Sample records for kilogram estimated oceanic

  1. Uncertainty Quantification in ocean state estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalmikov, Alexander G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantifying uncertainty and error bounds is a key outstanding challenge in ocean state estimation and climate research. It is particularly difficult due to the large dimensionality of this nonlinear estimation problem and ...

  2. A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haine, Thomas W. N.

    of the oceanic31 carbon pool. It influences light penetration with consequences for primary productivity1 A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2 S. Dwivedi1 , T. W. N. Haine2 and C. E. Del Castillo3 3 1 Department of Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences, University

  3. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2004 producer refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery

  4. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,800 10,100 7,100 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 681 1,760 7,190 4,510 4,000 Consumption.S. germanium consumption. The major end uses for germanium, worldwide, were estimated to be polymerization catalysts, 31%; fiber-optic systems, 24%; infrared optics, 23%; electronics/solar electric applications, 12

  5. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,200 13,800 26,500 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 5,730 681 1,760 7,190 5,000 Consumption.S. germanium consumption. The major end uses for germanium, worldwide, were estimated to be polymerization catalysts, 31%; fiber-optic systems, 24%; infrared optics, 23%; electronics/solar electric applications, 12

  6. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2003 producer. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics, infrared

  7. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2008 producer of 2008. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics

  8. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2007 producer in the fourth quarter of 2007. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production

  9. Estimates of Cabbeling in the Global Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Raymond W.

    Owing to the larger thermal expansion coefficient at higher temperatures, more buoyancy is put into the ocean by heating than is removed by cooling at low temperatures. The authors show that, even with globally balanced ...

  10. Estimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) relies on the availability of temperature differencesEstimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model Krishnakumar Rajagopalan Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawai'i Abstract

  11. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ZENDER: GLOBAL OCEAN WIND POWER POTENTIAL Serpetzoglou, E. ,Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCATEstimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT

  12. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and communications, in Ocean Engineering Planning and Designmicropro?ler, Engineering in the Ocean Environment, Ocean ’engineering diagnostic data will be transmitted. 5. GLOBAL OCEAN

  13. Eddy mean flow decomposition and eddy diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy mean flow decomposition and eddy diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean: 2] Eddy diffusivity of the surface velocity field in the tropical Pacific Ocean was estimated using diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean: 2. Results, J. Geophys. Res., 107(C10), 3154, doi:10

  14. Shipboard Measurements and Estimations of AirSea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Ship­board Measurements and Estimations of Air­Sea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean E dur­ ing the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean and Atmospheric Response of the surface­layer turbulence properties are compared with those from previous land and ocean results. Momentum

  15. An Observational Estimate of Inferred Ocean Energy Divergence KEVIN E. TRENBERTH AND JOHN T. FASULLO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fasullo, John

    An Observational Estimate of Inferred Ocean Energy Divergence KEVIN E. TRENBERTH AND JOHN T, in final form 25 September 2007) ABSTRACT Monthly net surface energy fluxes (FS) over the oceans ocean energy content" are compared with the directly observed ocean energy content (OE) and tendency

  16. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transports from ocean to land and global energy ?ows inof Earth energy imbal- ance, ocean warming, and thermostericthe ther- mal energy of the ocean, it remains a challenging

  17. Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean JONATHAN D. NASH College of Oceanic of boundary energy in local budgets. Until recently, internal wave energy fluxes in ocean observations were 2004, in final form 3 February 2005) ABSTRACT Energy flux is a fundamental quantity for understanding

  18. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oceans; their extensive total volume and large thermal capacity require a larger injection of energy

  19. Performance bounds on matched-field methods for source localization and estimation of ocean environmental parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Wen, 1967-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Matched-field methods concern estimation of source location and/or ocean environmental parameters by exploiting full wave modeling of acoustic waveguide propagation. Typical estimation performance demonstrates two fundamental ...

  20. The Estimated Global Ocean Wind Power Potential from QuikSCAT Observations, Accounting for Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    The Estimated Global Ocean Wind Power Potential from QuikSCAT Observations, Accounting for Turbine: (949) 824-3256 Abstract For the first time, global ocean usable wind power is evaluated for modern offshore turbine characteristics including hub height, usable portion of the wind speed distri- bution

  1. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Click Here for Full Article Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations. Zender (2010), Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting, global ocean usable wind power is evaluated for modern offshore turbine characteristics including hub

  2. Estimating changes in ocean ventilation from early 1990s CFC-12 and late 2000s SF6 measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waugh, Darryn W.

    Estimating changes in ocean ventilation from early 1990s CFC-12 and late 2000s SF6 measurements constrain the rates and pathways of ocean ventilation and act as proxies for biogeochemically relevant gases such as CO2 and oxygen. Various techniques have deduced changes in ocean ventilation over decadal timescales

  3. Estimation of light penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal waters from surface reflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Marcel

    Estimation of light penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal waters from surface reflectance, J. The algorithms are found to be valid both in coastal and oceanic waters, and largely insensitive to regional

  4. Estimates of wind energy input to the Ekman layer in the Southern Ocean from surface drifter data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    Estimates of wind energy input to the Ekman layer in the Southern Ocean from surface drifter data March 2009; published 5 June 2009. [1] The energy input to the upper ocean Ekman layer is assessed velocities, with an adjustment to account for the vertical structure of the upper ocean. The energy input

  5. Use of SF6 to estimate anthropogenic CO2 in the upper ocean Toste Tanhua,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waugh, Darryn W.

    Use of SF6 to estimate anthropogenic CO2 in the upper ocean Toste Tanhua,1 Darryn W. Waugh,2s. Here we apply SF6, a tracer that continues to increase in the atmosphere, as a basis for the Cant water mass transit time distributions (TTDs) calculated with SF6 are compared to those based on CFC-12

  6. Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation traditional deep water formation via entrainment of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse-active species collected for oxygen, total carbon, alkalinity, nutrients, and CFCs. The alkalinity and total carbon data

  7. Dynamically and Observationally Constrained Estimates of Water-Mass Distributions and Ages in the Global Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Tim; Primeau, Francois

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system at NCEP: The Pacific Ocean. Preprints, Eighth Symp.most of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, reaching a maximum ofin the Southern Ocean. In the Pacific Ocean, the overturning

  8. Energy pathways and structures of oceanic eddies from the ECCO2 State Estimate and Simplified Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ru, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying oceanic eddies is important for understanding and predicting ocean circulation and climate variability. The central focus of this dissertation is the energy exchange between eddies and mean ow and banded structures ...

  9. Dynamically and Observationally Constrained Estimates of Water-Mass Distributions and Ages in the Global Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Tim; Primeau, Francois

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lumpkin, R. , and K. Speer, 2007: Global ocean meridionalStammer 2004; Lumpkin and Speer 2007), but, in an advective–

  10. Subduction in an eddy-resolving state estimate of the northeast Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gebbie, Geoffrey Alexander, 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relatively little is known about the role of eddies in controlling subduction in the eastern half of the subtropical gyre. Here, a new tool to study the eastern North Atlantic Ocean is created by combining a regional, ...

  11. State estimation of the Labrador Sea with a coupled sea ice-ocean adjoint model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenty, Ian Gouverneur

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sea ice (SI) and ocean variability in marginal polar and subpolar seas are closely coupled. SI variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection/mode water formation, ...

  12. Scalability, scintillation readout and charge drift in a kilogram scale solid xenon particle detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, J; Jaskierny, W F; Markley, D; Pahlka, R B; Balakishiyeva, D; Saab, T; Filipenko, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  13. Global oceanic rainfall estimation from AMSR-E data based on a radiative transfer model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Kyoung-Wook

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    retrieval uncertainties. The algorithm uses six channels (dual polarizations at 36.5, 18.7 and 10.65GHz) and retrieves rain rates on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Monthly rain totals are estimated by summing average rain rates computed by merging six rain rates...

  14. Ventilation of the deep ocean constrained with tracer observations and implications for radiocarbon estimates of ideal mean age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwala, Samar

    Ventilation of the deep ocean constrained with tracer observations and implications for radiocarbon: ocean ventilation tracers ideal mean age radiocarbon age Green function inverse modeling Ocean ventilation is the process that transports water and climatically important trace gases such as carbon dioxide

  15. Proper orthogonal decomposition approach and error estimation of mixed finite element methods for the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navon, Michael

    for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model Zhendong Luo a , Jiang Zhu b , Ruiwen Wang b , I.M. Navon c Available online 8 May 2007 Abstract In this paper, the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model and the insufficient knowledge of air­sea exchange processes. The tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model

  16. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. , 110,2009), Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layerCO 2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent

  17. Estimating the instantaneous velocity of randomly moving target swarms in a stratified ocean waveguide by Doppler analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsatos, Ioannis

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Doppleranalysis has been extensively used in active radar and sonar sensing to estimate the speed and direction of a single target within an imaging system resolution cell following deterministic theory. For target swarms, ...

  18. Data-based estimates of suboxia, denitrification, and N2O production in the ocean and their sensitivities to dissolved O2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pathways, N2O is a powerful greenhouse gas that affects the Earth's energy balance and climate. The ocean

  19. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2009. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    58 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production 98% of domestic gallium consumption. About 67% of the gallium consumed was used in integrated and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2009. One company in Utah recovered

  20. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2005. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    66 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production, [(703) 648-7719, dkramer@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7975] #12;67 GALLIUM Consolidation of companies and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2005. One company in Utah recovered

  1. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1998. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    66 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production A. Kramer [(703) 648-7719, dkramer@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7722] #12;67 GALLIUM Events, Trends and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1998. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah

  2. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1996. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on world production of primary gallium were unavailable because data on the output of the few producers62 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production in optoelectronic devices, which include light-emitting diodes (LED's), laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar

  3. Dynamics of global ocean heat transport variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Steven Robert

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A state-of-the-art, high-resolution ocean general circulation model is used to estimate the time-dependent global ocean heat transport and investigate its dynamics. The north-south heat transport is the prime manifestation ...

  4. Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean C. L. Sabine,1 R. A. Feely,2 R. M. Key,3 J] This work presents an estimate of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean based on measurements from the WOCE tracers; 9355 Information Related to Geographic Region: Pacific Ocean; KEYWORDS: Pacific Ocean

  5. Comprehensive Ocean Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

  6. Intermediate-depth circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans measured by autonomous floats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Russ E

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,runs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans using the EstimatingIndian and (right) Pacific Oceans from the JPL–ECCO data-

  7. Variability of the Indo-Pacific Ocean exchanges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    The ECCO–GODAE global estimate of the ocean circulation 1992–2007 is analyzed in the region of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), including the Southern Ocean flow south of Australia. General characteristics are an intense ...

  8. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using...

  9. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sheet] map I - 732). General Electric Company. Ocean thermalby Washom et al. General Electric (1977), Francis (1977),selected is based on General Electric estimated the ammonia

  10. International Lige Colloquium on Ocean Dynamics, GAS TRANSFER AT WATER SURFACES, May 2 -6 2005 Estimation of air-sea gas and heat fluxes from infrared imagery and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaehne, Bernd

    2005 Estimation of air-sea gas and heat fluxes from infrared imagery and surface wave measurements and much higher heat fluxes. In addition, the infrared imagery analysis reveals potentially significant the infrared images. It is also shown that the difference in the surface boundary conditions for heat and gas

  11. A Comparison of Oceanic Precipitation Estimates in the Tropics and Subtropics KENNETH P. BOWMAN, CAMERON R. HOMEYER, AND DALON G. STONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2008, in final form 27 January 2009) ABSTRACT A number of Earth remote sensing satellites and by Remote Sensing Systems, Inc. Biases between the dif- ferent datasets are estimated by computing of latent heat by condensation is one of the most important drivers of the global atmo- spheric circulation

  12. Observing ocean heat content using satellite gravity and altimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Steven

    : ocean heat content, altimetry, satellite gravity, steric height, remote sensing Citation: Jayne, S. RObserving ocean heat content using satellite gravity and altimetry Steven R. Jayne1,2 and John M with satellite measurements of the Earth's time-varying gravity to give improved estimates of the ocean's heat

  13. Transport across 48N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction The partition of energy and freshwater flux between the ocean and the atmosphere and among various decomposition of ocean heat transport into thermal wind, gyre, and Ekman components for a rough estimateTransport across 48°N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic

  14. Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects of ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects. Here we present a set of regional climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean best estimate of twenty-first century sea level rise in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, given the current

  15. Is the deep Indian Ocean MOC sustained by breaking internal waves?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    % of the world ocean. [3] Here, the energy budget of the deep Indian Ocean MOC is assessed using a range of the Indian Ocean overturning circulation with estimates of energy sources (winds, tides, and geostrophic are capable of carrying energy from ocean boundaries into the interior, and are generally considered

  16. Large scale oceanic circulation and fluxes of freshwater, heat, nutrients and oxygen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganachaud, Alexandre Similien, 1970-

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, global inversion is used to estimate the large scale oceanic circulation based on the World Ocean Circulation Experiment and Java Australia Dynamic Experiment hydrographic data. A linear inverse "box" model is used ...

  17. Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Is the Indian Ocean MOC driven by breaking internal waves?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    of the ocean and that internal wave energy levels in the interior Indian Ocean are too weak to sustain, covering less than 20% of the world ocean. We assess the energy budget of the Indian Ocean MOC based circulation with published estimates of the energy put into the deep Indian Ocean by winds and tides. The main

  18. Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Jeroen Verspeek Anton Verhoef Ad Stoffelen Version 1.5 2011-03-16 #12;ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Contents 1 Introduction ....................................................................................................................3 2 NWP Ocean Calibration

  19. Ocean Engineering Development Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Ocean Engineering Hydrofoil Development Team Justin Eickmeier Mirela Dalanaj Jason Gray Matt test bed for future hydrofoil designs. 5) To create future student interest in the Ocean Engineering Efficiency and Acceleration. #12;Design Team Justin Eickmeier Team Leader Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior

  20. The decadal mean ocean circulation and Sverdrup balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    Elementary Sverdrup balance is tested in the context of the time-average of a 16-year duration time-varying ocean circulation estimate employing the great majority of global-scale data available between 1992 and 2007. The ...

  1. Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport COLM independent parameter- izations that use ocean color to estimate the penetration depth of shortwave radiation. This study offers a way to evaluate the changes in irradiance penetration depths in coupled ocean

  2. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

  3. CoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;VIIRS Operational Ocean Color User: NWS/EMC · Phytoplankton alter the penetration of solar radiationCoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color User Engagement, Quality Assessment Science Seminar #12;Outline Overview of VIIRS Ocean Color Proving Ground (Hughes) VIIRS Ocean Color

  4. Global energy conversion rate from geostrophic flows into internal lee waves in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikurashin, Maxim

    A global estimate of the energy conversion rate from geostrophic flows into internal lee waves in the ocean is presented. The estimate is based on a linear theory applied to bottom topography at O(1–10) km scales obtained ...

  5. Overturning circulation driven by breaking internal waves in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikurashin, Maxim

    A global estimate of the water-mass transformation by internal wave-driven mixing in the deep ocean is presented. The estimate is based on the energy conversion from tidal and geostrophic motions into internal waves combined ...

  6. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

  7. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  8. Mesoscale ocean dynamics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mHolm, D.; Alber, M.; Bayly, B.; Camassa, R.; Choi, W.; Cockburn, B.; Jones, D.; Lifschitz, A.; Margolin, L.; Marsden, L.; Nadiga, B.; Poje, A.; Smolarkiewicz, P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Levermore, D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The ocean is a very complex nonlinear system that exhibits turbulence on essentially all scales, multiple equilibria, and significant intrinsic variability. Modeling the ocean`s dynamics at mesoscales is of fundamental importance for long-time-scale climate predictions. A major goal of this project has been to coordinate, strengthen, and focus the efforts of applied mathematicians, computer scientists, computational physicists and engineers (at LANL and a consortium of Universities) in a joint effort addressing the issues in mesoscale ocean dynamics. The project combines expertise in the core competencies of high performance computing and theory of complex systems in a new way that has great potential for improving ocean models now running on the Connection Machines CM-200 and CM-5 and on the Cray T3D.

  9. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  10. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  11. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  12. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftin Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology haveThe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 2rogrammatic

  13. The vertical structure of ocean heat 89A64BC7DEF72B4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    freeze over [Winton, 2003]. While global ocean heat transport can be deduced from estimates of airThe vertical structure of ocean heat transport 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4 5567334EE72224EE1D523E1E;4#72B43%EE7D44 7D446BE27B725CE93$93BE647 #12;The vertical structure of ocean heat transport G

  14. Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the state’s Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...

  15. Estimating Methods

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the project's scope, the purpose of the estimate, and the availability of estimating resources, the estimator can choose one or a combination of techniques when estimating an activity or project. Estimating methods, estimating indirect and direct costs, and other estimating considerations are discussed in this chapter.

  16. Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

  17. 6, 51375162, 2006 Oceanic ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W. Fairall et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Water-side turbulence enhancement of ozone deposition to the ocean C. W. Fairall1 , D. Helmig2 , L. Fairall (chris.fairall@noaa.gov) 5137 #12;ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W

  18. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 208 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EARLY CENOZOIC EXTREME CLIMATES -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  19. December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 203 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE EQUATORIAL -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University. Acton Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  20. composition of putative oceans on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    point · Warm/hot ocean · Water-saturated atmosphere · Consumption of liquid water · hydration: continents and oceans Hot oceanic water Quartz Hydrated, oxidized rock Partially altered rock Unaltered rock · CO2, ~0.3-0.9 (volume fraction) · H2O, ~0.01-0.6 · N2, ~0.02-0.15 · High temperature corresponds

  1. The Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    Carbon sequestration Biological pump a b s t r a c t We present observation based estimatesThe Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n , A.C. Naveira Garabato a , T. Tsubouchi b , S January 2014 Keywords: Arctic Ocean Dissolved inorganic carbon Carbon budget Air­sea carbon dioxide flux

  2. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Primer L. A. Vega, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    It is estimated that, in an annual basis, the amount solar energy absorbed by the oceans is equivalent to at least amount of ocean solar energy does not pose an adverse environmental impact we must first identify of U.S. companies produced more than 50 kW of gross power, with a net output of up to 18 kW from

  3. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean: National Science Foundation _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling

  4. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with thethe western equatorial Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. , 96,

  5. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. ______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  6. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  7. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  8. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment. 1978. Renewable ocean energy sources, Part I.on aquaculture and ocean energy systems for the county of310, the Ocean the Ocean Energy Thermal Energy Conversion

  9. MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................. 24 #12;v ASMFC Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission BOEM Bureau of Ocean Energy Management BMPMID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research #12;MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research

  10. Ocean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands-on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    -on opportunities for research in ocean renewable energy, remotely operated vehicles, ocean mapping, ocean acousticsOcean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands, and coastal processes. The Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Laboratory is equipped with state

  11. ARM - Oceanic Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat fluxChinaNews : AMFAlaskaNews from theOceanic

  12. Ocean | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwestOakdale ElectricOcean Flow

  13. Estimating ventilation time scales using overturning stream functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Döös, Kristofer

    Estimating ventilation time scales using overturning stream functions Bijoy Thompson & Jonas 2014 # Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014 Abstract A simple method for estimating ventilation time-enclosed ocean basin ventilated through a narrow strait over a sill, and the result is compared to age estimates

  14. Ocean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Project 6: Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    generates an upwelling internal wave at 30N with a positive deviation in interface height of size 30m. What long would it take for this internal wave to propagate to 40N? c) At the same time that the wave passesOcean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Project 6: Waves Due: Thursday, March 1 1. A two layer

  15. Estimating erosional exhumation on Titan from drainage network morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perron, Taylor

    , to estimate cumulative erosion into an initially rough surface. We calibrate this method with a numerical the Cassini spacecraft. While Titan does not host a global surface ocean, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 190 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    164 Japan __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling under the international Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean

  17. Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dales, K Phillips

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

  18. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    near-inertial energy in an eddying ocean channel model. Geo-maximum integrated kinetic energy when the ocean was forcedto the the transfer of energy in the ocean from large scales

  19. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Washington,Power Applications, Division of Ocean Energy Systems, UnitedSands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  20. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~June 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  1. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftr:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  3. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  4. HOW TO COOK OCEAN PERCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is an excellent food fish with firm fle h. When cooked, the meat is white and flaky, with a delicate flavor. Ocean to the consumer until 1935. At that time, the indlu;try began experimenting with filleting and freezing ocean pel

  5. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 209 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING MANTLE PERIDOTITE ALONG Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. D. Jay Miller Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

  6. January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 210 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING THE NEWFOUNDLAND HALF OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND­IBERIA TRANSECT: THE FIRST CONJUGATE MARGIN DRILLING IN A NON-VOLCANIC RIFT Brian E. Tucholke Co Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  7. The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior Bonnie Monteleone, William Cooper, Jennifer O'Keefe, Pamela Seaton, and Maureen Conte #12;#12;#12;Plastic does not biodegrade it photo-degrades breaking down is the plastic cheese wrap? Unfortunately, marine creatures mistake plastics in the ocean for food #12

  8. February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland) Institut National des Sciences de l States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute of the University

  9. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  10. Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Research Council

    2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States has jurisdiction over 3.4 million square miles of ocean�an expanse greater than the land area of all fifty states combined. This vast marine area offers researchers opportunities to investigate the ocean�s role in an integrated Earth system, but also presents challenges to society, including damaging tsunamis and hurricanes, industrial accidents, and outbreaks of waterborne diseases. The 2010 Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil spill and 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami are vivid reminders that a broad range of infrastructure is needed to advance our still-incomplete understanding of the ocean. The National Research Council (NRC)�s Ocean Studies Board was asked by the National Science and Technology Council�s Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, comprised of 25 U.S. government agencies, to examine infrastructure needs for ocean research in the year 2030. This request reflects concern, among a myriad of marine issues, over the present state of aging and obsolete infrastructure, insufficient capacity, growing technological gaps, and declining national leadership in marine technological development; issues brought to the nation�s attention in 2004 by the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. A 15-member committee of experts identified four themes that encompass 32 future ocean research questions�enabling stewardship of the environment, protecting life and property, promoting economic vitality, and increasing fundamental scientific understanding. Many of the questions in the report (e.g., sea level rise, sustainable fisheries, the global water cycle) reflect challenging, multidisciplinary science questions that are clearly relevant today, and are likely to take decades of effort to solve. As such, U.S. ocean research will require a growing suite of ocean infrastructure for a range of activities, such as high quality, sustained time series observations or autonomous monitoring at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. Consequently, a coordinated national plan for making future strategic investments becomes an imperative to address societal needs. Such a plan should be based upon known priorities and should be reviewed every 5-10 years to optimize the federal investment. The committee examined the past 20 years of technological advances and ocean infrastructure investments (such as the rise in use of self-propelled, uncrewed, underwater autonomous vehicles), assessed infrastructure that would be required to address future ocean research questions, and characterized ocean infrastructure trends for 2030. One conclusion was that ships will continue to be essential, especially because they provide a platform for enabling other infrastructure � autonomous and remotely operated vehicles; samplers and sensors; moorings and cabled systems; and perhaps most importantly, the human assets of scientists, technical staff, and students. A comprehensive, long-term research fleet plan should be implemented in order to retain access to the sea. The current report also calls for continuing U.S. capability to access fully and partially ice-covered seas; supporting innovation, particularly the development of biogeochemical sensors; enhancing computing and modeling capacity and capability; establishing broadly accessible data management facilities; and increasing interdisciplinary education and promoting a technically-skilled workforce. The committee also provided a framework for prioritizing future investment in ocean infrastructure. They recommend that development, maintenance, or replacement of ocean research infrastructure assets should be prioritized in terms of societal benefit, with particular consideration given to usefulness for addressing important science questions; affordability, efficiency, and longevity; and ability to contribute to other missions or applications. These criteria are the foundation for prioritizing ocean research infrastructure investments by estimating

  11. "Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    /JPSS ­ UAV ­ Ocean optics, Biological ­ Laser penetration New opportunity · Insitu Sensors ­ (Gliders"Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories" "Ocean Observatories Contributions to Ocean Models and Data Assimilation For Ecosystems" Ocean Optics 2012 Glasgow Scotland Robert Arnone

  12. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the Southern Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments. Seattle, WA. Geological Society of America. Coale, K., 2003. Open Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments: What they have told us, what they have not. American Society for Limnology and Oceanography and The Oceanography Society, Honolulu, February 2004. Coale, K., 2004. Recent Research from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX), in Taking the Heat: What is the impact of ocean fertilization on climate and ocean ecology? Science of earth and sky. AAAS, February 12-16, Seattle, WA

  13. n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology Overview The Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology (COEST) is dedicated to the ocean, the most fascinating and the most challenging environment for human endeavour. COEST brings together the disciplines of ocean

  14. 4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    OSD 4, 709­732, 2007 Ice-shelf ­ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf M. R. Price Title Page published in Ocean Science Discussions are under open-access review for the journal Ocean Science Ice-shelf ­ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica from oxygen isotope ratio measurements M. R. Price 1

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CARIBBEAN OCEAN HISTORY AND THE CRETACEOUS Scientist, Leg 165 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College of any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORWEGIAN SEA Olav Eldholm Co-Chief Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Pni±ip o Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LESSER ANTILLES FOREARC J. Casey Moore Staff Science Representative, Leg 110 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Direct* Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean

  18. INSTRUCTIONS INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP) MANUSCRIPT AND PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station, Texas 77845, USA A signed copyright of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program or any other publications of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Author

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 109 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  20. Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 136 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and lithosphere evolution, earthquake source mechanisms, oceanic crustal structure, tsunami warning and monitoring

  2. Ocean Studies Board annual report 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities of the Ocean Studies Board fall into three broad categories: promoting the health of ocean sciences in the United States, encouraging the protection and wise use of the ocean and its resources, and applying ocean science to improve national security.

  3. Ocean Studies Board annual report 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities of the Ocean Studies Board fall into three broad categories: promoting the health of ocean sciences in the United States, encouraging the protection and wise use of the ocean and its resources, and applying ocean science to improve national security.

  4. Dept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Only Indian and Pacific Ocean GlobalEEZ100km from shorelineAtlantic OceanIndo-Pacific #12;OTEC MODELINGDept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology of deep layers, Increase in THC strength 1) Global 2) EEZ 3)100km from Shoreline 4) Only Atlantic Ocean 5

  5. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters in the upper ocean, the vertical distribution of solar radiation (ESR) in the shortwave domain plays (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal

  6. Mercury in the Anthropocene Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamborg, Carl

    The toxic metal mercury is present only at trace levels in the ocean, but it accumulates in fish at concentrations high enough to pose a threat to human and environmental health. Human activity has dramatically altered the ...

  7. Impact of Anthropogenic CO2 on the CaCO3 System in the Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruber, Nicolas

    Impact of Anthropogenic CO2 on the CaCO3 System in the Oceans Richard A. Feely,1, * Christopher L carbonate (CaCO3) particles. Here we estimate the in situ CaCO3 dissolution rates for the global oceans from2 on CaCO3 shell­ forming species. CaCO3 dissolution rates, ranging from 0.003 to 1.2 micromoles per

  8. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    western South Atlantic bottom water warming, Geophys. Res.Wijffels (2007a), Recent bottom water warming in the Paci?cin the Antarctic bottom water properties in the western

  9. A Biochemical Upper Ocean State Estimate in the Southern Ocean GasEx Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haine, Thomas W. N.

    Methods: Data Sources: In-situ: T, S, CDOM (350, 380, 400 nm), SF6 from SO GasEx cruise. Satellite: Sea. CDOM photodegradation model (del Vecchio & Blough, 2002). SF6 model including deliberate release multipliers ("4DVAR" method). Controls are Initial conditions for T, S, (u, v), CDOM,& SF6 . The state

  10. Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

  11. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Division Executive Director, Ocean Drilling

  12. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Division Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 environmental of the Seventh Ocean Energy Michel, H. B. ,of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference, Washington, DC.of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference. Sponsored by the

  14. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Washington,Power Applications, Division of Ocean Energy Systems, UnitedM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft

  15. Dynamics of a Submesoscale Surface Ocean Density Front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramczyk, Marshall

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dominant portion of the ocean energy [Capet et al. , 2008a].are important for the ocean energy budget and biogeochemicalrelevance for the ocean energy budget and nutrient

  16. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 environmental Seventh Ocean Energy Michel, H. B. , and M.of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference, Washington, DC.1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)

  17. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byand M.D. Sands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.

  18. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotCommercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  20. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion DraftDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

  3. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large

  4. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants bySands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

  6. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant-impact assessment ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

  7. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants bySands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plantof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

  8. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  11. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionE. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. AElectric Company. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission

  12. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)the intermediate field of ocean thermal energy conversionII of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,and M.D. Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

  14. Estimating ventilation time scales using overturning stream functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Döös, Kristofer

    Estimating ventilation time scales using overturning stream functions Bijoy Thompson & Jonas for estimating ventilation time scales from overturning stream functions is proposed. The stream function may describing an ide- alized semi-enclosed ocean basin ventilated through a narrow strait over a sill

  15. Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 207 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3E3 Canada -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations the international Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute

  17. Mechanistic models of oceanic nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Fanny

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oceanic nitrogen fixation and biogeochemical interactions between the nitrogen, phosphorus and iron cycles have important implications for the control of primary production and carbon storage in the ocean. The biological ...

  18. Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT-B NWP Ocean Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT-B NWP Ocean Calibration and Validation Technical Report SAF/OSI/CDOP2 #12;SAF/OSI/CDOP2/KNMI/TEC/RP/199 ASCAT-B NWP Ocean Calibration and Validation Summary On September 17 launched. For the ASCAT-B scatterometer, corrections are derived with the use of the NWP ocean calibration

  19. AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program U ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;Integrated Ocean Drilling Program United States Implementing Organization JOI T his Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)-U.S. Implementing Organization (USIO) Fiscal Year 2006

  20. Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

  1. 4 -Coastal Ocean Processes The Oregon Coastal Ocean: A Sink for Atmospheric CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    4 - Coastal Ocean Processes The Oregon Coastal Ocean: A Sink for Atmospheric CO 2 ? As part of the Coastal Ocean Processes (CoOP)-sponsored Coastal Ocean Advances in Shelf Transport project (COAST) we laboratory, we developed analytical sys- tems that were capable of measuring nutrient con- centrations and CO

  2. Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 19971998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 1997 Abstract. An anomalous climatic event occurred in the Indian Ocean (IO) region during 1997­1998, which 1997, warm SSTAs appeared in the western IO, and they peaked in February 1998. An ocean general

  3. Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    engineering, mixing and transport, water quality, ocean thermal energy conversion, hydrogen. GENO PAWLAK

  4. Career Opportunity in Ocean Energy POSITION TITLE: Director of Renewable Ocean Energy Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Career Opportunity in Ocean Energy POSITION TITLE: Director of Renewable Ocean Energy Research: The Coastal Studies Institute (CSI) is seeking a dynamic individual to lead its Renewable Ocean Energy Program for a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary renewable ocean energy research program. The position

  5. Ocean Sci., 3, 337344, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/337/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1/3 of the total tidal energy dissipation, in the ocean basins through "internal" waves breaking, eOcean Sci., 3, 337­344, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/337/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Unpredictability of internal M2 H. van Haren Netherlands

  6. Ocean Sci., 3, 461482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ocean Sci., 3, 461­482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Effects of mesoscale eddies on global ocean Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco *now at: Institute of Biogeochemistry

  7. Call title: "The ocean of tomorrow" Call identifier: FP7-OCEAN-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milano-Bicocca, UniversitĂ 

    challenges in ocean management Theme 5 ­ Energy Area ENERGY.10.1 Call "The ocean of tomorrow" ­ Joining1 Call title: "The ocean of tomorrow" · Call identifier: FP7-OCEAN-2010 · Date of publication: 30, and Biotechnology (KBBE) - EUR 6 million from Theme 5 ­ Energy - EUR 10.5 million from Theme 6 ­ Environment

  8. The effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    a severely reduced (&50 %) meridi- onal energy transport relative to the deep ocean runs. As a resultThe effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments Aaron Donohoe online: 28 June 2013 Ă? Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract The effect of ocean mixed layer

  9. Development and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations for Hurricane Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forecasts for individual storms and improved seasonal forecast of the ocean thermal energy availableDevelopment and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations in the Gulf of Mexico is being extended to provide NOAA the ability to evaluate new ocean observing systems

  10. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FLUID FLOW AND SUBDUCTION FLUXES ACROSS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  11. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  12. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS MARIANA CONVERGENT MARGIN/ WEST PHILIPPINE SEA Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX

  13. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS IZU-MARIANA MARGIN Dr. Terry Plank Co France Dr. Carlota Escutia Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SHAKEDOWN AND SEA TRIALS CRUISE Philip D. Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station

  15. SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 HANDBOOK OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TECHNICAL NOTE 3 portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A & M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO Philip D Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE H2O LONG-TERM SEAFLOOR Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS THE COTE D'IVOIRE - GHANA TRANSFORM MARGIN, Leg 159 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT HOLE 504B Dr. Henry Dick Dr. Jörg Erzinger Co Giessen Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Laura Stokking Staff Scientist, Leg 140 Ocean Drilling Program Copies of this publication may be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS PALEOGENE EQUATORIAL TRANSECT Dr. Mitchell __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LOGGING WHILE DRILLING AND ADVANCED CORKS Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LABRADOR SEA - BAFFIN BAY Dr. Michael A. Bradford Clement Staff Science Representative, Leg 105 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469" Philip Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science

  3. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST AFRICA Dr. William Ruddiman Co Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Jack G. Baldauf Staff Scientist, Leg 108 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Philip W Rabin Direct Ocean Drilling Program

  4. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FRACTURE ZONE DRILLING ON THE SOUTHWEST INDIAN Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, MA 02543 Andrew C. Adamson Staff Scientist, Leg 118 Ocean Drilling Program the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

  5. Ocean Optics Environmental Optics, Nanoscience Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    suspended solids swept up from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico The right picture shows a phytoplankton bloom and changes observed. This can be used to monitor pollution in our oceans and methods taken when levels become such as ocean pollution, currents and warming, and to see how the oceans are affecting the health of our planet

  6. Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochum, Markus

    Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1 G. Danabasoglu,1 M. Holland,1 Y.-O. Kwon,1 and W. G. Large1] The impacts of parameterized lateral ocean viscosity on climate are explored using three 120-year integrations of a fully coupled climate model. Reducing viscosity leads to a generally improved ocean circulation

  7. Oceanic Origins of Southwest Tropical Atlantic Biases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhao

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oceanic General Circulation Model POP Parallel Ocean Program ROMS Regional Ocean Modeling System SEC South Equatorial Current SECC South Equatorial Counter Current SETA Southeast Tropical Atlantic SEUC South Equatorial UnderCurrent SLP Sea Level... SST bias ................................................................................... 5 1.3.2 SST bias in SETA ...................................................................................... 8 1.4 Objectives and Approach...

  8. Menghua Wang NOAA STAR Ocean Color Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .g., BOUSSOLE, Chesapeake Bay, etc., will be added) Regional ocean color EDR monitoring Hawaii South PacificLw551, and nLw671. #12;VIIRS ocean color EDR regional time- series monitoring at South Pacific Gyre (SPG) #12;Online interactive plot of SPG time-series #12;Global deep-water (>1000 m) ocean color EDR

  9. Estimating Surface Oil Extent from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill using ASCAT Backscatter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Estimating Surface Oil Extent from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill using ASCAT Backscatter Richard Provo, UT 84602 Abstract--The damping effects of oil on capillary ocean waves alter the backscattered backscatter from the ocean surface uncontaminated by surface oil. Large differences between expected

  10. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryNovember-December 2009 Volume 13, Number 6 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research located on Virginia KeyAtlantic With an estimated 40% of the carbon dioxide (CO2 ) from fossil fuels having entered the oceans since the start studies in the Atlantic and equatorial Pacific performed by NOAA researchers and their affiliates. Carbon

  11. Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    of fast ice formation and growth. Instead, the modeled fast ice is replaced with pack ice which driftsEvaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project with estimates of sea ice thickness derived from pan-Arctic satellite freeboard measurements (2004

  12. Green's function approximation from cross-correlation of active sources in the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    Green's function approximation from cross-correlation of active sources in the ocean Laura A, California 92093 Received 15 January 2009; revised 1 May 2009; accepted 2 May 2009 Green's function, differences between the empirical Green's function estimates and simulated Green's functions, are explained

  13. Post-doc GIPSA-Lab / LGIT : Ocean Acoustic Tomography in shallow water and Signal Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    Post-doc GIPSA-Lab / LGIT : Ocean Acoustic Tomography in shallow water and Signal Processing influence and pollution in coastal areas. Consequently, they need the precise knowledge of the spatial and to estimate the sur- face height is also very interesting as these problems have many applications (acoustic

  14. An approach to determining nearshore bathymetry using remotely sensed ocean surface dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    of the hydrodynamic coupling between the water depth and the wave kinematics, methods which would determine the ocean-dimensional algorithm developed to estimate water depths from remotely sensed information of the water surface, using. Wave conditions including monochromatic and irregular waves are simulated in the model. Mean flow

  15. Radiative transfer in the earth's atmosphere-ocean system using Monte Carlo techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Paul Andrew

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRANSFER PROBLEM MONTE CARLO METHOD Assumptions of the Model Photon Pathlength Emulation Techniques Sampling Scattering Functions: Angles and Probabilities Emulation of an Interface Computing the Radiance by Statistical Estimation Determination... of Direction Cosines After Scattering Flux Estimation into Detectors Determination of a New Scattering Point Photon Trajectories Direct Flux and Radiance From the Ocean Bottonr Accounting for Multiple Orders of Scattering With the Bottom Computation...

  16. Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheon, Woo Geunn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

  17. On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Joseph L

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,in preparing the figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig.2 Pacific Ocean circulation Fig. 4 Pacific Ocean potential

  18. Comparison of the Carbon System Parameters at the Global CO2 Survey Crossover Locations in the North and South Pacific Ocean, 1990-1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feely, Richard A [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Lamb, Marilyn F. [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Greeley, Dana J. [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Wanninkhof, Rik [NOAA, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a collaborative program to measure global ocean carbon inventories and provide estimates of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (C02) uptake by the oceans. the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy have sponsored the collection of ocean carbon measurements as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment and Ocean-Atmosphere Carbon Exchange Study cruises. The cruises discussed here occurred in the North and South Pacific from 1990 through 1996. The carbon parameters from these 30 crossover locations have been compared to ensure that a consistent global data set emerges from the survey cruises. !'he results indicate that for dissolved inorganic carbon. fugacity of C02• and pH. the a~:,rreements at most crossover locations are well within the design specifications for the global CO) survey: whereas. in the case of total alkaliniry. the agreement between crossover locations is not as close.

  19. Horizontal stirring in the global ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández-Carrasco, I; Hernández-García, E; Turiel, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal mixing and the distribution of coherent structures in the global ocean are analyzed using Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE), computed for the surface velocity field derived from the Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES). FSLEs measure horizontal stirring and dispersion; additionally, the transport barriers which organize the oceanic flow can roughly be identified with the ridges of the FSLE field. We have performed a detailed statistical study, particularizing for the behaviour of the two hemispheres and different ocean basins. The computed Probability Distributions Functions (PDFs) of FSLE are broad and asymmetric. Horizontal mixing is generally more active in the northern hemisphere than in the southern one. Nevertheless the Southern Ocean is the most active ocean, and the Pacific the less active one. A striking result is that the main currents can be classified in two 'activity classes': Western Boundary Currents, which have broad PDFs with large FSLE values, and Eas...

  20. Ocean Sci., 10, 281322, 2014 www.ocean-sci.net/10/281/2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    28020, Spain 15Department of Solar Energy & Environmental Physics, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes of Environmental Physics, Ocean Physics and Modeling Group, Athens, Greece 12GEOMAR Helmholz Center for Ocean

  1. Technical and philosophical aspects of ocean disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapatka, Marchi Charisse

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ting Permissible Concentrations Alternatives to Ocean Oisposal. Deep-well injection. Incineration Land-based storage Land disposal. Rocycling. Advanced treatment Trends 55 56 58 58 61 61 62 65 66 71 83 87 90 91 TABLE OF CONTENTS... of Ocean Disposal. (August 1976) Plarchi Charisse Zapatka, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Roy W. Harm, Jr. The ocean disposal of waste materials is a controversial subject. People d1sagree as to whether this method...

  2. Introduction to the Ocean Drilling Program JOIDES RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction to the Ocean Drilling Program JOIDES RESOLUTION OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TECHNICAL NOTE 11 1989 #12;TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY #12;INTRODUCTION TO THE OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical Note No. 11 Anne Gilbert Graham Ocean Drilling Program Texas A

  3. 2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project- and Ocean Drilling Program Services on behalf of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program September 2007 #12;#12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which in February 2007 contained

  4. Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    ), the tropical cyclone heat potential, showing the thermal energy available in the ocean to enhance or decreaseShort Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite L., and Soulat, F. 2008. Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite. ­ ICES

  5. OceanObs 1999 G GRIFFITHS et al. OceanObs 99

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    , telecoms, defence, science, monitoring Hugin, Odyssey, OE X, R-One Robot, Martin, LDUUV, Autosub #12;Ocean

  6. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M . , and Yang, E. , 2007: Mesoscale eddies drive increasedIV The interaction of mesoscale and steady wind driven 1.ocean in presence of mesoscale eddies. Geophysical Research

  7. Ocean Viral Metagenomics (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rohwer, Forest

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest Rohwer from San Diego State University talks about "Ocean Viral Metagenomics" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: ocean energy converters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ocean energy converters DOE-Sponsored Reference Model Project Results Released On January 28, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events,...

  9. Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector.

  10. Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change -New Regulations: Implications for Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change - New Regulations: Implications for Ocean Engineers Dr. Philomène Verlaan Visiting Colleague, Department of Oceanography & Senior Framework for Scientific Research Involving Ocean Fertilization", a definition of marine geo-engineering

  11. Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color Laboratory, Ocean Optics Section, Code 7333, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 gould@nrlssc.navy.mil Abstract: Satellite-derived optical properties are compared to in situ mooring and ship-based measurements

  12. Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal Observatories" and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal integration of optical approaches into oceanographic research in general. OBJECTIVES These two courses created and optical oceanography and ocean color remote sensing to learn the fundamentals of optics in a coastal

  13. DETECTING AND TRACKING OF MESOSCALE OCEANIC FEATURES IN THE MIAMI ISOPYCNIC CIRCULATION OCEAN MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tandon, Amit

    DETECTING AND TRACKING OF MESOSCALE OCEANIC FEATURES IN THE MIAMI ISOPYCNIC CIRCULATION OCEAN MODEL developed to automatically detect, locate and track mesoscale eddies spatially and temporally. Using an invaluable tool to assess mesoscale oceanic features. Key Words ­ Scientific Visualization, Eddy Detection

  14. Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans December 2008 Received in revised form 15 May 2009 Accepted 23 May 2009 Keywords: Floating Algae Index (FAI Remote sensing Ocean color Climate data record Various types of oating algae have been reported in open

  15. 2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which contained almost 22,000 citation records related to the Deep Sea Drilling Institute (AGI). The database has been on line since August 2002. Beginning in 2006, citation records

  16. Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Ocean Thermal Resources The vast size of the ocean thermal resource and the baseload capability of OTEC systems of Hawaii throughout the year and at all times of the day. This is an indigenous renewable energy resource

  17. Effect of global ocean temperature change on deep ocean ventilation A. M. de Boer,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Daniel M.

    Effect of global ocean temperature change on deep ocean ventilation A. M. de Boer,1,2 D. M. Sigman suggest that the ocean's deep ventilation is stronger in warm climates than in cold climates. Here we use that a dynamically cold ocean is globally less ventilated than a dynamically warm ocean. With dynamic cooling

  18. ARM - Lesson Plans: Ocean Currents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, Alaska OutreachMaking CloudsMovingOcean

  19. Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jumpsource HistoryFractures belowOasisEnergyTheJump to:Ocean

  20. Implications of SSM/I observations for retrievals of ocean surface and marine atmospheric parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelkin, Eric Jason

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such restrictions. These algorithms appear to be applicable over half of the time over the global oceans. DEDICATION This thesis is dedicated to the memory of my two grandmothers, Bessie Dvoretsky and Bessie Nelkin, both of whom found pleasure in seeing me... of absorption and scattering are compared for various land and ocean areas. While it has been demonstrated that an increase in the amount of scattering by ice particles leads to an increase in estimated rainfall rate over land, it has not been conclusively...

  1. Oceanic alkyl nitrates as a natural source of tropospheric ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neu, Jessica L; Lawler, Michael J; Prather, Michael J; Saltzman, Eric S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the equatorial Pacific Ocean during Saga 3, J. Geophys.the troposphere over the Pacific Ocean during PEM- Tropics Ain the tropical Pacific Ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 32,

  2. Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab of the University of New Hampshire. Parking is available at the Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Building. Directions

  3. Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Guide to Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawaii REQUIREMENTS ............................................... 16 Ocean and Resources Engineering Page 3 #12;Page 4 Ocean and Resources Engineering BACKGROUND Hawaii's unique location, climate and marine

  4. ORE 601 Ocean and Resources Engineering Laboratory Designation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    ORE 601 Ocean and Resources Engineering Laboratory Designation Core course Catalog Description This course aims to provide ocean and resources engineering students with the fundamentals necessary Program Outcome 2: Basic science, mathematics, & engineering Program Outcome 3: Ocean engineering core

  5. Effects of variable wind stress on ocean heat content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klima, Kelly

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean heat content change (ocean heat uptake) has an important role in variability of the Earth's heat balance. The understanding of which methods and physical processes control ocean heat uptake needs improvement in order ...

  6. Incorporating Phaeocystis into a Southern Ocean ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shanlin; Moore, J. Keith

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 1.2003), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 2.global upper ocean ecosystem?biogeochemistry models against

  7. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs of work for Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) activities and deliverables for the current fiscal

  8. Biological and physical regulation of the oceanic fixed nitrogen reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Thomas Smith

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 412: 635-38in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Marine Chemistry 16:and N 2 fixation in the Pacific Ocean. Global Biogeochemical

  9. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vertically, carrying energy into the ocean interior with aas a beam of energy into the ocean interior, observations ofKelvin wave energy from the Indian Ocean bypasses the gap in

  10. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 136 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Operations ODP/TAI Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director ODP/TAMU May 1991 #12;This informal report Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute of the University of Tokyo (Japan) Any

  11. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC Mr. Michael A. Storms Supervisor of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Manager of Engineering and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Louis E. Garrison Deputy Director ODP

  12. Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 22092223 Technical Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 2209­2223 Technical Note Pulsatile vortex generators for low-speed maneuvering of small underwater vehicles Kamran Mohseni� Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, science writer). #12;1. Introduction Oceans hold the key to the origin and continuity of life on the Earth

  13. Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage Jason Heinrich Working Paper Laboratory for Energy the deployment of CO2 storage technologies used in the marine environment. This paper will address some of the legal issues involved in ocean storage of carbon dioxide from a US perspective. The following paragraphs

  14. Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, Alex J.

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aquantis® Current Plane (“C-Plane”) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS HAMMER DRILLING and NERO Dr. Jack Casey Chief.S.A. Tom Pettigrew Chief Engineer, Leg 179 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas 77845

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT ENGINEERING II: WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC Mr. Michael A. Storms Supervisor of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director ODP/TAMU September 1990 #12;This informal

  17. ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper An ESF Programme September 2003 #12;The, maintains the ship over a specific location while drilling into water depths up to 27,000 feet. A seven Amsterdam, The Netherlands #12;1 ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper Foreword 3

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST PACIFIC SEISMIC OBSERVATORY AND HAMMER DRILL ENGINEERING TESTS Dr. Toshihiko Kanazawa Co-Chief Scientist Earthquake Research Institute Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BASEMENT DRILLING OF THE ONTONG JAVA PLATEAU of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX 77845-9547 U.S.A. May 2000

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CENTRAL KERGUELEN PLATEAU Dr. Roland Schlich Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77841 Philip D.VRabinowitz Director ^^~-- ODP of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 106 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 ±nuwiLZ" ector ODP Drilling Program, Texas A & M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3469. In some cases, orders

  2. LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ENGINEERING PRELIMINARY REPORT NO. 3 EAST PACIFIC RISE 1992 #12;OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT East Pacific Rise Dr. Rodey Batiza Co 96822 Mr. Michael A. Storms Operations Superintendent/ Assistant Manager of Engineering and Drilling

  3. Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change John Ferguson1 NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries're finding - adult forecasts and climate change) #12;1. Past (for context) · The coastal pelagic ecosystem/survival #12;NE Pacific Ocean fisheries productivity, 200 BC to 2000 AD (by Finney et al. 2002 Nature) Main

  4. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  5. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 180 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 180 PRELIMINARY REPORT ACTIVE CONTINENTAL EXTENSION IN THE WESTERN WOODLARK BASIN, PAPUA NEW GUINEA Dr. Philippe Huchon CNRS, Laboratoire de Géologie �cole Normale Supérieure and Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa 2525 Correa Road Honolulu, HI 96822-2285 U.S.A. Dr. Adam Klaus Ocean

  6. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    under the international Ocean Drilling Program which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DSDP HOLE 504B REVISITED Keir Becker

  7. Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in ocean energy systems

  8. Wind-driven changes in Southern Ocean residual circulation, ocean carbon reservoirs and atmospheric CO[subscript 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.

    The effect of idealized wind-driven circulation changes in the Southern Ocean on atmospheric CO[subscript 2] and the ocean carbon inventory is investigated using a suite of coarse-resolution, global coupled ocean circulation ...

  9. Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency of biological pump in the global ocean. JournalOcean Biological Carbon Pump Carbon Flux Explorerocean’s “biological carbon pump” (Broecker and Peng, 1982;

  10. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs

  11. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint, Ocean Drilling Programs Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc. Washington DC 20005 19 July 2005 #12

  12. arctic ocean expedition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oceans contain a complex mixture of micro Bermingham, Eldredge 5 Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 301 Scientific Prospectus Geosciences Websites Summary: .tamu.edu...

  13. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Joint Oceanographic

  14. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Report summarizing the results of...

  15. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report describes the analysis and results of a rigorous assessment of...

  16. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Elliot E. Mainzer,...

  17. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Kenneth E. Legg,...

  18. The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of...

  19. Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Photo of water flowing from several openings in a hydropower dam....

  20. Self-adaptive processes for the mitigation of coherent multipath in ocean acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higley, William J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical Engineering (Applied Ocean Sciences) Universityin Electrical Engineering (Applied Ocean Sciences) by

  1. Changes in Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) retrievals due to the orbit boost estimated from rain gauge data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMoss, Jeremy

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    in precipitation retrievals from the satellite data alone. We estimate changes in TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and the Precipitation Radar (PR) precipitation retrievals due to the orbit boost by comparing them with surface rain gauges on ocean buoys operated...

  2. J. Ocean Univ. China (Oceanic and Coastal Sea Research) DOI 10.1007/s11802-011-1700-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morandini, Andre C.

    J. Ocean Univ. China (Oceanic and Coastal Sea Research) DOI 10.1007/s11802-011-1700-1 ISSN 1672-5182

  3. 1. Department, course number, title ORE 603 Oceanography for Ocean Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    1. Department, course number, title ORE 603 Oceanography for Ocean Engineers 2. Designation Core for ocean engineers. Introduction to ocean dynamical processes and general circulation. Ocean measurement Program Outcome 3: Ocean engineering core Program Outcome 6: Problem formulation & solution Program

  4. THE ROLE OF METHANOL IN THE CRYSTALLIZATION OF TITAN'S PRIMORDIAL OCEAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deschamps, Frederic [Institute of Geophysics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Mousis, Olivier [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut UTINAM, CNRS/INSU, UMR 6213, 25030 Besancon Cedex (France); Sanchez-Valle, Carmen [Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Lunine, Jonathan I., E-mail: frederic.deschamps@erdw.ethz.c [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Roma 'Tor Vergata', Rome (Italy)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key parameter that controls the crystallization of primordial oceans in large icy moons is the presence of anti-freeze compounds, which may have maintained primordial oceans over the age of the solar system. Here we investigate the influence of methanol, a possible anti-freeze candidate, on the crystallization of Titan's primordial ocean. Using a thermodynamic model of the solar nebula and assuming a plausible composition of its initial gas phase, we first calculate the condensation sequence of ices in Saturn's feeding zone, and show that in Titan's building blocks methanol can have a mass fraction of {approx}4 wt% relative to water, i.e., methanol can be up to four times more abundant than ammonia. We then combine available data on the phase diagram of the water-methanol system and scaling laws derived from thermal convection to estimate the influence of methanol on the dynamics of the outer ice I shell and on the heat transfer through this layer. For a fraction of methanol consistent with the building blocks composition we determined, the vigor of convection in the ice I shell is strongly reduced. The effect of 5 wt% methanol is equivalent to that of 3 wt% ammonia. Thus, if methanol is present in the primordial ocean of Titan, the crystallization may stop, and a sub-surface ocean may be maintained between the ice I and high-pressure ice layers. A preliminary estimate indicates that the presence of 4 wt% methanol and 1 wt% ammonia may result in an ocean of thickness at least 90 km.

  5. DECEMBER 1999 3073J O H N S O N A N D M C P H A D E N Interior Pycnocline Flow from the Subtropical to the Equatorial Pacific Ocean*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    to the Equatorial Pacific Ocean* GREGORY C. JOHNSON AND MICHAEL J. MCPHADEN NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental and Southern Hemispheres of the Pacific Ocean. In the North Pacific the pycnocline shoals and strengthens dra in the pycnocline of the central North Pacific. This study delineates this pathway and estimates an upper bound

  6. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Kevin

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing energy consumption and depleting reserves of fossil fuels have resulted in growing interest in alternative renewable energy from the ocean. Ocean currents are an alternative source of clean energy due to their inherent reliability, persistence and sustainability. General ocean circulations exist in the form of large rotating ocean gyres, and feature extremely rapid current flow in the western boundaries due to the Coriolis Effect. The Gulf Stream system is formed by the western boundary current of the North Atlantic Ocean that flows along the east coastline of the United States, and therefore is of particular interest as a potential energy resource for the United States. This project created a national database of ocean current energy resources to help advance awareness and market penetration in ocean current energy resource assessment. The database, consisting of joint velocity magnitude and direction probability histograms, was created from data created by seven years of numerical model simulations. The accuracy of the database was evaluated by ORNL?s independent validation effort documented in a separate report. Estimates of the total theoretical power resource contained in the ocean currents were calculated utilizing two separate approaches. Firstly, the theoretical energy balance in the Gulf Stream system was examined using the two-dimensional ocean circulation equations based on the assumptions of the Stommel model for subtropical gyres with the quasi-geostrophic balance between pressure gradient, Coriolis force, wind stress and friction driving the circulation. Parameters including water depth, natural dissipation rate and wind stress are calibrated in the model so that the model can reproduce reasonable flow properties including volume flux and energy flux. To represent flow dissipation due to turbines additional turbine drag coefficient is formulated and included in the model. Secondly, to determine the reasonableness of the total power estimates from the Stommel model and to help determine the size and capacity of arrays necessary to extract the maximum theoretical power, further estimates of the available power based on the distribution of the kinetic power density in the undisturbed flow was completed. This used estimates of the device spacing and scaling to sum up the total power that the devices would produce. The analysis has shown that considering extraction over a region comprised of the Florida Current portion of the Gulf Stream system, the average power dissipated ranges between 4-6 GW with a mean around 5.1 GW. This corresponds to an average of approximately 45 TWh/yr. However, if the extraction area comprises the entire portion of the Gulf Stream within 200 miles of the US coastline from Florida to North Carolina, the average power dissipated becomes 18.6 GW or 163 TWh/yr. A web based GIS interface, http://www.oceancurrentpower.gatech.edu/, was developed for dissemination of the data. The website includes GIS layers of monthly and yearly mean ocean current velocity and power density for ocean currents along the entire coastline of the United States, as well as joint and marginal probability histograms for current velocities at a horizontal resolution of 4-7 km with 10-25 bins over depth. Various tools are provided for viewing, identifying, filtering and downloading the data.

  7. Self-Study Report Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    ABET Self-Study Report for the Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawaii........................................................................................I-1 #12;1 Self-Study Report Ocean and Resources Engineering Master of Science University of Hawaii of Science (MS) in Ocean and Resources Engineering (formerly Master of Science in Ocean Engineering

  8. ORE 654: Applications of Ocean Acoustics Fall Semester 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    of this course is to provide the ocean engineering student an understanding of how sound propagates through: Ocean engineering specialization Program Outcome 5: Use of latest tools in ocean engineering ProgramORE 654: Applications of Ocean Acoustics Syllabus Fall Semester 2014 Tuesday/Thursday 12:00-1:15 PM

  9. The Ocean Lithosphere: A Fundamental Component of the Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    an important and hitherto unaccounted-for role in controlling ocean chemistry. Better quantification of global

  10. 2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2009 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  11. 2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2008 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  12. 2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2012 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  13. Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in the Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone Soup Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in the Ocean Drilling Program Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical Note No. 13 Compiled by Elizabeth A. Heise Ocean Drilling Program Texas A orpersonalresearchpurposes; however,republicationof any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling

  14. 2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2007 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  15. 2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2011 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  16. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION FISCAL YEAR 2008 ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM UNITED STATES IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION CONSORTIUM FOR OCEAN LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION CONTRACT OCE-0352500 1 OCTOBER 2007­30 SEPTEMBER 2008 #12;INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ii

  17. Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean WEALTH FROM OCEANS FLAGSHIP Jock of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY3 | Thunnus tonggol Thunnus obesus Thunnus albacares Thunnus of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY4 | Species SCA DR SIA SFA Thunnus alalunga + + + 0 Thunnus albacares + + + 0

  18. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Ocean, Estuary and Plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and nearshore ocean as critical habitat in the lifecycle of anadromous fish. Various entities recommended

  19. Ocean heat transport in a Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA): structure, mechanisms, and impacts on climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yangxing

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ) is primarily controled by the strength of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC), particularly in the Atlantic Ocean. The role of variation of temperature on variability of meridional OHT increases in the northern North Atlantic Ocean. Results iv... circulation in the mid-latitude Atlantic reinforces the MOCs, which contribute to a positive trend of OHT. Finaly, in the northern North Atlantic Ocean, a smal increase in meridional OHT and a slight weakening of MOC are detected. The weakening...

  20. The dynamic response of oceanic hydrate deposits to ocean temperature change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reagan, Matthew T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the fate of gas hydrates during transit through the oceanVA. (1998), Submarine Gas Hydrates. St. Petersburg. Gornitzgas reservoirs below gas-hydrate provinces, Nature, 427,

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 166 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Director ODP/TAMU _____________________ Jack Baldauf Manager Science Operations ODP Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract of the University of Tokyo (Japan) National Science Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council

  2. Ocean fertilization : ecological cure or calamity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogilvie, Megan Jacqueline, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The late John Martin demonstrated the paramount importance of iron for microscopic plant growth in large areas of the world's oceans. Iron, he hypothesized, was the nutrient that limited green life in seawater. Over twenty ...

  3. Antarctic ice sheet fertilises the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Death, R.

    Southern Ocean (SO) marine primary productivity (PP) is strongly influenced by the availability of iron in surface waters, which is thought to exert a significant control upon atmospheric CO2 concentrations on glacial/interglacial ...

  4. Climate Prediction: The Limits of Ocean Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Peter H.

    We identify three major areas of ignorance which limit predictability in current ocean GCMs. One is the very crude representation of subgrid-scale mixing processes. These processes are parameterized with coefficients whose ...

  5. Ocean fronts trigger high latitude phytoplankton blooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, John R.

    Density fronts are ubiquitous features of the upper ocean. Here, numerical simulations show that restratification at fronts inhibits vertical mixing, triggering phytoplankton blooms in low-light conditions. The stability ...

  6. Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muralidharan, Shylesh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

  7. Ocean Fertilization: Science, Policy, and Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Aaron L.

    Over the past 20 years there has been growing interest in the concept of fertilizing the ocean with iron to abate global warming. This interest was catalyzed by basic scientific experiments showing that iron limits primary ...

  8. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 PRELIMINARY REPORT GAS HYDRATE SAMPLING ON THE BLAKE RIDGE of Tokyo (Japan) National Science Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United, Iceland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any opinions, findings

  9. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000: A Coupled Air-Sea Mesoscale Model: Experiments inWind Stress Curl from a Mesoscale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev. ,2006: Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean

  10. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000: A Coupled Air-Sea Mesoscale Model: Experiments inWind Stress Curl from a Mesoscale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev. ,2006: Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean

  11. Ocean Engineering Two Year Graduate Course Schedule Graduate students from both the ocean and mechanical engineering programs may take courses from either discipline. The current schedule of courses for ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    6934 Ocean Energy Conversion - Dhanak EOC 6515 Hydro Aspects Ship Design** Ananthrakrishnan EOC 6934 Ocean Energy Conversion - Dhanak EOC 6312 Ocean and Seabed Acoustics** Frisk EOC 6312 Ocean and SeabedOcean Engineering Two Year Graduate Course Schedule Graduate students from both the ocean

  12. 156 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 22, NO. 1, JANUARY 1997 The Structure of Ocean-Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    156 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 22, NO. 1, JANUARY 1997 The Structure of Ocean engineering applications, notably in the design of ocean outfalls [2] and in the design of tidal power the Ocean Pollution Research Center under Grant R09401. D. A. Chin and S. Chinthamreddy

  13. Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains NearMaster University Tsunamis and ocean waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent

  14. The Cold Dark Ocean This talk will help younger students understand that most of the ocean is an expansive cold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the El Nińo/La Nińa cycle in the Pacific Ocean and how it impacts the climate of the Southeast UThe Cold Dark Ocean This talk will help younger students understand that most of the ocean is an expansive cold dark abyss. The concepts of solar heating of the ocean surface and effects of temperature

  15. Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote 2013. [1] Penetration of solar radiation in the ocean is determined by the attenuation coefficient (Kd. Lewis, R. Arnone, and R. Brewin (2013), Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans

  16. Effect of ocean surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    Effect of ocean surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean, J. T., and L. Thompson (2006), Effect of ocean surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L09604, doi:10.1029/2006GL025784. 1. Introduction [2

  17. Ocean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN AND WHIT G. ANDERSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    shortwave penetration in the high-latitude Southern Ocean causes an increase in the formation of mode waterOcean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN Jersey (Manuscript received 11 October 2007, in final form 17 July 2008) ABSTRACT Ocean water clarity

  18. BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean acoustic tomography, sensor webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    . NIHOUS Associate Professor, PhD 1983, UC Berkeley. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), marineFaculty BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean in the ocean, atmospheric and ionospheric tomography. KWOK FAI CHEUNG Professor , PhD 1991, British Columbia

  19. E. Guilyardi G. Madec L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guilyardi, Eric

    inertia and to its opacity, the ocean stores vast amounts of energy, away from a direct contactE. Guilyardi á G. Madec á L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance of a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM Received: 24 January 2000 / Accepted: 11 September 2000 Abstract

  20. ECMWF workshop on Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions, 10-12 Nov 2008 A revised ocean-atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interface #12;1*- Sensible heat flux 6*- Evaporation + int. energy [+ Qlat] ECMWF workshop on Ocean layer) 5- Surface ocean current 7- Surface height 7 1- Continental runoff + internal Energy 8 1*- SurfECMWF workshop on Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions, 10-12 Nov 2008 A revised ocean-atmosphere physical

  1. A New Family of Planets ? "Ocean Planets"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Leger; F. Selsis; C. Sotin; T. Guillot; D. Despois; H. Lammer; M. Ollivier; F. Brachet; A. Labeque; C. Valette

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A new family of planets is considered which is between rochy terrestrial planets and gaseous giant ones: "Ocean-Planets". We present the possible formation, composition and internal models of these putative planets, including that of their ocean, as well as their possible Exobiology interest. These planets should be detectable by planet detection missions such as Eddington and Kepler, and possibly COROT (lauch scheduled in 2006). They would be ideal targets for spectroscopic missions such as Darwin/TPF.

  2. CLIVAR Exchanges No. 65, Vol. 19, No. 2, July 2014 57 WGOMD evolving to CLIVAR Ocean Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : by a realistic ice melt distribution AMOC estimates with coupled climate model response forcing dataset suitable only models `truth' idealized experiments against which to compare models, parameterizations. Voldoire, and Q. Wang, 2014: North Atlantic simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments

  3. The 2007 Bering Strait oceanic heat flux and anomalous Arctic sea-ice Rebecca A. Woodgate,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Ron

    flowing PW weakens the ice-pack thereby promoting more sea-ice motion in response to wind, which in turnThe 2007 Bering Strait oceanic heat flux and anomalous Arctic sea-ice retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate,1 sea-ice retreat, we use observational data to estimate Bering Strait volume and heat transports from

  4. Reprinted from JOURNAL OF ATMOSPHERIC AND OCEANIC TECHNOLOGY, Vol. 12, No. 3, June 1995 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    to estimate the frequency-wavenumber power content for each sonar beam. The directional information is converted into the first four circular Fourier components at each frequency (including the mean power in the open ocean. A work- horse of most such data sets to date has been the tilt and roll buoy. While much

  5. A Brief Introduction to Ocean Oil Spills Professor Tommy Dickey, Secretary of the Navy/Chief of Naval Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    of Mexico Spill Ongoing BP Deepwater Horizon ­ Gulf of Mexico ­ estimates of 12,000-24,000 bbls/day or 430 by BP Photo provided by BP NASA Terra image #12;What are Causes of Ocean Oil Spills? * Oil drilling rig B lawsuit, >$2 B cleanup costs #12;BP Deepwater Horizon ­ Gulf of Mexico Located 40 miles southeast

  6. Journal of Ocean University of China (Oceanic and Coastal Sea Research) ISSN 1672-5182, October 31,2004, Vol.3, No.2, pp.19t-194

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Stephen Shangxing

    Journal of Ocean University of China (Oceanic and Coastal Sea Research) ISSN 1672-5182, October 31; seafloor asymmetry; mid-ocean ridges; Ailantic Ocean Number ISSN 1672-5182(2004)02-191-04 1 Introduction

  7. A synthesis of marine predator migrations, distribution, species overlap, and use of Pacific Ocean Exclusive Economic Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Autumn-Lynn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    North Pacific Ocean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .month in the North Pacific Ocean . . . . . . . . . . . .tracked in the Pacific Ocean during 2002-2009. Adapted from

  8. Fiscal Year 2007 Annual Report Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN SOUTHERN OCEAN 0° 120°E 150° 87°30' 88°00' N M0001Fiscal Year 2007 Annual Report Integrated Ocean Drilling Program · U.S. Implementing Organization­M0004 180° ESO USIO IODP Phase 1 Drill Sites, Expeditions 301­312 #12;Integrated Ocean Drilling

  9. Laboratory Experiments to Stimulate CO(2) Ocean Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masutani, S.M.

    1997-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Progress Report summarizes activities conducted over the period 8/16/96-2/15/97 as part of this project. This investigation responds to the possibility that restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions may be imposed in the future to comply with the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The primary objective of the investigation is to obtain experimental data that can be applied to assess the technical feasibility and environmental impacts of oceanic containment strategies to limit release of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal and other fossil fuel combustion systems into the atmosphere. Critical technical uncertainties of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} will be addressed by performing experiments that: (1) characterize size spectra and velocities of a dispersed CO{sub 2} phase in the near-field of a discharge jet; and (2) estimate rates of mass transfer from dissolving droplets of liquid CO{sub 2} encased in a thin hydrate shell. Experiments will be conducted in a laboratory facility that can reproduce conditions in the ocean to depths of 600 m (1,969 ft). Between 8/16/96 and 2/15/97, activities focused on modifications to the experimental apparatus and the testing of diagnostics. Following completion of these tasks, experiments will be initiated and will continue through the end of the 36 month period of performance. Major accomplishments of this reporting period were: (1) delivery, set-up, and testing of the PDPA (Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer), which will be the principal diagnostic of the continuous CO{sub 2} jet injection tests; (2) presentation of research papers and posters at the 212th American Chemical Society National Meeting and the Third International Conference on Carbon Dioxide Removal; (3) participation in the 4th Expert Workshop on Ocean Storage of Carbon Dioxide; (4) execution of an Agreement with ABB Management, Ltd. to support and extend the activities of this grant; and (5) initiation of research collaborations with Dr. P.M. Haugen of the University of Bergen, Norway, and Dr. A. Yamasaki of the National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Japan.

  10. Ocean Sci., 5, 115139, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/115/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is believed to be a primary location of surface ocean mixing as a result of wind energy input December 2008 ­ Published in Ocean Sci. Discuss.: 12 February 2009 Revised: 24 April 2009 ­ Accepted: 8 May response to wind stress forcing are assessed by com- paring surface drifter observations from the Southern

  11. Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

  12. Eddy correlation measurements of the air/sea flux of dimethylsulfide over the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radon over the northeast Pacific Ocean, J. Atmos. Chem. , 6,in the equatorial Pacific Ocean (1982 to 1996): Evidence ofover the northeast Pacific Ocean, J. Atmos. Chem. , Bates,

  13. A Spatial Deconvolution of Molecular Signals in Oceanic Dissolved Organic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meador, Travis B

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Limnol. Oceanogr. 47: 1595-the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 388: Karl, D. ,central equatorial Pacific Ocean, 1992: Daily and finescale

  14. Tropical Pacific nutrient dynamics in the modern and pleistocene ocean : insights from the nitrogen isotope system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafter, Patrick Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, Mar. Chem. , 3, 271–eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean, Mar. Chem. , 16, 277–and N 2 fixation in the Pacific Ocean, Global Biogeochem.

  15. A spatial deconvolution of molecular signals in oceanic dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meador, Travis Blake

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Limnol. Oceanogr. 47: 1595-the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 388: Karl, D. ,central equatorial Pacific Ocean, 1992: Daily and finescale

  16. Ocean Tidal Dissipation and its Role in Solar System Satellite Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Erinna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dominant contributor to the ocean energy dissipation (see §dominant contributor to the ocean energy dissipation (see §of interest, e.g. the ocean kinetic energy and tidal

  17. Spectral characterization of Ekman velocities in the Southern Ocean based on surface drifter trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elipot, Shane

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy input rates across the Southern Ocean. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .contributor to the upper ocean mixing energy budget. 1.2 Theenergy input in the Southern Ocean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  18. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Sponsored byApplications Division of Ocean Energy Systems Contract W-nental Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  19. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at several proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Environmental assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (FROH A PROPOSED OCEAN THERHAL _ENERGY _CONVERSION(OTEC) --:

  20. Effect of ocean mesoscale variability on the mean state of tropical Atlantic climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, H; Jochum, M; Murtugudde, R; Miller, A J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean State ofthe effect of oceanic mesoscale features on the mean climatemodel, resolving oceanic mesoscale variability leads to a

  1. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites toassessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) program;operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power

  2. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.recommendations for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  3. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants. Argonne,

  4. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) program;proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites tooperation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power

  5. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nental Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Impact Assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC),Intake Screens for Ocean Thermal Energy M.S. Thesis. Oregon

  6. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at several proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Environmental assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (The operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  7. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

    2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

  8. Variations in mid-ocean ridge CO2 emissions driven by glacial cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burley, Jonathan M A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geological record shows links between glacial cycles and volcanic productivity, both subaerially and at mid-ocean ridges. Sea-level-driven pressure changes could also affect chemical properties of mid-ocean ridge volcanism. We consider how changing sea-level could alter the \\cotwo{} emissions rate from mid-ocean ridges, on both the segment and global scale. We develop a simplified transport model for a highly incompatible element through a homogenous mantle; variations in the melt concentration the emission rate of the element are created by changes in the depth of first silicate melting. The model predicts an average global mid-ocean ridge \\cotwo{} emissions-rate of $53$~Mt/yr, in line with other estimates. We show that falling sea level would cause an increase in ridge \\cotwo{} emissions with a lag of about $100$~kyrs after the causative sea level change. The lag and amplitude of the response are sensitive to mantle permeability and plate spreading rate. For a reconstructed sea-level time series of the ...

  9. Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloane J. Wiktorowicz; Andrew P. Ingersoll

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune's deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be ~ 0.8 g/cm^3. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager flyby. As Neptune cools, the probability of a liquid ocean increases. Extrasolar "hot Neptunes," which presumably migrate inward toward their parent stars, cannot harbor liquid water oceans unless they have lost almost all of the hydrogen and helium from their deep interiors.

  10. Ocean current resource assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse to Time-BasedDecemberProgramsFleetWestOcean »Ocean current

  11. Cost Estimation Package

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter focuses on the components (or elements) of the cost estimation package and their documentation.

  12. The deep-ocean heat uptake in transient climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Boyin.; Stone, Peter H.; Sokolov, Andrei P.; Kamenkovich, Igor V.

    The deep-ocean heat uptake (DOHU) in transient climate changes is studied using an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) and its adjoint. The model configuration consists of idealized Pacific and Atlantic basins. The model ...

  13. Decoupling of iron and phosphate in the global ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parekh, Payal

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient for marine phytoplankton often limiting phytoplankton growth due to its low concentration in the ocean and thus playing a role in modulating the ocean's biological pump. In order to ...

  14. High School Ocean Sciences Challenge 2008 Challenge Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    High School Ocean Sciences Challenge 2008 Challenge Review Created by Laura Dover, Ocean Sciences Laboratory at Oregon State University High School Students Record PSAs James Roddey Facilitates a PSA ................................ 3 High School Challenge ............................ 3 High School Program Model

  15. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc. Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Joint Oceanographic Institutions.................................... 19 3.3.1. Drilling and Science Services

  16. Ocean Acidification Impacts on Shellfish Workshop: Findings and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Andrew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and ocean acidification data and information both within NOAA and in  collaboration with existing partnerships, such as the Department of Energy (

  17. Global isotopic signatures of oceanic island basalts / by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oschmann, Lynn A

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic analyses of 477 samples representing 30 islands or island groups, 3 seamounts or seamount chains, 2 oceanic ridges and 1 oceanic plateau [for a total of 36 geographic features] are compiled to form ...

  18. Comparison of wind stress algorithms, datasets and oceanic power input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Shaoyu

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If the ocean is in a statistically steady state, energy balance is a strong constraint, suggesting that the energy input into the world ocean is dissipated simultaneously at the same rate. Energy conservation is one of the ...

  19. Earthquake behavior and structure of oceanic transform faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roland, Emily Carlson

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oceanic transform faults that accommodate strain at mid-ocean ridge offsets represent a unique environment for studying fault mechanics. Here, I use seismic observations and models to explore how fault structure affects ...

  20. International Conference on Ocean Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Ocean Energy International Conference on Ocean Energy November 4, 2014 1:00PM EST to November 6, 2014 10:00PM EST Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada http:www.icoe2014canada.org...

  1. Persistent ocean monitoring with underwater gliders: Adapting sampling resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ryan N.

    Ocean processes are dynamic and complex and occur on multiple spatial and temporal scales. To obtain a synoptic view of such processes, ocean scientists collect data over long time periods. Historically, measurements were ...

  2. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isolating Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere in the KuroshioSST coupler . . . . Chapter 3 Mesoscale Ocean-Atmosphere4.2 Impact of Mesoscale SST on Precipitation Chapter 4 vi

  3. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionOpen cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary1978. 'Open cycle thermal energy converS1on. A preliminary

  4. Wind Bias from Sub-optimal Estimation Due to Geophysical Modeling Error Paul E. Johnson and David G . Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Wind Bias from Sub-optimal Estimation Due to Geophysical Modeling Error -Wind I Paul E. Johnson (which relates the wind to the normalized radar cross section, NRCS, of the ocean surface) is uncertainty in the NRCS for given wind conditions. When the estimated variability is in- cluded in the maximum likelihood

  5. Check Estimates and Independent Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Check estimates and independent cost estimates (ICEs) are tools that can be used to validate a cost estimate. Estimate validation entails an objective review of the estimate to ensure that estimate criteria and requirements have been met and well documented, defensible estimate has been developed. This chapter describes check estimates and their procedures and various types of independent cost estimates.

  6. Ocean Studies Board annual report 1989 and future plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The major activities of the Ocean Studies Board of the National Research Council for 1989 are reviewed. The following are discussed: the Navy Panel, the CO2 Panel, the Committee on the Ocean`s Role in Global Change, the Committee on the Coastal Ocean, the Workshop on Issues of U.S. Marine Fisheries, and the Continental Margins Workshop Committee. Future plans are covered.

  7. atlantic ocean samples: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Atlantic Oscillation Atlantic ocean as a heat reservoir 10 3.1 The reduced thermal damping argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  8. atlantic ocean woce: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Atlantic Oscillation Atlantic ocean as a heat reservoir 10 3.1 The reduced thermal damping argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  9. atlantic ocean bottom: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Atlantic Oscillation Atlantic ocean as a heat reservoir 10 3.1 The reduced thermal damping argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  10. Daniel T. Cox Professor, Coastal and Ocean Engineering Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    Daniel T. Cox Professor, Coastal and Ocean Engineering Program 202 Owen Hall School of Civil Reviewer: Applied Geography; Applied Ocean Research; Coastal Engineering; Coastal Engineering Journal of Engineering Mechanics; Journal of Geophysical Research ­ Ocean, Journal of Geophysical Research ­ Earth

  11. Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    1 Guide to Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering University engineering. The graduate program in ocean engineering at UH was initiated in 1966 and is one of the first and Technology (SOEST). The Department of Ocean Engineering and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute

  12. ORE 654: Applications of Ocean Acoustics Fall Semester 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    of this course is to provide the ocean engineering student an understanding of how sound propagates through science, mathematics, & engineering Program Outcome 4: Ocean engineering specialization Program Outcome 5: Use of latest tools in ocean engineering Program Outcome 6: Problem formulation & solution Program

  13. ORE 654: Applications of Ocean Acoustics Fall Semester 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    of this course is to provide the ocean engineering student an understanding of how sound propagates through, & engineering Program Outcome 4: Ocean engineering specialization Program Outcome 5: Use of latest tools in ocean engineering Program Outcome 6: Problem formulation & solution Program Outcome 9: Professional

  14. ORE 630 Structural Analysis in Ocean Engineering Designation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    ORE 630 Structural Analysis in Ocean Engineering Designation Offshore Engineering Required Course to Program Outcomes Program Outcome 2: Basic science, mathematics, & engineering Program Outcome 4: Ocean engineering specialization Program Outcome 5: Use of latest tools in ocean engineering Program Outcome 6

  15. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY09 Annual Report #12;Discrete core sampling #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine research successes of the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), programs

  16. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY10 Annual Report #12;Crane ball #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine research program Drilling Project (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), programs that revolutionized our view

  17. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY13 Annual Report #12;Tripping Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) monitored subseafloor environments and explored Earth's history Drilling Project (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), which revolutionized our view of Earth

  18. A decade of acoustic thermometry in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    A decade of acoustic thermometry in the North Pacific Ocean B. D. Dushaw,1 P. F. Worcester,2 W. H of acoustic thermometry in the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res., 114, C07021, doi:10.1029/2008JC005124. 1 of basin-scale heat content in the northeast Pacific Ocean were made using a broadband 133-Hz source

  19. DEEP MAXIMA OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC CHLOROPHYLL IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEEP MAXIMA OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC CHLOROPHYLL IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN E. L. VENRICK, J. A. MCGOWAN, AND A Pacific Ocean show that during most of the year the maximum concentrations of chlorophyll occur below in the world's oceans. There are several thousands of these measurements in the Pacific. Most

  20. Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wage, Kathleen

    Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E. Wage, Matthew A and the Acoustical Society of America. #12;Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E Thermometry of Ocean Climate ATOC and Alternate Source Test AST experiments. Vertical line arrays at Hawaii

  1. Ocean Studies Board annual report 1989 and future plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major activities of the Ocean Studies Board of the National Research Council for 1989 are reviewed. The following are discussed: the Navy Panel, the CO2 Panel, the Committee on the Ocean's Role in Global Change, the Committee on the Coastal Ocean, the Workshop on Issues of U.S. Marine Fisheries, and the Continental Margins Workshop Committee. Future plans are covered.

  2. The Energetics of Ocean Heat Transport ANAND GNANADESIKAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallis, Geoff

    between mechanical energy supply and thermal energy transport associated with the ocean circulation modeling studies of ocean tide generation and energy conversion (Simmons et al. 2004; Arbic et al. 2004a of recent papers have argued that the mechanical energy budget of the ocean places constraints on how

  3. Oceanic oxygen changes as a bellwether of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Oceanic oxygen changes as a bellwether of climate change Term paper in Biogeochemistry@ethz.ch] Tutor: Prof. Dr. Nicholas Gruber [nicholas.gruber@env.ethz.ch] Abstract The response of oceanic oxygen of climate change. Recent publications indicate that the oceanic oxygen outgassing is substaintially larger

  4. Implementation Plan for the Hybrid Ocean Modeling Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the atmosphere and cryosphere. The oceans operate in the climate system to transfer information (heat, saltImplementation Plan for the Hybrid Ocean Modeling Environment HOME R. Hallberg (NOAA/GFDL), A Recent advances in simulating the ocean through the use of generalized hybrid coordinate modeling

  5. August 2011 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 2011 1 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion in Hawaii Available data prompted ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) technology to be re-considered for use in Hawaii for OTEC development. Keywords- Ocean thermal energy conversion, OTEC, renewable energy, Hawaii

  6. Overview of Ocean Wave and Tidal Energy Lingchuan Mei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavaei, Javad

    Overview of Ocean Wave and Tidal Energy Lingchuan Mei Department of Electrical Engineering Columbia with the climate change has led us to the exploration of new renewable energy in the past few decades. Oceans of this paper is to briefly overview the technology development of the ocean energy exploration, focusing on two

  7. Advanced geophysical studies of accretion of oceanic lithosphere in Mid-Ocean Ridges characterized by contrasting tectono-magmatic settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Min, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of the oceanic lithosphere results from magmatic and extensional processes taking place at mid-ocean ridges (MORs). The temporal and spatial scales of the variability of these two processes control the degree ...

  8. Evolution of Anthropogenic Pb and Pb isotopes in the deep North Atlantic Ocean and the Indian Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong-Mi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pb and Pb isotopes in the ocean have varied on decadal to centennial time scales due to anthropogenic Pb inputs. Thus, tracing the temporal variation of Pb and Pb isotopes in the ocean provides information on the major ...

  9. The dynamic response of oceanic hydrate deposits to ocean temperature change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reagan, Matthew T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moridis, G.J. (2007), Oceanic gas hydrate instability andand salt inhibition of gas hydrate formation in the northernI.R. (1999), Thermogenic gas hydrates and hydrocarbon gases

  10. Mapping Ocean Observations in a Dynamical Framework: A 2004-06 Ocean Atlas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forget, Gael

    This paper exploits a new observational atlas for the near-global ocean for the best-observed 3-yr period from December 2003 through November 2006. The atlas consists of mapped observations and derived quantities. Together ...

  11. The National Ocean Service: america's oceans and coasts: safe, healthy, and productive Office of Coast Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ' Agreement on Ocean Health · Coastal Enterprise Report · Homeland Security National Response Framework Budget and Personnel · Budget Line: Mapping and Charting Base, Joint Hydrographic Center, Electronic Navigational transportation and port authorities · Commercial and recreational mariners · U.S. Power Squadrons #12

  12. 121OUR CHANGING PLANET Ocean Bathymetry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    . The plates act as giant radiators of heat. They cool, thicken, and gradually subside as they progress from axes represent a singular point in the system where the upwelling magma meets cold seawater. Hydrothermal cooling of magma chambers at the ridge axes recycles the entire volume of the ocean in just a few

  13. Ocean Acidification: The Other CO2 Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, Michael J.

    reserved 1941-1405/09/0115-0169$20.00 Key Words biogeochemistry, calcification, carbon dioxide, climate of calcium carbonate saturation states, which impacts shell-forming marine organisms from plankton to benthic for marine organisms to adapt to increasing CO2 and broader implications for ocean ecosystems are not well

  14. Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS3 Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide oasis3 prism 2­2, June 2004 Sophie Valcke 1 to realize a coupled simulation with OASIS3. The aim of OASIS3 is to provide a flexible and user friendly. OASIS3 synchronizes the exchanges of coupling fields between the models being coupled, and performs 2D

  15. Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS3 Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide oasis3 prism 2­3, August 2004 Sophie Valcke 1 to realize a coupled simulation with OASIS3. The aim of OASIS3 is to provide a flexible and user friendly. OASIS3 synchronizes the exchanges of coupling fields between the models being coupled, and performs 2D

  16. Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS 2.0 Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide and Reference Manual November 1995 Laurent for the straightforward use of OASIS 2.0. As far as we know, it is the best way to use it! The aim of OASIS is to provide been particularly emphasized in the OASIS design. The use of OASIS does not change the way the models

  17. Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves Paul C. Liu Abstract. Wavelet spectrum analysis characteristics. These insights are due to the nature of the wavelet transform that would not be immediately or decay, is Wavelets in Geophysics 151 Efi Foufoula-Georgiou and Praveen Kumar (eds.), pp. 151-166. ISBN 0

  18. The Ocean's least productive waters are expanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    The Ocean's least productive waters are expanding Jeffrey Polovina, Evan Howell, Melanie AbecassisWiFS Annual mean depth integrated net primary productivity (data from Behrenfeld 2007) #12;N Pacific Monthly for Pacific and Atlantic oligotrophic gyres expanding 0.79 ­ 4.40 %/yr (6.32- 35.2% increase in 2006 compared

  19. CARBON DIOXIDE AND OUR OCEAN LEGACY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a biologist at the California State Univer- sity San Marcos, with expertise in the effects of carbon dioxideCARBON DIOXIDE AND OUR OCEAN LEGACY G Carbon Dioxide: Our Role The United States is the single. Every day the average American adds about 118 pounds of carbon dioxide to the atmos- phere, due largely

  20. Exploring the Deep... Ocean-Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Climate oscillations 97 #12;Storing energy To understand how solar radiation affects large-scale processes), and biosphere (living organisms) that are driven by solar energy. The ocean and the atmosphere have the greatest on the others. To fully understand the dynamics of our climate, we must examine the global energy balance

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 144 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Haggerty Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 144 Department of Geosciences University of Tulsa Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 Dr of the Ocean Drilling Program: Janet A. Haggerty, Co-Chief Scientist (Research Office, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104) Isabella Premoli Silva, Co-Chief Scientist (Departimento di Scienze della Terra

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 146 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at two sites to determine its nature and whether free gas is present beneath it. At all drill site Program (Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden Science Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research

  3. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC) #12;#12;Claude's Off Rio de Janeiro (1933) · Floating Ice Plant: 2.2 MW OC- OTEC to produce 2000

  4. NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project Contract Number N62583-09-C-0083 CDRL A014 OTEC Mini-Spar Pilot Plant 9 December 2011 OTEC-2011-001-4 Prepared for: Naval Facilities; distribution is unlimited. #12; Configuration Report and Development Plan Volume 4 Site Specific OTEC

  5. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega · Floating Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC: Georges Claude (Open Cycle OTEC) · 1928 Ougree Experiment, France: Factory Water Outflow (33 °C) & Meuse

  6. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    designed bare rock guide base and use new drilling technology. The drillship JOIDES Resolution is scheduledOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE KANE FRACTURE ZONE Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469

  7. Ocean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Answers to Project 8: Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    mkgmkg m = m0292.0= b) How long would it take for this internal wave to propagate to 40N? First weOcean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Answers to Project 8: Waves 1. A two layer internal wave is 1028 kg/m3, and the density is 1029 kg/m3 in the lower layer. a) A wind event generates an upwelling

  8. The distinct behaviors of Pacific and Indian Ocean warm pool properties on seasonal and interannual time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seon Tae; Yu, Jin-Yi; Lu, Mong-Ming

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the tropical Indian and Pacific Ocean regions, Mon. WeatherIndian Ocean and in the Pacific Ocean, J. Ocean Univ. China,KIM ET AL. : PACIFIC AND INDIAN OCEAN WARM POOL Rayner, N.

  9. An Adaptive Particle Filtering Approach to Tracking Modes in a Varying Shallow Ocean Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candy, J V

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The shallow ocean environment is ever changing mostly due to temperature variations in its upper layers (< 100m) directly affecting sound propagation throughout. The need to develop processors that are capable of tracking these changes implies a stochastic as well as an 'adaptive' design. The stochastic requirement follows directly from the multitude of variations created by uncertain parameters and noise. Some work has been accomplished in this area, but the stochastic nature was constrained to Gaussian uncertainties. It has been clear for a long time that this constraint was not particularly realistic leading a Bayesian approach that enables the representation of any uncertainty distribution. Sequential Bayesian techniques enable a class of processors capable of performing in an uncertain, nonstationary (varying statistics), non-Gaussian, variable shallow ocean. In this paper adaptive processors providing enhanced signals for acoustic hydrophonemeasurements on a vertical array as well as enhanced modal function estimates are developed. Synthetic data is provided to demonstrate that this approach is viable.

  10. 498 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 26, NO. 4, OCTOBER 2001 Docking for an Autonomous Ocean Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Hanumant

    498 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 26, NO. 4, OCTOBER 2001 Docking for an Autonomous of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering, Woods Hole Oceano- graphic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA (e is with the Department of Ocean Engineering, Massachusetts Insti- tute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA (e

  11. Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information to assist developers of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems in site selection Energy Conversion The immense size of the ocean thermal resource and the baseload capability of OTECOcean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Ocean Thermal Resources off

  12. 137Cs(90Sr) and Pu isotopes in the Pacific Ocean sources & trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T.F., Millies-Lacrox, J.C. [Service Mixte de Securite Radologique, Mondhery (France); Hong, G.H. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan (Korea)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main source of artificial radioactivity in the world`s oceans can be attributed to worldwide fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. Measurements of selected artificial radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean were first conducted in the 1960`s where it was observed that fallout radioactivity had penetrated the deep ocean. Extensive studies carried out during the 1973-74 GEOSECS provided the first comprehensive data on the lateral and vertical distributions of {sup 9O}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and Pu isotopes in the Pacific on a basin wide scale. Estimates of radionuclide inventories in excess of amounts predicted to be delivered by global fallout alone were attributed to close-in fallout and tropospheric inputs from early U.S. tests conducted on Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Equatorial Pacific. In general, levels of fallout radionuclides (including {sup 9O}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and Pu isotopes) in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean have decreased considerably over the past 4 decades and are now much more homogeneously distributed. Resuspension and the subsequent deposition of fallout radionuclides from previously deposited debris on land has become an important source term for the surface ocean. This can be clearly seen in measurements of fallout radionuclides in mineral aerosols over the Korean Peninsula (Yellow dust events). Radionuclides may also be transported from land to sea in river runoff-these transport mechanisms are more important in the Pacific Ocean where large quantities of river water and suspended sands/fluvial sediments reach the coastal zone. Another unique source of artificial radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean is derived from the slow resolubilization and transport of radionuclides deposited in contaminated lagoon and slope sediments near U.S. and French test sites. Although there is a small but significant flux of artificial radionuclides depositing on the sea floor, > 80% of the total 239, {sup 240}Pu inventory and > 95% of the total {sup 137}Cs inventory remains in the water column. Studies conducted through the 1980`s appear to be consistent with earlier findings and indicate that radionuclide inventories in mid-northern latitudes are at least a factor of two above those expected from global fallout alone. The long term persistence of close-in and/or stratospheric fallout from nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands still appears to be the only plausible explanation for this anomaly.

  13. Types of Cost Estimates

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The chapter describes the estimates required on government-managed projects for both general construction and environmental management.

  14. Systems Engineering Cost Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryson, Joanna J.

    on project, human capital impact. 7 How to estimate Cost? Difficult to know what we are building early on1 Systems Engineering Lecture 3 Cost Estimation Dr. Joanna Bryson Dr. Leon Watts University of Bath: Contrast approaches for estimating software project cost, and identify the main sources of cost

  15. Upper-ocean variability in Drake Passage and the Weddell Sea : Measuring the oceanic response to air-sea and ice-ocean interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephenson, Gordon Ronald

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of nonlinear mesoscale eddies on oceanicGlobal observations of nonlinear mesoscale eddies. Prog.Firing, E. , 2007: Mean jets, mesoscale variability and eddy

  16. Are extrasolar oceans common throughout the Galaxy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Ehrenreich; Arnaud Cassan

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Light and cold extrasolar planets such as OGLE 2005-BLG-390Lb, a 5.5 Earth-mass planet detected via microlensing, could be frequent in the Galaxy according to some preliminary results from microlensing experiments. These planets can be frozen rocky- or ocean-planets, situated beyond the snow line and, therefore, beyond the habitable zone of their system. They can nonetheless host a layer of liquid water, heated by radiogenic energy, underneath an ice shell surface for billions of years, before freezing completely. These results suggest that oceans under ice, like those suspected to be present on icy moons in the Solar system, could be a common feature of cold low-mass extrasolar planets.

  17. Long-range propagation of ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    hours. Friday, February 22, 2013 #12;OceanPowerTechnologies A 103 foot long, 260ton buoy being tested #12;Wave Power? PelamisWavePower With T=10sec and a = 1 meter, the energy flux is 40kW/meter. An average 40kW/meter of wave power is typical of good sites. Energy Flux = cg × Energy Density = g2 Ta2 8

  18. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

  19. arXiv:math-ph/0307020v330Dec2003 Energy spectra of the ocean's internal wave field: theory and observations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabak, Esteban G.

    . Motivated by this difference, we tried to estimate the ac- curacy of the GMh power laws and thus reviewed], the last significant model revision [8,9] has surprisingly stood the test of time. However, a review of open ocean data sets reveals subtle variability in spectral power laws. We show in this letter

  20. Shipley, T.H., Ogawa, Y., Blum, P., and Bahr, J.M. (Eds.), 1997 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 156

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CORES WITH THE SHIPBOARD SCINTILLATION DETECTOR OF THE OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM: EXAMPLE FROM LEG 1561) spectrometry allows estimation of the elemental concentrations of K, U, and Th, which can be used to help-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and instrumental neutron activation analyses) data

  1. Ocean Carbon Cycle Data from the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The U.S. JGOFS program, a component of the U.S Global Change Research Program, grew out of the recommendations of a National Academy of Sciences workshop in 1984. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP). Data are available throughout the U.S. JGOFS web site at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/ and from the U.S. JGOFS Data System at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/jg/dir/jgofs/. Major named segments of the project are: Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) Study, Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Study, Equatorial Pacific Process Study, North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (1989), Arabian Sea Process Study, and the Southern Ocean Process Study.

  2. Short-term effects of Gamma Ray Bursts on oceanic photosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penate, Liuba; Cardenas, Rolando; Agusti, Susana

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We continue our previous work on the potential short-term influence of a gamma ray bursts on Earth's biosphere, focusing on the only important short-term effect on life: the ultraviolet flash which occurs as a result of the retransmission of the {\\gamma} radiation through the atmosphere. Thus, in this work we calculate the ultraviolet irradiances penetrating the first hundred meters of the water column, for Jerlov's ocean water types I, II and III. Then we estimate the UV flash potential for photosynthesis inhibition, showing that it can be important in a considerable part of the water column with light enough for photosynthesis to be done, the so called photic zone.

  3. Estimated Water Flows in 2005: United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow charts depicting water use in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of water use patterns. Approximately 410,500 million gallons per day of water are managed throughout the United States for use in farming, power production, residential, commercial, and industrial applications. Water is obtained from four major resource classes: fresh surface-water, saline (ocean) surface-water, fresh groundwater and saline (brackish) groundwater. Water that is not consumed or evaporated during its use is returned to surface bodies of water. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states in addition to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) and one national water flow chart representing a comprehensive systems view of national water resources, use, and disposition.

  4. Cyclone-cyclone Interactions through the Ocean Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Foltz, Gregory R.; Knaff, John A.

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The intense SST (Sea Surface Temperature) cooling caused by hurricane-induced mixing is restored at timescales on the order of weeks(1) and thus may persist long enough to influence a later hurricane passing over it. Though many studies have evaluated the effects of SST cool-ing induced by a hurricane on its own intensification(2, 3), none has looked at its effect on later storms. Using an analysis of observations and numerical model simulations, we demonstrate that hurricanes may influence the intensity of later hurricanes that pass over their linger-ing wakes. On average, when hurricanes encounter cold wakes, they experience SSTs that are ~0.4oC lower than when they do not encounter wakes and consequently decay(intensify) at a rate that is nearly three times faster(slower). In the region of warm SSTs (* 26.5oC) where the most intense and damaging hurricanes tend to occur, the percentage of hurricanes that encounter lingering cold wakes increases with hurricane frequency and was found to be as high as 40%. Furthermore, we estimate that the cumulative power dissipated(4) by the most energetic hurricanes has been reduced by as much as ~7% in a season through this effect. As the debate on changes in Atlantic hurricane activity associated with global warming(5) continues, the negative feedback between hurricane frequency and intensity resulting from hurricane-hurricane interactions through the ocean pathway deserves attention.

  5. Uranium in the oceans: Where it goes and why

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klinkhammer, G.P. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States)); Palmer, M.R. (Bristol Univ. (England))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium is removed from the oceans by diffusion across the sediment-water interface of organic-rich sediments. This pathway is the largest single sink in the global budget of this element. Dissolved uranium is drawn into suboxic sediments along a concentration gradient established by the precipitation of an insoluble phase which forms when U(VI) is reduced to U(IV). This transformation occurs relatively late in the diagenetic sequence, after the microbially mediated dissolution of manganese and iron oxides, and may be induced by the onset of sulfate reduction. Metallo-organics play an important role in the diagenetic behavior of this element as some uranium is released into solution when labile organics are consumed at the sediment-water interface. In contrast, the diagenesis of authigenic Fe- and Mn-oxides exerts negligible influence on the uranium diagenetic cycle. Variations in the uranium concentration of sediment with time are controlled directly by the uranium content of the source material settling from the water column, and indirectly, by the organic content of this material and sedimentation rate. Since diffusion from seawater influences dramatically the short-term burial rate of uranium, down-core distributions of dissolved and solid uranium can provide an estimate of recent sedimentation rates in rapidly accumulating sediments.

  6. Hypsometry of oceanic lithosphere with implications for Venus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, John Van Sant

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    terrestrial-style oceanic-type lithosphere although a few continental blocks, such as Ishtar and Aphrodite Terrae, may appear as well. If the Venusian and terrestrial "oceanic" lithospheres are similar in both composition and density and the average... as two isostatically compensated highland masses--Ishtar and Aphrodite Terrae ? which resemble terrestrial conti- nents, the lat+er case seems feasible. If there is ocean- ic lithosphere on Venus, the plate-model hypsometry should correlate well...

  7. Examining Management Issues for Incidentally Caught Species in Highly Migratory Species Fisheries in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Valerie Ann

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamics in the central Pacific Ocean, 1952- 1998. II. Afishing for tunas in the Pacific Ocean. Ecology and Societywestern and central north Pacific Ocean. ISC. 2013a. Stock

  8. Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stephen V.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    atmosphere over the eastern Pacific Ocean in summer, volumeover the eastern North Pacific Ocean: Spatial distribution,winds over the eastern North Pacific Ocean in spring and

  9. 2014 Ocean Drilling Cita on Report Covering Cita ons Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014 Ocean Drilling Cita on Report Covering Cita ons Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and Interna onal Ocean Discovery Program from #12;22014 Ocean Drilling Cita on Report Introduc on At the end of each fiscal year, the Interna onal

  10. MIT and Marine Systems and Ocean Science & Engineering MIT Industry Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    ; shipping and transportation; ocean energy; ocean acoustics; the role of the ocean in the global environmentMIT and Marine Systems and Ocean Science & Engineering MIT Industry Brief MIT's Industrial Liaison of Technology (MIT) is a leading center of research and education on topics related to marine systems, and ocean

  11. Establishing a Testing Center for Ocean Energy Technologies in...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and scaled devices in both laboratory and open water settings. To facilitate testing wave energy conversion devices, OSU developed and built a mobile ocean testing platform...

  12. Anisotropic GM Parameterization for Ocean Models Richard D. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Anisotropic GM Parameterization for Ocean Models Richard D. Smith Theoretical Division, Los. This complements the anisotropic viscosity parameterization recently developed by Smith and Mc

  13. Memorandum of Understanding On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Memorandum of Understanding On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic Renewable Energy Resources between the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and...

  14. Ocean Energy Technology Overview: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction to and overview of ocean renewable energy resources and technologies prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy management Program.

  15. State-Ocean City Beach Erosion Control District (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Beach Erosion Control District constitutes part of the Ocean City shoreline. Land clearing, construction activity, or the construction or placement of permanent structures within the district is...

  16. ambient ocean noise: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of anisotropy in oceanic ambient noise fields and its relevance to Acoustic Daylight imaging CiteSeer Summary: Acoustic Daylight is a new technique for creating pictorial...

  17. arctic ocean sediments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

  18. arctic ocean sediment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

  19. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 66 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 66 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2009 Timothy P. Boyer John I. Antonov Olga K. Baranova ......................................................................................... 28 1.1.8. Application software interfaces

  20. atlantic ocean supplementary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has been assessed. This area currents, which play an important role in the northwestern North Atlantic Ocean, cannot be resolved Drijfhout, Sybren 42 Equatorial currents...

  1. atlantic ocean table: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has been assessed. This area currents, which play an important role in the northwestern North Atlantic Ocean, cannot be resolved Drijfhout, Sybren 43 Equatorial currents...

  2. atlantic ocean: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has been assessed. This area currents, which play an important role in the northwestern North Atlantic Ocean, cannot be resolved Drijfhout, Sybren 42 Equatorial currents...

  3. Ecology, diversity and comparative genomics of oceanic cyanobacterial viruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Matthew Brian, 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The marine cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus are numerically dominant primary producers in the oceans. Each genera consists of multiple physiologically and genetically distinct groups (termed "ecotypes" in ...

  4. Anthropogenic Lead Emissions in the Ocean: The Evolving Global Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong-Mi

    We review the current distribution of lead and lead isotopes in the ocean with regard to the evolving pattern of human emissions during the past decades and centuries.

  5. New Insights into Light in the Oceans Tommy Dickey, UCSB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    biogeochemistry (carbon dioxide) with optics c. Global climate change and ocean ecosystems #12;Fundamental Problem and apparent optical properties * Light absorption, scattering, polarization * Radiative transfer at air

  6. ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

  7. archipelago indian ocean: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These improvements include the following: Observations In 2004, the United States had a total of six experimental Deep-Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis 82...

  8. andean uplift ocean: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    design. Topics Covered 1 Frandsen, Jannette B. 419 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS University of California eScholarship...

  9. antartic ocean radiocarbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    design. Topics Covered 1 Frandsen, Jannette B. 362 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS University of California eScholarship...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGen®...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Company TidGen turbine High-Fidelity Hydrostructural Analysis of Ocean Renewable Power Company's (ORPC's) TidGen Turbine On March 19, 2014, in Computational Modeling &...

  11. Indian Ocean radiocarbon: Data from the INDIGO 1, 2, and 3 cruises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepanski, R.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents {sup 14}C activities (expressed in the internationally adopted {Delta}{sup 14}C scale) from water samples taken at various locations and depths in the Indian and Southern oceans through the Indien Gaz Ocean (INDIGO) project. These data were collected as part of the INDIGO 1, INDIGO 2, and INDIGO 3 cruises, which took place during the years 1985, 1986, and 1987, respectively. These data have been used to estimate the penetration of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the Indian and Southern oceans. The document also presents supporting data for potential temperature, salinity, density (sigma-theta), {delta}{sup 13}C, and total CO{sub 2}. All radiocarbon measurements have been examined statistically for quality of sample counts and stability of counting efficiency and background. In addition, all data have been reviewed by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and assessed for gross accuracy and consistency (absence of obvious outliers and other anomalous values). These data are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. The NDP consists of this document and a magnetic tape containing machine-readable files. This document provides sample listing of the Indian Ocean radiocarbon data as they appear on the magnetic tape, as well as a complete listing of these data in tabular form. This document also offers retrieval program listings, furnishes information on sampling methods and data selection, defines limitations and restrictions of the data, and provides reprints of pertinent literature. 13 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Estimating Specialty Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

  13. Cooling load estimation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, R.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described. Correlations are described that permit auxiliary cooling estimates from monthly average insolation and weather data. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy required of a given building.

  14. Ocean Sci., 3, 291298, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/291/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Scaling aspects of the sea-ice-drift dynamics and pack on the ice pack. The revealed decrease of the fractal dimension as a result of large-scale fragmentation pack. 1 Introduction Two continuous processes determine, mainly, the mechani- cal behavior of the ice

  15. Ocean Sci., 5, 4758, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/47/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Hartmut

    flows into a new dynamic domain in which turbulence is generated by internal gravity waves rather than and waves but no mean shear, respectively. The new model reproduces the wave-turbulence transition analyzed in the interior of the ocean is dominantly driven by internal gravity waves, and the prevailing model

  16. Ocean Sci., 3, 299310, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/299/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    activities in the coastal areas and marine resource exploitation, such as open ocean oil ex- traction by the intense land usage and coastal urban development in recent years. More- over, as a matter of fact, human and industrial fisheries, are experiencing a constant increase, significantly affecting the marine ecosystem

  17. Ocean Sci., 8, 10411054, 2012 www.ocean-sci.net/8/1041/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    southward along the African coast near 30­35 S (e.g. Warren and Speer, 1991; Speer et al., 1995; Zangenberg the African coast in the Cape Basin to then enter the Indian Ocean (Speer et al., 1995; Van Aken et al., 2004

  18. Oceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    'Etudes Ge´ophysiques et d'Oce´anographie Spatiale, Toulouse, France Carl Wunsch Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA Received 31 July 2000; revised 4 September 2001; accepted 2 to and from the atmosphere, the ocean plays a major role in climate regulation. One of the main objectives

  19. Ocean Science, 1, 127144, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/127/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the period 1985­2002. Three At- lantic regions are considered ­ the subtropics, mid-latitudes, the northeast Atlantic ­ along with the Labrador Sea. The oceanic boundaries of each region coincide with hydro- graphic sections occupied in recent years. These regions broadly represent the formation sites of Eighteen Degree

  20. Ocean Sci., 3, 91104, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/91/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Modelling the cohesive sediment transport in the marine. In that aim a numerical model has been developed to predict the fate of the sediments introduced to the marine, incorporated in the parame- terization, apart from advection and dispersion, include co- hesive sediment

  1. Heat transport in the North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Glenn Harold

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L IB R AR Y A&M COLLEGE OF TEXAS HEAT TRANSPORT IN THE NORTH ATLANTIS OCEAN A Dissertation By GLENN HAROLD JUNG Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... the velocity difference be? tween depths 1 and 2 in a region between stations situated at positions A and B is used: V1 - v2 z l r - (DA - db ) (2) where c is 1/2X1 sin)#,-ft- Is the angular velocity of the earth, 0 is the latitude of the region, L...

  2. Heat transport in the North Atlantic Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Glenn Harold

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L IB R AR Y A&M COLLEGE OF TEXAS HEAT TRANSPORT IN THE NORTH ATLANTIS OCEAN A Dissertation By GLENN HAROLD JUNG Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... the velocity difference be? tween depths 1 and 2 in a region between stations situated at positions A and B is used: V1 - v2 z l r - (DA - db ) (2) where c is 1/2X1 sin)#,-ft- Is the angular velocity of the earth, 0 is the latitude of the region, L...

  3. ocean energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel'slinked openreduction+ocean energy Home

  4. Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling

  5. Ocean Power (4 Activities) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.ofUseIowaWeatherization11 JulyOcean Power

  6. Clean Cities: Ocean State Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthern Colorado CleanOcean State

  7. Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing: U.S.Climate ActionClimate, EarthOcean

  8. Ocean Motion International LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jumpsource HistoryFractures belowOasisEnergyThe NeedlesOcean

  9. Open Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff the Grid 1BOGProtonics IncOcean Energy

  10. Makai Ocean Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersource History View NewWind FarmMakai Ocean

  11. Ocean Flow Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwestOakdale ElectricOcean Flow Energy Jump

  12. Ocean Prospect Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwestOakdale ElectricOcean Flow Energy

  13. Ocean Energy Company LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence SeedNunn,andOasys WaterCity, New Jersey:OceanCompany

  14. Ocean Wavemaster Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence SeedNunn,andOasys WaterCity,Ocean Wavemaster Ltd

  15. Ocean Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)GasOcean Aerosols: The MarineRenewable

  16. Extreme wave height estimation for ocean engineering applications in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Chan Kwon

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    . 12:00 6 10 Katrina (2005) Aug. 23. 18:00 ? Aug. 31. 06:00 9 11 Rita (2005) Sep. 18. 00:00 ? Sep. 26. 06:00 10 12 Wilma (2005) Oct. 15. 18:00 ? Oct. 26. 18:00 12 13 Alberto (2006) Jun. 10. 06:00 ? Jun. 19. 06:00 3 14 Dean (2007) Aug. 13. 06... Gordon 5 22% 26% 4 Isidore 5 37% 45% 5 Lili 4 23% 16% 6 Ivan 12 11% 24% 7 Arlene 4 32% 34% 8 Dennis 3 38% 20% 9 Emily 6 26% 20% 10 Katrina 9 9% 20% 11 Rita 10 10% 16% 12 Wilma 12 11% 30% 13 Alberto 3 19% 24% 14 Dean 2 12% 42% 15 Dolly 4 20% 33...

  17. Error and uncertainty in estimates of Reynolds stress using ADCP in an energetic ocean state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapo, Mark Andrew.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) To that end, the space-time correlations of the error, turbulence, and wave processes are developed and then utilized to find the extent to which the environmental and internal processing parameters contribute to ...

  18. Global oceanic rainfall estimation from AMSR-E data based on a radiative transfer model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Kyoung-Wook

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved physically-based rainfall algorithm was developed using AMSR-E data based on a radiative transfer model. In addition, error models were designed and embedded in the algorithm to assess retrieval errors ...

  19. Using Satellite Ocean Color Data to Derive an Empirical Model for the Penetration Depth of Solar Radiation (Hp) in the Tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, .Dake

    Radiation (Hp) in the Tropical Pacific Ocean RONG-HUA ZHANG State Key Laboratory of Satellite OceanUsing Satellite Ocean Color Data to Derive an Empirical Model for the Penetration Depth of Solar Environment Dynamics, Second Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Hangzhou, Zhejiang

  20. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

  1. Carbon isotope ratios of organic compound fractions in oceanic suspended particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Jeomshik; Druffel, Ellen R. M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the northeast Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. , 101,slope to the abyssal NE Pacific Ocean, Deep Sea Res. , Partwaters of the equatorial Pacific Ocean, Deep Sea Res. , Part

  2. 1. Department, course number, and title ORE 654 Applications of Ocean Acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    : Basic science, mathematics, & engineering Program Outcome 4: Ocean engineering specialization Program Outcome 5: Use of latest tools in ocean engineering Program Outcome 6: Problem formulation & solution Course Objectives The objective of this course is to provide the ocean engineering student

  3. Coastal ocean studies in southern San Diego using high- frequency radar derived surface currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung Yong

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering, [Bye(1965)] Bye, J. A.Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering (Summa cum laude),Ocean Color Remote Sensing Professor Dariuz Stramski Mathematics and Methods in Physics and Engineering

  4. Coastal Ocean Studies in Southern San Diego Using High-Frequency Radar Derived Surface Currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung Yong

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering, [Bye(1965)] Bye, J. A.Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering (Summa cum laude),Ocean Color Remote Sensing Professor Dariuz Stramski Mathematics and Methods in Physics and Engineering

  5. Asian anthropogenic lead contamination in the North Pacific Ocean as evidenced by stable lead isotopic compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zurbrick, Cheryl Marie

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and North Central Pacific Ocean. Deep Sea Res. Part II Top.Lead Within the Northwest Pacific Ocean Evidenced by Leadventilation flux of the Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. 106(

  6. Sedimentary and mineral dust sources of dissolved iron to the world ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J. K; Braucher, O.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the tropi- cal Pacific Ocean II. Iron biogeochemistry,in the Northeast Pacific Ocean Gyre: Aerosols, iron, and theF. M. M. : The equatorial Pacific Ocean: Grazer-controlled

  7. Alkyl nitrate (C 1 -C 3 ) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, E. E; Yvon-Lewis, S. A; Saltzman, E. S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiment (WOCE), vol. 2, Pacific Ocean DRAFT, edited by M.over the equatorial Pacific Ocean during SAGA 3, J. Geophys.the troposphere over the Pacific Ocean during PEM- Tropics A

  8. Improved global bathymetry, global sea floor roughness, and deep ocean mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Joseph Jeffrey

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean inferred fromdissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean inferred fromthe amount of energy conversion in an ocean of finite depth

  9. Improved Global Bathymetry, Global Sea Floor Roughness, and Deep Ocean Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Joseph J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean inferred fromdissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean inferred fromthe amount of energy conversion in an ocean of finite depth

  10. High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and validation of ocean–atmosphere energy flux fields. WCRP-exchange of energy and material between the ocean and lowerexplained by a mean energy flux into the ocean of just 0.86

  11. Relative Roles of Climate Sensitivity and Forcing in Defining the Ocean Circulation Response to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffery R.

    The response of the ocean’s meridional overturning circulation (MOC) to increased greenhouse gas forcing is examined using a coupled model of intermediate complexity, including a dynamic 3D ocean subcomponent. Parameters ...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere ocean heat Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 The Oceans and Climate Change LuAnne Thompson Summary: it takes vastly more energy to heat up the ocean, ocean temperature is much more resistant to change than... dioxide is...

  13. Climate-Driven Basin-Scale Decadal Oscillations of Oceanic Phytoplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antoine, David

    Antoine, Fabrizio D'Ortenzio, Bernard Gentili Phytoplankton--the microalgae that populate the upper lit layers of the ocean--fuel the oceanic food web and affect oceanic and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels

  14. On the role of wind driven ocean dynamics in tropical Atlantic variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Meyre Pereira

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of the tropical Atlantic Ocean to wind stress forcing on seasonal and interannual time scales is examined using an ocean data assimilation product from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), and an ocean general circulation...

  15. HEAT STORAGE AND ADVECTION IN THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    HEAT STORAGE AND ADVECTION IN THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE GRADUATE maintaining the seasonal heat storage in the 0 to 250 meter surface layer of the North Pacific Ocean storage decreases eastward and northward from a maximum in the Western Tropical Pacific to a minimum

  16. High wind evaluation in the Southern Ocean Xiaojun Yuan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwala, Samar

    1 High wind evaluation in the Southern Ocean Xiaojun Yuan Lamont-Doherty of Earth Observatory based scatterometer instruments provide crucial surface wind measurements with high resolution over winds at high wind bands because these regions host the strongest wind fields at the ocean surface

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 124E ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 124E ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS PHILIPPINE SEA Michael A. Storms Supr. of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77840 Philip D. Rabinowitz Director ODP/TAMU- Barry W. Harding Manager of Engineering and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Louis

  18. FY04 Annual Report Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;FY04 Annual Report Integrated Ocean Drilling Program United States Implementing and the Science Community . . . . . . . . . . 34 RESEARCH TOWARD ENHANCED DRILLING CAPABILITY . . . 37 JOI of the goals of scientific ocean drilling for 8 years (ODP: 1997­2003; IODP: 2003­2005), making many invaluable

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 ENGINEERING AND SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 ENGINEERING AND SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EAST PACIFIC RISE Mr. Michael A. Storms Operations Superintendent/ Assistant Manager of Engineering and Drilling Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas 77845

  20. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY12 Annual Report #12;Handling downhole tool string #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine research in seafloor sediments and rocks. IODP builds upon the earlier successes of the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP

  1. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY11 Annual Report #12;Sunset aboard the JOIDES Resolution #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine as recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks. IODP builds upon the earlier successes of the Deep Sea Drilling

  2. Ocean Wave Converters: State of the Art and Current Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and benefits have been identified in the area of ocean wave energy extraction, i.e., harnessing the wave [3]. To harness the power energy in waves present a different set of technical challenges and a wide, this paper presents ocean wave energy fundamentals and then reviews the fundamental concepts and the main

  3. Production and recycling of oceanic crust in the early Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Thienen, Peter

    Chapter 6 Production and recycling of oceanic crust in the early Earth Abstract Because in the production and recycling of oceanic crust: (1) Small scale (x · 100km) convection involving the lower crust have been different from those in the present-day Earth. Crustal recycling must however have taken

  4. A dynamical picture of the oceanic tides Eugene I. Butikova)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butikov, Eugene

    tidal wave produced by these forces. This treatment uses a simplified model of the ocean consisting A detailed treatment of tide-generating forces is given, followed by a simplified dynamic theory of tidal waves. To clarify the underlying physics, we use a simple model of the ocean that consists of a water

  5. RADIOGENIC ISOTOPES: TRACERS OF PAST OCEAN CIRCULATION AND EROSIONAL INPUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jellinek, Mark

    of Earth Sciences Institute for Isotope Geology and Mineral Resources Eidgeno¨ssische Technische Hochschule the global mixing time of the ocean (Nd, Pb, Hf, and, in addition, Be). Their isotopic composition global ocean circulation system is largely driven by the sinking of cold, saline (and therefore dense

  6. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using satellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyllaconcentration ([Chl-a]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between?0.2and?0.6. Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted seamore »salt aerosol optical depth,AODdiff) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550?nmAODdiff(sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl-a] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl-a] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  7. Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Jun

    Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean Keji Liu Yongzhi Xu Jun Zou Abstract. We- penetrable inhomogeneous medium in a 3D finite depth ocean. The method is based on a scat- tering analysis extend the direct sampling method proposed in [13] to image a wave- penetrable inhomogeneous medium

  8. Intercomparison of oceanic and atmospheric forced and coupled mesoscale simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intercomparison of oceanic and atmospheric forced and coupled mesoscale simulations Part I: Surface Abstract. A mesoscale non-hydrostatic atmospheric model has been coupled with a mesoscale oceanic model current. In order to analyze the eect of mesoscale coupling, three simulations are compared: the ®rst one

  9. UNCORRECTED Grid geometry effects on convection in ocean climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlbrodt, Till

    UNCORRECTED PROOF Grid geometry effects on convection in ocean climate models: a conceptual study is the 12 improvement of convection parameterization schemes, but the question of grid geometry also plays to an at- 14 mosphere model. Such ocean climate models have mostly structured, coarsely resolved grids. 15

  10. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF OCEAN SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    or more of the following: ocean optics, ocean observing systems, phytoplankton ecology, marine chemistry. Possible related areas of research might include environmental chemistry and water quality. The successful chemistry and molecular methods, and will participate in data QA/QC and data management. The candidate has

  11. Ocean and Plume Science and Management Forum January 24, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was needed on both the table and draft management questions to prepare a package of materials for scientific1 Ocean and Plume Science and Management Forum January 24, 2014 Northwest Power and Conservation of the Ocean and Plume Science and Management Forum and led a round of introductions. The October 24, 2013

  12. A satellite ocean color observation operator system for eutrophication assessment in coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, Clément

    A satellite ocean color observation operator system for eutrophication assessment in coastal waters: Satellite ocean color Observation operator Eutrophication Remote sensing Radiative transfer modeling

  13. Multiscale dynamics of atmospheric and oceanic variability in the climate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Aneesh C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    applied to the Oceanic Mesoscale in the South Eastassimilation at the oceanic mesoscale: A review. JOURNAL-scale circulations and mesoscale convective activity in

  14. Cost Estimating Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates. No cancellations.

  15. Estimation of food consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M. Jr.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

  16. Operated device estimation framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rengarajan, Janarthanan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Protective device estimation is a challenging task because there are numerous protective devices present in a typical distribution system. Among various protective devices, auto-reclosers and fuses are the main overcurrent protection on distribution...

  17. Understanding the ocean carbon and sulfur cycles in the context of a variable ocean : a study of anthropogenic carbon storage and dimethylsulfide production in the Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Naomi Marcil

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthropogenic activity is rapidly changing the global climate through the emission of carbon dioxide. Ocean carbon and sulfur cycles have the potential to impact global climate directly and through feedback loops. Numerical ...

  18. Upper-ocean variability in Drake Passage and the Weddell Sea : Measuring the oceanic response to air-sea and ice-ocean interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephenson, Gordon Ronald

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fig. 2.2). The maximum heat input into the ocean (?150 tothis seasonal surface heat input. For our heat budget, weat which the cumulative heat input has reached its maximum (

  19. EXPLORATION Actual Estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2013 President's Budget Request 3,821.2 3,712.8 3,932.8 4,076.5 4,076.5 4 Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2013EXPLORATION EXP-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

  20. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant achievements in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power in this decade with subsequent large-scale commercialization to follow by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, Interstate Electronics has prepared an OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment (EA) that considers tne development, demonstration, and commercialization of OTEC power systems. The EA considers several tecnnological designs (open cycle and closed cycle), plant configurations (land-based, moored, and plantship), and power usages (baseload electricity and production of ammonia and aluminum). Potencial environmental impacts, health and safety issues, and a status update of international, federal, and state plans and policies, as they may influence OTEC deployments, are included.