Simon

    **TITLE** ASP Conference Series, Vol. **VOLUME**, **PUBLICATION YEAR** **EDITORS** Exotic stars the conference worthwhile, and what have we learnt?". The #12;rst speci#12;c question to consider is \\What makes a star exotic?" A sign outside the conference hotel, situated on route A1A a few kilometers north

  15. Non-profit Organization U.S. Postage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    generate appreciable wave amplitudes in the upper atmo- sphere ­ in this case, the airglow layer Japan, was observed in an airglow layer 250 kilometers above the earth's surface. It preceded. As a tsunami moves across the ocean, it produces atmospheric gravity waves forced by centimeter-level surface

  16. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: EarthSurface RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    of kilometers) [Yizhaq et al., 2007, 2013]. Sand dunes cover vast areas in arid and coastal regions ( 10. Dunes may be stabilized by vegetation and/or biogenic soil crust (BSC) [Danin et al., 1989]; since: · Modeling the role of psammophilous plants in sand dune dynamics · One, two, or, first predicted here, three

  17. 36 IEEE GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING LETTERS, VOL. 3, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 A Novel ELF Radar for Major Oil Deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taflove, Allen

    for Major Oil Deposits Jamesina J. Simpson, Student Member, IEEE, and Allen Taflove, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--This letter proposes a novel extremely low frequency (ELF) radar for major oil deposits. Using our recently provides a sensitive means to detect oil fields that are located within several kilometers of the Earth

  18. Flashover vulnerability of transmission and distribution lines to high-altitude electromagnetic pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, V.J. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Advanced Systems Technology Div.); Tesche, F.M. (E-Systems, Inc., Greenville, TX (USA)); Liu, T.K. (Lutech, Inc., Oakland, CA (US)); Barnes, P.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-04-01

    This paper estimates the vulnerability of transmission and distribution lines to flashover from the electromagnetic pulse generated by a nuclear detonation 400 kilometers above the earth. The analysis consists of first determining the cumulative probability of induced-voltage on three-phase lines, including shield and neutral conductors, for four operating voltages and then comparing these stresses to estimates of line insulation strength.

  19. Tracing global biogeochemical cycles and meridional overturning circulation using chromophoric dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    of the ocean, ultraviolet light penetration, and photochemical reactions that influence the cycling) within the top kilometer of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. However, a much weaker correspondence is found encompass all three ocean basins transecting the subtropics where satelliteretrieved surface ocean CDOM

  20. AFFILIATIONS: X. Li--GST, NOAA/NESDIS, College Park, Maryland; Zhang--Hurricane Research Division, AOML, NOAA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    at kilometer spa- tial resolution. However, the intense air­sea inter- action near the ocean surface cannot;radar that emits radar pulses that can penetrate through clouds. SAR then receives the radar back the ocean surface return--a process quite similar to the QuikSCAT scatterometer wind retrieval. As a result

  1. the continental crust or the over-lying sediments. Microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    of the University of Washington, Seattle. Just how massive this ocean crustal bio- sphere might be remains unclear,000 kilometers through the global ocean. For example, something seems to be nib- bling on the glass that makes up about 5% of ocean crustal rock; samples of the glass brought up by deep drilling are scarred with pits

  2. The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    of something like the proposed International Linear Collider--a 25 miles (40 kilometers) long machine place formidable demands on the accelerators that drive them. The design of the International Linear Collider (ILC), an RF-driven, TeV-scale, electron-positron machine, calls for a luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1

  3. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    RidgeRd. SimcoeSt. Hwy.7&12 RegRd.57 0 4 8 Kilometers Area = 51,980 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICSdatamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY Drivers Vehicles Trips/day 2011 2006 1996 1986 datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT

  4. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 51 TOWN OF RICHMOND HILL REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF YORK LeslieSt. Stouffville Rd. King 6 Kilometers Area = 10,180 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Population Age Daily

  5. Reducing False Alarms with Multi-modal Sensing for Pipeline Blockage (Extended)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidemann, John

    oilfield has many kilometers of distribution flowlines that collect crude oil extracted from wellhead by studying a specific application: blockages in oil flowline common in cold weather. We use pipe skin to collect data, detect prob- lems, and take actions in the physical world. Small and inexpensive, sensornets

  6. IEEE Wireless Communications February 2015112 1536-1284/15/$25.00 2015 IEEE Miao Wang and Xuemin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

    in gasoline costs over the vehicle's lifetime. For instance, a TESLA Model S, a pioneer retail battery PEV produced by TESLA Motors, costs only $30 per kilometer, while a gasoline-fueled premium sedan costs $173). As report- ed in [1], battery powered PEVs, which completely depend on rechargeable batteries and thus

  7. 16 IEEE Canadian Review -Spring / Printemps 2003 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Wai Tung

    power flow to the motor. There are cur- rently a number of companies specializing in e, approximately 300 companies sold over 1 million electric bikes in 2002 [1]. The efficiency of the e less energy per kilometer than a standard car. In addition, as solar panel technology becomes more

  8. Moore, J. C, Mascle, A., et al., 1990 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 110

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scales of tens to tens of thousands of years. High heat flow in the vicinity of 15°30'N and not elsewhere. Surface heat-flow values from Leg110(calculated from geothermal gradients forced through the bottom forearc and trench sediments. Geothermal gradi ents in the upper kilometer of sediment that extrapolate

  9. OCEAN STIRRING BY SWIMMING BODIES Jean-Luc Thiffeault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proposed that the mechanical energy delivered by the swimming motions of the marine biosphere could amount to almost 1012 W, a figure comparable to the energy delivered by the winds and tides. This suggests that this energy is delivered to the top three kilometers of the oceans, they estimate an effective diffusivity

  10. In Proceedings SC'98 Adaptive Parallel Computation of a Grand-Challenge Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stout, Quentin F.

    that the Sun interacts with the Earth is through the solar wind, which is an ionized multi- component fluid that emanates from the Sun and travels radially outward at hundreds of kilometers per second. Solar-wind involved in solar-wind phenomena, it had previously been impossible to predict CME propa- gation to Earth

  11. Architecture of the upper Sego Sandstone, Book Cliffs, Utah 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkhead, Stanley Scott

    2006-04-12

    ................................................................................................................... 22 SEDIMENTOLOGY.................................................................................................... 26 Marine Shale with Wavy Sandstones............................................................... 26 Highly... surfaces. The cross-section defines an 8.5 kilometer section that begins in Sego Canyon outside of Thompson Springs, Figure 12-Bedding diagram of major facies transitions with sedimentary logs overlain. SEDIMENTOLOGY Upper Sego Sandstone deposits can...

  12. Fission-track tectonic studies of the Transantarctic Mountains, Beardmore Glacier area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Transantarctic Mountains are a major transcontinental range stretching for some 4000 kilometers, varying from 200-400 kilometers in width, and having elevations up to 4500 meters. The uplift and formation of the Transantarctic Mountains have always been something of an enigma, but recent apatite fission-track analysis is providing important new information not only about their uplift history but also about the implications of that uplift history for the glacial history of Antarctica as a whole. The main field objective of this project was to collect samples for fission-track analysis to determine the timing and rate of uplift of the Transantarctic Mountains and measure relative vertical displacements across faults within the range. Results from southern Victoria Land indicate that uplift of the Transantarctic Mountains was initiated at about 50 million years ago and since that time the mountains have undergone some 5 kilometers of uplift at an average rate of 100 meters per million years. It is important to realize, however, that this is an average rate and may well conceal pulses of faster and slower uplift or even periods of subsidence. The amount of uplift across the mountain range is differential; from the axis of maximum uplift about 30 kilometers inland of the Victoria Land coast, the mountains dip gently westward under the polar ice cap. The study was extended to the Beardmore Glacier area to see whether the uplift history and tectonics varies from that observed in southern Victoria Land.

  13. JAVA Project IMIS 2009-2010 Page 1 sur 3 JAVA Project IMIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marfisi-Schottman, Iza

    the flow of luggage and carts in the airport. Big luggage Batterie recharge Airplane 3Airplane 2Airplane 1-in desk. #12;JAVA Project ­ IMIS ­ 2009-2010 Page 2 sur 3 The carts run on a battery that needs to be recharged every few kilometers. When the chart detects that its battery is low, it goes to one

  14. The Cotton-Square Borer. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhard, H. J. (Henry Jonathan)

    1929-01-01

    85.5 84.5 88.0 88.0 87.0 Pair number .. 1 EM 0 0 9 20 16 19 10 0 5 0 0 0 Laid 3 EM 0 0 2 18 10 17 0 0... 12 4 0 1 0 12 EM 4 4 3 7 10 11 13 0 0 ...,.. 9 EM 0 4 0 0 7 6 3 5 1 ...... '11 EM 2 9 7 6 8 1 0 0 1 0 20 BULLETIN NO. 401. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION remain fairly uniform, the incubation period...

  15. Kendall Square May 6, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrieli, John

    of zoning) ZONING REQUIREMENTS 10 #12;OTHER COMMITMENTS Study of off-road bicycle and pedestrian facilities $4.3 million Estimated city taxes Approximately $10 million annually New permanent jobs 2,500 New

  16. A chi-square goodness-of-fit test for non-identically distributed random variables: with application to empirical Bayes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, W.J.; Cox, D.D.; Martz, H.F.

    1997-12-01

    When using parametric empirical Bayes estimation methods for estimating the binomial or Poisson parameter, the validity of the assumed beta or gamma conjugate prior distribution is an important diagnostic consideration. Chi-square goodness-of-fit tests of the beta or gamma prior hypothesis are developed for use when the binomial sample sizes or Poisson exposure times vary. Nine examples illustrate the application of the methods, using real data from such diverse applications as the loss of feedwater flow rates in nuclear power plants, the probability of failure to run on demand and the failure rates of the high pressure coolant injection systems at US commercial boiling water reactors, the probability of failure to run on demand of emergency diesel generators in US commercial nuclear power plants, the rate of failure of aircraft air conditioners, baseball batting averages, the probability of testing positive for toxoplasmosis, and the probability of tumors in rats. The tests are easily applied in practice by means of corresponding Mathematica{reg_sign} computer programs which are provided.

  17. A tensor product state approach to spin-1/2 square J1-J2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model: evidence for deconfined quantum criticality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling Wang; Zheng-Cheng Gu; Frank Verstraete; Xiao-Gang Wen

    2015-07-14

    The ground state phase diagram of spin-1/2 J1-J2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on square lattice around the maximally frustrated regime (J2~0.5J1) has been debated for decades. Here we study this model using a recently proposed novel numerical method - the cluster update algorithm for tensor product states (TPSs). The ground state energies at finite sizes and in the thermodynamic limit (with finite size scaling) are in good agreement with exact diagonalization study. At the largest bond dimension available D = 9 and through finite size scaling of the magnetization order near the transition point, we accurately determine the critical point Jc=0.5321(2)J1 and the critical exponent beta = 0.499(3). In the range of 0.5321power law decaying dimer-dimer correlation, which suggests a potential gapless U(1) spin liquid phase. However, since the U(1) spin liquid is unstable due to the instanton effect, a VBS order with very small amplitude might develop at long wave length. Remarkably, by fitting a universal scaling function for the spin-spin correlation with fixed Jc find the critical exponents nu=0.68(3) and eta=0.34(3), which is in very good agreement to the observed critical exponents for deconfined quantum critical point (DQCP) in other systems. Thus, our numerical results strongly suggest a Landau forbidden phase transition from Neel order to VBS order at Jc=0.5321(2)J1.

  18. BLAST: The Mass Function, Lifetimes, and Properties of Intermediate Mass Cores from a 50 Square Degree Submillimeter Galactic Survey in Vela (l = ~265)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netterfield, Calvin B; Bock, James J; Chapin, Edward L; Devlin, Mark J; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C; Hughes, David H; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Martin, Peter G; Mauskopf, Phillip; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie; Roy, Arabindo; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S; Viero, Marco P; Wiebe, Donald V

    2009-01-01

    We present first results from an unbiased, 50 square degree submillimeter Galactic survey at 250, 350, and 500 microns from the 2006 flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST). The map has resolution ranging from 36" to 60" in the three submillimeter bands spanning the thermal emission peak of cold starless cores. We determine the temperature, luminosity, and mass of more than a thousand compact sources in a range of evolutionary stages and an unbiased statistical characterization of the population. From comparison with C^18 O data, we find the dust opacity per gas mass, kappa/R = 0.16 cm^2/g at 250 microns, for cold clumps. We find that 2% of the mass of the molecular gas over this diverse region is in cores colder than 14 K, and that the mass function for these cold cores is consistent with a power law with index alpha = -3.22 +/- 0.14 over the mass range 14 M_sun < M < 80 M_sun, steeper than the Salpeter alpha = -2.35 initial massfunction for stars. Additionally, we in...

  19. Critical cavity in the stretched fluid studied using square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Iwamatsu

    2009-04-04

    The generic square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy is used to study the stability of a cavity introduced into the stretched liquid. The various properties of the critical cavity, which is the largest stable cavity within the liquid, are compared with those of the critical bubble of the homogeneous bubble nucleation. It is found that the size of the critical cavity is always smaller than that of the critical bubble, while the work of formation of the former is always higher than the latter in accordance with the conjectures made by Punnathanam and Corti [J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 119}, 10224 (2003)] deduced from the Lennard-Jones fluids. Therefore their conjectures about the critical cavity size and the work of formation would be more general and valid even for other types of liquid such as metallic liquid or amorphous. However, the scaling relations they found for the critical cavity in the Lennard-Jones fluid are marginally satisfied only near the spinodal.

  20. Scaling properties of critical bubble of homogeneous nucleation in stretched fluid of square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Iwamatsu

    2008-08-07

    The square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy is used to study homogeneous bubble nucleation in a stretched liquid to check the scaling rule for the work of formation of the critical bubble as a function of scaled undersaturation $\\Delta\\mu/\\Delta\\mu_{\\rm spin}$, the difference in chemical potential $\\Delta\\mu$ between the bulk undersaturated and saturated liquid divided by $\\Delta\\mu_{\\rm spin}$ between the liquid spinodal and saturated liquid. In contrast to our study, a similar density-functional study for a Lennard-Jones liquid by Shen and Debenedetti [J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 114}, 4149 (2001)] found that not only the work of formation but other various quantities related to the critical bubble show the scaling rule, however, we found virtually no scaling relationships in our model near the coexistence. Although some quantities show almost perfect scaling relations near the spinodal, the work of formation divided by the value deduced from the classical nucleation theory shows no scaling in this model even though it correctly vanishes at the spinodal. Furthermore, the critical bubble does not show any anomaly near the spinodal as predicted many years ago. In particular, our model does not show diverging interfacial width at the spinodal, which is due to the fact that compressibility remains finite until the spinodal is reached in our parabolic models.

  1. The most important thing in social dance is to end up with the partner you started with. We shall illustrate this with square dance by tracking the movement of the women, assuming the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Russell Bruce

    1 The most important thing in social dance is to end up with the partner you started with. We shall illustrate this with square dance by tracking the movement of the women, assuming the men do not move with a woman in it, a permutation has occurred, and we summarize movements as cycles of changing positions

  2. A laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator: formulas for simulating the dynamics of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves during the device operation in the self-heating regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bondarenko, E A

    2014-04-28

    For a laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator we have developed a mathematical model, which allows one to simulate the temporal behaviour of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves in a situation when the device operates in the self-heating regime and is switched-on at different initial temperatures. (laser gyroscopes)

  3. Submillimeter tests of the gravitational inverse-square law C. D. Hoyle, D. J. Kapner, B. R. Heckel, E. G. Adelberger, J. H. Gundlach, U. Schmidt,* and H. E. Swanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Submillimeter tests of the gravitational inverse-square law C. D. Hoyle, D. J. Kapner, B. R. Heckel Motivated by a variety of theories that predict new effects, we tested the gravitational 1/r2 law these results as constraints on extensions of the standard model that predict Yukawa or power-law forces. We set

  4. The needle in the hundred square degree haystack: The hunt for binary neutron star mergers with LIGO and Palomar Transient Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leo P. Singer

    2015-01-12

    The Advanced LIGO and Virgo experiments are poised to detect gravitational waves (GWs) directly for the first time this decade. The ultimate prize will be joint observation of a compact binary merger in both gravitational and electromagnetic channels. However, GW sky locations that are uncertain by hundreds of square degrees will pose a challenge. I describe a real-time detection pipeline and a rapid Bayesian parameter estimation code that will make it possible to search promptly for optical counterparts in Advanced LIGO. Having analyzed a comprehensive population of simulated GW sources, we describe the sky localization accuracy that the GW detector network will achieve as each detector comes online and progresses toward design sensitivity. Next, in preparation for the optical search with the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), we have developed a unique capability to detect optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Its comparable error regions offer a close parallel to the Advanced LIGO problem, but Fermi's unique access to MeV-GeV photons and its near all-sky coverage may allow us to look at optical afterglows in a relatively unexplored part of the GRB parameter space. We present the discovery and broadband follow-up observations of eight GBM-iPTF afterglows. Two of the bursts are at low redshift, are sub-luminous with respect to "standard" cosmological bursts, and have spectroscopically confirmed broad-line type Ic supernovae. These two bursts are possibly consistent with mildly relativistic shocks breaking out from the progenitor envelopes rather than the standard mechanism of internal shocks within an ultra-relativistic jet. On a technical level, the GBM-iPTF effort is a prototype for locating and observing optical counterparts of GW events in Advanced LIGO with the Zwicky Transient Facility.

  5. Hydrogeologic evaluation and numerical simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.; Hill, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the ground-water system. The study area covers approximately 100,000 square kilometers between lat 35{degrees}N., long 115{degrees}W and lat 38{degrees}N., long 118{degrees}W and encompasses the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Hydrology in the region is a result of both the and climatic conditions and the complex described as dominated by interbasinal flow and may be conceptualized as having two main components: a series of relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper regional flow paths. A significant component of the regional ground-water flow is through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence. Throughout the regional flow system, ground-water flow is probably controlled by extensive and prevalent structural features that result from regional faulting and fracturing. Hydrogeologic investigations over a large and hydrogeologically complex area impose severe demands on data management. This study utilized geographic information systems and geoscientific information systems to develop, store, manipulate, and analyze regional hydrogeologic data sets describing various components of the ground-water flow system.

  6. Constraints on the neutrino parameters by future cosmological 21cm line and precise CMB polarization observations (PhD thesis, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI))

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyama, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the 21 cm line radiation coming from the epoch of reionization have a great capacity to study the cosmological growth of the Universe. Also, CMB polarization produced by gravitational lensing has a large amount of information about the growth of matter fluctuations at late time. In this thesis, we investigate their sensitivities to the impact of neutrino property on the growth of density fluctuations, such as the total neutrino mass, the neutrino mass hierarchy, the effective number of neutrino species (extra radiation), and the lepton asymmetry of our Universe. We will show that by combining the precise CMB polarization observations with Square Kilometer Array (SKA) we can measure the impact of non-zero neutrino mass on the growth of density fluctuation, and determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at 2 sigma level if the total neutrino mass is smaller than 0.1 eV. Additionally, we will show that by using these combinations we can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthes...

  7. The changing face of Hanford security 1990--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thielman, J.

    1995-12-01

    The meltdown of the Cold War was a shock to the systems built to cope with it. At the DOE`s Hanford Site in Washington State, a world-class safeguards and security system was suddenly out of step with the times. The level of protection for nuclear and classified materials was exceptional. But the cost was high and the defense facilities that funded security were closing down. The defense mission had created an umbrella of security over the sprawling Hanford Site. Helicopters designed to ferry special response teams to any trouble spot on the 1,456 square-kilometer site made the umbrella analogy almost literally true. Facilities were grouped into areas, fenced off like a military base, and entrance required a badge check for everyone. Within the fence, additional rings of protection were set up around security interests or targets. The security was effective, but costly to operate and inconvenient for employees and visitors alike. Moreover, the umbrella meant that virtually all employees needed a security clearance just to get to work, whether they worked on classified or unclassified projects. Clearly, some fundamental rethinking of safeguards and security was needed. The effort to meet that challenge is the story of transition at Hanford and documented here.

  8. Radio Astrometric Detection and Characterization of Extra-Solar Planets: A White Paper Submitted to the NSF ExoPlanet Task Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geoffrey C. Bower; Alberto Bolatto; Eric Ford; Paul Kalas; Jim Ulvestad

    2007-04-02

    The extraordinary astrometric accuracy of radio interferometry creates an important and unique opportunity for the discovery and characterization of exo-planets. Currently, the Very Long Baseline Array can routinely achieve better than 100 microarcsecond accuracy, and can approach 10 microarcsecond with careful calibration. We describe here RIPL, the Radio Interferometric PLanet search, a new program with the VLBA and the Green Bank 100 m telescope that will survey 29 low-mass, active stars over 3 years with sub-Jovian planet mass sensitivity at 1 AU. An upgrade of the VLBA bandwidth will increase astrometric accuracy by an order of magnitude. Ultimately, the colossal collecting area of the Square Kilometer Array could push astrometric accuracy to 1 microarcsecond, making detection and characterizaiton of Earth mass planets possible. RIPL and other future radio astrometric planet searches occupy a unique volume in planet discovery and characterization parameter space. The parameter space of astrometric searches gives greater sensitivity to planets at large radii than radial velocity searches. For the VLBA and the expanded VLBA, the targets of radio astrometric surveys are by necessity nearby, low-mass, active stars, which cannot be studied efficiently through the radial velocity method, coronagraphy, or optical interferometry. For the SKA, detection sensitivity will extend to solar-type stars. Planets discovered through radio astrometric methods will be suitable for characterization through extreme adaptive optics. The complementarity of radio astrometric techniques with other methods demonstrates that radio astrometry can play an important role in the roadmap for exoplanet discovery and characterization.

  9. SKA as a powerful hunter of jetted Tidal Disruption Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donnarumma, I; Fender, R; Komossa, S; Paragi, Z; Van Velzen, S; Prandoni, I

    2015-01-01

    Observational consequences of the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) can enable us to discover quiescent SMBHs and constrain their mass function. Moreover, observing jetted TDEs (from previously non-active galaxies) provides us with a new means of studying the early phases of jet formation and evolution in an otherwise "pristine" environment. Although several (tens) TDEs have been discovered since 1999, only two jetted TDEs have been recently discovered in hard X-rays, and only one, Swift J1644+57, has a precise localization which further supports the TDE interpretation. These events alone are not sufficient to address those science issues, which require a substantial increase of the current sample. Despite the way they were discovered, the highest discovery potential for {\\em jetted} TDEs is not held by current and up-coming X-ray instruments, which will yield only a few to a few tens events per year. In fact, the best strategy is to use the Square Kilometer Array to detect TDEs an...

  10. A FOURTH H I 21 cm ABSORPTION SYSTEM IN THE SIGHT LINE OF MG J0414+0534: A RECORD FOR INTERVENING ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanna, A.; Webb, J. K.; Curran, S. J.; Whiting, M. T.; Bignell, C.

    2013-08-01

    We report the detection of a strong H I 21 cm absorption system at z = 0.5344, as well as a candidate system at z = 0.3389, in the sight line toward the z = 2.64 quasar MG J0414+0534. This, in addition to the absorption at the host redshift and the other two intervening absorbers, takes the total to four (possibly five). The previous maximum number of 21 cm absorbers detected along a single sight line is two and so we suspect that this number of gas-rich absorbers is in some way related to the very red color of the background source. Despite this, no molecular gas (through OH absorption) has yet been detected at any of the 21 cm redshifts, although, from the population of 21 cm absorbers as a whole, there is evidence for a weak correlation between the atomic line strength and the optical-near-infrared color. In either case, the fact that so many gas-rich galaxies (likely to be damped Ly{alpha} absorption systems) have been found along a single sight line toward a highly obscured source may have far-reaching implications for the population of faint galaxies not detected in optical surveys, a possibility which could be addressed through future wide-field absorption line surveys with the Square Kilometer Array.

  11. Constraints on the neutrino parameters by future cosmological 21cm line and precise CMB polarization observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshihiko Oyama; Kazunori Kohri; Masashi Hazumi

    2015-10-13

    Observations of the 21 cm line radiation coming from the epoch of reionization have a great capacity to study the cosmological growth of the Universe. Also, CMB polarization produced by gravitational lensing has a large amount of information about the growth of matter fluctuations at late time. In this paper, we investigate their sensitivities to the impact of neutrino property on the growth of density fluctuations, such as the total neutrino mass, the effective number of neutrino species (extra radiation), and the neutrino mass hierarchy. We will show that by combining a precise CMB polarization observations such as Simons Array with a 21 cm line observation such as Square kilometer Array (SKA) phase 1 and a baryon acoustic oscillation observation (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument:DESI) we can measure effects of non-zero neutrino mass on the growth of density fluctuation if the total neutrino mass is larger than 0.1eV. Additionally, the combinations can strongly improve errors of the bounds on the effective number of neutrino species sigma(N_nu) ~ 0.06-0.09 at 95 % C.L.. Finally, by using SKA phase 2, we can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at 95 % C.L. if the total neutrino mass is similar to or smaller than 0.1 eV.

  12. Constraints on the neutrino parameters by future cosmological 21cm line and precise CMB polarization observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyama, Yoshihiko; Hazumi, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the 21 cm line radiation coming from the epoch of reionization have a great capacity to study the cosmological growth of the Universe. Also, CMB polarization produced by gravitational lensing has a large amount of information about the growth of matter fluctuations at late time. In this paper, we investigate their sensitivities to the impact of neutrino property on the growth of density fluctuations, such as the total neutrino mass, the effective number of neutrino species (extra radiation), and the neutrino mass hierarchy. We will show that by combining a precise CMB polarization observations such as Simons Array with a 21 cm line observation such as Square kilometer Array (SKA) phase 1 and a baryon acoustic oscillation observation (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument:DESI) we can measure effects of non-zero neutrino mass on the growth of density fluctuation if the total neutrino mass is larger than 0.1eV. Additionally, the combinations can strongly improve errors of the bounds on the effect...

  13. ATMOSPHERIC MODELING IN SUPPORT OF A ROADWAY ACCIDENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, R.; Hunter, C.

    2010-10-21

    The United States Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS) routinely performs prescribed fires at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southwest South Carolina. This facility covers {approx}800 square kilometers and is mainly wooded except for scattered industrial areas containing facilities used in managing nuclear materials for national defense and waste processing. Prescribed fires of forest undergrowth are necessary to reduce the risk of inadvertent wild fires which have the potential to destroy large areas and threaten nuclear facility operations. This paper discusses meteorological observations and numerical model simulations from a period in early 2002 of an incident involving an early-morning multicar accident caused by poor visibility along a major roadway on the northern border of the SRS. At the time of the accident, it was not clear if the limited visibility was due solely to fog or whether smoke from a prescribed burn conducted the previous day just to the northwest of the crash site had contributed to the visibility. Through use of available meteorological information and detailed modeling, it was determined that the primary reason for the low visibility on this night was fog induced by meteorological conditions.

  14. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

    2006-03-01

    The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

  15. K-25 D and D Challenges - 12170

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eidam, Greg [Bechtel National, Inc. (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the K-25 former gaseous diffusion plant provides lessons learned applicable to other D and D projects in the DOE Complex. The 175,000- square-meter, 1.6-kilometer-long building is contaminated with highly enriched uranium (HEU), Tc-99, trace quantities of other fission products, asbestos, PCBs, and other hazardous wastes. Safety challenges include deteriorated electrical systems, significant structural degradation, and criticality and exposure risks. The project completely revised the D and D approach after a worker fell through an operating floor and was seriously injured. For protection from deteriorated building conditions, the project reduced the number of workers in the facility, limited their hours in the building, and installed nets and barriers to protect them from falls through weakened floors and from falling material. The new plan involved removing high-risk components, removing motors and compressors, and demolishing the building from the outside with heavy equipment with most of the piping and components inside the building during demolition. The team provided temporary electrical power; reconfigured the criticality alarm system; upgraded security; performed sampling and analysis to locate and characterize HEU deposits and Tc-99; and, to establish 'criticality incredible' conditions, conducted a nondestructive assay program and injected foam into equipment and piping as a contamination fixative. (authors)

  16. Gigantic Ordovician volcanic ash fall in North America and Europe: Biological, tectonomagmatic, and event-stratigraphic significance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, W.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Bergstroem, S.M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States)); Kolata, D.R. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1992-10-01

    Biostratigraphical, geochemical, isotopic, and paleogeographic data suggest that the Millbrig K-bentonite, one of the thickest and most widespread Ordovician volcanic ash beds in eastern North America, is the same as the so-called 'Big Bentonite' in Baltoscandia. This is the first time that the same K-bentonite has been identified in both North America and Europe, and it serves as a unique event-stratigraphic marker over a large portion of the Northern Hemisphere. This eruption produced at least 340 km[sup 3] of dense-rock-equivalent ash that was deposited in a layer up to 1-2 m thick over several million square kilometers. As much as 800 km[sup 3] of additional ash may have fallen into the Iapetus Ocean, for a total of 1,140 km[sup 3]. Trace element geochemistry shows that the ash was derived from a felsic calc-alkalic magmatic source characteristic of volcanism in a continental crust-based, destructive plate-margin setting. This is one of the largest, if not the largest, ash falls recorded in Earth's Phanerozoic stratigraphic record, but its recognizable effect on faunas and floras was minimal, and it did not result in a global extinction event. The Millbrig-Big Bentonite bed provides accurate time control for sedimentologic, paleoecologic, and paleogeographic reconstructions across plates positioned in tropical (Laurentia) and temperate (Baltica) latitudes during Middle Ordovician time.

  17. Radio astronomy in Africa: the case of Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asabere, Bernard Duah; Horellou, Cathy; Winkler, Hartmut; Jarrett, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    South Africa has played a leading role in radio astronomy in Africa with the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO). It continues to make strides with the current seven-dish MeerKAT precursor array (KAT-7), leading to the 64-dish MeerKAT and the giant Square Kilometer Array (SKA), which will be used for transformational radio astronomy research. Ghana, an African partner to the SKA, has been mentored by South Africa over the past six years and will soon emerge in the field of radio astronomy. The country will soon have a science-quality 32m dish converted from a redundant satellite communication antenna. Initially, it will be fitted with 5 GHz and 6.7 GHz receivers to be followed later by a 1.4 - 1.7 GHz receiver. The telescope is being designed for use as a single dish observatory and for participation in the developing African Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Network (AVN) and the European VLBI Network. Ghana is earmarked to host a remote station during a possible SKA Phase 2. The loca...

  18. Solar panels as cosmic-ray detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stella, Carlo; Assis, Pedro; Brogueira, Pedro; Santo, Catarina Espirito; Goncalves, Patricia; Pimenta, Mario; De Angelis, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Due to fundamental limitations of accelerators, only cosmic rays can give access to centre-of- mass energies more than one order of magnitude above those reached at the LHC. In fact, extreme energy cosmic rays (1018 eV - 1020 eV) are the only possibility to explore the 100 TeV energy scale in the years to come. This leap by one order of magnitude gives a unique way to open new horizons: new families of particles, new physics scales, in-depth investigations of the Lorentz symmetries. However, the flux of cosmic rays decreases rapidly, being less than one particle per square kilometer per year above 1019 eV: one needs to sample large surfaces. A way to develop large-effective area, low cost, detectors, is to build a solar panel-based device which can be used in parallel for power generation and Cherenkov light detection. Using solar panels for Cherenkov light detection would combine power generation and a non-standard detection device.

  19. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. F. Grossman

    2000-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the US Department of Energy's Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km{sup 2} (1,375 mi{sup 2}), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

  20. CONSTRAINT ON THE PARAMETERS OF THE INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING MODEL FOR RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lv, M.; Wang, H. G. [Center for Astrophysics, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Lee, K. J. [Max-Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, Bonn 53121 (Germany); Qiao, G. J.; Xu, R. X., E-mail: hgwang@gzhu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-11-01

    The inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model can explain various pulse profile shapes and the diversity of the pulse profile evolution based on the mechanism where the radio emission is generated through ICS between secondary relativistic particles and radio waves from polar gap avalanches. In this paper, we study the parameter space of the ICS model for 15 pulsars that share the common pulse profile evolution phenomenon, where the pulse profiles are narrower at higher observing frequencies. Two key parameters, the initial Lorentz factor and the energy loss factor of secondary particles, are constrained using the least-squares fitting method, where we fit the theoretical curve of the 'beam-frequency mapping' of the ICS model to the observed pulse widths at multiple frequencies. The uncertainty of the inclination and viewing angles are taken into account in the fitting process. It is found that the initial Lorentz factor is larger than 4000, and the energy loss factor is between 20 and 560. The Lorentz factor is consistent with the prediction of the inner vacuum gap model. Such high-energy loss factors suggest significant energy loss for secondary particles at altitudes of a few tens to hundreds of kilometers.

  1. 3-D visualisation and interpretation of seismic attributes extracted from large 3-D seismic datasets: Subregional and prospect evaluation, deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sola, M.; Haakon Nordby, L.; Dailey, D.V.; Duncan, E.A. (BP and Statoil Alliance, Stavanger (Norway))

    1996-01-01

    High resolution 3-D visualization of horizon interpretation and seismic attributes from large 3-D seismic surveys in deepwater Nigeria has greatly enhanced the exploration team's ability to quickly recognize prospective segments of subregional and prospect specific scale areas. Integrated workstation generated structure, isopach and extracted horizon consistent, interval and windowed attributes are particularly useful in illustrating the complex structural and stratigraphical prospectivity of deepwater Nigeria. Large 3-D seismic volumes acquired over 750 square kilometers can be manipulated within the visualization system with attribute tracking capability that allows for real time data interrogation and interpretation. As in classical seismic stratigraphic studies, pattern recognition is fundamental to effective depositions facies interpretation and reservoir model construction. The 3-D perspective enhances the data interpretation through clear representation of relative scale, spatial distribution and magnitude of attributes. In deepwater Nigeria, many prospective traps rely on an interplay between syndepositional structure and slope turbidite depositional systems. Reservoir systems in many prospects appear to be dominated by unconfined to moderately focused slope feeder channel facies. These units have spatially complex facies architecture with feeder channel axes separated by extensive interchannel areas. Structural culminations generally have a history of initial compressional folding with late in extensional collapse and accommodation faulting. The resulting complex trap configurations often have stacked reservoirs over intervals as thick as 1500 meters. Exploration, appraisal and development scenarios in these settings can be optimized by taking full advantage of integrating high resolution 3-D visualization and seismic workstation interpretation.

  2. A PILOT FOR A VERY LARGE ARRAY H I DEEP FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Ximena; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Hess, Kelley M. [Department of Astronomy, Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Pisano, D. J. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6315, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Kreckel, Kathryn [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Momjian, Emmanuel [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Popping, Attila [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Oosterloo, Tom [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, NL-7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Chomiuk, Laura [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Verheijen, M. A. W. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Postbus 800, NL-9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Henning, Patricia A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A.; Wilcots, Eric M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Scoville, Nick, E-mail: ximena@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    High-resolution 21 cm H I deep fields provide spatially and kinematically resolved images of neutral hydrogen at different redshifts, which are key to understanding galaxy evolution across cosmic time and testing predictions of cosmological simulations. Here we present results from a pilot for an H I deep field done with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We take advantage of the newly expanded capabilities of the telescope to probe the redshift interval 0 < z < 0.193 in one observation. We observe the COSMOS field for 50 hr, which contains 413 galaxies with optical spectroscopic redshifts in the imaged field of 34' Multiplication-Sign 34' and the observed redshift interval. We have detected neutral hydrogen gas in 33 galaxies in different environments spanning the probed redshift range, including three without a previously known spectroscopic redshift. The detections have a range of H I and stellar masses, indicating the diversity of galaxies we are probing. We discuss the observations, data reduction, results, and highlight interesting detections. We find that the VLA's B-array is the ideal configuration for H I deep fields since its long spacings mitigate radio frequency interference. This pilot shows that the VLA is ready to carry out such a survey, and serves as a test for future H I deep fields planned with other Square Kilometer Array pathfinders.

  3. Effect of faulting on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faunt, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    This study characterizes the hydrogeologic system of the Death Valley region, an area covering approximately 100,000 square kilometers. The study also characterizes the effects of faults on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region by synthesizing crustal stress, fracture mechanics,a nd structural geologic data. The geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. Faulting and associated fracturing is pervasive and greatly affects ground-water flow patterns. Faults may become preferred conduits or barriers to flow depending on whether they are in relative tension, compression, or shear and other factors such as the degree of dislocations of geologic units caused by faulting, the rock types involved, the fault zone materials, and the depth below the surface. The current crustal stress field was combined with fault orientations to predict potential effects of faults on the regional ground-water flow regime. Numerous examples of fault-controlled ground-water flow exist within the study area. Hydrologic data provided an independent method for checking some of the assumptions concerning preferential flow paths. 97 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Asteroid Discovery and Characterization with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, R Lynne; Ivezic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a ground-based, optical, all-sky, rapid cadence survey project with tremendous potential for discovering and characterizing asteroids. With LSST's large 6.5m diameter primary mirror, a wide 9.6 square degree field of view 3.2 Gigapixel camera, and rapid observational cadence, LSST will discover more than 5 million asteroids over its ten year survey lifetime. With a single visit limiting magnitude of 24.5 in r-band, LSST will be able to detect asteroids in the Main Belt down to sub-kilometer sizes. The current strawman for the LSST survey strategy is to obtain two visits (each visit being a pair of back-to-back 15s exposures) per field, separated by about 30 minutes, covering the entire visible sky every 3-4 days throughout the observing season, for ten years. The catalogs generated by LSST will increase the known number of small bodies in the Solar System by a factor of 10-100 times, among all populations. The median number of observations for Main Belt aster...

  5. A VIRTUAL SKY WITH EXTRAGALACTIC H I AND CO LINES FOR THE SQUARE KILOMETRE ARRAY AND THE ATACAMA LARGE MILLIMETER/SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreschkow, D.; Kloeckner, H.-R.; Heywood, I.; Rawlings, S.; Levrier, F.

    2009-10-01

    We present a sky simulation of the atomic H I-emission line and the first 10 {sup 12}C{sup 16}O rotational emission lines of molecular gas in galaxies beyond the Milky Way. The simulated sky field has a comoving diameter of 500 h {sup -1} Mpc; hence, the actual field of view depends on the (user-defined) maximal redshift z {sub max}; e.g., for z {sub max} = 10, the field of view yields approx4 x 4 deg{sup 2}. For all galaxies, we estimate the line fluxes, line profiles, and angular sizes of the H I and CO-emission lines. The galaxy sample is complete for galaxies with cold hydrogen masses above 10{sup 8} M {sub sun}. This sky simulation builds on a semi-analytic model of the cosmic evolution of galaxies in a LAMBDA cold dark matter (LAMBDACDM) cosmology. The evolving CDM distribution was adopted from the Millennium Simulation, an N-body CDM simulation in a cubic box with a side length of 500 h {sup -1} Mpc. This side length limits the coherence scale of our sky simulation: it is long enough to allow the extraction of the baryon acoustic oscillations in the galaxy power spectrum, yet the position and amplitude of the first acoustic peak will be imperfectly defined. This sky simulation is a tangible aid to the design and operation of future telescopes, such as the Square Kilometre Array, Large Millimeter Telescope, and Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. The results presented in this paper have been restricted to a graphical representation of the simulated sky and fundamental dN/dz analyses for peak flux density limited and total flux limited surveys of H I and CO. A key prediction is that H I will be harder to detect at redshifts z approx> 2 than predicted by a no-evolution model. The future verification or falsification of this prediction will allow us to qualify the semi-analytic models.

  6. Potential energy surface fitting by a statistically localized, permutationally invariant, local interpolating moving least squares method for the many-body potential: Method and application to N{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Jason D.; Doraiswamy, Sriram; Candler, Graham V., E-mail: truhlar@umn.edu, E-mail: candler@aem.umn.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Truhlar, Donald G., E-mail: truhlar@umn.edu, E-mail: candler@aem.umn.edu [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Theory Center, and Supercomputing Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Fitting potential energy surfaces to analytic forms is an important first step for efficient molecular dynamics simulations. Here, we present an improved version of the local interpolating moving least squares method (L-IMLS) for such fitting. Our method has three key improvements. First, pairwise interactions are modeled separately from many-body interactions. Second, permutational invariance is incorporated in the basis functions, using permutationally invariant polynomials in Morse variables, and in the weight functions. Third, computational cost is reduced by statistical localization, in which we statistically correlate the cutoff radius with data point density. We motivate our discussion in this paper with a review of global and local least-squares-based fitting methods in one dimension. Then, we develop our method in six dimensions, and we note that it allows the analytic evaluation of gradients, a feature that is important for molecular dynamics. The approach, which we call statistically localized, permutationally invariant, local interpolating moving least squares fitting of the many-body potential (SL-PI-L-IMLS-MP, or, more simply, L-IMLS-G2), is used to fit a potential energy surface to an electronic structure dataset for N{sub 4}. We discuss its performance on the dataset and give directions for further research, including applications to trajectory calculations.

  7. Physical Consequences of a Momenta-Transfering Particle Theory of Induced Gravity and New Measurements Indicating Variation from Inverse Square Law at Length Scale of .1 mm: Statistical Time Properties of Gravitational Interaction and Analysis Thereof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary Christopher Vezzoli

    2001-04-04

    This work presents physical consequences of our theory of induced gravity (Ref.1) regarding: 1) the requirement to consider shape and materials properties when calculating graviton cross section collision area; 2) use of Special Relativity; 3) implications regarding the shape of cosmos; 4) comparison to explanations using General Relativity; 5) properties of black holes; 6) relationship to the strong force and the theorized Higgs boson; 7) the possible origin of magnetic attraction; 8) new measurements showing variation from gravitational inverse square behavior at length scales of 0.1 mm and relationship to the Cosmological constant, and proof of the statistical time properties of the gravitational interaction.

  8. The Development of the Linac Coherent Light Source RF Gun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowell, David H; Lewandowski, James; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Li, Zenghai; Schmerge, John; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; Xiao, Liling

    2015-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first x-ray laser user facility based upon a free electron laser (FEL). In addition to many other stringent requirements, the LCLS XFEL requires extraordinary beam quality to saturate at 1.5 angstroms within a 100 meter undulator.[1] This new light source is using the last kilometer of the three kilometer linac at SLAC to accelerate the beam to an energy as high as 13.6 GeV and required a new electron gun and injector to produce a very bright beam for acceleration. At the outset of the project it was recognized that existing RF guns had the potential to produce the desired beam but none had demonstrated it. This paper describes the analysis and design improvements of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA s-band gun leading to achievement of the LCLS performance goals.

  9. Small space object imaging : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Valley, Michael T.; Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2009-10-01

    We report the results of an LDRD effort to investigate new technologies for the identification of small-sized (mm to cm) debris in low-earth orbit. This small-yet-energetic debris presents a threat to the integrity of space-assets worldwide and represents significant security challenge to the international community. We present a nonexhaustive review of recent US and Russian efforts to meet the challenges of debris identification and removal and then provide a detailed description of joint US-Russian plans for sensitive, laser-based imaging of small debris at distances of hundreds of kilometers and relative velocities of several kilometers per second. Plans for the upcoming experimental testing of these imaging schemes are presented and a preliminary path toward system integration is identified.

  10. Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg

    2009-07-30

    July 21, 2009 Berkeley Lab summer lecture: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

  11. Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-11-01

    The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter.

  12. EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. The DOE NEPA process for this project has been canceled.

  13. Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

  14. Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-07-21

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

  15. A Differential Phase Shift Scheme for Quantum Key Distribution in Passive Optical Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Hentschel; Andreas Poppe; Bernhard Schrenk; Momtchil Peev; Edwin Querasser; Roland Lieger

    2014-12-19

    We propose a scheme for quantum key distribution (QKD) in a passive optical network (PON) based on differential phase shift (DPS) coding. A centralized station including all expensive components serves many users, making it suitable for a true multi-user network in a local environment with moderate distances on the order of a few kilometers. The emphasis lies on an asymmetric design for cost effective implementation of network end points.

  16. The Development of the Bronze Age Funerary Landscape of Nichoria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Michael J.

    2014-11-28

    for periodicals in the reference lists of the chapters follow the conventions of the Ameri- can Journal of Archaeology 111 (2007), pp. 14–34. List of Abbreviations CR Crete DA Dark Age dat. dative diam. diameter dim. dimensions EDS energy dispersive X... diachronic analyses of the development of the site and its eventual incorpora- tion within the boundaries of the Pylian state (Ben- net 1995, 1999). Nichoria is located on the western arc of the Gulf of Messenia, about two kilometers inland...

  17. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Bunch-Length Monitor using Coherent Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Juhao; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. One of the most critical diagnostic devices is the bunch length monitor (BLM), which is to be installed right after each compressor utilizing coherent radiation from the last bending magnet. We describe the components and the optical layout of such a BLM. Based on the setup geometry, we discuss some issues about the coherent radiation signal.

  18. Technology Development for a Neutrino AstrophysicalObservatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.; He, Y.D.; Jackson, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Lai, K.W.; Learned, J.; Ling, J.; Liu, D.; Lowder, D.; Moorhead, M.; Morookian, J.M.; Nygren, D.R.; Price, P.B.; Richards, A.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.; Smoot, George F.; Stokstad, R.G.; VanDalen, G.; Wilkes, J.; Wright, F.; Young, K.

    1996-02-01

    We propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  19. Technology development for a neutrino astrophysical observatory. Letter of intent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.

    1996-02-01

    The authors propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  20. Flashover vulnerability of transmission and distribution lines to high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, V.J.; Liu, T.K.; Tesche, F.M.; Barnes, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper estimates the vulnerability of transmission and distribution lines to flashover from the electromagnetic pulse generated by a nuclear detonation 400 kilometers above the earth. The analysis consists of first determining the cumulative probability of induced-voltage on three-phase lines, including shield and neutral conductors, for four operating voltages and then comparing these stresses to estimates of line insulation strength. 11 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. WORD PROBLEMS 1. Suppose your car gets 25 miles per gallon of gasoline and the price of gas is $3.50 per gallon. Write

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koban, Nic

    on the other side of the river and 8 kilometers down stream (see figure 2). The man can run 5 km/hr and can and then run to B in terms of x. 3 8 A B C Figure 2: Point C is directly across the river from point A. Point B of fence are to be used to enclose a rectangular field next to a straight river. The river acts as one side

  2. Partially-reflected water-moderated square-piteched U(6.90)O2 fuel rod lattices with 0.67 fuel to water volume ratio (0.800 CM Pitch)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harms, Gary A.

    2015-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative funded the design and construction of the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX) at Sandia National Laboratories. The start-up of the experiment facility and the execution of the experiments described here were funded by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. The 7uPCX is designed to investigate critical systems with fuel for light water reactors in the enrichment range above 5% 235U. The 7uPCX assembly is a water-moderated and -reflected array of aluminum-clad square-pitched U(6.90%)O2 fuel rods.

  3. Towards Ultra-High Resolution Models of Climate and Weather

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wehner, Michael; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John

    2007-01-01

    We present a speculative extrapolation of the performance aspects of an atmospheric general circulation model to ultra-high resolution and describe alternative technological paths to realize integration of such a model in the relatively near future. Due to a superlinear scaling of the computational burden dictated by stability criterion, the solution of the equations of motion dominate the calculation at ultra-high resolutions. From this extrapolation, it is estimated that a credible kilometer scale atmospheric model would require at least a sustained ten petaflop computer to provide scientifically useful climate simulations. Our design study portends an alternate strategy for practical power-efficient implementations of petaflop scale systems. Embedded processor technology could be exploited to tailor a custom machine designed to ultra-high climate model specifications at relatively affordable cost and power considerations. The major conceptual changes required by a kilometer scale climate model are certain to be difficult to implement. Although the hardware, software, and algorithms are all equally critical in conducting ultra-high climate resolution studies, it is likely that the necessary petaflop computing technology will be available in advance of a credible kilometer scale climate model.

  4. AB Space Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-03-02

    On 4 January 2007 the author published the article Wireless Transfer of Electricity in Outer Space in http://arxiv.org wherein he offered and researched a new revolutionary method of transferring electric energy in space. In that same article, he offered a new engine which produces a large thrust without throwing away large amounts of reaction mass (unlike the conventional rocket engine). In the current article, the author develops the theory of this kind of impulse engine and computes a sample project which shows the big possibilities opened by this new AB-Space Engine. The AB-Space Engine gets the energy from ground-mounted power; a planet electric station can transfer electricity up to 1000 millions (and more) of kilometers by plasma wires. Author shows that AB-Space Engine can produce thrust of 10 tons (and more). That can accelerate a space ship to some thousands of kilometers/second. AB-Space Engine has a staggering specific impulse owing to the very small mass expended. The AB-Space Engine reacts not by expulsion of its own mass (unlike rocket engine) but against the mass of its planet of origin (located perhaps a thousand of millions of kilometers away) through the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen.

  5. Space nuclear power, propulsion, and related technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, Marshall

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is one of the nation's largest research and development (R&D) facilities, with headquarters at Albuquerque, New Mexico; a laboratory at Livermore, California; and a test range near Tonopah, Nevada. Smaller testing facilities are also operated at other locations. Established in 1945, Sandia was operated by the University of California until 1949, when, at the request of President Truman, Sandia Corporation was formed as a subsidiary of Bell Lab's Western Electric Company to operate Sandia as a service to the U.S. Government without profit or fee. Sandia is currently operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by AT&T Technologies, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of AT&T. Sandia's responsibility is national security programs in defense and energy with primary emphasis on nuclear weapon research and development (R&D). However, Sandia also supports a wide variety of projects ranging from basic materials research to the design of specialized parachutes. Assets, owned by DOE and valued at more than $1.2 billion, include about 600 major buildings containing about 372,000 square meters (m2) (4 million square feet [ft2]) of floor space, located on land totalling approximately 1460 square kilometers (km2) (562 square miles [mi]). Sandia employs about 8500 people, the majority in Albuquerque, with about 1000 in Livermore. Approximately 60% of Sandia's employees are in technical and scientific positions, and the remainder are in crafts, skilled labor, and administrative positions. As a multiprogram national laboratory, Sandia has much to offer both industrial and government customers in pursuing space nuclear technologies. The purpose of this brochure is to provide the reader with a brief summary of Sandia's technical capabilities, test facilities, and example programs that relate to military and civilian objectives in space. Sandia is interested in forming partnerships with industry and government organizations, and has already formed several cooperative alliances and agreements. Because of the synergism of multiple governmental and industrial sponsors of many programs, Sandia is frequently able to provide complex technical solutions in a relatively short time, and often at lower cost to a particular customer. They have listed a few ongoing programs at Sandia related to space nuclear technology as examples of the possible synergisms that could result from forming teams and partnerships with related technologies and objectives.

  6. Hanford's 100-HX Pump and Treat Project - a Successful Blend of Science, Technology, Construction, and Project Management - 12412

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albin, Kenneth A.; Bachand, Marie T.; Biebesheimer, Fred H.; Neshem, Dean O.; Smoot, John L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) recently completed construction and start-up of the $25 million 100-HX Groundwater Pump and Treat Project for the Department of Energy (DOE) at its Hanford Reservation site in Washington State. From the onset, the 100-HX Project Leadership Team was able to successfully blend the science and technology of a state-of-the-art groundwater pump and treat system with the principles, tools, and techniques of traditional industrial-type construction and project management. From the 1940's through most of the 1980's, the United States used the Hanford Site to produce nuclear material for national defense at reactor sites located along the Columbia River. While the reactors were operational, large volumes of river water were treated with sodium dichromate (to inhibit corrosion of the reactor piping) and used as a coolant for the reactors. After a single pass through the reactor and before being discharged back to the river, the coolant water was sent to unlined retention basins to cool and to allow the short-lived radioactive contaminants to decay. As a result of these operations, hexavalent chromium was introduced to the vadose zone, and ultimately into the groundwater aquifer and the adjacent Columbia River. In addition, numerous leaks and spills of concentrated sodium dichromate stock solution over the lifetime of reactor operations led to higher concentrations of chromate in the vadose zone and groundwater in localized areas. As a result, the 100 Area was included in the National Priorities List sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The mission of the 100-HX Project is to significantly reduce the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the groundwater by treating up to 3.8 billion gallons (14,300 mega-liters) of contaminated water over its first nine years of operations. In order to accomplish this mission, groundwater scientists and geologists using sophisticated scientific modeling optimized the 100-HX's approximately 0.7 square mile (181 hecto-meters) extraction and injection well field to support continuous operation of a maximum of 800 gallons (3,028 liters) per minute, 24 hours per day, and 7 days per week. The use of traditional resin technology for the plant's ion exchange system required a change out of the resin every 12 weeks and shipment to an offsite facility 1,500 miles (2,414 kilometers) away for regeneration. Instead, the project leadership pursued newer technology with a disposable resin that could be disposed of on-site and would require less frequent change outs, reducing the project's life cycle costs by more than $16 million. Constructing the facility had its own challenges. The well field location overlapped ecologically sensitive lands where bald eagles and native wildlife use the land for their mating habitat for nearly half of the year. Building locations had to be planned around historically and culturally sensitive areas, and around another contractor's remediation work zones. Also, the size of the well field required a transfer (pumping) facility and installation of more than 60 miles (97 kilometers) of high-density polypropylene pipe, 23 miles (38 kilometers) of power cable, and 28 miles (46 kilometers) of control cable. Along with schedule and budget constraints typical of any fast-track project, the project team dealt with severe resource constraints due to competing projects across the Hanford Site caused by the influx of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus funding. In addition, the project team itself was stretched between completing another $25 million dollar construction project while designing and constructing this project. In order to save money, the project schedule was compressed by three months from the original baseline schedule. This was made possible by the strong use of project management principles throughout the design, construction, and testing phases, as well as implementation of many lessons learned from a similar construction project. In summary, the 100-HX

  7. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    research and publications, practices of scholarly journals, electronic publication, and open access Resolution, Creating a Task Force to Investigate Open Access to Faculty and Student Publications and Make and Student Publications and Make Appropriate Recommendations" Resolved, That the Academic Senate of San Jose

  8. Least-squares methods for computational electromagnetics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolev, Tzanio Valentinov

    2004-11-15

    The modeling of electromagnetic phenomena described by the Maxwell's equations is of critical importance in many practical applications. The numerical simulation of these equations is challenging and much more involved than initially believed...

  9. THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH. George Square Library.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    . Entrance 3, Page 11. Entrance 4, Page 11. InternalAccess. Page 12. Receptions. Page 15. Lifts. Page 19. Platform Lift. Page 19. Stairs, Page 20. Toilets, Page 21. DepartmentLocations, Page 22. Floor Plans, Page at Pollock Halls. The nearest railway line is at Waverley Station in the city Centre. The nearest bus stops

  10. Representations as Sums of Squares Henri Cohen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Henri

    . 2 #12;Proof. Write a = bx2 1 + cx2 2. Generalizing the above example, we have the identity (bx2 1 + cx2 2)x2 + (b2 cx2 1 + bc2 x2 2)y2 = b(x1x - cx2y)2 + c(bx1y + x2x)2 , and since the determinant of the transformation matrix is bx2 1 + cx2 2 = a = 0, the lemma follows. Pfister's first theorem is the following

  11. Self-guided tour George Square campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Ewan Hall, financed by Sir William McEwan, MP for Central Edinburgh and founder of the famous city brewery

  12. David Hume Tower George Square, Edinburgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    into Windmill Lane, through the car park gate and down to the back door of the basement. Bus stops on Buccleuch Street are approximately 250yards from Windmill Lane. Persons with mobility difficulties

  13. LEAST-SQUARES METHODS FOR INCOMPRESSIBLE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-04-14

    This work was sponsored in part by the National Science. Foundation under grand ... National Lab, Livermore,. CA94551 (wang32@popcorn.llnl.gov). 1 ...

  14. Minimum Mean Squared Error Interference Alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honig, Michael L.

    ¨unchen, 80290 Munich, Germany Email: {dschmidt,utschick}@tum.de Department of Electrical Engineering of interference prices. Given a set of announced prices, a transmitter selects a resource (e.g., power or beam

  15. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    ; CSSA and the editorial board of the San José Mercury News. RATIONALE: In Education Code section 66602) five ex-officio members, including the Governor, three other elected officials and the Chancellor, (b code section 66602 specifically and explicitly requires that the Governor must appoint a faculty

  16. Office of the President One Washington Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    of any books, newspapers, pamphlets, and other published materials that are available for sale at the campus bookstore is prohibited. 4. Handbills, pamphlets, flyers, and other similar information materials

  17. Blue Square Energy BSE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossence Jump to: navigation,Bloomer Electric &LtdEnergy

  18. Square Engineering Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfin JumpOpenColorado)Spider

  19. Square Butte Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPage Edit withSpion

  20. square miles | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult formats Home Jweers'ssmartsolar

  1. OpenEI Community - square miles

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid Data available for downloadGRR 3rd Quarter -/0 en(DLA)

  2. Jackson Square | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducing theActivation byIs aItemPolarTool

  3. KAT-7 SCIENCE VERIFICATION: USING H I OBSERVATIONS OF NGC 3109 TO UNDERSTAND ITS KINEMATICS AND MASS DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carignan, C.; Frank, B. S.; Hess, K. M.; Lucero, D. M.; Randriamampandry, T. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Goedhart, S.; Passmoor, S. S., E-mail: ccarignan@ast.uct.ac.za [SKA South Africa, The Park, Park Road, Pinelands, 7405 (South Africa)

    2013-09-15

    H I observations of the Magellanic-type spiral NGC 3109, obtained with the seven dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), are used to analyze its mass distribution. Our results are compared to those obtained using Very Large Array (VLA) data. KAT-7 is a pathfinder of the Square Kilometer Array precursor MeerKAT, which is under construction. The short baselines and low system temperature of the telescope make it sensitive to large-scale, low surface brightness emission. The new observations with KAT-7 allow the measurement of the rotation curve (RC) of NGC 3109 out to 32', doubling the angular extent of existing measurements. A total H I mass of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is derived, 40% more than what is detected by the VLA observations. The observationally motivated pseudo-isothermal dark matter (DM) halo model can reproduce the observed RC very well, but the cosmologically motivated Navarro-Frenk-White DM model gives a much poorer fit to the data. While having a more accurate gas distribution has reduced the discrepancy between the observed RC and the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) models, this is done at the expense of having to use unrealistic mass-to-light ratios for the stellar disk and/or very large values for the MOND universal constant a{sub 0}. Different distances or H I contents cannot reconcile MOND with the observed kinematics, in view of the small errors on these two quantities. As with many slowly rotating gas-rich galaxies studied recently, the present result for NGC 3109 continues to pose a serious challenge to the MOND theory.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Manacapuru, Brazil for the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON) Field Campaign

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Amazon rain forest in Brazil is the largest broadleaf forest in the world, covering 7 million square kilometers of the Amazon Basin in South America. It represents over half of the planet’s remaining rain forests, and comprises the most biodiverse tract of tropical rain forest on the planet. Due to the sheer size of the Amazon rain forest, the area has a strong impact on the climate in the Southern Hemisphere. To understand the intricacies of the natural state of the Amazon rain forest, the Green Ocean Amazon, or GOAMAZON, field campaign is a two-year scientific collaboration among U.S. and Brazilian research organizations. They are conducting a variety of different experiments with dozens of measurement tools, using both ground and aerial instrumentation, including the ARM Aerial Facility's G-1 aircraft. For more information on the holistic view of the campaign, see the Department of Energy’s GOAMAZON website. As a critical component of GOAMAZON, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will obtain measurements near Manacapuru, south of Manaus, Brazil, from January to December 2014. The city of Manaus, with a population of 3 million, uses high-sulfur oil as their primary source of electricity. The AMF site is situated to measure the atmospheric extremes of a pristine atmosphere and the nearby cities’ pollution plume, as it regularly intersects with the site. Along with other instrument systems located at the Manacapuru site, this deployment will enable scientists to study how aerosol and cloud life cycles are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity.

  5. U-PLANT GEOGRAPHIC ZONE CLEANUP PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROMINE, L.D.

    2006-02-01

    The U Plant geographic zone (UPZ) occupies 0.83 square kilometers on the Hanford Site Central Plateau (200 Area). It encompasses the U Plant canyon (221-U Facility), ancillary facilities that supported the canyon, soil waste sites, and underground pipelines. The UPZ cleanup initiative coordinates the cleanup of the major facilities, ancillary facilities, waste sites, and contaminated pipelines (collectively identified as ''cleanup items'') within the geographic zone. The UPZ was selected as a geographic cleanup zone prototype for resolving regulatory, technical, and stakeholder issues and demonstrating cleanup methods for several reasons: most of the area is inactive, sufficient characterization information is available to support decisions, cleanup of the high-risk waste sites will help protect the groundwater, and the zone contains a representative cross-section of the types of cleanup actions that will be required in other geographic zones. The UPZ cleanup demonstrates the first of 22 integrated zone cleanup actions on the Hanford Site Central Plateau to address threats to groundwater, the environment, and human health. The UPZ contains more than 100 individual cleanup items. Cleanup actions in the zone will be undertaken using multiple regulatory processes and decision documents. Cleanup actions will include building demolition, waste site and pipeline excavation, and the construction of multiple, large engineered barriers. In some cases, different cleanup actions may be taken at item locations that are immediately adjacent to each other. The cleanup planning and field activities for each cleanup item must be undertaken in a coordinated and cohesive manner to ensure effective execution of the UPZ cleanup initiative. The UPZ zone cleanup implementation plan (ZCIP) was developed to address the need for a fundamental integration tool for UPZ cleanup. As UPZ cleanup planning and implementation moves forward, the ZCIP is intended to be a living document that will provide a focal point for integrating UPZ actions, including field cleanup activities, waste staging and handling, and post-cleanup monitoring and institutional controls.

  6. An Update On Waste Control Specialists' 2004 License Application For Safe Disposal Of Class A, B, and C Low-Level Radioactive Waste In Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltzer, R.; Eriksson, L. [Waste Control Specialists LLC, Three Lincoln Centre, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2008-07-01

    On December 10, 2007, Waste Control Specialists LLC (WCS) received notification that the Executive Director of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) had prepared an interim draft license and made a preliminary decision that it met all statutory and regulatory requirements for safe disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the WCS' site in Texas. Pursuant to this interim draft license, WCS will be authorized to dispose Class A, B, and C LLW in two enhanced near-surface landfills at WCS' 5.4-square-kilometer (1,338-acre) treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) site in Andrews County, Texas (Fig. 1). One landfill will be dedicated to LLW generated within the member/party states of the Texas Compact (Texas and Vermont), while the other will be dedicated to LLW generated by the federal government. The calculated annual peak dose to the maximally exposed member of the general public, i.e., an adjacent resident, from any of the proposed LLW-disposal landfills occurs approximately 36,400 years after closure and is 0.034 milli-sievert (mSv) (3.4 milli-rem (mrem)), which is less than 14 percent of the applicable regulatory limit of 25 mSv (25 mrem). The draft license will be published in February 2008, which will be followed by 12 months of public hearings, and three months for preparation of the final license. Based on this schedule, the final license is due in May 2009. When opened, the WCS site will achieve a national milestone; it will be the first new Compact LLW-disposal site in the USA to open under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, as amended in 1985. (authors)

  7. Final Technical Report: DOE-Biological Ocean Margins Program. Microbial Ecology of Denitrifying Bacteria in the Coastal Ocean.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Kerkhof

    2013-01-01

    The focus of our research was to provide a comprehensive study of the bacterioplankton populations off the coast of New Jersey near the Rutgers University marine field station using terminal restriction fragment polymorphism analysis (TRFLP) coupled to 16S rRNA genes for large data set studies. Our three revised objectives to this study became: (1) to describe bacterioplankton population dynamics in the Mid Atlantic Bight using TRFLP analysis of 16S rRNA genes. (2) to determine whether spatial and temporal factors are driving bacterioplankton community dynamics in the MAB using monthly samping along our transect line over a 2-year period. (3) to identify dominant members of a coastal bacterioplankton population by clonal library analysis of 16S rDNA genes and sequencing of PCR product corresponding to specific TRFLP peaks in the data set. Although open ocean time-series sites have been areas of microbial research for years, relatively little was known about the population dynamics of bacterioplankton communities in the coastal ocean on kilometer spatial and seasonal temporal scales. To gain a better understanding of microbial community variability, monthly samples of bacterial biomass were collected in 1995-1996 along a 34-km transect near the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO-15) off the New Jersey coast. Surface and bottom sampling was performed at seven stations along a transect line with depths ranging from 1 to 35m (n=178). The data revealed distinct temporal patterns among the bacterioplankton communities in the Mid-Atlantic Bight rather than grouping by sample location or depth (figure 2-next page). Principal components analysis models supported the temporal patterns. In addition, partial least squares regression modeling could not discern a significant correlation from traditional oceanographic physical and phytoplankton nutrient parameters on overall bacterial community variability patterns at LEO-15. These results suggest factors not traditionally measured during oceanographic studies are structuring coastal microbial communities.

  8. Radio Jets and Galaxies as Cosmic String Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fa-bo Feng

    2012-07-17

    The lensing effect of a cosmic string is studied, and some new methods are proposed to detect the cosmic string. The technique for using jets as extended gravitational lensing probes was firstly explored by Kronberg. We use the "alignment-breaking parameter" $ \\eta_G $ as a sensitive indicator of gravitational distortion by a wiggly cosmic string. Then, we applied the non-constant deflection angle to jets, and $ \\eta_G $ of a specific jet is just related to the projected slope of the jet. At least three jets in the sample of Square Kilometer Array (SKA) would have significant signals ($ \\eta_G >10^\\circ $) if the wiggly infinite cosmic string existed. The distortion of elliptical object is also studied and used to do a statistical research on directions of axes and ellipticities of galaxies. In the direction of the string, we find that galaxies appear to be more elliptical for an observer and the distribution of apparent ellipticity changes correspondingly. Ellipticity distribution of current SDSS spiral sample has the signal-to-noise ratio up to 8.48 which is large enough for astronomical observations. The future survey, such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and Dark Energy Survey (DES), would weaken the requirement of special geometry in the data processing. As a result, all kinds of distributions, including ellipticity axis distribution, would serve as probes to detect wiggly strings in the near future. In brief, if a wiggly cosmic string existed, these signals would be convenient to be observed with the future weak lensing survey or other surveys in deep space. If there was no lensing signal in these distributions, it would give the upper limit of the abundance of infinite strings.

  9. SYNTHETIC OFF-AXIS LIGHT CURVES FOR LOW-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Eerten, Hendrik J.; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2011-06-01

    We present results for a large number of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow light curve calculations, done by combining high-resolution two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics simulations using RAM with a synchrotron radiation code. Results were obtained for jet energies, circumburst medium densities, and jet angles typical for short and underluminous GRBs, different observer angles, and observer frequencies from low radio (75 MHz) to X-ray (1.5 keV). We summarize the light curves through smooth power-law fits with up to three breaks, covering jet breaks for small observer angles, the rising phase for large observer angles, and the rise and decay of the counterjet. All light curve data are publicly available on the Web. The data can be used for model fits to observational data and as an aid for predicting observations by future telescopes such as LOFAR or the Square Kilometer Array and will benefit the study of neutron star mergers using different channels, such as gravitational-wave observations with LIGO or Virgo. For small observer angles, we find jet break times that vary significantly between frequencies, with the break time in the radio substantially postponed. Increasing the observer angle also postpones the measured jet break time. The rising phase of the light curve for large observer angle has a complex shape that cannot always be summarized by a simple power law. Except for very large observer angles, the counterjet is a distinct feature in the light curve, although in practice the signal will be exceedingly difficult to observe by then.

  10. U-SQUARE U-SQUAREUC Centers & at U-Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franco, John

    StratfordAvenue Probasco Road Joslyn Street Riddle Road CLIFTONAVENUE MCMICKEN GATEWAYStraight Street Ludlow

  11. Temporal and spatial variability of ooid sand shoals: Comparison of Mississippian of Kentucky and Quaternary of Bahamas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, M.R. (Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (USA))

    1989-08-01

    An examination of the lithology and topography of Andros Island, Bahamas, reveals it is a Pleistocene ooid sand shoal. A comparison with Joulters Cays (a modern ooid sand shoal directly to the north) shows that much of the original depositional topography is preserved through at least one cycle of sea level highstand and lowstand. Both the Pleistocene and the Holocene ooid sand bodies are a few kilometers to tens of kilometers wide. The total vertical relief of a single episode of Quaternary ooid sand deposition is more than 10 m and includes accumulation in tidal channels, shallow flat areas, and eolian dunes. Today, much of Andros Island is within 2 m of present sea level and is the site of a belt several kilometers wide consisting of muddy tidal flat sediments overlying an exposure surface. The site of ooid sand deposition and shoal complex formation is not continuous along shorelines, especially windward margins, but shifts abruptly along the margins of platforms as a result of minor fluctuations of sea level. Thus, it should be expected that ooid sand shoals (ancient and modern) should be in direct lateral and vertical contact with lagoons, tidal flats, and reefs. The Mississippian Slade Formation contains many of the features of Quaternary ooid sand accumulation: abrupt vertical and lateral gradations between oolitic grainstones, packstones, and lime mudstones, vertical relief of individual oolitic sedimentary packages up to 30 m (perhaps with eolian dunes) and numerous exposure surfaces of varying intensities. These characteristics suggest that this formation represents a time of rapid fluctuations of relative sea level and abrupt shifts in the sites of ooid sand shoal complexes.

  12. Status of understanding of the saturated-zone ground-water flow system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as of 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckey, R.R.; Tucci, P.; Faunt, C.C.; Ervin, E.M.

    1996-12-31

    Yucca Mountain, which is being studied extensively because it is a potential site for a high-level radioactive-waste repository, consists of a thick sequence of volcanic rocks of Tertiary age that are underlain, at least to the southeast, by carbonate rocks of Paleozoic age. Stratigraphic units important to the hydrology of the area include the alluvium, pyroclastic rocks of Miocene age (the Timber Mountain Group; the Paintbrush Group; the Calico Hills Formation; the Crater Flat Group; the Lithic Ridge Tuff; and older tuffs, flows, and lavas beneath the Lithic Ridge Tuff), and sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age. The saturated zone generally occurs in the Calico Hills Formation and stratigraphically lower units. The saturated zone is divided into three aquifers and two confining units. The flow system at Yucca Mountain is part of the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek subbasin of the Death Valley groundwater basin. Variations in the gradients of the potentiometric surface provided the basis for subdividing the Yucca Mountain area into zones of: (1) large hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change at least 300 meters in a few kilometers; (2) moderate hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change about 45 meters in a few kilometers; and (3) small hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change only about 2 meters in several kilometers. Vertical hydraulic gradients were measured in only a few boreholes around Yucca Mountain; most boreholes had little change in potentiometric levels with depth. Limited hydraulic testing of boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area indicated that the range in transmissivity was more than 2 to 3 orders of magnitude in a particular hydrogeologic unit, and that the average values for the individual hydrogeologic units generally differed by about 1 order of magnitude. The upper volcanic aquifer seems to be the most permeable hydrogeologic unit, but this conclusion was based on exceedingly limited data.

  13. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

    2012-09-29

    This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

  14. Life Cycle Assessment of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007: Ethanol - Global Warming Potential and Environmental Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G. A.; Hsu, D. D.; Inman, D.; Aden, A.; Mann, M. K.

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study is to use life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the global warming potential (GWP), water use, and net energy value (NEV) associated with the EISA-mandated 16 bgy cellulosic biofuels target, which is assumed in this study to be met by cellulosic-based ethanol, and the EISA-mandated 15 bgy conventional corn ethanol target. Specifically, this study compares, on a per-kilometer-driven basis, the GWP, water use, and NEV for the year 2022 for several biomass feedstocks.

  15. Striped Bass Spawning in Non-Estuarine Portions of the Savannah River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, D.; Paller, M.

    2007-04-17

    Historically, the estuarine portions of the Savannah River have been considered to be the only portion of the river in which significant amounts of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) spawning normally occur. A reexamination of data from 1983 through 1985 shows a region between River Kilometers 144 and 253 where significant numbers of striped bass eggs and larvae occur with estimated total egg production near that currently produced in the estuarine reaches. It appears possible that there are two separate spawning populations of striped bass in the Savannah River.

  16. Electromagnetic acceleration of permanent magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolya, S N

    2015-01-01

    We consider the acceleration of the permanent magnets, consisting of neodymium iron boron by means of the running magnetic field gradient. It is shown that the specific magnetic moment per nucleon in neodymium iron boron is determined by the remained magnetization of the substance. The maximum accessable gradient of the magnetic field accelerating the permanent magnets is determined by the coercive force thirty kilogauss. For the neodymium iron boron magnets this gradient is equal to twenty kilogauss divided by one centimeter. The finite velocity of the magnets six kilometers per second, the length of acceleration is six hundred thirty-seven meters.

  17. Thermochronologic constraints on the late Cenozoic exhumation history of the Gurla Mandhata metamorphic core complex, Southwestern Tibet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCallister, Andrew T.; Taylor, Michael Halford; Murphy, M. A.; Styron, Richard H.; Stockli, Daniel F.

    2014-02-01

    300 Kilometers Indus -Yalu Suture Bangong -Nujiang Suture Jinsha Su t ure MFT ATF Tarim basin Qaidam basin Qiangtang terrane Lhasa terrane Himalaya Songpan-Ganzi terrane KF JF YGR HF GMD NLR SLR TKG TYC KCF CR PQX ADM LPD NQT GLR Lhasa LC LNG GCF... RPF BCFZB LK Normal Fault Strike-Slip Fault Thrust Fault Suture Zone 1:7,000,000 scale 80° E 85° E 90° E 95° E 30° N 35° N Figure 1. Shaded relief map of the Tibetan plateau showing the distribution of active faults. Thrust faults are red, normal...

  18. Hardware design document for the Infrasound Prototype for a CTBT IMS station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breding, D.R.; Kromer, R.P.; Whitaker, R.W.; Sandoval, T.

    1997-11-01

    The Hardware Design Document (HDD) describes the various hardware components used in the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) Infrasound Prototype and their interrelationships. It divides the infrasound prototype into hardware configurations items (HWCIs). The HDD uses techniques such as block diagrams and parts lists to present this information. The level of detail provided in the following sections should be sufficient to allow potential users to procure and install the infrasound system. Infrasonic monitoring is a low cost, robust, and effective technology for detecting atmospheric explosions. Low frequencies from explosion signals propagate to long ranges (few thousand kilometers) where they can be detected with an array of sensors.

  19. SCADA computer sytem controls major Saudi Aramco crude oil pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dempsey, J.; Al-Habib, R. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31

    A replacement Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) computer system which monitors and controls two 1,100 kilometer pipelines and eleven associated pump stations is described. The SCADA system was designed to meet two objectives: (1) decentralize the overall control system and provide a distributed control system capable of regulatory control at each pump and pressure reducing station, and (2) provide system wide monitoring and supervisory control function during normal operations at the crude oil terminal. The SCADA computer system hardware (host computers and consoles), software modules, and applications are overviewed. A data flow diagram and a hardware configuration diagram are provided. 3 figs.

  20. Platinum-group element abundance patterns in different mantle environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehkaemper, M.; Halliday, A.N.; Barfod, D.; Fitton, J.G.; Dawson, J.B.

    1997-11-28

    Mantle-derived xenoliths from the Cameroon Line and northern Tanzania display differences in their platinum-group element (PGE) abundance patterns. The Cameroon Line lherzolites have uniform PGE patterns indicating a homogeneous upper mantle over several hundreds of kilometers, with approximately chondritic PGE ratios. The PGE patterns of the Tanzanian peridotites are similar to the PGE systematics of ultramafic rocks from ophiolites. The differences can be explained if the northern Tanzanian lithosphere developed in a fluid-rich suprasubduction zone environment, whereas the Cameroon Line lithosphere only experienced melt extraction from anhydrous periodotites. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Photon counting for quantum key distribution with Peltier cooled InGaAs/InP APD's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damien Stucki; Grégoire Ribordy; André Stefanov; Hugo Zbinden; John G. Rarity; Tom Wall

    2001-06-01

    The performance of three types of InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes is investigated for photon counting at 1550 nm in the temperature range of thermoelectric cooling. The best one yields a dark count probability of $% 2.8\\cdot 10^{-5}$ per gate (2.4 ns) at a detection efficiency of 10% and a temperature of -60C. The afterpulse probability and the timing jitter are also studied. The results obtained are compared with those of other papers and applied to the simulation of a quantum key distribution system. An error rate of 10% would be obtained after 54 kilometers.

  2. Photon counting for quantum key distribution with Peltier cooled InGaAs/InP APD's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stucki, D; Stefanov, A; Zbinden, H; Rarity, J G; Wall, T; Stucki, Damien; Ribordy, Gr\\'{e}goire; Stefanov, Andr\\'{e}; Zbinden, Hugo; Rarity, John G.; Wall, Tom

    2001-01-01

    The performance of three types of InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes is investigated for photon counting at 1550 nm in the temperature range of thermoelectric cooling. The best one yields a dark count probability of $% 2.8\\cdot 10^{-5}$ per gate (2.4 ns) at a detection efficiency of 10% and a temperature of -60C. The afterpulse probability and the timing jitter are also studied. The results obtained are compared with those of other papers and applied to the simulation of a quantum key distribution system. An error rate of 10% would be obtained after 54 kilometers.

  3. Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2012-06-01

    This paper introduces the concept of constant Volt/Hz operation of offshore wind power plants. The deployment of offshore WPPs requires power transmission from the plant to the load center inland. Since this power transmission requires submarine cables, there is a need to use High-Voltage Direct Current transmission, which is economical for transmission distances longer than 50 kilometers. In the concept presented here, the onshore substation is operated at 60 Hz synced with the grid, and the offshore substation is operated at variable frequency and voltage, thus allowing the WPP to be operated at constant Volt/Hz.

  4. LISA long-arm interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Ira Thorpe

    2009-11-16

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will observe gravitational radiation in the milliHertz band by measuring picometer-level fluctuations in the distance between drag-free proof masses over baselines of approximately five million kilometers. The measurement over each baseline will be divided into three parts: two short-arm measurements between the proof masses and a fiducial point on their respective spacecraft, and a long-arm measurement between fiducial points on separate spacecraft. This work focuses on the technical challenges associated with these long-arm measurements and the techniques that have been developed to overcome them.

  5. Oahu Solar Measurement Grid (1-Year Archive): 1-Second Solar Irradiance; Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sengupta, M.; Andreas, A.

    2010-03-16

    Seventeen measurement stations in the south western region of the island of Oahu collected data at 1-second intervals over the course of a year. The sensors are located in a 1-kilometer grid and the information then can be used to predict what PV outputs might be at 1-second intervals for medium-sized and large PV systems. This DOE-funded study by NREL supports the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI), a multifaceted program to substantially increase the use of renewable energy in Hawaii.

  6. US Department of Energy (DOE)/Gosatomnadzor (GAN) of Russia project at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranov, I.A.; Konoplev, K.A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Hauser, G.C. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    This paper presents a summary of work accomplished within the scope of the DOE-Gosatomnadzor (GAN) Agreement to reduce vulnerability to theft of direct-use nuclear materials in Russia. The DOE-GAN agreement concerns the Russian Academy of Science B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI), located 45 kilometers from St. Petersburg. The PNPI operates facilities to research basic nuclear physics. Current world conditions require particular attention to the issue of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) of nuclear materials. The long-term plan to increase security at the facility is outlined, including training, physical protection upgrades, and material control and accountability. 4 figs.

  7. 4-D seismic technologies: intersurvey calibration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Jeffrey Paul

    1998-01-01

    schematic). Each streamer measured 3000 m with 6000 m maximum offset, resulting in 48 fold 51 95 8 96 97 (300 tt) QJ C 0 Mlles 0 Kilometers 100 Study ares Green Canyon Figure 1 - Location map of the Green Canyon Block 52/53 Field. coverage...-lapse interpretation. Figure 8a is a "layer cake" geologic model taken from the Ross and Altan work. The following parameters; a 688 x 512 grid with 10 x 10m cells and a pseudo-spectral full-elastic, wave-equation algorithm were used to create a synthetic shot...

  8. Indirect Detection of Dark Matter in km-size Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bergstrom; Joakim Edsjo; Paolo Gondolo

    1999-06-02

    Neutrino telescopes of kilometer size are currently being planned. They will be two or three orders of magnitude larger than presently operating detectors, but they will have a much higher muon energy threshold. We discuss the trade-off between area and energy threshold for indirect detection of neutralino dark matter captured in the Sun and in the Earth and annihilating into high energy neutrinos. We also study the effect of a higher threshold on the complementarity of different searches for supersymmetric dark matter.

  9. Cost-Effective Cementitious Material Compatible with Yucca Mountain Repository Geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dole, LR

    2004-12-17

    The current plans for the Yucca Mountain (YM) repository project (YMP) use steel structures to stabilize the disposal drifts and connecting tunnels that are collectively over 100 kilometers in length. The potential exist to reduce the underground construction cost by 100s of millions of dollars and improve the repository's performance. These economic and engineering goals can be achieved by using the appropriate cementitious materials to build out these tunnels. This report describes the required properties of YM compatible cements and reviews the literature that proves the efficacy of this approach. This report also describes a comprehensive program to develop and test materials for a suite of underground construction technologies.

  10. T-Negative Issue 11 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1976-01-01

    ) 20 . torn; Clarica Scott, p. 15. T-Waves: Letters ? 22 perVerse -- Cecily Horton & Ruth Berman ......11 bacover: Spock by Tim Courtney Brag Dept: Pour Quarters (La Salle College, Philadelphia PA 191^1, 50^/copy) pub lished a shorfHfantasy by me...; they could be any where within a radius of approximately 160 kilometers, given the four days they have been here on foot." Kirk stared thoughtfully at the dis tant brilliance in the noon sky. The supernova was a good distance away, but it rivaled...

  11. Stratigraphic Profiles for Selected Hanford Site Seismometer Stations and Other Locations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.

    2014-02-01

    Stratigraphic profiles were constructed for eight selected Hanford Site seismometer stations, five Hanford Site facility reference locations, and seven regional three-component broadband seismometer stations. These profiles provide interpretations of the subsurface layers to support estimation of ground motions from past earthquakes, and the prediction of ground motions from future earthquakes. In most cases these profiles terminated at the top of the Wanapum Basalt, but at selected sites profiles were extended down to the top of the crystalline basement. The composite one-dimensional stratigraphic profiles were based primarily on previous interpretations from nearby boreholes, and in many cases the nearest deep borehole is located kilometers away.

  12. Oahu Solar Measurement Grid (1-Year Archive): 1-Second Solar Irradiance; Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sengupta, M.; Andreas, A.

    Seventeen measurement stations in the south western region of the island of Oahu collected data at 1-second intervals over the course of a year. The sensors are located in a 1-kilometer grid and the information then can be used to predict what PV outputs might be at 1-second intervals for medium-sized and large PV systems. This DOE-funded study by NREL supports the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI), a multifaceted program to substantially increase the use of renewable energy in Hawaii.

  13. Effects of overstory composition and prescribed fire on fuel loading across a heterogeneous managed landscape in the southeastern USA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    In the southeastern USA, land use history, forest management and natural geomorphic features have created heterogeneous fuel loads. This apparent temporal and spatial variation in fuel loads make it difficult to reliably assess potential fire behavior from remotely sensed canopy variables to determine risk and to prescribe treatments. We examined this variation by exploring the relationships between overstory forest vegetation attributes, recent fire history, and selected surface fuel components across an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape. Measurements of dead and live vegetation components of surface fuels were obtained from 624 permanent plots, or about 1 plot per 100 ha of forest cover. Within forest vegetation groups, we modeled the relationship between individual surface fuel components and overstory stand age, basal area, site quality and recent fire history, then stochastically predicted fuel loads across the landscape using the same linkage variables. The fraction of the plot variation, i.e., R2, explained by predictive models for individual fuel components ranged from 0.05 to 0.66 for dead fuels and 0.03 to 0.97 for live fuels in pine dominated vegetation groups. Stand age and basal area were generally more important than recent fire history for predicting fuel loads. Mapped fuel loads using these regressor variables showed a very heterogeneous landscape even at the scale of a few square kilometers. The mapped patterns corresponded to stand based forest management disturbances that are reflected in age, basal area, and fire history. Recent fire history was significant in explaining variation in litter and duff biomass. Stand basal area was positively and consistently related to dead fuel biomass in most groups and was present in many predictive equations. Patterns in live fuel biomass were related to recent fire history, but the patterns were not consistent among forest vegetation groups. Age and basal area were related to live fuels in a complex manner that is likely confounded with periodic disturbances that disrupt stand dynamics. This study complements earlier hazardous fuels research in the southeastern USA, and indicates that succession, disturbance, site quality and decomposition interact with forest management practices to create variable spatial and temporal conditions. The inclusion of additional land use, disturbance history, and soil-topographic variables coupled to improved sampling methods may increase precision and subsequent fuel mapping.

  14. Savannah River Site Footprint Reduction Results under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - 13302

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flora, Mary [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Angelia [United States Department of Energy Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Pope, Robert [United States Environmental Protection Agency Region IV Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)] [United States Environmental Protection Agency Region IV Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is an 802 square-kilometer United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, managed and operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. Construction of SRS began in the early 1950's to enhance the nation's nuclear weapons capability. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950's, eventually utilizing five production reactors constructed to support the national defense mission. Past operations have resulted in releases of hazardous constituents and substances to soil and groundwater, resulting in 515 waste sites with contamination exceeding regulatory thresholds. More than 1,000 facilities were constructed onsite with approximately 300 of them considered radiological, nuclear or industrial in nature. In 2003, SRS entered into a Memorandum of Agreement with its regulators to accelerate the cleanup using an Area Completion strategy. The strategy was designed to focus cleanup efforts on the 14 large industrial areas of the site to realize efficiencies of scale in the characterization, assessment, and remediation activities. This strategy focuses on addressing the contaminated surface units and the vadose zone and addressing groundwater plumes subsequently. This approach streamlines characterization and remediation efforts as well as the required regulatory documentation, while enhancing the ability to make large-scale cleanup decisions. In February 2009, Congress approved the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) to create jobs and promote economic recovery. At SRS, ARRA funding was established in part to accelerate the completion of environmental remediation and facility deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). By late 2012, SRS achieved 85 percent footprint reduction utilizing ARRA funding by accelerating and coupling waste unit remediation with D and D of remnant facilities. Facility D and D activities were sequenced and permitted with waste unit remediation activities to streamline regulatory approval and execution. Achieving footprint reduction fulfills the Government's responsibility to address legacy contamination; allows earlier completion of legally enforceable compliance agreement milestones; and enables future potential reuse of DOE resources, including land and infrastructure for other missions. Over the last 3.5 years significant achievements were met that contributed to footprint reduction, including the closure of 41 waste units (including 20 miles of radiologically contaminated stream) and decommissioning of 30 facilities (including the precedent setting in situ closure of two former production reactors, the first in the DOE Complex). Other notable achievements included the removal of over 39,750 cubic meters of debris and 68,810 cubic meters of contaminated soils, including 9175 cubic meters of lead-contaminated soil from a former site small arms testing range and treatment of 1,262 cubic meters of tritium-laden soils and concrete using a thermal treatment system. (authors)

  15. A Hydrostratigraphic Model and Alternatives for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat-Climax Mine, Lincoln and Nye Counties, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geotechnical Sciences Group Bechtel Nevada

    2006-01-01

    A new three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit was completed in 2005. The model area includes Yucca Flat and Climax Mine, former nuclear testing areas at the Nevada Test Site, and proximal areas. The model area is approximately 1,250 square kilometers in size and is geologically complex. Yucca Flat is a topographically closed basin typical of many valleys in the Basin and Range province. Faulted and tilted blocks of Tertiary-age volcanic rocks and underlying Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks form low ranges around the structural basin. During the Cretaceous Period a granitic intrusive was emplaced at the north end of Yucca Flat. A diverse set of geological and geophysical data collected over the past 50 years was used to develop a structural model and hydrostratigraphic system for the basin. These were integrated using EarthVision? software to develop the 3-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model. Fifty-six stratigraphic units in the model area were grouped into 25 hydrostratigraphic units based on each unit's propensity toward aquifer or aquitard characteristics. The authors organized the alluvial section into 3 hydrostratigraphic units including 2 aquifers and 1 confining unit. The volcanic units in the model area are organized into 13 hydrostratigraphic units that include 8 aquifers and 5 confining units. The underlying pre-Tertiary rocks are divided into 7 hydrostratigraphic units, including 3 aquifers and 4 confining units. Other units include 1 Tertiary-age sedimentary confining unit and 1 Mesozoic-age granitic confining unit. The model depicts the thickness, extent, and geometric relationships of these hydrostratigraphic units (''layers'' in the model) along with the major structural features (i.e., faults). The model incorporates 178 high-angle normal faults of Tertiary age and 2 low-angle thrust faults of Mesozoic age. The complexity of the model area and the non-uniqueness of some of the interpretations incorporated into the base model made it necessary to formulate alternative interpretations for some of the major features in the model. Five of these alternatives were developed so they could be modeled in the same fashion as the base model. This work was done for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Underground Test Area subproject of the Environmental Restoration Project.

  16. CHEMICAL FIXATION OF CO2 IN COAL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS AND RECYCLING THROUGH BIOSYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Henry Copeland; Paul Pier; Samantha Whitehead; Paul Enlow; Richard Strickland; David Behel

    2003-12-15

    This Annual Technical Progress Report presents the principle results in enhanced growth of algae using coal combustion products as a catalyst to increase bicarbonate levels in solution. A co-current reactor is present that increases the gas phase to bicarbonate transfer rate by a factor of five to nine. The bicarbonate concentration at a given pH is approximately double that obtained using a control column of similar construction. Algae growth experiments were performed under laboratory conditions to obtain baseline production rates and to perfect experimental methods. The final product of this initial phase in algae production is presented. Algal growth can be limited by several factors, including the level of bicarbonate available for photosynthesis, the pH of the growth solution, nutrient levels, and the size of the cell population, which determines the available space for additional growth. In order to supply additional CO2 to increase photosynthesis and algal biomass production, fly ash reactor has been demonstrated to increase the available CO2 in solution above the limits that are achievable with dissolved gas alone. The amount of dissolved CO2 can be used to control pH for optimum growth. Periodic harvesting of algae can be used to maintain algae in the exponential, rapid growth phase. An 800 liter scale up demonstrated that larger scale production is possible. The larger experiment demonstrated that indirect addition of CO2 is feasible and produces significantly less stress on the algal system. With better harvesting methods, nutrient management, and carbon dioxide management, an annual biomass harvest of about 9,000 metric tons per square kilometer (36 MT per acre) appears to be feasible. To sequester carbon, the algal biomass needs to be placed in a permanent location. If drying is undesirable, the biomass will eventually begin to aerobically decompose. It was demonstrated that algal biomass is a suitable feed to an anaerobic digester to produce methane. The remaining carbonaceous material is essentially bio-inactive and is permanently sequestered. The feasibility of using algae to convert carbon dioxide to a biomass has been demonstrated. This biomass provides a sustainable means to produce methane, ethanol, and/or bio diesel. The first application of concept demonstrated by the project could be to use algal biomass production to capture carbon dioxide associated with ethanol production.

  17. Modeling the neutral hydrogen distribution in the post-reionization Universe: intensity mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Datta, Kanan K.; Choudhury, T. Roy, E-mail: villaescusa@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: kanan@ncra.tifr.res.in, E-mail: tirth@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2014-09-01

    We model the distribution of neutral hydrogen (HI) in the post-reionization era and investigate its detectability in 21 cm intensity mapping with future radio telescopes like the Square Kilometer array (SKA). We rely on high resolution hydrodynamical N-body simulations that have a state-of-the-art treatment of the low density photoionized gas in the inter-galactic medium (IGM). The HI is assigned a-posteriori to the gas particles following two different approaches: a halo-based method in which HI is assigned only to gas particles residing within dark matter halos; a particle-based method that assigns HI to all gas particles using a prescription based on the physical properties of the particles. The HI statistical properties are then compared to the observational properties of Damped Lyman-? Absorbers (DLAs) and of lower column density systems and reasonable good agreement is found for all the cases. Among the halo-based method, we further consider two different schemes that aim at reproducing the observed properties of DLAs by distributing HI inside halos: one of this results in a much higher bias for DLAs, in agreement with recent observations, which boosts the 21 cm power spectrum by a factor ? 4 with respect to the other recipe. Furthermore, we quantify the contribution of HI in the diffuse IGM to both ?{sub HI} and the HI power spectrum finding to be subdominant in both cases. We compute the 21 cm power spectrum from the simulated HI distribution and calculate the expected signal for both SKA1-mid and SKA1-low configurations at 2.4 ? z ? 4. We find that SKA will be able to detect the 21 cm power spectrum, in the non-linear regime, up to k ? 1 h/Mpc for SKA1-mid and k ? 5 h/Mpc for SKA1-low with 100 hours of observations. We also investigate the perspective of imaging the HI distribution. Our findings indicate that SKA1-low could detect the most massive HI peaks with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) higher than 5 for an observation time of about 1000 hours at z = 4, for a synthesized beam width of 2'. Detection at redshifts z?2.4 with SKA1-mid would instead require a much longer observation time to achieve a comparable SNR level.

  18. COLOR DEPENDENCE IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    August, Tyler M.; Wiegert, Paul A.

    2013-06-15

    The size distribution of the asteroid belt is examined with 16956 main belt asteroids detected in data taken from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey in two filters (g' and r'). The cumulative H (absolute magnitude) distribution is examined in both filters, and both match well to simple power laws down to H = 17, with slopes in rough agreement with those reported the literature. This implies that disruptive collisions between asteroids are gravitationally dominated down to at least this size, and probably sub-kilometer scales. The slopes of these distributions appear shallower in the outer belt than the inner belt, and the g' distributions appear slightly steeper than the r'. The slope shallowing in the outer belt may reflect a real compositional difference: the inner asteroid belt has been suggested to consist mostly of stony and/or metallic S-type asteroids, whereas carbonaceous C-types are thought to be more prevalent further from the Sun. No waves are seen in the size distribution above H = 15. Since waves are expected to be produced at the transition from gravitationally-dominated to internal strength-dominated collisions, their absence here may imply that the transition occurs at sub-kilometer scales, much smaller than the H = 17 (diameter {approx} 1.6 km) cutoff of this study.

  19. A Search for Subkilometer-sized Ordinary Chondrite Like Asteroids in the Main-Belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, H W; Chen, Y T; Ip, W H; Chang, C K

    2015-01-01

    The size-dependent effects of asteroids on surface regolith and collisional lifetimes suggest that small asteroids are younger than large asteroids. In this study, we performed multicolor main-belt asteroid (MBA) survey by Subaru telescope/Suprime-Cam to search for subkilometer-sized ordinary chondrite (Q-type) like MBAs. The total survey area was 1.5 deg^2 near ecliptic plane and close to the opposition. We detected 150 MBAs with 4 bands (B, V , R, I) in this survey. The range of absolute magnitude of detected asteroids was between 13 and 22 magnitude, which is equivalent to the size range of kilometer to sub-kilometer diameter in MBAs. From this observation, 75 of 150 MBAs with color uncertainty less than 0.1 were used in the spectral type analysis, and two possible Q-type aster- oids were detected. This mean that the Q-type to S-type ratio in MBAs is < 0.05. Meanwhile, the Q/S ratio in near Earth asteroids (NEAs) has been estimated to be 0.5 to 2 (Binzel et al., 2004; Dandy et al., 2003). Therefore, Q-t...

  20. Final project report on arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir: Volume 1, Main text. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, C.J.; Byrd, J.T.; Grebmeier, J.M.; Harris, R.A.; Moore, R.C.; Madix, S.E.; Newman, K.A.; Rash, C.D.

    1995-04-01

    This document reports on the study of arsenic contamination in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system, downstream from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products, such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal; it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the Environmental Protection Agency; and disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. Four main sites were sampled quarterly over a 3-year period. Sites investigated included lower Watts Bar Reservoir near Watts Bar Dam [Tennessee River kilometer (TRK) 849.6], the Kingston area [Clinch River kilometer (CRK) 1.6], Poplar Creek, and the McCoy Branch Embayment. Additional sites were investigated in the vicinity of these main stations to determine the distribution of contamination and to identify possible alternative or additional sources of arsenic.