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1

So How Do THey DeciDe  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

So How Do So How Do THey DeciDe wHaT To Do aT THe iNL? nuclear energy Nuclear energy is a clean, safe, vital part of this country's energy mix. S takeholders frequently tell us they're impressed by all the nuclear research we do at the idaho National Laboratory, but they wonder why we don't do more work on renewable energy, like wind, solar and hydro. well, the answer is, we do research in those

2

Kilo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilo Geothermal Area Kilo Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilo Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65.8101865,"lon":-151.2360627,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

Thermodynamics of Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome MtrF. Thermodynamics of Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome MtrF. Abstract: Electron transporting multiheme...

4

rillEdge is a software system that provides real-time deci-sion support when drilling oil wells. Decisions are sup-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D rillEdge is a software system that provides real-time deci- sion support when drilling oil wells developed DrillEdge to reduce the cost and decrease the probability of fail- ures in oil well drilling. Currently, DrillEdge continuously mon- itors around 30 oil well drilling operations in parallel for sever

Aamodt, Agnar

5

Data:381deca3-a2f1-4614-9626-fed82694ac2d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

deca3-a2f1-4614-9626-fed82694ac2d deca3-a2f1-4614-9626-fed82694ac2d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Delmarva Power Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: OL "HPS" 250 Watt (Enclosed) (Customer Owned w/o maintenance) 109 kW Sector: Lighting Description: http://www.delmarva.com/_res/documents/DEMasterTariff.pdf Source or reference: Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

6

Data:B1b36c2c-1417-49a9-84de-cae935fd41c0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c2c-1417-49a9-84de-cae935fd41c0 c2c-1417-49a9-84de-cae935fd41c0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Cimarron Electric Coop Effective date: 2002/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Mercury Vapor Light - 175W Sector: Lighting Description: Available to all consumers of the Cooperative receiving service under any other retail rate schedule. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Billing Adjustments: PCA (Based on 70 per kWh per light) and Tax Adjustment (Reference Sheet No.1) Each additional pole is $2.15 per month and buried cables cost an extra $1.5 per month.

7

Drop of coherence of the lower kilo-Hz QPO in neutron stars: is there a link with the innermost stable circular orbit?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using all available archival data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we follow the frequency of the kilo-Hz QPOs in three low luminosity neutron star low mass X-ray binaries; namely 4U 1636-536, 4U 1608-522, and 4U1735-44. Following earlier work, we focus our analysis on the lower kilo-Hz QPO, for which we study the dependency of its quality factor (Q) amplitude as a function of frequency over a range covering from 500 Hz to 1000 Hz. As previously found for 4U 1636-536, we show that the quality factor of the lower kilo-Hz increases with frequency up to a maximum frequency around 800 Hz, beyond which an abrupt drop of its coherence is observed down to a limiting frequency where the QPO disappears completely. Simultaneously the amplitude of the QPOs is almost constant below the peak frequency and starts to decrease smoothly afterwards. The peak frequency is 850 Hz, 820 Hz, 740 Hz whereas the limiting frequency is 920 Hz, 900 Hz and 830 Hz for 4U 1636-536, 4U 1608-522 and 4U 1735-44 respectively. A ceiling of the lower QPO frequencies is also seen clearly in a frequency versus count rate diagram for all sources. This behavior is reproducible within an object and between objects. We suggest here that the drop of coherence of the lower QPO may be a geometry-related effect, which could be related to the last stable circular orbit.

Didier Barret; Jean-Francois Olive; M. Coleman Miller

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

8

Data:4c3deca2-d9a7-42fb-82b2-255e3c13e2c3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

deca2-d9a7-42fb-82b2-255e3c13e2c3 deca2-d9a7-42fb-82b2-255e3c13e2c3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Bandon, Oregon (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: City Use Small Commercial Single Phase- Inside City Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

9

unitsmetricrpp.dvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

International International system of units (SI) 1 3. INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM OF UNITS (SI) See "The International System of Units (SI)," NIST Special Publication 330, B.N. Taylor, ed. (USGPO, Washington, DC, 1991); and "Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI)," NIST Special Publication 811, 1995 edition, B.N. Taylor (USGPO, Washington, DC, 1995). SI prefixes 10 24 yotta (Y) 10 21 zetta (Z) 10 18 exa (E) 10 15 peta (P) 10 12 tera (T) 10 9 giga (G) 10 6 mega (M) 10 3 kilo (k) 10 2 hecto (h) 10 deca (da) 10 -1 deci (d) 10 -2 centi (c) 10 -3 milli (m) 10 -6 micro (µ) 10 -9 nano (n) 10 -12 pico (p) 10 -15 femto (f) 10 -18 atto (a) 10 -21 zepto (z) 10 -24 yocto (y) J. Beringer et al.(PDG), PR D86, 010001 (2012) and 2013 update for the 2014 edition (http://pdg.lbl.gov) December 18, 2013 12:01 2 3. International system of units (SI) Physical quantity Name of unit Symbol Base units length meter

10

Personalized estimation of dose to red bone marrow and the associated leukaemia risk attributable to pelvic kilo-voltage cone beam computed tomography scans in image-guided radiotherapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to investigate the imaging dose to red bone marrow (RBM) and the associated leukaemia risks attributable to pelvic kilo-voltage cone beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) scans in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The RBM doses of 42 patients (age 2.7–86.4 years) were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. The trabecular spongiosa was segmented to substitute RBM rather than the whole bone. Quantitative correlations between anthropometric variables such as age, physical bone density (PBD) and RBM dose were established. Personalized leukaemia risk was evaluated using an improved Boice model which included the age-associated RBM involvement. An incremental leukaemia risk of 29%–82% (mean = 45%) was found to be associated with 40 pelvic kVCBCT scans in the subject group used in a typical external beam radiation therapy course. Higher risks were observed in children. Due to the enhanced photoelectric effect in high atomic number materials, PBD was observed to strongly affect the RBM dose. Considerable overestimations (9%–42%, mean = 28%) were observed if the whole bone doses were used as surrogates of RBM doses. The personalized estimation of RBM dose and associated leukaemia risk caused by pelvic kVCBCT scans is clinically feasible with the proposed empirical models. Higher radiogenic cancer risks are associated with repeated kVCBCT scans in IGRT of cancer patients, especially children.

Yibao Zhang; Yulong Yan; Ravinder Nath; Shanglian Bao; Jun Deng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania" Pennsylvania" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",165683,162367,166034,166201,169029,168942,175022,177167,173903,161596,97076,27634,30537,30099,33900,1058,1311,1077,1225,1160,1087 " Independent Power Producers",784,1158,1892,2839,3331,4161,5191,4742,5231,21630,93924,158605,164018,165678,170336,205816,205075,212668,209081,205083,213653 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",4587,4726,6302,6692,6588,7129,7301,7239,7732,7107,6558,6171,5718,6774,6676,7629,8854,9033,8978,10278,12168 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",171054,168251,174228,175731,178948,180232,187513,189147,186867,190333,197557,192410,200274,202551,210912,214503,215240,222778,219284,216521,226908

12

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon" Oregon" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",49172,46298,41220,40743,37490,44031,47884,49068,46352,51698,46060,38060,39732,38578,39093,37407,43069,43203,44591,42703,41143 " Independent Power Producers",370,330,335,427,399,429,457,511,510,583,496,467,718,4003,4801,4493,4055,4269,5801,6621,6953 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",250,324,300,326,276,276,2032,2166,3686,3916,4464,5675,5842,5358,5891,5947,4831,6181,6952,6386,6421 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",49792,46952,41855,41496,38165,44736,50373,51746,50549,56196,51020,44201,46292,47939,49785,47847,51955,53653,57344,55710,54516

13

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho" Idaho" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",8618,8282,6260,9023,7303,10063,12231,13512,11978,12456,10114,6667,8164,7733,7766,8032,10495,8612,8894,9978,8589 " Independent Power Producers",498,464,394,693,613,927,1053,1164,958,1043,855,1696,681,1788,2175,1895,2042,2098,2361,2324,2674 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",81,81,81,83,81,79,98,205,215,209,194,201,245,245,248,240,214,177,134,192,156 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",9197,8827,6736,9799,7997,11069,13381,14881,13150,13708,11163,8564,9090,9765,10188,10167,12751,10888,11389,12494,11419

14

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California" California" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",114528,104968,119310,125782,126749,121881,114706,112183,114926,87875,85856,70133,74588,81728,75177,89348,100338,87349,83347,85124,96940 " Independent Power Producers",15407,17428,17919,20462,18752,18957,19080,18587,31929,57912,78996,88665,63545,65429,75928,68721,76509,82491,85067,80767,69294 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",17547,19021,21149,21598,21642,21691,21513,21932,23267,22964,23410,21305,26976,25458,24567,23459,21399,22342,21535,21009,19582 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",147482,141418,158378,167842,167143,162529,155299,152701,170122,168751,188263,180103,165109,172616,175672,181527,198247,192181,189949,186900,185816

15

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",31313,31038,31899,32687,33324,32674,33972,34376,35471,36167,40108,41958,41510,41226,40436,41015,42056,42353,41177,37468,39584 " Independent Power Producers",226,206,218,231,246,237,267,298,308,178,790,1667,961,2877,5596,6834,7004,9680,10629,11515,9937 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",930,984,1012,1013,1775,2427,2632,2726,2850,2897,3044,2958,2866,2314,1685,1643,1533,1782,1545,1531,1135 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",32469,32228,33128,33931,35345,35337,36871,37400,38630,39243,43942,46582,45337,46417,47718,49492,50593,53816,53351,50513,50656

16

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas" Arkansas" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",37053,38365,37370,38049,39548,39527,43678,42790,43199,44131,41486,44728,42873,41637,45055,40545,42068,45523,45880,45423,47108 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","*",2,1,"-","*",4,3,1,"*","*",1247,5030,3204,3997,6966,6311,5940,8786,10732 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",539,1304,1550,1436,1215,1151,847,1286,1361,1220

17

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota" Minnesota" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",41550,40428,37784,41254,40917,42503,41792,40303,43977,44154,46616,44798,48569,49576,47232,46791,46711,47793,46758,44442,45429 " Independent Power Producers",240,174,316,294,330,399,432,445,506,832,1067,1424,1206,2858,2792,3332,4136,3774,5472,5851,5909 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",50,650,606,605,510,552,697,309,938,639,1143,784,628,560 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",41789,40602,38099,41548,41247,42902,42224,40798,45133,45592,48288,46732,50327,53132,50333,51062,51485,52710,53014,50921,51898

18

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland" Maryland" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",31497,38215,39587,43488,43766,44659,44381,44553,48514,49324,31783,88,31,52,30,44,12,24,6,2,3 " Independent Power Producers",20,20,20,18,20,167,277,290,305,341,15801,46079,44828,48824,48457,48780,45406,46274,43748,40492,40879 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",1227,1192,1122,1017,1067,1071,1136,1377,1405,1528,3050,2808,2835,2813,2926,3196,2902,3275,3086,2795,2237 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",32744,39427,40729,44524,44852,45896,45793,46219,50223,51193,50634,48975,47695,51689,51413,52020,48320,49573,46840,43290,43118

19

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New York" New York" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",128655,126077,112229,106315,103763,101161,104360,108099,115840,97009,73188,58569,43466,41579,40956,39963,41599,40248,38170,35771,34633 " Independent Power Producers",2433,2411,2837,2833,3040,3142,3479,3187,3316,24869,40757,62191,76297,77979,81182,90252,86965,91333,89612,86856,89333 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",1262,2815,6252,9652,13943,23754,22950,25109,21459,21097,21188,20401,17189,15615,13744,14475,11624,12388,10722,8866,11183 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",132350,131303,121318,118799,120746,128057,130790,136394,140615,142975,135132,141161,136952,135173,135882,144690,140187,143969,138504,131494,135150

20

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine" Maine" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",9064,9519,8335,8076,9016,2668,7800,3223,3549,1189,3,"-",1,1,1,1,"*",1,1,1,2 " Independent Power Producers",1880,1884,1807,1922,1911,1501,1611,1595,1805,5949,7619,12050,13006,11668,12630,13127,11091,10154,10942,10946,11278 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",473,751,824,801,661,803,815,787,842,829,1691,2924,3212,1691,1400,730,701,702,575,479,603 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",11417,12154,10967,10799,11588,4972,10226,5605,6195,7967,9313,14975,16219,13361,14031,13858,11792,10857,11517,11426,11883

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kilo deca deci" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",36479,35802,32838,28164,27466,26972,27759,33899,26037,4360,1705,1566,1157,2056,1524,1622,943,494,507,448,803 " Independent Power Producers",1729,1772,1941,2398,2938,3577,3114,3560,12600,29003,30158,30176,34031,40102,41036,42122,41847,43406,39846,35883,38145 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",751,2573,4422,5619,6648,6241,6139,6647,6296,6333,5981,5769,5852,5378,4053,2896,1938,2400,1444,1918,3192 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",38958,40148,39201,36180,37052,36790,37012,44105,44933,39695,37844,37511,41040,47536,46614,46640,44728,46300,41797,38249,42139

22

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan" Michigan" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",89059,94567,82679,92250,83721,92479,95155,89565,85146,87875,89572,97067,100452,96634,99609,104831,97374,96786,94504,82787,89667 " Independent Power Producers",639,694,868,1186,1343,1456,1777,1679,1747,1723,1751,2399,5031,2302,2560,4337,3859,11028,10954,10449,12570 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",6354,6702,7907,8906,9221,9611,12045,12288,11014,11080,10476,10502,10138,9917,13904,10161,9077,9327,7350,6204,7475 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",96051,101963,91455,102341,94285,103546,108977,103532,97907,100678,101800,109968,115620,108853,116073,119329,110310,117141,112807,99440,109712

23

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio" Ohio" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",126510,132694,136297,133735,129021,137860,142900,141249,146448,140912,144358,135484,139904,139086,142305,102751,98159,100536,98397,93940,92198 " Independent Power Producers",9,9,9,7,3,5,5,"-","-","-",3157,5242,6421,6124,4699,52817,55836,53366,53646,40775,49722 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",32,26,33,26,1305,20,49,44,155,117,275,268,302,382,319,328,322,350,298,472,652 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",126551,132729,136338,133768,130329,137885,142954,141293,146603,141029,147790,140995,146627,145591,147324,155896,154317,154252,152341,135187,142572

24

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah" Utah" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",32260,30158,32921,33461,34455,32101,32229,33969,35160,36071,35827,35139,36072,37545,37166,36695,39591,43320,44424,40992,39522 " Independent Power Producers",23,23,23,229,384,377,424,402,395,409,440,396,485,447,406,706,829,1096,976,1325,1517 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",8,9,10,11,9,7,7,11,11,-2,10,9 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",32283,30181,32943,33690,34839,32478,32653,34371,35556,36488,36276,35544,36568,38002,37579,37408,40430,44427,45398,42327,41048

25

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont" Vermont" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",4993,5259,4698,4301,5294,4840,5004,5323,4394,4735,5307,4734,2971,626,643,674,803,701,753,712,721 " Independent Power Producers",134,95,132,297,282,280,309,314,508,933,958,711,2465,5396,4800,5013,6256,5121,6046,6546,5874 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",5126,5353,4830,4598,5576,5120,5313,5637,4902,5668,6265,5445,5437,6022,5444,5687,7059,5822,6799,7257,6595 " Combined Heat and Power, Industrial",38,35,40,46,41,40,37,43,45,36,38,35,20,6,27,30,25,2,21,25,25 "Industrial and Commercial Generation Subtotal",38,35,40,46,41,40,37,43,45,36,38,35,20,6,27,30,25,2,21,25,25

26

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

United States" United States" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",2808151,2825023,2797219,2882525,2910712,2994529,3077442,3122523,3212171,3173674,3015383,2629946,2549457,2462281,2505231,2474846,2483656,2504131,2475367,2372776,2471632 " Independent Power Producers",31895,38596,45836,53396,54514,58222,60132,58741,91455,200905,457540,780592,955331,1063205,1118870,1246971,1259062,1323856,1332068,1277916,1338712 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",61275,71942,91319,107976,123500,141480,146567,148111,153790,155404,164606,169515,193670,195674,184259,180375,165359,177356,166915,159146,162042

27

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii" Hawaii" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",7996,7333,6861,6084,6055,6191,6420,6213,6301,6452,6535,6383,7513,6493,6982,6915,7040,6928,6701,6510,6416 " Independent Power Producers",386,377,408,512,623,641,606,656,647,603,656,521,400,551,267,280,349,508,901,804,762 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",542,146,1760,2585,2713,2809,2932,2869,2790,2782,2860,3225,3289,3640,3568,3769,3566,3525,3190,3122,2945 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",8924,7856,9030,9181,9391,9640,9958,9738,9738,9837,10051,10129,11202,10685,10818,10964,10956,10961,10792,10435,10123

28

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada" Nevada" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",19286,20922,20963,19820,20519,19997,21362,22870,26553,26486,29342,27896,25009,24635,24246,24112,19686,22377,22979,26095,23711 " Independent Power Producers",764,999,1181,1552,1565,1611,1762,1831,1749,1712,3691,3535,4653,5324,11022,13955,9546,7624,9872,9393,9015 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-",144,1203,2130,2433,2356,2456,2331,2312,2335,2453,2445,2428,3236,2399,2146,2282,2257,1900,2013,2157 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",20051,22065,23348,23502,24518,23964,25580,27031,30614,30532,35485,33876,32089,33195,37667,40214,31515,32257,34751,37500,34883

29

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico" Mexico" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",28491,25065,27708,28364,30018,29432,29364,30568,31428,31654,32856,32211,29926,31770,32243,33562,35411,34033,33845,34245,30848 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",185,370,40,273,589,805,1291,1404,2420,4881,4912 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",19,19,19,17,18,17,382,507,520,524,520,493,496,504,"-",479,479,472,464,477,417 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",28510,25084,27726,28382,30036,29449,29747,31075,31948,32179,33560,33074,30462,32548,32831,34846,37181,35909,36729,39603,36178

30

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia" Virginia" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",47200,48941,48964,52182,52732,52727,56533,58986,63815,65071,65843,62135,62880,61806,65104,65456,61176,64317,59780,59225,58902 " Independent Power Producers",428,813,1670,2298,2313,3341,3017,2510,2285,2408,2858,4697,4828,6058,6263,5279,4636,6538,4970,5627,9303 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",2162,2318,2886,4068,4062,3856,3952,3746,2827,3234,5344,4593,4074,4368,4509,5251,4409,4638,5020,2608,2545 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",49790,52072,53520,58547,59107,59925,63502,65242,68927,70713,74045,71426,71783,72232,75876,75986,70221,75493,69770,67461,70750

31

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming" Wyoming" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",39378,38667,41852,40155,42337,39684,40852,40765,44699,42951,44586,43764,42532,42261,43060,44032,42905,43144,43909,43182,44739 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",2,11,246,349,576,1052,1350,702,1484,1465,1627,1918,2408 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",39378,38667,41852,40155,42337,39684,40852,40765,44701,42962,44832,44113,43108,43314,44410,44734,44389,44610,45537,45100,47146 " Combined Heat and Power, Industrial",597,631,622,617,665,568,620,644,646,670,663,664,676,313,398,833,1012,1024,964,929,973

32

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",62289,66767,70109,68025,71204,68967,70877,78060,81299,83096,88150,85808,81710,80348,81352,82915,84356,88826,94453,89640,91233 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",3290,10954,11851,20891,16390,17617,22209,24217,21713,19954 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-","-","-","-",271,399,388,383,410,434,425,459,1153,1823,1874,1689,1959,1853,370,301,188

33

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Dakota" South Dakota" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",6427,6573,6246,5256,7991,8812,10066,12450,9089,10557,9697,7401,7722,7905,7358,6368,6989,5991,6942,7780,8682 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",39,153,152,143,145,140,416,1367 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",6427,6573,6246,5256,7991,8812,10066,12450,9089,10557,9697,7401,7722,7944,7510,6521,7132,6137,7083,8196,10050 " Combined Heat and Power, Commercial","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*"

34

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington" Washington" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",100479,101353,84115,83771,82348,95671,112606,117453,97128,112072,96227,67683,88568,82205,83501,83153,94067,90531,93162,90733,88057 " Independent Power Producers",177,189,312,302,336,365,324,408,350,484,6588,9454,9817,13541,15054,15287,10887,13797,14908,10531,12330 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",8,257,706,2663,4568,4693,4204,2947,3246,3048,4065,4427,3268,3350,2583,2517,2385,1948,1860,2085,1740 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",100664,101799,85133,86736,87252,100729,117135,120808,100724,115604,106879,81564,101654,99097,101138,100956,107339,106277,109929,103349,102127

35

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska" Nebraska" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",21631,22972,22387,22724,21946,25279,27323,28388,28720,29981,29046,30412,31550,30368,31944,31392,31599,32403,32356,33776,36243 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",165,208 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",8,8,9,7,8,8,21,"*",8,4,5,5,5,6

36

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina" Carolina" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",69260,69838,71479,75588,74194,78440,76326,78374,84397,87347,90421,86735,93689,91544,94407,99104,95873,99997,97921,97337,100611 " Independent Power Producers",60,38,63,58,64,61,52,55,64,40,179,497,633,278,486,735,730,771,753,430,1034 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",349,627,565,509,416,100,855,595,623,619,506,650,770 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",69320,69876,71541,75646,74258,78501,76378,78429,84810,88014,91165,87741,94738,91923,95747,100435,97225,101387,99179,98416,102414

37

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana" Indiana" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",97738,98200,97300,99951,103485,105189,105557,110466,112772,114183,119721,114666,112030,112396,114690,117374,117644,116728,115888,103594,107853 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-","-","-",46,70,85,788,2828,3794,3665,9879,3417,3268,3659,3488,4518,4839,4228,6464 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",1,12,22,5474,5630,5650,5526,5915,5301,5984,7525

38

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" Oklahoma" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",45063,44850,45943,48811,45381,47955,47545,48380,51454,50279,51403,50414,51218,49777,48298,54251,51917,54178,60075,57517,57421 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",844,3970,4247,8913,10282,14784,14871,12651,14423,11546 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",1017,2964,2895,3139,3381,3314,3042,3173,3539,3434,3027,2731,2622,5217,2256,2822,2642,2854,2682,2318,2382 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",46080,47814,48838,51949,48762,51269,50586,51553,54993,53712,54430,53988,57810,59240,59467,67355,69344,71902,75409,74258,71348

39

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida" Florida" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",123624,130744,133977,140067,141791,147157,145140,147984,169447,166914,169889,170966,182347,188035,193384,196096,200015,200534,196524,195063,206062 " Independent Power Producers",1696,2267,3025,3472,3551,4082,3903,3716,4258,4560,5676,5675,7247,8276,10334,10189,10156,11500,10142,10774,10587 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",647,549,745,2138,5777,9333,11125,9779,9348,9526,10037,8957,9242,10335,8779,8515,8656,8420,8326,7203,6914 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",125967,133560,137746,145677,151119,160571,160168,161479,183053,181000,185602,185598,198835,206645,212497,214800,218827,220453,214992,213040,223563

40

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

West Virginia" West Virginia" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",77364,71254,72334,71078,77703,77322,83978,88284,89605,91678,89709,51609,63342,64057,59084,61242,68164,69348,66667,51709,56720 " Independent Power Producers",250,300,568,1238,1353,936,929,960,946,892,1040,28458,29373,28429,28498,30556,23959,23058,23138,17700,22757 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-","*",354,443,414,377,442,456,443,435,451,306,409,446,465,467,470,417,411,413,388 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",77614,71554,73256,72759,79470,78635,85349,89701,90994,93005,91200,80373,93123,92932,88047,92265,92593,92823,90216,69822,79865

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kilo deca deci" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Toward Kilo-instruction Processors ADRI AN CRISTAL, OLIVERIO J. SANTANA, and MATEO VALERO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

access latencies. Categories and Subject Descriptors: C.1.1 [Processor Architectures]: Single Data Stream`ecnica de Catalunya, Edifici D6, Campus Nord, c/ Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona, Spain; email: {adrian

Martínez, José F.

42

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",592,171,109,54,69,653,3301,3563,2061,9,11,"-",12,12,12,11,11,11,11,11,11 " Independent Power Producers",50,2403,4315,4037,4191,3310,3964,3552,5028,5843,5406,6990,6927,5557,4891,5957,5875,6989,7324,7633,7696 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",422,292,291,502,400,447,379,539,518,473,506,459,71,9,"-",18,18,"-","-","-","-" "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",1064,2867,4716,4594,4660,4410,7644,7654,7608,6326,5923,7449,7010,5578,4904,5987,5904,7000,7335,7644,7707

43

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",361,180,74,188,274,189,110,71,244,230,97,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",47,123,262,74,36,226,81,75,72,35,200 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",361,180,74,188,274,189,110,71,244,230,144,123,262,74,36,226,81,75,72,35,200

44

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware" Delaware" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",7100,7604,6267,8306,8501,8324,8122,6579,6318,6239,4137,1872,171,31,24,26,17,48,19,13,30 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",1402,4429,5271,6653,6866,7078,6025,7283,5227,3695,4839 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",109,128,129,102,132,1579,675,758

45

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut" Connecticut" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",32156,23552,25154,28715,27201,26932,15774,13228,15123,20484,16993,2817,21,60,45,42,48,37,52,47,66 " Independent Power Producers",673,719,1024,1058,1099,1604,1279,1246,1461,4993,13223,25296,28878,27167,30345,31564,32431,31087,28138,28959,31185 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",1987,2562,2671,2691,2552,2512,2289,2321,2264,2243,2401,2080,2053,1986,1966,1697,1874,1831,1956,1874,1724 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",34815,26833,28848,32463,30853,31048,19342,16795,18847,27720,32617,30193,30952,29212,32356,33303,34352,32956,30147,30880,32974

46

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina" North Carolina" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",79845,83520,83007,88754,91455,96110,102787,107371,113112,109882,114433,109807,115598,118433,118329,121675,117797,123216,118778,112961,121251 " Independent Power Producers",104,431,432,429,1175,1773,1638,1793,467,474,693,810,1914,1943,1699,1863,1815,1686,1398,1341,2605 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",2587,3470,3579,3482,3544,3965,3247,1467,3024,2835,3287,3343,3272,3575,3207,3064,2854,3034,2929,2188,2598 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",82535,87420,87018,92665,96174,101848,107671,110631,116603,113191,118414,113961,120784,123951,123234,126602,122467,127936,123105,116490,126454

47

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi" Mississippi" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",22924,23305,20488,23234,26222,26395,28838,31228,31992,32212,33896,47550,35099,31359,32838,30619,34159,34427,33796,34759,40841 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-",3,3,3,4,5,4,257,1404,2277,5028,7308,9060,12704,10182,13718,12653,12129,11779 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",1440,1366,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

48

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey" Jersey" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",36489,37029,31167,34285,31932,27088,19791,23761,35911,38868,25254,1630,1569,1910,1649,1249,1043,-191,-206,-187,-186 " Independent Power Producers",253,716,1240,1099,1408,1434,1700,1556,1138,1229,15677,41097,43924,41228,42169,46809,48723,51439,52292,52182,56686 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",2202,3824,8384,9975,12108,13591,13156,13370,13598,13525,14104,13418,13693,12777,10705,11365,9999,10653,10740,8717,8041 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",38943,41569,40791,45359,45448,42113,34647,38687,50647,53622,55035,56145,59186,55916,54523,59422,59765,61901,62825,60712,64540

49

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama" Alabama" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",76232,85051,90792,94124,95171,99589,115093,113684,113394,113909,118037,118744,123739,126846,124555,126304,124365,124273,128055,118782,122766 " Independent Power Producers",28,25,25,11,15,7,6,5,4,49,42,45,2357,4065,6127,4821,7103,9202,10683,15302,20923 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",666,787,778,788,693,647,671,683,842,747,550,698,1459,1311,1446,2174,4683,5705,2569,4606,4243 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",76925,85863,91596,94922,95879,100244,115770,114372,114240,114704,118629,119487,127555,132221,132127,133299,136152,139180,141307,138690,147933

50

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana" Louisiana" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",58168,57158,55188,59353,60170,65555,58643,61120,66107,64837,57601,50378,54922,43485,47604,44158,40891,43523,43164,43592,51681 " Independent Power Producers",866,749,855,1434,1169,1162,1167,1253,1264,1024,11091,14007,16941,21184,18811,18095,18740,17735,18768,16746,17780 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",1604,1581,954,1579,1606,1404,1377,1568,1664,1522,1421,1551,1650,1845,5233,8254,4165,4416,4317,4836,5083 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",60638,59488,56997,62366,62945,68121,61187,63941,69035,67383,70113,65936,73513,66513,71648,70507,63796,65674,66249,65174,74544

51

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska" Alaska" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",4493,4286,4167,4581,4762,4847,4982,5108,4590,4609,4938,5416,5472,5673,5866,5946,6069,6146,6262,6167,6205 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",80,"-","-","-" " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",211,227,224,237,244,162,182,174,187,210,177,209,204

52

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas" Texas" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",234047,238343,239964,248174,255141,261709,272283,277190,293068,292458,297299,265013,149587,86882,92054,95187,94638,97260,94637,90418,95099 " Independent Power Producers",24,24,24,22,21,24,122,151,183,1072,10466,30779,138777,197114,205978,216933,224749,224719,229159,227007,232230 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",13642,13589,14417,15794,15448,18178,19080,19891,23626,25590,28495,35618,56862,55432,49841,44759,41286,46010,45785,44780,43045 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",247713,251956,254405,263990,270610,279911,291485,297232,316877,319120,336259,331410,345226,339428,347872,356879,360674,367989,369581,362206,370374

53

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Hampshire" New Hampshire" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",10810,12705,13451,14586,11888,13936,15419,14264,14238,13876,12702,13095,12276,6232,6169,5638,4575,4888,4348,3788,3979 " Independent Power Producers",1135,1168,1209,1216,1130,1099,1180,1164,1360,1818,1861,1574,3385,15014,17315,18438,17297,18237,18471,16314,18163 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",93,90,87,83,68,85,85,75,92,94,86,80,20,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",12038,13964,14747,15885,13086,15120,16684,15504,15690,15788,14648,14749,15681,21245,23484,24076,21872,23125,22819,20103,22143

54

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas" Kansas" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",33869,32315,31764,36433,37284,38230,39875,37844,41481,42003,44765,44643,46692,46156,46409,45421,44621,49256,45276,44443,45270 " Independent Power Producers",1,1,10,5,10,11,11,14,11,12,15,65,479,377,368,436,895,857,1354,2234,2654 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",33870,32316,31774,36438,37294,38242,39886,37858,41492,42015,44780,44708,47171,46532,46778,45857,45516,50114,46630,46677,47924 " Combined Heat and Power, Commercial","-","-","-","-",5,5,1,1,1,2,2,2,1,1,1,"*","-","-","-","-","-"

55

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky" Kentucky" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",73807,75505,77351,84998,84097,86162,88438,91558,86151,81658,81350,83678,80162,80697,82921,85680,86816,85259,86012,90030,97472 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",4766,11011,11503,11448,11369,10566,11097,11622,11449,11397,11316,119,171 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",73807,75505,77351,84998,84097,86162,88438,91558,90917,92669,92853,95126,91530,91263,94018,97302,98266,96656,97328,90149,97644 " Combined Heat and Power, Commercial","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",98,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

56

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Dakota" North Dakota" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",26824,27535,28592,28500,29004,28842,30770,29720,30519,31260,31123,30136,31147,31075,29527,31513,30328,30403,30853,31375,31344 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",52,209,215,363,614,1687,2625,3216 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",26824,27535,28592,28500,29004,28842,30770,29720,30519,31260,31123,30136,31147,31127,29735,31728,30692,31016,32539,34000,34560

57

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",59011,60121,56627,53202,61519,65400,67827,71073,74894,73505,76284,78991,79797,86102,86420,90159,91118,89926,89179,86705,90177 " Independent Power Producers","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",226,1039,783,828,319,165,820,1423,1383,1843 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",46,5,30,45,127,41,55

58

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia" Georgia" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",97565,90809,91779,95738,98753,102016,98729,101780,108717,110537,116177,110565,111856,115755,117919,126445,127368,132832,126031,115075,120426 " Independent Power Producers",8,7,8,11,53,316,124,219,407,513,1431,1847,4894,3031,3861,4913,5164,6843,5431,9080,12115 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",568,792,716,664,386,388,207,33,141,178,274,114,25,178 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",97573,90816,91787,95748,98806,102332,98853,102567,109915,111766,118271,112798,117138,118993,121813,131499,132709,139949,131576,124180,132719

59

Project TRACS: Empirically Investigating Transformation through Relatedness, Autonomy, and Competence Support Logic Model Rooted in Self-Determination Theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project TRACS: Empirically Investigating Transformation through Relatedness, Autonomy appointments toolkit (R, A , C) Project TRACS PI/Director Co-Director & Manager Project Leads & Team MSU&T and hiring procedures -Modern sexism is reduced -Women faculty feel improved job satisfaction -Women intend

Dyer, Bill

60

Conversion Tables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Contents taken from Glossary: Carbon Dioxide and Climate, 1990. ORNL/CDIAC-39, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Third Edition. Edited by: Fred O'Hara Jr. 1 - International System of Units (SI) Prefixes 2 - Useful Quantities in CO2 3 - Common Conversion Factors 4 - Common Energy Unit Conversion Factors 5 - Geologic Time Scales 6 - Factors and Units for Calculating Annual CO2 Emissions Using Global Fuel Production Data Table 1. International System of Units (SI) Prefixes Prefix SI Symbol Multiplication Factor exa E 1018 peta P 1015 tera T 1012 giga G 109 mega M 106 kilo k 103 hecto h 102 deka da 10 deci d 10-1 centi c 10-2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kilo deca deci" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Mechanism and Site Requirements for Ethanol Oxidation on Vanadium Oxide Domains Beata Kilos, Alexis T. Bell,* and Enrique Iglesia*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was then heated in dry air (Praxair, zero grade) flowing at 0.83 cm3 s-1 g-1 . The temperature was raised at 0

Bell, Alexis T.

62

Profit Maximization of Cognitive Virtual Network Operator in A Dynamic Wireless Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the transmission price (deci- sion variable) and market state (exogenous stochastics). · Realistic cognitive radio

Huang, Jianwei

63

Molecular Structure and Free Energy Landscape for Electron Transport...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Free Energy Landscape for Electron Transport in the Deca-Heme Cytochrome MtrF. Molecular Structure and Free Energy Landscape for Electron Transport in the Deca-Heme Cytochrome...

64

Linking Perceptions of School Belonging to Academic Motivation and Academic Achievement Amongst Student Athletes: A Comparative Study Between High-Revenue Student Athletes and Non-Revenue Student Athletes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

60, 49-66. Ryan, R. , Stiller, J. , & Lynch, J. (1994).Powelson, 1991; Ryan, Stiller, & Lynch, 1994). Deci et al.

Anderson, Christine Marie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects life history Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

41 Animal personalities and the divergence of life histories Summary: how life- history decisions that have already been made affect the costs and benefits of deci- sions......

66

A Global and Long-Range Picture of Energy Developments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ConvenDeep Oil shale Totaltional offshore Enhanced andand recovery tar...oil and some possibly deep offshore oil. The analysis of region...bio-mass, geothermal, and wind energy. In the analysis that...170 per kilo-watt for gas turbines up to $920 per kilo-watt...

Wolf Häfele

1980-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Wastren-EnergX Mission Support LLC Contract Number: DE-CI0000004 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 128,879,762 Contract Period: December 2009 - July 2015 Fee Information...

68

Environmental Health Policy Decisions: The Role of Uncertainty in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1998 Abstract Regulatory reform will increasingly call for more economic analysis in deci- sions about of environmental health. The present article follows this train of thought while noting that regulatory reform

Washington at Seattle, University of

69

Security decision-making among interdependent organizations R. Ann Miura-Ko, Benjamin Yolken, John Mitchell, and Nicholas Bambos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the same passwords at several independent web sites, security deci- sions by one organization may have- ments of others. We apply this framework to investigate three examples: web site security with shared

Mitchell, John C.

70

PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY THE FRIENDS OF THE BANCROFT LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94720  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, cases and procedures in the office of the District Attorney of Alameda County, state finance, executive, with the Governor under pressure of deci- sion-making and their ensuing cabbages- and-kings conversations, that mark

California at Berkeley, University of

71

Outside Review of the Doctoral Program of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry of Texas Technical University (TTU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observed no desire to remain static. There is also a deci- sion-making process in place to support with the internal and external reviewers present and again on February 6 among internal reviewers. The review team

Rock, Chris

72

LBMS Facility Use Only Log in # ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ Operator:____________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:_________________________ Ionization Method: ESI MALDI MALDI-TOF/TOF Separation: LC/MS LC/MS/MS Instrument: Qstar DECA STR 4700 Synapt complex PTM analysis Sample ID:__________________ Formula: _______________________ Molecular Weight

Meagher, Mary

73

Extraction behavior of uranium(VI), plutonium(IV), zirconium(IV), ruthenium(III) and europium(III) with ?-pre-irradiated solutions of N,N?-methylbutyl substituted amides in n-dodecane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extraction of plutonium(IV), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV), europium(III) and ruthenium(III) with ?-pre-irradiated n-dodecane solutions of methylbutyl substituted hexanamide (MBHA), octanamide (MBOA) and deca...

P. B. Ruikar; M. S. Nagar; M. S. Subramanian…

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Acculturation of Chinese-American Adolescents in Negotiating Autonomy and Connectedness: Comparison between Chinese- and European-Americans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Hauser, Bell, & O?Connor, 1994; Collins & Repinski; Deci & Ryan, 1995; Grotevant & Cooper, 1986, 1998; Harter, 1999; Neff & Harter, 2002a; Ryan & Solky, 1996), families? ethnic backgrounds and cultural values play a role in defining the optimal..., Hauser, Bell, & O?Connor, 1994; Collins & Repinski; Deci & Ryan, 1995; Grotevant & Cooper, 1986, 1998; Harter, 1999; Neff & Harter, 2002a; Ryan & Solky, 1996), families? ethnic backgrounds and cultural values play a role in defining the optimal...

Chang, Tzu-Fen

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

75

Toward Understanding Dynamic Annealing Processes in Irradiated Ceramics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scattering IBA Ion Beam Analysis vi IBM Ion Beam Modification IED Ionization Enhanced Diffusion IP Intermediate Defect Peak keV Kilo Electron Volt KP Kinchin-Pease Ld Diffusion Length LED Light Emitting Diode LLNL Lawrence Livermore National...

Myers, Michael

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

76

NASA Green Flight Challenge: Conceptual Design Approaches and Technologies to Enable 200 Passenger Miles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-diesel, and other bio-fuel engines. The aircraft are using various technologies to improve aerodynamic, propulsionW = = = Jet Propellant Knots True Airspeed Kilo-Watt MPG = Miles Per Gallon MPGe MSL = = Miles Per Gallon

Waliser, Duane E.

77

Figures of merit for testing standard models: application to dark energy experiments in cosmology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Kilo-Degree Survey (KIDS), Panoramic Survey Telescope Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS),1 Dark Energy Survey (DES),2 Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST),3 Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)4 and Euclid.5......

A. Amara; T. D. Kitching

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

78

Accuracy of photometric redshifts for future weak lensing surveys from space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Survey Telescope (LSST), Pan-STARRS and Dark Energy Survey (DES). The results highlight the importance...ground-based telescopes [e.g. Kilo-Degree Survey, Pan-STARRS, Dark Energy Survey (DES), Large Synoptic Survey Telescope......

F. Bellagamba; M. Meneghetti; L. Moscardini; M. Bolzonella

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Data:84e2fa36-5dd3-49d9-9563-8f646c3f8450 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

which may interfere with service to other customers, or all transformer-type welding machines larger than 25 kilo-volt amperes, will not be served on this rate. Source or...

80

Data:A563ad4a-6f47-40bd-9bfa-d67a6d66a93d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

which may interfere with service to other customers, or all transformer-type welding machines larger than 25 kilo-volt amperes, will not be served on this rate. Source or...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kilo deca deci" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

DARHT-II Injector Transients and the Ferrite Damper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If we use an equivalent beam resistance of 2 kilo-ohms, theany gaps ) is equivalent to a resistance of 60 ohms inthe equivalent circuit in Figure 3.4. This series resistance

M., Waldron, W.; Reginato, L.; Chow, K.; Houck. T.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.; Kang,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

On Hilbert's Tenth Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using an iterated Horner schema for evaluation of diophantine polynomials, we define a partial $\\mu$-recursive "decision" algorithm decis as a "race" for a first nullstelle versus a first (internal) proof of non-nullity for such a polynomial -- within a given theory T extending Peano Arithmetique PA. If T is diophantine sound, i.e., if (internal) provability implies truth -- for diophantine formulae --, then the T-map decis gives correct results when applied to the codes of polynomial inequalities $D(x_1,...,x_m) \

Michael Pfender

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 42454258, 2012 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/4245/2012/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that previously the occurrence of INES 7 major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite dif- ferent, the radioactive contamination patterns over reactor accident can subject around 30 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent deci- sion

Meskhidze, Nicholas

84

Modeling the Relations Between Flow Regime Components, Species Traits, and Spawning Success of Fishes in Warmwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of warmwater stream fishes and may guide deci- sions related to stream regulation and management. Keywords impoundment and regulation can reduce peak and low discharge events in terms of both frequency and magnitude (Petts 1986). Peaking hydro- electric power generation often releases discrete surges of water from

Kwak, Thomas J.

85

25 Years of MCDA in nuclear emergency management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......with high chemical/nuclear accident risk perceptions...involved, public policy deliberative processes...analysis to guide public policy deliberations. Decis...public debate on nuclear power. Eur. J...multi-criteria analysis in nuclear emergency management...Intelligent Decision and Policy Making Support Systems......

K. Nadia Papamichail; Simon French

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations Odd Erik Gundersen In this paper we present DrillEdge - a commercial and award winning software system that monitors oil that provides real-time deci- sion support when drilling oil wells. Decisions are supported through analyzing

Aamodt, Agnar

87

Estimating the Weight of Evidence in Forensic Speaker Verification Beat Pfister and Rene Beutler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speech database is used to calibrate the valuation scale for an individual case. 1. Introduction. Since even the best SV systems are not able to make this deci- sion 100 % correctly, the trade properties (e.g. sex, age, mental and health state, language). In order to use SV in foren- sic casework, we

88

T-Negative Issue 22  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

program. To substitute for the lower level, the dialogue was incredibly pyrotechnic. In all, the show was probably the best of the new Saturday morning offerings. However, STAR TREK was deci mated in the 70 market Neilson ratings, finishing a poor third...

Multiple Contributors

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

On the Complexity of Computing Generators of Closed Sets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Complexity of Computing Generators of Closed Sets Miki Hermann1 and Bari¸s Sertkaya2 1 LIX investigate the computational complexity of some deci- sion and counting problems related to generators the problem of checking the existence of a generator with a specified cardinality, and about the problem

Baader, Franz

90

Automated Meta-Level Control Reasoning in Complex Agents Anita Raja and Victor Lesser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-time control decisions on schedul- ing and planning of domain actions. These deci- sions are made actions, interact with other agents, plan a course of action and carry it out. All these have to be done or replanning. This requires an agent's de- liberation to be interleaved with execution. The planning

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

91

48 CINCIA HOJE vol. 31 n 183 Bases biolgicas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustentabilidade ambiental. A decisão sobre essa questão, porém, também precisa levar em conta aspectos científicos- nômicos (expansão das ativida- des agrícolas), por um lado, e de sustentabilidade ambiental, por outro

Metzger, Jean Paul Walter

92

he Northwest Power and Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into account in deci- Fifth Northwest Power Plan Recommends Conservation, Wind Power to Reduce Risk of Future Adopts 23 Subbasin 8 Plans to Guide Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Success Stories: Flathead River 9 Flow on the Natural Resources; Fish, Wildlife and Parks; and Judiciary committees. Whiting, a member of the Confeder

93

Differentiability properties of Rank Linear Utilities G. Carlier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differentiability properties of Rank Linear Utilities G. Carlier April 8, 2006 Abstract We study generalize the rank dependent expected utility and are called rank-linear utilities in deci- sion theory results generalize those obtained for the rank dependent expected utility in [1]. The author wishes

Carlier, Guillaume

94

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was chosen and thus noise on the BCD data lines causes only a temporary error. General Binary Coded Decimal Standard Identification Data is recorded as Binary Coded Decimal numbers. A standard frequency could location and the Binary-Coded Deci- mal Time Signals transmitted to the scopes. The second system

Groppi, Christopher

95

Sweden Beyond Oil: Nuclear Commitments and Solar Options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...based on national deci-sions...re-quires more integration between end...and wind energy have to be...planning on the national level and...Energy of renewable energy plantations...transport (the grid above, say...Moreover, the challenge to policy-makers...open-ended energy policy can...control by the national government...

M. Lönnroth; T. B. Johansson; P. Steen

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

96

Petrale Sole Stock Assessment Review (STAR) Panel Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constituted a major uncertainty in the assessment (Figure 1), as did the appropriate natural mortality ratePetrale Sole Stock Assessment Review (STAR) Panel Report Hotel Deca, Seattle, Washington 20-24 June Leipzig PFMC Groundfish Advisory Subpanel (GAP) Stock Assessment Team (STAT) Melissa Haltuch NMFS

97

CUSTOM SYNTHESIS by TDC RESEARCH,Inc. To follow up on our conversation regarding TDC Research Custom Synthesis program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CUSTOM SYNTHESIS by TDC RESEARCH,Inc. To follow up on our conversation regarding TDC Research Custom Synthesis program: Here is a brief description of what we can/will do in the custom synthesis area will perform re-synthesis and scale up of any length for any compound up to 500 g. Occasionally we will do kilo

Hudlicky, Tomas

98

Mouse immunoglobulin D: messenger RNA and genomic DNA sequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a-helical or a, 8-pleated sheet conformation. Very similar...0.971.912 0.973, 8-Sheet potential (Ps) 1.045 1...phase; AG is the change in free energy in kilo-calories per mole...will initiate, 8-pleated sheet formations; values > 1.000...

PW Tucker; CP Liu; JF Mushinski; FR Blattner

1980-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

99

32 Marine Fisheries Review Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Azores and Madeira (DGPA, 1998). Historically, fisheries have targeted elasmobranchs to supply the liver-oil-products peaked (oil prices reached US$4.00 ~ US$5.00 per liter) and then declined from 1987 to 1999 (oil prices generally decreased over time, with a corresponding increase in price per kilo- gram. The most important

100

arXiv:0901.3557v1[astro-ph.IM]22Jan2009 Astronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. sparsity c ESO 2009 January 22, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey and the VISTA Kilo-Degree Infrared Galaxy Survey2 (KIDS/VIKING), the Dark Energy Survey3 (DES') is a powerful probe of dark energy and dark matter. A number of current and planned sur- veys are dedicated-STARRS), the SuperNovae Acceleration Probe5 (SNAP), the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope6 (LSST) and the Dark UNiverse

Masci, Frank

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kilo deca deci" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Seeing in the dark – II. Cosmic shear in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Suprime-Cam (HSC; Miyazaki et-al. 2006), Dark Energy Survey (DES; 1 The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration 2005), the KIlo-Degree...et al. MNRAS (2003) 341:1311. The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration. (2005) preprint ( astro-ph......

Eric M. Huff; Tim Eifler; Christopher M. Hirata; Rachel Mandelbaum; David Schlegel; Uroš Seljak

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Jack Dongarra A Historical Overview and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a performance advantage of at least one order of magnitude over conventional systems of that time. Raw mean the rate of execution for floating-point operations. Here we chart Kilo-flop (thousands the complete lifespan of modern computing-- we see an increase in performance averaging two orders of mag

Dongarra, Jack

103

A Measure of Violence: Forty Years of "First Contact" Among the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Provinces, this territory and its people have long been penetrated by colonisation. However, although differences in their interactions with the agents of the state, church and market. In the Baruya valley, and sold a few dozen kilos of dried beans in the Suowi valley (also called Ikundi valley, after the name

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

104

IEDWorking Paper 21 December 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a prod- uct's energy consumption in physical units (kilo- watt hours), other labels focus on monetary units (for instance US$). Currently applied labels accu- mulate a product's energy use over the period of one year, while the energy consumption for a single use or for the product's expected lifetime could

Fischlin, Andreas

105

Climax vegetation and soils of the Blackland Prairie of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for tie I iree, inte -e. , ts and h. rpful 'ugi, s!"intra prov'deci by my . nmraitt *r members, Drs, C. i, . Ccclf ray, J, D. R)odd and M. F, Sweet- Special I ha?!cs . re exrr. rr!cd tn 'r;:, V. r'I, Mo"!ruing, Pore. t Sci . . nc r. ?! or r. :r. ol a...

Collins, Odell Brown

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Cell, Vol. 122, 169182, July 29, 2005, Copyright 2005 by Elsevier Inc. DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2005.06.006 Stochastic Gene Expression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.06.006 Stochastic Gene Expression in a Lentiviral Positive-Feedback Loop: HIV-1 Tat Fluctuations Drive Phenotypic that the phage's lysis/lysogeny life-cycle deci- sion is a paradigmatic example of how stochastic ther-HIV-1 Tat/computational study of an HIV-1 model vector promoters is critical in controlling the switch and can (LTR-GFP-IRES-Tat

Schaffer, David V.

107

Organometallics 1993, 12, 3896-3905 Metallocene Analogues with Split (2 + 4)-?r-Electron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2.1.02s63deca-3,8-dien-5-yl (DICP) anion with iron(I1) and chromium(I1) chloride the orange diamagnetic)MII(CO)~(8) and (BC0D)K and Cp*Ni(acac) (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, acac = acetylacetonate) gave. The X-ray crystal analysis of 11 confirmed the qs bonding of BCOD to iron and showed a gauche

Bluemel, Janet

108

Commercial Building Partnerships: Partners and Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Alliances Building Energy Alliances August 1, 2011 Bank of America * Punta Gorda, FL * Multiple Locations Best Buy Co., Inc. * Lakewood, CO * To Be Determined CB Richard Ellis Group, Inc. / Fitzmartin Consulting * Denver, CO Clark Atlanta University * Center for Alternative, Renewable Energy, Technology and Training Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) * Lackland Air Force Base Forest City Enterprises, Inc. * Forest City-Richmond, VA Grand Valley State University * Library * Seidman Center Hines (Morgan Stanley property owner)

109

Acetylenic 2-phenylethylamides and new isobutylamides from Acmella oleracea (L.) R. K. Jansen, a Brazilian spice with larvicidal activity on Aedes aegypti  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ethanol extract obtained from dried leaves of Acmella oleracea afforded after a liquid/liquid partition procedure a larvicidal hexane fraction (LC50 = 145.6 ppm) and a non larvicidal dichloromethane one. From the inactive fraction, three amides were identified, two new structures, named deca-6,9-dihydroxy-(2E,7E)-dienoic acid isobutylamide (1), deca-8,9-dihydroxy-(2E,6Z)-dienoic acid isobutylamide (2) and the known nona-2,3-dihydroxy-6,8-diynoic acid 2-phenylethylamide (3). Bioassay-guided chromatographic fractionation of the hexane partition led to the identification of an amide mixture, nona-(2Z)-en-6,8-diynoic acid 2-phenylethylamide (4) and deca-(2Z)-en-6,8-diynoic acid 2-phenylethlylamide (5). This mixture was active against Aedes aegypti larvae at LC50 = 7.6 ppm. Low toxicity of crude extracts and derived fractions on Artemia salina nauplies showed the possibility of using them to control the A. aegypti mosquito larvae. This is the first report on larvicidal activity of acetylenic 2-phenylethylamides and their identification in A. oleracea leaves.

Naomi Kato Simas; Elisangela da Costa Lima Dellamora; Jan Schripsema; Celso Luiz Salgueiro Lage; Alfredo Martins de Oliveira Filho; Ludger Wessjohann; Andrea Porzel; Ricardo Machado Kuster

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Property:PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from utility-scale PV in urban areas of a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

111

Property:Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity Capacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Capacity Property Type Quantity Description Potential electric energy generation, default units of megawatts. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS 0.000001 TW,terawatt,terawatts,Terawatt,Terawatts,TeraWatt,TeraWatts,TERAWATT,TERAWATTS

112

Property:PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from EGS Geothermal for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

113

Property:GeneratingCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeneratingCapacity GeneratingCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GeneratingCapacity Property Type Quantity Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS 0.000001 TW,terawatt,terawatts,Terawatt,Terawatts,TeraWatt,TeraWatts,TERAWATT,TERAWATTS

114

Property:PotentialCSPCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialCSPCapacity PotentialCSPCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialCSPCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from CSP for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

115

Property:PlannedCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PlannedCapacity PlannedCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PlannedCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The total planned capacity for a given area, region or project. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS 0.000001 TW,terawatt,terawatts,Terawatt,Terawatts,TeraWatt,TeraWatts,TERAWATT,TERAWATTS

116

Property:GrossProdCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GrossProdCapacity GrossProdCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GrossProdCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Sum of the property AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty for all Energy Generation Facilities with properties: Sector: Geothermal Energy InGeothermalResourceArea: set to the the variable vName of the Geothermal Resource Area Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS

117

Property:PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Offshore Wind for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

118

Property:PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Geothermal Hydrothermal for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

119

Property:PotentialHydropowerCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialHydropowerCapacity PotentialHydropowerCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialHydropowerCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Hydropower for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

120

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from gaseous biopower for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kilo deca deci" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Property:PotentialBiopowerSolidMass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:PotentialBiopowerSolidMass Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerSolidMass Property Type Quantity Description The potential mass of solid biopower material for a place. Use this type to express a quantity of magnitude, or an object's resistance to acceleration. The default unit is the kilogram (kg). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilogram Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Kilograms - 1 kg, kilo, kilogram, kilograms, Kilogram, kilogramme, kilos Grams - 1000 g, gram, gramme, grams Tonnes - 0.001 tonnes, metric tons, Tonnes, Metric Tonnes Pounds - 2.205 lbs, pounds, pound, Pounds, Lbs Stone - 0.1575 stones, st, stone Ounces - 35.27 ounces, oz, Ounces, ounce

122

Property:InstalledCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InstalledCapacity InstalledCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name InstalledCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Installed Capacity (MW) or also known as Total Generator Nameplate Capacity (Rated Power) Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

123

Property:IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential Jump to: navigation, search Property Name IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential Property Type Quantity Description Conventional hydrothermal electricity generation potential from identified hydrothermal sites, as determined by the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment (Williams et al, 2008). Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS

124

Property:PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Onshore Wind for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

125

Property:PotentialRooftopPVCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialRooftopPVCapacity PotentialRooftopPVCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialRooftopPVCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Rooftop PV for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

126

Property:MeanCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MeanCapacity MeanCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name MeanCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Mean capacity potential at location based on the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment if the United States Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

127

Optimization of operating parameters for the Texas A&M Variable Energy Cyclotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'S Empirical C on st r aint: Fr Fr e quency De e Vo 1 tag e (Kilo v o lt s ) Main Coil (Amps) TCO'l: TC02: TC03: TC04: TC05: TC06: TC07: TC08: TC09: TC10: TC11: TC12: TC13: TC14: TC15: TC16: TC17: ee Voltage equency; D 7. 04200 34 478...'S Empirical C on st r aint: Fr Fr e quency De e Vo 1 tag e (Kilo v o lt s ) Main Coil (Amps) TCO'l: TC02: TC03: TC04: TC05: TC06: TC07: TC08: TC09: TC10: TC11: TC12: TC13: TC14: TC15: TC16: TC17: ee Voltage equency; D 7. 04200 34 478...

Wolters, Richard Arthur

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Property:PotentialBiopowerSolidCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerSolidCapacity PotentialBiopowerSolidCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerSolidCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from solid biopower for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

129

Property:UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential Jump to: navigation, search Property Name UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential Property Type Quantity Description Estimated conventional hydrothermal electricity generation potential from undiscovered hydrothermal sites, as determined by the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment (Williams et al, 2008). Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS

130

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass Property Type Quantity Description The potential mass of gaseous biopower material for a place. Use this type to express a quantity of magnitude, or an object's resistance to acceleration. The default unit is the kilogram (kg). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilogram Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Kilograms - 1 kg, kilo, kilogram, kilograms, Kilogram, kilogramme, kilos Grams - 1000 g, gram, gramme, grams Tonnes - 0.001 tonnes, metric tons, Tonnes, Metric Tonnes Pounds - 2.205 lbs, pounds, pound, Pounds, Lbs Stone - 0.1575 stones, st, stone Ounces - 35.27 ounces, oz, Ounces, ounce BDT - 0.001 BDT, Bone Dry Tonnes, bdt Pages using the property "PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass"

131

Property:NetProdCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NetProdCapacity NetProdCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NetProdCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Sum of the property SummerPeakNetCpcty for all Energy Generation Facilities with properties: Sector: Geothermal Energy InGeothermalResourceArea: set to the the variable vName of the Geothermal Resource Area Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS

132

Property:PotentialRuralUtilityScalePVCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialRuralUtilityScalePVCapacity PotentialRuralUtilityScalePVCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialRuralUtilityScalePVCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from rural utility-scale PV for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

133

Characterization of PP2A regulatory B subunits in Fusarium verticillioides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

my parents and parents-in-law for their encouragement and support. vii NOMENCLATURE PP2A Protein Phosphatase type 2A FB1 Fumonisin B1 PDA Potato Dextrose Agar PDB Potato Dextrose Broth YEPD Yeast Extract Peptone Dextrose kb kilo base pair... and mutant strains on various solid media; PDA, V8 agar, and Defined Medium (DM) ... 31 Figure 11 Growth and morphology of the wild type and mutant strains on YEPD agar and in YEPD broth...

Shin, Joonhee

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

134

Comparative Genomics of Gossypium spp. through GBS and Candidate Genes – Delving into the Controlling Factors behind Photoperiodic Flowering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARATIVE GENOMICS OF GOSSYPIUM SPP. THROUGH GBS AND CANDIDATE GENES ? DELVING INTO THE CONTROLLING FACTORS BEHIND PHOTOPERIODIC FLOWERING A Dissertation by CARLA JO LOGAN YOUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A.../Deletion Polymorphism IPGB Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology Ka Non-synonymous Nucleotide Substitution Rate kb Kilobase(s) kDa KiloDalton Ks Synonymous Nucleotide Substitution Rate LD Long Day LD Linkage Disequilibrium MAS Marker Assisted...

Young, Carla Jo Logan

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

135

Chapter 4: The Building Architectural Design  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

: The Building : The Building Architectural Design Schematic Design Designing Using Computer Simulations Design of High Performance Features and Systems Designing for Daylighting Passive and Active Solar Systems Accommodating Recycling Activities LANL | Chapter 4 The Building Architectural Design Schematic Design Achieving a sustainable building requires a commitment from developing the initial F&OR documents through construction detailing and commissioning. Initial deci- sions, such as the building's location, general massing, and configuration profoundly affect the building's envi- ronmental impact and energy performance. Well- defined sustainable goals will guide the entire spectrum of decision-making throughout the design and con- struction process (see Chapter 2).

136

Use of Information Theory Concepts for Developing Contaminated Site Detection Method: Case for Fission Product and Actinides Accumulation Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information theory concepts and their fundamental importance for environmental pollution analysis in light of experience of Chernobyl accident in Belarus are discussed. An information and dynamic models of the radionuclide composition formation in the fuel of the Nuclear Power Plant are developed. With the use of code DECA numerical calculation of actinides (58 isotopes are included) and fission products (650 isotopes are included) activities has been carried out and their dependence with the fuel burn-up of the RBMK-type reactor have been investigated. (authors)

Harbachova, N.V.; Sharavarau, H.A. [Joint Institute of Power and Nuclear Research - 'Sosny' National Academy of Sciences, 99 Academic, A.K. Krasin Str., 220109 Minsk (Belarus)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

An investigation of Araldite 6060 as a model material for photoelastic stress analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the hardener HR 901 deca not act as a normal type oatalyst, but becomes aa actual part of the resia. Since the reaction between the resin and the hardeaer is not exothermic, there need not and should not be aay variatioa in the amouat of hardener used... regardless of the size of the castiag. Since some plastics such as Castelite(4), a polyester resia, have aa exothermic hard- eaiag reactioa, the amount of catalyst used must be varied according to the size of the castiag to be made. This varia- tien ia...

Anderson, Byron Hubert

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Dust Measurement of Two Organophosphorus Flame Retardants, Resorcinol Bis(diphenylphosphate) (RBDPP) and Bisphenol A Bis(diphenylphosphate) (BPA-BDPP), Used as Alternatives for BDE-209  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dust Measurement of Two Organophosphorus Flame Retardants, Resorcinol Bis(diphenylphosphate) (RBDPP) and Bisphenol A Bis(diphenylphosphate) (BPA-BDPP), Used as Alternatives for BDE-209 ... Resorcinol bis(diphenylphosphate) (RBDPP) and bisphenol A bis(diphenylphosphate) (BPA-BDPP) are two halogen-free organophosphorus flame retardant (PFRs) that are used as an alternative for the decabromodiphenyl ether (Deca-BDE) technical mixture in TV/flatscreen housing and other electronic consumer products. ... In this study, dust samples were collected from various microenvironments in The Netherlands (houses, cars), Greece (houses), and Sweden (apartments, cars, furniture stores, electronics stores) and analyzed for RBDPP and BPA-BDPP. ...

Sicco H. Brandsma; Ulla Sellström; Cynthia A. de Wit; Jacob de Boer; Pim E. G. Leonards

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

139

HPLC AND Mass Spectroscopic Characterization of Mango (Mangifera Indica L.) Gallotannins Following Enzymatic Hydrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finnigan LCQ Deca XP Max MSn ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with an ESI ion source (ThermoFisher, San Jose, CA). Separation of compounds was completed with a Dionex (Sunnydale, CA) Acclaim? 120 A, (4.6 X 250 mm; 5?M). Mobile phases used included 0... was observed from incubation with both 13,000 U/mL and 20,000 U/mL ?-glucosidase. If all gallotannins were hydrolyzed into their respective moieties, the amount of increase observed after hydrolysis would be expected to be higher than an 8-fold increase...

Krenek, Kimberly A.

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

140

Modulated Release of a Volatile Compound from Starch Matrixes via Enzymatically Controlled Degradation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The activity of the liquid enzyme formulation (protein content was 38 mg/mL) was 120 KNU/g of enzyme formulation (1 Kilo Novo alpha-amylase Unit, KNU, activity unit is the amount of enzyme which breaks down 5.26 g of starch/h at 37 °C to dextrins and oligosaccharides at pH 5.6 (as given in the Termamyl product data sheet by Novo Nordisk). ... Although the amount of water was minimized, ?-amylase started to break down the matrix during the encapsulation process. ... (GCWS) starches (waxy maize, normal maize, Hylon-5, and Hylon-7; amylose content <1, 28, 54, and 68%, resp.) ...

Gülden Y?lmaz; Gaye Öngen; Remy O. J. Jongboom; Herman Feil; Cees van Dijk; Wim E. Hennink

2002-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kilo deca deci" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Vrme-och strmningsteknik Thermal and Flow Engineering Processteknikens grunder (PTG) 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sidan. 1303. One kilo of a gas (the gas is CO2 for e = 0,1,2; CO for e = 3,4,5,6; H2 for e = 7 for questions 1303 and 1304 1304. En behållare med gas (gasen är CO2 för e = 0,1,2; CO för e = 3,4,5,6; H2 för e = u + pv, och pv = RT (för n=1 mol) 1304. A container filled with a gas (the gas is CO2 for e = 0

Zevenhoven, Ron

142

Readiness Review RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Readiness Review Module Readiness Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Readin Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ness Rev view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) view e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-

143

Preliminary Safety Design RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Preliminary Safety Design Review Module Preliminary Safety Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Pr C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R reliminar Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ry Safety view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) y Design e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

144

Facility Disposition Safety Strategy RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facility Disposition Safety Strategy Review Module Facility Disposition Safety Strategy Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Facilit C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R ty Dispos Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan sition Saf view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) fety Strat e pplicability D-3 EMENT tegy CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

145

Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Assurance for Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Q C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Quality A Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Assuranc view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) e (QA) e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

146

Earned Value Management System RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Earned Value Management System Review Module Earned Value Management System Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O Ea 0 OFFICE OF arned Va C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R alue Man Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan agement view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) t System e pplicability D-3 EMENT (EVMS) CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

147

National Environmental Policy Act RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Environmental Policy Act Review Module National Environmental Policy Act Review Module March 2010 CD- N -0 OFFICE O National E C CD-1 OF ENVIRO Standa Environm Rev Critical Deci CD-2 M ONMENTA ard Review mental P view Modul ision (CD) A C March 2010 AL MANAG Plan olicy Act le Applicability D-3 GEMENT t (NEPA) CD-4 ) Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

148

Commissioning Plan RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Checkout, Testing, and Checkout, Testing, and Commissioning Plan Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O Ch 0 OFFICE OF heckout, T C CD-1 F ENVIRON Standard R Testing, a Revi Critical Decis CD-2 Ma NMENTAL Review Plan and Com iew Module sion (CD) Ap CD arch 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) mmissioni e pplicability D-3 EMENT ing Plan CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

149

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seismic Design Expectations Report Seismic Design Expectations Report March 2010 CD- This Rev of th Se -0 view Module w he overall Cons OFFICE O eismic De C CD-1 was used to dev struction Projec inco OF ENVIRO Standard esign Exp Critical Deci CD-2 M velop the Revie ct Review cond orporated in the ONMENTA Review Pla pectation ision (CD) A C March 2010 ew Plan for the ducted in 2009 e current versio AL MANAG an (SRP) ns Report Applicability D-3 e Oak Ridge Bl 9. Lessons lear on of the Modu GEMENT t (SDER) CD-4 ldg. 3019 60% rned from this r ule. ) Post Ope design review review have be eration w as part een Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental

150

Final Design RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Design Review Module Final Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 [This Rev Design Re O 0 view Module w eview of the OR OFFICE OF C CD-1 was used to dev R U 233 Dispo F ENVIRO Standard R Fin Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M velop the Revie osition Project ONMENTAL Review Plan al Design view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 ew Plan for 90% in 2009. Lesso Module.] L MANAGE n (SRP) n e pplicability D-3 % Design Revi ons learned hav EMENT CD-4 iew of SWPF i ve been incorpo Post Ope in 2008 and for orated in the R eration r 60% Review Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively.

151

Integrated Project Team RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Project Team (IPT) Review Module Integrated Project Team (IPT) Review Module March 2010 CD-0 This R O 0 Review Modul OFFICE OF Inte C CD-1 le was piloted F ENVIRO Standard R grated P Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M at the OR U 23 incorporated ONMENTAL Review Plan Project Te view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 33 Disposition in the Review L MANAGE n (SRP) eam (IPT e pplicability D-3 Project in 200 Module. EMENT T) CD-4 09. Lessons lea Post Ope arned have been eration n Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM

152

Conceptual Safety Design RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conceptual Safety Design Review Module Conceptual Safety Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Conceptua Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan al Safety view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) y Design e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital

153

Conceptual Design RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conceptual Design Review Module Conceptual Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Concep Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ptual De view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) sign e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

154

Acquisition Strategy RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Acquisition Strategy Review Module Acquisition Strategy Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Acquisi Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ition Stra view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) ategy e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,

155

VOLUME I A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I I A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION THE NEW WORLD, 1939 /1946 RICHARD G. HEWLETT AND OSCAR E. ANDERSON, JR. 1962 UNIVERSITY PARK, PENNSYLVANIA THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY PRESS Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 62-14633 Designed by Marilyn Shobaken CONTENTS FOREWORD BY THE CHAIRMAN, v HISTORICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ix PREFACE 1 THE INHERITANCE Historical setting, January, 1947; summary of AEC inheritance. 2 IN THE BEGINNING Discovery of fission; first efforts to gain federal sup- port for nuclear research; growing interest in military potential; authority for an all-out investigation of atomic weapons. 3 EXPLORING THE ROUTES TO THE WEAPON OSRD efforts to select best production process; deci- sion to expand project, June, 1942; transfer of re-

156

Project Execution Plan RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Execution Plan (PEP) Review Module Project Execution Plan (PEP) Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF P C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Project E Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Execution view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) n Plan e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

157

Risk Management RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Risk Management Review Module Risk Management Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Risk M Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Managem view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE (SRP) ment e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, and EM's internal

158

What is Clean Cities?; Clean Cities Fact Sheet (September 2008 Update)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP), Clean Cities con- tributes to the energy, environmental, and economic security of the United States by supporting local deci- sions to reduce our dependence on imported petroleum. Established in 1993 in response to the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992, the partnership provides tools and resources for voluntary, community-centered programs to reduce consumption of petroleum-based fuels. In almost 90 coalitions, government agencies and private companies voluntarily come together under the umbrella of Clean Cities. The partnership helps all parties identify mutual interests and meet the objectives of reducing the use of imported oil, developing regional economic opportunities, and improving air quality.

159

Petroleum prospects of a part of the Marfa Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, an 3. les 'ifith F'iarlxeC unconformity on the Pennsyl vaIlxan BnI3 l s ovcr3. af n u~lconformably by ti e Tr3assic Hissett conglomerate. f: 'e slssctt . 11 Xne c&IIi'lIImerate Xs &IIIIIsusl feet t ~c'I~ ~Tosyww 0rc tr, cwo ~s cora% e. ts mrc...:tion in this area, 2 T I;. 6 C 7 U K i'. h I' lc: Tho 1-'. . r 'ciao=, ofo roc!cs 8-". . io-. . es . . -. , ' the . '. . r. ! thon cnd dolit'-rio rapicns:. . re intec!c:ell fou lcd ~id fau. . deci. Lc. Jf. ' 'L'h"= defor'. :c tioF. Ih! t ' hc! Qx; Gs. :I'8- aa...

Seward, Clay Luzenberg

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

DECIGO: The Japanese space gravitational wave antenna  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DECi-hertz Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (DECIGO) is the planned Japanese space gravitational wave antenna, aiming to detect gravitational waves from astrophysically and cosmologically significant sources mainly between 0.1 Hz and 10 Hz and thus to open a new window for gravitational wave astronomy and for the universe. DECIGO will consist of three drag-free spacecraft, 1000 km apart from each other, whose relative displacements are measured by a differential Fabry-Perot interferometer. We plan to launch DECIGO in middle of 2020s, after sequence of two precursor satellite missions, DECIGO pathfinder and Pre-DECIGO, for technology demonstration required to realize DECIGO and hopefully for detection of gravitational waves from our galaxy or nearby galaxies.

Shuichi Sato; Seiji Kawamura; Masaki Ando; Takashi Nakamura; Kimio Tsubono; Akito Araya; Ikkoh Funaki; Kunihito Ioka; Nobuyuki Kanda; Shigenori Moriwaki; Mitsuru Musha; Kazuhiro Nakazawa; Kenji Numata; Shin-ichiro Sakai; Naoki Seto; Takeshi Takashima; Takahiro Tanaka; Kazuhiro Agatsuma; Koh-suke Aoyanagi; Koji Arai; Hideki Asada; Yoichi Aso; Takeshi Chiba; Toshikazu Ebisuzaki; Yumiko Ejiri; Motohiro Enoki; Yoshiharu Eriguchi; Masa-Katsu Fujimoto; Ryuichi Fujita; Mitsuhiro Fukushima; Toshifumi Futamase; Katsuhiko Ganzu; Tomohiro Harada; Tatsuaki Hashimoto; Kazuhiro Hayama; Wataru Hikida; Yoshiaki Himemoto; Hisashi Hirabayashi; Takashi Hiramatsu; Feng-Lei Hong; Hideyuki Horisawa; Mizuhiko Hosokawa; Kiyotomo Ichiki; Takeshi Ikegami; Kaiki T Inoue; Koji Ishidoshiro; Hideki Ishihara; Takehiko Ishikawa; Hideharu Ishizaki; Hiroyuki Ito; Yousuke Itoh; Nobuki Kawashima; Fumiko Kawazoe; Naoko Kishimoto; Kenta Kiuchi; Shiho Kobayashi; Kazunori Kohri; Hiroyuki Koizumi; Yasufumi Kojima; Keiko Kokeyama; Wataru Kokuyama; Kei Kotake; Yoshihide Kozai; Hideaki Kudoh; Hiroo Kunimori; Hitoshi Kuninaka; Kazuaki Kuroda; Kei-ichi Maeda; Hideo Matsuhara; Yasushi Mino; Osamu Miyakawa; Shinji Miyoki; Mutsuko Y Morimoto; Tomoko Morioka; Toshiyuki Morisawa; Shinji Mukohyama; Shigeo Nagano; Isao Naito; Kouji Nakamura; Hiroyuki Nakano; Kenichi Nakao; Shinichi Nakasuka; Yoshinori Nakayama; Erina Nishida; Kazutaka Nishiyama; Atsushi Nishizawa; Yoshito Niwa; Taiga Noumi; Yoshiyuki Obuchi; Masatake Ohashi; Naoko Ohishi; Masashi Ohkawa; Norio Okada; Kouji Onozato; Kenichi Oohara; Norichika Sago; Motoyuki Saijo; Masaaki Sakagami; Shihori Sakata; Misao Sasaki; Takashi Sato; Masaru Shibata; Hisaaki Shinkai; Kentaro Somiya; Hajime Sotani; Naoshi Sugiyama; Yudai Suwa; Rieko Suzuki; Hideyuki Tagoshi; Fuminobu Takahashi; Kakeru Takahashi; Keitaro Takahashi; Ryutaro Takahashi; Ryuichi Takahashi; Tadayuki Takahashi; Hirotaka Takahashi; Takamori Akiteru; Tadashi Takano; Keisuke Taniguchi; Atsushi Taruya; Hiroyuki Tashiro; Yasuo Torii; Morio Toyoshima; Shinji Tsujikawa; Yoshiki Tsunesada; Akitoshi Ueda; Ken-ichi Ueda; Masayoshi Utashima; Yaka Wakabayashi; Hiroshi Yamakawa; Kazuhiro Yamamoto; Toshitaka Yamazaki; Jun'ichi Yokoyama; Chul-Moon Yoo; Shijun Yoshida; Taizoh Yoshino

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kilo deca deci" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Prelminary Design RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Preliminary Design Review Module Preliminary Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Prelim Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan inary De view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) esign e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

162

Demonstrating LED and Fiber Optic Lighting in Commissary Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demonstrating LED and Fiber Optic Demonstrating LED and Fiber Optic Lighting in Commissary Applications Joseph Konrade Energy Technology Program Specialist Federal Energy Management Program 2 GOAL OF THE PROJECT * Promote New Lighting Technology * Document Energy Savings * Duplicate the technology * Expand Alternative Financing Opportunities * Include Lighting Technology in Government Projects within Utility Service Territory 3 History * FEMP sponsored E4 audits * Audit designed to review Utility Cost, Operations and Maintenance, New Technology Application * 3 Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) received services under the agreement with DOE * Fort George G Meade pays a high electricity rate Electricity cost $0.171/kWh (PWC sub-metered rate) * Commissary was previously unmetered - Meter installed during installation of lighting project. New meter showing higher

163

The effect of gradients of temperature of the sea surface on moving groups of cumulus clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 16N to 25N. Prom ship data, for the p . rticulax de+ca of inves;igat'on, i0, ", I, 'I2, nd 1H Inarch 1 9oH, a. map o f mean ai temperature v, as cons I ruc I? ed. . A map of sea-air temoerature differ ence vas ob- tained. Stabilii;y of . I...;he subclcud layer eras exam! ned. favorable areas and uafavorable a! cas f' or cloud dcv. i. lep- ment on the basis of' the sea-air Lemperaiure O'Lfference !vere de+ermined. Comparison?::ith an observed ?, . ? day com? posi+o cloud m . p shoved i irly good...

Stearns, John Robb

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY MARTIN MARIETTA CORPORATION (MMC) FORMERLY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MARTIN MARIETTA CORPORATION (MMC) FORMERLY MARTIN MARIETTA CORPORATION (MMC) FORMERLY KNOWN AS GENERAL DYNAMICS - SPACE SYSTEMS DIVISION (GD- SSD) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO: DE-FC36- 93CH10554; W(A)-94-012; CH-0831 Martin Marietta Corporation (MMC) has recently acquired the Space Systems Division of the General Dynamics Corporation (GD- SSD) which had earlier requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions under a cooperative agreement for the development of a 1 kilo-Joule current limiter under DOE Contract No. DE-FC36-93CH10554. MMC, by accepting the Advance Waiver Patent Rights and certain amendments to the Data Rights, has indicated that they wish to proceed with the waiver petition. This agreement was awarded under DOE's

165

Microsoft Word - CX-LanePhaseSeparationProjects_FY13_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, 2012 6, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Michael Marleau - TEP-TPP-1 Project Manager Proposed Action: Lane Substation 500/230-kV Transformer Phase Separation Project Project Work Order Number: 00298187 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities Location: Lane Substation, Lane County, Oregon Township 17 South, Range 5 East, Section 36 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to increase the physical distance that separates each phase of the 500/230-kiloVolt transformer banks at BPA's Lane Substation. The reason for the increased distance is to minimize the effects of a transformer fire or explosion as

166

Batteries - Materials Engineering Facility: Scale-Up R&D Bridges Gap  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argonne's Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D program Argonne's Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D program Initial discovery amounts of battery materials are small compared to the kilo-scale amounts needed for validation of new battery technologies. Argonne researcher Sabine Gallagher Argonne researcher Sabine Gallagher loads a sample mount of battery cathode materials for X-ray diffraction, an analysis tool for obtaining information on the crystallographic structure and composition of materials. Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) Argonne's new Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) supports the laboratory's Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D Program. The MERF is enabling the development of manufacturing processes for producing advanced battery materials in sufficient quantity for

167

CX-002196: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2196: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2196: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002196: Categorical Exclusion Determination STS-100 Test Stand Experiment CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/04/2010 Location(s): Princeton, New Jersey Office(s): Princeton Site Office, Science The proposed action would consist of operation of a 100 kilovolt (kV) test stand, the STS-I00, acquired from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in which advanced plasma sources will be developed and ion-ion plasmas will be studied at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The STS-100 would be used to generate 100 kilo-electron volt ion beams, as well as a general purpose vacuum chamber with excellent diagnostic access. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002196.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-0813: Final Environmental Assessment

168

CX-009705: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

705: Categorical Exclusion Determination 705: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009705: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lane Substation 500/230-kV Transformer Phase Separation Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 12/06/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to increase the physical distance that separates each phase of the 500/230-kiloVolt transformer banks at BPA's Lane Substation. The reason for the increased distance is to minimize the effects of a transformer fire or explosion as outlined in the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, Inc. guidelines for substation fire suppression. CX-009705.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-008705: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009708: Categorical Exclusion Determination

169

Dr. Yuan Ping Lawrence Livermore National Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Creating, diagnosing and Creating, diagnosing and controlling high-energy- density matter with lasers Dr. Yuan Ping Lawrence Livermore National Lab Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 - 3:00PM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at 2:45PM The PrinceTon Plasma Physics laboraTory is a U.s. DeParTmenT of energy faciliTy Since their invention in 1960's, lasers with power spanning from Kilo- Watt to PetaWatt have been widely used in almost every branch of sci- ence, leading to numerous discoveries and novel techniques. At present, lasers are capable of creating extreme states of matter in a laboratory, at conditions resembling those most extreme in the Universe: they heat matter up to the temperatures inside stars, they create electric field and

170

Data:561a47f4-71ac-4163-acc1-f26728c3bded | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f4-71ac-4163-acc1-f26728c3bded f4-71ac-4163-acc1-f26728c3bded No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Tell City, Indiana (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Tariff OPL: Single Phase Off Peak Lighting Sector: Lighting Description: "This rate applies to kilo-watt hours use for Street and Private Dusk to Dawn lighting. The purpose of this rate is for the Tell City Electric Department to bill the Electric Department for the KWH used for off peak lighting." Source or reference: Rates Binder 1, Illinois State University Source Parent:

171

Creating Market Change from the Inside Out: Applying the Collaborative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

These industrial applications have These industrial applications have been largely overlooked, yet represent a major energy savings opportunity- for industrial electric motor systems alone, USDOE Motor Challenge estimates savings of 9 billion kiloWatt-hours per year by 2010. Because the savings are typically found in system-based instead of component-based solutions, persuasive actions (education, incentives) are usually more effective than directed actions (regulations) in these applications. To be successful and persistent, persuasive actions require lasting behavioral change, which is often difficult to accomplish. This talk focuses on a process model that has emerged from work on industrial motor system efficiency in the Washington DC project office. The model seeks to effect institutional and behavioral change by using government in the role of a

172

Polyamide 66 as a Cryogenic Dielectric  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvements in superconductor and cryogenic technologies enable novel power apparatus, \\eg, cables, transformers, fault current limiters, generators, \\etc, with better device characteristics than their conventional counterparts. In these applications electrical insulation materials play an important role in system weight, footprint (size), and voltage level. The trend in the electrical insulation material selection has been to adapt or to employ conventional insulation materials to these new systems. However, at low temperatures, thermal contraction and loss of mechanical strength in many materials make them unsuitable for superconducting power applications. In this paper, a widely used commercial material was characterized as a potential cryogenic dielectric. The material is used in ``oven bag'' a heat-resistant polyamide (nylon) used in cooking (produced by Reynolds\\textregistered, Richmond, VA, USA). It is first characterized by Fourier transform infrared and x-ray diffraction techniques and determined to be composed of polyamide 66 (PA66) polymer. Secondly the complex dielectric permittivity and dielectric breakdown strength of the PA66 films are investigated. The dielectric data are then compared with data reported in the literature. A comparison of dielectric strength with a widely used high-temperature superconductor electrical insulation material, polypropylene-laminated paper (PPLP\\texttrademark\\ a product of Sumitomo Electric Industries, Japan), is provided. It is observed that the statistical analysis of the PA66 films yields 1\\% failure probability at $127\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$; this value is approximately $46\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$ higher than PPLP\\texttrademark. It is concluded that PA66 may be a good candidate for cryogenic applications. Finally, a summary of dielectric properties of some of the commercial tape insulation materials and various polymers is also provided.

Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL; Messman, Jamie M [ORNL; Aytug, Tolga [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Annihilations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Decaimientos: Aniquilaciones Decaimientos: Aniquilaciones Avanzar Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! Las aniquilaciones son diferentes de los decaimientos en que en una aniquilación una partícula de materia y una partícula de antimateria se aniquilan entre sí conviertiéndose totalmente en energía, en tanto que en un decaimiento una parte de la masa de la partícula que decae se convierte en energía, y el resto de la masa se convierte en masa de las nuevas partículas. Durante una aniquilación, una partícula de materia y una de antimateria interactúan entre sí, convirtiendo toda la energía que poseen antes de la aniquilación, en una partícula portadora de fuerza, muy energética (un gluón, W/Z, o un fotón). Estos portadores de fuerzas, a su vez, pueden decaer generando otras partículas.

174

Single molecule pulling with large time steps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, we presented a generalization of the Jarzynski nonequilibrium work theorem for phase space mappings. The formalism shows that one can determine free energy differences from approximate trajectories obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in which very large time steps are used. In this work we test the method by simulating the force-induced unfolding of a deca-alanine helix in vacuum. The excellent agreement between results obtained with a small, conservative time step of 0.5fs and results obtained with a time step of 3.2fs (i.e., close to the stability limit) indicates that the large-time-step approach is practical for such complex biomolecules. We further adapt the method of Hummer and Szabo for the simulation of single molecule force spectroscopy experiments to the large-time-step method. While trajectories generated with large steps are approximate and may be unphysical—in the simulations presented here we observe a violation of the equipartition theorem—the computed free energies are exact in principle. In terms of efficiency, the optimum time step for the unfolding simulations lies in the range 1–3fs.

Harald Oberhofer; Christoph Dellago; Stefan Boresch

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

175

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY OSRAM OPTO SEMICONDUCTORS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 14:37 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO RGCP-HQ P.02/04 5 14:37 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO RGCP-HQ P.02/04 * * STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY OSRAM OPTO SEMICONDUCTORS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26-05NT42341, SUBCONTRACT QZ001; W(A)-05-017, CH-1280 The Petitioner, OSRAM Opto Semiconductor (Osram) was awarded a subcontract under this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Scaling Up KiloLumen Solid- State Lighting Exceeding 100 LPW via Remote Phosphor." The cooperative agreement was awarded to Light Prescriptions Innovators, LLC (LPI). The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop a new white light emitting diode (LED) light source that emits 1000 lumens with an efficacy exceeding 100 lumens per watt (LPW). The new white LED light source will use multiple

176

The role of radial particle flow on power balance in DIII-D  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The importance of radial particle flow on the power flowing across the last closed flux surface (separatrix) in DIII-D [Luxon et al. International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion (International Atomic Energy Agency Vienna 1986) Vol. I p. 159] is considered. The perpendicular thermal diffusivity at the separatrix is near 1 m2/s in low confinement operation (L-mode) and 0.1 m2/s in high confinement (H-mode). The particle diffusivity is about one-fourth of the thermal diffusivity producing radial particle fluxes of the order of kilo-amperes. The particle flux is 10 to 100 times the particle input from neutral beam sources consistent with core fueling being dominated by neutral recycling. The radial particle flux scales with the neutral pressure in the private flux region suggesting the core is fueled predominantly from neutrals which recycle from the divertor through the private flux and into the core near the singular point where the poloidal field is zero (X-point). There is significant core power loss associated with the large particle flux across the separatrix. The electron temperature measured at the top of the edge pedestal in H-mode operation scales inversely with the particle flux. In turn the core energy confinement scales with the pedestal temperature and hence inversely with the particle flux. The results presented here indicate the global particle confinement time is between 0.5 and 2 times the global energy confinement time.

G. D. Porter; DIII-D team

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

FY07 LDRD Final Report Precision, Split Beam, Chirped-Pulse, Seed Laser Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this LDRD ER was to develop a robust and reliable technology to seed high-energy laser systems with chirped pulses that can be amplified to kilo-Joule energies and recompressed to sub-picosecond pulse widths creating extremely high peak powers suitable for petawatt class physics experiments. This LDRD project focused on the development of optical fiber laser technologies compatible with the current long pulse National Ignition Facility (NIF) seed laser. New technologies developed under this project include, high stability mode-locked fiber lasers, fiber based techniques for reduction of compressed pulse pedestals and prepulses, new compact stretchers based on chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBGs), new techniques for manipulation of chirped pulses prior to amplification and new high-energy fiber amplifiers. This project was highly successful and met virtually all of its goals. The National Ignition Campaign has found the results of this work to be very helpful. The LDRD developed system is being employed in experiments to engineer the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) front end and the fully engineered version of the ARC Front End will employ much of the technology and techniques developed here.

Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

178

BRIGHT 'MERGER-NOVA' FROM THE REMNANT OF A NEUTRON STAR BINARY MERGER: A SIGNATURE OF A NEWLY BORN, MASSIVE, MILLISECOND MAGNETAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A massive millisecond magnetar may survive the merger of a neutron star (NS) binary, which would continuously power the merger ejecta. We develop a generic dynamic model for the merger ejecta with energy injection from the central magnetar. The ejecta emission (the {sup m}erger-nova{sup )} powered by the magnetar peaks in the UV band and the peak of the light curve, progressively shifts to an earlier epoch with increasing frequency. A magnetar-powered merger-nova could have an optical peak brightness comparable to a supernova, which is a few tens or hundreds times brighter than the radioactive-powered merger-novae (the so-called macro-nova or kilo-nova). On the other hand, such a merger-nova would peak earlier and have a significantly shorter duration than that of a supernova. An early collapse of the magnetar could suppress the brightness of the optical emission and shorten its duration. Such millisecond-magnetar-powered merger-novae may be detected from NS-NS merger events without an observed short gamma-ray burst, and could be a bright electromagnetic counterpart for gravitational wave bursts due to NS-NS mergers. If detected, it suggests that the merger leaves behind a massive NS, which has important implications for the equation-of-state of nuclear matter.

Yu, Yun-Wei [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)] [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Zhang, Bing; Gao, He, E-mail: yuyw@mail.ccnu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

179

Unmanned airships for near earth remote sensing missions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years the study of Earth processes has increased significantly. Conventional aircraft have been employed to a large extent in gathering much of this information. However, with this expansion of research has come the need to investigate and measure phenomena that occur beyond the performance capabilities of conventional aircraft. Where long dwell times or observations at very low attitudes are required there are few platforms that can operate safely, efficiently, and cost-effectively. One type of aircraft that meets all three parameters is the unmanned, autonomously operated airship. The UAV airship is smaller than manned airships but has similar performance characteristics. It`s low speed stability permits high resolution observations and provides a low vibration environment for motion sensitive instruments. Maximum airspeed is usually 30mph to 35mph and endurance can be as high as 36 hours. With scientific payload capacities of 100 kilos and more, the UAV airship offers a unique opportunity for carrying significant instrument loads for protracted periods at the air/surface interface. The US Army has operated UAV airships for several years conducting border surveillance and monitoring, environmental surveys, and detection and mapping of unexploded ordinance. The technical details of UAV airships, their performance, and the potential of such platforms for more advanced research roles will be presented. 3 refs., 5 figs.

Hochstetler, R.D. [Research Adventures,Inc., Kensington, MD (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Electric Power Delivery Testing Feasibility Study Task 6 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Report is covers the completion of the Electric Power Delivery Testing Feasibility Study. The objective of this project was to research, engineer, and demonstrate high-power laboratory testing protocols to accurately reproduce the conditions on the electric power grid representing both normal load switching and abnormalities such as short-circuit fault protection. Test circuits, equipment, and techniques were developed and proven at reduced power levels to determine the feasibility of building a large-scale high-power testing laboratory capable of testing equipment and systems at simulated high-power conditions of the U.S. power grid at distribution levels up through 38 kiloVolts (kV) and transmission levels up through 230 kV. The project delivered demonstrated testing techniques, high-voltage test equipment for load testing and synthetic short-circuit testing, and recommended designs for future implementation of a high-power testing laboratory to test equipment and systems, enabling increased reliability of the electric transmission and distribution grid.

Thomas Tobin

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kilo deca deci" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Development of Strengthened Bundle High Temperature Superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the process of developing high temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cables, it was found that mechanical strength of the superconducting tape is the most crucial property that needs to be improved. It is also desirable to increase the current carrying capacity of the conductor so that fewer layers are needed to make the kilo-amp class cables required for electric utility usage. A process has been developed by encapsulating a stack of Bi-2223/Ag tapes with a silver or non-silver sheath to form a strengthened bundle superconductor. This process was applied to HTS tapes made by the Continuous Tube Forming and Filling (CTFF) technique pursued by Plastronic Inc. and HTS tapes obtained from other manufacturers. Conductors with a bundle of 2 to 6 HTS tapes have been made. The bundled conductor is greatly strengthened by the non-silver sheath. No superconductor degradation as compared to the sum of the original critical currents of the individual tapes was seen on the finished conductors.

Lue, J.W.; Lubell, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Demko, J.A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Tomsic, M. [Plastronic, Inc., Troy, OH (United States); Sinha, U. [Southwire Company, Carollton, GA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Radiation safety considerations for the parasitic Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low intensity electron beam parasitic to the operation of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has been transported through the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) facility making secondary test beams available for users. Photons generated in collimation of the SLC electron and positron beams in the linac pass through a splitter magnet that deflects the primary beams away from the linac axis into the SLC beam lines. These photons are converted to electrons and positrons in a secondary production target located down beam on the linac axis. The secondary electrons are then transported through the FFTB beam line onto experimental detectors. The average power of the parasitic beam is very low, thus, it presents no hazards. However, various accident scenarios involving failure of the splitter magnet and the active protection devices could send much more powerful SLC beams (up to 90 kilo-watts) into this zero-degree secondary beam line. For the accident cases, the average power in the transmitted beam was calculated using the Monte Carlo programs EGS4 and TURTLE. Results from analysis of the radiation protection systems that assure safety during the parasitic operation are presented.

Rokni, S.H.; Iverson, R.H.; Keller, L.P.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Data:Be67027f-f923-4a18-afc1-fbf56b41265b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7027f-f923-4a18-afc1-fbf56b41265b 7027f-f923-4a18-afc1-fbf56b41265b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Otsego Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Single Phase in Excess of 25 kVa Sector: Description: *PPA Charges apply to all rates Your monthly bill may include an item called "PPA" (Purchased Power Adjustment). The PPA charge is the "Fuels Charge" that other utilities pass along as the cost of fuel increases. The wholesale cost for power and energy, as well as the cost for delivering that power and energy over NYSEG's transmission lines, varies from month to month-even from hour to hour. Since this increased cost is not included in OEC's base rate of $.08728 per kilo-watt hour (kWh), we collect those increased costs through the PPA.

184

The distribution and biomagnification of higher brominated \\{BDEs\\} in terrestrial organisms affected by a typical e-waste burning site in South China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Soil, vegetation, and several terrestrial species including turtledove, chicken, goose, grasshopper, dragonfly, butterfly and ant, were collected from an area surrounding a typical e-waste burning site in South China. The samples were examined to investigate the levels, congener profiles, and biomagnification extent of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) that may be present in the environment as a result of the e-waste, which was processed in a crude recycling style. Elevated levels of ?21PBDEs were found in the biota (101–4725 ng g?1 lipid weight (lw)), vegetation leaf (82.9–319 ng g?1 dry weight (dw)) and soil samples (5.2–22 110 ng g?1 dw), indicating that PBDE contamination in the samples collected from the e-waste burning site may pose risks to the local terrestrial ecosystem and local populations. Higher BDE congeners, especially deca-BDE (BDE-209) were the dominant homologs in organisms and nonbiological matrices, followed by nona-BDE and octa-BDE. Biomagnification factors (BMFs) were calculated as the ratio of the lipid-normalized concentration in the predator to that in the prey. The highest BMF (3.4) was determined for BDE-153 in the grasshopper/turtledove food chain. Other higher brominated congeners, such as BDE-202, -203, -154, -183 and -209, were also biomagnified in the terrestrial food chain with \\{BMFs\\} of 1.7–3.3. BDE-47, -100, and -99 were not biomagnified in the examined food chains (BMFs < 1), which suggests that bioaccumulation and biotransformation of \\{PBDEs\\} in terrestrial ecosystems could be distinguished from those in aquatic ecosystems.

Zhiqiang Nie; Shulei Tian; Yajun Tian; Zhenwu Tang; Yi Tao; Qingqi Die; Yanyan Fang; Jie He; Qi Wang; Qifei Huang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

In vitro effects of brominated flame retardants and metabolites on CYP17 catalytic activity: A novel mechanism of action?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fire incidents have decreased significantly over the last 20 years due, in part, to regulations requiring addition of flame retardants (FRs) to consumer products. Five major classes of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are hexabromocyclododecane isomers (HBCDs), tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) and three commercial mixtures of penta-, octa- and deca-polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners, which are used extensively as commercial FR additives. Furthermore, concentrations of PBDEs have been rapidly increasing during the 1999s in human breast milk and a number of endocrine effects have been reported. We used the H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line to assess possible effects of some of these BFRs (PBDEs and several of their hydroxylated (OH) and methoxylated (CH{sub 3}O) metabolites or analogues), TBBPA and brominated phenols (BPs) on the combined 17{alpha}-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase activities of CYP17. CYP17 enzyme catalyzes an important step in sex steroidogenesis and is responsible for the biosynthesis of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione in the adrenals. In order to study possible interactions with BFRs, a novel enzymatic method was developed. The precursor substrate of CYP17, pregnenolone, was added to control and exposed H295R cells, and enzymatic production of DHEA was measured using a radioimmunoassay. In order to avoid pregnenolone metabolism via different pathways, specific chemical inhibitor compounds were used. None of the parent/precursor BFRs had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on CYP17 activity except for BDE-183, which showed significant inhibition of CYP17 activity at the highest concentration tested (10 {mu}M), with no signs of cytotoxicity as measured by mitochondrial toxicity tests (MTT). A strong inhibition of CYP17 activity was found for 6-OH-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromoDE (6-OH-BDE47) with a concentration-dependent decrease of almost 90% at 10 {mu}M, but with a concurrent decrease in cell viability at the higher concentrations. Replacement of the 6-OH group by a 6-CH{sub 3}O group eliminated this cytotoxic effect, but CYP17 activity measured as DHEA production was still significantly inhibited. Other OH- or CH{sub 3}O-PBDE analogues were used to elucidate possible structural properties behind this CYP17 inhibition and associated cytotoxicity, but no distinct structure activity relationship could be determined. These in vitro results indicate that OH and CH{sub 3}O-PBDEs have potential to interfere with CYP17 activity for which the in vivo relevance still has to be adequately determined.

Canton, Rocio F. [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), University of Utrecht, Yalelaan 2, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: r.Fernandezcanton@iras.uu.nl; Sanderson, J. Thomas [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut Armand-Frappier (INRS-IAF), Universite du Quebec, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H9R 1G6 (Canada); Nijmeijer, Sandra [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), University of Utrecht, Yalelaan 2, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bergman, Ake [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Letcher, Robert J. [National Wildlife Research Centre, Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A OH3 (Canada); Berg, Martin van den [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), University of Utrecht, Yalelaan 2, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Stability and support issues in the construction of large span caverns for physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New physics experiments, proposed to study neutrinos and protons, call for the use of large underground particle detectors. In the United States, such detectors would be housed in the US Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL), sited within the footprint of the defunct Homestake Mine, South Dakota. Although the experimental proposals differ in detail, all rely heavily upon the ability of the mined and reinforced rock mass to serve as a stable host for the detector facilities. Experimental proposals, based on the use of Water Cherenkov detector technology, specify rock caverns with excavated volumes in excess of half a million cubic meters, spans of at least 50 m, sited at depths of approximately one to 1.5 kilometers. Although perhaps sited at shallower depth, proposals based on the use of Liquid Argon (LAr) detector technology are no less challenging. LAr proposals not only call for the excavation of large span caverns, but have an additional need for the safe management of large quantities (kilo-tonnes) of cryogenic liquid, including critical provisions for the fail-safe egress of underground personnel and the reliable exhaust of Argon gas in the event of a catastrophic release. These multi-year, high value physics experiments will provide the key experimental data needed to support the research of a new generation of physicists as they probe the behavior of basic particles and the fundamental laws of nature. The rock engineer must deliver caverns that will reliably meet operational requirements and remain stable for periods conservatively estimated to be in excess of twenty years. This paper provides an overview of the DUSEL site conditions and discusses key end-user requirements and design criteria likely to dominate in determining the viability of experimental options. The paper stresses the paramount importance of collecting adequate site-specific data to inform early siting, dimensioning and layout decisions. Given the large-scale of the excavation and likely timeline to construction, the paper also strongly suggests that there are exciting opportunities for the rock mechanics and engineering community to identify and efficiently integrate research components into the design and construction process.

Laughton, C.; /Fermilab

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Combining prior day contours to improve automated prostate segmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To improve the accuracy of automatically segmented prostate, rectum, and bladder contours required for online adaptive therapy. The contouring accuracy on the current image guidance [image guided radiation therapy (IGRT)] scan is improved by combining contours from earlier IGRT scans via the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm. Methods: Six IGRT prostate patients treated with daily kilo-voltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) had their original plan CT and nine CBCTs contoured by the same physician. Three types of automated contours were produced for analysis. (1) Plan: By deformably registering the plan CT to each CBCT and then using the resulting deformation field to morph the plan contours to match the CBCT anatomy. (2) Previous: The contour set drawn by the physician on the previous day CBCT is similarly deformed to match the current CBCT anatomy. (3) STAPLE: The contours drawn by the physician, on each prior CBCT and the plan CT, are deformed to match the CBCT anatomy to produce multiple contour sets. These sets are combined using the STAPLE algorithm into one optimal set. Results: Compared to plan and previous, STAPLE improved the average Dice's coefficient (DC) with the original physician drawn CBCT contours to a DC as follows: Bladder: 0.81 {+-} 0.13, 0.91 {+-} 0.06, and 0.92 {+-} 0.06; Prostate: 0.75 {+-} 0.08, 0.82 {+-} 0.05, and 0.84 {+-} 0.05; and Rectum: 0.79 {+-} 0.06, 0.81 {+-} 0.06, and 0.85 {+-} 0.04, respectively. The STAPLE results are within intraobserver consistency, determined by the physician blindly recontouring a subset of CBCTs. Comparing plans recalculated using the physician and STAPLE contours showed an average disagreement less than 1% for prostate D98 and mean dose, and 5% and 3% for bladder and rectum mean dose, respectively. One scan takes an average of 19 s to contour. Using five scans plus STAPLE takes less than 110 s on a 288 core graphics processor unit. Conclusions: Combining the plan and all prior days via the STAPLE algorithm to produce treatment day contours is superior to the current standard of deforming only the plan contours to the daily CBCT. STAPLE also improves the precision, with a substantial decrease in standard deviation, a key for adaptive therapy. Geometrically and dosimetrically accurate contours can be automatically generated with STAPLE on prostate region kV CBCT in a time scale suitable for online adaptive therapy.

Godley, Andrew; Sheplan Olsen, Lawrence J.; Stephans, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44195 (United States); Zhao Anzi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44195 and Department of Physics, Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called “agents” from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing the focus towards “what to observe” rather than “how to observe” in large sensor networks, allowing the agents to actively determine both the structure of the network and the relevance of the information they are seeking to collect. In addition to providing an implicit coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Outcome Summary: All milestones associated with this project have been completed. In particular, private sensor objective functions were developed which are aligned with the global objective function, sensor effectiveness has been improved by using “sensor teams,” system efficiency has been improved by 30% using difference evaluation func- tions, we have demonstrated system reconfigurability for 20% changes in system con- ditions, we have demonstrated extreme scalability of our proposed algorithm, we have demonstrated that sensor networks can overcome disruptions of up to 20% in network conditions, and have demonstrated system reconfigurability to 20% changes in system conditions in hardware-based simulations. This final report summarizes how each of these milestones was achieved, and gives insight into future research possibilities past the work which has been completed. The following publications support these milestones [6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 18, 19].

Tumer, Kagan

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

130 LPW 1000 Lm Warm White LED for Illumination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An illumination-grade warm-white LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2700 and 3500 K and capable of producing 1000 lm output at over 130 lm/W at room temperature, has been developed in this program. The high-power warm-white LED is an ideal source for use in indoor and outdoor lighting applications. Over the two year period, we have made the following accomplishments: • Developed a low-cost high-power white LED package and commercialized a series of products with CCT ranging from 2700 to 5700 K under the product name LUXEON M; • Demonstrated a record efficacy of 124.8 lm/W at a flux of 1023 lm, CCT of 3435 K and color rendering index (CRI) over 80 at room temperature in the productized package; • Demonstrated a record efficacy of 133.1 lm/W at a flux of 1015 lm, CCT of 3475 K and CRI over 80 at room temperature in an R&D package. The new high-power LED package is a die-on-ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 2 mm2 InGaN pump dice, flip-chip attached to a ceramic submount in a 2x2 array configuration. The submount design utilizes a design approach that combines a high-thermal- conductivity ceramic core for die attach and a low-cost and low-thermal-conductivity ceramic frame for mechanical support and as optical lens carrier. The LED package has a thermal resistance of less than 1.25 K/W. The white LED fabrication also adopts a new batch level (instead of die-by-die) phosphor deposition process with precision layer thickness and composition control, which provides not only tight color control, but also low cost. The efficacy performance goal was achieved through the progress in following key areas: (1) high-efficiency royal blue pump LED development through active region design and epitaxial growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs); (2) improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN-die-level and package-level optical extraction efficiency; and (3) improvement in phosphor system efficiency by improving the lumen equivalent (LE) and phosphor package efficiency (PPE) through improvement in phosphor-package interactions. The high-power warm-white LED product developed has been proven to have good reliability through extensive reliability tests. The new kilo-lumen package has been commercialized under the product name LUXEON M. As of the end of the program, the LUXEON M product has been released in the following CCT/CRI combinations: 3000K/70, 4000K/70, 5000K/70, 5700K/70, 2700K/80, 3000K/80 and 4000K/80. LM-80 tests for the products with CCTs of 4000 K and higher have reached 8500 hours, and per IESNA TM-21-11 have established an L70 lumen maintenance value of >51,000 hours at A drive current and up to 120 °C board temperature.

Soer, Wouter

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

190

Scaling Up: Kilolumen Solid-State Lighting Exceeding 100 LPW via Remote Phosphor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thirty-month project was successful in attaining its ambitious objectives of demonstrating a radically novel 'remote-phosphor' LED light source that can out-perform conventional conformal coated phosphor LED sources. Numerous technical challenges were met with innovative techniques and optical configurations. This product development program for a new generation of solid-state light sources has attained unprecedented luminosity (over 1 kilo-lumen) and efficacy (based on the criterion lumens per 100mw radiant blue). LPI has successfully demonstrated its proprietary technology for optical synthesis of large uniform sources out of the light output of an array of separated LEDs. Numerous multiple blue LEDs illuminate single a phosphor patch. By separating the LEDs from the phosphor, the phosphor and LEDs operate cooler and with higher efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions (from startup to steady state). Other benefits of the system include: better source uniformity, more types of phosphor can be used (chemical interaction and high temperatures are no longer an issue), and the phosphor can be made up from a pre-manufactured sheet (thereby lowering cost and complexity of phosphor deposition). Several laboratory prototypes were built and operated at the expected high performance level. The project fully explored two types of remote phosphor system: transmissive and reflective. The first was found to be well suited for a replacement for A19 type incandescent bulbs, as it was able to replicate the beam pattern of a traditional filament bulb. The second type has the advantages that it is pre-collimate source that has an adjustable color temperature. The project was divided in two phases: Phase I explored a transmissive design and Phase II of the project developed reflective architectures. Additionally, in Phase II the design of a spherical emitting transmissive remote phosphor bulb was developed that is suitable for replacement of A19 and similar light bulbs. In Phase II several new reflective remote phosphor systems were developed and patents applied for. This research included the development of reflective systems in which the short-pass filter operated at a nominal incidence angle of 15{sup o}, a major advancement of this technology. Another goal of the project was to show that it is possible to align multiple optics to multiple LEDs (spaced apart for better thermal management) to within an accuracy in the z-direction of 10 microns or less. This goal was achieved. A further goal was to show it is possible to combine and homogenize the output from multiple LEDs without any flux loss or significant increase in etendue. This goal also was achieved. The following color-coded computer drawing of the Phase 2 reflective remote phosphor prototype gives an idea of the accuracy challenges encountered in such an assembly. The actual setup has less functional clarity due to the numerous items of auxiliary equipment involved. Not only did 10 degrees of freedoms alignment have to be supplied to the LEDs and component prisms as well, but there were also micro-titrating glue dispensers and vacuum hoses. The project also utilized a recently introduced high-index glass, available in small customized prisms. This prototype also embodies a significant advance in thin-film design, by which an unprecedented 98% single-pass efficiency was attained over a 30 degree range of incidence angle (Patents Pending). Such high efficiency is especially important since it applies to the blue light going to the phosphor and then again to the phosphor's light, so that the 'system' efficiency associated with short-pass filter was 95.5%. Other losses have to be kept equally small, towards which a new type of ultra-clear injection-moldable acrylic was discovered and used to make ultra-transparent CPC optics. Several transmissive remote phosphor prototypes were manufactured that could replace screw-in type incandescent bulbs. The CRI of the white light from these prototypes varied from 55 to 93. The system efficiency achieved was between 27 to 29.5

Waqidi Falicoff

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z