Sample records for kilogram km kilometer

  1. Scalability, scintillation readout and charge drift in a kilogram scale solid xenon particle detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, J; Jaskierny, W F; Markley, D; Pahlka, R B; Balakishiyeva, D; Saab, T; Filipenko, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  2. High Energy Neutrino Astronomy: Towards Kilometer-Scale Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Of all high-energy particles, only neutrinos can directly convey astronomical information from the edge of the universe---and from deep inside the most cataclysmic high-energy processes. Copiously produced in high-energy collisions, travelling at the velocity of light, and not deflected by magnetic fields, neutrinos meet the basic requirements for astronomy. Their unique advantage arises from a fundamental property: they are affected only by the weakest of nature's forces (but for gravity) and are therefore essentially unabsorbed as they travel cosmological distances between their origin and us. Many of the outstanding mysteries of astrophysics may be hidden from our sight at all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum because of absorption by matter and radiation between us and the source. For example, the hot dense regions that form the central engines of stars and galaxies are opaque to photons. In other cases, such as supernova remnants, gamma ray bursters, and active galaxies, all of which may involve compact objects or black holes at their cores, the precise origin of the high-energy photons emerging from their surface regions is uncertain. Therefore, data obtained through a variety of observational windows---and especially through direct observations with neutrinos---may be of cardinal importance. In this talk, the scientific goals of high energy neutrino astronomy and the technical aspects of water and ice Cherenkov detectors are examined, and future experimental possibilities, including a kilometer-square deep ice neutrino telescope, are explored.

  3. Power Challenges of Large Scale Research Infrastructures: the Square Kilometer Array and Solar Energy Integration; Towards a zero-carbon footprint next generation telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Domingos; Ruiz, Valeriano; Silva, Manuel; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Santander-Vela, Juande; Maia, Dalmiro; Antón, Sonia; van Ardenne, Arnold; Vetter, Matthias; Kramer, Michael; Keller, Reinhard; Pereira, Nuno; Silva, Vitor

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will be the largest Global science project of the next two decades. It will encompass a sensor network dedicated to radioastronomy, covering two continents. It will be constructed in remote areas of South Africa and Australia, spreading over 3000Km, in high solar irradiance latitudes. Solar Power supply is therefore an option to power supply the SKA and contribute to a zero carbon footprint next generation telescope. Here we outline the major characteristics of the SKA and some innovation approaches on thermal solar energy Integration with SKA prototypes.

  4. Modeling temporal variations of electrical resistivity associated with pore pressure change in a kilometer-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (hautot@univ-brest.fr) [1] From 1995 to 1998 the natural electric field was monitored with an array of 20 role of fluids in the distortion of the induced electric fields. Electromagnetic methods could provide in a kilometer-scale natural system Sophie Hautot School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

  5. Square Kilometer Array Telescope - Precision Reference Frequency Synchronisation via 1f-2f Dissemination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, B; Gao, C; Bai, Y; Dong, J W; Wang, L J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) is an international effort to build the world's largest radio telescope, with one square kilometer collecting area. Besides its ambitious scientific objectives, such as probing the cosmic dawn and cradle of life, SKA also demands several revolutionary technological breakthroughs, with ultra-high precision synchronisation of the frequency references for thousands of antennas being one of them. In this report, aimed at applications to SKA, we demonstrate a frequency reference synchronization and dissemination scheme with the phase noise compensation function placed at the client site. Hence, one central hub can be linked to a large number of client sites, forming a star-shaped topology. As a performance test, the 100 MHz reference signal from a Hydrogen maser clock is disseminated and recovered at two remote sites. Phase noise characteristics of the recovered reference frequency signal coincides with that of the hydrogen-maser source and satisfies SKA requirement.

  6. Status of aeromagnetic survey coverage of Yucca Mountain and vicinity to a radius of about 140 kilometers, southwestern Nevada and southeastern California, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikora, R.F.; Ponce, D.A.; Oliver, H.W.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifty aeromagnetic surveys in the southwestern part of Nevada and the southeastern part of California have been evaluated to assess the quality and coverage of aeromagnetic data within 140 kilometers (km) of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The compilation shows that all the study area is covered by aeromagnetic surveys, but in some areas, particularly in the Death Valley region, new surveys flown with closer flight line spacing and lower elevations than the existing coverage are needed. In addition, the California part of the study area needs to be analytically continued downward to 305 meters (m) above ground level to provide a consistent data set for interpretation of subsurface geologic structures.

  7. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2009. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    58 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production 98% of domestic gallium consumption. About 67% of the gallium consumed was used in integrated and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2009. One company in Utah recovered

  8. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2005. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    66 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production, [(703) 648-7719, dkramer@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7975] #12;67 GALLIUM Consolidation of companies and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2005. One company in Utah recovered

  9. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1998. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    66 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production A. Kramer [(703) 648-7719, dkramer@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7722] #12;67 GALLIUM Events, Trends and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1998. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah

  10. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1996. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on world production of primary gallium were unavailable because data on the output of the few producers62 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production in optoelectronic devices, which include light-emitting diodes (LED's), laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar

  11. A simple theory of cloud spreading at ranges from 1-2000 km

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, F.A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examples support the conclusion that cloud or plume spreading in the troposphere proceeds rapidly and rather steadily for times on the order of a day or two and to distances of several hundreds of kilometers. Subsequently, possibly after a transition to the asymptotic rate of relative diffusion, the cloud begins to develop a streaky structure under the influence of the large-scale, enstrophy-cascade range of motions. The GASP spectra indicate that the transition between these two modes of spreading begins at several hundred kilometers ad is well developed by about 1000 km, in terms of spectral wavelength. The cloud streaks and patches elongate rapidly, evidently at the exponential rate, but spread laterally more slowly, at a rate that represents the effects of the conservation of cloud area under large-scale deformation and the lateral diffusion at the asymptotic rate. Although this relative diffusion occurs at a comparatively slow rate, it is very effective in reducing cloud concentrations in combination with the rapid, large-scale cloud stretching by the 2-D, enstrophy-cascade range eddies. The LANL heavy-methane cloud data indicate that the net result is very rapid decay of cloud concentration, apparently at an exponential rate.

  12. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers UC Davis Water Management Research Group Aplication Efficiency: Dry Beans 2001 Developed as a cooperative project between University of California, Davis United States Geological Survey and California Department of Water Resources Map prepared

  13. Teleportation of entanglement over 143 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Herbst; Thomas Scheidl; Matthias Fink; Johannes Handsteiner; Bernhard Wittmann; Rupert Ursin; Anton Zeilinger

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    As a direct consequence of the no-cloning theorem, the deterministic amplification as in classical communication is impossible for quantum states. This calls for more advanced techniques in a future global quantum network, e.g. for cloud quantum computing. A unique solution is the teleportation of an entangled state, i.e. entanglement swapping, representing the central resource to relay entanglement between distant nodes. Together with entanglement purification and a quantum memory it constitutes a so-called quantum repeater. Since the aforementioned building blocks have been individually demonstrated in laboratory setups only, the applicability of the required technology in real-world scenarios remained to be proven. Here we present a free-space entanglement-swapping experiment between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife, verifying the presence of quantum entanglement between two previously independent photons separated by 143 km. We obtained an expectation value for the entanglement-witness operator, more than 6 standard deviations beyond the classical limit. By consecutive generation of the two required photon pairs and space-like separation of the relevant measurement events, we also showed the feasibility of the swapping protocol in a long-distance scenario, where the independence of the nodes is highly demanded. Since our results already allow for efficient implementation of entanglement purification, we anticipate our assay to lay the ground for a fully-fledged quantum repeater over a realistic high-loss and even turbulent quantum channel.

  14. Sensitivity and noise analysis of 4 km laser interferometric gravitational wave antennae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adhikari, Rana, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Around the world, efforts are underway to commission several kilometer-scale laser interferometers to detect gravitational radiation. In the United States, there are two collocated interferometers in Hanford, Washington ...

  15. Daylight quantum key distribution over 1.6 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. T. Buttler; R. J. Hughes; S. K. Lamoreaux; G. L. Morgan; J. E. Nordholt; C. G. Peterson

    2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) has been demonstrated over a point-to-point $\\sim1.6$-km atmospheric optical path in full daylight. This record transmission distance brings QKD a step closer to surface-to-satellite and other long-distance applications.

  16. Accelerated Aging Effects on Kevlar KM2 Fiber Survivability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Tony

    2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    as an alternative test method to the pneumatic grip setup. ........................................ 87 ix LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1. DuPont?s Kevlar fiber grades and their tensile material properties ranked by ascending tensile modulus.... ................................................................................. 5 Table 2. Kevlar KM2 properties given by DuPont. ........................................................... 6 Table 3. Fiber rapid degradation Design of Experiment factors and levels. .................... 36 Table 4. Recorded experimentally...

  17. An exact sequence for KM /2 with applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vishik, Alexander

    of characteristics zero. For a sequence a = (a1, . . . , an) of invertible elements of k consider the homomorphism KM the authors were members of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. We would like to thank both the small Pfister quadric or the norm quadric associated with the symbol a. Denote by k(Qa) the function

  18. Basic Properties Radius: = RRSun 109km1096.6 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Shantanu

    of the Sun radius T (K) (kg/m3) Core: 57 106.1106.125.0 ×× SunRr Radiative zone: 46 1021087.025.0 ×× Sun 10810km2000 - ×r Corona: 116 10101.00.01 - - SunSun RRr Upper corona merges into the Solar Wind. #12;Interior Nuclear reactions in core via p-p chain: MeV)(12.9HHHeHeHe MeV)(5.49HeHH MeV)44.1(HHH 11433 312

  19. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  20. The Square Kilometer Array Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Braun

    1995-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific motivation is reviewed for a next generation radio observatory operating at frequencies between about 200 MHz and 2 GHz with about 2 orders of magnitude greater sensitivity than that which is currently available, together with sub-arcsecond angular resolution. Instrumental concepts for the telescope are discussed, highlighting the role of mass produced receiver elements and digital electronics in increasing cost-effectiveness while actively reducing the instrument's sensitivity to radio frequency interference.

  1. Johnson(-like)-Noise-Kirchhoff-Loop Based Secure Classical Communicator Characteristics, for Ranges of Two to Two Thousand Kilometers, via Model-Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Mingesz; Zoltan Gingl; Laszlo B. Kish

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A pair of Kirchhoff-Loop-Johnson(-like)-Noise communicators, which is able to work over variable ranges, was designed and built. Tests have been carried out on a model-line performance characteristics were obtained for ranges beyond the ranges of any known direct quantum communication channel and they indicate unrivalled signal fidelity and security performance of the exchanged raw key bits. This simple device has single-wire secure key generation and sharing rates of 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 bit/second for corresponding copper wire diameters/ranges of 21 mm / 2000 km, 7 mm / 200 km, 2.3 mm / 20 km, and 0.7 mm / 2 km, respectively and it performs with 0.02% raw-bit error rate (99.98 % fidelity). The raw-bit security of this practical system significantly outperforms raw-bit quantum security. Current injection breaking tests show zero bit eavesdropping ability without triggering the alarm signal, therefore no multiple measurements are needed to build an error statistics to detect the eavesdropping as in quantum communication. Wire resistance based breaking tests of Bergou-Scheuer-Yariv type give an upper limit of eavesdropped raw bit ratio of 0.19 % and this limit is inversely proportional to the sixth power of cable diameter. Hao's breaking method yields zero (below measurement resolution) eavesdropping information.

  2. afm-12 1-km avhrr: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unsupervised classi ? cation of 1 km monthly Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Di ? erence Vegetation Index (NDVI) composites covering...

  3. High rate, long-distance quantum key distribution over 250km of ultra low loss fibres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Stucki; N. Walenta; F. Vannel; R. T. Thew; N. Gisin; H. Zbinden; S. Gray; C. R. Towery; S. Ten

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fully automated quantum key distribution prototype running at 625 MHz clock rate. Taking advantage of ultra low loss fibres and low-noise superconducting detectors, we can distribute 6,000 secret bits per second over 100 km and 15 bits per second over 250km.

  4. An exact sequence for KM* =2 with applications to quadratic forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) of invertible elements of k consider the homomorphism KM*(k)=2 ! KM*+n(k)=2. In its present form the paper was written while the authors were members of the Institute for Advanced* * or the norm quadric associated with the symbol a_. Denote by k(Qa_) the function field of Qa_and by (Qa_)0

  5. Eleutherodactylus discoidalis BOLIVIA: Departamento Tarija: 12.3 km NW of Entre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castoe, Todd A.

    Eleutherodactylus discoidalis BOLIVIA: Departamento Tarija: 12.3 km NW of Entre Ri´os, on the road to Tarija, MNK-A 3877­97. Eleutherodactylus ibischi BOLIVIA: Departamento Santa Cruz: Km 68.5 on Santa Cruz- Samaipata road, MNK-A 6612. Eleutherodactylus zongoensis BOLIVIA: Departamento La Paz: Valle de Zongo, 1250

  6. Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) serves as a centralized repository providing a common interface for all D&D related activities.

  7. Comparison And Discussion Of The 6 Km Temperature Maps Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Discussion Of The 6 Km Temperature Maps Of The Western Us Prepared By The Smu Geothermal Lab And The Usgs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  8. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GIS ... Dataset Activity Stream Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km resolution for Ghana from NREL (Abstract):  Raster GIS data, exported as BIL...

  9. atmosphere 0-70 km: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconduct... Summers, D J; Datta, A; Duraisamy, M; Luo, T; Lyons, G T 2012-01-01 100 A 233 km...

  10. Distribution of Time-Energy Entanglement over 100 km fiber using superconducting single-photon detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Zhang; Hiroki Takesue; Sae Woo Nam; Carsten Langrock; Xiuping Xie; M. M. Fejer; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we report an experimental realization of distributing entangled photon pairs over 100 km of dispersion-shifted fiber. In the experiment, we used a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide to generate the time-energy entanglement and superconducting single-photon detectors to detect the photon pairs after 100 km. We also demonstrate that the distributed photon pairs can still be useful for quantum key distribution and other quantum communication tasks.

  11. Intelligent scraping experience using ultrasonics in two 60in./56in. dual diameter 100 km seawater transmission pipelines in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, A.F.; Chu, K.S.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saudi ARAMCO`s two 60in./56in. (1524/1422 mm) diameter Seawater Injection Pipelines used for secondary oil recovery stretch from the Seawater Treatment Plant across the Arabian Desert for a distance of approximately 100 kilometers. Both lines were put into operation in mid 1978 using over the ditch Plicoflex tape wrap as a means of protection against external corrosion. A significant portion of both pipelines (32 km of each line) runs through Subkha (salty moist) areas. A series of test hole evaluations in 1989 indicated moderate to sever external corrosion particularly in Subkha which necessitated sleeving and external coating application. In 1991 a series of leaks, four (4) in total over a period of two (2) months occurred in Pipeline {number_sign}2 due to external corrosion. This suggested that the line(s) were in urgent need of at least partial replacement or major rehabilitation. Prior to making a final decision on partial replacement it was decided to run an Intelligent Scraper in both pipelines to ascertain both internal and external pipeline conditions. An Ultrasonic Scraper the largest of it`s kind in the world, similar to what was used in the Alyeska Pipeline was developed and successfully run in both pipelines in February 1993. This paper discusses the pipeline history, test hole evaluations, Intelligent Scraping experiences, field evaluation for anomaly verification, and repair of approximately 120 locations as identified by the Intelligent Scraping run. The Intelligent Scraping evaluation played a major role in the cancellation of partial pipeline replacement with cost savings estimated $30 MM.

  12. 100 km secure differential phase shift quantum key distribution with low jitter up-conversion detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleni Diamanti; Hiroki Takesue; Carsten Langrock; M. M. Fejer; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2006-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a quantum key distribution experiment in which keys that were secure against all individual eavesdropping attacks allowed by quantum mechanics were distributed over 100 km of optical fiber. We implemented the differential phase shift quantum key distribution protocol and used low timing jitter 1.55 um single-photon detectors based on frequency up-conversion in periodically poled lithium niobate waveguides and silicon avalanche photodiodes. Based on the security analysis of the protocol against general individual attacks, we generated secure keys at a practical rate of 166 bit/s over 100 km of fiber. The use of the low jitter detectors also increased the sifted key generation rate to 2 Mbit/s over 10 km of fiber.

  13. On the Penetration of the 660 km Phase Change by Mantle Downflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in an upward force which resists the passage of the downwelling through the phase change. Cold material piles up and spreads lat- erally on the phase-change boundary. Eventu- ally, enough cold materialOn the Penetration of the 660 km Phase Change by Mantle Downflows David Bercovici Department

  14. 21 Nordic Seminar on Computational Mechanics T. Kvamsdal, K.M. Mathisen and B. Pettersen (Eds)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLachlan, Robert

    ). A B-series for the system y = f(y) is a formal series in powers of the step size h and in terms 121 Nordic Seminar on Computational Mechanics NSCM-21 T. Kvamsdal, K.M. Mathisen and B. Pettersen symmetric integration methods) versus the preservation of symplecticity. 1 INTRODUCTION Given the system

  15. Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more a plate tectonic framework for the his- tory of the Michigan basin. INTRODUCTION The Michigan basin of the Michigan basin has led to numerous proposals for basin subsidence mechanisms, including thermal contraction

  16. Large-scale (100s km) distributions of tuna larvae (family Scombridae), par-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abundance and fecundity of T. albacares (yellowfin tuna) and K. pelamis (skipjack tuna) in the western. pelamis larvae. Other possible explanations, however, are that previous sampling scales of 100s km between waters (Miller, 1979), and Thunnus spp. and K. pelamis larvae were up to 100 times more concentrated

  17. Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution. This estimate includes all on-site sources and sinks of carbon Agronomic Feedstock Production and Environmental Impact Analyses ORNL uses high-resolution projections of feedstock production in analyses of soil carbon change, soil erosion, energy use, net

  18. Mode-Locking in 25-km Fibre Laser , S.Turitsyn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobtsev, Sergei M.

    generation of ultra-short optical pulses with high energy. The extension of the cavity lengthMode-Locking in 25-km Fibre Laser A.Ivanenko (1,2) , S.Turitsyn (1) , S.Kobsev (2) , M.Dubov (1) (1) Photonics Research Group, Aston University, UK, s.k.turitsyn@aston.ac.uk (2) Laser Systems Laboratory

  19. Four-neutrino analysis of 1.5km-baseline reactor antineutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Sin Kyu; Ko, Young-Ju; Siyeon, Kim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses of sterile neutrinos are not yet known, and depending on the orders of magnitudes, their existence may explain reactor anomalies or the spectral shape of reactor neutrino events at 1.5km-baseline detector. Here, we present four-neutrino analysis of the results announced by RENO and Daya Bay, which performed the definitive measurements of $\\theta_{13}$ based on the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos at km-order baselines. Our results using 3+1 scheme include the exclusion curve of $\\Delta m^2_{41}$ vs. $\\theta_{14}$ and the adjustment of $\\theta_{13}$ due to correlation with $\\theta_{14}$. The value of $\\theta_{13}$ obtained by RENO and Daya Bay with a three-neutrino oscillation analysis is included in the $1\\sigma$ interval of $\\theta_{13}$ allowed by our four-neutrino analysis.

  20. Four-neutrino analysis of 1.5km-baseline reactor antineutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin Kyu Kang; Yeong-Duk Kim; Young-Ju Ko; Kim Siyeon

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses of sterile neutrinos are not yet known, and depending on the orders of magnitudes, their existence may explain reactor anomalies or the spectral shape of reactor neutrino events at 1.5km-baseline detector. Here, we present four-neutrino analysis of the results announced by RENO and Daya Bay, which performed the definitive measurements of $\\theta_{13}$ based on the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos at km-order baselines. Our results using 3+1 scheme include the exclusion curve of $\\Delta m^2_{41}$ vs. $\\theta_{14}$ and the adjustment of $\\theta_{13}$ due to correlation with $\\theta_{14}$. The value of $\\theta_{13}$ obtained by RENO and Daya Bay with a three-neutrino oscillation analysis is included in the $1\\sigma$ interval of $\\theta_{13}$ allowed by our four-neutrino analysis.

  1. Practical free-space quantum key distribution over 10 km in daylight and at night

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard J. Hughes; Jane E. Nordholt; Derek Derkacs; Charles G. Peterson

    2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated quantum key distribution (QKD) over a 10-km, 1-airmass atmospheric range during daylight and at night. Secret random bit sequences of the quality required for the cryptographic keys used to initialize secure communications devices were transferred at practical rates with realistic security. By identifying the physical parameters that determine the system's secrecy efficiency, we infer that free-space QKD will be practical over much longer ranges under these and other atmospheric and instrumental conditions.

  2. Hydrodynamic simulations of a combined hydrogen, helium thermonuclear runaway on a 10-km neutron star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J.W.; Sparks, W.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used a Lagrangian, hydrodynamic stellar-evolution computer code to evolve a thermonuclear runaway in the accreted hydrogen rich envelope of a 1.0M, 10-km neutron star. Our simulation produced an outburst which lasted about 2000 sec and peak effective temperature was 3 keV. The peak luminosity exceeded 2 x 10/sup 5/ L. A shock wave caused a precursor in the light curve which lasted 10/sup -5/ sec.

  3. Quantum key distribution over 25 km with an all-fiber continuous-variable system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Lodewyck; Matthieu Bloch; Raul Garcia-Patron; Simon Fossier; Evgueni Karpov; Eleni Diamanti; Thierry Debuisschert; Nicolas J. Cerf; Rosa Tualle-Brouri; Steven W. McLaughlin; Philippe Grangier

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the implementation of a reverse-reconciliated coherent-state continuous-variable quantum key distribution system, with which we generated secret keys at a rate of more than 2 kb/s over 25 km of optical fiber. Time multiplexing is used to transmit both the signal and phase reference in the same optical fiber. Our system includes all experimental aspects required for a field implementation of a quantum key distribution setup. Real-time reverse reconciliation is achieved by using fast and efficient LDPC error correcting codes.

  4. A 24 km fiber-based discretely signaled continuous variable quantum key distribution system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quyen Dinh Xuan; Zheshen Zhang; Paul L. Voss

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a continuous variable key distribution system that achieves a final secure key rate of 3.45 kb/sec over a distance of 24.2 km of optical fiber. The protocol uses discrete signaling and post-selection to improve reconciliation speed and quantifies security by means of quantum state tomography. Polarization multiplexing and a frequency translation scheme permit transmission of a continuous wave local oscillator and suppression of noise from guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering by more than 27 dB.

  5. Quantum key distribution over 25 km with an all-fiber continuous-variable system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lodewyck, Jerome; Fossier, Simon [Thales Research and Technologies, RD 128, 91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique-CNRS-Universite Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Bloch, Matthieu; McLaughlin, Steven W. [GeorgiaTech-CNRS UMI 2958, 2-3 rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Garcia-Patron, Raul; Karpov, Evgueni; Cerf, Nicolas J. [Centre for Quantum Information and Communication, Ecole Polytechnique, CP 165/59, Universite libre de Bruxelles, 50 av. F. D. Roosevelt, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Diamanti, Eleni; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Grangier, Philippe [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique-CNRS-Universite Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Debuisschert, Thierry [Thales Research and Technologies, RD 128, 91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the implementation of a reverse-reconciliated coherent-state continuous-variable quantum key distribution system, with which we generated secret keys at a rate of more than 2 kb/s over 25 km of optical fiber. Time multiplexing is used to transmit both the signal and phase reference in the same optical fiber. Our system includes all experimental aspects required for a field implementation of a quantum key distribution setup. Real-time reverse reconciliation is achieved by using fast and efficient low-density parity check error correcting codes.

  6. Powder River 0 20 40 KILOMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. coal basins. The Powder River Basin (PRB) in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana (fig. 1 tons (MST), some 42 percent of the total coal pro- duction in the United States, making the PRB the single most important coal-producing basin in the Nation. About 426 MST (92 percent of total PRB coal

  7. Time-resolved particle velocity measurements at impact velocities of 10 km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Reinhart, W.D.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypervelocity launch capabilities (9--16 km/s) with macroscopic plates have become available in recent years. It is now feasible to conduct instrumented plane-wave tests using this capability. Successfully conducting such tests requires a planar launch and impact at hypervelocities, appropriate triggering for recording systems, and time-resolved measurements of motion or stress at a particular point or set of points within the target or projectile during impact. The authors have conducted the first time-resolved wave-profile experiments using velocity interferometric techniques at impact velocities of 10 km/s. These measurements show that aluminum continues to exhibit normal release behavior to 161 GPa shock pressure, with complete loss of strength of the shocked state. These experiments have allowed a determination of shock-wave window transparency in conditions produced by a hypervelocity impact. In particular, lithium fluoride appears to lose transparency at a shock stress of 200 GPa; this appears to be the upper limit for conventional wave profile measurements using velocity interferometric techniques.

  8. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Thornton, Michele M [ORNL; Mayer, Benjamin W [ORNL; Wilhelmi, Nate [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Devarakonda, Ranjeet [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More information: http://daymet.ornl.gov Presenter: Ranjeet Devarakonda Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data and Climatological Summaries provides gridded estimates of daily weather parameters for North America, including daily continuous surfaces of minimum and maximum temperature, precipitation occurrence and amount, humidity, shortwave radiation, snow water equivalent, and day length. The current data product (Version 2) covers the period January 1, 1980 to December 31, 2013 [1]. The prior product (Version 1) only covered from 1980-2008. Data are available on a daily time step at a 1-km x 1-km spatial resolution in Lambert Conformal Conic projection with a spatial extent that covers the conterminous United States, Mexico, and Southern Canada as meteorological station density allows. Daymet data can be downloaded from 1) the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) search and order tools (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/cart/add2cart.pl?add=1219) or directly from the DAAC FTP site (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/dsviewer.pl?ds_id=1219) and 2) the Single Pixel Tool [2] and THREDDS (Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services) Data Server [3]. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool allows users to enter a single geographic point by latitude and longitude in decimal degrees. A routine is executed that translates the (lon, lat) coordinates into projected Daymet (x,y) coordinates. These coordinates are used to access the Daymet database of daily-interpolated surface weather variables. Daily data from the nearest 1 km x 1 km Daymet grid cell are extracted from the database and formatted as a table with one column for each Daymet variable and one row for each day. All daily data for selected years are returned as a single (long) table, formatted for display in the browser window. At the top of this table is a link to the same data in a simple comma-separated text format, suitable for import into a spreadsheet or other data analysis software. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool also provides the option to download multiple coordinates programmatically. A multiple extractor script is freely available to download at http://daymet.ornl.gov/files/daymet.zip. The ORNL DAAC s THREDDS data server (TDS) provides customized visualization and access to Daymet time series of North American mosaics. Users can subset and download Daymet data via a variety of community standards, including OPeNDAP, NetCDF Subset service, and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map/Coverage Service. The ORNL DAAC TDS also exposes Daymet metadata through its ncISO service to facilitate harvesting Daymet metadata records into 3rd party catalogs. References: [1] Thornton, P.E., M.M. Thornton, B.W. Mayer, N. Wilhelmi, Y. Wei, R. Devarakonda, and R.B. Cook. 2014. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2. Data set. Available on-line [http://daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. [2] Devarakonda R., et al. 2012. Daymet: Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.go/singlepixel.html]. [3] Wei Y., et al. 2014. Daymet: Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.gov/thredds_tiles.html].

  9. Deep sea tests of a prototype of the KM3NeT digital optical module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Aharonian, F; Aiello, S; Albert, A; Ameli, F; Anassontzis, E G; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; de Asmundis, R; Band, H; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F; Baret, B; Baron, S; Belias, A; Berbee, E; Berg, A M van den; Berkien, A; Bertin, V; Beurthey, S; van Beveren, V; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Bianucci, S; Billault, M; Birbas, A; Rookhuizen, H Boer; Bormuth, R; Bouche, V; Bouhadef, B; Bourlis, G; Bouwhuis, M; Bozza, C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Cacopardo, G; Caillat, L; Calamai, M; Calvo, D; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Caruso, F; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Cereseto, R; Champion, C; Chateau, F; Chiarusi, T; Christopoulou, B; Circella, M; Classen, L; Cocimano, R; Colonges, S; Coniglione, R; Cosquer, A; Costa, M; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Curtil, C; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Rosa, G; Deniskina, N; Destelle, J -J; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q; Drakopoulou7, E; Drouhin, D; Drury, L; Durand, D; Eberl, T; Eleftheriadis, C; Elsaesser, D; Enzenhofer, A; Fermani, P; Fusco, L A; Gajana, D; Gal, T; Galata, S; Gallo, F; Garufi, F; Gebyehu, M; Giordano, V; Gizani, N; Ruiz, R Gracia; Graf, K; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Grmek, A; Habel, R; van Haren, H; Heid, T; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Henry, S; Hernandez-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hevinga, M A; van der Hoek, M; Hofestadt, J; Hogenbirk, J; Hugon, C; Hosl, J; Imbesi, M; James, C; Jansweijer, P; Jochum, J; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Kappos, E; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Keller, P; Kieft, G; Koffeman, E; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Koopstra, J; Korporaal, A; Kouchner, A; Koutsoukos, S; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Provost, H Le; Leisos, A; Lenis, D; Leonora, E; Clark, M Lindsey; Liolios, A; Alvarez, C D Llorens; Lohner, H; Presti, D Lo; Louis, F; Maccioni, E; Mannheim, K; Manolopoulos, K; Margiotta, A; Maris, O; Markou, C; Martinez-Mora, J A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Mos, S; Moudden, Y; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolaou, C; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Orzelli, A; Papageorgiou, K; Papaikonomou, A; Papaleo, R; Pavalas, G E; Peek, H; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Petridou, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, Th; Priede, M; Puhlhofer, G; Pulvirenti, S; Racca, C; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Rapidis, P A; Razis, P; Real, D; Resvanis, L; Reubelt, J; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Royon, J; Saldana, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Santangelo, A; Sapienza, P; Savvidis, I; Schmelling, J; Schnabel, J; Sedita, M; Seitz, T; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Siotis, I; Sipala, V; Solazzo, M; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J; Stolarczyk, T; Stransky, D; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Tezier, D; Theraube, S; Thompson, L F; Timmer, P; Trapierakis, H I; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tsirigotis, A; Tzamarias, S; Tzamariudaki, E; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vermeulen, J; Vernin, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D; Werneke, P; Wiggers, L; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; van Wooning, R H L; Yatkin, K; Zachariadou, K; Zonca, E; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; Zwart, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first prototype of a photo-detection unit of the future KM3NeT neutrino telescope has been deployed in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This digital optical module has a novel design with a very large photocathode area segmented by the use of 31 three inch photomultiplier tubes. It has been integrated in the ANTARES detector for in-situ testing and validation. This paper reports on the first months of data taking and rate measurements. The analysis results highlight the capabilities of the new module design in terms of background suppression and signal recognition. The directionality of the optical module enables the recognition of multiple Cherenkov photons from the same $^{40}$K decay and the localization bioluminescent activity in the neighbourhood. The single unit can cleanly identify atmospheric muons and provide sensitivity to the muon arrival directions.

  10. Interpreting Energy and Tracer Spectra of Upper-Ocean Turbulence in the Submesoscale Range (1–200 km)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    Submesoscale (1–200 km) wavenumber spectra of kinetic and potential energy and tracer variance are obtained from in situ observations in the Gulf Stream region and in the eastern subtropical North Pacific. In the Gulf ...

  11. Practical Point-to-Point Free-Space Quantum Key Distribution over 1/2 KM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttler, W.T.; Hughes, R.J.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated point-to-point single-photon quantum key distribution (QKD) over a free-space optical path of {approximately}475 m under daylight conditions. This represents an increase of >1,000 times farther than any reported point-to-point demonstration, and >6 times farther than the previous folded path daylight demonstration. We expect to extend the daylight range to 2 km or more within the next few months. A brief description of the system is given here. The QKD transmitter, a.k.a. ''Alice'' (Fig. 1), consists of three thermoelectrically cooled diode lasers, a single interference filter (IF), two optical attenuators, two linear polarizers, two non-polarization beam-splitters (BSs), and a 27x beam expander. The two data-lasers' (dim-lasers') wavelengths are temperature controlled and constrained by the IF to {approximately}773 {+-} 0.5 nm, while the transmitted wavelength of the bright-laser (timing-laser) is {approximately}768 nm; the data-lasers are configured to emit a weak pulse of approximately 1 ns duration. The transmitter incorporates no active polarization switching--a first in QKD.

  12. Free-Space distribution of entanglement and single photons over 144 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Ursin; F. Tiefenbacher; T. Schmitt-Manderbach; H. Weier; T. Scheidl; M. Lindenthal; B. Blauensteiner; T. Jennewein; J. Perdigues; P. Trojek; B. Oemer; M. Fuerst; M. Meyenburg; J. Rarity; Z. Sodnik; C. Barbieri; H. Weinfurter; A. Zeilinger

    2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Entanglement is the essence of quantum physics and inspires fundamental questions about the principles of nature. Moreover it is also the basis for emerging technologies of quantum information processing such as quantum cryptography, quantum teleportation and quantum computation. Bell's discovery, that correlations measured on entangled quantum systems are at variance with a local realistic picture led to a flurry of experiments confirming the quantum predictions. However, it is still experimentally undecided whether quantum entanglement can survive global distances, as predicted by quantum theory. Here we report the violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality measured by two observers separated by 144 km between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife via an optical free-space link using the Optical Ground Station (OGS) of the European Space Agency (ESA). Furthermore we used the entangled pairs to generate a quantum cryptographic key under experimental conditions and constraints characteristic for a Space-to-ground experiment. The distance in our experiment exceeds all previous free-space experiments by more than one order of magnitude and exploits the limit for ground-based free-space communication; significantly longer distances can only be reached using air- or space-based platforms. The range achieved thereby demonstrates the feasibility of quantum communication in space, involving satellites or the International Space Station (ISS).

  13. Global coupling at 660 km is proposed to explain plate tectonics and the generation of the earth's magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozsef Garai

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of low viscosity layers in the mantle is supported by line of geological and geophysical observations. Recent high pressure and temperature investigations indicated that partial carbonate melt should exist at the bottom of the lithosphere and at 660 km. The presence of few percent carbonate melt reduces the viscosity by several order of magnitude. The globally existing 660 km very low viscosity layer allows the development of differential rotation between the upper and lower mantle. This differential rotation between the 660 km outer shell and the rest of the earth offers a plausible explanation for plate tectonics and for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. Simple dynamo model is proposed, which able to reproduce all of the features of the contemporary and, within reasonable uncertainty, the paleomagnetic field. The model is also consistent with geological and geophysical observations.

  14. A robot that walked 65 km on a single charge: energy-effective and reliable locomotion using trajectory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    PRE-PRINT A robot that walked 65 km on a single charge: energy-effective and reliable locomotion environment, that steps towards that goal. Ranger is essentially planar (rather than 3D); it has only 3 of 0.28). The high reliability and low energy use are achieved by: 1) development of an accurate bench

  15. Brillouin optical time-domain analysis over a 240 km-long fiber loop with no repeater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Brillouin optical time-domain analysis over a 240 km-long fiber loop with no repeater Xabier Angulo.angulo@io.cfmac.csic.es; phone +34 915618806 ext.:222 ABSTRACT In this paper we combine the use of optical pulse coding and seeded second-order Raman amplification to extend the sensing distance of Brillouin optical time

  16. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 2003 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 2003 page 1 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2003 , Anton not LBNL 7 11:18.8 Singer, Brett C 30-39 men 3 8 11:20.2 Yegian, Derek 30-39 men 4 9 11:20.4 Nihei 45 13:26.9 card not turned in 46 13:27.4 Elliott, James B 30-39 men 18 #12;LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3

  17. 552 THE WILSON BULLETIN l Vol. 104, No. 3, September1992 On 21 July 1990, I found a second nest of similar construction, approximately 1 km to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurd, Peter L.

    of similar construction, approximately 1 km to the NW. It was located on a tree fern (Cyathea sp., ca 8.8 cm

  18. 48Deep Impact Comet Encounter On July 5, 2005 at 5:45 UT the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson Jr., James E.

    ,000,000 kilograms of comet material, we will ignore this effect since the comet's mass was over 45 trillion a blast, whose energy is equal to that of a 7.5 x 10 8 kilogram kilogram Impactor traveling at 10.3 km,000,000 kilograms of comet material, we will ignore this effect since the comet's mass was over 45 trillion

  19. Assessment of the 60 km rapid update cycle (RUC) with near real-time aircraft reports. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.E.; Richard, C.; Kim, S.; Bailey, D.

    1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the Center-TRA-CON Advisory System (CTAS), a set of Air Traffic Management (ATM) Decision Support Tools (DST) for en route (Center) and terminal (TRACON) airspace designed to enable controllers to increase capacity and flight efficiency. A crucial component of the CTAS, or any ATM DST, is the computation of the time-of-flight of aircraft along flight path segments. Earlier NASA studies show that accurate knowledge of the wind through which the aircraft are flying is required to estimate time-of-flight accurately. There are current envisioned to be two sources of wind data for CTAS: The Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) for the Center airspace, a numerical model developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Forecast System Laboratory (FSL) and run operationally by the National Weather Service (NWS) National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP); and The Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) Terminal Winds (TW) for the TRACON airspace, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory under funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This study has three goals: (1) determine the errors in the baseline 60 km resolution RUC forecast wind fields relative to the needs of en route DSTs such as CTAS, (2) determine the benefit of using the TW algorithm to refine the RUC forecast wind fields with near real-time Meteorological Data Collection and Reporting System (MDCRS) reports, and (3) identify factors that influence wind errors in order to improve accuracy and estimate errors in real time.

  20. Mulching as a countermeasure for crop contamination within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yera, T.S.; Vallejo, R.; Tent, J.; Rauret, G. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain); Omelyanenko, N.; Ivanov, Y. [Ukrainian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of mulch soil cover on crop contamination by {sup 137}Cs was studied within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Experiments were performed with oats (Avena sativa) over a three year period. In 1992 soil surface was covered by a plastic net. In 1993 two straw mulch treatments were applied at a dose rate of 200 g m{sup {minus}2} using {sup 137}Cs contaminated and clean straw, respectively. A similar mulch treatment was applied in 1994, and two mulch doses of clean straw were tested. Protection of the soil with a plastic net significantly increased crop yield and reduced crop contamination. When clean straw was used as a mulch layer, a significant decrease of about 30--40% in {sup 137}Cs activity concentration was observed. Mulching with {sup 137}Cs contaminated straw did not reduce crop contamination, probably due to an increase in soil available {sup 137}Cs released from the contaminated mulch. Mulching has been shown to be an effective treatment both for reducing {sup 137}Cs plant contamination and improving crop yield. Therefore, it can be considered as a potential countermeasure in a post-accident situation.

  1. 1000 2000 3000 4000 .5 0 1 KILOMETER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    Rocks, Including Interbedded Limestone, Ordovician Black Shale/Slate Green Shale/Slate Bedded Limestone Quartz Arenite or Quartz Rich Wacke Brown/Tan/Olive DrabShale/Slate, Mudstone, and Sandstone Red Shale/Slate

  2. Topology of neutral hydrogen distribution with the Square Kilometer Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yougang; Wu, Fengquan; Chen, Xuelei; Wang, Xin; Kim, Juhan; Park, Changbom; Lee, Khee-Gan; Cen, Renyue

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Morphology of the complex HI gas distribution can be quantified by statistics like the Minkowski functionals, and can provide a way to statistically study the large scale structure in the HI maps both at low redshifts, and during the epoch of reionization (EoR). At low redshifts, the 21cm emission traces the underlying matter distribution. Topology of the HI gas distribution, as measured by the genus, could be used as a "standard ruler". This enables the determination of distance-redshift relation and also the discrimination of various models of dark energy and of modified gravity. The topological analysis is also sensitive to certain primordial non-Gaussian features. Compared with two-point statistics, the topological statistics are more robust against the nonlinear gravitational evolution, bias, and redshift-space distortion. The HI intensity map observation naturally avoids the sparse sampling distortion, which is an important systematic in optical galaxy survey. The large cosmic volume accessible to SKA w...

  3. THE 300 km s[superscript –1] STELLAR STREAM NEAR SEGUE 1: INSIGHTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF ITS BRIGHTEST STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunnan, Ragnhild

    We present a chemical abundance analysis of 300S-1, the brightest likely member star of the 300 km s[superscript –1] stream near the faint satellite galaxy Segue 1. From a high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectrum, we determine ...

  4. Practical quantum key distribution over 60 hours at an optical fiber distance of 20km using weak and vacuum decoy pulses for enhanced security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Dynes; Z. L. Yuan; A. W. Sharpe; A. J. Shields

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental one-way decoy pulse quantum key distribution running continuously for 60 hours is demonstrated over a fiber distance of 20km. We employ a decoy protocol which involves one weak decoy pulse and a vacuum pulse. The obtained secret key rate is on average over 10kbps. This is the highest rate reported using this decoy protocol over this fiber distance and duration.

  5. Configuration studies for a cubic-kilometre deep-sea neutrino telescope - KM3NeT - with NESSY, a fast and flexible approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Carr; D. Dornic; F. Jouvenot; G. Maurin; for the KM3NeT consortium

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical predictions for neutrino fluxes indicate that km$^{3}$ scale detectors are needed to detect certain astrophysical sources. The three Mediterranean experiments, ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR are working together on a design study, KM3NeT, for a large deep-sea neutrino telescope. A detector placed in the Mediterranean Sea will survey a large part of the Galactic disc, including the Galactic Centre. It will complement the IceCube telescope currently under construction at the South Pole. Furthermore, the improved optical properties of sea water, compared to Antarctic ice, will allow a better angular resolution and hence better background rejection. The main work presented in this paper is to evaluate different km$^{3}$ scale detector geometries in order to optimize the muon neutrino sensitivity between 1 and 100 TeV. For this purpose, we have developed a detailed simulation based on the {\\it Mathematica} software - for the muon track production, the light transmission in water, the environmental background and the detector response. To compare different geometries, we have mainly used the effective neutrino area obtained after the full standard reconstruction chain.}

  6. 217 km long distance photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry based on ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo-Liang Shentu; Qi-Chao Sun; Xiao Jiang; Xiao-Dong Wang; Jason S. Pelc; M. M. Fejer; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry with 42.19 dB dynamic range using an ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector. By employing the long wave pump technique and a volume Bragg grating, we reduce the noise of our up-conversion single photon detector, and achieve a noise equivalent power of -139.7 dBm/sqrt(Hz). We perform the OTDR experiments using a fiber of length 216.95 km, and show that our system can identify defects along the entire fiber length with a distance resolution better than 10 cm in a measurement time of 13 minutes.

  7. The `Skyline' Distance 46km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VOTEDINTOP10OF WORLDTRAILS2004 Croeso i Afan, lleoliad beicio mynydd heb ei ail. Mae gan y lle yma bopeth - o swooping singletrack threading through beautiful forest to exposed rocky doubletrack on wide open hills

  8. xu-km-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development1U CO1) 1 Winter FuelsYOURxinyufuUpdraft

  9. SpaceX 2 Cargo Manifest TOTAL CARGO: 575 kilograms / 1268 pounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supplies Lego MSG gloves #12;12 PIG SCK SPHERES VCAM EXPRESS Rack Stowage Lockers Surplus +4C Ice Supply Pack o Top. & Inj. Medications Pack o Oral Meds Pack ECLSS o H2 Sensor ORU o ACY Urine Filter

  10. Electron-beam processing of kilogram quantities of iridium for radioisotope thermoelectric generator applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huxford, T.J.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel-cladding materials in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Hardware produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been used in Voyagers I and 2, Galilee, and Ulysses spacecraft. An integral part of the production of iridium-sheet metal involves electron-beam (EB) processing. These processes include the degassing of powder-pressed compacts followed by multiple meltings in order to purify 500-g buttons of Ir-0.3% W alloy. Starting in 1972 and continuing into 1992, our laboratory EB processing was Performed (ca. 1970) in a 60-kW (20 kV at 3 A), two-gun system. In 1991, a new 150-kW EB gun facility was installed to complement the older unit. This paper describes how the newly installed system was qualified for production of RTG developmental work is discussed that will potentially improve the existing process by utilizing the capabilities of the new EB system.

  11. Electron-beam processing of kilogram quantities of iridium for radioisotope thermoelectric generator applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huxford, T.J.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel-cladding materials in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Hardware produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been used in Voyagers I and 2, Galilee, and Ulysses spacecraft. An integral part of the production of iridium-sheet metal involves electron-beam (EB) processing. These processes include the degassing of powder-pressed compacts followed by multiple meltings in order to purify 500-g buttons of Ir-0.3% W alloy. Starting in 1972 and continuing into 1992, our laboratory EB processing was Performed (ca. 1970) in a 60-kW (20 kV at 3 A), two-gun system. In 1991, a new 150-kW EB gun facility was installed to complement the older unit. This paper describes how the newly installed system was qualified for production of RTG developmental work is discussed that will potentially improve the existing process by utilizing the capabilities of the new EB system.

  12. conversion ratio (the amount of body weight gained for every kilogram of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    aquaculture systems, offshore systems, aquaponic systems, advances in modelling of aquaculture impacts

  13. Status of Neutrino Astronomy: The Quest for Kilometer-Scale Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a (very) personal attempt to summarize the status of neutrino astronomy: its scientific motivations, our understanding of natural water and ice as particle detectors and, finally, the detector technology.

  14. Adaptive Selective Learning for Automatic Identification of Sub-Kilometer Craters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    Martian terrain characterized by heterogeneous surface morphology. The experimental results demonstrate and present geological processes and provide the only tool for measuring rela- tive ages of observed geologic. Geologic stratigraphy based on manually collected databases has coarse spatial resolutions. Finer spatial

  15. Semi-supervised based Active Class Selection for Automatic Identification of Sub-Kilometer Craters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    characterized by heterogeneous surface morphology. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed about the past and present geological processes and provide the only tool to measuring relative ages of observed geologic formations. The size distribution of craters conforms to the power-law as large craters

  16. Temperature (oC)! Height(km)!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and forecasting ! ·Temperature decreases in altitude + water vapor > instabilities can develop ·Well mixed + O2 + M = O3 + M to proceed. It is M here that transfers the excess energy to the surrounding created and transported to high latitudes PSCs form in cold, dark, polar lower stratosphere PSCs process

  17. Brazil's Legal Amazon 5 million km2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    effect on atmosphere · Effect cloud formation · Increase cloud cover: aerosols that do not absorb much sunlight · act as seeds for clouds · Decrease cloud cover: aerosols that absorb sunlight · create layer photometer · Direct solar radiation · Calculate columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) · Level 2 data · AOT 500

  18. KM_C364e-20170629133124

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015Just Plain Cool,relocatesm

  19. KM_C654e-20150324133840

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015Just Plain Cool,relocatesm

  20. All-optical remote monitoring of propane gas using a 5-km-long, low-loss optical fiber link and an InGaP light-emitting diode in the 1. 68-. mu. m region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.; Ito, H.; Inaba, H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the fully optical remote detection of low-level propane (C/sub 3/H/sub 8/) gas realized by the scheme based on a long distance, very low-loss silica optical fiber link connected to a compact absorption cell in conjunction with a high radiant InGaP light-emitting diode at 1.68 ..mu..m. For this application, the near-infrared absorption spectrum of propane was measured and studied to find very complicated bands around 1.69, 1.53, and 1.38 ..mu..m. This simple system, employing a 5-km-long silica optical fiber link, was demonstrated to be capable of achieving reproducibly the detection sensitivity less than 2.4 Torr for propane gas in air, i.e., about 14% of the lower explosion limit of propane density. This result verifies a large capability for major applications to various strategic points within the environment, such as industrial complexes as well as urban and residential areas, with considerably increased reliability and safety over the existing techniques.

  1. DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zhao Junwei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ofman, Leon [Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

  2. Three-dimensional geologic structures from inversion of gravity anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinson, Charles Alvin

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Parameters used were: Zo=7 km, R=l gm/cm , fr=0. 09 km-', fz=0. 125 km iterations=6 and final rms difference was 7. 6 10-4 km. . 42 12 Inversion Model 1. Parameters used were p = 0. 1 gm/cms, zo = 5. 4 km, f& = 0. 045 and fz = 0. 095. Contours... are in kilometers relative to sea level 56 13 Inversion Model 2. Parameters used were p = 0. 1 gm/cm zo = 5. 4 km, fq = 0. 001 and fz = 0. 002. Contours are in kilometers relative to sea level 58 14 Gravity difference between the anomaly produced by Inversion...

  3. Fabric Analysis of Survivor Clasts in the Southwest Deforming Zone of the San Andreas Fault at Three Kilometers Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loftin, Aileen

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    -frequency and shape-size distributions of survivor clasts from the SDZ were characterized through 3D analysis of X-Ray Computed Tomography (XCT) images of SDZ core samples. A number of processing techniques were employed to calibrate, remove artifacts, filter...

  4. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    a specific amount of water. AE express- es how well an irrigation system can potential- ly distributes 1 shows the AE values used for different irrigation systems (Canessa et al. 2011). Re- gional AE estimates in Table 2 were esti- mated using a weighted average of AE and irrigation system's crop acreage

  5. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    is operated to de- liver a specific amount of water. AE express- es how well an irrigation system can as the target water depth. Table 1 shows the AE values used for different irrigation systems (Canessa et al and irrigation system's crop acreage for each region (Tindula et al. 2013). The main assu- mptions is that every

  6. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    - liver a specific amount of water. AE express- es how well an irrigation system can potential- ly depth. Table 1 shows the AE values used for different irrigation systems (Canessa et al. 2011). Re- gional AE estimates in Table 2 were esti- mated using a weighted average of AE and irrigation system

  7. DATA TRANSMISSION OPTIONS FOR VMT DATA AND FEE COLLECTION CENTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    , VMT fee, data processing, fuel tax alternatives, fee collection center, customer service center 18.59 kilometers squared km2 VOLUME VOLUME mL milliliters 0.034 fluid ounces fl oz fl oz fluid ounces 29

  8. General Physics I Exam 1 -Chs. 1,2,3 -Units, Motion Sep. 16, 2009 Name Rec. Instr. Rec. Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wysin, Gary

    General Physics I Exam 1 - Chs. 1,2,3 - Units, Motion Sep. 16, 2009 Name Rec. Instr. Rec. Time , M=106 , G=109 , T=1012 . 1. (2) Which of the following is NOT an SI unit? a. meter b. kilogram c), in standard SI units without any prefixes, preserving the number of significant figures. a) 630 µs b) 42400 km

  9. Daylight quantum key distribution over 1.6 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buttler, W T; Lamoreaux, S K; Morgan, G L; Nordholt, J E; Peterson, C G

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) has been demonstrated over a point-to-point transmission distance brings QKD a step closer to surface-to-satellite and other long-distance applications.

  10. ELECTROMAGNETIC CONSTRUCTION OF A 1 KM-RADIUS RADIATION SHIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the light of recent studies on bootstrapped lunar solar-electric power plants, mass drivers, and autonomous-drivers, (g) teleoperation of lunar and orbital facilities, (h) orbital assembly of lunar-derived solar power presence beyond Earth is limited to a very few government employees and robots who are sent up, entirely

  11. The European Optical Module for Paris, KM-3 electronics meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiebusch, Christopher

    of subsequent hits (> 20ns) (Multiple muon detection) Low afterpulse rate EOM Philips XP-2600 (14") hybrid (+XP;CPUModem Comunication Power & DATA(optical) Q-T DC/DC DMQT Pulse LED XP2600 PhilipsPMT Remote

  12. Microsoft Word - China_10km_solar_documentation.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 June - 5

  13. Microsoft Word - Ethiopia_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 June -

  14. Microsoft Word - Ghana_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 June -of

  15. Microsoft Word - Kenya_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 June -ofKenya

  16. Microsoft Word - Nepal_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 JuneNepal

  17. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2011. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % was used in research and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace, consumer goods, industrial equipment, medical equipment

  18. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2001. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as consumer goods, medical equipment, industrial components, telecommunications, and aerospace applications. Integrated

  19. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2000. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as consumer goods, medical equipment, industrial components, telecommunications, and aerospace applications

  20. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2003. One company in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace

  1. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2006. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace

  2. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2010. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace, consumer goods, industrial equipment, medical equipment, and telecommunications. ICs were used

  3. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2007. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace, consumer goods, industrial equipment, medical equipment, and telecommunications. ICs were used

  4. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2004. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % was used in research and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace, consumer goods, industrial equipment, medical equipment

  5. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2008. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace, consumer goods, industrial equipment, medical equipment, and telecommunications. ICs were used

  6. Kilogram Scale Synthesis of a Triazine-based Dendrimer and the Development of a General Strategy for the Installation of Pharmacophores to Yield Potential Drug Delivery Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditto, Vincent J.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    investigated for macromolecular drug delivery. Upon acylation of each drug with BOC-isonipecotic acid, substitution on the dendrimer may occur with varying levels of success depending on the drug in question. Upon successful substitution to afford the desired...

  7. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,800 10,100 7,100 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 681 1,760 7,190 4,510 4,000 Consumption.S. germanium consumption. The major end uses for germanium, worldwide, were estimated to be polymerization catalysts, 31%; fiber-optic systems, 24%; infrared optics, 23%; electronics/solar electric applications, 12

  8. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,200 13,800 26,500 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 5,730 681 1,760 7,190 5,000 Consumption.S. germanium consumption. The major end uses for germanium, worldwide, were estimated to be polymerization catalysts, 31%; fiber-optic systems, 24%; infrared optics, 23%; electronics/solar electric applications, 12

  9. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1998 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1998 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania Production, refinery 10,000 10,000 18,000 20,000 22,000e Total imports 14,700 16,200 27,500 23,700 20

  10. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2000 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, and Issues: World refinery production of germanium remained steady in 2000. The recycling of scrap continued

  11. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2003 producer. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics, infrared

  12. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2004 producer refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery

  13. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2002 producer price-bearing materials generated from the processing of zinc ores. The germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. The refinery in Oklahoma doubled its production

  14. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2001 producer price-bearing materials generated from the processing of zinc ores. The germanium refineries in New York and Oklahoma and set up in New York. The refinery in Oklahoma expanded, and a new secondary facility was built in North

  15. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1995 producer price, was approximately industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery production Reserves6 Reserve base6 1994

  16. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2008 producer of 2008. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics

  17. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1999 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7757] #12;73 GERMANIUM Events, Trends, and Issues: World refinery production

  18. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1996 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1996 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, and chemotherapy), 5%. Salient Statistics--United States: 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996e Production, refinery 13,000 10

  19. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1997 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1997 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, refinery 10,000 10,000 10,000 18,000 20,000e Total imports 15,000 15,000 16,000 27,000 17,0001 Exports NA

  20. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2007 producer in the fourth quarter of 2007. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production

  1. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1997. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1997. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah in optoelectronic devices, which include light-emitting diodes (LED's), laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar-than-expected increase in demand. The company planned to operate its refineries in France and Germany using stockpiled

  2. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1995. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1995. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah recovered devices, which include light-emitting diodes (LED's), laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells contract to a consortium of private companies to develop gallium nitride technology. Blue LED's are useful

  3. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1999. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1999. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah in optoelectronic devices, which include light-emitting diodes (LED's), laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar in July. The additional facility was expected to double the company's refinery capacity to 100

  4. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2002. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2002. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Integrated circuits represented 65% of gallium demand forecasts of market growth, several companies were consolidating, reducing, or eliminating their Ga

  5. Amino acid supplementation of low-protein sorghum-soybean meal diets for 5 to 20 and 20 to 50 kilogram swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Jeffrey Alan

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; isoleucine content appeared to be marginal in the 12/o protein diet, but was adequate in the 15'/o protein diet. The addition of NaHCOs to the 12'/, protein diet to obtain the electrolyte balance (Na + K - Cl) of the PC did not affect performance... of the amino acid content of sorghum to NRC (1988) requirements, indicates that Met (plus cystine (Cys)) should be the third-limiting and Trp the fourth-limiting amino acid. The addition of Met to Lys- Thr-fortified sorghum based diets has been shown...

  6. Southern California Edison's Evaluation of California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1 Publicly Available Publications and Data 5.2 Personal Communication 6.0 GLOSSARY APPENDIX, approximately 80 kilometers (km) northwest of the City of San Diego and 97 km southeast of Los Angeles Base (Base) near the northwest end of the Base's shoreline. Figure 11 also shows

  7. A l u m n i C a m p u sE N E R G I E (89 Kilometer nordwestlich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vollmer, Heribert

    Referenzprojekt für die Ent- wicklung der Offshore-Wind- energie besondere Bedeutung zu. Derzeit laufen in der Aus und 15 Insti- Einleitung Ziel der Bundesregierung ist es, bis zum Jahr 2030 Offshore- Windparks mit- wicklung fiel im Herbst 2008 mit dem Bau des Umspann- werks für das Offshore-Test- feld alpha ventus

  8. Neotectonics, geodesy, and seismic hazard in the Northern Walker Lane of Western North America: Thirty kilometers of crustal shear and no strike-slip?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , University of Nevada, Reno 89557, United States b Nevada Geodetic Laboratory, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 89557, United States c Nevada Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno 89557, United States a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 2 January 2012 Received in revised

  9. 22LRO Explores the Apollo 12 Landing Area on the Moon NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) from a lunar orbit of 21 kilometers (13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    22LRO Explores the Apollo 12 Landing Area on the Moon NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO of the Apollo 12 landing site. Images show the twists and turns of the paths made when the astronauts explored the lunar surface. One of the details that shows up is a bright L-shape in the Apollo 12 image. It marks

  10. 1 [2.7 km/s] 3 [2.4; 2.7;2.9 km/s] 8 along the strike 3 along the strike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Fisiche - Universita' degli Studi "Federico II" - Napoli - Italy; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e with Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia). One of the goals is to perform a sensitivity analysis

  11. COLOMBIA GUYANA VENEZUELA FR.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    PERU CHILE ARGENTINA PARAGUAY BOLIVIA COLOMBIA GUYANA SURINAME URUGUAY VENEZUELA FR. GUIANA POPULATION DENSITY, 2000 Population density measures the number of persons per square kilometer of land area the population grids and thus may appear coarse. Lambert Azimuthal Equal Area Projection ´ 0 500 1,000 km

  12. Transmitter-induced modulation of subionospheric VLF signals: Ionospheric heating rather than electron precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    path lies thousands of kilometers from the heating VLF transmitter. The 21.4 kHz transmitter NPM that the observed perturbations, despite occurring on a probe signal pathway that is 1750 km away from NPM at its point of closest approach, are due to direct ionospheric heating by the keyed VLF transmitter NPM

  13. J. C. Fulton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    groundwater to remove 220 kilograms of hexavalent chromium and 1,600 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride this fiscal year. The project also continued Pump-and-Treat...

  14. CONTRIBUTED PAPERS RELATED TO SUMMARY TALKS. MOSSBAUER STUDY OF CUBIC IRON-DOPED KM~F,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CONTRIBUTED PAPERS RELATED TO SUMMARY TALKS. MOSSBAUER STUDY OF CUBIC IRON-DOPED KMFeront ttC Btudiespar spectroscopie Mossbauer avec et sans champ magnetique. L'interaction quadrupolaire by the Mossbauer technique in the presence of a magnetic field. The quadrupole interaction induced by a 50 k

  15. Irregular structures observed below 71 km in the night-time polar D-region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . The payload contained two instru- ments. PIP (positive ion probe) measured positive ion current and CPP (cold plasma probes) measured electron current as well as electron temperature. The latter parameter archipelago. The ®rst instrumented rocket was launched on 20 November, 1997, at 1730 UT during geomagnetically

  16. Results1980 LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 1.87mi-3.01km SEPT 12, 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M 3 EED Solar 4 10:04.6 Steve Shaffer M 4 MMRD 5 10:10 Greg Hirsch M 5 MMRD 6 10:30 Mark Levinson M 3 12:27 No name on stick 4 4 12:28 Phil Nelson M 4 1 ESD 4 5 12:30 Charles K Birdsall M 4 2 EECS

  17. Telecom Implementation In The first long range link testing (34 KM) was done in 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lien, Jyh-Ming

    and days from the nearest highway · 1 I #12;Putting Alvarion radio at Kobang School #12;#12;#12;· S.N at Mohare Relay Station #12;Installing Antennas #12;Tower at Mohare #12;Web Site Nepal Wireless #12;Solar Paners at Mohare Relay Station #12;Power Generation and Backup Systems Used in the Relay Stations · S.N

  18. Chemistry Publications 2008 Shrivastava, RK; Maudru, E; Singh, G; Wightman, RH; Morgan, KM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    - elastic neutron scattering JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B, 2008, 112, 10873-10878 11 Dickson, SJ for simultaneous electrical resistance and neutron diffraction measurements REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS, 2008

  19. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (38)K(m)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, G. C.; Boisvert, G.; Bricault, P.; Churchman, R.; Dombsky, M.; Lindner, T.; Macdonald, J. A.; Vandervoort, E.; Bishop, S.; D'Auria, J. M.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; Leslie, J. R.; Mak, H. -B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . J. Schrewe, and K. S. Sharma, Nucl. Phys. A 405, 29 (1983). [5] A. P. Baerg, Metrologia 1, 131 (1965). [6] J. A. Cameron and B. Singh, Nucl. Data Sheets 109, 1 (2008). [7] G. T. A. Squier, W. E. Burcham, J. M. Freeman, R. J. Petty, S. D. Hoath...

  20. Results1981 LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 1.87 mi= 3.01 km Sept 24, 1981

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8 UCB Campus 5 1 12:22 David Burke M 4 9 BMD 5 2 12:23 Ruben Zelwer M 5 0 ESD 5 3 12:25.3 Karl Saari

  1. New Agroforestry Site: Kotumachigi village About 20 Km from the town of Gadag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    ,000 · Number of Houses 1400 · Population below poverty line ~25% · Drinking water: Only one well with two, onion and cotton · Red and black soil #12;Drudgery for water and fuel is a burden for women and children

  2. Solar: monthly latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south...

  3. -90 -60 -30 0 30 60 90 120 Lenght along the trajectory (km)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veres, Peter

    , especially when the precise all-sky reduction methods are used. Mobility The system is portable (weight of 6 and illumination of the sky. The network TheAMOS cameras systematically monitor meteor activity in the Slovak camera records about 10 000 meteors per year as well as about 50 transient luminous events (sprites

  4. Memo: Estimates of hydrology in small (<80 km2 urbanized watersheds under dry weather and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Johnson, 2004; Hetzel, 2007). The Bay Area Storm Water Management Agencies (BASMAA) that hold National management practices (BMPs) to achieve load reduction and demonstrate at the end of 20 years (2025 Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits have been asked to increase effort and implement best

  5. Fiber-Level Modeling of Dynamic Strength KM2 Ballistic Fabric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    .g., as reinforcements in rigid polymer matrix composites (PMCs) for lightweight vehicle- armor systems). Flexible agile, and more mobile so that they can be quickly transported to operations conducted throughout-amide) fabric and an E-glass fiber/ethyl cellulose composite in body-armor systems can be linked to the Korean

  6. NOAA Technical Report NESDIS 143 NOAA Coral Reef Watch 50 km Satellite Sea Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and solar-terrestrial sciences. From these sources, it develops and disseminates environmental data, energy development and distribution, global food supplies, and the development of natural resources. Mark Eakin1 William Skirving2,3 Tyler R. L. Christensen1,2 Alan E. Strong1,2 Jianke Li1,2 1 NOAA Coral

  7. Results1983 LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.865 mi) Sept. 23, 1983

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NAME GROUP PLACE PLACE TIME NAME GROUP PLACE 1 9:21.9 Fletcher Miller Tom Trippe 40 40-49 1 8 2 4 11:45.8 Stephen Derenzo 40-49 3 9 1 13:28.7 Dave Fortney 30-39 2 1 2 5 11:47.2 Harry:45.7 Tom Morgan 30-39 2 5 3 9 12:04.7 W. Nazaroff

  8. Why Lean ?y ( QC TQC 5-7 KPI Competency HA-SHA KM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

    ­ Jidoka) 4. (Kaizen ­ Continuous Improvement) etc. #12;Why lean Thinking in Healthcare ? 1. 80 : 80

  9. Cathodoluminescence petrography and isotope geochemistry of KT impact ejecta deposited 360 km from the Chicxulub crater,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claeys, Philippe

    Administration, Headquarters, Code SD, Washington, DC 20546, USA ­Instituto Mexicano del Petro´leo, Eje Lazaro

  10. Cytosolic High Km 5 -Nucleotidase and 5 (3 )-Deoxyribonucleotidase in Substrate Cycles Involved in Nucleotide Metabolism*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchi, Vera

    in Nucleotide Metabolism* Received for publication, August 21, 2000, and in revised form, November 14, 2000 that the hkm-NT is not involved in the regulation of deoxyribo- nucleotide pools but affects IMP and GTP pools. dNT-1, instead, appears to be the catabolic arm of substrate cycles regulating pyrimidine nucleotide

  11. 1000 2000 3000 4000 x [km] -150 -100 -50 0 50 100 150

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experiments with Magnetoacoustic Waves in the Solar Atmosphere C. Nutto1, O. Steiner1, W. Schaffenberger2, M in the photosphere. We have 123 cells in the horizontal direction and 93 cells in the vertical direction is identical for each panel, it can be clearly seen that the transmission coefficient declines with increasing

  12. Solving the Solar Neutrino Problem 2 km Underground -- the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. P. Poon; for the SNO Collaboration

    2003-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is capable of measuring simultaneously the flux of electron-type neutrinos and the total flux of all active flavours of neutrinos originating from the Sun. A model-independent test of neutrino flavour transformation was performed by comparing these two measurements. Assuming an undistorted neutrino energy spectrum, this transformation has been definitively demonstrated in the pure D2O phase of the SNO experiment. In the second phase with dissolved NaCl in the D2O, the total active solar neutrino flux was measured without any assumption on the energy dependence of flavour transformation. In this talk, results from these measurements, their physics implications and the current status of the SNO experiment are presented.

  13. Wind: wind power density maps at 50m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    density for Ghana. (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential in Ghana. Data and Resources Download MapsZIP Download Maps More...

  14. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IMAGEGRID command. (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential in Cuba. Values range from 0 to 547. (Supplemental Information):...

  15. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    file, 50 m wind power density for eastern China. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential in eastern China. Values range from 0 to 3079 Wm2. (Supplemental...

  16. Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    density for Cuba. (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential in Cuba. Data and Resources Download MapsZIP Download Maps More...

  17. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Central America (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential within the following countries in Central America: Belize, El...

  18. Wind: wind power density maps at 50m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Central America. (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential within the following countries in Central America: Belize, El...

  19. Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PDF maps of Eastern China wind mapping. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential in eastern China. Includes maps of full mapping region, and 15...

  20. File:NREL-afg-10km-dir.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,SizeEthiopiametstak.pdfMFSA06-2012 (1).pdfBioMap.pdf

  1. File:NREL-afg-10km-glo.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,SizeEthiopiametstak.pdfMFSA06-2012

  2. File:NREL-afg-10km-tilt.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,SizeEthiopiametstak.pdfMFSA06-2012Afghanistan - Annual

  3. Single-Column Modeling D. A. Randall and K.-M. Xu Colorado State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan McCorkleSingin' in the RainC.J. SomervilleD. A.

  4. Microsoft Word - 802.11i Rec Practices _KM-BL final edit ver 10_.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC) Richard2015MountainLLCFebruary 2014 FORNewsINLSecuring WLANs

  5. Microsoft Word - Sri_Lanka_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 JuneNepalLanka

  6. I?raak Nuke, NXOO Leaa Km&l, NY00

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c* -W. ti.

  7. Comparison And Discussion Of The 6 Km Temperature Maps Of The Western Us

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York:GovernorCommons Capital* NREL/SR-550-28329

  8. 48Deep Impact Comet Encounter On July 4, 2005 at 5:45 UT the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the impact ejected 10,000,000 kilograms of comet material, we will ignore this effect since the comet's mass nucleus and deliver a blast, whose energy is equal to that of a 7.5 x 10 8 kilogram kilogram Impactor,000,000 kilograms of comet material, we will ignore this effect since the comet's mass was over 45 trillion

  9. Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter.

  10. Association of the threespot damelsfish (Stegastes planifrons) in ridge mortality of Diploria strigosa in the flower garden banks of the National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proppe, Darren Sean

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of ridge mortality, however, they do establish a relationship between S. planifrons and ridge mortality. Introduction: The East and West Hower Gardens banks, located in the Northwest Gulf of Mexico, about 180 km south southeast of Galveston, Texas... of the two banks are 19 km apart The banks occupy an area of over 300 acres and are sepamted from the neatest coral reefs off Tampico, Mexico, by more than 500 kilometers (Bright, Gittings, Rezak 90). Due to this isolauon, the Hower Gardens are rehtively...

  11. Observations from 1 km beneath to 25 km above the sea surface reveal the complex interactions in Indian Ocean westerly wind bursts associated with the MaddenJulian oscillation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    velocity profile measurements using W-band Doppler radar and high-resolution Doppler lidar; · continuousC-bandDopplerradarscansmeasuring radial velocity and radar reflectivity; · particle size distributions and chemical composi- tion of aeros by a sustained period of warming moderated by the cooling effect of ocean turbulence. Our pur- pose here

  12. The Savannah River Site is a 803 km2 (310 square mile) industrial complex operated by the Department of Energy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    clearing and frequent burning for agriculture were extensive. European settlement subjected streams to cattle grazing followed by timber harvest, and intensive agriculture. Effects of the latter are evidenced was a monumental task. Networks of roads and railroads, power plants, five nuclear reactors as well as production

  13. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 21, 2011 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13:29.1 Carlo Benedetti 30-39 men 19 57 13:31.2 Jim K Chiu 50-59 men 3 58 13:34.1 Andrew McNeil 30:42.4 Matthias W Reinsch 40-49 men 10 62 13:44.9 Andrew Canning 40-49 men 11 63 13:46.2 Nathan Patrick Craig men 20 64 13:53.1 Norman L Zhu 30-39 men 22 65 13:54.8 Vamsi K Vytla

  14. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 0.2 0.4 Velocity (km/s) Poisson's Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crone, Timothy J.

    with observations. This inconsistency will be corrected in future models, but does not affect the basic conclusions

  15. Void bounds for fluid transport in sea ice K.M. Golden a,*, A.L. Heaton a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    ice is a porous composite of pure ice with brine, air and salt inclusions whose microstructure varies and biological processes. Yet little is known, for example, about bulk flow of brine or diffusive transport dynamics in sea ice: estimating the effective fluid permeability tensor k(/) and its dependence on brine

  16. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 2008 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angelis 9:56.6 Dilworth Y Parkinson 2 14:47.2 Katie Antypas 10:24.3 Gregory L Hura 3 15:28.8 Cindy H Wu 11-39 men 1 2 10:23.6 Ying Wu L Hura 30-39 men 2 4 10:31.2 Ryan C Ogliore:43.5 Emanuele Pedersoli L Fischer 40-49 men 10 53 13:46.2 Scott D Gradia not circled

  17. The operation involved two B3 helicopters using under slung buckets flying the 20 km from a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    on the island 24hrs and 7days after the final drop. Laboratory testing found no residue and the rahui was lifted a public seminar was also given to the Faroese Biologist and Ornithologist Societies, and a television

  18. Mean vertical wind in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere region (80120 km) deduced from the WINDII observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    thermosphere. It is a remote-sensing instrument providing the hori- zontal wind components. In this study at the equator and tropics. Zonal Coriolis acceleration and adiabatic heating and cooling rate associated subsidence heating and adiabatic cool- ing. Thus the knowledge of meridional and vertical winds provides

  19. [Km 100 to 1000 mM (17)] and to S. cerevisiae hexose transporters' apparent affinity for glucose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severson, David

    to biofuel-producing strains of yeast (Fig. 3) over- comes a major bottleneck to fermentation of lignocellulosic feedstocks and probably will help to make cellulosic biofuels economically viable. References, Biocatalysis Biotransform. 27, 27 (2009). 17. M. Chauve et al., Biotechnol. Biofuels 3, 3 (2010). 18. K. A

  20. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 0.2 0.4 Velocity (km/s) Poisson's Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crone, Timothy J.

    ' (10), and Darcy's equation (11). Several studies of submarine hydrothermal systems have shown Medium Inflowing Fluid at Elevated Temperatures Seafloor Figure 9. Steady state temperature and Darcy.42, porosity of 0.25, and a permeability of 10-14 m2 . Figure 10. Darcy velocities of the fluid exiting

  1. KM Central, ICASIT List of Ph.D. Dissertations & Theses, ProQuest Direct -in Knowledge Management from 1991 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lien, Jyh-Ming

    -technical investigation of the determinants of knowledge management systems usage Al-Busaidi, Kamla Ali Ph-level instructional renewal Edge, Karen Ph.D. University of Toronto (Canada) 197 NR02925 12 Knowledge management

  2. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) September 14, 1990 Place Time Name Group Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­49 2 34 12:09.6 Leo Greiner Stephen Christie 30­39 9 36 12:11.7 Jean-Michel Nataf Stephen Derenzo 40­49 6 70 13:27.7 William Jagust 30­39 32 115 14:30.1 Tom Taylor 40­49 15 116 14:31.8 Jason Ross

  3. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 2.95 km (1.84 mi) September 16, 1988 Envelope Time Name Group Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    22 36 12:13.1 Tom Swain 38 70 12:58.6 Mike Kollrack Stephen Derenzo 40-49 7 72 13:07.2 James C. Bartholomew:32.7 Craig Jacobson Tom

  4. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) September 22, 1995 Dummy first body page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 5 10:40.0 Greg Klunder 30-39 4 6 10:40.8 Stephen Lockett 30-39 5 7 10:41.7 Greg Klein 30-39 6 8 10 Huesman Tom West 40-49 3 57 12:48.7 Mohan Kalyanaraman :34.3 Stephen Leland

  5. LBL RUNAROUND 3.00 km (1.865 mi) September 19, 1986 page 1 Place Time Name Group Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :28.8 Daniel Strongin Tom Rucker 12:09.4 Orin Dahl 50-59 1 35 12:10.5 Tom Swain Yaeger 40-49 3 41 12:38.4 Stephen Derenzo 40-49 4 42 12:38.7 Laisheng Wang

  6. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 8, 2010 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -49 men 12 58 13:23.1 Nicholas S Norberg 30-39 men 15 59 13:25.4 Sergi Molins Rafa 30-39 men 16 60 13

  7. Iceberg size and orientation estimation using SeaWinds K.M. Stuart, D.G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    processes. For instance, iceberg positions affect shipping lanes, outline ocean currents, and influence but are unable to penetrate cloud cover and are dependent on solar illumination. Despite the high Ocean has also been documented. Even though SeaWinds was never designed to track icebergs, an extensive

  8. Mesoscale Systems: weather associated with circulation systems of horizontal scales of 5 to 1,000 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    Mesoscale Systems: weather associated with circulation systems of horizontal scales of 5 to 1 faster at night #12;Dispersion in Mesoscale Systems Mesoscale systems can have large effects on pollution

  9. A Proposal for a Detector 2 km Away From the T2K Neutrino May 30, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    energies. High energy muons which exit the water Cherenkov detector will be measured by an iron muon ranger Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Warszawa (Poland): D. Kielczewska1 H.Niewodnicza´nski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krak´ow (Poland): A. Szelc, A. Zalewska Institute for Nuclear Research RAS

  10. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) September 24, 1993 Place Time Name GroupGroup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :49 Charles Taberski 40-49 1 16 11:54 Arild Larsen :10 Keith Lewis 30-39 17 53 13:10 Carlos Solis, Jr.

  11. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 9, 2009 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :55.5 Dilworth Y Parkinson 30-39 men 1 6 10:59.9 Justin Paul Ishida -39 women 1 65 13:57.5 Kang Wei Chou

  12. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 1997 Place Time Name Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9:45.0 Etien, Robert Paul 30-39 1 3 10:04.8 Farias, Leonel 30-39 2 4:06.6 Volfbeyn, Paul , Jens 30-39 28 63 13:18.8 Lewis, Keith 40-49 5 64 13:19.1 Chou, Peter

  13. Multiphase Flow Metering: An Overview Manoj Kumar KM, Senior Scientist, Non-destructive Evaluation Lab, GE Global Research,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.SolarUS DeptMultilateralMultimediaScienceMultiphase

  14. Data Release Report for Source Physics Experiment 1 (SPE-1), Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Margaret [NSTec] [NSTec; Mercadente, Jennifer [NSTec] [NSTec

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The first Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-1) was conducted in May 2011. The explosive source was a ~100-kilogram TNT-equivalent chemical set at a depth of 60 meters. It was recorded by an extensive set of instrumentation that includes sensors both at near-field (less than 100 meters) and far-field (more than 100 meters) distances. The near-field instruments consisted of three-component accelerometers deployed in boreholes around the shot and a set of singlecomponent vertical accelerometers on the surface. The far-field network comprised a variety of seismic and acoustic sensors, including short-period geophones, broadband seismometers, three-component accelerometers, and rotational seismometers at distances of 100 meters to 25 kilometers. This report coincides with the release of these data for analysts and organizations that are not participants in this program. This report describes the first Source Physics Experiment and the various types of near-field and far-field data that are available.

  15. Threadleaf Groundsel and Forage Response to Herbicides in the Davis Mountains.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, R.D.; Ueckert, D.N.; Nelson J.T.; Cox, J.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    groundsel. MATERIALS AND METHODS Description of the Study Area The study was conducted on the Billy and Tommy Weston Ranch , 6.4 kilometers (km) southeast of Fort Davis , Texas in Jeff Davis County. Elevation of the study area is 1,524 m and average... to the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo for partial financial support of this research, to Billy and Tommy Weston for providing land for the research, to Dr. Charles E. Gates for assistance with statistical analyses , to Brad Lisenbee for assistance...

  16. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

  17. I.-S. Kang K. Jin B. Wang K.-M. Lau J. Shukla V. Krishnamurthy S.D. Schubert D.E. Wailser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, In-Sik

    to the climatological intraseasonal oscillation (CISO). In contrast to the model composite, several models fail- ond. The CISO of precipitation is also examined over the Indian monsoon and the East Asia

  18. Web Note A for "Polymorphic karyotypic suppression of a somatic recombinational pathway for loss of heterozygosity", K.M. Haigis & W.F. Dove Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dove, William

    -210.71 5 8 3 1 2 2 3 1 1 0 1 -212.46 4 4 7 1 2 3 4 1 0 0 0 -210.76 5 9 4 1 2 3 4 1 1 1 1 -212.55 5 40

  19. the Earth's) at a distance of 100 km that lasts for 100 s after an . For Vredefort, these are minimum values because the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet,

    : Vredefort, South Africa. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 137, 232­245 (1999). 8. Hart, R. J., Hargraves, R. B

  20. Dombroski, M.J. and K.M. Carley, October, 2002, "NETEST: Estimating a Terrorist Network's Structure," Computational & Mathematical Organization Theory, 8, pp. 235-241.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    ," Computational & Mathematical Organization Theory, 8, pp. 235 & Mathematical Organization Theory, 8, pp. 235 and asymmetric form of warfare against elusive terrorist organizations. Defense and investigative organizations

  1. Upper mantle seismic velocity variations beneath northern Tanza-nia coupled with the structure of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritsema, Jeroen

    of the litho- sphere or by a broad thermal upwelling extending from the lower mantle into the upper mantle: plume, rift, eastAfrica, craton. INTRODUCTION Although eastAfrica has long been regarded as a classic. 1). In the first study, relative traveltimes from P and S waves were inverted for upper mantle

  2. Development and evolution of detachment faulting along 50 km of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 16.5ºN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Deborah K.; Schouten, Hans; Dick, Henry; Cann, Joe; Salters, Vincent; Marschall, Horst R.; Ji, Fuwu; Yoerger, Dana; Sanfilippo, Alessio; Parnell-Turner, Ross; Palmiotto, Camilla; Zheleznov, Alexei; Bai, Hailong; Junkin, Will; Urann, Ben; Dick, Spencer; Sulanowska, Margaret; Lemmond, Peter; Curry, Scott

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    (CTD) profiler; 5) Seapoint optical backscatter 145 sensor; 6) Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) sensor; 7) An electrochemical (Eh) sensor 146 supplied by K. Nakamura; 8) Digital still camera with 1 megapixel resolution; and 9) Dual 3-147 Axis...

  3. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) September 16, 1994 Place Time Name GroupGroup Place Time Name GroupGroup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blodgett 30-39 4 63 12:59.0 Tom McVeigh 40-49 5 6 10:33.9 Doug Crawford 30-39 5 64 13:00.8 Robert Meierhans:13.3 John Byrd 30-39 30 9 10:52.9 Steve Lindaas Stephen:45.1 Tom Swain 30-39 35 27 11:46.7 Bob Ajemian 30-39 15 85 13:45.9 Mark Turner 30-39 36 28 11:50.9 Bernhard

  4. The Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada, was the site for a 12-kiloton-ton nuclear test

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV&--I33NY&~ '

  5. Determinants of multiple measures of acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D.J.; Anderson, J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical analyses of the acceleration capability of gasoline vehicles have focused on zero to 97 km/h acceleration rates and have concluded that peak power per kilogram is an appropriate single surrogate for acceleration capability. In this paper, statistical methods are used with data for 107 vehicles tested and reported by Consumers Union for 1986--1988 model years to estimate the determinants of contemporary gasoline vehicle acceleration capability under various conditions, adding new variables to the statistical tests reported by others. Like previous studies, this analysis determined that power and weight provide the most information about acceleration capability. Using a model formulation unlike other studies, this study found that engine displacement also provides statistically significant improvements in explanation of 0-48, 0-97, and 48-97 km/h acceleration times. The coefficients of the equations imply that the use of smaller displacement engines, holding peak power constant, diminishes start-up and 0-97 km/h acceleration capability. A separate equation is estimated to illustrate the effects of advanced engine technologies on displacement, controlling for power. This equation is used in conjunction with the acceleration equations to illustrate a method of estimating performance-equivalent engine substitutions when engine technologies change. Transmission type was important for start-up acceleration, with automatic-transmission-equipped vehicles being significantly slower than stick-shift-equipped vehicles. Fuel injection was found to significantly improve start-up acceleration. Variables proxying aerodynamic-drag effects tended to be significant determinants of acceleration in the higher-speed equations, but not for start-up acceleration. Estimated aerodynamic drag effects indicated that drag slows down 0-97, 48-97, and 72-105 km/h acceleration of pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles more than passenger cars and vans.

  6. Folio PreVIEWS - Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from hazardous waste. Concentration: The quantity of a substance in a unit of sample media (e.g., milligrams per liter, or micrograms per kilogram). Confined aquifer: A...

  7. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    500/kW Anode tail gas Hydrogen Engine Gen-Set ICE/Generatorliter V-10 engine and about 26 kilograms of hydrogen, stored

  8. 2D monolayers could yield thinnest solar cells ever

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have shown how using a different type of material could yield thinner, more lightweight solar panels that provide power densities - watts per kilogram of material - orders of...

  9. US, Kazakhstan Cooperate to Eliminate Highly Enriched Uranium...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of 36 kilograms (approximately 80 pounds) of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuel from the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) in Almaty, Kazakhstan. The HEU was...

  10. Microsoft Word - NMMSS Newsletter December 2014 Final.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uranium) or one kilogram or more of foreign-obligated source material (natural uranium, depleted uranium, or thorium). Most NRC licensees report to NMMSS by calendar year. This...

  11. BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMfSSIOd. 63 1806.. ...................................

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    running on the pole. The weight of the rope,which is of hemp, is about 1,450 kilograms. When the harpoon

  12. Arguments for a "U.S. Kamioka": SNOLab and its Implications for North American Underground Science Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. C. Haxton; K. A. Philpott; Robert Holtz; Philip Long; J. F. Wilkerson

    2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue for a cost-effective, long-term North American underground science strategy based on partnership with Canada and initial construction of a modest U.S. Stage I laboratory designed to complement SNOLab. We show, by reviewing the requirements of detectors now in the R&D phase, that SNOLab and a properly designed U.S. Stage I facility would be capable of meeting the needs of North America's next wave of underground experiments. We discuss one opportunity for creating a Stage I laboratory, the Pioneer tunnel in Washington State, a site that could be developed to provide dedicated, clean, horizontal access. This unused tunnel, part of the deepest (1040 m) tunnel system in the U.S., would allow the U.S. to establish, at low risk and low cost, a laboratory at a depth (2.12 km.w.e., or kilometers of water equivalent) quite similar to that of the Japanese laboratory Kamioka (2.04 km.w.e.). We describe studies of cosmic ray attenuation important to properly locating such a laboratory, and the tunnel improvements that would be required to produce an optimal Stage I facility. We also discuss possibilities for far-future Stage II (3.62 km.w.e.) and Stage III (5.00 km.w.e.) developments at the Pioneer tunnel, should future North American needs for deep space exceed that available at SNOLab.

  13. The Relative Abundance of Desert Tortoises on the Nevada Test Site within Ecological Landform Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Woodward, Kurt R. Rautenstrauch, Derek B. Hall, and W. Kent Ostler

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sign-survey transects were sampled in 1996 to better determine the relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These transects were sampled within ecological land-form units (ELUs), which are small, ecologically homogeneous units of land. Two-hundred and six ELUs were sampled by walking 332 transects totaling 889 kilometers (km) (552 miles [mi]). These ELUs covered 528 km{sup 2} (204 mi{sup 2}). Two-hundred and eighty-one sign were counted. An average of 0.32 sign was found per km walked. Seventy percent of the area sampled had a very low abundance of tortoises, 29 percent had a low abundance, and 1 percent had a moderate abundance. A revised map of the relative abundance of desert tortoise on the NTS is presented. Within the 1,330 km{sup 2} (514 mi{sup 2}) of desert tortoise habitat on the NTS, 49 percent is classified as having no tortoises or a very low abundance, 18 percent has a low or moderate abundance, 12 percent is unclassified land being used by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, and the remaining 21 percent still has an unknown abundance of desert tortoises. Based on the results of this work, the amount of tortoise habitat previously classified as having an unknown or low-moderate abundance, and on which clearance surveys and on-site monitoring was required, has been reduced by 20 percent.

  14. The relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site within ecological landform units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, R. [Bechtel National (United States); Rautenstrauch, K.R. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States); Hall, D.B.; Ostler, W.K. [Bechtel Nevada (United States)

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sign-survey transects were sampled in 1996 to better determine the relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These transects were sampled within ecological land-form units (ELUs), which are small, ecologically homogeneous units of land. Two-hundred and six ELUs were sampled by walking 332 transects totaling 889 kilometers (km). These ELUs covered 528 km{sup 2}. Two-hundred and eight-one sign were counted. An average of 0.32 sign was found per km walked. Seventy percent of the area sampled had a very low abundance of tortoises, 29% had a low abundance, and 1% had a moderate abundance. A revised map of the relative abundance of desert tortoise on the NTS is presented. Within the 1,330 km{sup 2} of desert tortoise habitat on the NTS, 49% is classified as having no tortoises or a very low abundance, 18% has a low or moderate abundance, 12% is unclassified land being used by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, and the remaining 21% still has an unknown abundance of desert tortoises. Based on the results of this work, the amount of tortoise habitat previously classified as having an unknown or low-moderate abundance, and on which clearance surveys and on-site monitoring was required, has been reduced by 20%.

  15. THE WAVE PROPERTIES OF CORONAL BRIGHT FRONTS OBSERVED USING SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, David M.; DeLuca, Edward E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gallagher, Peter T., E-mail: longda@tcd.ie [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coronal bright fronts (CBFs) are large-scale wavefronts that propagate through the solar corona at hundreds of kilometers per second. While their kinematics have been studied in detail, many questions remain regarding the temporal evolution of their amplitude and pulse width. Here, contemporaneous high cadence, multi-thermal observations of the solar corona from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) and Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft are used to determine the kinematics and expansion rate of a CBF wavefront observed on 2010 August 14. The CBF was found to have a lower initial velocity with weaker deceleration in STEREO observations compared to SDO observations ({approx}340 km s{sup -1} and -72 m s{sup -2} as opposed to {approx}410 km s{sup -1} and -279 m s{sup -2}). The CBF kinematics from SDO were found to be highly passband-dependent, with an initial velocity ranging from 379 {+-} 12 km s{sup -1} to 460 {+-} 28 km s{sup -1} and acceleration ranging from -128 {+-} 28 m s{sup -2} to -431 {+-} 86 m s{sup -2} in the 335 A and 304 A passbands, respectively. These kinematics were used to estimate a quiet coronal magnetic field strength range of {approx}1-2 G. Significant pulse broadening was also observed, with expansion rates of {approx}130 km s{sup -1} (STEREO) and {approx}220 km s{sup -1} (SDO). By treating the CBF as a linear superposition of sinusoidal waves within a Gaussian envelope, the resulting dispersion rate of the pulse was found to be {approx}8-13 Mm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. These results are indicative of a fast-mode magnetoacoustic wave pulse propagating through an inhomogeneous medium.

  16. TECI-INICAL RGPORT A-78-3 MECHANICAL HARVESTING OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    plants from the harvesting site or area to the takeout point on the water-land interface. Once there1I1a'IJ. TECI-INICAL RGPORT A-78-3 MECHANICAL HARVESTING OF AQUATIC PLANTS R.rtl FIELD EVALUATION cubic metre kilograms kilograms per sCluare metre Fl #12;MECHANICAL HARVESTING OF AQUATIC PLANTS FIELD

  17. Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR’s Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoqing Wu

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations.

  18. The Highest Energy Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays and Neutrinos: Facts, Fancy and Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2001-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Although cosmic rays were discovered 90 years ago, we do not know how and where they are accelerated. There is compelling evidence that the highest energy cosmic rays are extra-galactic -- they cannot be contained by our galaxy's magnetic field anyway because their gyroradius exceeds its dimensions. Elementary elementary-particle physics dictates a universal upper limit on their energy of $5\\times10^{19}$ eV, the so-called Greisen-Kuzmin-Zatsepin cutoff; however, particles in excess of this energy have been observed, adding one more puzzle to the cosmic ray mystery. Mystery is nonetheless fertile ground for progress: we will review the facts and mention some very speculative interpretations. There is indeed a realistic hope that the oldest problem in astronomy will be resolved soon by ambitious experimentation: air shower arrays of $10^4$ km$^2$ area, arrays of air Cerenkov detectors and kilometer-scale neutrino observatories.

  19. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. N. Doyle

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The site is located within the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (R-MAD) compound and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding areas within an existing fenced area measuring approximately 50 x 37 meters (160 x 120 feet). The site was used from the early 1960s to the early 1970s as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program to decontaminate test-car hardware and tooling. The site was reactivated in the early 1980s to decontaminate a radiologically contaminated military tank. This Closure Report (CR) describes the closure activities performed to allow un-restricted release of the R-MAD Decontamination Facility.

  20. Submesoscale dispersion in the vicinity of the Deepwater Horizon spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poje, Andrew C; Lipphardt,, Bruce; Haus, Brian K; Ryan, Edward H; Haza, Angelique C; Reniers, A J H M; Olascoaga, Josefina; Novelli, Guillaume; Beron-Vera, Francisco J; Chen, Shuyi; Mariano, Arthur J; Jacobs, Gregg; Hogan, Pat; Coelho, Emanuel; Kirwan,, A D; Huntley, Helga; Griffa, Annalisa

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable forecasts for the dispersion of oceanic contamination are important for coastal ecosystems, society and the economy as evidenced by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 and the Fukushima nuclear plant incident in the Pacific Ocean in 2011. Accurate prediction of pollutant pathways and concentrations at the ocean surface requires understanding ocean dynamics over a broad range of spatial scales. Fundamental questions concerning the structure of the velocity field at the submesoscales (100 meters to tens of kilometers, hours to days) remain unresolved due to a lack of synoptic measurements at these scales. \\textcolor{black} {Using high-frequency position data provided by the near-simultaneous release of hundreds of accurately tracked surface drifters, we study the structure of submesoscale surface velocity fluctuations in the Northern Gulf Mexico. Observed two-point statistics confirm the validity of classic turbulence scaling laws at 200m$-$50km scales and clearly indicate tha...

  1. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) interaction with electric power systems. Power Systems Technology Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high altitude nuclear burst, detonated at a height of 50 km or more, causes two types of electromagnetic pulses (EMP) - high altitude EMP (HEMP) and magnetohydrodynamic EMP (MHD-EMP). This high altitude EMP scenario is of principal concern when assessing the effects of EMP on electric power systems, because the total United States can be simultaneously illuminated by HEMP and MHD-EMP can cover a large area of up to several hundred kilometers in diameter. The purpose of this project was first to define typical electrical power system characteristics for EMP analysis, and second, to determine reasonable worst case EMP induced surges on overhead electric power system transmission and distribution lines for reasonable assumptions, using unclassified HEMP and MHD-EMP electric field waveforms.

  2. The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

  3. Evaluation of hypotheses for the cause of the 1886 Charleston earthquake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, R.M.; Long, L.T. (Law Environmental, Inc., Kennesaw, GA (USA); Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a geophysical/geological investigation of the earth's crust at seismogenic depths in the Charleston, South Carolina area. This investigation was made for the purpose of narrowing the range of theories that have been used to explain the historic 1886 Charleston earthquake. Since a number of these theories are based on only a portion of the available data, we have established a comprehensive data set in order to allow these hypotheses to be subjected to the entire data set. Specifically, we combined existing and new gravity, magnetic and topographic data in grids of 128 km, 256 km and 1028 km on a side centered on Charleston. Seismic, geologic and drilling data were collected and summarized. A magnetotelluric survey consisting of 12 soundings interpreted to depths of over 40 kilometers defined the bottom of the rigid crust with assistance from seismic reflection and other data. A geologic model of the crust in the area of Charleston was constructed and it defined the locations of Triassic/Jurassic basins Paleozoic plutons in greater detail than has previously been achieved. 102 refs., 75 figs.

  4. Gigantic Ordovician volcanic ash fall in North America and Europe: Biological, tectonomagmatic, and event-stratigraphic significance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, W.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Bergstroem, S.M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States)); Kolata, D.R. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biostratigraphical, geochemical, isotopic, and paleogeographic data suggest that the Millbrig K-bentonite, one of the thickest and most widespread Ordovician volcanic ash beds in eastern North America, is the same as the so-called 'Big Bentonite' in Baltoscandia. This is the first time that the same K-bentonite has been identified in both North America and Europe, and it serves as a unique event-stratigraphic marker over a large portion of the Northern Hemisphere. This eruption produced at least 340 km[sup 3] of dense-rock-equivalent ash that was deposited in a layer up to 1-2 m thick over several million square kilometers. As much as 800 km[sup 3] of additional ash may have fallen into the Iapetus Ocean, for a total of 1,140 km[sup 3]. Trace element geochemistry shows that the ash was derived from a felsic calc-alkalic magmatic source characteristic of volcanism in a continental crust-based, destructive plate-margin setting. This is one of the largest, if not the largest, ash falls recorded in Earth's Phanerozoic stratigraphic record, but its recognizable effect on faunas and floras was minimal, and it did not result in a global extinction event. The Millbrig-Big Bentonite bed provides accurate time control for sedimentologic, paleoecologic, and paleogeographic reconstructions across plates positioned in tropical (Laurentia) and temperate (Baltica) latitudes during Middle Ordovician time.

  5. Atmosphere of a sunspot based on observations in the x-ray, extreme ultraviolet, optical, and radio ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staude, J.; Fuerstenberg, F.; Hildebrandt, J.; Krueger, A.; Jakimiec, J.; Obridko, V.N.; Siarkowski, M.; Sylwester, B.; Sylwester, J.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the lower chromosphere of an umbra is best described within the framework of a model close to that of Teplitskaya et al. This model can be extended to higher levels using a large temperature gradient, so that Troughly-equal40 000 K and an electron density n/sub e/roughly-equal4x10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/ are reached at a height zroughly-equal2000 km above the umbral photosphere. These values are defined by the EUV data of the HRTS instrument. At higher levels one must presume the existence of at least two components: The hot component, which occupies ..cap alpha..roughly-equal0.8--0.9 of the total volume, has a narrow transition layer, and the coronal values of Troughly-equal1.8x10/sup 6/ K and n/sub e/roughly-equal5x10/sup 8/ even at a height z = 3000--5000 km. These values are consistent both with the absence of an x-ray emission flux above large sunspots and with the high brightness temperature T/sub b/ = 1.8x10/sup 6/ K of emission in the centimeter range from the same region. This hot coronal matter surrounds the bases of cool loops emerging from the umbra in the form of bundles, and they emit the EUV lines observed at 10/sup 4/< or =T< or =10/sup 6/ K. In the corona the z dependence of all the physical quantities, including ..cap alpha.., over a distance of several thousand kilometers can be taken as weak. Along the axis of a loop T grows slowly, the loops become more horizontal, and at distances and heights of several tens of thousands of kilometers above a flocculus they appear as hot x-ray loops.

  6. Greenhouse Gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE): Evaluation of a new method to look at high resolution spatial/temporal distributions of carbon over key sub km sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobler, Jeremy; Zaccheo, T. Scott; Blume, Nathan; Braun, Michael; Perninit, Timothy; McGregor, Doug; Botos, Chris; Dobeck, Laura

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently a new laser based approach for measuring area with potential for producing 2D estimates of the concentration spatial distribution has been developed through a cooperative agreement with the National Energy and Technology Laboratory of the Department of Energy, Exelis Inc. and AER Inc. The new approach is based on a pair of continuous wave intensity modulated laser absorption spectrometer transceivers, combined with a series of retro reflectors located around the perimeter of the area being monitored. The main goal of this cooperative agreement is monitoring, reporting and verification for ground carbon capture and storage projects. The system was recently tested at the Zero Emission Research and Technology site in Bozeman, MT, with underground leak rates ranging from 0.1 – 0.3 metric ton per day (T/d), as well as a 0.8 T/d surface release. Over 200 hours of data were collected over a rectangular grid 180m x 200m between August 18th and September 9th. In addition, multiple days of in situ data were acquired for the same site, using a Licor gas analyzer systems. Initial comparisons between the laser-based system and the in situ agree very well. The system is designed to operate remotely and transmit the data via a 3G/4G connection along with weather data for the site. An all web-based system ingests the data, populates a database, performs the inversion to ppm CO2 using the Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM), and displays plots and statistics for the retrieved data. We will present an overview of the GreenLITE measurement system, outline the retrieval and reconstruction approach, and discuss results from extensive field testing.

  7. Smoke consisting of mixtures of dust and industrial pollution covering the Forbidden City, Beijing, China. BY K.-M. LAU, V. RAMANATHAN, G.-X. WU, Z. LI, S. C. TSAY, C. HSU, R. SIKKA, B. HOLBEN, D. LU,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    ) regions have found that anthropogenic aerosols may signifi- cantly change the energy balance government agencies from China, India, Italy, Japan, and the United States. At the workshop, par- ticipants of related national research programs in China, India, Japan, Italy, and the United States

  8. ... als erstes bilden wir eine 68,6 km lange Menschenkette! Wenn wir uns an den Hnden fassen, knnen wir die Standorte der TUM in Mnchen, Garching und Weihenstephan verbin-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiz, Ulrich

    , können wir die Standorte der TUM in München, Garching und Weihenstephan verbin- den ­ und schaffen es in Munich, Garching and Weihenstephan ­ and even reach as far as the airport. From there, we could jump

  9. PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF SINGLET CAPTURE IN HYDROGEN V.A. Andreev , T. Banks , L. Bonnet , R.M. Carey , T.A. Case , D. Chitwood , S.M. Clayton , K.M. Crowe , P.T. Debevec ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammel, Peter

    magnet which is a specially designed coil wound closely around the Alu vessel containing the TPC well-known of the nucleon charged current form factors, the induced pseudo- scalar "$# , to 7%. Mu detector (Aluminium pressure vessel housing the TPC) with magnetic field coil is retracted for preparing

  10. In the 1st experiment, gilts (LWX LR) belonging to a farm located 15 km away were exposed to the boar immediately after their arrival in the experimental farm. In the second

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    was probably due to an insufficient stimulation of adrenal glands and pituitary as shown by lower plasma levels of cortisol, LH and prolactin. The dexamethasone treatment retarded by about 70 hours the onset of first* Institut Technique du Yorc, 149, rue de Bercy, 75595 Paris Cedex 12 Sperm production of boars subjected

  11. Submerged Stories from the Sidelines of Archaeological Science: The History and Politics of the Keban Dam Rescue Project (1967-1975) in Eastern Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dissard, Laurent

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sits among trees beside a wadi, about one kilometer East ofvillage. Erosion by the wadi and a small irrigation ditch

  12. Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathenson, M.; Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nehring, N.L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Raft River area of Idaho contains a geothermal system of intermediate temperatures (approx. = 150/sup 0/C) at depths of about 1.5 km. Outside of the geothermal area, temperature measurements in three intermediate-depth drill holes (200 to 400 m) and one deep well (1500 m) indicate that the regional conductive heat flow is about 2.5 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/ sec or slightly higher and that temperature gradients range from 50/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/C/km in the sediments, tuffs, and volcanic debris that fill the valley. Within and close to the geothermal system, temperature gradients in intermediate-depth drill holes (100 to 350 m) range from 120/sup 0/ to more than 600/sup 0/C/km, the latter value found close to an artesian hot well that was once a hot spring. Temperatures measured in three deep wells (1 to 2 km) within the geothermal area indicate that two wells are in or near an active upflow zone, whereas one well shows a temperature reversal. Assuming that the upflow is fault controlled, the flow is estimated to be 6 liter/sec per kilometer of fault length. From shut-in pressure data and the estimated flow, the permeability times thickness of the fault is calculated to be 2.4 darcy m. Chemical analyses of water samples from old flowing wells, recently completed intermediate-depth drill holes, and deep wells show a confused pattern. Geothermometer temperatures of shallow samples suggest significant re-equilibration at temperatures below those found in the deep wells. Silica geothermometer temperatures of water samples from the deep wells are in reasonable agreement with measured temperatures, whereas Na-K-Ca temperatures are significantly higher than measured temperatures. The chemical characteristics of the water, as indicated by chloride concentration, are extremely variable in shallow and deep samples. Chloride concentrations of the deep samples range from 580 to 2200 mg/kg.

  13. Regional groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Iterative Performance Assessment, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahola, M.; Sagar, B. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain are presented. Both a regional (200 {times} 200 km) and subregional (50 {times} 50 km) model were used in the analyses. Simulations were conducted to determine the impact of various disruptive that might take place over the life span of a proposed Yucca Mountain geologic conditions repository on the groundwater flow field, as well as changes in the water-table elevations. These conditions included increases in precipitation and groundwater recharge within the regional model, changes in permeability of existing hydrogeologic barriers, a:nd the vertical intrusion of volcanic dikes at various orientations through the saturated zone. Based on the regional analysis, the rise in the water-table under Yucca Mountain due to various postulated conditions ranged from only a few meters to 275 meters. Results of the subregional model analysis, which was used to simulate intrusive dikes approximately 4 kilometers in length in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, showed water-table rises ranging from a few meters to as much as 103 meters. Dikes oriented approximately north-south beneath Yucca Mountain produced the highest water-table rises. The conclusions drawn from this analysis are likely to change as more site-specific data become available and as the assumptions in the model are improved.

  14. Corrective action decision document second gas station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403). Revision No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes}. The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-03 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (3 5 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service.

  15. Mesozoic rift basins in western desert of Egypt, their southern extension and impact on future exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, M.A. (Conoco, Cairo (Egypt))

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rift basins are a primary target of exploration in east, central, and west Africa. These intracratonic rift basins range in age from the Triassic to the Neogene and are filled with lagoonal-lacustrine sand-shale sequences. Several rift basins may be present in the Western Desert of Egypt. In the northeastern African platform, the Mesozoic Tethyan strand lines were previously interpreted to have limited southern extension onto the continent. This concept, based upon a relatively limited amount of subsurface data, has directed and focused the exploration for oil and gas to the northernmost 120 km of the Western Desert of Egypt. Recent well and geophysical data indicate a southerly extension of mesozoic rift basins several hundred kilometers inland from the Mediterranean Sea. Shushan/Faghur and Abu Gharadig/Bahrein basins may represent subparallel Mesozoic basins, trending northeast-southwest. Marine Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sediments were recently reported from wells drilled approximately 500 km south of the present-day Mediterranean shoreline. The link of these basins with the Sirte basin to the southwest in Libya is not well understood. Exploration is needed to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of such basins.

  16. Cenozoic basin development in Hispaniola

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, P.; Burke, K.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four distinct generations of Cenozoic basins have developed in Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) as a result of collisional or strike-slip interactions between the North America and Caribbean plates. First generation basins formed when the north-facing Hispaniola arc collided with the Bahama platform in the middle Eocene; because of large post-Eocene vertical movements, these basins are preserved locally in widely separated areas but contain several kilometers of arc and ophiolite-derived clastic marine sediments, probably deposited in thrust-loaded, flexure-type basins. Second generation basins, of which only one is exposed at the surface, formed during west-northwesterly strike-slip displacement of southern Cuba and northern Hispaniola relative to central Hispaniola during the middle to late Oligocene; deposition occurred along a 5-km (3-mi) wide fault-angle depression and consisted of about 2 km (1 mi) of submarine fan deposits. Third generation basins developed during post-Oligocene convergent strike-slip displacement across a restraining bend formed in central Hispaniola; the southern 2 basins are fairly symmetrical, thrust-bounded ramp valleys, and the third is an asymmetrical fault-angle basin. Fourth generation basins are pull-aparts formed during post-Miocene divergent strike-slip motion along a fault zone across southern Hispaniola. As in other Caribbean areas, good source rocks are present in all generations of basins, but suitable reservoir rocks are scarce. Proven reservoirs are late Neogene shallow marine and fluvial sandstones in third generation basins.

  17. Reduction Chemistry of Rare-Earth Metal Complexes: Toward New Reactivity and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wenliang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elsner, A. ; Milliken, M. As hybrid cars gobble rare metals,rare-earths are heavily used in fuel-efficient hybrid cars.In a leading model of hybrid car, 1 kilogram of neodymium

  18. Analysis of factor productivity in agricultural systems in Zimbabwe and application of Geographic Information Systems in soil erosion prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mugabe, Phanuel

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photographs were digitized into an Arc/Info GIS. This was used to determine the area under crops and grazing. Range forage production figures in kilograms per hectare for the area were obtained from Agricultural Technical and Extension Services inventories...

  19. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trucks converted to hydrogen ICE engines. The goal of theliter V-10 engine and about 26 kilograms of hydrogen, storedcombustion engine that will use the hydrogen for “on-demand”

  20. EA-1255: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to transport 5.26 kilograms of enriched uranium-23 5 in the form of nuclear fuel, from the Republic of Georgia to the United Kingdom.

  1. EA-1123: Transfer of Normal and Low-Enriched Uranium Billets to the United Kingdom, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to transfer approximately 710,000 kilograms (1,562,000 pounds) of unneeded normal and low-enriched uranium to the United Kingdom; thus,...

  2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Stardust-NExT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Power: Solar panels providing from 170 to 800 watts, depending on distance from the sun. Stardust (2.16 feet) deep; length of solar arrays 4.8 meters (15.9 feet) tip to tip Weight: 385 kilograms (848

  3. 2011 Robotics Challenge Saturday May 21, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    Detection and Removal Robot (BDAR-bot) LEVEL: Middle School ­ All Grades TYPE OF CONTEST: Team COMPOSITION uranium, to make a nuclear bomb. With nearly 2 million kilograms of each in existence in the world today

  4. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    430 million tonnes coal-equivalent energy use by 2025. More187 kilograms of coal equivalent primary energy use for eachof usable acquired energy from coal, oil and natural over

  5. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    ................................................................................................................. 8 #12;iv Conversion Factors Multiply By To obtain Mass metric ton (t, 1,000 kilograms) million to the emergence of new clean- energy and defense-related technologies, combined with China's decisions to restrict

  6. Design and manufacturing of an ion electrospray propulsion system package and passively-fed propellant supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perna, Louis Evan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellites under 500 kilograms have been growing more popular with the miniaturization of high-performance electronics and instruments. Constellations and formations of satellites consisting of thousands of small satellites ...

  7. albicans critical role: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    240 kilograms of plutonium oxide 5 Standards for Quality and the Coordinating Role of Wine Critics CiteSeer Summary: When product quality matters but is not observable before...

  8. 6 Explorations in Materials Science ICE Materials and Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    plastic weigh boats or other disposable containers kilogram weights, lead sinkers or sealable containers safety goggles hot plate Bunsen burner balance tongs aluminum foil plastic wrap petroleum jelly cotton

  9. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan‘s 2007 primary plastics demand of 107.95 kilograms perChina reaches a lower plastic demand level of 75 kilogramsper capita primary plastics demand was used to estimate per

  10. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can be produced from coal gasification at delivered costs ofper kilogram. Gasification of Coal and Other Hydrocarbons Inkg/day Small Coal Oxygen-blown Gasification 313,090 kg/day

  11. advanced plutonium fuels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offices. In addition to the plutonium, the feed stock also contains about 17 tonnes of depleted uranium, about 600 kg of highly enriched uranium, and many kilograms of neptunium...

  12. 51Gamma Ray Bubbles in the Milky Way NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has unveiled a previously

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of these bubbles A) in kilograms? B) in solar mass units if 1 SMU = 2.0 x 10 30 kg? Problem 3 - Suppose of these bubbles A) in kilograms? B) in solar mass units if 1 SMU = 2.0 x 10 30 kg? Answer: A) Mass in one cubic) In solar mass units M= 1.4 x 10 27 kg x (1 SMU/2.0x 10 30 kg) = 1.1 x 10 10 solar masses. Problem 3

  13. Preliminary Safety Analysis of the Gorleben Site: Geological Database - 13300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Jan Richard; Mrugalla, Sabine; Dresbach, Christian; Hammer, Joerg [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), 30655 Hannover, Stilleweg 2 (Germany)] [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), 30655 Hannover, Stilleweg 2 (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gorleben salt dome is 4 km wide and nearly 15 km long. It is composed of different salt rock types of the Zechstein (Upper Permian) series and extends to the Zechstein basis in a depth of more than 3 km. In the course of the salt dome formation the salt was moved several kilometers. During the uplift of the salt the initially plane-bedded strata of the Zechstein series were extensively folded. In this process anhydrite as a competent layer was broken to isolated blocks. In the core of the salt dome the Hauptsalz, which is characterized by a particularly high creeping capacity, forms a homogeneous halite body with a volume of several cubic kilometres. The Hauptsalz contains gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons in separated zones of decimeter to meter dimensions. The overall hydrocarbon content is far below 0.01 %. At the flanks the salt dome consists of salt rocks with lower creeping capacities. Brine reservoirs with fluid volumes in the range of liters to hundreds of cubic meters exist in certain regions of this part of the salt dome. The water content of the Hauptsalz is below 0.02 %. Interconnected pores do not exist in the salt rock outside of fluid bearing or fractured areas, i.e. the salt rock is impermeable. The exploration of the Gorleben site as a potential site for a HLW-repository started in 1979 and is still in progress. To date no scientific findings contest the suitability of the site for a safe HLW-repository. (authors)

  14. Density anomalies in the crust and upper mantle below the Tonga-Kermadec trench and below the Rio Grande Rift: implied magnitude and orientation of maximum shear stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mecham, Brent Bradshaw

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kilometers. A third model assumes partial isostatic compensation of the bathymetry, but adds a superimposed lithospheric slab sub- ducting into the trench, and suggests an oceanic crust thickness of 8 kilometers. A complete Bouguer gravity anomaly over... are presented, which successfully account for the observed gravity anomaly across the rift. The first model assumes a heat source, below a 35 kilometer thick continental crust, which promotes regular lateral changes in density due to the horizontal geothermal...

  15. Simulated Interdiction: Proliferation Security Initiative 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gassam, Geraldine; Jacob, Savio; Jenecka, Bobby; Lanzing, Kevin; Lee, Jeonghoon; Reves, Nick; Slanker, Julie; Trojan, Anthony; Wismer, Ryan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the European Union. Terrain: Vast central plains, mountains in West, hills and low mountains in east; rugged mountains and broad river valleys in Alaska, rugged volcanic topography in Hawaii. Border Length: Canada 8,893 kilometers, Mexico 3,141 kilometers... Area: approximately 17 million square kilometers. Terrain: broad plains with low hills west of primary mountain range; vast coniferous forest and tundra in central northern territory; uplands and mountains along southern border regions Border Length...

  16. Salt Tolerant Succulents -Grand CaymanSalt Tolerant Succulents -Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 50.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands National Biodiversity Action Plan wwwPonds, Pools and Mangrove Lagoons - Cayman Brac 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands NationalPools, Ponds and Mangrove Lagoons - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands National

  17. Recent Results From The Daya Bay Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao Zhang; for the Daya Bay Collaboration

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has observed the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors at $\\sim$kilometer baselines. The relative measurement of the $\\bar\

  18. Recent Results From The Daya Bay Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has observed the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors at $\\sim$kilometer baselines. The relative measurement of the $\\bar\

  19. A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the vents, being flanked or covered with volcaniclastic flow deposits. Each volcanic pile is several kilometers wide and several hundred meters thick, and overlaps one after...

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Technology and Engineering...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and incomplete understanding of the coupled processes related to fluid flow, geomechanics and geochemistry over scales from nanometers to kilometers. Activities proposed for...

  1. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for California Natural Gas Vehicles Partnership. ShanghaiReport for California Natural Gas Vehicles Partnership. CISfor compressed natural gas cars. 14 The vehicle kilometers

  2. ~ 15206 Station 7 Stat io 6 A 15415 } ~ 15455 ". ~ '15405

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    ;N t o.51 ,II KILOMETER olM0CRATER _6STATIONr-PHYSIOGRAPHIC BOUNDARY _-6 6A SPUR~7 ()DEX 8-0 -3 MARE

  3. achala sierras pampeanas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a kilometers-thick Paleozoic fault zone in the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, central Argentina Geosciences Websites Summary: . There are relatively few documented examples of...

  4. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KILOMETERS () = FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT NUMBER WITHIN PLANTKaupo o () = FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT NUMBER WITHIN PLANTSea o = o FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT HYDROELECTRIC GENERATING

  5. EUREKA WHITE PINE LYONCARSON CITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    DOUGLAS STOREY ESMERALDA 1 3 2 Geologic Mapping Digital 0 0 20 40 60 80 kilometers North 20 40 60 miles 1

  6. NERSC Supercomputers Help Explain the Last Big Freeze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic, where ocean currents would have transported it to the North Atlantic (near Greenland), allowing it to disrupt the ocean's heat engine. "With 18 kilometers between each...

  7. america project newsletter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equal Area 0 500 Kilometers. Ramankutty, et al. (2010). Global Fertilizer Application and Manure Production. Data distributed by the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center...

  8. ORNL part of new project to study how tropical forests worldwide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    better than ten kilometers. This is the resolution that next-generation Earth system models will achieve during the project's lifetime. The team will take advantage of...

  9. analog fiber-optic links: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meter to kilometer scales. Laboratory results demonstrate the feasibility of the heat pulse method implemented with fiber optic temperature sensing to obtain accurate distributed...

  10. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to the Dry Flats disposal site, 6 road miles (mi) [10 kilometers (km)] to the southeast. At the disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal site would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action activities would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The proposed remedial action would result in the loss of approximately 162 ac (66 ha) of soils at the processing and disposal sites; however, 133 ac (55 ha) of these soils at and adjacent to the processing site are contaminated and cannot be used for other purposes. If supplemental standards are approved by the NRC and state of Colorado, approximately 112 ac (45 ha) of contaminated soils adjacent to the processing site would not be cleaned up. This area is steeply sloped. The cleanup of this contamination would have adverse environmental consequences and would be potentially hazardous to remedial action workers. Another 220 ac (89 ha) of soils would be temporarily disturbed during the remedial action. The final disposal site would result in approximately 57 ac (23 ha) being removed from livestock grazing and wildlife use.

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 135, Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks (USTs), which is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

  12. Socioeconomic impact of photovoltaic power at Schuchulik, Arizona. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahr, D.; Garrett, B.G.; Chrisman, C.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Schuchuli, a small remote village on the Papago Indian Reservation in southwest Arizona, is 27 kilometers (17 miles) from the nearest available utility power. In some respects, Schuchuli resembles many of the rural villages in other parts of the world. For example, it's relatively small in size (about 60 residents), composed of a number of extended family groupings, and remotely situated relative to major population centers (190 km, or 120 miles, from Tucson). Its lack of conventional power is due to the prohibitive cost of supplying a small electrical load with a long-distance distribution line. Furthermore, alternate energy sources are expensive and place a burden on the resources of the villagers. On December 16, 1978, as part of a federally funded project, a solar cell power system was put into operation at Schuchuli. The system powers the village water pump, lighting for homes ad other village buildings, family refrigerators and a communal washing machine and sewing machine. The project, managed for the US Department of Energy by the NASA Lewis Research Center, provided for a one-year socio-economic study to assess the impact of a relatively small amount of electricity on the basic living environment of the villagers. The results of that study are presented, including village history, group life, energy use in general and the use of the photovoltaic-powered appliances. No significant impacts due to the photovoltaic power system were observed.

  13. Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, J.B.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fewer wells and less footage were drilled in 1986 compared to 1985. Total drilling decreased by 23% as 217 wells were completed compared to 289 in 1985. Footage drilled during 1986 declined by 52%; about 1.3 million ft were drilled compared to about 2.7 million feet in 1985. The success rate for exploration wells of 34% during 1986 is due to considerably higher success rates in Nigeria and Gabon compared to 1985. Significant discoveries were made in Nigeria, Angola, Congo, and Gabon. Seismic acquisition was the major geophysical activity during 1986. Seismic activity (2-D and 3-D) decreased by 12% to about 230 crew-months. Total 2-D seismic kilometers recorded increased by 26% to about 82,000 km due to significant 2-D marine seismic activity in Nigeria and Angola. Surface geology, photogeology, geochemistry, gravimetry, and aeromagnetic surveys decreased compared to 1985. Total oil production in 1986 was 834 million bbl (about 2.2 million BOPD), an increase of 2%, with the most significant increased in Cameroon and Angola. The production share of OPEC countries (Nigeria and Gabon) versus non-OPEC countries increased to 72% in 1986 compared to 67% in 1985. 32 figures, 5 tables.

  14. Magnetic field gradients in solar wind plasma and geophysics periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bershadskii

    2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Using recent data obtained by Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) the pumping scale of the magnetic field gradients of the solar wind plasma has been calculated. This pumping scale is found to be equal to 24h $\\pm$ 2h. The ACE spacecraft orbits at the L1 libration point which is a point of Earth-Sun gravitational equilibrium about 1.5 million km from Earth. Since the Earth's magnetosphere extends into the vacuum of space from approximately 80 to 60,000 kilometers on the side toward the Sun the pumping scale cannot be a consequence of the 24h-period of the Earth's rotation. Vise versa, a speculation is suggested that for the very long time of the coexistence of Earth and of the solar wind the weak interaction between the solar wind and Earth could lead to stochastic synchronization between the Earth's rotation and the pumping scale of the solar wind magnetic field gradients. This synchronization could transform an original period of the Earth's rotation to the period close to the pumping scale of the solar wind magnetic field gradients.

  15. X-ray Emission from Thunderstorms and Lightning

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Joseph Dwyer

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    How lightning is initiated in the relatively low electric fields inside thunderclouds and how it can then propagate for tens of kilometers through virgin air are two of the great unsolved problems in the atmospheric sciences.  Until very recently it was believed that lightning was entirely a conventional discharge, involving only low-energy (a few eV) electrons.  This picture changed completely a few years ago with the discovery of intense x-ray emission from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning.  This energetic emission cannot be produced by a conventional discharge, and so the presence of x-rays strongly implies that runaway breakdown plays a role in lightning processes.  During runaway breakdown, electrons are accelerated through air to nearly the speed of light by strong electric fields.  These runaway electrons then emit bremsstrahlung x-rays and gamma-rays during collisions with air.  Indeed, the x-ray and gamma-ray emission produced by runaway breakdown near the tops of thunderstorms is bright enough to be seen from outer space, 600 km away.  As a result, the physics used for decades to describe thunderstorm electrification and lightning discharges is incomplete and needs to be revisited. 

  16. Area 6 Decontamination Pond Corrective Action Unit 92 Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report for the Period January 2000-December 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Traynor

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Corrective Action Unit 92, was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP, 1995]) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (NDEP, 1996) on May 11, 1999. Historically the Decontamination Pond was used for the disposal of partially treated liquid effluent discharged from the Decontamination Facility (Building 6-05) and the Industrial Laundry (Building 6-07) (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1996). The Decontamination Pond was constructed and became operational in 1979. Releases of RCRA-regulated hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents have not been discharged to the Decontamination Pond since 1988 (DOE/NV, 1996). The pipe connecting the Decontamination Pond and Decontamination Facility and Industrial Laundry were cut and sealed at the Decontamination Pad Oil/Water Separator in 1992. The Decontamination Pond was closed in place by installing a RCRA cover. Fencing was installed around the periphery to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring at the site consists of quarterly inspections of the RCRA cover and fencing, and a subsidence survey. Additional inspections are conducted if: Precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period, or An earthquake occurs with a magnitude exceeding 4.5 on the Richter scale within 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) of the closure.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 406: Area 3 Building 03-74 and Building 03-58 Under ground Discharge Points and Corrective Action Unit 429: Area 3 Building 03-55 and Area 9 Building 09-52 Underground Discharge Points, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Underground Discharge Points (UDPs) included in both CAU 406 and CAU 429. The CAUs are located in Area 3 and Area 9 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

  18. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1999-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 423, Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (UDP) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CADD provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend a preferred corrective action for the single Corrective Action Site (CAS), 03-02-002-0308, within CAU 423. Corrective Action Unit 423 is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The TTR is approximately 255 kilometers (km) (140 miles[mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The UDP is approximately 73 meters (m) (240 feet [ft]) northwest of the northwest corner of Building 03-60, the Auto Maintenance Shop. Corrective Action Unit 423 is comprised of the UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60. The UDP received waste oil products from the Auto Maintenance Shop, a light-duty fleet maintenance shop in the Area 3 compound, from 1965 to 1989 or 1990 (DOE/NV, 1997).

  19. Emplacement of bitumen (asphalite) veins in the Nequen Basin, Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parnell, J.; Carey, P.F. [The Queen`s Univ. of Belfast (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Veins of solid bitumen (asphaltite) have been commerically exploited in the Neuquen basin, Argentina, for over 100 yr. Veins are up to 5 m wide and several kilometers in length, over a region of 15,000 km{sup 2}. These veins were emplaced in fractures both parallel and at high angles to bedding, in close proximity to their source rocks in the Vaca Muetra and Agrio formation (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous). Two or more phases of bitumen emplacement can be recognized in several localities; structures bearing viscous oil are younger than structures having solid bitumen. Bitumen emplacement was vigorous and caused brecciation and spalling of the host rocks. The bitumen was also viscous, and supports rock debris ranging in size from sand grains up to meter-scale slabs. Brecciation, bedding-parallel injection, and wall rock impregnation suggest high fluid pressures during emplacement. High fluid pressure may have been engendered by substantial hydrocarbon generation from rich source rocks in a low-permeability sequence, and probably caused the fractures into which the bitumen migrated. The bedding-parallel veins facilitated decollement during thrusting that took place during and after bitumen emplacement. The timing of emplacement relative to thrusting and oil migration constrains bitumen emplacement to the Eocene-Oligocene.

  20. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Falls City, Texas. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Falls City, Texas, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). The following plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. The Falls City site is in Karnes County, Texas, approximately 8 miles [13 kilometers southwest of the town of Falls City and 46 mi (74 km) southeast of San Antonio, Texas. Before surface remedial action, the tailings site consisted of two parcels. Parcel A consisted of the mill site, one mill building, five tailings piles, and one tailings pond south of Farm-to-Market (FM) Road 1344 and west of FM 791. A sixth tailings pile designated Parcel B was north of FM 791 and east of FM 1344.

  1. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita Uranium Processing Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform remedial action at the Naturita, Colorado, uranium processing site to reduce the potential health effects from the radioactive materials at the site and at vicinity properties associated with the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contain measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect groundwater quality. Remedial action at the Naturita site must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of Colorado. The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to either the Dry Flats disposal site, 6 road miles (mi) [10 kilometers (km)] to the southeast, or a licensed non-DOE disposal facility capable of handling RRM. At either disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed Dry Flats disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal site would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This report discusses environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action.

  2. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Remedial action selection report, Appendix B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small town of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated UMTRA sites at Slick Rock, the Union Carbide (UC) site and the North Continent (NC) site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The UC site is approximately 1 mile (mi) [2 kilometers (km)] downstream of the NC site. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres (ac) [22 hectares (ha)] at the UC site and 12 ac (4.9 ha) at the NC site. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 620, 000 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) [470,000 cubic meters (m{sup 3})]. In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, four vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into groundwater.

  3. Climatology of Mid-latitude Ionospheric Disturbances from the Very Large Array Low-frequency Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmboldt, J F; Cotton, W D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a climatological study of ionospheric disturbances derived from observations of cosmic sources from the Very Large Array (VLA) Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) are presented. We have used the ionospheric corrections applied to the 74 MHz interferometric data within the VLSS imaging process to obtain fluctuation spectra for the total electron content (TEC) gradient on spatial scales from a few to hundreds of kilometers and temporal scales from less than one minute to nearly an hour. The observations sample nearly all times of day and all seasons. They also span latitudes and longitudes from 28 deg. N to 40 deg. N and 95 deg. W to 114 deg. W, respectively. We have binned and averaged the fluctuation spectra according to time of day, season, and geomagnetic (Kp index) and solar (F10.7) activity. These spectra provide a detailed, multi-scale account of seasonal and intraday variations in ionospheric activity with wavelike structures detected at wavelengths between about 35 and 250 km. In some cases,...

  4. Miocene reef facies of Pelagian Block, central Mediterranean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedley, H.M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Miocene reefs outcrop in the Maltese Islands, southeastern Sicily, and the pelagian island of Lampedusa. Several rapid eustatic sea level fluctuations affected these late Tortonian-early Messinian build-ups; normal salinities appear to have been maintained during these events. Substrate, topography, sedimentation rate, and tectonic/eustatic events controlled reef development, which can be grouped into three settings: The most stable situation, the oldest Maltese and southeastern Sicilian reefs, has a ramp profile 15-30 km wide. The outermost zone consists of a broad belt of the large benthic foraminifer Heterostegina (compared with the underyling Oligocene beds rich in Lepidocyclina). Coralline algal carbonates, commonly rhodolitic, form a broad biostromal up-ramp association, kilometers in width, which commonly extends into the shallowest parts of the shelf. Scattered across the shallower ramp areas, in water depths generally less than 10 m, are coral-algal patch reefs, rarely larger than 20-50 m in diameter, commonly with truncated tops, and dominated by crustose coralline algae and the corals Porites and Tarbellastraea.

  5. Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for non-thermal treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. The effects of siting, construction, and overall operation of the MWF have been evaluated in a separate State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) EIS (City of Richland 1998). The proposed action includes transporting the LLMW from the Hanford Site to the ATG Facility, non-thermal treatment of the LLMW at the ATG MWF, and transporting the waste from ATG back to the Hanford Site. Impacts fi-om waste treatment operations would be bounded by the ATG SEPA EIS, which included an evaluation of the impacts associated with operating the non-thermal portion of the MWF at maximum design capacity (8,500 metric tons per year) (City of Richland 1998). Up to 50 employees would be required for non-thermal treatment portion of the MWF. This includes 40 employees that would perform waste treatment operations and 10 support staff. Similar numbers were projected for the thermal treatment portion of the MWF (City of Richland 1998).

  6. Corrective action decision document, Second Gas Station, Tonopah test range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 403) has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes} (FFACO, 1996). The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-0360 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (35 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service. The Second Gas Station CAS was formerly known as the Underground Diesel Tank Site, Sandia Environmental Restoration Site Number 118. The gas station was in use from approximately 1965 to 1980. The USTs were originally thought to be located 11 meters (m) (36 feet [ft]) east of the Old Light Duty Shop, Building 0360, and consisted of one gasoline UST (southern tank) and one diesel UST (northern tank) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The two associated fuel dispensary stations were located northeast (diesel) and southeast (gasoline) of Building 0360 (CAU 423). Presently the site is used as a parking lot, Building 0360 is used for mechanical repairs of vehicles.

  7. Applying distributions of hydraulic conductivity for anisotropic systems and applications to Tc Transport at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen G Hunt

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    43Tc99 is spreading mostly laterally through the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site sediments. At higher tensions in the unsaturated zone, the hydraulic conductivity may be strongly anisotropic as a consequence of finer soils to retain more water than coarser ones, and for these soils to have been deposited primarily in horizontal structures. We have tried to develop a consistent modeling procedure that could predict the behavior of Tc plumes. Our procedure consists of: (1) Adapting existing numerical recipes based on critical path analysis to calculate the hydraulic conductivity, K, as a function of tension, h, (2) Statistically correlating the predicted K at various values of the tension with fine content, (3) Seeking a tension value, for which the anisotropy and the horizontal K values are both sufficiently large to accommodate multi-kilometer spreading, (4) Predicting the distribution of K values for vertical flow as a function of system support volume, (5) Comparing the largest likely K value in the vertical direction with the expected K in the horizontal direction, (6) Finding the length scale at which the two K values are roughly equal, (7) Comparing that length scale with the horizontal spreading of the plume. We find that our predictions of the value of the tension at which the principle spreading is likely occurring compares very well with experiment. However, we seem to underestimate the physical length scale at which the predominantly horizontal spreading begins to take on significant vertical characteristics. Our data and predictions would seem to indicate that this should happen after horizontal transport of somewhat over a km, but the chiefly horizontal transport appears to continue out to scales of 10km or so.

  8. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report, Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [m]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd{sup 3} (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3} (420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}). Information presented in this Final Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and referenced in supporting documents represents the current disposal cell design features and ground water compliance strategy proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the Maybell, Colorado, tailings site. Both the disposal cell design and the ground water compliance strategy have changed from those proposed prior to the preliminary final RAP document as a result of prudent site-specific technical evaluations.

  9. Rulison Site Surface Closure Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report provides documentation for closure of the Rulison Site surface and summarizes the data from groundwater monitoring conducted quarterly in 1996 and 1997. The quarterly groundwater monitoring was conducted to demonstrate that no contaminants are migrating from the pond after completion of the pond remediation activities. The Rulison Site is located in the North 1/2 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 25, Township 7 South, Range 95 West of the 6` Principal Meridian, Garfield County, Colorado, approximately 19 kilometers (km) (12 miles [mi]) southwest of Rifle, Colorado, and approximately 65 km (40 mi) northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado (Figure I - 1). The site is situated on the north slope of Battlement Mesa on the upper reaches of Battlement Creek at an elevation of approximately 2,500 meters (m) (8,200 feet [ft]). The valley is open to the north-northwest and is bounded on the other three sides by steep mountain slopes that rise to elevations above 2,927 m (9,600 ft). Project Rulison was a joint U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and Austral Oil Company (Austral) experiment. It was conducted under the AEC`s Plowshare Program to evaluate the feasibility of using a nuclear device to stimulate natural gas production in low- permeability, gas-producing geologic formations. The experiment consisted of detonating a 40-kiloton nuclear device at a depth of 2, 568 m (8,426 ft) below ground surface on September 10, 1969, followed by natural gas production testing in 1970 and 1971 (AEC, 1973).

  10. Human-Made Climate Change: A Moral, Political and Legal Issue Dr. James E. Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    kilometers deep, and the ice sheets, which are two to three kilometers thick, the climate system responds. #12;Climate Tipping Points 1. Ice Sheet Disintegration - Ocean Warming Ice Shelves Melt Ice Streams Interdependencies 3. Methane Hydrate ,,frozen methane - In Tundra & On Continental Shelves - Depends On Ocean & Ice

  11. 36Super-fast solar flares ! NASA's Ramaty High Energy Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    36Super-fast solar flares ! NASA's Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite has been studying solar flares since 2002. The sequence of figures to the left shows a flaring region hr/3600 sec = 0.98 kilometers/sec. The solar flare blob was traveling at 207 kilometers per second

  12. Determining Home Range and Preferred Habitat of Feral Horses on the Nevada National Security Site Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Ashley V. [NSTec

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Feral horses (Equus caballus) are free-roaming descendants of domesticated horses and legally protected by the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, which mandates how feral horses and burros should be managed and protected on federal lands. Using a geographic information system to determine the home range and suitable habitat of feral horses on the federally managed Nevada National Security Site can enable wildlife biologists in making best management practice recommendations. Home range was estimated at 88.1 square kilometers. Site suitability was calculated for elevation, forage, slope, water presence and horse observations. These variables were combined in successive iterations into one polygon. Suitability rankings established that 85 square kilometers are most suitable habitat, with 2,052 square kilometers of good habitat 1,252 square kilometers of fair habitat and 122 square kilometers of least suitable habitat.

  13. Y-12 National Security Complex Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program 2007 Calendar Yeare Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, M.J.; Greeley, M. S. Jr.; Morris, G. W.; Roy, W. K.; Ryan, M. G.; Smith, J. G.; Southworth, G. R.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) which became effective May 1, 2006, continued a requirement for a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The BMAP was originally developed in 1985 to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protected the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek: EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). The objectives of the current BMAP are similar, specifically to assess stream ecological conditions relative to regulatory limits and criteria, to assess ecological impacts as well as recovery in response to Y-12 operations, and to investigate the causes of continuing impacts. The BMAP consists of three tasks that reflect complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the biotic integrity of EFPC. These tasks include: (1) bioaccumulation monitoring, (2) benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring, and (3) fish community monitoring. As required by the NPDES permit, the BMAP benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring task includes studies to annually evaluate the receiving stream's biological integrity in comparison to TN Water Quality Criteria. BMAP monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) appropriate habitat distribution, and (5) access. The primary sampling sites include upper EFPC at kilometers (EFKs) 24.4 and 23.4 [upstream and downstream of Lake Reality (LR) respectively]; EFK 18.7 (also EFK 18.2 and 19), located off the ORR and below an area of intensive commercial and light industrial development; EFK 13.8, located upstream from the Oak Ridge Wastewater Treatment Facility (ORWTF); and EFK 6.3 located approximately 1.4 km below the ORR boundary (Fig. 1.1). Actual sampling locations on EFPC may differ slightly by task according to specific requirements of the task. Brushy Fork (BF) at kilometer (BFK) 7.6 and Hinds Creek at kilometer (HCK) 20.6 are the most commonly used reference sites for the Y-12 BMAP. Additional sites off the ORR are also occasionally used for reference, including Beaver Creek, Bull Run, Cox Creek, and Paint Rock Creek (Fig. 1.2). Summaries of the sampling designs for the three primary tasks of the Y-12 Complex BMAP for EFPC are presented in Tables 1.1-1.3. This report covers the 2007 study period, although data collected outside this time period are included as appropriate. To address the biological monitoring requirements for Bear Creek and McCoy Branch, CERCLA-funded data is summarized in Appendix A (for Bear Creek) and Appendix B (for McCoy Branch). Data for these two watersheds is provided herein to address Section IX of the NPDES Permit for Y-12, where 'Results of these CERCLA programs can be used to meet the biological monitoring requirements of this permit'. For potential comparison with instream biological measures, a summary of the toxicity testing results for Y-12 outfalls into upper EFPC is provided in Appendix C (these results have been previously reported).

  14. Modifications and Applications of the HERMES model: June - October 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaugh, J E

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) model has been developed to describe the response of energetic materials to low-velocity mechanical stimulus, referred to as HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response) or BVR (Burn to Violent Reaction). For tests performed with an HMX-based UK explosive, at sample sizes less than 200 g, the response was sometimes an explosion, but was not observed to be a detonation. The distinction between explosion and detonation can be important in assessing the effects of the HE response on nearby structures. A detonation proceeds as a supersonic shock wave supported by the release of energy that accompanies the transition from solid to high-pressure gas. For military high explosives, the shock wave velocity generally exceeds 7 km/s, and the pressure behind the shock wave generally exceeds 30 GPa. A kilogram of explosive would be converted to gas in 10 to 15 microseconds. An HEVR explosion proceeds much more slowly. Much of the explosive remains unreacted after the event. Peak pressures have been measured and calculated at less than 1 GPa, and the time for the portion of the solid that does react to form gas is about a millisecond. The explosion will, however, launch the confinement to a velocity that depends on the confinement mass, the mass of explosive converted, and the time required to form gas products. In many tests, the air blast signal and confinement velocity are comparable to those measured when an amount of explosive equal to that which is converted in an HEVR is deliberately detonated in the comparable confinement. The number of confinement fragments from an HEVR is much less than from the comparable detonation. The HERMES model comprises several submodels including a constitutive model for strength, a model for damage that includes the creation of porosity and surface area through fragmentation, an ignition model, an ignition front propagation model, and a model for burning after ignition. We have used HERMES in computer simulations of US and UK variants of the Steven Test. We have recently improved some of the submodels, and report those developments here, as well as the results of some additional applications.

  15. U.S. Department of the Interior December 2012 U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Greens Creek Mine in Alaska because the Silver Shaft at the Lucky Friday Mine was undergoing). References Cited Coeur d'Alene Mines Corp., 2012, Coeur reports third quarter financial and operating results@usgs.gov Internet: http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals SILVER IN SEPTEMBER 2012 U.S. mines produced 81,400 kilograms

  16. Performance oriented packaging testing of nine Mk 3 Mod 0 signal containers in PPP-B-621 wood box for packing group II solid hazardous materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libbert, K.J.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PPP-B-621 wood box containing nine Mk 3 Mod 0 Signal containers was tested for conformance to Performance Oriented Packaging criteria established by Code of Federal Regulations Title 49 CFR. The container was tested with a gross weight of 123.3 pounds (56 kilograms) and met all requirements.

  17. The Office Air Handling Unit versus the Two Dedicated Air Handling Unit System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, L.; Liu, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both analytical and the numerical methods have been developed to compares the energy performance of the OAHU systems and the two-AHU (TAHU) system. The OAHU system saves up to 1.85 kilojoules heating energy for each kilogram air supplied...

  18. 204 BULLETIN OF TRE UNITEII sfrxrnsFISTI coxaiissIoN. red flesh and are delicious eating. The growth of lhis ish in a place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it passes from a weight of S gmms to S kilograms [$ ounce to 153 pouurls: about], jucreasing a tliousaucl Rhiiid carp and those of Montreuil-sur-lder are highly esteemccl, viliile those of the Lot River pass in big boxes for f'i.01~two to tliree weeks in running river mfer, so as to be rid of` the muddy taste

  19. Detoxification of Organophosphate Nerve Agents by Immobilized Escherichia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    et al., 1989). In the United States over 40 million kilograms of organo- phosphate pesticides, in ap- proximately 100 min, at a specific rate of 0.160 mM min-1 (g cell dry wt)-1 . The immobilized with mus- cular responses, and in vital organs produces serious symp- toms and eventually death (Donarski

  20. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production from Existing Nuclear Power Plants Using Alkaline Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana R. Swalla

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The mid-range industrial market currently consumes 4.2 million metric tons of hydrogen per year and has an annual growth rate of 15% industries in this range require between 100 and 1000 kilograms of hydrogen per day and comprise a wide range of operations such as food hydrogenation, electronic chip fabrication, metals processing and nuclear reactor chemistry modulation.

  1. JULY 8, 2013 AUDIT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JULY 8, 2013 AUDIT REPORT REPORT NO. IG-13-019 (ASSIGNMENT NO. A-12-008-00) OFFICE OF AUDITS NASA International Space Station kg kilogram OIG Office of Inspector General #12;JULY 8, 2013 REPORT NO. IG-13'S EFFORTS TO MAXIMIZE RESEARCH ON THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL National

  2. Licensed fuel facility status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, D.; Brown, C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NRC is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facilities inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of high enriched uranium, low enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233.

  3. Licensed fuel facility status report: Inventory difference data, July 1, 1994--June 30, 1995. Volume 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, D.R.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facility inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material.

  4. Licensed fuel facility status report. Inventory difference data, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992: Volume 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, D.; Brown, C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NRC is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facilities inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of high enriched uranium, low enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233.

  5. Licensed fuel facility status report: Inventory difference data, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1991. Volume 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NRC is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facilities inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of high enriched uranium, low enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233.

  6. THE RISK OF NUCLEAR TERRORISM AND NEXT STEPS TO REDUCE THE DANGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Breach at Necsa on 08 November 2007," Nuclear Energy Corporation of South Africa, 13 November 2007 nuclear facility in South Africa, where hundreds of kilograms of weapon-grade highly enriched uranium (HEU, and then disappeared through the same hole they had cut in the fence. No one on either team was shot or captured. South

  7. News | At Guelph http://www.uoguelph.ca/atguelph/08-10-08/newsharvesting.shtml 1 of 2 10/17/08 7:06 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    grains, food and feed. Raizada will pay for $1,000 worth of the company's storage bags to be sent will be awarded to GrainPro Inc., a Massachusetts-based company whose products -- from 10-kilogram grain sacks, they found a university student who is building energy windmills in his native Malawi. They also found one

  8. Energy and Society Week 3 Section Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    to office hours soon. Energy versus Power - Work refers to an activity involving a force and movement: Suppose a family spends $100/month on their electricity bill. How much coal (in kilograms) wentWh and the power plant has a conversion efficiency of 30%. Coal has an energy density of 29.3x106 J/kg. Before

  9. REVIEW ARTICLE Guowei CAI, Ben M. CHEN, Tong H. LEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmei, Chen

    a brief review on the historical development of the rotorcraft unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs integration, aerodynamic modeling and automatic flight control system involved in constructing the unmanned with a payload of a few tens of kilograms. Characterized by unique features such as relatively low cost, small

  10. SR -1419 Final Report PREDICTING MOTION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Alan

    ) Unclassified 21. No. of Pages 22. Price #12;vi CONVERSION FACTORS (Approximate conversions to metric measures.................................................................... III TECHNICAL REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE ...................................V CONVERSION FACTORS.2291 foot pounds kilogram meters divide by 7.23285 foot pounds Newton meters multiply by 1.35582 ENERGY foot

  11. Deploying a Sensor Network in an Extreme Environment K.Martinez, P.Padhy, A.Elsaify, G.Zou, A.Riddoch, J.K. Hart*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    powerful distributed processing but many services, such as storage, for sensor networks [6]. This type inside glaciers. This paper describes the solutions to power management, radio communications and other (including small sub- kilogram intelligent tele-robots) [1], aeroplanes [10] and micro-submarines [13

  12. 2009 Guidelines to Defra / DECC's GHG Conversion Factors for Company Reporting Produced by AEA for the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , emissions factors have only been provided for CO2. The 2009 update provides emissions factors for the non-CO to landfill) into kilograms of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2eq). Carbon dioxide equivalent is a universal and refrigeration have been added. v. International electricity emission factors have been added Major changes

  13. Site-specific analysis of glycosylated proteins using mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irungu, Janet W.

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in Telsa, m in kilograms, r in meters, q in Coulombs, and v in meters per second. 25, 28, 30 As shown from equation 2, the cyclotron frequency is inversely proportional to the mass-to-charge ratio (m/q or m/z). All ions of the same m/q rotate...

  14. 24Meteorite Compositions: A matter of density Most people have heard about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the solar system. The above meteorite sample is called the Esquel Pallasite, and was part of a 1000 kilogram was the mass of each of the two ingredients to the pallasite? Problem 2 - Meteorite collectors find and sell Problem 2 - Meteorite collectors find and sell samples by the gram. The price of a gram of the Esquel

  15. Plasma acceleration from radio-frequency discharge in dielectric capillary A. Dunaevskya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1063/1.2214127 Electric propulsion devices for spacecraft with masses of several tens of kilograms are in increasing, weight, and dimensions. Saturation and thermal load on the magnetic system limit miniaturization had only an efficiency of 6% at 100 W consumed power.4 Pulsing propulsion de- vices such as pulsed

  16. The agreement gives the go-ahead for work to start

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . But the rewards, if Iter can be made to work successfully, are extremely attractive. Investment costs One kilogram judged and irresponsible." The European Commission said the investment costs were justified, explaining reactor will take around eight years to build. The EU is to foot about 50% of the cost to build

  17. Revised: 6 November 1991 Trends in the Consumption of Energy-Intensive Basic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised: 6 November 1991 Trends in the Consumption of Energy-Intensive Basic Materials on the consumption, rather than production, of materials. Earlier analyses of trends in basic materials consumption materials consumption patterns on energy use is the recognition that physical units (kilograms) are more

  18. GERMANIUM--1997 32.1 By Robert D. Brown, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GERMANIUM--1997 32.1 GERMANIUM By Robert D. Brown, Jr. Germaniumisagrayish production, which amounted to slightly less than one-third of the world refinery production in 1997 in 1997. The USGS estimated domestic germanium reserves at 450,000 kilograms (kg), equivalent to 16 years

  19. Physics 408 --Exam 1 Name___________________________________________ You are graded on your work, with partial credit where it is deserved.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Roland E.

    , with partial credit where it is deserved. Please give clear, well-organized solutions. heat capacity (at not actually calculating it). (f) (5) Show that the heat capacity at low temperatures is proportional to T n constant volume) for liquid water = 4200 J/kg !K , 0! C=273 K 1. (a) (13) A kilogram of liquid water

  20. Volume 118 (2013) http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/jres.118.016 Journal of Research of the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Institute of Standards and Technology 353 The New Kilogram Definition and its Implications for High and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 patrick.abbott@nist.gov zeina.kubarych@nist.gov The SI unit of mass (or practicability) of scientific metrology is useless. For instance, specifying a chronometer

  1. A Saturn Ring Observer Mission Using Multi-Mission Radioisotope Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelson, Robert D.; Spilker, Thomas R.; Shirley, James H. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 301-445W, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Saturn remains one of the most fascinating planets within the solar system. To better understand the complex ring structure of this planet, a conceptual Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) mission is presented that would spend one year in close proximity to Saturn's A and B rings, and perform detailed observations and measurements of the ring particles and electric and magnetic fields. The primary objective of the mission would be to understand ring dynamics, including the microphysics of individual particles and small scale (meters to a few kilometers) phenomena such as particle agglomeration behavior. This would be accomplished by multispectral imaging of the rings at multiple key locations within the A and B rings, and by ring-particle imaging at an unprecedented resolution of 0.5 cm/pixel. The SRO spacecraft would use a Venus-Earth-Earth-Jupiter Gravity Assist (VEEJGA) and be aerocaptured into Saturn orbit using an advanced aeroshell design to minimize propellant mass. Once in orbit, the SRO would stand off from the ring plane 1 to 1.4 km using chemical thrusters to provide short propulsive maneuvers four times per revolution, effectively causing the SRO vehicle to 'hop' above the ring plane. The conceptual SRO spacecraft would be enabled by the use of a new generation of multi-mission Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) currently being developed by NASA and DOE. These RPSs include the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). The RPSs would generate all necessary electrical power ({>=}330 We at beginning of life) during the 10-year cruise and 1-year science mission ({approx}11 years total). The RPS heat would be used to maintain the vehicle's operating and survival temperatures, minimizing the need for electrical heaters. Such a mission could potentially launch in the 2015-2020 timeframe, with operations at Saturn commencing in approximately 2030.

  2. Final Report on Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Wu, G. J. Zhang

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations. • The project resulted in nine peer-reviewed publications and numerous scientific presentations that directly address the CCPP’s scientific objective of improving climate models. • We developed a package of improved convection parameterization that includes improved closure, trigger condition for convection, and comprehensive treatment of convective momentum transport. • We implemented the new convection parameterization package into several versions of the NCAR models (both coupled and uncoupled). This has led to 1) Improved simulation of seasonal migration of ITCZ; 2) Improved shortwave cloud radiative forcing response to El Niño in CAM3; 3) Improved MJO simulation in both uncoupled and coupled model; and 4) Improved simulation of ENSO in coupled model. • Using the dynamic core of CCM3, we isolated the dynamic effects of convective momentum transport. • We implemented mosaic treatment of subgrid-scale cloud-radiation interaction in CCM3.

  3. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry Facility Raw Water Intake Pipeline Replacement Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1497, for the proposed replacement of the existing 107 centimeter (cm) [42 inch (in)] 6.87 kilometer (km) [4.27 mile (mi)] raw water intake pipeline (RWIPL). This action is necessary to allow for continued, optimum operations at the West Hackberry facility (main site/facility). The EA described the proposed action (including action alternatives) and three alternatives to the proposed action. The EA evaluated only the potential environmental consequences of the proposed action (one action alternative), and Alternative 3, which consisted of the No Build Action that is required by 10 CFR 1021.321(c). Based on the analysis in DOE/EA-1497, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting humans or the natural environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). To further minimize impacts to environmental media, the DOE will also implement a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for this action. The MAP is included as Appendix F of this EA, which is appended to this FONSI. The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, authorizes the creation of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to store crude oil to reduce the United States' vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Crude oil is stored in geologic formations, or salt domes, located under these facilities. The purpose of this proposed project is to construct a new RWIPL at the main site to replace the existing RWIPL which services this facility.

  4. Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

  5. Final Technical Report: DOE-Biological Ocean Margins Program. Microbial Ecology of Denitrifying Bacteria in the Coastal Ocean.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Kerkhof

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of our research was to provide a comprehensive study of the bacterioplankton populations off the coast of New Jersey near the Rutgers University marine field station using terminal restriction fragment polymorphism analysis (TRFLP) coupled to 16S rRNA genes for large data set studies. Our three revised objectives to this study became: (1) to describe bacterioplankton population dynamics in the Mid Atlantic Bight using TRFLP analysis of 16S rRNA genes. (2) to determine whether spatial and temporal factors are driving bacterioplankton community dynamics in the MAB using monthly samping along our transect line over a 2-year period. (3) to identify dominant members of a coastal bacterioplankton population by clonal library analysis of 16S rDNA genes and sequencing of PCR product corresponding to specific TRFLP peaks in the data set. Although open ocean time-series sites have been areas of microbial research for years, relatively little was known about the population dynamics of bacterioplankton communities in the coastal ocean on kilometer spatial and seasonal temporal scales. To gain a better understanding of microbial community variability, monthly samples of bacterial biomass were collected in 1995-1996 along a 34-km transect near the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO-15) off the New Jersey coast. Surface and bottom sampling was performed at seven stations along a transect line with depths ranging from 1 to 35m (n=178). The data revealed distinct temporal patterns among the bacterioplankton communities in the Mid-Atlantic Bight rather than grouping by sample location or depth (figure 2-next page). Principal components analysis models supported the temporal patterns. In addition, partial least squares regression modeling could not discern a significant correlation from traditional oceanographic physical and phytoplankton nutrient parameters on overall bacterial community variability patterns at LEO-15. These results suggest factors not traditionally measured during oceanographic studies are structuring coastal microbial communities.

  6. Variability of Power from Large-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Scenarios in the State of Gujarat: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, B.; Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

  7. Variability of Power from Large-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Scenarios in the State of Gujarat (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, B.; Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

  8. Variability of Photovoltaic Power in the State of Gujarat Using High Resolution Solar Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Weekley, A.; Lopez, A.; Zhang, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Parsons, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

  9. Systematic variations in stress state in the southern San Joaquin Valley: Inferences based on well-bore data and contemporary seismicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillo, D.A.; Zoback, M.D. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of stress-induced well-bore breakouts in 35 wells from 10 production fields in the southern San Joaquin Valley (SSJV) indicates systematic spatial variations in the direction of the maximum horizontal stresses at three different scales. First, the regional northeast-southwest compressional stress direction seen along the western margin of the San Joaquin Valley in the Elk Hills, Kettleman Hills, and Coalinga areas, gradually changes to approximately north-south compression over a distance of 10-20 km in the SSJV. This major excursion in the stress field seen in the Yowlumne, Yowlumne North, Paloma, and Rio Viejo production fields represents an approximately 40[degrees] counterclockwise rotation in the direction of the maximum horizontal stress (MHS). This systematic reorientation is consistent with approximately north-south convergence as seen in the local fold axes and reverse faults of Pliocene age and younger. Second, at the extreme south of the SSJV in the San Emidio, Los Lobos, Pleito, Wheeler Ridge, and North Tejon fields, another systematic, but localized, reorientation in the stress field indicates an abrupt change to an approximately east-northeast-west-southwest compression over a distance of a few kilometers. This latter reorientation of MHS stress direction, which is inconsistent with the local east-west-trending fold axes and thrust faults, represents a 40-50[degrees] clockwise rotation in the stresses; this reorientation appears to be limited to oil production fields located within the inferred hanging wall of the White Wolf fault that ruptured during the 1952 Kern County earthquake. Inversion of earthquake focal mechanisms of events located below the perturbed stress field indicates approximately north-south compression. The stress drop associated with the 1952 earthquake may have been responsible for rotating the MHS stress direction, implying that the remote horizontal stresses are comparable in magnitude. 53 refs., 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electic Drive System Interim Report - Revised

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, C.W.; Hsu, J.S.; Marlino, L.D.; Miller, C.W.; Ott, G.W., Jr.; Oland, C.B.; Burress, T.A.

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2004 Toyota Prius is a hybrid automobile equipped with a gasoline engine and a battery-powered electric motor. Both of these motive power sources are capable of providing mechanical drive power for the vehicle. The engine can deliver a peak power output of 57 kilowatts (kW) at 5000 revolutions per minute (rpm) while the motor can deliver a peak power output of 50 kW at 1300 rpm. Together, this engine-motor combination has a specified peak power output of 82 kW at a vehicle speed of 85 kilometers per hour (km/h). In operation, the 2004 Prius exhibits superior fuel economy compared to conventionally powered automobiles. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical performance of the 2004 Toyota Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. As a hybrid vehicle, the 2004 Prius uses both a gasoline-powered internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor as motive power sources. Innovative algorithms for combining these two power sources results in improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions compared to traditional automobiles. Initial objectives of the laboratory tests were to measure motor and generator back-electromotive force (emf) voltages and determine gearbox-related power losses over a specified range of shaft speeds and lubricating oil temperatures. Follow-on work will involve additional performance testing of the motor, generator, and inverter. Information contained in this interim report summarizes the test results obtained to date, describes preliminary conclusions and findings, and identifies additional areas for further study.

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  12. Environmental assessment of ground water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming. Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an environmental assessment of the Spook, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. It analyzes the impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action for ground water compliance. The proposed action is to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for the UMTRA Project sites (40 CFR Part 192) by meeting supplemental standards based on the limited use ground water at the Spook site. This proposed action would not require site activities, including ground water monitoring, characterization, or institutional controls. Ground water in the uppermost aquifer was contaminated by uranium processing activities at the Spook site, which is in Converse County, approximately 48 miles (mi) (77 kilometers [km]) northeast of Casper, Wyoming. Constituents from the site infiltrated and migrated into the uppermost aquifer, forming a plume that extends approximately 2500 feet (ft) (800 meters [m]) downgradient from the site. The principal site-related hazardous constituents in this plume are uranium, selenium, and nitrate. Background ground water in the uppermost aquifer at the site is considered limited use. It is neither a current nor a potential source of drinking water because of widespread, ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using treatment methods reasonably employed in public water supply systems (40 CFR {section} 192.11 (e)). Background ground water quality also is poor due to first, naturally occurring conditions (natural uranium mineralization associated with an alteration front), and second, the effects of widespread human activity not related to uranium milling operations (uranium exploration and mining activities). There are no known exposure pathways to humans, animals, or plants from the contaminated ground water in the uppermost aquifer because it does not discharge to lower aquifers, to the surface, or to surface water.

  13. Biological assessment of remedial action at the abandoned uranium mill tailings site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to conduct remedial action to clean up the residual radioactive materials (RRM) at the Naturita uranium processing site in Colorado. The Naturita site is in Montrose County, Colorado, and is approximately 2 miles (mi) (3 kilometer [km]) from the unincorporated town of Naturita. The proposed remedial action is to remove the RRM from the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan disposal site. To address the potential impacts of the remedial action on threatened and endangered species, the DOE prepared this biological assessment. Informal consultations with the U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) were initiated in 1986, and the FWS provided a list of the threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. This list was updated by two FWS letters in 1988 and by verbal communication in 1990. A biological assessment was included in the environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed remedial action that was prepared in 1990. This EA addressed the impacts of moving the Naturita RRM to the Dry Flats disposal site. In 1993, the design for the Dry Flats disposal alternative was changed. The FWS was again consulted in 1993 and provided a new list of threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. The Naturita EA and the biological assessment were revised in response to these changes. In 1994, remedial action was delayed because an alternate disposal site was being considered. The DOE decided to move the FIRM at the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan site. Due to this delay, the FWS was consulted in 1995 and a list of threatened and endangered species was provided. This biological assessment is a revision of the assessment attached to the Naturita EA and addresses moving the Naturita RRM to the Upper Burbank Quarry disposal site.

  14. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

  15. Cornell University, Office of Sponsored Programs Awards Received in June 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    : NOVEL X-RAY SCATTERING STUDIES $120,000 DBW CALICCHIA, MARCIA ILR-EXT OCFS HUMAN SERVICES LEADERSHIP FOR THE SQUARE KILOMETER ARRAY $500,064 BMT CORDES, JAMES M CRSR NSF NEUTRON STARS, ELECTRON DENSITY TURBULENCE

  16. Lepers and Ludwig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: This is not a postcard about South Korea. It is a postcard about compassion and connection that just happens to take place in South Korea on Sorok Island, located one kilometer off the southwest coast. ...

  17. Open to the public! : a new network of communal recreation waterfront space in Bangkok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srirojanapinyo, Apichart

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physically and historically, Bangkok has been shaped by its relationship to its waterfront. Flowing 370 kilometers through Thailand, the Chao Phraya River is more than the nation's lifeline. It was a principal waterway ...

  18. Tunable micro-cavities in photonic band-gap yarns and optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit, Gilles, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vision behind this work is the fabrication of high performance innovative fiber-based optical components over kilometer length-scales. The optical properties of these fibers derive from their multilayer dielectric ...

  19. Facies architecture of the Upper Sego member of the Mancos Shale Formation, Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Eric D.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    1, dominantly highly marine bioturbated sandstones which thin landward over kilometers, is cut locally by an erosion surface overlain by tidal bed sets. It is capped by a localized transgressive shell lag and then a thin continuous marine shale...

  20. Toll road public-private partnerships in Malaysia : using the CLIOS process for policy improvements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, John L., 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Malaysia has relied on private sector provision of toll roads for over twenty years using public- private partnerships (PPPs). While the program has been successful in providing close to 1,800 kilometers of highway in that ...

  1. altmark north german: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in...

  2. anapodaris gorge south: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in...

  3. area south eastern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in...

  4. area south china: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in...

  5. Section 2.3 (cont.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 19, 2014 ... kilometers. a. Derive a formula expressing the acceleration of the car as a function of time. b. At what rate is the velocity of the car changing with.

  6. Rediscovering the River Bièvre : the feasibility of restoring ecological functions in an urban stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Jacob T., 1978-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bièvre's 36-kilometer course stretches from the southwest of Paris near Satin-Quentin-en- Yvelines through numerous towns before disappearing into the urban hydraulic network upon its approach to Paris's dense urban ...

  7. From a deep and daunting research lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, Sally

    tank... How many measurements would you need to make to find the temperature of the water everywhere in the tank? heater 10 inches 20 inches 15 inchesthermometer #12;Measuring the ocean > Thousands of kilometers

  8. LLNL Conducts First Plutonium Shot Using the JASPER Gas Gun ...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    kilometers per second at a plutonium target. The impact produces a high-pressure shock wave that passes through the plutonium in a fraction of a microsecond while diagnostic...

  9. EA-0534-FEA-1991.pdf

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Carolina and Georgia. The LANL site encompasses approximately 111 square kilometers in north-central New Mexico. It is located on the Pajarito Plateau, a series of mesas and...

  10. In-Situ Control of BaZrO3 and BaSnO3 Nanorod Alignment and Microstructure in YBa2Cu3O7-x Thin Films by Strain Modulated Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baca, Francisco Javier A.

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    With the ability to carry very high electrical currents per unit area in kilometer length wires, high temperature superconductors (HTS) are especially promising candidates for applications where size and weight constraints ...

  11. Eurographics Conference on Visualization (EuroVis) 2012 S. Bruckner, S. Miksch, and H. Pfister

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Bernd

    mesoscale eddies, that are believed to have a role in the transport and redistribution of salt, heat Mesoscale eddies are vortices with diameters on the order of a hundred kilometers and typical lifetimes

  12. 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting AIAA-2007-0874 January 8-11, 2007 Reno, NV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhixiong "James"

    size of the resonator (usually the order of 1m for meso-scale CRDS) to several kilometers. Through limitations on the meso-scale CRDS technique. The intensity of the light coupled into and out of the cavity

  13. Path-Loss Characteristics of Urban Wireless Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herring, Keith T.

    Wireless channel data was collected in Cambridge, Massachusetts for diverse propagation environments over distances ranging from tens of meters to several kilometers using mobile 2.4-GHz transmitters and receivers. The ...

  14. Digital outcrop mapping of a reservoir-scale incised valley fill, Sego Sandstone, Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fey, Matthew F.

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    methodologies are demonstrated by mapping rock variations and stratal geometries within several kilometers-long, sub-parallel exposures of the Lower Sego Sandstone in San Arroyo Canyon, Book Cliffs, Utah. The digital outcrop model of the Lower Sego Sandstone...

  15. Fish population and behavior revealed by instantaneous continental-shelf scale imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symonds, Deanelle T

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of a technique to instantaneously image and continuously monitor the abundance, spatial distribution, and behavior of fish populations over thousands of square kilometers using Ocean Acoustic Waveguide ...

  16. 32 computer Published by the IEEE Computer Society 0018-9162/14/$31.00 2014 IEEE Cover Feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    device is stationary or mobile. With existing RF transmission power levels, it is feasible to harvest power several kilometers from TV towers and several hundred meters from cellular base stations.3

  17. Stratal architecture and sedimentology of a portion of the Upper Cambrian Hickory Sandstone, central Texas, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Teran, Isaac Antonio

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    in central Texas provide an exceptional opportunity to examine the sedimentology of deposits of this age in order to interpret sedimentary environments. During quarrying, vertical walls, one half-kilometer long and several tens of meters high, are blasted...

  18. Hydrodynamic and transport phenomena at the interface between flow and aquatic vegetation : from the forest to the blade scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From the canopy scale to the blade scale, interactions between fluid motion and kelp produce a wide array of hydrodynamic and scalar transport phenomena. At the kilometer scale of the kelp forest, coastal currents transport ...

  19. DOE/EA-0978 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT SLUDGE STABILIZATION AT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of chemistry and Physics, Robert C. Weast, Ph.D., 70th Ed., 1989-1990, CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Florida. square 0.39 square miles square kilometers centimeters G-3 October...

  20. Oceanographic Controls on Coral Reef Habitats in Present and Future Climates /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Lauren Amelia

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-wide variation in coral reef communities. MarineJA and Yates KK (2009) Coral reefs and ocean acidification.impacts, and global change on coral reefs. PLoS biology 6(

  1. Going Home? The Failed Myth of Return in Eddy L. Harris’s Native Stranger: A Black American’s Journey into the Heart of Africa and Caryl Phillips’s The Atlantic Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Zara

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    themselves by please, my Zara Bennett coded question. AreDiop(IFAN), 1997. Zara Bennett Zara Bennett is a doctoralThe Atlantic Sound Zara Bennett Located a few kilometers off

  2. Capturing the impacts of land use on travel behavior : comparison of modeling approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannan, Veronica Adelle

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most urban planning literature suggests that compact and mixed-use neighborhoods correlate with lower vehicle kilometers traveled (VKT), and accordingly, lower energy consumption and transportation-related emissions. ...

  3. The Masdar Development - Climate Engineering for a Carbon-neutral City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuler, M.; Fiedler, T.; Lauster, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approach of defining sustainable urban development: The six square kilometer city, designed by Foster and Partner for the Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company, is eventually to house 50,000 people in accordance with WWF One Planet Living sustainability standards...

  4. IceCube: Neutrino Physics from GeV - PeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An update on recent discoveries by the IceCube project, which transforms approximately one cubic kilometer of natural Antarctic ice into a Cherenkov detector. This paper will be submitted to SLAC for inclusion in the Snowmass2013 proceedings

  5. Leveraging infrastructure : sustainable bus rapid transit route planning in Beirut, Lebanon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabti, Jumana M., 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis applies the concepts of urban design, public transportation planning, economic development, and sustainability, to the routing and site plan of a two-kilometer bus rapid transit (BRT) line segment into downtown ...

  6. Rice Field Geochemistry and Hydrology: An Explanation for Why Groundwater Irrigated Fields in Bangladesh are Net Sinks of Arsenic from Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Rebecca B.

    Irrigation of rice fields in Bangladesh with arsenic-contaminated groundwater transfers tens of cubic kilometers of water and thousands of tons of arsenic from aquifers to rice fields each year. Here we combine observations ...

  7. The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Investigation of the Settler Mortality Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albouy, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seen in their rate of 16.3 for Malta (70 kilometers east ofnineteenth centuries, and Malta, resettled at the turn ofAJR consists of Australia, Malta, and New Zealand. Minimum

  8. Comment on "Aptian faulting in the Haushi-Huqf (Oman) and the tectonic evolution of the southeast Arabian platform-margin"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    exposures of the Wadi Sha'bat al Tawraq from which this conclusion has been drawn (location in Figure 1a. Geological setting In an area of about 10 square kilometers encompassing the Wadi Sha'bat al Tawraq, two

  9. Open Issues in the search for gravitational wave transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackburn, Lindy L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LIGO-Virgo network of kilometer-scale laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors reached a major milestone with the successful operation of LIGO's fifth (S5) and Virgo's first (VSR1) science runs during 2005-2007. ...

  10. Maritime Cliffs and Ironshore -Grand CaymanMaritime Cliffs and Ironshore -Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 50.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    CaymanMaritime Cliffs and Ironshore - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands National Biodiversity Action Plan www Mosaic #12;Sandy Beach and Cobble - Little CaymanSandy Beach and Cobble - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2

  11. Seasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand CaymanSeasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 50.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands National Biodiversity;Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Cayman BracSeasonally Flooded Grasslands - Cayman Brac 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2-Modified Areas - Little CaymanUrban and Man-Modified Areas - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers

  12. 2003 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; November 2003; v. 31; no. 11; p. 969972; 3 figures. 969

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Audrey D.

    abruptly across the margin over a distance of 50 km, from 35 km beneath the Black Warrior foreland basin

  13. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's petrochemical facilities 1 km to 8 km distant. Such episodes produced sharp increases in all three species

  14. Modellierung Mariner kosysteme am Beispiel der Ostsee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rostock, Universität

    (60km³/Jahr) Flusswassereintrag 480 km³/Jahr Mittlere Tiefe = 52 m Dars.-Schwelle=18 m Volumen= 21000

  15. Integrating Cover Crops into Strip-Till Cropping Systems in a Semi-Arid Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noland, Reagan Lee

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    -Jensen and Schjoerring, 2001). Accumulation of soil organic matter can increase soil organic C (West and Post, 2002). Therefore, establishment and preservation of leguminous residue can also increase carbon sequestration (Reeves, 1997) along with nutrient availability... ingredient a.e. Acid equivalents CP Crude protein DM Dry matter g Gram ha Hectare kg Kilogram MAP Mean annual precipitation MAT Mean annual temperature NDF Neutral detergent fiber NO3-N Nitrate-nitrogen SOC Soil organic carbon vii...

  16. SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS Autumn Semester MECHANICS 2 hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the mass of the Sun in kilograms. (4 marks) (d) Show that the total energy is E = - 1 2 GMm r , that is(t), kinetic energy T and specific angular momentum h, given by T = 1 2 m r · r, h = r × r, where r dr of kinetic energy due to the force is T = F · r. (4 marks) (ii) (a) Show that the change in kinetic energy

  17. Pesticide fate in an aboveground disposal system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderglas, Brian Richard

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineers, 1979). Prior to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976. , little attention had been given to pesticide waste solutions leading to careless and dangerous disposal practices. Rinsate and washwaters were rarely collected... health as well as to livestock and crops and other vegetation in the affected area. Recent amendments (1984) to RCRA's federal regulations require that pesticide users who generate more than one hundred kilograms per month of acutely hazardous wastes...

  18. Axion Dark Matter Detection using Atomic Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sikivie

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark matter axions may cause transitions between atomic states that differ in energy by an amount equal to the axion mass. Such energy differences are conveniently tuned using the Zeeman effect. It is proposed to search for dark matter axions by cooling a kilogram-sized sample to milliKelvin temperatures and count axion induced transitions using laser techniques. This appears an appropriate approach to axion dark matter detection in the $10^{-4}$ eV mass range.

  19. Conducting polymers as potential active materials in electrochemical supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudge, A.; Davey, J.; Raistrick, I.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ferraris, J.P. [Texas Univ., Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronically,conducting polymers represent an interesting class of materials for use in electrochemical capacitors because of the combination of high capacitive energy density and low materials cost. Three generalized types of electrochemical capacitors can be constructed using conducting polymers as active material, and in the third of these, which utilizes conducting polymers that can be both n- and p-doped, energy densities of up to 40 watt-hours per kilogram of active material on both electrodes have been demonstrated.

  20. Conducting polymers as potential active materials in electrochemical supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudge, A.; Davey, J.; Raistrick, I.; Gottesfeld, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Ferraris, J.P. (Texas Univ., Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronically,conducting polymers represent an interesting class of materials for use in electrochemical capacitors because of the combination of high capacitive energy density and low materials cost. Three generalized types of electrochemical capacitors can be constructed using conducting polymers as active material, and in the third of these, which utilizes conducting polymers that can be both n- and p-doped, energy densities of up to 40 watt-hours per kilogram of active material on both electrodes have been demonstrated.

  1. Light-water reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning the reference PWR reactor system; once-through, low-enrichment uranium-235 fuel, 30 MWD per kilogram (PWR LEU(5)-OT); once-through, low-enrichment, high-burnup uranium fuel (PWR LEU(5)-Mod OT); self-generated plutonium spiked recycle (PWR LEU(5)-Pu-Spiked Recycle); denatured uranium-233/thorium cycle (PWR DU(3)-Th Recycle DU(3)); and plutonium/thorium cycle (Pu/ThO/sub 2/ Burner).

  2. Dawn at Vesta Press Kit/JULY 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    .c.brown@nasa.gov Washington, DC Jia-Rui Cook/Priscilla Vega Dawn Mission 818-354-0850/4-1357 Jet Propulsion Laboratory, jccook-gain antenna is 5 feet (1.52 meters) in diameter. When the solar arrays are deployed, Dawn's wingspan is 64.6 kilograms) hydrazine propellant Power: Two 27-foot-by-8-foot (8.3-meter-by- 2.3-meter) solar panels

  3. Process for the synthesis of aliphatic alcohol-containing mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greene, M.I.; Gelbein, A.P.

    1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the synthesis of mixtures which include saturated aliphatic alcohols is disclosed. In the first step of the process, the first catalyst activation stage, a catalyst, which comprises the oxides of copper, zinc, aluminum, potassium and one or two additional metals selected from the group consisting of chromium, magnesium, cerium, cobalt, thorium and lanthanum, is partially activated. In this step, a reducing gas stream, which includes hydrogen and at least one inert gas, flows past the catalyst at a space velocity of up to 5,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. The partially activated catalyst is then subjected to the second step of the process, second-stage catalyst activation. In this step, the catalyst is contacted by an activation gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide present in a volume ratio of 0.5:1 and 4:1, respectively, at a temperature of 200 to 450 C and a pressure of between 35 and 200 atmospheres. The activation gas flows at a space velocity of from 1,000 to 20,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. Second-stage activation continues until the catalyst is contacted with at least 500,000 liters (STP) of activation gas per kilogram of catalyst. The fully activated catalyst, in the third step of the process, contacts a synthesis gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  4. Process for the synthesis of aliphatic alcohol-containing mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greene, Marvin I. (Oradell, NJ); Gelbein, Abraham P. (Morristown, NJ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the synthesis of mixtures which include saturated aliphatic alcohols is disclosed. In the first step of the process, the first catalyst activation stage, a catalyst, which comprises the oxides of copper, zinc, aluminum, potassium and one or two additional metals selected from the group consisting of chromium, magnesium, cerium, cobalt, thorium and lanthanum, is partially activated. In this step, a reducing gas stream, which includes hydrogen and at least one inert gas, flows past the catalyst at a space velocity of up to 5,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. The partially activated catalyst is then subjected to the second step of the process, second-stage catalyst activation. In this step, the catalyst is contacted by an activation gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide present in a volume ratio of 0.5:1 and 4:1, respectively, at a temperature of 200.degree. to 450.degree. C. and a pressure of between 35 and 200 atmospheres. The activation gas flows at a space velocity of from 1,000 to 20,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. Second-stage activation continues until the catalyst is contacted with at least 500,000 liters (STP) of activation gas per kilogram of catalyst. The fully activated catalyst, in the third step of the process, contacts a synthesis gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata and ROTC 1, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord; Marutzky, Sam

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) was developed for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain. The CAIP is a requirement of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) (FFACO, 1996). The FFACO addresses environmental restoration activities at U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) facilities and sites including the underground testing area(s) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This CAIP describes the investigation activities currently planned for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU. These activities are consistent with the current Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project strategy described in Section 3.0 of Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the FFACO (1996) and summarized in Section 2.1.2 of this plan. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU extends over several areas of the NTS (Figure 1-1) and includes former underground nuclear testing locations in Areas 12 and 16. The area referred to as ''Rainier Mesa'' includes the geographical area of Rainier Mesa proper and the contiguous Aqueduct Mesa. Figure 1-2 shows the locations of the tests (within tunnel complexes) conducted at Rainier Mesa. Shoshone Mountain is located approximately 20 kilometers (km) south of Rainier Mesa, but is included within the same CAU due to similarities in their geologic setting and in the nature and types of nuclear tests conducted. Figure 1-3 shows the locations of the tests conducted at Shoshone Mountain. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU falls within the larger-scale Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Investigation Area, which also includes the northwest section of the Yucca Flat CAU as shown in Figure 1-1. Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain lie adjacent to the Timber Mountain Caldera Complex and are composed of volcanic rocks that erupted from the caldera as well as from more distant sources. This has resulted in a layered volcanic stratigraphy composed of thick deposits of welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuff and lava flows. These deposits are proximal to the source caldera and are interstratified with the more distal facies of fallout tephra and bedded reworked tuff from more distant sources. In each area, a similar volcanic sequence was deposited upon Paleozoic carbonate and siliciclastic rocks that are disrupted by various thrust faults, normal faults, and strike-slip faults. In both Rainier Mesa (km) to the southwest, and Tippipah Spring, 4 km to the north, and the tunnel complex is dry. Particle-tracking simulations performed during the value of information analysis (VOIA) (SNJV, 2004b) indicate that most of the regional groundwater that underlies the test locations at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain eventually follows similar and parallel paths and ultimately discharges in Death Valley and the Amargosa Desert. Particle-tracking simulations conducted for the regional groundwater flow and risk assessment indicated that contamination from Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain were unlikely to leave the NTS during the 1,000-year period of interest (DOE/NV, 1997a). It is anticipated that CAU-scale modeling will modify these results somewhat, but it is not expected to radically alter the outcome of these previous particle-tracking simulations within the 1,000-year period of interest. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAIP describes the corrective action investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The CAI will be conducted by the UGTA Project, which is part of the NNSA/NSO Environmental Restoration Project (ERP). The purpose and scope of the CAI are presented in this section, followed by a summary of the entire document.

  6. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darling, James E.; Pajak, Paul; Wunderlich, Mary P.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was undertaken to assess the effects of Kerr Dam operations on the fisheries of the Lower Flathead System. Supported by Bonneville Power Administration funding, and conducted by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, the study began in December of 1982 and is scheduled for completion in December of 1987. This report covers the 1983-84 field season and includes the status of target fish species populations in the Flathead River and tributaries, and initial work in South Bay of Flathead Lake. Additionally it addresses how Kerr operations may effect the reproduction of salmonids and northern pike. Combined trout population estimates for rainbow, brown, brook, and bull trout, averaged 13 fish/km of the lower Flathead River. The number of bull trout and cutthroat trout captured was so low that estimation of their individual populations was not possible. An interim closure to trout harvest on the lower Flathead River was recommended and approved by the Tribal Council until study results can be further analyzed and management options reviewed. Population estimates for northern pike ranged from six/kilometer in poorer habitat, to one hundred three/km in the best habitat in the main Flathead River. Seven pike were radio tagged and their movements monitored. Movements of over 89 km were recorded. One fish left the Flathead River and moved down the Clark Fork to the Plains area. Fish weirs were constructed on the Jocko River and Mission Creek to assess spawning runs of trout from the main river. Thirty-two adult rainbow passed the Jocko weir and twenty-eight passed the Mission weir during the spring spawning season. Twenty adult brown trout were captured at the Jocko weir and five at Mission weir in the fall. The Jocko weir suffered minor damage due to bed load movement during high flows of spring runoff. The structure of trout populations in the lower Flathead River points to spawning and recruitment problems caused by hydroelectric operations and sedimentation. Among the consequences of the present operational regime are constant, rapid changes in river discharge during spawning and Incubation seasons of trout species present in the lower river. Hamilton and Buell (1976) reported that similar fluctuation might exceed tolerance limits of adults and inhibit spawning behavior, dewater redds, strand fry, and displace juveniles to habitats less suitable for survival. Similar problems are felt to exist on the lower river. Constant fluctuations over backwater vegetation have been linked to major problems in successful northern pike spawning and recruitment by preventing access to spawning sites, and dewatering eggs and attached fry. Phase I of the South Bay investigation was completed this year resulting in a detailed study program for the next three years. Dominant habitat types were mapped, and physical habitat and biological monitoring methods were evaluated and selected. Permanent habitat transects, water quality stations, fish sampling, gillnetting, seining, and trapping sites were established.

  7. Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electric Drive System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staunton, Robert H [ORNL; Ayers, Curtis William [ORNL; Chiasson, J. N. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burress, Timothy A [ORNL; Marlino, Laura D [ORNL

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2004 Toyota Prius is a hybrid automobile equipped with a gasoline engine and a battery- and generator-powered electric motor. Both of these motive-power sources are capable of providing mechanical-drive power for the vehicle. The engine can deliver a peak-power output of 57 kilowatts (kW) at 5000 revolutions per minute (rpm) while the motor can deliver a peak-power output of 50 kW over the speed range of 1200-1540 rpm. Together, this engine-motor combination has a specified peak-power output of 82 kW at a vehicle speed of 85 kilometers per hour (km/h). In operation, the 2004 Prius exhibits superior fuel economy compared to conventionally powered automobiles. To acquire knowledge and thereby improve understanding of the propulsion technology used in the 2004 Prius, a full range of design characterization studies were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical characteristics of the 2004 Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. These characterization studies included (1) a design review, (2) a packaging and fabrication assessment, (3) bench-top electrical tests, (4) back-electromotive force (emf) and locked rotor tests, (5) loss tests, (6) thermal tests at elevated temperatures, and most recently (7) full-design-range performance testing in a controlled laboratory environment. This final test effectively mapped the electrical and thermal results for motor/inverter operation over the full range of speeds and shaft loads that these assemblies are designed for in the Prius vehicle operations. This testing was undertaken by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) program through its vehicle systems technologies subprogram. The thermal tests at elevated temperatures were conducted late in 2004, and this report does not discuss this testing in detail. The thermal tests explored the derating of the Prius motor design if operated at temperatures as high as is normally encountered in a vehicle engine. The continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures are projected from test data at 900 rpm. A separate, comprehensive report on this thermal control study is available [1].

  8. Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electric Drive System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staunton, R.H.; Ayers, C.W.; Chiasson, J.N. (U Tennessee-Knoxville); Burress, B.A. (ORISE); Marlino, L.D.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2004 Toyota Prius is a hybrid automobile equipped with a gasoline engine and a battery- and generator-powered electric motor. Both of these motive-power sources are capable of providing mechanical-drive power for the vehicle. The engine can deliver a peak-power output of 57 kilowatts (kW) at 5000 revolutions per minute (rpm) while the motor can deliver a peak-power output of 50 kW over the speed range of 1200-1540 rpm. Together, this engine-motor combination has a specified peak-power output of 82 kW at a vehicle speed of 85 kilometers per hour (km/h). In operation, the 2004 Prius exhibits superior fuel economy compared to conventionally powered automobiles. To acquire knowledge and thereby improve understanding of the propulsion technology used in the 2004 Prius, a full range of design characterization studies were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical characteristics of the 2004 Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. These characterization studies included (1) a design review, (2) a packaging and fabrication assessment, (3) bench-top electrical tests, (4) back-electromotive force (emf) and locked rotor tests, (5) loss tests, (6) thermal tests at elevated temperatures, and most recently (7) full-design-range performance testing in a controlled laboratory environment. This final test effectively mapped the electrical and thermal results for motor/inverter operation over the full range of speeds and shaft loads that these assemblies are designed for in the Prius vehicle operations. This testing was undertaken by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) program through its vehicle systems technologies subprogram. The thermal tests at elevated temperatures were conducted late in 2004, and this report does not discuss this testing in detail. The thermal tests explored the derating of the Prius motor design if operated at temperatures as high as is normally encountered in a vehicle engine. The continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures are projected from test data at 900 rpm. A separate, comprehensive report on this thermal control study is available [1].

  9. Space nuclear power, propulsion, and related technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, Marshall

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is one of the nation's largest research and development (R&D) facilities, with headquarters at Albuquerque, New Mexico; a laboratory at Livermore, California; and a test range near Tonopah, Nevada. Smaller testing facilities are also operated at other locations. Established in 1945, Sandia was operated by the University of California until 1949, when, at the request of President Truman, Sandia Corporation was formed as a subsidiary of Bell Lab's Western Electric Company to operate Sandia as a service to the U.S. Government without profit or fee. Sandia is currently operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by AT&T Technologies, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of AT&T. Sandia's responsibility is national security programs in defense and energy with primary emphasis on nuclear weapon research and development (R&D). However, Sandia also supports a wide variety of projects ranging from basic materials research to the design of specialized parachutes. Assets, owned by DOE and valued at more than $1.2 billion, include about 600 major buildings containing about 372,000 square meters (m2) (4 million square feet [ft2]) of floor space, located on land totalling approximately 1460 square kilometers (km2) (562 square miles [mi]). Sandia employs about 8500 people, the majority in Albuquerque, with about 1000 in Livermore. Approximately 60% of Sandia's employees are in technical and scientific positions, and the remainder are in crafts, skilled labor, and administrative positions. As a multiprogram national laboratory, Sandia has much to offer both industrial and government customers in pursuing space nuclear technologies. The purpose of this brochure is to provide the reader with a brief summary of Sandia's technical capabilities, test facilities, and example programs that relate to military and civilian objectives in space. Sandia is interested in forming partnerships with industry and government organizations, and has already formed several cooperative alliances and agreements. Because of the synergism of multiple governmental and industrial sponsors of many programs, Sandia is frequently able to provide complex technical solutions in a relatively short time, and often at lower cost to a particular customer. They have listed a few ongoing programs at Sandia related to space nuclear technology as examples of the possible synergisms that could result from forming teams and partnerships with related technologies and objectives.

  10. Tucson Electric Power Company Sahuarita-Nogales Transmission Line Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Tucson Electric Power Company (TEP) has applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for a Presidential Permit to construct and operate a double-circuit, 345,000-volt (345-kV) electric transmission line across the United States border with Mexico. Under Executive Order (EO) 10485 of September 3, 1953, as amended by EO 12038 of February 3, 1978, a Presidential Permit is required to construct, connect, operate, or maintain facilities at the U.S. international border for the transmission of electric energy between the United States and a foreign country. DOE has determined that the issuance of a Presidential Permit to TEP for the proposed project would constitute a major Federal action that may have a significant impact on the environment within the meaning of the ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA) 42 United States Code (U.S.C.) {section}4321 et seq. For this reason, DOE has prepared this Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to evaluate potential environmental impacts from the proposed Federal action (granting a Presidential Permit for the proposed transmission facilities) and reasonable alternatives, including the No Action Alternative. This EIS was prepared in accordance with Section 102(2)(c) of NEPA, Council of Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1500-1508), and DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021). DOE is the lead Federal Agency, as defined by 40 CFR 1501.5. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USFS), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) of the U.S. Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission, U.S. and Mexico (USIBWC), are cooperating agencies. Each of these organizations will use the EIS for its own NEPA purposes, as described in the Federal Agencies' Purpose and Need and Authorizing Actions section of this summary. The 345-kV double-circuit transmission line would consist of twelve transmission line wires, or conductors, and two neutral ground wires that would provide both lightning protection and fiber optic communications, on a single set of support structures. The transmission line would originate at TEP's existing South Substation (which TEP would expand), in the vicinity of Sahuarita, Arizona, and interconnect with the Citizens Communications (Citizens) system at a Gateway Substation that TEP would construct west of Nogales, Arizona. The double-circuit transmission line would continue from the Gateway Substation south to cross the U.S.-Mexico border and extend approximately 60 miles (mi) (98 kilometers [km]) into the Sonoran region of Mexico, connecting with the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE, the national electric utility of Mexico) at CFE's Santa Ana Substation.

  11. Environmental Assessment for Electrical Power System Upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) follows the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. In this case, the DOE decision to be made is whether to construct and operate a 19.5-mile (mi) (31-kilometer [km]) electric transmission line (power line) reaching from the Norton Substation, west across the Rio Grande, to locations within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Areas (TAs) 3 and 5 at Los Alamos, New Mexico. The construction of one electric substation at LANL would be included in the project as would the construction of two line segments less than 1,200 feet (ft) (366 meters [m]) long that would allow for the uncrossing of a portion of two existing power lines. Additionally, a fiber optics communications line would be included and installed concurrently as part of the required overhead ground conductor for the power line. The new power line would improve the reliability of electric service in the LANL and Los Aktrnos County areas as would the uncrossing of the crossed segments of the existing lines. Additionally, installation of the new power line would enable the LANL and the Los Alamos County electric grid, which is a shared resource, to be adapted to accommodate the future import of increased power when additional power service becomes available in the northern New Mexico area. Similarly, the fiber optics line would allow DOE to take advantage of future opportunities in enhanced communications services. The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the baseline environmental conditions at the proposed power line location, (2) analyze the potential effects to the existing environment from construction, operation, and maintenance of a new power line, and (3) compare the effects of the Proposed Action and the four action alternatives to the No Action Alternative. In addition, the EA provides DOE with environmental information that could be used in developing mitigative actions to minimize or avoid adverse effects to the integrity of the human environment and natural ecosystems should DOE decide to proceed with construction and operation of the new power line. Ultimately, the goal of NEPA and this EA is to aid DOE officials in making decisions based on understanding the environmental consequences of their decision.

  12. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

    2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

  13. Chromospheric Anemone Jets as Evidence of Ubiquitous Reconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazunari Shibata; Tahei Nakamura; Takuma Matsumoto; Kenichi Otsuji; Takenori J. Okamoto; Naoto Nishizuka; Tomoko Kawate; Hiroko Watanabe; Shin'ichi Nagata; Satoru UeNo; Reizaburo Kitai; Satoshi Nozawa; Saku Tsuneta; Yoshinori Suematsu; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Toshifumi Shimizu; Yukio Katsukawa; Theodore D. Tarbell; Thomas E. Berger; Bruce W. Lites; Richard A. Shine; Alan M. Title

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The heating of the solar chromosphere and corona is a long-standing puzzle in solar physics. Hinode observations show the ubiquitous presence of chromospheric anemone jets outside sunspots in active regions. They are typically 3 to 7 arc seconds = 2000 to 5000 kilometers long and 0.2 to 0.4 arc second = 150 to 300 kilometers wide, and their velocity is 10 to 20 kilometers per second. These small jets have an inverted Y-shape, similar to the shape of x-ray anemone jets in the corona. These features imply that magnetic reconnection similar to that in the corona is occurring at a much smaller spatial scale throughout the chromosphere and suggest that the heating of the solar chromosphere and corona may be related to small-scale ubiquitous reconnection.

  14. Multi-Messenger Astronomy: Cosmic Rays, Gamma-Rays, and Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Although cosmic rays were discovered a century ago, we do not know where or how they are accelerated. There is a realistic hope that the oldest problem in astronomy will be solved soon by ambitious experimentation: air shower arrays of 10,000 kilometer-square area, arrays of air Cerenkov telescopes and kilometer- scale neutrino observatories. Their predecessors are producing science. We will review the highlights: - Cosmic rays: the highest energy particles and the GZK cutoff, the search for cosmic accelerators and the the Cygnus region, top-down mechanisms: photons versus protons? - TeV-energy gamma rays: blazars, how molecular clouds may have revealed proton beams, first hints of the diffuse infrared background? - Neutrinos: first results and proof of concept for technologies to construct kilometer-scale observatories.

  15. Status of the AMANDA South Pole Neutrino Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1996-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial deployment of optical modules near 1 and 2 kilometer depth indicate that deep polar ice is the most transparent known natural solid. Experience with early data has revealed that a detector, conceived to measure muons tracks, can also measure energy of high energy neutrinos as well as bursts of MeV neutrinos, e.g. produced by supernovae and gamma ray bursts. We plan to complete AMANDA this austral summer to form a detector of 11 deep strings instrumented over 400 meters height with 300 optical modules. We will argue that ice is the ideal medium to deploy a future kilometer-scale detector and discuss the first deployment of 10 strings of kilometer length.

  16. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuell, Michael A.; Everett, Scott R. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 1999 annual report covers the third year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 1999 white sturgeon were captured, marked and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. A total of 33,943 hours of setline effort and 2,112 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1999. A total of 289 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 29 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 11.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 27 cm to 261 cm and averaged 110 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 98 cm to 244 cm and averaged 183.5 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon < 60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 1,823 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,052-4,221. A total of 15 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 6.4 km (4 miles) downstream to 13.7 km (8.5 miles) upstream; however, 83.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 kilometers (0.5 miles). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 29 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 49 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests the fish are currently growing faster than fish historicly inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. Five white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River.

  17. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, C.A.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  18. Artificial ozone holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. N. Dolya

    2014-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This article considers an opportunity of disinfecting a part of the Earth surface, occupying a large area of ten thousand square kilometers. The sunlight will cause dissociation of molecular bromine into atoms; each bromine atom kills thirty thousand molecules of ozone. Each bromine plate has a mass of forty milligrams grams and destroys ozone in the area of hundred square meters. Thus, to form the ozone hole over the area of ten thousand square kilometers, it is required to have the total mass of bromine equal to the following four tons.

  19. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  20. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

    2013-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  1. The Critical Density and the Effective Excitation Density of Commonly Observed Molecular Dense Gas Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optically thin critical densities and the effective excitation densities to produce a 1 K km/s (or 0.818 Jy km/s $(\\frac{\

  2. Vegetational, edaphic and topographic relationships of a 25-year exclosure on the Edwards Plateau, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Terry Warren

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exclosure expressed in kilograms/hectare. Data from Table 6. 38 An Eriochloa eez'icea stand on the Sonors Ex- periment Station study exclosure. 40 Detail of the production sampling quadrat in an Eriochloa sericea stand on the Sonora Ex- periment... Station study exclosure. 42 An Az'istida wriFhtii stand on the Sonora Experiment Station study exclosure. 44 Microrelief of the /Lrietida un'ightii stand on the Sonora Experiment Station study exclosure. 46 Microrelief of the Erioneuron pilosum stand...

  3. Environmental Aspects of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles: Parametric Modeling and Preliminary Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yancey, Kristina D.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    High-enriched uranium, or uranium that has an enrichment of more than 20% 235U HLW High Level Waste, the highly radioactive materials produced by nuclear reactors MWe Megawatt electric, the amount of power entering the electrical grid LEU Low-enriched... uranium, or uranium that has an enrichment of less than 20% 235U Sievert Unit describing biological effects of radiation such that 1 Sievert is equal to 1 Joule/kilogram, abbreviated Sv tHM tonne Heavy Metal tonne A measurement of mass such that 1...

  4. Nuclear criticality safety in D and D operations: a Los Alamos experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory require the interaction of several disciplines so that the effort to D&D radiological facilities can proceed unencumbered, on schedule, and within budget. Although playing a minor role, the Laboratory`s Nuclear Criticality Safety Group has provided criticality safety guidance to one such D&D team efficiently and cost-effectively. During the first major D&D effort at Los Alamos, a total of about 6 kilograms of uranium [U(93)] was recovered from a facility thought to contain only tens of grams.

  5. Comparison of the INRIM and PTB lattice-spacing standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massa, E; Kuetgens, U

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To base the kilogram definition on the atomic mass of the silicon 28 atom, the present relative uncertainty of the silicon 28 lattice parameter must lowered to 3E-9. To achieve this goal, a new experimental apparatus capable of a centimetre measurement-baseline has been made at the INRIM. The comparison between the determinations of the lattice parameter of crystals MO*4 of INRIM and WASO4.2a of PTB is intended to verify the measurement capabilities and to assess the limits of this experiment.

  6. Growth curve analysis of Rambouillet ewes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathenge, James Mwai

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for this study. However, most of the results were reported for 152 observations; a subset of the 283 records that contained the smst complete set of weighted' Type of birth and rearing was the single most significant source of variation for preweaning body... weights and growth rates. Estimation of mature weight obtained for 184 records was 59. 6 + . 77 kilograms. Based upon analysis of yearly weights, ewes had reached maturity by 42 months of age. Birth and 120-day weight were lower than those reported...

  7. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. M.; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: The rare gases krypton, xenon, and radon pose both an economic opportunity and a potential environmental hazard. Xenon is used in commercial lighting, medical imaging, and anesthesia, and can sell for $5,000 per kilogram. Radon, by contrast, Is naturally radioactive and the second largest cause of lung cancer, and radioactive xenon, 133Xe, was a major pollutant released In the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. We describe an organic cage molecule that can capture xenon and radon with unprecedented selectivity, suggesting new technologies for environmental monitoring, removal of pollutants, or the recovery of rare, valuable elements from air.

  8. A study of the use of feed supplements for prevention of experimental bitterweed (Hymenoxys odorata) poisoning in sheep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridges, Gary Wayne

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in reducing the toxicity of bitterv!eed (~H&!en~ox s odorata). In each of four experiments, sheep were divided into four groups of two and were dosed with bitterweed equal in weight to 0. 1/, 0. 2/, 0. 4'i and 0. 8'/ of their body weight. The median lethal... as above and the LD50 was estimated to be 4. 0 + 0. 3 gm bitterweed per kilogrtln! of body weight. Sodium sulfate, administered to the lambs at a rate of 340 mg per kilogram of body v!eight prior to dosing with bitterv!eed, also affected the toxicity...

  9. A study of the use of feed supplements for prevention of experimental bitterweed (Hymenoxys odorata) poisoning in sheep 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridges, Gary Wayne

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in reducing the toxicity of bitterv!eed (~H&!en~ox s odorata). In each of four experiments, sheep were divided into four groups of two and were dosed with bitterweed equal in weight to 0. 1/, 0. 2/, 0. 4'i and 0. 8'/ of their body weight. The median lethal... as above and the LD50 was estimated to be 4. 0 + 0. 3 gm bitterweed per kilogrtln! of body weight. Sodium sulfate, administered to the lambs at a rate of 340 mg per kilogram of body v!eight prior to dosing with bitterv!eed, also affected the toxicity...

  10. Maintenance Requirements of Chickens and the Effect of Age of Chickens on the Productive Energy of Feeds. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?merits were calculated to the average weight of for the , the experiment, usually 3 weeks. The caloric productive energy consumed in the ration fed less the calories of energy stored in the chicken give the calories of productive energy used... used for maintenance, calories per day per 100 gram =100C + (11 13 X42) = D ... 7.18 Lc.Ab.4.. Layin; quiren chicke A,, ": rl LU1131U In I maintc caloric ._ly 37 grams of the ration per day and kilogram would be required for ntenance...

  11. Active neutron multiplicity counting of bulk uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensslin, N.; Krick, M.S.; Langner, D.G.; Miller, M.C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new nondestructive assay technique being developed to assay bulk uranium containing kilogram quantities of {sup 235}U. The new technique uses neutron multiplicity analysis of data collected with a coincidence counter outfitted with AmLi neutron sources. We have calculated the expected neutron multiplicity count rate and assay precision for this technique and will report on its expected performance as a function of detector design characteristics, {sup 235 }U sample mass, AmLi source strength, and source-to-sample coupling. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Effects of explicit atmospheric convection at high CO2 Nathan P. Arnolda,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tziperman, Eli

    in the climate system by reflecting incoming shortwave solar radiation (cooling), intercepting outgoing longwave impact at the surface is about -20 W/m2 cooling in the global mean, and regional impacts can approach 40 in climate science. Progress has been complicated by the hundred-kilometer horizontal grid spacing of most

  13. Neutrino Astronomy: Physics Goals, Detector Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. K. Gaisser

    1997-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a review of high energy neutrino astronomy that might be done with a kilometer-scale detector. The emphasis is on diffuse neutrinos of extragalactic origin and their relation to possible sources of the highest energy cosmic rays, such as active galaxies, cosmological gamma-ray burst sources and topological defects.

  14. Neutrino Physics with the IceCube Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kiryluk; for the IceCube Collaboration

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    IceCube is a cubic kilometer neutrino telescope under construction at the South Pole. The primary goal is to discover astrophysical sources of high energy neutrinos. We describe the detector and present results on atmospheric muon neutrinos from 2006 data collected with nine detector strings.

  15. Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , the medium starts deform- ing, with the onset of small-scale instabilities and pip- hal-00845894,version1 fluidization or liquefaction of the granular matrix. The shape of the fluidized zone, in- ferred from are encountered worldwide and at different scales, from kilometers (kimberlite pipes [5], mud volcanoes [6

  16. Forms and Distributions of Hurricane Ike Backflow and Scour Features: Bolivar Peninsula, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potts, Michael Killgore

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and backflow features in the beach and dune environments along Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. Using Ward?s cluster analysis, the 454 identified features were grouped according to shape and size characteristics generated by an object-oriented shape analysis... ............................................................................. 76 Analysis of Features per Kilometer of Shoreline ........................... 78 IV RESULTS ............................................................................................. 79 Size...

  17. Abstract--We investigated the use of otolith morphology to indicate the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of otolith shape. Variables were compared among four regions of the GBR separated by hundreds of kilometers in the southern parts of the GBR caused by a large tropical cyclone in March 1997. Results indicated the presence be defined as separate stocks. the stocks have spent some periods of Although the precise definition of

  18. Reducing False Alarms with Multi-modal Sensing for Pipeline Blockage (Extended)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidemann, John

    supported by CiSoft (Center for In- teractive Smart Oilfield Technologies), a Center of Research Ex in the context of a specific example: cold-oil blockages in flowlines in pro- ducing oilfields. A typical oilfield has many kilometers of distribution flowlines that collect crude oil extracted from wellhead

  19. Humboldt National Forest East Mormon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    14 16 Kilometers Carson City Ely Nevada Las Vegas Solar Energy Study Areas in Nevada Map Prepared Boundary Existing Designated Corridor (See Note 2) (As of 6/5/2009) Solar Energy Study Area (As of 6 Mead National Recreation Area Mojave National Preserve Death Valley National Park Arizona Nevada

  20. 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Purpose and Scope of MARSSIM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --ranging in size from Federal weapons- production facilities covering hundreds of square kilometers to the nuclear Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Department of Energy (DOE) are responsible radioactive contamination. The decommissioning that follows remediation will normally require a demonstration

  1. MAP TRANSFORMATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC SPACE WALDO RUDOLPH TOBLER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobler, Waldo

    MAP TRANSFORMATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC SPACE by WALDO RUDOLPH TOBLER A thesis submitted in partial. If the transformations were dependent only on a factor of proportionality, as in the conversion from miles to kilometers relations, just as isometric transformations of a spherical surface to a plane are not possible. Maps

  2. 73Working with Rates Because things change in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    years Problem 6 - 416 gamma-ray bursts spotted in 52 weeks Problem 7 - 3000 kilometers traveled in 200 in 800 years = 2 novas/year Problem 6 - 416 gamma-ray bursts spotted in 52 weeks = 8 gamma-ray bursts

  3. Continued on page 3 Graduate student Jarvis Caffrey worked as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    while testing seawater for concentrations of Cesium off the coast of Japan. Three hundred kilometers off deep inside the research vessel Kaimikai-o-Kanaloa. Caffrey is us- ing a purpose-built device to col isotope produced by fission and one of the contaminants released by the Fukushima nuclear plant disaster

  4. South Dakota North Platte R.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Dakota Nebraska Index map North Platte R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in cooperation with the NORTH PLATTE NATURAL RESOURCES DISTRICT SIGNIFICANT FINDINGS

  5. Using Strain Gauges to Detect Epoxy Debonding in Insulated Rail Joints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    within a control block. Adjacent circuits within the track are separated by insulated rail joints (alsoUsing Strain Gauges to Detect Epoxy Debonding in Insulated Rail Joints Daniel Peltier, Christopher mainline track. These require insulated rail joints every several kilometers in order to electrically

  6. CLOUD LIFE CYCLE OBSERVED DURING THE 2009 CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY FIELD CAMPAIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -month experiment, five scanning microwave radiometers were deployed along an eight-kilometer line and programmed cover conditions. The high-resolution tomographic retrievals provide a unique opportunity- 98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher by accepting the manuscript

  7. Lectures on Neutrino Astronomy: Theory and Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Overview of neutrino astronomy: multidisciplinary science. 2. Cosmic accelerators: the highest energy cosmic rays. 3. Neutrino beam dumps: supermassive black holes and gamma ray bursts. 4. Neutrino telescopes: water and ice. 5. Indirect dark matter detection. 6. Towards kilometer-scale detectors.

  8. Graellsia, 63(1): 135-142 (2007) * Department of Animal Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada (Spain) 18071, Granada. Spain. hormiga@ugr.es

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villemant, Claire

    of Granada (Spain) 18071, Granada. Spain. hormiga@ugr.es A. Tinaut* ABSTRACT A new species, Rossomyrmex of this genus were described: R. minuchae, found in Sierra Nevada (Granada, Spain) many kilometers away from represents a first clue to finding Rossomyrmex. Outside of Spain we have searched in Mongolia (2005

  9. 2012 Conference on Intelligent Data Understanding EddyScan: A Physically Consistent Ocean Eddy Monitoring Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    the Agulhas Current, which flows along the southeastern coast of Africa and around the tip of South Africa dynamics. In addition to dominating the ocean's kinetic energy, eddies play a significant role. The ocean's kinetic energy is dominated by mesoscale variability: scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers

  10. , T.V.Shymchuk , I.V.Stasyuk, T.S.Mysakovych

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and localized in such following places as object "Shelter", points of a burial of radioactive waste, temporary storages or remained imme- diately in an environment. In a 30-kilometer zone of alienation one of basic there is a utilization problem for waste which are formed after Chornobyl acci- dent

  11. An evaluation and comparison of current technologies for stocking rate management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haby, Travis Scott

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    30 kilometers east, southeast of the tow'n of Paducah. Annual precipitation is highly varied with an average of approximately 634. 5 mm. The average frost-free period is 220 days. The study site consisted of 4 pastures on the southern end...

  12. August 14, 2003 ---Home Site Index Site Search/Archive Help --Welcome, jmd@mit.edu Member Center Log Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    management of demand, smarter use of coal as well as renewable energy sources, and increased use of nuclear possible to dispose of spent fuel safely, the issue is actually doing it. Successful operation Yucca Mountain. For example, burying spent fuel several kilometers deep in a dry well, called a borehole

  13. 4/3/12 2:13 PMMantle Convection: Earth's Interior Page 1 of 3http://conman.geos.vt.edu/~sdk/mantle/interior.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    spherical shells: the crust, the mantle, and the core. The crust ranges from 6 to 70 kilometers thick minerals and the liquid iron outer core. #12;4/3/12 2:13 PMMantle Convection: Earth's Interior Page 2 of 3, O) in the Sun's outer corona and show no indication of chemical alteration since their formation

  14. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MEXICO TEXAS MEXICO 0 50 100 150 200 KILOMETERS EXPLANATION Rio Grande Basin Closed subbasin Basin Reservoirs Rio Grande above Amistad International Reservoir. COLORADO NEW MEXICO TEXAS MEXICO Figure 1. Rio of new contami- nants, and successful efforts in environmental pollution remedi- ation. Historical data

  15. Reprint draft October 8, 2003 Pliocene tephra correlations between East African

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deMenocal, Peter B.

    , University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Abstract A continuous record of Pliocene-Pleistocene East African volcanic tephra deposition has been developed from a marine sediment sequence at Ocean Drilling-Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) sites from the Gulf of Aden, nearly one thousand kilometers northeast of hominid

  16. Grays Harbor D e m o g r a p h i c a n d S o c i o e c o n o m i c C h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o f S e a t t l eD e m o g r a p h i c a n d S o c i o e c o n o m i c C h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o f S e a t t l e

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Jefferson Puget Sound L a k e Y o u n g s L a k e Y o u n g s King Pierce Snohomish Thurston Kitsap Kittitas-gridded area Puget Sound Puget Sound 0 30 6015 Miles 0 30 6015 Kilometers - Puget Sound Copyright 2006

  17. Laboratoire de Conception de Systmes Mcaniques Gnie mcanique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    chains were the cost-efficiency ratio and the service level. Nowadays, according to the new concerns suggest that for a same performance level, the second model shows: · 40% reduction in transport costs per pallet, · 20% reduction in handling costs per pallet, · 25% cut in total truck kilometers travelled

  18. Frank Breust, Governmental Affairs,BMW Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    kilometers ~1.100vehicles BMW i3 and BMW i8 BMW i is more than just an electric car. BMW i offers 360 + 95 hp electric motor #12;FULLY ELECTRIC CAR SHARING. DRIVENOW IN THE BAYAREA. On;FULLY ELECTRIC CAR SHARING. DRIVENOW IN THE BAYAREA. On-Street-Parking necessary for better visibility

  19. 542 American Scientist, Volume 94 2006 Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society. Reproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Robert J.

    Exclusion Zone, a region within a 30-kilometer radius of the Cher- nobyl Nuclear Power Plant. We were environment on the local wildlife. We have performed a variety of experiments in the Zone. In one of our earli- sion. The genetic impacts proved to be subtle and not likely to threaten the rodent's repro- ductive

  20. Spatial patterns of flow and their modification within and around a giant kelp forest Brian Gaylord1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Spatial patterns of flow and their modification within and around a giant kelp forest Brian Gaylord and over the full extent of a giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) forest located at Mohawk Reef, Santa reported for larger (kilometer-scale) kelp beds, suggesting that alongshore currents may play a greater

  1. http://bos.sagepub.com/ Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    of the Atomic Scientists Timothy A. Mousseau and Anders P. Møller Chernobyl's wildlife Landscape portrait contaminants on Chernobyl's wildlife Timothy A. Mousseau and Anders P. Møller Abstract The Chernobyl accident,000 square kilometers of land. The Chernobyl Forum Report, an initiative of the International Atomic Energy

  2. The world's offshore continental margins contain vast reserves of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    The world's offshore continental margins contain vast reserves of gas hydrate, a frozen form of nat-seafloor geology. Increasing use of marine multicomponent seismic technol- ogy by oil and gas companies now allows seafloor strata over distances of several kilometers across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico

  3. EOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION Seismology is the study of the propaga-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    , and mineral resources at depths of meters to a few kilometers. Detailed knowledge of the Earth's near sur of seismology has emerged, including hydrocarbon and resource exploration, earth- quake detection and hazard, and reconstructing the twentieth- century history of global storm activity from ocean-generated seismic noise

  4. VOLUME 90 NUMBER 23 9 JUNE 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., 2004], but recent advances in the design, electronics, and reliability of the components of the seis accurately beneath ice-covered oceans, where ice poses significant risk to survey equipment, the preferred-Laurent. In 2008, the same equipment was used to collect approximately 1300 kilometers of seismic data in single

  5. Thesis development The following briefly summarizes the development of my project from the initial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    knew we wanted to try to date old moraine sequences in Patagonia, but we did not know exactly where travelled over 12,000 kilometers across the length and breadth of Argentine Patagonia and had a truck Patagonia in Esquel was willing to store the stones and arrange shipment to the UK. Back in Edinburgh, Steve

  6. Introduction 1.1 Layman's Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfister, Henry D.

    ,500 kilometers. In 1794, the first mechanical optical telegraph used a network of signal flags mounted on towers the sender may repeatedly transmit one message bit per channel use, uncertainty in the transmission due probable bit value. For example, if each message bit is transmitted q times, then the rate of transmission

  7. Introduction: The Evolving Landscape of 21st American Spaceflight. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Entrepreneurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Emerging Space Companies of the solar system. Today's space economy extends some 36,000 kilometers (22,369 miles) from the surface to bloom. As we expand our activities in the solar system over the next decades, NASA programs

  8. 16 IEEE Canadian Review -Spring / Printemps 2003 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Wai Tung

    power flow to the motor. There are cur- rently a number of companies specializing in e, approximately 300 companies sold over 1 million electric bikes in 2002 [1]. The efficiency of the e less energy per kilometer than a standard car. In addition, as solar panel technology becomes more

  9. INTRODUCTION Thanks to advances in analytical chemistry and low-detec-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    facilities, platinum-group ele- ments (PGE) recently joined the panel of geochemical tracers of the Earth to extrapolate from the behavior of trace minerals to evolution at the planetary scale. PGE BUDGET OF THE EARTH to thousands of kilometers in diameter) within 107 to 108 years after the formation of the solar system. Due

  10. Architecture of the upper Sego Sandstone, Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkhead, Stanley Scott

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................................... 22 SEDIMENTOLOGY.................................................................................................... 26 Marine Shale with Wavy Sandstones............................................................... 26 Highly... surfaces. The cross-section defines an 8.5 kilometer section that begins in Sego Canyon outside of Thompson Springs, Figure 12-Bedding diagram of major facies transitions with sedimentary logs overlain. SEDIMENTOLOGY Upper Sego Sandstone deposits can...

  11. OBSERVATORY SNO INSTITUTE MEMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    neutrino telescope, the size of a ten-storey building, two kilometers underground in Inco's Creighton Mine their properties. For many years, the number of solar neutrinos measured by other underground detectors has been of the SNO detector to measure all three types of neutrinos to determine that solar neutrinos are changing

  12. Predicting Air Quality: Current Status and Future Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandu, Adrian

    Predicting Air Quality: Current Status and Future Directions Gregory R. Carmichael ,a Adrian Sandu, OR 97207, USA Abstract Air quality prediction plays an important role in the management of our envi can predict pollution in an urban air shed with spatial resolution less than a kilometer, and cover

  13. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 28792892, 2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/10/2879/2010/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    path lengths up to multi- ple kilometers in a compact absorption cell and has a signif- icantly higher sensitivity than conventional absorption spec- troscopy. This tool opens new prospects for study of gaseous a frequency-doubled, tuneable dye laser emitting pulses at 253.65 nm with a pulse repetition fre- quency of 50

  14. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Miller, John; Barsotti, Lisa; Martynov, Denis; Brooks, Aidan; Coyne, Dennis; Abbott, Rich; Adhikari, Rana; Arai, Koji; Bork, Rolf; Kells, Bill; Rollins, Jameson; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Vajente, Gabriele; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Derosa, Ryan; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Betzweiser, Joseph; Frolov, Valera; Mullavey, Adam; O`Reilly, Brian; Dwyer, Sheila; Izumi, Kiwamu; Kawabe, Keita; Landry, Michael; Sigg, Daniel; Ballmer, Stefan; Massinger, Thomas J; Staley, Alexa; Mueller, Chris; Grote, Hartmut; Ward, Robert; King, Eleanor; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chunnong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale interferometer. In this work we describe the first observation of parametric instability in an Advanced LIGO detector, and the means by which it has been removed as a barrier to progress.

  15. NuclearNuclear ""BurningBurning"" of Nuclearof Nuclear ""WasteWaste"" Constantine P. Tzanos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , total of about 66 kilometers long, to accommodate about 1100 waste packages, 70,000 tons of heavy metal 300 meters above water table. s Construction: 5 years s Operations: 50 years s Monitoring: 50 years failure, igneousigneous intrusion, volcanic eruption, seismic ground motion, and seismicintrusion

  16. Tracing global biogeochemical cycles and meridional overturning circulation using chromophoric dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    of the ocean, ultraviolet light penetration, and photochemical reactions that influence the cycling) within the top kilometer of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. However, a much weaker correspondence is found encompass all three ocean basins transecting the subtropics where satelliteretrieved surface ocean CDOM

  17. AFFILIATIONS: X. Li--GST, NOAA/NESDIS, College Park, Maryland; Zhang--Hurricane Research Division, AOML, NOAA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    at kilometer spa- tial resolution. However, the intense air­sea inter- action near the ocean surface cannot;radar that emits radar pulses that can penetrate through clouds. SAR then receives the radar back the ocean surface return--a process quite similar to the QuikSCAT scatterometer wind retrieval. As a result

  18. the continental crust or the over-lying sediments. Microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    of the University of Washington, Seattle. Just how massive this ocean crustal bio- sphere might be remains unclear,000 kilometers through the global ocean. For example, something seems to be nib- bling on the glass that makes up about 5% of ocean crustal rock; samples of the glass brought up by deep drilling are scarred with pits

  19. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 522:11901205, 1999 September 10 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    tens of thou- sands of kilometers in diameter and consist of a dark region, or umbra, with magnetic the umbra and penumbra are darker in white light than the quiet photosphere, and the Ðeld strengths in the umbra and penumbra are typically 2 orders of magnitude higher than the average Ðeld strengths

  20. 6 0 o p r a h . c o m o c t o b e r 2 0 1 1 LifeLive Your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    into their boat and affix a GPS-enabled satellite tag to its dorsal fin. When the 14-footer reenters the water're congenitally incapable." But she's got me up to five kilometers. Sometimes it's a relief just to focus

  1. Flashover vulnerability of transmission and distribution lines to high-altitude electromagnetic pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, V.J. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Advanced Systems Technology Div.); Tesche, F.M. (E-Systems, Inc., Greenville, TX (USA)); Liu, T.K. (Lutech, Inc., Oakland, CA (US)); Barnes, P.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper estimates the vulnerability of transmission and distribution lines to flashover from the electromagnetic pulse generated by a nuclear detonation 400 kilometers above the earth. The analysis consists of first determining the cumulative probability of induced-voltage on three-phase lines, including shield and neutral conductors, for four operating voltages and then comparing these stresses to estimates of line insulation strength.

  2. Wednesday, March 26, 2008 Celebrating IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    of interest (for example, the appearance of exotic dark matter particles, or even miniature black holes) from 80 strings suspended in holes drilled in the ice by hot water and spaced over a square kilometer in place by pouring water into the hole, which then freezes, they are utterly inaccessible. In fact

  3. Moore, J. C, Mascle, A., et al., 1990 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 110

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scales of tens to tens of thousands of years. High heat flow in the vicinity of 15°30'N and not elsewhere. Surface heat-flow values from Leg110(calculated from geothermal gradients forced through the bottom forearc and trench sediments. Geothermal gradi ents in the upper kilometer of sediment that extrapolate

  4. Interactions between Oil-Spill Pollutants and Natural Stressors Can Compound Ecotoxicological Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, Andrew

    SYMPOSIUM Interactions between Oil-Spill Pollutants and Natural Stressors Can Compound productive habitats on earth, yet are at risk from human activities including marine oil spills. The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill contaminated hundreds of kilometers of coastal habitat, particularly

  5. The Last of the Wild ver. 2 The Last of the Wild represents the least influenced (most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    The Last of the Wild ver. 2 Oceania The Last of the Wild represents the least influenced (most wild) areas of major terrestrial biomes. Most wild in each biome are defined as areas with Human Footprint. The Last of the Wild Data set. Available at http://www.sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/wildareas 0 500 Kilometers

  6. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    , and monthly totals of precipitation, direct runoff, and evapotranspiration on 1-kilometer grid-cells of non of Agriculture (Digital General Soil Map of the United States); soil moisture relative to maximum AWC from recharge for grid-cells with irrigation will be estimated from nearby non- irrigated grid-cells to estimate

  7. Structural and Morphologic Study of Shatsky Rise Oceanic Plateau in the Northwest Pacific Ocean from 2D Multichannel Seismic Reflection and Bathymetry Data and Implications for Oceanic Plateau Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinchang

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    and shallow flank slopes (<0.5o-1.5o), characterized by lava flows emanating from the volcano center and extending hundreds of kilometers down smooth, shallow flanks to the surrounding seafloor. Ori Massif is another large volcano that is similar, but smaller...

  8. 105Lunar Crater Frequency Distributions This image of the 800-meter x 480-meter region near the Apollo-11 landing pad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Apollo-11 landing pad (arrow) was taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). It reveals hundreds of craters covering the landing area with sizes as small as 5 meters. The Apollo-11 landing pad is near and gives the surface density of craters near the Apollo-11 landing site in terms of craters per kilometer 2

  9. STRUCTURE OF A CARBONATE/HYDRATE MOUND IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    the mound. Keywords: carbonate/hydrate mound, seismic structures, gas migration, seafloor observatorySTRUCTURE OF A CARBONATE/HYDRATE MOUND IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO T. McGee1* , J. R. Woolsey1 of California, San Diego ABSTRACT A one-kilometer-diameter carbonate/hydrate mound in Mississippi Canyon Block

  10. IX. IMPACT OF AEROSOLS FROM THE ERUPTION OF EL CHICHN ON BEAM RADIATION IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    of 25 kilometers [1]. The effect of this dense cloud upon the atmosphere and climate in the Northern around the earth from 5 degrees to about 30 degrees north latitude. The cloud has had an effect upon in the Pacific Northwest due to the effects of the stratospheric cloud from El Chichón. By looking at quantities

  11. JPL D-33509 Earth Observing System (EOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1000 1200 FWHM / km Nathaniel J. Livesey, William G. Read, Lucien Froidevaux, Alyn Lambert, Gloria L

  12. The Lower Columbia River As a System:The Lower Columbia River As a System: An Oceanographic Point of ViewAn Oceanographic Point of View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Science Foundation US Army EngineersUS Army Engineers Bonneville Power AdministrationBonneville Power Administration NOAANOAA--FisheriesFisheries Miller FoundationMiller Foundation Thanks to: StephanieThanks toSalinity intrusion (~10--60 km in CR)60 km in CR) ­­ Tides (245 km, to Bonneville Dam)Tides (245 km

  13. Ferry-Based Linear Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    of oil, gas, and water pipeline infrastructure using wireless sensor networks. #12;IEEE Globecom 2013 UAE (2006): 2,580 Km of gas pipelines 2,950 Km of oil pipelines 156 Km of refined products pipelines. Desalinated water. Saudi Arabia: 3,800 Km. Oil, Gas, and Water Pipeline UseOil, Gas, and Water

  14. Some evidence on determinants of fuel economy as a function of driving cycle and test type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D.J.; Anderson, J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical methods are used with 107 vehicles whose fuel economy was presented and reported for five test types in a single publication by Consumers Union (CU) for 1986--1988 vehicles. Standard loglinear statistical formulations (i.e., multiplicative models of interactions) are used with data from this and supplementary sources to develop coefficients estimating the percent fuel economy gain per percent change in engine/vehicle design characteristic. The coefficients are developed for the five different test conditions evaluated by CU and are compared with each other on the basis of attributes of the tests. The insights of engineering models are used to develop expectations regarding the shift in size of coefficients as driving cycles change. In both the engineering models and the statistical model, the effect of weight is estimated to be higher in urban driving than in highway driving. For two test categories -- field tests and dynamometer tests -- the benefits of weight reduction are statistically estimated to be greatest in urban driving conditions. The effect on idle fuel flow rate of designing vehicles to hold performance roughly constant by maintaining power per kilogram and/or displacement per kilogram is examined, and its implication for the size of the weight effect is simply approximated from Sovran`s 1983 engineering model results. The fuel-economy-decreasing effect of the desire for performance is estimated to be somewhat larger in the statistical analysis than in the NAS study, when engine technology is held constant.

  15. Stepwise redefinition of the SI base units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Issaev, L K; Khruschov, V V

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The four SI base units are proposed to be redefined in two stages: first, the kilogram, mole and ampere should be defined, and then the kelvin. To realize the redefinition of a base unit of the SI in terms of fundamental physical constant (FPC), a principle of coincidence of their physical dimensions is put forward. Direct applying this principle will lead to the changing of the sets of base and derived units in the new SI. If we want to preserve the continuity of the division between base and derived units in the new and the current SI, the principle is to be generalized with the time dimension factor be included. The status of the mole as the base unit of measurement is considered in the current and new SI. It is proposed to redefine the kilogram using a fixed value of the Avogadro constant and then to redefine the kelvin, after the measurement accuracy of the Boltzmann constant has been increased and agreed with the values of other constants of molecular physics.

  16. Dual battery sets including zinc MnO{sub 2} rechargeable cells on constant power tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumm, B. Jr.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric vehicle power requirements typically are much greater than what would be recommended for rechargeable zinc manganese dioxide alkaline batteries. In order to use the zinc manganese dioxide system as an economical power source for heavy load or pulse systems it is necessary to augment the pulse load carrying capability. Eagle-Cliffs is testing commercially available rechargeable zinc manganese dioxide cells in sets. These sets consist one configuration of the zinc manganese dioxide cells accompanied by a much lower capacity device ( which may be another configuration of zinc manganese dioxide cells) supporting any heavy pulse current requirements. Thus the zinc manganese dioxide cells provide at least a low cost, environmentally desirable main power battery and perhaps the pulse power yet the system still meets the intermittent high power needs of many uses. In this test program, small zinc manganese dioxide rechargeable cells are supported by a nickel cadmium battery or a different set of zinc manganese dioxide cells simulating any of a number of devices such as power batteries, large capacitors, flywheels, etc. Discharge performance demonstrating forty-five to fifty watt-hours per kilogram and 80 watts per kilogram is achieved by the system.

  17. Europe report discloses biofuels' embarrassing secret

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    According to a recently released European Union (EU) internal document, biofuels can produce up to four times more greenhouse gas emissions than the conventional diesel or gasoline they are intended to replace. Conventional gasoline and diesel emit around 85 kilograms of CO2-equivalent per gigajoule of energy. For biofuels to make any sense, they have to beat this by a margin, or else why bother given all the negative externalities associated with growing biofuels? The EU study suggests that the carbon footprint of typical European biofuels is in the range of 100--150 and North American soybeans score around 340 -- at least four times higher than conventional transportation fuels. By contrast, Latin American sugar cane and bioethanol from palm oil from Southeast Asia, is relatively better at 82 and 74 kilograms per gigajoule, respectively. But even in these cases, it is far from clear if biofuels are superior to conventional fuels due to the many externalities associated with biofuels, including clearing of virgin forests and loss of habitat and biodiversity. Moreover, biofuel production in many regions competes directly with food production, resulting in higher food costs.

  18. Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas, 2002-2003 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, T.; Geist, D.; Arntzen, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of the Snake River hydroelectric system has affected fall Chinook salmon smolts by shifting their migration timing to a period (mid- to late-summer) when downstream reservoir conditions are unfavorable for survival. Subsequent to the Snake River Chinook salmon fall-run Evolutionary Significant Unit being listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, recovery planning has included changes in hydrosystem operations (e.g., summer flow augmentation) to improve water temperature and flow conditions during the juvenile Chinook salmon summer migration period. In light of the limited water supplies from the Dworshak reservoir for summer flow augmentation, and the associated uncertainties regarding benefits to migrating fall Chinook salmon smolts, additional approaches for improved smolt survival need to be evaluated. This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that evaluated relationships among river discharge, hyporheic zone characteristics, and egg pocket water temperature in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. This was a pilot-scale study to evaluate these relationships under existing operations of Hells Canyon Dam (i.e., without any prescribed manipulations of river discharge) during the 2002-2003 water year. The project was initiated in the context of examining the potential for improving juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon survival by modifying the discharge operations of Hells Canyon Dam. The potential for improved survival would be gained by increasing the rate at which early life history events proceed (i.e., incubation and emergence), thereby allowing smolts to migrate through downstream reservoirs during early- to mid-summer when river conditions are more favorable for survival. PNNL implemented this research project at index sites throughout 160 km of the Hells Canyon Reach (HCR) of the Snake River. The HCR extends from Hells Canyon Dam (river kilometer [rkm] 399) downstream to the upper end of Lower Granite Reservoir near rkm 240. We randomly selected 14 fall Chinook salmon spawning locations as study sites, which represents 25% of the most used spawning areas throughout the HCR. Interactions between river water and pore water within the riverbed (i.e., hyporheic zone) at each site were quantified through the use of self-contained temperature and water level data loggers suspended inside of piezometers. Surrounding the piezometer cluster at each site were 3 artificial egg pockets. In mid-November 2002, early-eyed stage fall Chinook salmon eggs were placed inside of perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes, along with a temperature data logger, and buried within the egg pockets. Fall Chinook salmon eggs were also incubated in the laboratory for the purpose of developing growth curves that could be used as indicators of emergence timing. The effects of discharge on vertical hydrologic exchange between the river and riverbed were inferred from measured temperature gradients between the river and riverbed, and the application of a numerical model. The hydrologic regime during the 2002-2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures suggested that there was significant vertical hydrologic exchange during all time periods. The combined results of temperature monitoring and numerical modeling indicate that only 2 of 14 sites were significantly affected by short-term (hourly to daily) large magnitude changes in discharge. Although the two sites exhibited acute flux reversals between river water and hyporheic water resulting from short-term large magnitude

  19. Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Consolidation of Certain Dynamic Experimentation Activities at the Two-Mile Mesa Complex Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), follows the Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an environmental assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a national security laboratory located at Los Alamos, New Mexico, that comprises about 40 square miles (mi{sup 2}) (103.6 square kilometers [km{sup 2}]) of buildings, structures, and forested land (Figure 1). It is administered by NNSA for the Federal government and is managed and operated under contract by the University of California (UC). The NNSA must make a decision whether to consolidate and construct new facilities for the Dynamic Experimentation Division (DX) to create a central core area of facilities, including offices, laboratories, and other support structures, at LANL's Two-Mile Mesa Complex, which comprises portions of Technical Area (TA) 6, TA-22, and TA-40. This Proposed Action would involve constructing new buildings; consolidating existing operations and offices; enhancing utilities, roads, and security infrastructure; and demolishing or removing older buildings, structures, and transportables at various technical areas used by DX (Figure 2). This EA has been prepared to assess the potential environmental consequences of this proposed construction, operational consolidation, and demolition project. The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the underlying purpose and need for NNSA action; (2) describe the Proposed Action and identify and describe any reasonable alternatives that satisfy the purpose and need for agency action; (3) describe baseline environmental conditions at LANL; (4) analyze the potential indirect, direct, and cumulative effects to the existing environment from implementation of the Proposed Action, and (5) compare the effects of the Proposed Action with the No Action Alternative and other reasonable alternatives. For the purposes of compliance with NEPA, reasonable alternatives are identified as being those that meet NNSA's purpose and need for action by virtue of timeliness, appropriate technology, and applicability to LANL. The EA process provides NNSA with environmental information that can be used in developing mitigative actions, if necessary, to minimize or avoid adverse effects to the quality of the human environment and natural ecosystems should NNSA decide to proceed with implementing the Proposed Action at LANL. Ultimately, the goal of NEPA, and this EA, is to aid NNSA officials in making decisions based on an understanding of environmental consequences and in taking actions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment.

  20. Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River, Estuary, and Plume in 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Skalski, John R.; Deters, Katherine A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Richard L.; Titzler, P. Scott; Hughes, Michael S.; Kim, Jin A.; Trott, Donna M.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty regarding the migratory behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids passing through the lower Columbia River and estuary after negotiating dams on the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) prompted the development and application of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS). The JSATS has been used to investigate the survival of juvenile salmonid smolts between Bonneville Dam (river kilometer (rkm) 236) and the mouth of the Columbia River annually since 2004. In 2010, a total of 12,214 juvenile salmonids were implanted with both a passive integrated transponder (PIT) and a JSATS acoustic transmitter. Using detection information from JSATS receiver arrays deployed on dams and in the river, estuary, and plume, the survival probability of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts tagged at John Day Dam was estimated form multiple reaches between rkm 153 and 8.3 during the spring. During summer, the survival probability of subyearling Chinook salmon was estimated for the same reaches. In addition, the influence of routes of passage (e.g., surface spill, deep spill, turbine, juvenile bypass system) through the lower three dams on the Columbia River (John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville) on juvenile salmonid smolt survival probability from the dams to rkm 153 and then between rkm 153 and 8.3 was examined to increase understanding of the immediate and latent effects of dam passage on juvenile salmon survival. Similar to previous findings, survival probability was relatively high (>0.95) for most groups of juvenile salmonids from the Bonneville Dam tailrace to about rkm 50. Downstream of rkm 50 the survival probability of all species and run types we examined decreased markedly. Steelhead smolts suffered the highest mortality in this lower portion of the Columbia River estuary, with only an estimated 60% of the tagged fish surviving to the mouth of the river. In contrast, yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts survived to the mouth of the river at higher rates, with estimated survival probabilities of 84% and 86%, respectively. The influence of route of passage at the lower three dams in the FCRPS on juvenile salmonid survival appeared to be relatively direct and immediate. Significant differences in estimated survival probabilities of juvenile salmonid smolts among groups with different dam passage experiences were often detected between the dams and rkm 153. In contrast, the influence of route of passage on survival to the mouth of the Columbia River was not apparent among the groups of tagged juvenile salmonids with different FCRPS passage experiences after they had already survived to a point about 80 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. Yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts that migrated through the lower estuary in off-channel habitats took two to three times longer to travel through these lower reaches and their estimated survival probabilities were not significantly different from that of their cohorts which migrated in or near the navigation channel. A large proportion of the tagged juvenile salmonids migrating in or near the navigation channel in the lower estuary crossed from the south side of the estuary near Astoria, Oregon and passed through relatively shallow expansive sand flats (Taylor Sands) to the North Channel along the Washington shore of the estuary. This migratory behavior may contribute to the avian predation losses observed on for fish (2 to 12% of fish in this study).

  1. Primer on Use of Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging for On-Site Inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, J R

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of an On-Site Inspection (OSI) is to determine whether a nuclear explosion has occurred in violation of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and to gather information which might assist in identifying the violator (CTBT, Article IV, Paragraph 35) Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging (MSIR) is allowed by the treaty to detect observables which might help reduce the search area and thus expedite an OSI and make it more effective. MSIR is permitted from airborne measurements, and at and below the surface to search for anomalies and artifacts (CTBT, Protocol, Part II, Paragraph 69b). The three broad types of anomalies and artifacts MSIR is expected to be capable of observing are surface disturbances (disturbed earth, plant stress or anomalous surface materials), human artifacts (man-made roads, buildings and features), and thermal anomalies. The purpose of this Primer is to provide technical information on MSIR relevant to its use for OSI. It is expected that this information may be used for general background information, to inform decisions about the selection and testing of MSIR equipment, to develop operational guidance for MSIR use during an OSI, and to support the development of a training program for OSI Inspectors. References are provided so readers can pursue a topic in more detail than the summary information provided here. The following chapters will provide more information on how MSIR can support an OSI (Section 2), a short summary what Multi-Spectral Imaging and Infra Red Imaging is (Section 3), guidance from the CTBT regarding the use of MSIR (Section 4), and a description of several nuclear explosion scenarios (Section 5) and consequent observables (Section 6). The remaining sections focus on practical aspects of using MSIR for an OSI, such as specification and selection of MSIR equipment, operational considerations for deployment of MISR equipment from an aircraft, and the conduct of field exercises to mature MSIR for an OSI. Finally, an appendix provides detail describing the magnitude and spatial extent of the surface shock expected from an underground nuclear explosion. If there is a seismic event or other data to suggest there has been a nuclear explosion in violation of the CTBT, an OSI may be conducted to determine whether a nuclear explosion has occurred and to gather information which may be useful in identifying the party responsible for conducting the explosion. The OSI must be conducted in the area where the event that triggered the inspection request occurred, and the inspected area must not exceed 1,000 square kilometers, or be more than 50 km on aside (CTBT Protocol, Part II, Paragraphs 2 and 3). One of the guiding principles for an inspection is that it be effective, minimally intrusive, timely, and cost-effective [Hawkins, Feb 1998]. In that context, MSIR is one of several technologies that can be used during an aircraft overflight to identify ground regions of high interest in a timely and cost-effective manner. This allows for an optimized inspection on the ground. The primary purpose for MSIR is to identify artifacts and anomalies that might be associated with a nuclear explosion, and to use the location of those artifacts and anomalies to reduce the search area that must be inspected from the ground. The MSIR measurements can have additional utility. The multi-spectral measurements of the ground can be used for terrain classification, which can aid in geological characterization of the Inspected Area. In conditions of where light smoke or haze is present, long-wave infrared imaging can provide better imaging of the ground than is possible with standard visible imagery.

  2. Experimental Measurement of the Flow Field of Heavy Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Browand; Charles Radovich

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Flat flaps that enclose the trailer base on the sides and top are known to reduce truck drag and reduce fuel consumption. Such flapped-truck geometries have been studied in laboratory wind tunnels and in field tests. A recent review of wind tunnel data for a variety of truck geometries and flow Reynolds numbers show roughly similar values of peak drag reduction, but differ in the determination of the optimum flap angle. Optimum angles lie in the range 12 degrees-20 degrees, and may be sensitive to Reynolds number and truck geometry. The present field test is undertaken to provide additional estimates of the magnitude of the savings to be expected on a typical truck for five flap angles 10, 13, 16, 19, and 22 degrees. The flaps are constructed from a fiberglass-epoxy-matrix material and are one-quarter of the base width in length (about 61 cm, or 2 feet). They are attached along the rear door hinge lines on either side of the trailer, so that no gap appears at the joint between the flap and the side of the trailer The flap angle is adjusted by means of two aluminum supports. The present test is performed on the NASA Crows Landing Flight Facility at the northern end of the San Joaquin valley in California. The main runway is approximately 2400 meters in length, and is aligned approximately in a north-south direction The test procedure is to make a series of runs starting at either end of the runway. All runs are initiated under computer control to accelerate the truck to a target speed of 60 mph (96 6 km/hr), to proceed at the target speed for a fixed distance, and to decelerate at the far end of the runway. During a run, the broadcast fuel rate, the engine rpm, forward speed, elapsed time--as well as several other parameters (10 in all)--are digitized at a rate of 100 digitizations per second. Various flapped-conditions are interspersed with the ''no flaps'' control, and are sequenced in a different order on different days. Approximately 310 runs are accumulated over the 5-day test period, May 17-21, 2004. The runway slopes rather uniformly upward from north-to-south. Over the distance of 2424 meters between our two ''start'' markers at either end of the runway, the net change in elevation is a little over ten meters. Test results clearly show the greater fuel consumption required to lift the truck against gravity in the southbound direction For this reason, it is important that the tests be averaged over a round trip circuit--that is, a run in both directions over the identical portion of the roadway. Northbound-southbound averages require an overlap segment of the runway (near the middle of the runway) where the truck--starting from either end--has achieved its target speed. For the target truck speed of 60 mph, this overlap region is approximately 700 meters in length. Typically a run and the return run are accomplished within a time interval of 6 minutes. Analysis of the data show fuel consumption savings at all flap angle settings tested, when compared to the ''no flaps'' condition. The most beneficial flap angle appears to be 13 degrees, for which the fuel consumption is 0.3778 {+-} 0.0025 liters/km compared to the ''no flaps'' control of 0.3941 {+-} 0.0034 liters/km. The error bounds expressed above mark the 99% confidence interval in the mean values given. That is, additional estimates of the mean fuel consumption would be expected to lie within the bounds given, approximately 99% of the time. The fuel consumption saving is--to reasonable accuracy--about 1.63 liters/100 kilometers. These savings represent the increment associated only with the change in drag due to the presence or absence of flaps. The result will hold for any truck of similar size and shape and engine performance regardless of the loading of the truck or the rolling resistance. The economy achieved by use of base flaps can be compared to the economy resulting from driving two trucks in a tandem configuration. In December 2003, such fuel consumption tests were performed at the same Crows Landing testsite. In the tests, two identical trucks are ope

  3. The Development of the Linac Coherent Light Source RF Gun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowell, David H; Lewandowski, James; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Li, Zenghai; Schmerge, John; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; Xiao, Liling

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first x-ray laser user facility based upon a free electron laser (FEL). In addition to many other stringent requirements, the LCLS XFEL requires extraordinary beam quality to saturate at 1.5 angstroms within a 100 meter undulator.[1] This new light source is using the last kilometer of the three kilometer linac at SLAC to accelerate the beam to an energy as high as 13.6 GeV and required a new electron gun and injector to produce a very bright beam for acceleration. At the outset of the project it was recognized that existing RF guns had the potential to produce the desired beam but none had demonstrated it. This paper describes the analysis and design improvements of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA s-band gun leading to achievement of the LCLS performance goals.

  4. The North Korean missile program: How advanced is it?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, D.; Kadyshev, T.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past three years there have been increasing numbers of reports that North Korea is developing a 1,000-1,300-kilometer range missile generally referred to as the NoDongg-1. Pyongyang`s missile program has generated international concern because of North Korea`s potential nuclear capabilities, its proximity to South Korea and Japan and its reported missile sales to Iran, Syria and Libya. In June 1993, Japanese and South Korean wire services reported that North Korea had test fired several missiles into the Sea of Japan in late May, at least two of which were though to be NoDong-1 missiles. A missile with a 1,300-kilometer range would give North Korea the capability to reach all of Japan, and give Iran and Libya the capability to reach all of Israel.

  5. Small space object imaging : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Valley, Michael T.; Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of an LDRD effort to investigate new technologies for the identification of small-sized (mm to cm) debris in low-earth orbit. This small-yet-energetic debris presents a threat to the integrity of space-assets worldwide and represents significant security challenge to the international community. We present a nonexhaustive review of recent US and Russian efforts to meet the challenges of debris identification and removal and then provide a detailed description of joint US-Russian plans for sensitive, laser-based imaging of small debris at distances of hundreds of kilometers and relative velocities of several kilometers per second. Plans for the upcoming experimental testing of these imaging schemes are presented and a preliminary path toward system integration is identified.

  6. Tradeoffs between Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Design of Urban Transit Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griswold, Julia Baird

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of veh (kWh/veh-km) Cost per kWh ($/kWh) Operating cost ($/of veh (kWh/veh-km) Cost per kWh ($/kWh) Operating cost ($/

  7. Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diesel) carbon dioxide emissions from electricity (gCO 2 /kWh) distance traveled (km) fuel economy (km/gal) electricity work used (kWh) lower heating value

  8. Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sources to the north are shallow at 15 km depth compared to 22 km to the south. The loss of magnetism to the north is probably due to increased heat as a result of magmatic...

  9. aphrodite terra venus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is the Sun? 250 BC: Aristarchos of Samos calculates AU 7 million km 16th century: Tycho Brahe measures AU 8 million km 17 century: Johannes Kepler estimates AU 24 million...

  10. Nighttime Ionospheric D-region: Equatorial and Non-equatorial Neil R. Thomson,1 and Wayne M. McRae2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otago, University of

    ' ~ 85.0 km and sharpness ~ 0.63 km-1. These paths include NPM (Hawaii) to Washington DC, Omega Hawaii Hawaii to Dunedin, and NPM (Hawaii) to Dunedin. It is suggested that the effects of irregularities

  11. Aluto-Langano Geothermal Field, Ethiopian Rift Valley- Physical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is estimated to be between 3000 and 6000 MWt yr km-3, or 10-20 MWc km-3 for over 30 years. Author B. Gizaw Published Journal Geothermics, 1993 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  12. The 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Silvia

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear accident: the Risk Policy Aftermath 3 #12;Personal experience in March 2011 Tsukuba 170km Tokyo 230km Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power

  13. The Mechanics of Unrest at Long Valley Caldera, California: 1...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    source depth by 2.1 km (35%), and the source volume by 0.038 km3 (44%). Authors M. Battaglia, P. Segall, J. Murray, P. Cervelli and J. Langbein Published Journal Journal of...

  14. Characterization of 618-11 solid waste burial ground, disposed waste, and description of the waste generating facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hladek, K.L.

    1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The 618-11 (Wye or 318-11) burial ground received transuranic (TRTJ) and mixed fission solid waste from March 9, 1962, through October 2, 1962. It was then closed for 11 months so additional burial facilities could be added. The burial ground was reopened on September 16, 1963, and continued operating until it was closed permanently on December 31, 1967. The burial ground received wastes from all of the 300 Area radioactive material handling facilities. The purpose of this document is to characterize the 618-11 solid waste burial ground by describing the site, burial practices, the disposed wastes, and the waste generating facilities. This document provides information showing that kilogram quantities of plutonium were disposed to the drum storage units and caissons, making them transuranic (TRU). Also, kilogram quantities of plutonium and other TRU wastes were disposed to the three trenches, which were previously thought to contain non-TRU wastes. The site burial facilities (trenches, caissons, and drum storage units) should be classified as TRU and the site plutonium inventory maintained at five kilograms. Other fissile wastes were also disposed to the site. Additionally, thousands of curies of mixed fission products were also disposed to the trenches, caissons, and drum storage units. Most of the fission products have decayed over several half-lives, and are at more tolerable levels. Of greater concern, because of their release potential, are TRU radionuclides, Pu-238, Pu-240, and Np-237. TRU radionuclides also included slightly enriched 0.95 and 1.25% U-231 from N-Reactor fuel, which add to the fissile content. The 618-11 burial ground is located approximately 100 meters due west of Washington Nuclear Plant No. 2. The burial ground consists of three trenches, approximately 900 feet long, 25 feet deep, and 50 feet wide, running east-west. The trenches constitute 75% of the site area. There are 50 drum storage units (five 55-gallon steel drums welded together) buried in three rows in the northeast comer. In addition, five eight-foot diameter caissons are located at the west end of the center row of the drum storage units. Initially, wastes disposed to the caissons and drum storage units were from the 325 and 327 building hot cells. Later, a small amount of remote-handled (RH) waste from the 309 building Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) cells, and the newly built 324 building hot cells, was disposed at the site.

  15. Technology development for a neutrino astrophysical observatory. Letter of intent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  16. Technology Development for a Neutrino AstrophysicalObservatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.; He, Y.D.; Jackson, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Lai, K.W.; Learned, J.; Ling, J.; Liu, D.; Lowder, D.; Moorhead, M.; Morookian, J.M.; Nygren, D.R.; Price, P.B.; Richards, A.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.; Smoot, George F.; Stokstad, R.G.; VanDalen, G.; Wilkes, J.; Wright, F.; Young, K.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  17. Megaton Water Cerenkov Detectors and Astrophysical Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maury Goodman

    2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Although formal proposals have not yet been made, the UNO and Hyper-Kamiokande projects are being developed to follow-up the tremendously successful program at Super-Kamiokande using a detector that is 20-50 times larger. The potential of such a detector to continue the study of astrophysical neutrinos is considered and contrasted with the program for cubic kilometer neutrino observatories.

  18. Application of the 2-D Continuous Wavelet Transforms for Characterization of Geological and Geophysical Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuong, Au K

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    continuous wavelet transforms to imag- ing of Shatsky Rise plateau using marine seismic data . . . . . 3 1.1.3 Multi-scale analysis the surface roughness of the minerals . . . 6 1.2 Dissertation structure... evolution. Oceanic plateaus are very large igneous provinces in the deep 3 oceans and are generally a result of massive basaltic volcanism. Observations show that the size of these plateaus ranges up to millions of square kilometers, suggest- ing they must...

  19. A Program Evaluation of a Rwandan Milk Collection Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balinas, Melanie Elizabeth

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    inhabitants per square kilometer. Land scarcity issues will increase with a growing population. Currently, 46% of Rwanda is cultivated (TechnoServe Rwanda, 2008). Of that land, the average farm household cultivates plots of one and a quarter acres (World Food...) revealed that 85% of the households were agriculturally based. Those households cultivate land and rely on agriculture as the primary or only source of income (World Food Programme, 2012). Food security and poverty issues persist with the current levels...

  20. 54X-rays from Hot Gases Near the SN1979C Black Hole The Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is in solar mass units, and R is in kilometers. Problem 1 - Combining these equations using the method-Newton and the German ROSAT observatory revealed a bright source of X-rays that has remained steady for the 12 years, or distribution of X-rays with energy, support the idea that the object in SN 1979C is a black hole being fed