National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for kg kilograms km

  1. Cellulosic emissions (kg of pollutant per km2 county area) -...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cellulosic emissions (kg of pollutant per km2 county area) Data reflects projected air emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOX), ammonia (NH3), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur oxide (SOX),...

  2. Cordes Graefe KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy Electricals Ltd BHELEurope Limited JumpAGGraefe KG Jump to:

  3. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2009. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    diselenide (CIGS) thin film solar cell. The company's CIGS material utilizes a flexible substrate that allows), photodetectors, and solar cells, represented 31% of gallium demand. The remaining 2% was used in research in the United States decreased to between $450 and $500 per kilogram. Several records for solar cell efficiency

  4. Performance test report for the 1000 kg melter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-11-01

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the 100 kg melter offgas report on testing performed by GTS Duratek Inc., in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV- 384215. The document contains the complete offgas report on the 100 kg melter as prepared by Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. A summary of this report is also contained in the ``GTS Duratek, Phase 1 Hanford Low-Level Waste Melter Tests: Final Report`` (WHC-SD-VI-027).

  5. Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydagis, Matthew Mark; /Chicago U.

    2010-12-01

    The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

  6. Energiefeld Bayern GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of theClimateElgin,Wind UKEnergiefeld Bayern GmbH Co KG Jump

  7. Nordwind Handels GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon: EnergyNongqishi Electric PowerHandels GmbH Co KG Jump

  8. Fuel 21 GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpAFlex FuelsEnergyInc| OpenFuMA Tech GmbHGmbH Co KG

  9. Windkraft Luhrs GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho)VosslohWestConnecticut:WindLuhrs GmbH Co KG Jump

  10. Property:Dry Mass (kg) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search Property NameDefinition JumpShoreDoes ThisDry Mass (kg)

  11. Fuhrlander Pfleiderer GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy ElectricalsFTL Solar JumpNetworking Name:Pfleiderer GmbH Co KG

  12. Teleportation of entanglement over 143 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Herbst; Thomas Scheidl; Matthias Fink; Johannes Handsteiner; Bernhard Wittmann; Rupert Ursin; Anton Zeilinger

    2015-02-06

    As a direct consequence of the no-cloning theorem, the deterministic amplification as in classical communication is impossible for quantum states. This calls for more advanced techniques in a future global quantum network, e.g. for cloud quantum computing. A unique solution is the teleportation of an entangled state, i.e. entanglement swapping, representing the central resource to relay entanglement between distant nodes. Together with entanglement purification and a quantum memory it constitutes a so-called quantum repeater. Since the aforementioned building blocks have been individually demonstrated in laboratory setups only, the applicability of the required technology in real-world scenarios remained to be proven. Here we present a free-space entanglement-swapping experiment between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife, verifying the presence of quantum entanglement between two previously independent photons separated by 143 km. We obtained an expectation value for the entanglement-witness operator, more than 6 standard deviations beyond the classical limit. By consecutive generation of the two required photon pairs and space-like separation of the relevant measurement events, we also showed the feasibility of the swapping protocol in a long-distance scenario, where the independence of the nodes is highly demanded. Since our results already allow for efficient implementation of entanglement purification, we anticipate our assay to lay the ground for a fully-fledged quantum repeater over a realistic high-loss and even turbulent quantum channel.

  13. Pblico -Principal Meteorologia captou rajadas de 220 km/hora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Público - Principal Meteorologia captou rajadas de 220 km/hora Autor: Lurdes Ferreira Id: 1038362 #12;Público - Principal Meteorologia captou rajadas de 220 km/hora Autor: Lurdes Ferreira Id: 1038350.768,80 EUR #12;Público - Principal Meteorologia captou rajadas de 220 km/hora Autor: Lurdes Ferreira Id

  14. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  15. Status of the KM3NeT project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margiotta, A

    2014-01-01

    KM3NeT is a deep-sea research infrastructure being constructed in the Mediterranean Sea. It will be installed at three sites: KM3NeT-Fr, offshore Toulon, France, KM3NeT-It, offshore Portopalo di Capo Passero, Sicily (Italy) and KM3NeT-Gr, offshore Pylos, Peloponnese, Greece. It will host the next generation Cherenkov neutrino telescope and nodes for a deep sea multidisciplinary observatory, providing oceanographers, marine biologists, and geophysicists with real time measurements. The neutrino telescope will search for Galactic and extra-Galactic sources of neutrinos, complementing IceCube in its field of view. The detector will have a modular structure and consists of six building blocks, each including about one hundred Detection Units (DUs). Each DU will be equipped with 18 multi-PMT digital optical modules. The first phase of construction has started and shore and deep-sea infrastructures hosting the future KM3NeT detector are being prepared in France near Toulon and in Italy, near Capo Passero in Sicily....

  16. GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: 100-kg melter offgas report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)] [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the 100-kg melter offgas report on testing performed by GTS Duratek, Inc., in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The document contains the complete offgas report on the 100-kg melter as prepared by Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. A summary of this report is also contained in the GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford Low-Level Waste Melter Tests: Final Report (WHC-SD-WM-VI-027).

  17. The European Optical Module for Paris, KM-3 electronics meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiebusch, Christopher

    V) Tref optical link single mode (500 Mbd) Control, Ocean cable (30km) String-Controller(SC) Data (Ocean bottom) Sea water return #12;Why 2 di erent OMs in DUMAND II ? JOM and EOM are complementary Currents Voltages HighVoltage #12;The EOM Scintillator Electrical penetrator 432 mm 345 mm Philips XP2600

  18. 4-70C Propane (molar mass = 44.1 kg/kmol) poses a greater fire danger than methane (molar mass = 16 kg/kmol) since propane is heavier than air (molar mass = 29 kg/kmol), and it will settle near the floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    4-36 Ideal Gas 4-70C Propane (molar mass = 44.1 kg/kmol) poses a greater fire danger than methane (molar mass = 16 kg/kmol) since propane is heavier than air (molar mass = 29 kg/kmol), and it will settle

  19. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  20. Finite Future Cosmological Singularity Times and Maximum Predictability Times in a Nonlinear FRW-KG Scalar Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Max Wilson; Keith Andrew

    2012-07-27

    We investigate the relative time scales associated with finite future cosmological singularities, especially those classified as Big Rip cosmologies, and the maximum predictability time of a coupled FRW-KG scalar cosmology with chaotic regimes. Our approach is to show that by starting with a FRW-KG scalar cosmology with a potential that admits an analytical solution resulting in a finite time future singularity there exists a Lyapunov time scale that is earlier than the formation of the singularity. For this singularity both the cosmological scale parameter a(t) and the Hubble parameter H(t) become infinite at a finite future time, the Big Rip time. We compare this time scale to the predictability time scale for a chaotic FRW-KG scalar cosmology. We find that there are cases where the chaotic time scale is earlier than the Big Rip singularity calling for special care in interpreting and predicting the formation of the future cosmological singularity.

  1. Ozone Climatologies Figure 1: Ozone climatology for control run in kg/m(a), percentage change in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Ozone Climatologies (a) (b) (c) Figure 1: Ozone climatology for control run in kg/m³(a), percentage change in ozone for the perturbed runs; tropopause region (b), whole stratosphere (c). Determining the impact of lower stratospheric ozone depletion on Southern Hemisphere climate Sarah P.E. Keeley and Nathan

  2. Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Christopher James; Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Yatsandra; Mayes, Richard T.; Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree; Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana

    2014-08-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, “Complete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent”. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

  3. First Dark Matter Search Results from a 4-kg CF$_3$I Bubble Chamber Operated in a Deep Underground Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behnke, E.; Behnke, J.; Brice, S.J.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Collar, J.I.; Conner, A.; Cooper, P.S.; Crisler, M.; Dahl, C.E.; Fustin, D.; Grace, E.; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2012-04-01

    New data are reported from the operation of a 4.0 kg CF{sub 3}I bubble chamber in the 6800 foot deep SNOLAB underground laboratory. The effectiveness of ultrasound analysis in discriminating alpha decay background events from single nuclear recoils has been confirmed, with a lower bound of >99.3% rejection of alpha decay events. Twenty single nuclear recoil event candidates and three multiple bubble events were observed during a total exposure of 553 kg-days distributed over three different bubble nucleation thresholds. The effective exposure for single bubble recoil-like events was 437.4 kg-days. A neutron background internal to the apparatus, of known origin, is estimated to account for five single nuclear recoil events and is consistent with the observed rate of multiple bubble events. This observation provides world best direct detection constraints on WIMP-proton spin-dependent scattering for WIMP masses >20 GeV/c{sup 2} and demonstrates significant sensitivity for spin-independent interactions.

  4. High rate, long-distance quantum key distribution over 250km of ultra low loss fibres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Stucki; N. Walenta; F. Vannel; R. T. Thew; N. Gisin; H. Zbinden; S. Gray; C. R. Towery; S. Ten

    2009-03-23

    We present a fully automated quantum key distribution prototype running at 625 MHz clock rate. Taking advantage of ultra low loss fibres and low-noise superconducting detectors, we can distribute 6,000 secret bits per second over 100 km and 15 bits per second over 250km.

  5. Simulation for KM3NeT using ANTARES-Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kuch

    2006-06-21

    The KM3NeT project is a common European effort for the design of a km3-scale deep-sea neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean. For the upcoming Design Study simulations have been done using modified ANTARES software. Several concepts and ideas have been tested for their merits and feasibility.

  6. Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) serves as a centralized repository providing a common interface for all D&D related activities.

  7. Distribution of Time-Energy Entanglement over 100 km fiber using superconducting single-photon detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Zhang; Hiroki Takesue; Sae Woo Nam; Carsten Langrock; Xiuping Xie; M. M. Fejer; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2007-12-25

    In this letter, we report an experimental realization of distributing entangled photon pairs over 100 km of dispersion-shifted fiber. In the experiment, we used a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide to generate the time-energy entanglement and superconducting single-photon detectors to detect the photon pairs after 100 km. We also demonstrate that the distributed photon pairs can still be useful for quantum key distribution and other quantum communication tasks.

  8. African elephants are the largest living land animals; a large adult male weighs as much as 6000kg (six metric tonnes).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kram, Rodger

    (mean mass 1542kg). They were trained by their keepers at Zoo Atlanta, Georgia, USA, to wear a loose golf cart (Fig. 1). The mask was connected to a pump mounted on the 629The Journal of Experimental

  9. Penetration Experiments with 6061-T6511 Aluminum Targets and Spherical-Nose Steel Projectiles at Striking Velocities Between 0.5 and 3.0 km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrestal, M.J.; Piekutowski, A.J.

    1999-02-04

    We conducted depth of penetration experiments with 7.11-mm-diameter, 74.7-mm-long, spherical-nose, 4340 steel projectiles launched into 250-mm-diameter, 6061-T6511 aluminum targets. To show the effect of projectile strength, we used projectiles that had average Rockwell harnesses of R{sub c} = 36.6, 39.5, and 46.2. A powder gun and two-stage, light-gas guns launched the 0.023 kg projectiles at striking velocities between 0.5 and 3.0 km/s. Post-test radiographs of the targets showed three response regions as striking velocities increased: (1) the projectiles remained visibly undeformed, (2) the projectiles permanently deformed without erosion, and (3) the projectiles eroded and lost mass. To show the effect of projectile strength, we compared depth-of-penetration data as a function of striking velocity for spherical-nose rods with three Rockwell harnesses at striking velocities ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 km/s. To show the effect of nose shape, we compared penetration data for the spherical-nose projectiles with previously published data for ogive-nose projectiles.

  10. Bottom interacting sound at 50 km range in a deep ocean environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    of acoustic methods in many applications. In this paper acoustic bottom interaction in the deep water LongBottom interacting sound at 50 km range in a deep ocean environment Ilya A. Udovydchenkova) Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole

  11. Aalborg Universitet Full Scale Test on a 100km, 150kV AC Cable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    wind farm Horns Rev 2, located in Denmark west coast, to Denmark's 400 kV transmission network from the electrical measurements on a 99.7 km, 150 kV three-phase AC cable, connecting 215 MW offshore

  12. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (38)K(m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, G. C.; Boisvert, G.; Bricault, P.; Churchman, R.; Dombsky, M.; Lindner, T.; Macdonald, J. A.; Vandervoort, E.; Bishop, S.; D'Auria, J. M.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; Leslie, J. R.; Mak, H. -B.

    2010-01-01

    The half-life of (38)K(m) has been measured to be 924.46(14) ms, a result that is a factor of two more precise than any of the five previous measurements of this quantity. The previous results are not consistent with one another, but our result...

  13. A 3 km atmospheric boundary layer on Titan indicated by dune spacing and Huygens data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudin, Philippe

    Note A 3 km atmospheric boundary layer on Titan indicated by dune spacing and Huygens data Ralph D a b s t r a c t Some 20% of Titan's surface is covered in large linear dunes that resemble parameter limiting the growth of giant dunes, namely the boundary layer thickness (Andreotti et al., 2009

  14. The prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Aharonian, F; Aiello, S; Albert, A; Ameli, F; Anassontzis, E G; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; Avgitas, T; Balasi, K; Band, H; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F; Baret, B; Baron, S; Barrios, J; Belias, A; Berbee, E; Berg, A M van den; Berkien, A; Bertin, V; Beurthey, S; van Beveren, V; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Biagioni, A; Bianucci, S; Billault, M; Birbas, A; Rookhuizen, H Boer; Bormuth, R; Bouché, V; Bouhadef, B; Bourlis, G; Boutonnet, C; Bouwhuis, M; Bozza, C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Cacopardo, G; Caillat, L; Calamai, M; Calvo, D; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Caruso, F; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Cereseto, R; Champion, C; Château, F; Chiarusi, T; Christopoulou, B; Circella, M; Classen, L; Cocimano, R; Coleiro, A; Colonges, S; Coniglione, R; Cosquer, A; Costa, M; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Rosa, G; Deniskina, N; Destelle, J -J; Distefano, C; Di Capua, F; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q; Drakopoulou, E; Drouhin, D; Drury, L; Durand, D; Eberl, T; Elsaesser, D; Enzenhöfer, A; Fermani, P; Fusco, L A; Gajanana, D; Gal, T; Galatà, S; Garufi, F; Gebyehu, M; Giordano, V; Gizani, N; GraciaRuiz, R; Graf, K; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Grmek, A; Habel, R; van Haren, H; Heid, T; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Henry, S; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hevinga, M A; van der Hoek, M; Hofestädt, J; Hogenbirk, J; Hugon, C; Hößl, J; Imbesi, M; James, C W; Jansweijer, P; Jochum, J; de Jong, M; Jongen, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Kappos, E; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Keller, P; Kieft, G; Koffeman, E; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Koopstra, J; Korporaal, A; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Provost, H Le; Leismüller, K P; Leisos, A; Lenis, D; Leonora, E; LindseyClark, M; Alvarez, C D Llorens; Löhner, H; Lonardo, A; Loucatos, S; Louis, F; Maccioni, E; Mannheim, K; Manolopoulos, K; Margiotta, A; Mari?, O; Markou, C; Martínez-Mora, J A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Melis, K W; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C M; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Mos, S; Moudden, Y; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolaou, C; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Orzelli, A; Papaikonomou, A; Papaleo, R; P?v?la?, G E; Peek, H; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Pikounis, K; Popa, V; Pradier, Th; Priede, M; Pühlhofer, G; Pulvirenti, S; Racca, C; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Rapidis, P A; Razis, P; Real, D; Resvanis, L; Reubelt, J; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Santangelo, A; Sapienza, P; Schmelling, J; Schnabel, J; Sciacca, V; Sedita, M; Seitz, T; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Sipala, V; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Stavropoulos, G; Steijger, J; Stolarczyk, T; Stransky, D; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Tézier, D; Théraube, S; Thompson, L F; Timmer, P; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tsirigotis, A; Tzamarias, S; Tzamariudaki, E; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vermeulen, J; Vernin, P; Vicini, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D; Werneke, P; Wiggers, L; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; van Wooning, R H L; Zonca, E; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; Zwart, A

    2015-01-01

    A prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescope has been installed at 3500m depth 80km offshore the Italian coast. KM3NeT in its final configuration will contain several hundreds of detection units. Each detection unit is a mechanical structure anchored to the sea floor, held vertical by a submerged buoy and supporting optical modules for the detection of Cherenkov light emitted by charged secondary particles emerging from neutrino interactions. This prototype string implements three optical modules with 31 photomultiplier tubes each. These optical modules were developed by the KM3NeT Collaboration to enhance the detection capability of neutrino interactions. The prototype detection unit was operated since its deployment in May 2014 until its decommissioning in July 2015. Reconstruction of the particle trajectories from the data requires a nanosecond accuracy in the time calibration. A procedure for relative time calibration of the photomultiplier tubes contained in each optical module is...

  15. ENERGY SPECTRUM OF PRIMARY COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 1017 OBTAINED USING AKENO 20 KM2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OG 6.3-3 ENERGY SPECTRUM OF PRIMARY COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 1017 EV OBTAINED USING AKENO 20 KM2 ARRAY M, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152, Japan . Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica these showers, 60 of them are initiated by primaries with energies larger than 1019 eV. The energy spectrum

  16. Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution. This estimate includes all on-site sources and sinks of carbon Agronomic Feedstock Production and Environmental Impact Analyses ORNL uses high-resolution projections of feedstock production in analyses of soil carbon change, soil erosion, energy use, net

  17. Large-scale (100s km) distributions of tuna larvae (family Scombridae), par-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abundance and fecundity of T. albacares (yellowfin tuna) and K. pelamis (skipjack tuna) in the western. pelamis larvae. Other possible explanations, however, are that previous sampling scales of 100s km between waters (Miller, 1979), and Thunnus spp. and K. pelamis larvae were up to 100 times more concentrated

  18. Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    other cra- tonic settings, such as the Illinois, Paris, and North Sea basins (Heidlauf et al., 1986ABSTRACT Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more corrections and estimates of paleo- bathymetry, we recognize four different styles of subsidence in the basin

  19. Teleporting independent qubits through a 97 km free-space channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Juan; Ren, Ji-Gang; Cao, Yuan; Yong, Hai-Lin; Wu, Yu-Ping; Liu, Chang; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Jiang, Yan; Cai, Xin-Dong; Xu, Ping; Pan, Ge-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Yu; Chen, Yu-Ao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2012-01-01

    With the help of quantum entanglement, quantum communication can be achieved between arbitrarily distant places without passing through intermediate locations by quantum teleportation. In the laboratory, quantum teleportation has been demonstrated over short distance by photonic and atomic qubits. Using fiber links, quantum teleportation has been achieved over kilometer distances. Long distance quantum teleportation is of particular interest and has been one of the holy grails of practical quantum communication. Most recently, quantum teleportation over 16 km free-space link was demonstrated. However, a major restriction in this experiment is that the unknown quantum state cannot directly come from outside. Here, based on an ultra-bright multi-photon entanglement source, we demonstrate quantum teleportation, closely following the original scheme, for any unknown state created outside, between two optical free-space links separated by 97 km. Over a 35-53 dB high-loss quantum channel, an average fidelity of 80....

  20. The prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KM3NeT Collaboration; S. Adrián-Martínez; M. Ageron; F. Aharonian; S. Aiello; A. Albert; F. Ameli; E. G. Anassontzis; M. Anghinolfi; G. Anton; S. Anvar; M. Ardid; T. Avgitas; K. Balasi; H. Band; G. Barbarino; E. Barbarito; F. Barbato; B. Baret; S. Baron; J. Barrios; A. Belias; E. Berbee; A. M. van den Berg; A. Berkien; V. Bertin; S. Beurthey; V. van Beveren; N. Beverini; S. Biagi; A. Biagioni; S. Bianucci; M. Billault; A. Birbas; H. Boer Rookhuizen; R. Bormuth; V. Bouché; B. Bouhadef; G. Bourlis; C. Boutonnet; M. Bouwhuis; C. Bozza; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; G. Cacopardo; L. Caillat; M. Calamai; D. Calvo; A. Capone; L. Caramete; F. Caruso; S. Cecchini; A. Ceres; R. Cereseto; C. Champion; F. Château; T. Chiarusi; B. Christopoulou; M. Circella; L. Classen; R. Cocimano; A. Coleiro; S. Colonges; R. Coniglione; A. Cosquer; M. Costa; P. Coyle; A. Creusot; G. Cuttone; C. D'Amato; A. D'Amico; G. De Bonis; G. De Rosa; N. Deniskina; J. -J. Destelle; C. Distefano; F. Di Capua; C. Donzaud; D. Dornic; Q. Dorosti-Hasankiadeh; E. Drakopoulou; D. Drouhin; L. Drury; D. Durand; T. Eberl; D. Elsaesser; A. Enzenhöfer; P. Fermani; L. A. Fusco; D. Gajanana; T. Gal; S. Galatà; F. Garufi; M. Gebyehu; V. Giordano; N. Gizani; R. GraciaRuiz; K. Graf; R. Grasso; G. Grella; A. Grmek; R. Habel; H. van Haren; T. Heid; A. Heijboer; E. Heine; S. Henry; J. J. Hernández-Rey; B. Herold; M. A. Hevinga; M. van der Hoek; J. Hofestädt; J. Hogenbirk; C. Hugon; J. Hößl; M. Imbesi; C. W. James; P. Jansweijer; J. Jochum; M. de Jong; M. Jongen; M. Kadler; O. Kalekin; A. Kappes; E. Kappos; U. Katz; O. Kavatsyuk; P. Keller; G. Kieft; E. Koffeman; H. Kok; P. Kooijman; J. Koopstra; A. Korporaal; A. Kouchner; I. Kreykenbohm; V. Kulikovskiy; R. Lahmann; P. Lamare; G. Larosa; D. Lattuada; H. Le Provost; K. P. Leismüller; A. Leisos; D. Lenis; E. Leonora; M. LindseyClark; C. D. Llorens Alvarez; H. Löhner; A. Lonardo; S. Loucatos; F. Louis; E. Maccioni; K. Mannheim; K. Manolopoulos; A. Margiotta; O. Mari?; C. Markou; J. A. Martínez-Mora; A. Martini; R. Masullo; K. W. Melis; T. Michael; P. Migliozzi; E. Migneco; A. Miraglia; C. M. Mollo; M. Mongelli; M. Morganti; S. Mos; Y. Moudden; P. Musico; M. Musumeci; C. Nicolaou; C. A. Nicolau; A. Orlando; A. Orzelli; A. Papaikonomou; R. Papaleo; G. E. P?v?la?; H. Peek; C. Pellegrino; M. G. Pellegriti; C. Perrina; P. Piattelli; K. Pikounis; V. Popa; Th. Pradier; M. Priede; G. Pühlhofer; S. Pulvirenti; C. Racca; F. Raffaelli; N. Randazzo; P. A. Rapidis; P. Razis; D. Real; L. Resvanis; J. Reubelt; G. Riccobene; A. Rovelli; M. Saldaña; D. F. E. Samtleben; M. Sanguineti; A. Santangelo; P. Sapienza; J. Schmelling; J. Schnabel; V. Sciacca; M. Sedita; T. Seitz; I. Sgura; F. Simeone; V. Sipala; A. Spitaleri; M. Spurio; G. Stavropoulos; J. Steijger; T. Stolarczyk; D. Stransky; M. Taiuti; G. Terreni; D. Tézier; S. Théraube; L. F. Thompson; P. Timmer; L. Trasatti; A. Trovato; M. Tselengidou; A. Tsirigotis; S. Tzamarias; E. Tzamariudaki; B. Vallage; V. Van Elewyck; J. Vermeulen; P. Vernin; P. Vicini; S. Viola; D. Vivolo; P. Werneke; L. Wiggers; J. Wilms; E. de Wolf; R. H. L. van Wooning; E. Zonca; J. D. Zornoza; J. Zúñiga; A. Zwart

    2015-10-06

    A prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescope has been installed at 3500m depth 80km offshore the Italian coast. KM3NeT in its final configuration will contain several hundreds of detection units. Each detection unit is a mechanical structure anchored to the sea floor, held vertical by a submerged buoy and supporting optical modules for the detection of Cherenkov light emitted by charged secondary particles emerging from neutrino interactions. This prototype string implements three optical modules with 31 photomultiplier tubes each. These optical modules were developed by the KM3NeT Collaboration to enhance the detection capability of neutrino interactions. The prototype detection unit was operated since its deployment in May 2014 until its decommissioning in July 2015. Reconstruction of the particle trajectories from the data requires a nanosecond accuracy in the time calibration. A procedure for relative time calibration of the photomultiplier tubes contained in each optical module is described. This procedure is based on the measured coincidences produced in the sea by the 40K background light and can easily be expanded to a detector with several thousands of optical modules. The time offsets between the different optical modules are obtained using LED nanobeacons mounted inside them. A set of data corresponding to 600 hours of livetime was analysed. The results show good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations of the expected optical background and the signal from atmospheric muons. An almost background-free sample of muons was selected by filtering the time correlated signals on all the three optical modules. The zenith angle of the selected muons was reconstructed with a precision of about 3{\\deg}.

  1. Hydrodynamic simulations of a combined hydrogen, helium thermonuclear runaway on a 10-km neutron star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J.W.; Sparks, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    We have used a Lagrangian, hydrodynamic stellar-evolution computer code to evolve a thermonuclear runaway in the accreted hydrogen rich envelope of a 1.0M, 10-km neutron star. Our simulation produced an outburst which lasted about 2000 sec and peak effective temperature was 3 keV. The peak luminosity exceeded 2 x 10/sup 5/ L. A shock wave caused a precursor in the light curve which lasted 10/sup -5/ sec.

  2. The KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margiotta, Annarita

    2014-01-01

    KM3NeT is a deep-sea research infrastructure being constructed in the Mediterranean Sea. It will host the next generation Cherenkov neutrino telescope and nodes for a deep sea multidisciplinary observatory, providing oceanographers, marine biologists, and geophysicists with real time measurements. The neutrino telescope will complement IceCube in its field of view and exceed it substantially in sensitivity. Its main goal is the detection of high energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. The detector will have a modular structure with six building blocks, each consisting of about one hundred Detection Units (DUs). Each DU will be equipped with 18 multi-PMT digital optical modules. The first phase of construction has started and shore and deep-sea infrastructures hosting the future KM3NeT detector are being prepared offshore Toulon, France and offshore Capo Passero on Sicily, Italy. The technological solutions for the neutrino detector of KM3NeT and the expected performance of the neutrino telescope are present...

  3. Predicted Radiation Output from Several Kilograms of Plutonium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cycle & Fuel Materials(11); Nuclear Physics & Radiation Physics(73) radiation output, passive signature, plutonium oxide Word Cloud More Like This Full Text File size NAView Full...

  4. Predicted Radiation Output from Several Kilograms of Plutonium Oxide

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding accessusers'(x≤2) surface: A

  5. Predicted Radiation Output from Several Kilograms of Plutonium Oxide

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding accessusers'(x≤2) surface: A(Technical Report) | SciTech

  6. Mean zonal acceleration and heating of the 70- to 100-km region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyahara, S.; Portnyagin, Yu.I.; Forbes, J.M. (Boston Univ., MA (USA)); Solovjeva, T.V. (Inst. for Experimental Meteorology, Obninsk (USSR))

    1991-02-01

    The dynamical interactions which occur in the atmospheric region around the mesopause ({approximately} 90 km) determine the boundary characteristics for the thermospheric region above. In the present work, using an empirical model of Eulerian-mean meridional motions based on monthly climatological winds from these radar data, the net vertical motions in this atmospheric regime are derived from the continuity equation. Assuming empirical prescriptions of the mean density and temperature fields, mean heat flux divergences and momentum flux divergences are estimated which exhibit very specific characteristics in the height versus latitude domain for winter, summer, and equinox conditions in both hemispheres. A numerical circulation model including gravity wave/mean flow and tide/mean flow interactions is utilized to examine possible origins of these heat and acceleration sources. At low latitudes ({le}30{degree}), it is evident that atmospheric tides represent the primary wave source contribution to zonal mean acceleration and heating of this region of the atmosphere; similarly, at middle and high latitudes ({ge}30{degree}) below about 90 km, dissipation of vertically propagating gravity waves appears to provide the dominant momentum source for the mean zonal circulation. However, above approximately 90 km and between about 40{degree} and 70{degree} latitude, very significant regions of mean heating and acceleration exist which are not accounted for by the effects of vertically propagating gravity waves and tides. The possible origins of these effects are examined. The authors suggest that the two most likely candidates to explain these observed features are (1) obliquely propagating gravity waves and/or (2) planetary scale waves.

  7. KM3NeT: A Next Generation Neutrino Telescope in the Mediterranean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kappes; for the KM3NeT Consortium

    2007-11-05

    To complement the IceCube neutrino telescope currently under construction at the South Pole, the three Mediterranean neutrino telescope projects ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR have joined forces to develop, construct and operate a km^3-scale neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Since February 2006, the technical specifications and performance of such a detector are studied in the framework of a 3-year EU-funded Design Study. In 2009 a technical design report will be released laying the foundations for the construction of the detector. In the following, the current status of the Design Study is presented and examples of solutions for the technical challenges are discussed.

  8. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Thornton, Michele M [ORNL; Mayer, Benjamin W [ORNL; Wilhelmi, Nate [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Devarakonda, Ranjeet [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    More information: http://daymet.ornl.gov Presenter: Ranjeet Devarakonda Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data and Climatological Summaries provides gridded estimates of daily weather parameters for North America, including daily continuous surfaces of minimum and maximum temperature, precipitation occurrence and amount, humidity, shortwave radiation, snow water equivalent, and day length. The current data product (Version 2) covers the period January 1, 1980 to December 31, 2013 [1]. The prior product (Version 1) only covered from 1980-2008. Data are available on a daily time step at a 1-km x 1-km spatial resolution in Lambert Conformal Conic projection with a spatial extent that covers the conterminous United States, Mexico, and Southern Canada as meteorological station density allows. Daymet data can be downloaded from 1) the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) search and order tools (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/cart/add2cart.pl?add=1219) or directly from the DAAC FTP site (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/dsviewer.pl?ds_id=1219) and 2) the Single Pixel Tool [2] and THREDDS (Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services) Data Server [3]. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool allows users to enter a single geographic point by latitude and longitude in decimal degrees. A routine is executed that translates the (lon, lat) coordinates into projected Daymet (x,y) coordinates. These coordinates are used to access the Daymet database of daily-interpolated surface weather variables. Daily data from the nearest 1 km x 1 km Daymet grid cell are extracted from the database and formatted as a table with one column for each Daymet variable and one row for each day. All daily data for selected years are returned as a single (long) table, formatted for display in the browser window. At the top of this table is a link to the same data in a simple comma-separated text format, suitable for import into a spreadsheet or other data analysis software. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool also provides the option to download multiple coordinates programmatically. A multiple extractor script is freely available to download at http://daymet.ornl.gov/files/daymet.zip. The ORNL DAAC s THREDDS data server (TDS) provides customized visualization and access to Daymet time series of North American mosaics. Users can subset and download Daymet data via a variety of community standards, including OPeNDAP, NetCDF Subset service, and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map/Coverage Service. The ORNL DAAC TDS also exposes Daymet metadata through its ncISO service to facilitate harvesting Daymet metadata records into 3rd party catalogs. References: [1] Thornton, P.E., M.M. Thornton, B.W. Mayer, N. Wilhelmi, Y. Wei, R. Devarakonda, and R.B. Cook. 2014. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2. Data set. Available on-line [http://daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. [2] Devarakonda R., et al. 2012. Daymet: Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.go/singlepixel.html]. [3] Wei Y., et al. 2014. Daymet: Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.gov/thredds_tiles.html].

  9. KG Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder atHills,New York:Just Hot ResourcesEnergy Jump to:KATKEM

  10. Understanding internal backgrounds of NaI(Tl) crystals toward a 200~kg array for the KIMS-NaI experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adhikari, P; Choi, S; Ha, C; Hahn, I S; Jeon, E J; Joo, H W; Kang, W G; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, K W; Kim, N Y; Kim, S K; Kim, Y D; Kim, Y H; Lee, H S; Lee, J H; Lee, M H; Leonard, D S; Li, J; Oh, S Y; Olsen, S L; Park, H K; Park, H S; Park, K S; So, J H; Yoon, Y S

    2015-01-01

    The Korea Invisible Mass Search (KIMS) collaboration has developed low-background NaI(Tl) crystals that are suitable for the direct detection of WIMP dark matter. With experience built on the KIMS-CsI programs, the KIMS-NaI experiment will consist of a 200~kg NaI(Tl) crystal array surrounded by layers of shielding structures and will be operated at the Yangyang underground laboratory. The goal is to provide an unambiguous test of the DAMA/LIBRA's annual modulation signature. Measurements of six prototype crystals show progress in the reduction of internal contaminations of radioisotopes. Based on our understanding of these measurements, we expect to achieve a background level in the final detector configuration that is less than 1~count/day/keV/kg for recoil energies around 2~keV. The annual modulation sensitivity for the KIMS-NaI experiment shows that an unambiguous 7$\\sigma$ test of the DAMA/LIBRA signature would be possible with a 600~kg$\\cdot$year exposure with this system.

  11. Deep sea tests of a prototype of the KM3NeT digital optical module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Aharonian, F; Aiello, S; Albert, A; Ameli, F; Anassontzis, E G; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; de Asmundis, R; Band, H; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F; Baret, B; Baron, S; Belias, A; Berbee, E; Berg, A M van den; Berkien, A; Bertin, V; Beurthey, S; van Beveren, V; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Bianucci, S; Billault, M; Birbas, A; Rookhuizen, H Boer; Bormuth, R; Bouche, V; Bouhadef, B; Bourlis, G; Bouwhuis, M; Bozza, C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Cacopardo, G; Caillat, L; Calamai, M; Calvo, D; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Caruso, F; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Cereseto, R; Champion, C; Chateau, F; Chiarusi, T; Christopoulou, B; Circella, M; Classen, L; Cocimano, R; Colonges, S; Coniglione, R; Cosquer, A; Costa, M; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Curtil, C; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Rosa, G; Deniskina, N; Destelle, J -J; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q; Drakopoulou7, E; Drouhin, D; Drury, L; Durand, D; Eberl, T; Eleftheriadis, C; Elsaesser, D; Enzenhofer, A; Fermani, P; Fusco, L A; Gajana, D; Gal, T; Galata, S; Gallo, F; Garufi, F; Gebyehu, M; Giordano, V; Gizani, N; Ruiz, R Gracia; Graf, K; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Grmek, A; Habel, R; van Haren, H; Heid, T; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Henry, S; Hernandez-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hevinga, M A; van der Hoek, M; Hofestadt, J; Hogenbirk, J; Hugon, C; Hosl, J; Imbesi, M; James, C; Jansweijer, P; Jochum, J; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Kappos, E; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Keller, P; Kieft, G; Koffeman, E; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Koopstra, J; Korporaal, A; Kouchner, A; Koutsoukos, S; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Provost, H Le; Leisos, A; Lenis, D; Leonora, E; Clark, M Lindsey; Liolios, A; Alvarez, C D Llorens; Lohner, H; Presti, D Lo; Louis, F; Maccioni, E; Mannheim, K; Manolopoulos, K; Margiotta, A; Maris, O; Markou, C; Martinez-Mora, J A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Mos, S; Moudden, Y; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolaou, C; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Orzelli, A; Papageorgiou, K; Papaikonomou, A; Papaleo, R; Pavalas, G E; Peek, H; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Petridou, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, Th; Priede, M; Puhlhofer, G; Pulvirenti, S; Racca, C; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Rapidis, P A; Razis, P; Real, D; Resvanis, L; Reubelt, J; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Royon, J; Saldana, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Santangelo, A; Sapienza, P; Savvidis, I; Schmelling, J; Schnabel, J; Sedita, M; Seitz, T; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Siotis, I; Sipala, V; Solazzo, M; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J; Stolarczyk, T; Stransky, D; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Tezier, D; Theraube, S; Thompson, L F; Timmer, P; Trapierakis, H I; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tsirigotis, A; Tzamarias, S; Tzamariudaki, E; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vermeulen, J; Vernin, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D; Werneke, P; Wiggers, L; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; van Wooning, R H L; Yatkin, K; Zachariadou, K; Zonca, E; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; Zwart, A

    2014-01-01

    The first prototype of a photo-detection unit of the future KM3NeT neutrino telescope has been deployed in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This digital optical module has a novel design with a very large photocathode area segmented by the use of 31 three inch photomultiplier tubes. It has been integrated in the ANTARES detector for in-situ testing and validation. This paper reports on the first months of data taking and rate measurements. The analysis results highlight the capabilities of the new module design in terms of background suppression and signal recognition. The directionality of the optical module enables the recognition of multiple Cherenkov photons from the same $^{40}$K decay and the localization bioluminescent activity in the neighbourhood. The single unit can cleanly identify atmospheric muons and provide sensitivity to the muon arrival directions.

  12. Radiation damage of polyethylene exposed in the stratosphere at an altitude of 40 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Bilek, Marcela

    2011-01-01

    Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) films were exposed at an altitude of 40 km over a 3 day NASA stratospheric balloon mission from Alice Springs, Australia. The radiation damage, oxidation and nitration in the LDPE films exposed in stratosphere were measured using ESR, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy. The results were compared with those from samples stored on the ground and exposed in a laboratory plasma. The types of free radicals, unsaturated hydrocarbon groups, oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing groups in LDPE film exposed in the stratosphere and at the Earth's surface are different. The radiation damage in films exposed in the stratosphere are observed in the entire film due to the penetration of high energy cosmic rays through their thickness, while the radiation damage in films exposed on the ground is caused by sunlight penetrating into only a thin surface layer. A similarly thin layer of the film is damaged by exposure to plasma due to the low energy of the plasma particles. The intensity of oxidation ...

  13. Proposal of a new generation of Laser Beacon for time calibration in the KM3NeT neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Real, Diego [IFIC, Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, C Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The KM3NeT collaboration aims at the construction of a multi-km3 high-energy neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea consisting of a matrix of pressure resistant glass spheres holding each a set (31) of small area photomultipliers. The main motivation of the telescope is to observe cosmic neutrinos through the Cherenkov light induced in sea water by charged particles produced in neutrino interactions with the surrounding medium. A relative time calibration between photomultipliers of the order of 1 ns is required to achieve an optimal performance. To this end, several time calibration subsystems have been developed. In this article, the proposal of a last generation Laser Beacon, to be used in KM3NeT and developed to measure and monitor the relative time offsets between photomultipliers, is presented.

  14. Brillouin optical time-domain analysis over a 240 km-long fiber loop with no repeater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Brillouin optical time-domain analysis over a 240 km-long fiber loop with no repeater Xabier Angulo.angulo@io.cfmac.csic.es; phone +34 915618806 ext.:222 ABSTRACT In this paper we combine the use of optical pulse coding and seeded second-order Raman amplification to extend the sensing distance of Brillouin optical time

  15. Directed aerial robot explorers for planetary exploration A.A. Pankine a,*, K.M. Aaron a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    Directed aerial robot explorers for planetary exploration A.A. Pankine a,*, K.M. Aaron a , M architecture relies upon the use of Directed Aerial Robot Explorers (DAREs), which essentially are long. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Scientific ballooning; Direct Aerial Robot

  16. Evidence from P-to-S mantle converted waves for a flat b660-kmQ discontinuity beneath Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Evidence from P-to-S mantle converted waves for a flat b660-kmQ discontinuity beneath Iceland Z. Du; accepted 19 September 2005 Available online 22 November 2005 Editor: R.D. van der Hilst Abstract Iceland discontinuity beneath central Iceland is shallow relative to peripheral regions and this was interpreted

  17. Iceberg size and orientation estimation using SeaWinds K.M. Stuart, D.G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Iceberg size and orientation estimation using SeaWinds K.M. Stuart, D.G. Long Microwave Earth but are unable to penetrate cloud cover and are dependent on solar illumination. Despite the high University's Microwave Earth Remote Sensing (MERS) Laboratory. These floating glacial ice fragments

  18. Test Results of a 1.2 kg/s Centrifugal Liquid Helium Pump for the ATLAS Superconducting Toroid Magnet System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pengo, R; Passardi, Giorgio; Pirotte, O; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The toroid superconducting magnet of ATLAS-LHC experiment at CERN will be indirectly cooled by means of forced flow of liquid helium at about 4.5 K. A centrifugal pump will be used, providing a mass flow of 1.2 kg/s and a differential pressure of 40 kPa (ca. 400 mbar) at about 4300 rpm. Two pumps are foreseen, one for redundancy, in order to feed in parallel the cooling circuits of the Barrel and the two End-Caps toroid magnets. The paper describes the tests carried out at CERN to measure the characteristic curves, i.e. the head versus the mass flow at different rotational speeds, as well as the pump total efficiency. The pump is of the "fullemission" type, i.e. with curved blades and it is equipped with an exchangeable inducer. A dedicated pump test facility has been constructed at CERN, which includes a Coriolis-type liquid helium mass flow meter. This facility is connected to the helium refrigerator used for the tests at CERN of the racetrack magnets of the Barrel and of the End-Cap toroids.

  19. Research, development and demonstration of lead-acid batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979. [165 Ah, 36. 5 Wh/kg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodamer, G.W.; Branca, G.C.; Cash, H.R.; Chrastina, J.R.; Yurick, E.M.

    1980-06-01

    Progress during the 1979 fiscal year is reported. All the tooling and capital equipment required for the pilot line production has been installed. A limited amount of plate production has been realized. A highly automated and versatile testing facility was established. The fabrication and testing of the initial calculated design is discussed. Cell component adjustments and the trade-offs associated with those changes are presented. Cells are being evaluated at the 3-hour rate. They have a capacity of 165 Ah and an energy density of 36.5 Wh/kg, and have completed 105 cycles to date. Experimental results being pursued under the advanced battery development program to enhance energy density and cycle life are presented. Data on the effects of different electrolyte specific gravity, separators, retainers, paste densities, battery additives and grid alloy composition on battery performance are presented and evaluated. Advanced battery prototype cells are under construction. Quality Assurance activities are summarized. They include monitoring the cell and battery fabrication and testing operations as well as all relevant documentation procedures. 12 figures, 28 tables.

  20. by the ratio of biogas production to organic matter input : 0.20 to 0.3 M3/kg organic When considering the period of steady operation, i.e. without technical problems such

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by the ratio of biogas production to organic matter input : 0.20 to 0.3 M3/kg organic matter. When produced and mainly cor- responded to the heating of fresh manure. Selfconsumption was all the larger

  1. PTG 2010PTG 2010 i i 33 P blP bl 55PTG 2010PTG 2010 vningvning 33 ProblemProblem 55 2 kg of steam at a pressure of 1 bar are contained in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    PTG 2010PTG 2010 ö iö i 33 P blP bl 55PTG 2010PTG 2010 övningövning 33 ProblemProblem 55 2 kg the internal pressure reaches 10 kPa, the tank walls will collapsewill collapse. a) Sketch a p-v diagram University - TkF Heat Engineering - 20500 Turku Finland 1 2 P blP bl 55ProblemProblem 55 Givet: ( )2 2 kg

  2. Equation of State Measurements of Materials Using a Three-Stage Gun to Impact Velocities of 11km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REINHART,WILLIAM D.; CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; CARROLL,DANIEL E.; THORNHILL,T.G.; WINFREE,N.A.

    2000-09-26

    Understanding high pressure behavior of homogeneous as well as heterogeneous materials is necessary in order to address the physical processes associated with hypervelocity impact events related to space science applications including orbital debris impact and impact lethality. At very high impact velocities, material properties will be subjugated to phase-changes, such as melting and vaporization. These phase states cannot be obtained through conventional gun technology. These processes need to be represented accurately in hydrodynamic codes to allow credible computational analysis of impact events resulting from hypervelocity impact. In this paper, techniques that are being developed and implemented to obtain the needed shock loading parameters (Hugoniot states) for material characterization studies, namely shock velocity and particle velocity, will be described at impact velocities up to 11 km/s. What is new in this report is that these techniques are being implemented for use at engagement velocities never before attained utilizing two-stage light-gas gun technology.

  3. Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in 1500 km^3 of Sea Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoko Kurahashi; Justin Vandenbroucke; Giorgio Gratta

    2010-07-30

    An underwater acoustic sensor array spanning ~1500 km^3 is used to search for cosmic-ray neutrinos of ultra-high energies (UHE, E > 10^18 eV). Approximately 328 million triggers accumulated over an integrated 130 days of data taking are analysed. The sensitivity of the experiment is determined from a Monte Carlo simulation of the array using recorded noise conditions and expected waveforms. Two events are found to have properties compatible with showers in the energy range 10^24 to 5x10^24 eV and 10^22 to 5x10^22 eV. Since the understanding of impulsive backgrounds is limited, a flux upper limit is set providing the most sensitive limit on UHE neutrinos using the acoustic technique.

  4. Design of the high-speed framing, FEC, and interleaving hardware used in a 5.4km free-space optical communication experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, Joseph Anthony, Jr.

    The forward error correction (FEC) and interleaver realizations used in a 5.4 km horizontal-path link experiment incorporated several unique elements that were specifically tailored to address turbulence-induced fading. ...

  5. Location of the M 2.0 Earthquake on 08/22/2010 that Occurred 25 km North of West Valley, New York.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Location of the M 2.0 Earthquake on 08/22/2010 that Occurred 25 km North of West Valley, New York at 16:41:47 (UTC) about 25 km north of West Valley, New York. There were no felt reports by residents and their distribution is plotted in Figure 2. 22 August 2010, Md 2.0 Earthquake 15 miles north of West Valley, NY -78

  6. Extension of the operating parameters of the two stage light gas gun to velocities below 2 km/sec.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoe, R S

    2007-08-28

    The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Facility (JASPER) located in area 27 at the Nevada Test Site Has been tasked with providing high accuracy information on the Equation Of State (EOS) and other dynamic properties of weapons grade plutonium and other actinides important to the stockpile stewardship program. In the past 5 years this facility has provided dozens of experimental data points for the accurate determination of pressure density relationship for these materials over a broad pressure range. In order to complete this survey it is necessary to extend the low pressure region to include projectile velocities below 2 km/s. For most gas gun facilities this would present not too great a difficulty, one could simply decrease the amount of propellant along with a decrease in the strength of the petal valve, However JASPER requires that the piston be securely embedded in the Acceleration Reservoir (AR) as part of the containment system. The projectile must remain flat and undistorted. This requirement makes the attainment of slow velocities problematic. This talk will discuss the JASPER Facility, A finite difference code developed to give predictive capability for two stage gas guns, and a set of experiments performed to demonstrate this capability.

  7. Assessment of the 60 km rapid update cycle (RUC) with near real-time aircraft reports. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.E.; Richard, C.; Kim, S.; Bailey, D.

    1998-07-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the Center-TRA-CON Advisory System (CTAS), a set of Air Traffic Management (ATM) Decision Support Tools (DST) for en route (Center) and terminal (TRACON) airspace designed to enable controllers to increase capacity and flight efficiency. A crucial component of the CTAS, or any ATM DST, is the computation of the time-of-flight of aircraft along flight path segments. Earlier NASA studies show that accurate knowledge of the wind through which the aircraft are flying is required to estimate time-of-flight accurately. There are current envisioned to be two sources of wind data for CTAS: The Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) for the Center airspace, a numerical model developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Forecast System Laboratory (FSL) and run operationally by the National Weather Service (NWS) National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP); and The Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) Terminal Winds (TW) for the TRACON airspace, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory under funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This study has three goals: (1) determine the errors in the baseline 60 km resolution RUC forecast wind fields relative to the needs of en route DSTs such as CTAS, (2) determine the benefit of using the TW algorithm to refine the RUC forecast wind fields with near real-time Meteorological Data Collection and Reporting System (MDCRS) reports, and (3) identify factors that influence wind errors in order to improve accuracy and estimate errors in real time.

  8. A nonsteady one-dimensional theoretical model of Mars' neutral atmospheric composition between 30 and 200 km

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigo, R.; Garcia-Alvarez, E.; Lopez-Gonzalez, M.J.; Lopez-Moreno, J.J. (Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Granada (Spain))

    1990-08-30

    There has been a big advance in the knowledge of the composition of the atmosphere of the planet Mars since its exploration by different missions in the 1970s, and this will be deeply increased in the following years as the upcoming programs to Mars develop. In this context, the authors have elaborated a model of the Mars' neutral atmosphere including the following compounds: O({sup 3}P), O({sup 1}D), O{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, H, H{sub 2}, OH, H{sub 2}O, HO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2}, between 30 and 200 km of altitude. The model is carried out for middle latitudes in equinox conditions and with moderate solar activity and provides the day-to-night evolution of the atmosphere. The scarcity of observations corresponding to the nightside of the planet has made it necessary to calculate the atmospheric temperature profile based on the available observations and on theoretical estimations. The model includes a detailed treatment of both the photochemical and the dynamical processes. In this sense, the most recent values of the reaction rates and photodissociation cross sections have been used, and a new height profile of the eddy diffusion coefficient has been computed which is able to explain the vertical distribution of carbon monoxide. The concentration profiles obtained show, in general, a very good agreement with the available experimental measurements.

  9. Mulching as a countermeasure for crop contamination within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yera, T.S.; Vallejo, R.; Tent, J.; Rauret, G. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain); Omelyanenko, N.; Ivanov, Y. [Ukrainian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1999-03-15

    The effect of mulch soil cover on crop contamination by {sup 137}Cs was studied within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Experiments were performed with oats (Avena sativa) over a three year period. In 1992 soil surface was covered by a plastic net. In 1993 two straw mulch treatments were applied at a dose rate of 200 g m{sup {minus}2} using {sup 137}Cs contaminated and clean straw, respectively. A similar mulch treatment was applied in 1994, and two mulch doses of clean straw were tested. Protection of the soil with a plastic net significantly increased crop yield and reduced crop contamination. When clean straw was used as a mulch layer, a significant decrease of about 30--40% in {sup 137}Cs activity concentration was observed. Mulching with {sup 137}Cs contaminated straw did not reduce crop contamination, probably due to an increase in soil available {sup 137}Cs released from the contaminated mulch. Mulching has been shown to be an effective treatment both for reducing {sup 137}Cs plant contamination and improving crop yield. Therefore, it can be considered as a potential countermeasure in a post-accident situation.

  10. Leitner Hubert KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervarLeeds, United Kingdom: Energy Resources Jump

  11. fed ad libitum until slaughter at 2 kg live weight, as either pellets, mash (60 p. 100 meal, 4o p. 100 water) or meal in a 2 X3factorial design with 4 replicates.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    fed ad libitum until slaughter at 2 kg live weight, as either pellets, mash (60 p. 100 meal, 4o p week period for 8 M /D mash and meal diets were - 0.264 and — 6.218 g DI,G on 8 M /D pellets 12 M/D pellets, mash and meal were 33.10, 27.90 and z6.si g, respectively (SED ± 2.321 g

  12. Twelve-month, 12 km resolution North American WRF-Chem v3.4 air quality simulation: performance evaluation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tessum, C. W.; Hill, J. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2014-12-02

    We present results from and evaluate the performance of a 12 month, 12 km horizontal resolution air pollution simulation for the contiguous United States using the WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) meteorology and chemical transport model (CTM). We employ the 2005 US National Emissions Inventory, the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM), and the Modal Aerosol Dynamics Model for Europe (MADE) with a Volatility Basis Set (VBS) secondary aerosol module. Overall, model performance is comparable to contemporary models used for regulatory and health-effects analysis, with an annual average daytime ozone (O3) mean fractional bias (MFB) of 12% and anmore »annual average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) MFB of ?1%. WRF-Chem, as configured here, tends to overpredict total PM2.5 at some high concentration locations, and generally overpredicts average 24 h O3 concentrations, with better performance at predicting average daytime and daily peak O3 concentrations. Predictive performance for PM2.5 subspecies is mixed: the model overpredicts particulate sulfate (MFB = 65%), underpredicts particulate nitrate (MFB = ?110%) and organic carbon (MFB = ?65%), and relatively accurately predicts particulate ammonium (MFB = 3%) and elemental carbon (MFB = 3%), so that the accuracy in total PM2.5 predictions is to some extent a function of offsetting over- and underpredictions of PM2.5 subspecies. Model predictive performance for PM2.5 and its subspecies is in general worse in winter and in the western US than in other seasons and regions, suggesting spatial and temporal opportunities for future WRF-Chem model development and evaluation.« less

  13. Experimental loophole-free violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electron spins separated by 1.3 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Hensen; H. Bernien; A. E. Dréau; A. Reiserer; N. Kalb; M. S. Blok; J. Ruitenberg; R. F. L. Vermeulen; R. N. Schouten; C. Abellán; W. Amaya; V. Pruneri; M. W. Mitchell; M. Markham; D. J. Twitchen; D. Elkouss; S. Wehner; T. H. Taminiau; R. Hanson

    2015-08-24

    For more than 80 years, the counterintuitive predictions of quantum theory have stimulated debate about the nature of reality. In his seminal work, John Bell proved that no theory of nature that obeys locality and realism can reproduce all the predictions of quantum theory. Bell showed that in any local realist theory the correlations between distant measurements satisfy an inequality and, moreover, that this inequality can be violated according to quantum theory. This provided a recipe for experimental tests of the fundamental principles underlying the laws of nature. In the past decades, numerous ingenious Bell inequality tests have been reported. However, because of experimental limitations, all experiments to date required additional assumptions to obtain a contradiction with local realism, resulting in loopholes. Here we report on a Bell experiment that is free of any such additional assumption and thus directly tests the principles underlying Bell's inequality. We employ an event-ready scheme that enables the generation of high-fidelity entanglement between distant electron spins. Efficient spin readout avoids the fair sampling assumption (detection loophole), while the use of fast random basis selection and readout combined with a spatial separation of 1.3 km ensure the required locality conditions. We perform 245 trials testing the CHSH-Bell inequality $S \\leq 2$ and find $S = 2.42 \\pm 0.20$. A null hypothesis test yields a probability of $p = 0.039$ that a local-realist model for space-like separated sites produces data with a violation at least as large as observed, even when allowing for memory in the devices. This result rules out large classes of local realist theories, and paves the way for implementing device-independent quantum-secure communication and randomness certification.

  14. Twelve-month, 12 km resolution North American WRF-Chem v3.4 air quality simulation: performance evaluation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tessum, C. W.; Hill, J. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2015-04-07

    We present results from and evaluate the performance of a 12-month, 12 km horizontal resolution year 2005 air pollution simulation for the contiguous United States using the WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) meteorology and chemical transport model (CTM). We employ the 2005 US National Emissions Inventory, the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM), and the Modal Aerosol Dynamics Model for Europe (MADE) with a volatility basis set (VBS) secondary aerosol module. Overall, model performance is comparable to contemporary modeling efforts used for regulatory and health-effects analysis, with an annual average daytime ozone (O3) mean fractional bias (MFB) of 12%more »and an annual average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) MFB of ?1%. WRF-Chem, as configured here, tends to overpredict total PM2.5 at some high concentration locations and generally overpredicts average 24 h O3 concentrations. Performance is better at predicting daytime-average and daily peak O3 concentrations, which are more relevant for regulatory and health effects analyses relative to annual average values. Predictive performance for PM2.5 subspecies is mixed: the model overpredicts particulate sulfate (MFB = 36%), underpredicts particulate nitrate (MFB = ?110%) and organic carbon (MFB = ?29%), and relatively accurately predicts particulate ammonium (MFB = 3%) and elemental carbon (MFB = 3%), so that the accuracy in total PM2.5 predictions is to some extent a function of offsetting over- and underpredictions of PM2.5 subspecies. Model predictive performance for PM2.5 and its subspecies is in general worse in winter and in the western US than in other seasons and regions, suggesting spatial and temporal opportunities for future WRF-Chem model development and evaluation.« less

  15. Milestone Report - Demonstrate Braided Material with 3.5 g U/kg Sorption Capacity under Seawater Testing Condition (Milestone M2FT-15OR0310041 - 1/30/2015)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Christopher James; Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Yatsandra; Mayes, Richard T; Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana

    2015-01-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-15OR0310041 (1/30/2015) entitled, Demonstrate braided material with 3.5 g U/kg sorption capacity under seawater testing condition . This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent braided materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed four braided fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 3.5 g U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. The braided adsorbents were synthesized by braiding or leno weaving high surface area polyethylene fibers and conducting radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile monomers onto the braided materials followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. The four braided adsorbents demonstrated capacity values ranging from 3.7 to 4.2 g U/kg adsorbent after 56 days of exposure in natural coastal seawater at 20 oC. All data are normalized to a salinity of 35 psu.

  16. Expedition to the 30-km Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and the Utilization of its Experience in Education and Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aszodi, Attila; Yamaji, Bogdan [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 1521 Budapest (Hungary); Silye, Judit [Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Safety Directorate, H-1539 Budapest, P.O. Box 676 (Hungary); Pazmandi, Tamas [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O.B. 49. (Hungary)

    2006-07-01

    Between May 28 - June 4, 2005, under the organization of the Hungarian Nuclear Society (HNS) and the Hungarian Young Generation Network (HYGN) - which operates within the framework of the HNS - a scientific expedition visited the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and the surrounding exclusion zone. The participants were young Hungarian nuclear professionals supervised by more experienced experts. The main scientific goals of the expedition were the followings: Get personal experiences in a direct way about the current status of the Chernobyl Power Plant and its surroundings, the contamination of the environment and about the doses. Gather information about the state of the shut down power plant and the shelter built above the damaged 4. unit. Training of young nuclear experts by performing on site measurements. The Hungarian expedition successfully achieved its objectives by performing wide-range of environmental and dosimetric measurements and collecting numerous biological and soil samples. Within the 30-km exclusion zone the influence of the accident occurred 20 years ago still could be measured clearly; however the level of the radioactivity is manageable in most places. The dosimetric measurements showed that no considerable exposure occurred among the members of the expedition. The analysis of samples has been started at the International Chernobyl Center in Slavutich. During the expedition not only environmental sampling and in-situ measurements were carried out but it was also well documented with photos and video recordings for educational, training and PR purposes. A documentary TV film was recorded during the expedition. The first-hand knowledge acquired during the expedition helps the authentic communication of the accident and its present-day consequences, which is especially important in 2006, 20 years after the Chernobyl accident. Since Ukraine and Hungary are neighbor countries the media constantly discuss the accident, the consequences and the risks of using nuclear energy. In addition in November 2005 Hungary's parliament approved plans to extend the lifetime of the country's four-unit nuclear power plant. In order to have the crucial public support for nuclear energy it is very important to dispel unrealistic dismay and misbelieves regarding these questions. Thus it is extremely beneficial to have a film on this topic created by nuclear professionals especially for the public audience. In 2005 a book on the Chernobyl accident was published in Hungary that covers this expedition in a full chapter [2]. We plan to present the film to the audience of the conference. (authors)

  17. Fig.3. Seismicity plots showing the depths and epicenters on Galapagos Is-lands. Note how the earthquakes are clustered at 10 km depth, probably contro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    Bolivar). LAT LONG Fig.6. The GV01-GV04 baseline has recorded vertical uplift since the 2005 eruption with the vertical bars: Red = 2005 Sierra Negra, Blue= 2006 and Orange= 2007. The shallow and cluster seismicity= 2006 and Orange= 2007. A GV01GV07 2 km 0 Deep magma source B Sill magma Chamber body GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM

  18. PSR B0329+54: Substructure in the scatter-broadened image discovered with RadioAstron on baselines of up to 235,000 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, M V; Bartel, N; Gwinn, C R; Johnson, M D; Joshi, B C; Kardashev, N S; Karuppusamy, R; Kovalev, Y Y; Kramer, M; Rudnitskii, A G; Safutdinov, E R; Shishov, V I; Smirnova, T V; Soglasnov, V A; Zensus, J A; Zhuravlev, V I

    2015-01-01

    We studied scattering properties of the pulsar PSR B0329+54 with a ground-space radio interferometer RadioAstron which included the 10-m Space Radio Telescope, the 110-m Green Bank Telescope, the 14x25-m Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, and the 64-m Kalyazin Radio Telescope. The observations were performed at 324 MHz on baselines of up to 235,000 km in November 2012 and January 2014. At short ground-space baselines of less than about 20,000 km, the visibility amplitude decreases with the projected baseline length, providing a direct measurement of the diameter of the scattering disk of 4.7$\\pm$0.9 mas. The size of the diffraction spot near Earth is 15,000$\\pm$3,000 km. At longer baselines of up to 235,000 km, where no interferometric detection of the scattering disk would be expected, significant visibilities were observed with amplitudes scattered around a constant value. These detections result in a discovery of a substructure in the completely resolved scatter-broadened image of the pointlike source, ...

  19. Development and analysis of a 12-year daily 1-km forest fire dataset across North America from NOAA/AVHRR data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Development and analysis of a 12-year daily 1-km forest fire dataset across North America from NOAA Forest Service, Fire Sciences Laboratory, P.O. Box 8089, Missoula, MT 59807, United States g NOAA forests play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. While forest fires in North America (NA) have

  20. 1154 IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 19, NO. 15, AUGUST 1, 2007 10 10 Gb/s DWDM Transmission Through 2.2-km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Joseph M.

    Transmission Through 2.2-km Multimode Fiber Using Adaptive Optics Rahul A. Panicker, Jeffrey P. Wilde, Joseph M. Kahn, David F. Welch, and Ilya Lyubomirsky Abstract--Transmitter-based adaptive optics and receiver-crystal spatial light modulator controls the launched field pattern for ten 10-Gb/s nonreturn-to-zero channels

  1. A thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (time-GCM): Equinox solar cycle minimum simulations (30-500 km)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roble, R.G.; Ridley, E.C.

    1994-03-15

    A new simulation model of the mesosphere, thermosphere, and ionosphere with coupled electrodynamics has been developed and used to calculate the global circulation, temperature and compositional structure between 30-500 km for equinox, solar cycle minimum, geomagnetic quiet conditions. The model incorporates all of the features of the NCAR thermosphere-ionosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIE-GCM) but the lower boundary has been extended downward from 97 to 30 km (10 mb) and it includes the physical and chemical processes appropriate for the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. The first simulation used Rayleigh friction to represent gravity wave drag in the middle atmosphere and although it was able to close the mesospheric jets it severely damped the diurnal tide. Reduced Rayleigh friction allowed the tide to penetrate to thermospheric heights but did not close the jets. A gravity wave parameterization developed by Fritts and Lu allows both features to exist simultaneously with the structure of tides and mean flow dependent upon the strength of the gravity wave source. The model calculates a changing dynamic structure with the mean flow and diurnal tide dominant in the mesosphere, the in-situ generated semi-diurnal tide dominating the lower thermosphere and an in-situ generated diurnal tide in the upper thermosphere. The results also show considerable interaction between dynamics and composition, especially atomic oxygen between 85 and 120 km. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  2. 217 km long distance photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry based on ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo-Liang Shentu; Qi-Chao Sun; Xiao Jiang; Xiao-Dong Wang; Jason S. Pelc; M. M. Fejer; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

    2013-08-05

    We demonstrate a photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry with 42.19 dB dynamic range using an ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector. By employing the long wave pump technique and a volume Bragg grating, we reduce the noise of our up-conversion single photon detector, and achieve a noise equivalent power of -139.7 dBm/sqrt(Hz). We perform the OTDR experiments using a fiber of length 216.95 km, and show that our system can identify defects along the entire fiber length with a distance resolution better than 10 cm in a measurement time of 13 minutes.

  3. Unscaled Scaled (% / km) Geographic Area /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diversity Keyhabitatquantity Sedimentload Obstructions ChannelStability Flow Food Temperature Predation Chemicals Competition functional habitats. Within the Methow basin, the Lower Twisp, Lower Methow Mainstem, Middle Methow Mainstem

  4. xu-km-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r mReducingwhistleblowerxinyufu Ames25

  5. THE 300 km s{sup -1} STELLAR STREAM NEAR SEGUE 1: INSIGHTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF ITS BRIGHTEST STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frebel, Anna; Casey, Andrew R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lunnan, Ragnhild [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Norris, John E. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Wyse, Rosemary F. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 300 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gilmore, Gerard [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    We present a chemical abundance analysis of 300S-1, the brightest likely member star of the 300 km s{sup -1} stream near the faint satellite galaxy Segue 1. From a high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectrum, we determine a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.46 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.23 (random and systematic uncertainties) for star 300S-1, and find an abundance pattern similar to typical halo stars at this metallicity. Comparing our stellar parameters to theoretical isochrones, we estimate a distance of 18 {+-} 7 kpc. Both the metallicity and distance estimates are in good agreement with what can be inferred from comparing the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data of the stream stars to globular cluster sequences. While several other structures overlap with the stream in this part of the sky, the combination of kinematic, chemical, and distance information makes it unlikely that these stars are associated with either the Segue 1 galaxy, the Sagittarius Stream, or the Orphan Stream. Streams with halo-like abundance signatures, such as the 300 km s{sup -1} stream, present another observational piece for understanding the accretion history of the Galactic halo.

  6. 0.1 nm0.1 nm1 nm1 nm10 nm10 nm100 nm100 nm11 mm1010 mm100100 mm1 mm1 mm1 cm1 cm10 cm10 cm1 m1 m10 m10 m100 m100 m1 km1 kmWWAVELENGTHAVELENGTHWAVELENGTHWWAVELENGTHW 0.01K (-273C) 100K 5000K5000K5000K5000K5000K 30,000K 30,000,000K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    visible and invisible light from across the Cosmos SKA (Square Kilometre Array) SKA will be the world nuclear power ALMA E-ELT GAIAJWST XMM SKA sea level 690km 384,400km ALMA (Atacama Large Millimetre Array) ALMA is a giant array of 66 antennas observing at millimetre/submillimetre wavelengths. Location

  7. 5 km/h 10 km/h 6 km/h

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    = 9.5 g h = 6.3 cm v g Procedure-1 Initial kinetic energy: (1/2) m v2 Initial potential energy: 0 Final kinetic energy: 0 Final potential energy: (m+M)gh The conservation of the mechanical energy + M) ] v2 Initial potential energy: 0 #12;Final kinetic energy: 0 Final potential energy: (m

  8. Intelligent scraping experience using ultrasonics in two 60in./56in. dual diameter 100 km seawater transmission pipelines in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, A.F.; Chu, K.S.

    1995-10-01

    Saudi ARAMCO`s two 60in./56in. (1524/1422 mm) diameter Seawater Injection Pipelines used for secondary oil recovery stretch from the Seawater Treatment Plant across the Arabian Desert for a distance of approximately 100 kilometers. Both lines were put into operation in mid 1978 using over the ditch Plicoflex tape wrap as a means of protection against external corrosion. A significant portion of both pipelines (32 km of each line) runs through Subkha (salty moist) areas. A series of test hole evaluations in 1989 indicated moderate to sever external corrosion particularly in Subkha which necessitated sleeving and external coating application. In 1991 a series of leaks, four (4) in total over a period of two (2) months occurred in Pipeline {number_sign}2 due to external corrosion. This suggested that the line(s) were in urgent need of at least partial replacement or major rehabilitation. Prior to making a final decision on partial replacement it was decided to run an Intelligent Scraper in both pipelines to ascertain both internal and external pipeline conditions. An Ultrasonic Scraper the largest of it`s kind in the world, similar to what was used in the Alyeska Pipeline was developed and successfully run in both pipelines in February 1993. This paper discusses the pipeline history, test hole evaluations, Intelligent Scraping experiences, field evaluation for anomaly verification, and repair of approximately 120 locations as identified by the Intelligent Scraping run. The Intelligent Scraping evaluation played a major role in the cancellation of partial pipeline replacement with cost savings estimated $30 MM.

  9. Measurement of Plasma Dynamics in the TCSU RMF Current Drive Experiment K.M. Velas, C.L. Deards, P.A. Melnik, J.A Grossnickle, A.L. Hoffman, K.E. Miller, R.D. Milroy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Measurement of Plasma Dynamics in the TCSU RMF Current Drive Experiment K.M. Velas, C.L. Deards, P.A. Melnik, J.A Grossnickle, A.L. Hoffman, K.E. Miller, R.D. Milroy Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Washington Detailed magnetic measurements of Field-Reversed Configurations (FRC) from

  10. y 1000km of high resolution sleeve-gun array transects on the North Sza Fan, located at tbe mouth orwegian Channel, reveal three domina tyles of sedimentation within a thick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    y 1000km of high resolution sleeve-gun array transects on the North Sza Fan, located at tbe mouth the lution data across the fan other than conventional he seismic source was an arra nstruments 40 in3 sleeve-guns along the fan axis. These data were shot with the same sleeve-gun array but recorded digitally via a 144

  11. We present HI observations of the environment of three nearby (~ 2000-2500 km s-1 ) Ly-absorbers. The absorbers are located along the sight lines towards Markarian 817, Markarian 509 and VII Zwicky 118. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, John

    ABSTRACT We present HI observations of the environment of three nearby (~ 2000-2500 km s-1 ) Ly. We thus find, by comparing to the HI mass function, that there is 4 to 5 times more HI around Ly- absorbers than on average in the sky. The HI Environment of Nearby Ly-alpha Absorbers INTRODUCTION Numerical

  12. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01

    can be produced from coal gasification at delivered costs ofper kilogram. Gasification of Coal and Other Hydrocarbons Inkg/day Small Coal Oxygen-blown Gasification 313,090 kg/day

  13. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the FutureGen Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    by weight. 6 na No performance target or no CCPI target. kg kilogram; Btu British thermal unit. Sources: DOE, 2002; DOE, 2006a; DOE, 2006b. When switching between coals,...

  14. BOI043620003.DOC/KG B-1 Upper Snake Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /pool ratio, LWD, width/depth ratio, etc.) necessary for supporting the life history functions of focal

  15. A study of Kg/Ko values from reservoir performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Gerald Sewall

    1957-01-01

    factor at current pressure, barrels reservoir oil per barrel stook tank oil bo = forjsation volune factor at original yressure, barrels reservoir oil per barrel stock tank oil TABLE 3 VOLUEETRIC CALCULATIOEE POR FIELD?A? R-r (36V9 - ISO~ ( ~0 026... absolute. This study was concluded when the average reservoir pressure had decU. ned to 4, , 3Q, pounds per square inch absolute. This pressure deoline was accompanied by the production sf 566, 137 barrels of stock tank oil and 2, ling, 310 standar4 MCF...

  16. Country Zone 0.5 Kg 1 Kg Country Zone 0.5 Kg 1 Kg AFGHANISTAN 7 21.72 26.78 NEW WORK 9 7.20 11.70

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    .72 26.78 COMOROS 7 21.72 26.78 FIJI 6 21.72 26.78 CONGO 7 21.72 26.78 FINLAND 5 9.59 14.65 COOK IS 6

  17. Flabeg GmbH co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport Jump to: navigation,FirstGeoThermtheForks,

  18. Fichtner GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbHFarinello Geothermal PowerGuidelinesFerrisburgh,Fertile,Fibrowatt

  19. MT Energie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHKKemblaSolar Jump to:Industries Inc JumpMT

  20. Mann Naturenergie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitou Springs,Mann Naturenergie GmbH Co

  1. ETBKN GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetek EuropeEPG Fuel Cell LLcESPESPEETBKN

  2. Campa Biodiesel GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick,Calendar HomeGmbHFunds InvestmentCammonGmbH

  3. Campa Sud GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick,Calendar HomeGmbHFunds

  4. Meihui Windpark GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgency (IRENA) JumpLiterature

  5. RIO Energie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgency (IRENA)OptionsEquivalent URI JumpbsamenAnatolia JumpRIO

  6. SSB Antriebstechnik GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgency (IRENA)OptionsEquivalentB Energy CompanySSB

  7. Marina Biodiesel GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name:PowerInformationMantechMapMarcegagliaM

  8. Otag GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGEProjects/DefinitionsOrchidxOsCompOst EnergyOtag

  9. RUSOL GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETEREFU Elektronik GmbH JumpChinaRMRS IndiaRUSOL

  10. Rapsveredelung Vorpommern GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETEREFU Elektronik

  11. Renion Biogas GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEast Jump to: navigation, search Name:Renion Biogas GmbH

  12. GETproject GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpAFlexStock Co LtdWiegand GmbHGEO2GETproject GmbH Co

  13. Hoogen Bioenergie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimen RiverScoring Tool Jump to: navigation,HongyuanHoogen

  14. Imtech Deutschland GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimen RiverScoringUtilitiesRenov veisInformation

  15. Leonhard Kurz GmbH CO KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervarLeeds, United Kingdom: Energy ResourcesEnergy JumpLeonhard

  16. Leopold Kostal GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervarLeeds, United Kingdom: Energy ResourcesEnergy

  17. SGL Rotec GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEastCarbon Development | OpenGmbHSEMOSEVIL JumpRotec

  18. Schnell Z ndstrahlmotoren AG Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEastCarbonOpen EnergyPonsa,SasolScarlattiConzervSchnell

  19. Schunk Group GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEastCarbonOpenSchulthess Group Jump to:

  20. Stelio Solar GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarket Studies JumpSteinbine Development LLC Jump

  1. AVANCIS GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgramInformationEnergyAG Jump to:AT

  2. CIS Solartechnik GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: Energy Resources JumpCIA-The World Factbook JumpCIS

  3. Bernt Lorentz GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBent County,Benton,BerksWisconsin:

  4. GEE Energy GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprint VenturesColorado:Georgia:FutureG2 EnergyGEE Energy

  5. Wallenborn Projektentwicklung GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho)Vossloh Kiepe Jump to:WKVWallenborn

  6. Property:Dry Mass(kg) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. Berger Lichttechnik GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.EnergyWoodenDateSAEngineeringBecosaJundaBeinnBerger

  8. Energy age wind ltd Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy Electricals LtdEcowind Jump(Redirected fromTransfer-MDE Jumpage

  9. Europartner Solar GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy Electricals LtdEcowindEnvironmentalEsco Energy

  10. Germania Windpark GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy ElectricalsFTL SolarGate Solar JumpGeothermal RegulatoryGermania

  11. Makarere University glacialarealextent(km2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Glacier fig. (c) 29 52'Eo glacial extent (1955) glacial extent (1990) lake / river (a) (b) 022'N o 023'N o considered to be rising air temperatures which have amplified ice losses by evaporation and melting. Field prominent as warming continues in the 21st century. The projected loss of the glacial ice, Nzururu

  12. Along channel distance [km] Salinity [psu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at estuaries that have already seen the effects of tectonically induced sea level rise, scientists have been -- that is the upper intertidal mudflats and salt marsh edge -- while the decreased drag on the channel bed leads

  13. KM_C364e-20170629133124

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducingJobs2015Administration shows off theKIVA

  14. KM_C654e-20150324133840

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducingJobs2015Administration shows off theKIVA

  15. Kode Dansk English AD Andorra ANDORRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KENYA KG Kirgisistan KYRGYZSTAN KH Cambodia CAMBODIA KI Kiribati KIRIBATI KM Comorerne COMOROS KN Sankt

  16. DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Zhao Junwei; Ofman, Leon

    2011-07-20

    Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

  17. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of germanium increased in 1999, with slightly larger amounts brought to market by Canada and China. Output from companies supplied domestic and export markets with germanium-bearing materials generated from the mining were to be recovered from ash and flue dust generated in the burning of certain coals for power

  18. Kilogram Scale Synthesis of a Triazine-based Dendrimer and the Development of a General Strategy for the Installation of Pharmacophores to Yield Potential Drug Delivery Agents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditto, Vincent J.

    2011-02-22

    Diverse dendrimer peripheries are often produced through convergent synthesis with multiple protection-deprotection steps. Achieving such diversity while maintaining monodispersity, has previously proven problematic. ...

  19. Svar Birgisson REYST report 04-2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    . Biodiesel is a natural, renewable transportation fuel which increases lubrication of diesel engines and decreases carbon emission equal to 3.11 kg for each kilogram of biodiesel used instead of fossil diesel in the price of rapeseed meal and in price of biodiesel means an IRR of equity is 22% and 21%. One of the main

  20. Appendix V. List of Acronyms and Abbreviations, and Glossary of Terms List of Acronyms and Abbreviations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    practicable control technology Bq/kg Becquerel/kilogram. BRC Bureau of Radiation Control CAA Clean Air Act Ca and Abbreviations Ac actinium ac acre ac-ft acre-feet ACAA American Coal Ash Association AEA Atomic Energy Act AEC Source and Non-point Sources (USGS computer model) BAT best achievable technology Bi bismuth BPCT best

  1. Appendix I. List of Acronyms and Abbreviations, and Glossary of Terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    practicable control technology Bq/kg Becquerel/kilogram. BRC Bureau of Radiation Control CAA Clean Air Act Ca and Abbreviations Ac actinium ac acre ac-ft acre-feet ACAA American Coal Ash Association AEA Atomic Energy Act AEC Source and Non-point Sources (USGS computer model) BAT best achievable technology Bi bismuth BPCT best

  2. BY BOER DENG Universities in the United States employ many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    enriched uranium or weapons-grade plutonium needed to build a bomb, an event known as `breakout'. The preliminary deal requires that Iran reduce the number of operating centrifuges from 19,000 to 5,060 and its stockpile of low-enriched uranium from 10,000 kilograms to 300 kg. Under this scenario, it would take

  3. Parameterization and Geometric Optimization of Balloon Launched Sensorcraft for Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Atmospheric Science Through Robotic Aircraft SLS Selective Laser Sintering SLA Stereolithography FDM Fused Deposition Modeling P Power, Watts (W) t Time, seconds (s) M Mass, Kilograms (kg) COTS Commercial Off) The University of Southampton ASTRA project seeks to investigate new technologies for enabling low cost

  4. University of Southampton Research Repository ePrints Soton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    of altitudes. Nomenclature ASTRA Atmospheric Science Through Robotic Aircraft SLS Selective Laser Sintering SLA Stereolithography FDM Fused Deposition Modeling P Power, Watts (W) t Time, seconds (s) M Mass, Kilograms (kg) COTS Aircraft (ASTRA) The University of Southampton ASTRA project seeks to investigate new technologies

  5. General Physics I Exam 1 -Chs. 1,2,3 -Units, Motion Sep. 16, 2009 Name Rec. Instr. Rec. Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wysin, Gary

    General Physics I Exam 1 - Chs. 1,2,3 - Units, Motion Sep. 16, 2009 Name Rec. Instr. Rec. Time , M=106 , G=109 , T=1012 . 1. (2) Which of the following is NOT an SI unit? a. meter b. kilogram c), in standard SI units without any prefixes, preserving the number of significant figures. a) 630 µs b) 42400 km

  6. Wurth Solar GmbH Co KG Wuerth Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:Wizard Power PtyOhio:DoingMissouri:Wujiang OasisWurth

  7. IT-gesttztes Investitionscontrolling Arno Edinger, SAP Deutschland AG & Co. KG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Rechenwerke #12;Projektsystem (PS) Das PSP-Element als zentrales Stammdatum © SAP 2009 / Page 6 Das Projektsystem ist... eigenständiges Modul und integraler Bestandteil des SAP ERP Systems. der Abbildung Betrachtung aller beteiligten Geschäftsvorfälle. Das PSP-Element im SAP Projektsystem eignet sich als zentra

  8. SunWare Solartechnik GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model for theSunLan Solar Co Ltd JumpSunRiderSunTrac

  9. Geothermie Unterhaching GmbH und Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:Bore TechnologiesAssessment InsettingGridGeothermeon

  10. Green Energy Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon:Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  11. Sonnen Solar Park GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSiliciumEnergy Inc JumpPennsylvania: EnergySonnen Solar Park

  12. Joint Solar Silicon GmbH Co KG JSSI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder atHills,New York: Energy Resources Jump to:Joice, Iowa:Solar

  13. Paradigma Energie und Umwelttechnik GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program |View New PagesParabolic-Trough Technology RoadmapParadigma

  14. Deutsche Rotor und Turm Service GmbH Co KG DRTS | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to: navigation,Department of Defense

  15. Elektrizitatswerk Goldbach Hoesbach GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of theClimate FinanceElektrizitatswerk Goldbach Hoesbach

  16. Bekon Energy Technologies GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece:Bajo enInformationTianrunZhongmei ChengxinBekon

  17. Offshore Burger Windpark Butendiek GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgency (IRENA)Options Jump to:NordwindNuevasOffshore Burger

  18. MBE Mitteldeutsche BioEnergie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lyon-Lincoln Electric CoopMAP JumpMB

  19. NUW Nordbrandenburger UmesterungsWerke GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,MeregNIFE BateriasInternationalNTT Advanced

  20. PV Eiwa Systemtechnik GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLC Jump to:3 of Mason County Jump to:Eiwa

  1. Reis Robotics GmbH Co KG Maschinenfabrik | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETEREFURecent contentSWand Transfer ofReis

  2. Rheinische Bio Ester GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEast Jump to: navigation,ReportVelho Energ

  3. GEE Gesellschaft fuer Erneuerbare Energien mbH Co KG | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpAFlexStock Co LtdWiegand GmbH Jump

  4. Habdank PV Montagesysteme GmbH Co KG Habdank PV Mounting Systems | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimen River Power Co LtdGuntherGreen Power Co

  5. KSP Kluenemann Solar Projekt GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar Hydro JumpHuari Silicon MaterialJuncoKSK Energy VenturesKSP

  6. Kompass Corporate Finance GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar Hydro JumpHuariKeewatinKenya:ElectricKokhanokKomexKompass

  7. Umwelt Windrad GmbH Co KG UWR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) JumpGTZ Climate Oriented MobilityManagement AG

  8. Voith Siemens Hydro Power Generation GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho) JumpWinside,VisualizationViva SolarOcean

  9. AT AGRAR TECHNIK GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgramInformationEnergyAG Jump to:AT AGRAR TECHNIK

  10. KvH Projekt GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItronKanoshKetchikanKlondikeKun Renewables JumpKvH Projekt

  11. ABO Wind Biogas Sachsen Anhalt GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSprings Logo:

  12. GEWI Planungs und Vertriebsgesellschaft mbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy ElectricalsFTL Solar JumpNetworkingGAOH Offshore

  13. Abul K.M. Azad Northern Illinois University, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with online laboratories, pedagogical design, system architectures for remote laboratories, future trends A Cataloguing in Publication record for this book is available from the British Library. All work contributed of the trademark or registered trademark. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data #12;254 Copyright

  14. Detecting Solar Neutrino Flare in Megaton and km^3 detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Fargion; Paola Di Giacomo

    2009-01-21

    To foresee a solar flare neutrino signal we infer its upper and lower bound. The upper bound was derived since a few years by general energy equipartition arguments on observed solar particle flare. The lower bound, the most compelling one for any guarantee neutrino signal, is derived by most recent records of hard Gamma bump due to solar flare on January 2005 (by neutral pion decay).The observed gamma flux reflects into a corresponding one for the neutrinos, almost one to one. Therefore we obtain minimal bounds already at the edge of present but quite within near future Megaton neutrino detectors. Such detectors are considered mostly to reveal cosmic supernova background or rare Local Group (few Mpc) Supernovas events. However Megaton or even inner ten Megaton Ice Cube detector at ten GeV threshold may also reveal traces of solar neutrino in hardest energy of solar flares. Icecube, marginally, too. Solar neutrino flavors may shine light on neutrino mixing angles.

  15. 0.3 km/s for events within 2 km; and 7.9 0.1 km/s for events more than 2 km below the reflector. See

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arblaster, Julie

    greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols. However, most of the observed warming from 1900 to 1949 was likely due to natural climate variation. Most of the observed global-scale warming over the last 50 years is believed to have been due to the increase in atmospheric green- house gas concentrations (1). Here, we inves

  16. Change of Paradigm in KM Towards Collaborative Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlen, Rainer

    Chair in Communications Department of Computer & Information Science University of Konstanz, Germany as a means of having better control over the production and usage of explicit and implicit knowledge. ·Human Genome project - A 13-year effort coordinated by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National

  17. Accelerated Aging Effects on Kevlar KM2 Fiber Survivability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Tony

    2013-04-12

    good replacement for single filament tests and estimation techniques can determine the bundle Weibull parameters. Furthermore, the survival function for treated fibers is better if the bundle is lubricated. The accelerated aging experiments show...

  18. Zentralpanama 5 km stl. vom Kanal, tropisches Klima, Tonbden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Christian

    vorherigen Landnutzung · für Unterschiede zwischen den Vegetationen Ausblick: bessere Aussagen bei Messung zu

  19. Microsoft Word - China_10km_solar_documentation.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickey HotMicrosemi Corp Jump to:VII,China

  20. Microsoft Word - Ethiopia_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickey HotMicrosemi Corp JumpEthiopia Final

  1. Microsoft Word - Ghana_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickey HotMicrosemi Corp

  2. Microsoft Word - Kenya_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickey HotMicrosemi CorpKenya Final country

  3. Microsoft Word - Nepal_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickey HotMicrosemi CorpKenya FinalNepal

  4. PET 424304 2015 Exercises 1+2 of 4 16 Jan + 30 Jan 2015 1. 1kg ice at 263 K 1 kg water at 293 K. Heat Q at T = T is supplied by the surroundings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ,340] = 293·[(-21,99 ­ 5,339) + (149,13 ­ 65,13)·0,34)] = 361 (W/s)/mol ice The same result is found via lost,340·5141 = 1750 W/mol ice xout/H2O = 491,8 + 0,340·2612 = 1381 W/mol ice EX = 1381 / 1750 = 0/mol for ex4 PET 424304 2015 Exercises 1+2 of 4 16 Jan + 30 Jan 2015 3. Wmin = Ex°separation = 0,79·Ex°N2

  5. 1 av / of 4 Massverfring och separationsteknik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ångbubblan. (1½p.) c. Ett kilogram vatten (W, 18 kg/mol) tillsätts; vattnet blandar sig inte med B.fi/fak/tkf/vt/Swe/education_Evaluation_sw.htm A) under den senaste vecka; B) några veckor sedan; C) några månader sedan; D) ett år eller längre sedan; E) inte ännu; F) kommer inte ihåg, skall därför ännu göra det (på nytt). When did you give your

  6. First 10 kg of Naked Germanium Detectors in Liquid Nitrogen installed in the GENIUS-Test-Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus; O. Chkvorez; I. V. Krivosheina; H. Strecker; C. Tomei

    2003-09-15

    The first four naked high purity Germanium detectors were installed successfully in liquid nitrogen in the GENIUS-Test-Facility (GENIUS-TF) in the GRAN SASSO Underground Laboratory on May 5, 2003. This is the first time ever that this novel technique aiming at extreme background reduction in search for rare decays is going to be tested underground. First operational parameters are presented.

  7. glacial-scale enrichment would result in an air-to-sea flux of about 4.6 mol C m 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an area of 225 km2 . Iron infusions in the north patch of 631 kg and 450 kg were repeated on 16 January, with repeated infusions on 29 January, 1 February, and 5 Feb- ruary. Each infusion involved 315 kg spread over a 225 km2 area. For both patches, initial iron infusions were supple- mented with infusions of SF6 and 3

  8. ABSTRACT: This study examines NEXRAD Stage III product (hourly, cell size 4 km by 4 km) for its ability in estimating precipitation in cen-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    ability in estimating precipitation in cen- tral New Mexico, a semiarid area. A comparison between Stage III and a network of gauge precipitation estimates during 1995 to 2001 indi- cates that Stage III (1) overestimates the hourly conditional mean (CM) precipitation by 33 percent in the monsoon season and 55 per

  9. An accurate determination of the Avogadro constant by counting the atoms in a 28Si crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas, B; Bartl, G; Becker, P; Bettin, H; Borys, M; Busch, I; Gray, M; Fuchs, P; Fujii, K; Fujimoto, H; Kessler, E; Krumrey, M; Kuetgens, U; Kuramoto, N; Mana, G; Manson, P; Massa, E; Mizushima, S; Nicolaus, A; Picard, A; Pramann, A; Rienitz, O; Schiel, D; Valkiers, S; Waseda, A

    2010-01-01

    The Avogadro constant links the atomic and the macroscopic properties of matter. Since the molar Planck constant is well known via the measurement of the Rydberg constant, it is also closely related to the Planck constant. In addition, its accurate determination is of paramount importance for a definition of the kilogram in terms of a fundamental constant. We describe a new approach for its determination by "counting" the atoms in 1 kg single-crystal spheres, which are highly enriched with the 28Si isotope. It enabled isotope dilution mass spectroscopy to determine the molar mass of the silicon crystal with unprecedented accuracy. The value obtained, 6.02214084(18) x 10^23 mol^-1, is the most accurate input datum for a new definition of the kilogram.

  10. Fiber-Level Modeling of Dynamic Strength KM2 Ballistic Fabric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    .g., as reinforcements in rigid polymer matrix composites (PMCs) for lightweight vehicle- armor systems). Flexible agile, and more mobile so that they can be quickly transported to operations conducted throughout-amide) fabric and an E-glass fiber/ethyl cellulose composite in body-armor systems can be linked to the Korean

  11. 1000 2000 3000 4000 x [km] -150 -100 -50 0 50 100 150

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experiments with Magnetoacoustic Waves in the Solar Atmosphere C. Nutto1, O. Steiner1, W. Schaffenberger2, M. Steffen3 Motivation Numerical Set-up Results Conclusions Outlook References Longitudinal Transversal

  12. Cathodoluminescence petrography and isotope geochemistry of KT impact ejecta deposited 360 km from the Chicxulub crater,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouke, Bruce W.

    ** and ALFRED G. FISCHER *Department of Geology, University of Illinois, 245 Natural History Building, 1301 W Barton Creek Formation dolomitized marine limestone overlain by 16 m of dolomitized Albion Formation impact ejecta. The Albion Formation consists of a lower fine- grained »1-m-thick spheroid bed

  13. Spatial variability of arsenic in 6000 tube wells in a 25 km2 of Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    [van Geen et al., 2002]. A comparison of the cost of installing such a well ($US$50 for a typical 50-ft well) with the per capita GNP of Bangladesh of US$1400, after adjusting for purchasing power [World

  14. New Agroforestry Site: Kotumachigi village About 20 Km from the town of Gadag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    rainwater harvesting. #12;The farmer was seriously concerned about planting trees let alone 2500 seedlings and cities. Need to install weather stations to generate interest in the environment. Water harvesting

  15. Eleutherodactylus discoidalis BOLIVIA: Departamento Tarija: 12.3 km NW of Entre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castoe, Todd A.

    College, Box 555, 124 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604-0555, USA 2 Department of Biology, University

  16. Sensitivity and noise analysis of 4 km laser interferometric gravitational wave antennae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adhikari, Rana, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Around the world, efforts are underway to commission several kilometer-scale laser interferometers to detect gravitational radiation. In the United States, there are two collocated interferometers in Hanford, Washington ...

  17. Why Lean ?y ( QC TQC 5-7 KPI Competency HA-SHA KM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

    ­ Jidoka) 4. (Kaizen ­ Continuous Improvement) etc. #12;Why lean Thinking in Healthcare ? 1. 80 : 80

  18. Indirect Detection of Dark Matter in km-size Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bergstrom; Joakim Edsjo; Paolo Gondolo

    1999-06-02

    Neutrino telescopes of kilometer size are currently being planned. They will be two or three orders of magnitude larger than presently operating detectors, but they will have a much higher muon energy threshold. We discuss the trade-off between area and energy threshold for indirect detection of neutralino dark matter captured in the Sun and in the Earth and annihilating into high energy neutrinos. We also study the effect of a higher threshold on the complementarity of different searches for supersymmetric dark matter.

  19. Comparison And Discussion Of The 6 Km Temperature Maps Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    three areas of difference are discussed in detail. These three areas are critical for EGS resource evaluation yet they are quite different between the two maps. The data in...

  20. Memo: Estimates of hydrology in small (<80 km2 urbanized watersheds under dry weather and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    weather and first flush flows from pump station facilities to publicly owned treatment works (POTWs questions and to help BASMAA with a preliminary ranking of pump station watersheds to focus on in response such as coldwater fish rearing and habitat for other native or endangered species Landscape irrigation (reducing

  1. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    regions do not completely cover eastern China. Projection Parameters Projection LAMBERTAZIMUTHAL Datum WGS84 Zunits METERS Units METERS Spheroid DEFINED Major Axis...

  2. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Spatial Reference Information (Beg) ***** Projection Parameters Coordinate System: LambertAzimuthalEqualArea FalseEasting: 0.000000 FalseNorthing: 0.000000...

  3. Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    regions do not completely cover eastern China. Projection Parameters Projection LAMBERTAZIMUTHAL Datum WGS84 Z-units METERS Units METERS Spheroid DEFINED Major Axis...

  4. CURRICULUM VITAE OF K.M. ARIFUL KABIR ADDRESS OF PRESENT INSTITUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCann, Robert J.

    cycle driven by solar collector. Title of M.S Thesis: Estimation of energies for ground state, Singlet Morphology), Fluid Dynamics and Solar cooling systems, Thermal Engineering RECOGNITIONS Life Member Numerical Analysis, Computational Mathematics, Quantum Mechanics, Thermal Engineering, and Fluid Dynamics

  5. I?raak Nuke, NXOO Leaa Km&l, NY00

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and MyersHr. Anthony V. Andolina:I * .z-y:c* -7 i!W.

  6. File:NREL-afg-10km-dir.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent Changes AllApschem.pdfgasp 03.pdfMmpa 2007.pdf Jump to:ModifyBioMap.pdf

  7. File:NREL-afg-10km-glo.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent Changes AllApschem.pdfgasp 03.pdfMmpa 2007.pdf Jump

  8. File:NREL-afg-10km-tilt.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent Changes AllApschem.pdfgasp 03.pdfMmpa 2007.pdf Jumptilt.pdf Jump to:

  9. Microsoft Word - Sri_Lanka_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickey HotMicrosemi CorpKenya

  10. Single-Column Modeling D. A. Randall and K.-M. Xu Colorado State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShiftwater vapor andParticle DatabaseC.J.AC.

  11. Comparison And Discussion Of The 6 Km Temperature Maps Of The Western Us

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open EnergyColoradoBiomassPlus JumpQinghai Dangshun*Prepared

  12. Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in 1500 Km^3

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) | SciTechsaturatedcrystals (Journal Article) | SciTech Connectof

  13. Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in 1500 Km^3

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) | SciTechsaturatedcrystals (Journal Article) | SciTech Connectofof

  14. Microsoft Word - 802.11i Rec Practices _KM-BL final edit ver 10_.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPAEnergy May 28MarEnergyDanielJune 14, 2011Securing WLANs

  15. (Astro)Physics 343 Lecture # 5: Sun, Stars, and Planets; Fourier Transforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Andrew J.

    (Astro)Physics 343 Lecture # 5: Sun, Stars, and Planets; Fourier Transforms #12; Schedule # 5: running now #12;February 12, 2007 Physics/Astronomy 343 5 Size, mass, and distance of the Sun 106 mi Distance From Sun 2.0 x 1030 kg1.9 x 1027 kg6.0 x 1024 kgMass 1,400,00 km 865,000 mi 140,000 km

  16. Trace Fission Product Ratios for Nuclear Forensics Attribution of Weapons-Grade Plutonium from Fast Breeder Reactor Blankets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborn, Jeremy

    2014-08-13

    for the 500-MWe Indian PFBR was obtained from Chirayath et al.22 and essential parameters are listed in Table II. There is an active core, one meter in height, which consists of an inner core and outer core of MOX “driver” fuel. The MOX fuel of the active...-Particle MOX – Mixed Oxide MWd/kg – Megawatt-day per kilogram of heavy metal MWe – Megawatt electric NPT – Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons ORNL – Oak Ridge National Laboratory PFBR – Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor PHWR...

  17. Honorary graduates of the University of Southampton His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh KG Doctor of Science (1967)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molinari, Marc

    1967-01-01

    W Buckley Doctor of Science (2012) Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell FRS Doctor of Science (2008) #12 Doctor of Science (1992) James Cameron Doctor of the University (2004) The Rt Revd Harry James Carpenter (2008) Sir David Cox Doctor of Science (2007) David John Moore Cornwell (John Le Carré) Doctor

  18. NAME_______________________ (1) In the figure, a uniform beam, mass M = 65 kg and length 10.0 m, is hinged at the bottom,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Joseph

    its axis with angular velocity . At this point, solar panels, which spin with the satellite constant. (d) The moment of inertia decreases, due to the energy expended in extending the solar panels. (e is unchanged when the panels are extended, the angular velocity will remain unchanged. (g) The angular momentum

  19. 164 2011 Ernst & Sohn Verlag fr Architektur und technische Wissenschaften GmbH & Co. KG, Berlin Structural Concrete 12 (2011), No. 3 Diederik Veenendaal*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lygeros, John

    2011-01-01

    .201100014 The concept of casting concrete in fabrics, fabric formwork tech- nology, has resurfaced the use of reeds tied together to form the lower surface on which a sand mortar is applied a primary, thin layer of concrete as it hardened be- fore casting the rest of the structure [3]. In both

  20. 271 Ernst & Sohn Verlag fr Architektur und technische Wissenschaften GmbH & Co. KG, Berlin Bauphysik 31 (2009), Heft 5 Die Entwicklung energetisch optimierter Lftungsstrategien fr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    and renovation of energy saving buildings requires an accurate knowledge of how hygrothermal components and build in rooms. Developing energy- optimized ventilation strategies for moisture-related problems and the design of components, building envelope and building use. This model library should be used for developing an energy

  1. Evaluation of a Low Power, High Repetition-Rate Laser for MALDI M. Bromirski, A. Loboda, W. Ens, and K.G. Standing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ens, Werner

    Evaluation of a Low Power, High Repetition-Rate Laser for MALDI M. Bromirski, A. Loboda, W. Ens A compact, low-power, high repetition rate (10 kHz) laser has been tested for use in MALDI in a conventional rate produces detector saturation. The use of a lower power laser focused to a smaller spot may

  2. Physics 343 Lecture # 5: Sun, Stars, and Planets; Bayesian analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Andrew J.

    Physics 343 Lecture # 5: Sun, Stars, and Planets; Bayesian analysis #12; Schedule/Astronomy 343 3 Size, mass, and distance of the Sun ---3.74 x 108 s 11.9 years 3.156 x 107 s 1 year Period ---778 x 106 km 483 x 106 mi 150 x 106 km 93 x 106 mi Distance From Sun 2.0 x 1030 kg 1.9 x 1027 kg 6.0 x

  3. Mesoscale Systems: weather associated with circulation systems of horizontal scales of 5 to 1,000 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    . Urban heat island induced circulations (city-country side circulation) 4. Mountain-valley winds in winter #12;Urban Heat Island Urban heat island intensity: DTu-r = Turban - Trural Max DTu-r usually at night Intensity of urban heat island depends on many factors · Size of city · Geographical location

  4. 2 Bernd Freytag, Hartmut Holweger, Matthias Steffen, HansGunter Ludwig log 10 (H p0 /km)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    granules because efficient radiative exchange tends to favour larger cells. Other depth scales are less.R.G. 1 Stellar surface structure: size of granules Improvements in observational methods have opened on the Sun to those stars: First he compared the typical horizontal size of a solar granule x gran (his

  5. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 0.2 0.4 Velocity (km/s) Poisson's Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crone, Timothy J.

    pressure anomalies). As a result, tidal stresses lead to spatial variations in pore pressure that can this hypothesis. First, we used a one-dimensional model of pore pressure based on Biot's poroelastic theory velocity field. The flow pattern is very sensitive to the inflow pressure gradient, and for these models

  6. [Km 100 to 1000 mM (17)] and to S. cerevisiae hexose transporters' apparent affinity for glucose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severson, David

    , and British Petroleum Technology Ventures (through the Energy Biosciences Institute) have submitted a patent

  7. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 9, 2009 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :55.5 Dilworth Y Parkinson 30-39 men 1 6 10:59.9 Justin Paul Ishida -39 women 1 65 13:57.5 Kang Wei Chou

  8. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 1997 Place Time Name Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9:45.0 Etien, Robert Paul 30-39 1 3 10:04.8 Farias, Leonel 30-39 2 4:06.6 Volfbeyn, Paul , Jens 30-39 28 63 13:18.8 Lewis, Keith 40-49 5 64 13:19.1 Chou, Peter

  9. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 8, 2010 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -49 men 12 58 13:23.1 Nicholas S Norberg 30-39 men 15 59 13:25.4 Sergi Molins Rafa 30-39 men 16 60 13

  10. Multiphase Flow Metering: An Overview Manoj Kumar KM, Senior Scientist, Non-destructive Evaluation Lab, GE Global Research,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStressMove dataKiel7Multimodal ImagingMultiphase

  11. Analysis on storage off-gas emissions from woody, herbaceous, and torrefied biomass

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Lim, C. Jim; Bi, Xiaotao T.; Kuang, Xingya; Melin, Staffan; Yazdanpanah, Fahimeh; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2015-03-02

    Wood chips, torrefied wood chips, ground switchgrass, and wood pellets were tested for off-gas emissions during storage. Storage canisters with gas-collection ports were used to conduct experiments at room temperature of 20 °C and in a laboratory oven set at 40 °C. Commercially-produced wood pellets yielded the highest carbon monoxide (CO) emissions at both 20 and 40 °C (1600 and 13,000 ppmv), whereas torrefied wood chips emitted the lowest of about more »20 and 40 °C at the end of 11 days of storage. CO emission factors (milligrams per kilogram of biomass) calculated were lowest for ground switchgrass and torrefied wood chips (2.68 and 4.86 mg/kg) whereas wood pellets had the highest CO of about 10.60 mg/kg, respectively, at 40 °C after 11 days of storage. In the case of CO?, wood pellets recorded the lowest value of 55.46 mg/kg, whereas switchgrass recorded the highest value of 318.72 mg/kg. This study concludes that CO emission factor is highest for wood pellets, CO? is highest for switchgrass and CH? is negligible for all feedstocks except for wood pellets, which is about 0.374 mg/kg at the end of 11-day storage at 40 °C.« less

  12. Laboratory 11 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Position Control of a Flexible Joint 11.1 Objective The objective of this laboratory is to design a full in this laboratory is illustrated. For this laboratory, the servo is used in the high gear ratio configuration (refer = 2.6 · Km: one of the motor torque constants. Km = 0.00767 · Kg: gear ratio of the motor

  13. cPIES sites Q: Downstream of SFZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    from PF core [km] North (downstream) South (upstream) 5958.55857.557 0 50 100 150 Latitude of max() N cPIES sites Q: Downstream of SFZ Neutraldensity[kg/m 3 ] Distance from PF core [km] -100-50050100 27.2 27.4 27.6 27.8 28 28.2 Q: Upstream of SFZ Distance from PF core [km] -100

  14. March market review. [Spot market prices for uranium (1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The spot market price for uranium in unrestricted markets weakened further during March, and at month end, the NUEXCO Exchange Value had fallen $0.15, to $7.45 per pound U3O8. The Restricted American Market Penalty (RAMP) for concentrates increased $0.15, to $2.55 per pound U3O8. Ample UF6 supplies and limited demand led to a $0.50 decrease in the UF6 Value, to $25.00 per kgU as UF6, while the RAMP for UF6 increased $0.75, to $5.25 per kgU. Nine near-term uranium transactions were reported, totalling almost 3.3 million pounds equivalent U3O8. This is the largest monthly spot market volume since October 1992, and is double the volume reported in January and February. The March 31 Conversion Value was $4.25 per kgU as UF6. Beginning with the March 31 Value, NUEXCO now reports its Conversion Value in US dollars per kilogram of uranium (US$/kgU), reflecting current industry practice. The March loan market was inactive with no transactions reported. The Loan Rate remained unchanged at 3.0 percent per annum. Low demand and increased competition among sellers led to a one-dollar decrease in the SWU Value, to $65 per SWU, and the RAMP for SWU declined one dollar, to $9 per SWU.

  15. Cryogenic Double Beta Decay Experiments: CUORE and CUORICINO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reina Maruyama; for the CUORE Collaboration

    2008-09-23

    Cryogenic bolometers, with their excellent energy resolution, flexibility in material, and availability in high purity, are excellent detectors for the search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Kilogram-size single crystals of TeO_2 are utilized in CUORICINO for an array with a total detector mass of 40.7 kg. CUORICINO currently sets the most stringent limit on the halflife of Te-130 of T > 2.4x10^{24} yr (90% C.L.), corresponding to a limit on the effective Majorana neutrino mass in the range of < 0.2-0.9 eV. Based on technology developed for CUORICINO and its predecessors, CUORE is a next-generation experiment designed to probe neutrino mass in the range of 10 - 100 meV. Latest results from CUORICINO and overview of the progress and current status of CUORE are presented.

  16. Radon backgrounds in the DEAP-1 liquid argon based Dark Matter detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amaudruz, P -A; Beltran, B; Boudjemline, K; Caldwell, M G Boulay B Cai T; Chen, M; Chouinard, R; Cleveland, B T; Contreras, D; Dering, K; Duncan, F; Ford, R; Giuliani, R Gagnon F; Golovko, M Gold V V; Gorel, P; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hakobyan, R; Hallin, A L; Harvey, P; Hearns, C; Jillings, C J; Ku?niak, M; Lawson, I; Li, O; Lidgard, J; Liimatainen, P; Lippincott, W H; Mathew, R; McDonald, A B; McElroy, T; McFarlane, K; McKinsey, D; Muir, A; Nantais, C; Nicolics, K; Nikkel, J; Noble, T; O'Dwyer, E; Olsen, K S; Ouellet, C; Pasuthip, P; Pollmann, T; Rau, W; Retiere, F; Ronquest, M; Skensved, P; Sonley, T; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E; Veloce, L; Ward, M

    2012-01-01

    The DEAP-1 \\SI{7}{kg} single phase liquid argon scintillation detector was operated underground at SNOLAB in order to test the techniques and measure the backgrounds inherent to single phase detection, in support of the DEAP-3600 Dark Matter detector. Backgrounds in DEAP are controlled through material selection, construction techniques, pulse shape discrimination and event reconstruction. This report details the analysis of background events observed in three iterations of the DEAP-1 detector, and the measures taken to reduce them. The $^{222}$Rn decay rate in the liquid argon was measured to be between 16 and \\SI{26}{\\micro\\becquerel\\per\\kilogram}. We found that the background spectrum near the region of interest for Dark Matter detection in the final DEAP-1 detector generation is well described considering events from three sources: radon daughters decaying on the surface of the active volume, the expected rate of electromagnetic events misidentified as nuclear recoils due to inefficiencies in the pulse sh...

  17. Intrinsic neutron background of nuclear emulsions for directional Dark Matter searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandrov, A; Buonaura, A; Consiglio, L; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; Di Crescenzo, A; Di Marco, N; Di Vacri, M L; Furuya, S; Galati, G; Gentile, V; Katsuragawa, T; Laubenstein, M; Lauria, A; Loverre, P F; Machii, S; Monacelli, P; Montesi, M C; Naka, T; Pupilli, F; Rosa, G; Sato, O; Tioukov, V; Umemoto, A; Yoshimoto, M

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments of the nuclear emulsion technology led to the production of films with nanometric silver halide grains suitable to track low energy nuclear recoils with submicrometric length. This improvement opens the way to a directional Dark Matter detection, thus providing an innovative and complementary approach to the on-going WIMP searches. An important background source for these searches is represented by neutron-induced nuclear recoils that can mimic the WIMP signal. In this paper we provide an estimation of the contribution to this background from the intrinsic radioactive contamination of nuclear emulsions. We also report the induced background as a function of the read-out threshold, by using a GEANT4 simulation of the nuclear emulsion, showing that it amounts to about 0.02 neutrons per year per kilogram, fully compatible with the design of a 10 kg$\\times$year exposure.

  18. Product (a) Type (b) Time of Harvest Gear Code (c) Area of catch (d) Net Weight No. of Fish F/FR RD/GG/DR/FL/OT (mm/yy) (kg) (when RD, GG or DR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Product (a) Type (b) Time of Harvest Gear Code (c) Area of catch (d) Net Weight No. of Fish F/FR RD=Other (describe the type of product; ____________________.) (c): If the Gear Code is OT, describe the type of gear

  19. CubeSats are a newly emerging, low-cost, rapid development platform for space exploration research. They are small spacecraft with a mass and volume of up to 12 kg and 12,000 cm3, respectively. To date,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    combustion and flow through the nozzle using both theoretical equations and finite- volume CFD modeling using energy generated by onboard photovoltaic panels to electrolyze water, thus producing combustible

  20. 460 2008 Ernst & Sohn Verlag fr Architektur und technische Wissenschaften GmbH & Co. KG, Berlin Geomechanik und Tunnelbau 1 (2008), Heft 5 DOI: 10.1002/geot.200800050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brückl, Ewald

    2008-01-01

    this risk. These methods are based on Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) lo- cating sources and receivers kann zur Verminderung der Risiken beitragen. Diese seismischen Methoden basieren auf ,,Vertical Seismic in case of construction by a tunnel boring machine (TBM). Seismic imaging of faults and other geological

  1. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Tobiason

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during February 1999. Soil samples were collected using a direct-push method. Soil samples were collected at 0.6-m (2-ft) intervals from the surface to 1.8 m (6 ft) below ground surface. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE, 1999b). Soil sample results indicated that two locations in the bermed area contain total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as diesel at concentrations of 124 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and 377 mg/kg. This exceeds the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) regulatory action level for TPH of 100 mg/kg (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996). The TPH-impacted soil will be removed and disposed as part of the corrective action.

  2. km on Lake Tanganyika (Fig. 2C). Single airguns or multigun arrays in the size range of40 to 140 cubic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    these rift sediments to be Cenozoic in age. 10. Sequence boundaries are the unconformities and their correlative conformities that define deposition- al sequences. A review of the concepts of sequence stratigraphy is presented in C. E. Payton, Ed., Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol. Mem. 26 (1977). 11. T. J. Dunkelman, J. A

  3. Himalayan orogen, so much so that the locus of deep exhumation has been maintained nearly 100 km northwards of the Himalayan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Modeling mountain building and the seismic cycle in the Himalaya of Nepal. J. Geophys. Res. 105, 13389. Seismotectonics of the Nepal Himalaya from a local seismic network. J. Asian Earth Sci. 17, 703­712 (1999). 8 from two perspectives. GSA Bull. 112, 324­350 (2000). 12. DeCelles, P. G. et al. Stratigraphy

  4. The role of precipitation size distributions in km-scale NWP simulations of intense precipitation: Evaluation of cloud properties and surface precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Weverberg K.; Vogelmann A.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbec, L.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties and surface precipitation to assumptions regarding the size distributions of the precipitating hydrometeors in a one-moment bulk microphysics scheme. Three sensitivity experiments were applied to two composites of 15 convective and 15 frontal stratiform intense precipitation events observed in a coastal midlatitude region (Belgium), which were evaluated against satellite-retrieved cloud properties and radar-rain-gauge derived surface precipitation. It is found that the cloud optical thickness distribution was well captured by all experiments, although a significant underestimation of cloudiness occurred in the convective composite. The cloud-top-pressure distribution was improved most by more realistic snow size distributions (including a temperature-dependent intercept parameter and non-spherical snow for the calculation of the slope parameter), due to increased snow depositional growth at high altitudes. Surface precipitation was far less sensitive to whether graupel or hail was chosen as the rimed ice species, as compared to previous idealized experiments. This smaller difference in sensitivity could be explained by the stronger updraught velocities and higher freezing levels in the idealized experiments compared to typical coastal midlatitude environmental conditions.

  5. Evaluation of moist processes during intense precipitation in km-scale NWP models using remote sensing and in-situ data: Impact of microphysics size distribution assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Weverberg, K.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbe, L.

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of moist processes and surface precipitation during three extreme precipitation events over Belgium to the representation of rain, snow and hail size distributions in a bulk one-moment microphysics parameterisation scheme. Sensitivities included the use of empirically derived relations to calculate the slope parameter and diagnose the intercept parameter of the exponential snow and rain size distributions and sensitivities to the treatment of hail/graupel. A detailed evaluation of the experiments against various high temporal resolution and spatially distributed observational data was performed to understand how moist processes responded to the implemented size distribution modifications. Net vapor consumption by microphysical processes was found to be unaffected by snow or rain size distribution modifications, while it was reduced replacing formulations for hail by those typical for graupel, mainly due to intense sublimation of graupel. Cloud optical thickness was overestimated in all experiments and all cases, likely due to overestimated snow amounts. The overestimation slightly deteriorated by modifying the rain and snow size distributions due to increased snow depositional growth, while it was reduced by including graupel. The latter was mainly due to enhanced cloud water collection by graupel and reduced snow depositional growth. Radar reflectivity and cloud optical thickness could only be realistically represented by inclusion of graupel during a stratiform case, while hail was found indispensable to simulate the vertical reflectivity profile and the surface precipitation structure. Precipitation amount was not much altered by any of the modifications made and the general overestimation was only decreased slightly during a supercell convective case.

  6. ShoreZone in the Arctic 8,000 km of Coastal Habitat Mapping Cathy Coon, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, catherine.coon@boem.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @coastalandoceans.com Cindy Hartmann Moore, NOAA/NMFS, cindy.hartmann@noaa.gov Tahzay Jones, National Park Service, Tahzay Resources Inc., john@coastalandoceans.com Cindy Hartmann Moore | NOAA/NMFS, cindy.hartmann@noaa.gov Tahzay

  7. Development and evolution of detachment faulting along 50 km of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 16.5ºN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Deborah K.; Schouten, Hans; Dick, Henry; Cann, Joe; Salters, Vincent; Marschall, Horst R.; Ji, Fuwu; Yoerger, Dana; Sanfilippo, Alessio; Parnell-Turner, Ross; Palmiotto, Camilla; Zheleznov, Alexei; Bai, Hailong; Junkin, Will; Urann, Ben; Dick, Spencer; Sulanowska, Margaret; Lemmond, Peter; Curry, Scott

    2014-12-05

    [Smith et al., 2003] yielding a 119 6 remarkable average of about one earthquake (roughly > magnitude 2.5-3.0), every three days. 120 Based on seismicity rate and their interpretation of the morphology, Escartín et al. [2008] 121 concluded... to the volcanic axis, was interpreted as a newly emerging normal fault 101 forming a rafted block on top of the older West Ridge detachment fault. Seafloor photographs 102 from a camera tow near the top of East Ridge show steep fault scarps cutting pillow lavas...

  8. Generating carbon flux model parameters and drivers via space/time geostatistics As we know, our best moderate scale (1-10 Km2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is to parameterise and drive models with ground based data from sparse measurement networks. One characteristic the ecology, management, etc. Remotely sensed data offers a unique, large area data source to constrain models models: Kriging allows us to more objectively interpolate our data over the domain of interest

  9. Figure S1. Comparison of modelled PM2.5 (27 km resolution) with measurements at Harwell2 (UK) in January 2006.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    m-3 ) between two2 simulations with a 15% emission reduction of either NOx or NH3 in January 2006 for the3 European domain. Aerosol formation is more sensitive to NOx emissions in blue regions and4 more concentration (µg m-3 ) between two2 simulations with a 15% emission reduction of either NOx or NH3 in June 2006

  10. OVERVIEW OF DT RESULTS FROM TFTR M.G. BELL, K.M. McGUIRE, V. ARUNASALAM, C.W. BARNES', S.H. BATHA2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. lo TRINITI, Moscow, Russia. University of California, Irvine, California, USA Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia. " Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project transport coefficients from helium gas puffing experiments. The loss of energetic alpha particles

  11. The Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada, was the site for a 12-kiloton-ton nuclear test

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB100 Ambrosia'1 ~(3JlpVSecretaryNV/13609-53

  12. PDRD (SR13046) TRITIUM PRODUCTION FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, P.; Sheetz, S.

    2013-09-30

    Utilizing the results of Texas A&M University (TAMU) senior design projects on tritium production in four different small modular reactors (SMR), the Savannah River National Laboratory’s (SRNL) developed an optimization model evaluating tritium production versus uranium utilization under a FY2013 plant directed research development (PDRD) project. The model is a tool that can evaluate varying scenarios and various reactor designs to maximize the production of tritium per unit of unobligated United States (US) origin uranium that is in limited supply. The primary module in the model compares the consumption of uranium for various production reactors against the base case of Watts Bar I running a nominal load of 1,696 tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) with an average refueling of 41,000 kg low enriched uranium (LEU) on an 18 month cycle. After inputting an initial year, starting inventory of unobligated uranium and tritium production forecast, the model will compare and contrast the depletion rate of the LEU between the entered alternatives. This is an annual tritium production rate of approximately 0.059 grams of tritium per kilogram of LEU (g-T/kg-LEU). To date, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license has not been amended to accept a full load of TPBARs so the nominal tritium production has not yet been achieved. The alternatives currently loaded into the model include the three light water SMRs evaluated in TAMU senior projects including, mPower, Holtec and NuScale designs. Initial evaluations of tritium production in light water reactor (LWR) based SMRs using optimized loads TPBARs is on the order 0.02-0.06 grams of tritium per kilogram of LEU used. The TAMU students also chose to model tritium production in the GE-Hitachi SPRISM, a pooltype sodium fast reactor (SFR) utilizing a modified TPBAR type target. The team was unable to complete their project so no data is available. In order to include results from a fast reactor, the SRNL Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) ran a Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) model of a basic SFR for comparison. A 600MWth core surrounded by a lithium blanket produced approximately 1,000 grams of tritium annually with a 13% enriched, 6 year core. This is similar results to a mid-1990’s study where the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), a 400 MWth reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), could produce about 1,000 grams with an external lithium target. Normalized to the LWRs values, comparative tritium production for an SFR could be approximately 0.31 g-T/kg LEU.

  13. Pellet property requirements for future blast-furnace operations and other new ironmaking processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, A.K.; Oshnock, T.W. [U.S. Steel, Monroeville, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The requirements for the physical, chemical and metallurgical properties of pellets have continued to become more stringent as blast-furnace productivity and coke rate have been rapidly improved during the last decade. In addition, the age and deterioration of the North American coke batteries, the lack of capital to sufficiently rebuild them, and the threat of increasingly more stringent environmental controls for the coke batteries has forced North American ironmakers to begin implementing pulverized coal injection to minimize the coke requirements for the blast furnace and to seriously investigate developing other ironmaking processes that use coal instead of coke. Therefore, the next major step in North American ironmaking has included injecting pulverized coal (PC) at 200 kilograms per ton of hot metal (kg/ton) [400 pounds per net ton of hot metal (lb/NTHM)] or greater which will result in the coke rate decreasing to less than 300 kg/ton (600 lb/NTHM) or less. As a result, the pellets will spend more time in the furnace and will be required to support more total weight. Pellets can also be a major iron unit source for other cokeless ironmaking processes such as the COREX process or the AISI direct ironmaking process. This paper will explore the pellet property requirements for future blast-furnace operations and cokeless ironmaking processes.

  14. Data Release Report for Source Physics Experiments 2 and 3 (SPE-2 and SPE-3) Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Margaret; Obi, Curtis

    2015-01-26

    The second Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-2) was conducted in Nevada on October 25, 2011, at 1900:00.011623 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). The explosive source was 997 kilograms (kg) trinitrotoluene (TNT) equivalent of sensitized heavy ammonium fuel oil (SHANFO) detonated at a depth of 45.7 meters (m). The third Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-3) was conducted in Nevada on July 24, 2012, at 1800:00.44835 GMT. The explosive source was 905 kg TNT equivalent of SHANFO detonated at a depth of 45.8 m. Both shots were recorded by an extensive set of instrumentation that includes sensors both at near-field (less than 100 m) and far-field (100 m or greater) distances. The near-field instruments consisted of three-component accelerometers deployed in boreholes at 15, 46, and 55 m depths around the shot and a set of single-component vertical accelerometers on the surface. The far-field network was composed of a variety of seismic and acoustic sensors, including short-period geophones, broadband seismometers, three-component accelerometers, and rotational seismometers at distances of 100 m to 25 kilometers. This report coincides with the release of these data for analysts and organizations that are not participants in this program. This report describes the second and third Source Physics Experiment shots and the various types of near-field and far-field data that are available.

  15. DOE H2 Program Annual Review, 5-20-2003 Insulated Pressure Vessels for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    range. J. We are generating tank performance data. K. Testing BOP components. L. Low venting losses) car, km 0 1 2 3 4 5 hydrogenlosses,kg low-pressure LH2 tank MLVSI insulated pressure vessel fueled with LH2 LH2 80 K CH2 1998: thermodynamic analysis 1999: cryogenic cycling 2001: DOT/ISO Tests 2003

  16. 1.Basic Properties of Stars This is the Sun during a total eclipse. The Sun, our closest star, is very much

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peletier, Reynier

    1.Basic Properties of Stars This is the Sun during a total eclipse. The Sun, our closest star of the knowledge that we currently have about stars has been derived by studying the Sun. In this module, we start Solar System: the Sun. For the Sun we have: LTM = 4 1026 W MTM = 2 1030 kg RTM = 7 105 km (T ~ 6000K

  17. *Corresponding author: Email: rainer.volkamer@colorado.edu; British Journal of Environment & Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    author: Email: rainer.volkamer@colorado.edu; British Journal of Environment & Climate Change 3 is a source for both NO2 and Ox'. NO2 production Research Article #12;British Journal of Environment & Climate Change, 3(4): .........., 2013 is highest over the city (1.35 kg hr -1 km -2 NO2), and about 30 times

  18. United States and Czech Republic Establish a Joint Civil Nuclear...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    our two nations. Last month, DOE completed the transfer of 75 kilograms of fluoride salt from the Department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory to the Czech Nuclear Research...

  19. Table 7. Carbon intensity of the energy supply by State (2000...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carbon intensity of the energy supply by State (2000-2011)" "kilograms of energy-related carbon dioxide per million Btu" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2011"...

  20. TECI-INICAL RGPORT A-78-3 MECHANICAL HARVESTING OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    plants from the harvesting site or area to the takeout point on the water-land interface. Once there1I1a'IJ. TECI-INICAL RGPORT A-78-3 MECHANICAL HARVESTING OF AQUATIC PLANTS R.rtl FIELD EVALUATION cubic metre kilograms kilograms per sCluare metre Fl #12;MECHANICAL HARVESTING OF AQUATIC PLANTS FIELD

  1. EOS of North America, Inc. Material Pricing Order Placement: us.materialorders@eos-na.com or via fax: (248) 306-0298

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    conductivity, high-stiffness $62 9012-0029 Polyamide 12 Carbon Fiber Reinforced CarbonMide® Black, light) 306-0143 www.eos.info *Sold in 20 kilogram increments for plastics. **Sold in 10 kilogram increments, 2014 v13 EOS Materials Plastics Detailed material information, including data sheets, can be found

  2. Research Reactor Preparations for the Air Shipment of Highly Enriched Uranium from Romania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. J. Allen; I. Bolshinsky; L. L. Biro; M. E. Budu; N. V. Zamfir; M. Dragusin; C. Paunoiu; M. Ciocanescu

    2010-03-01

    In June 2009 two air shipments transported both unirradiated (fresh) and irradiated (spent) Russian-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) nuclear fuel from two research reactors in Romania to the Russian Federation for conversion to low enriched uranium. The Institute for Nuclear Research at Pitesti (SCN Pitesti) shipped 30.1 kg of HEU fresh fuel pellets to Dimitrovgrad, Russia and the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) shipped 23.7 kilograms of HEU spent fuel assemblies from the VVR S research reactor at Magurele, Romania, to Chelyabinsk, Russia. Both HEU shipments were coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), were managed in Romania by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN), and were conducted in cooperation with the Russian Federation State Corporation Rosatom and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Both shipments were transported by truck to and from respective commercial airports in Romania and the Russian Federation and stored at secure nuclear facilities in Russia until the material is converted into low enriched uranium. These shipments resulted in Romania becoming the 3rd country under the RRRFR program and the 14th country under the GTRI program to remove all HEU. This paper describes the research reactor preparations and license approvals that were necessary to safely and securely complete these air shipments of nuclear fuel.

  3. Bioventing approach to remediate a gasoline contaminated subsurface. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kampbell, D.H.; Wilson, J.T.; Griffin, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    Bioventing is a subsurface process using an air stream to enhance biodegradation of oily contaminants. Two pilot-scale bioventing systems were installed at a field site. Process operations began in October 1990. The field site is located at an air station. A spill in 1969 of about 100,000 kilograms aviation gasoline was caused by a broken underground transfer line. A major portion of the spilled product still persists as an oily-phase residue in a 80x360 meter plume. The subsurface is a uniform beach sand with the ground water level near five meters. Prior to startup of the venting systems, a grass cover was established and a nutrient solution was dispersed throughout the unsaturated subsurface. Subsurface air flow patterns are being determined with a tracer gas of sulfur hexafloride. Soil gas, core material, and underground water are being monitored to determine the extent of remediation. Objectives of the study are to demonstrate that surface emissions of gasoline are minimal, oily residue will be reduced to <100 mg fuel carbon/Kg core material, and the process will be applicable to full-scale remediation. Flow rate is based on a calculated residence time of 24 hours. Surface emission of fuel hydrocarbons have not exceeded 1 micrograms/liter soil gas.

  4. Propulsion engineering study for small-scale Mars missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, J.

    1995-09-12

    Rocket propulsion options for small-scale Mars missions are presented and compared, particularly for the terminal landing maneuver and for sample return. Mars landing has a low propulsive {Delta}v requirement on a {approximately}1-minute time scale, but at a high acceleration. High thrust/weight liquid rocket technologies, or advanced pulse-capable solids, developed during the past decade for missile defense, are therefore more appropriate for small Mars landers than are conventional space propulsion technologies. The advanced liquid systems are characterize by compact lightweight thrusters having high chamber pressures and short lifetimes. Blowdown or regulated pressure-fed operation can satisfy the Mars landing requirement, but hardware mass can be reduced by using pumps. Aggressive terminal landing propulsion designs can enable post-landing hop maneuvers for some surface mobility. The Mars sample return mission requires a small high performance launcher having either solid motors or miniature pump-fed engines. Terminal propulsion for 100 kg Mars landers is within the realm of flight-proven thruster designs, but custom tankage is desirable. Landers on a 10 kg scale also are feasible, using technology that has been demonstrated but not previously flown in space. The number of sources and the selection of components are extremely limited on this smallest scale, so some customized hardware is required. A key characteristic of kilogram-scale propulsion is that gas jets are much lighter than liquid thrusters for reaction control. The mass and volume of tanks for inert gas can be eliminated by systems which generate gas as needed from a liquid or a solid, but these have virtually no space flight history. Mars return propulsion is a major engineering challenge; earth launch is the only previously-solved propulsion problem requiring similar or greater performance.

  5. Evaluation of Settler Tank Thermal Stability during Solidification and Disposition to ERDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, David E.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2015-03-30

    Ten 16-foot-long and 20-inch diameter horizontal tanks currently reside in a stacked 2×5 (high) array in the ~20,000-gallon water-filled Weasel Pit of the 105-KW Fuel Storage Basin on the US-DOE Hanford Site. These ten tanks are part of the Integrated Water Treatment System used to manage water quality in the KW Basin and are called “settler” tanks because of their application in removing particles from the KW Basin waters. Based on process knowledge, the settler tanks are estimated to contain about 124 kilograms of finely divided uranium metal, 22 kg of uranium dioxide, and another 55 kg of other radioactive sludge. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed by CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is charged with managing the settler tanks and arranging for their ultimate disposal by burial in ERDF. The presence of finely divided uranium metal in the sludge is of concern because of the potential for thermal runaway reaction of the uranium metal with water and the formation of flammable hydrogen gas as a product of the uranium-water reaction. Thermal runaway can be instigated by external heating. The STP commissioned a formal Decision Support Board (DSB) to consider options and provide recommendations to manage and dispose of the settler tanks and their contents. Decision criteria included consideration of the project schedule and longer-term deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of the KW Basin. The DSB compared the alternatives and recommended in-situ grouting, size-reduction, and ERDF disposal as the best of six candidate options for settler tank treatment and disposal. It is important to note that most grouts contain a complement of Portland cement as the binding agent and that Portland cement curing reactions generate heat. Therefore, concern is raised that the grouting of the settler tank contents may produce heating sufficient to instigate thermal runaway reactions in the contained uranium metal sludge.

  6. Data Release Report for Source Physics Experiments 2 and 3 (SPE-2 and SPE-3) Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Margaret; Obi, Curtis

    2015-04-30

    The second Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-2) was conducted in Nevada on October 25, 2011, at 1900:00.011623 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). The explosive source was 997 kilograms (kg) trinitrotoluene (TNT) equivalent of sensitized heavy ammonium fuel oil (SHANFO) detonated at a depth of 45.7 meters (m). The third Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-3) was conducted in Nevada on July 24, 2012, at 1800:00.44835 GMT. The explosive source was 905 kg TNT equivalent of SHANFO detonated at a depth of 45.8 m. Both shots were recorded by an extensive set of instrumentation that includes sensors both at near-field (less than 100 m) and far-field (100 m or greater) distances. The near-field instruments consisted of three-component accelerometers deployed in boreholes at 15, 46, and 55 m depths around the shot and a set of single-component vertical accelerometers on the surface. The far-field network was composed of a variety of seismic and acoustic sensors, including short-period geophones, broadband seismometers, three-component accelerometers, and rotational seismometers at distances of 100 m to 25 kilometers. This report coincides with the release of these data for analysts and organizations that are not participants in this program. This report describes the second and third Source Physics Experiment shots and the various types of near-field and farfield data that are available.This revised document includes reports on baseline shift corrections for the SPE-2 and SPE-3 shots that were missing from the original January 2015 version.

  7. Gas cylinder disposal pit remediation waste minimization and management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alas, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Solow, A.; Criswell, C.W.; Spengler, D. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brannon, R.; Schwender, J.M.; Eckman, C.K.; Rusthoven, T. [ETSC Government Services, Inc., Schaumburg, IL (United States)

    1995-02-01

    A remediation of a gas cylinder disposal pit at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico has recently been completed. The cleanup prevented possible spontaneous releases of hazardous gases from corroded cylinders that may have affected nearby active test areas at Sandia`s Technical Area III. Special waste management, safety, and quality plans were developed and strictly implemented for this project. The project was conceived from a waste management perspective, and waste minimization and management were built into the planning and implementation phases. The site layout was planned to accommodate light and heavy equipment, storage of large quantities of suspect soil, and special areas to stage and treat gases and reactive chemicals removed from the pit, as well as radiation protection areas. Excavation was a tightly controlled activity using experienced gas cylinder and reactive chemical specialists. Hazardous operations were conducted at night under lights, to allow nearby daytime operations to function unhindered. The quality assurance plan provided specific control of, and documentation for, critical decisions, as well as the record of daily operations. Both hand and heavy equipment excavation techniques were utilized. Hand excavation techniques were utilized. Hand excavation techniques allows sealed glass containers to be exhumed unharmed. In the end, several dozen thermal batteries; 5 pounds (2.3 kg) of lithium metal; 6.6 pounds (3.0 kg) of rubidium metal; several kilograms of unknown chemicals; 140 cubic yards (107 cubic meters) of thorium-contaminated soil; 270 cubic yards (205 cubic meters) of chromium-contaminated soil; and 450 gas cylinders, including 97 intact cylinders containing inert, flammable, toxic, corrosive, or oxidizing gases were removed and effectively managed to minimize waste.

  8. Greenhouse Gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE): Evaluation of a new method to look at high resolution spatial/temporal distributions of carbon over key sub km sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobler, Jeremy; Zaccheo, T. Scott; Blume, Nathan; Braun, Michael; Perninit, Timothy; McGregor, Doug; Botos, Chris; Dobeck, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Recently a new laser based approach for measuring area with potential for producing 2D estimates of the concentration spatial distribution has been developed through a cooperative agreement with the National Energy and Technology Laboratory of the Department of Energy, Exelis Inc. and AER Inc. The new approach is based on a pair of continuous wave intensity modulated laser absorption spectrometer transceivers, combined with a series of retro reflectors located around the perimeter of the area being monitored. The main goal of this cooperative agreement is monitoring, reporting and verification for ground carbon capture and storage projects. The system was recently tested at the Zero Emission Research and Technology site in Bozeman, MT, with underground leak rates ranging from 0.1 – 0.3 metric ton per day (T/d), as well as a 0.8 T/d surface release. Over 200 hours of data were collected over a rectangular grid 180m x 200m between August 18th and September 9th. In addition, multiple days of in situ data were acquired for the same site, using a Licor gas analyzer systems. Initial comparisons between the laser-based system and the in situ agree very well. The system is designed to operate remotely and transmit the data via a 3G/4G connection along with weather data for the site. An all web-based system ingests the data, populates a database, performs the inversion to ppm CO2 using the Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM), and displays plots and statistics for the retrieved data. We will present an overview of the GreenLITE measurement system, outline the retrieval and reconstruction approach, and discuss results from extensive field testing.

  9. The research project GLOWA-Danube (www.glowa-danube.de) investigates Global Change effects on the water cycle of the Upper Danube river basin (Germany, ~80.0000 km) involving 11 different disciplines from natural and social sciences.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    in the simulation system DANUBIA. A primary scope of DANUBIA is to evaluate consequences of IPCC derived climate, treatment and distribution. It acts as a link between the natural 'supply side', simulated by a groundwater it for showering, toilet flush, laundry etc. The wastewater is passed through virtual clarification plants

  10. High upwind concentrations observed during an upslope tracer event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    In February of 1991 the Rocky Flats Plant conducted twelve tracer experiments to validate an emergency response dispersion model known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985). Experimenters released 140 to 260 kilograms of inert tracer gas (sulfur hexafloride) from the plant over an 11 hour period. During each release, one hundred and sixty-five samples, most of which formed concentric rings of 8 and 16 km radius from the plant, recorded cumulative hourly concentrations of the tracer at one meter above ground level (AGL). Figure 1 contains a depiction of the sampler location, the terrain, and the meteorological stations available within the tracer study area. Brown (1991) describes the experimental setup in more detail. The subject of this paper is an event that occurred early in the fifth experiment, on February 9, 1991. In this experiment, tracer material released from 13:00 to 17:00 LST appeared both downwind and upwind of the source, with the highest concentrations upwind. During the fifth experiment, high pressure in Utah produced mostly sunny skis around Rocky Flats. For most of the day, one could find moderate (5 to 10 ms{sup {minus}1}) northerly (from the North) flow within the 700 to 500 mb level of the atmosphere (approximately 3000 to 5500 meters above Mean Sea Level (MSL)). Synoptic scale motions were isolated enough from the surface layer and heating was great enough to produce a 1 km deep upslope flow (flow from the East to the West) by late afternoon. The winds reversed and became downslope at approximately 17:30 LST.

  11. Design and manufacturing of an ion electrospray propulsion system package and passively-fed propellant supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perna, Louis Evan

    2014-01-01

    Satellites under 500 kilograms have been growing more popular with the miniaturization of high-performance electronics and instruments. Constellations and formations of satellites consisting of thousands of small satellites ...

  12. THE PLUTONIUM STORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.

    2010-01-01

    the bulk of the uranium, as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate, fromto separate large- amounts of uranyl nitrate from plutonium.Plutonium. A sample of uranyl nitrate weighing 1.2 kilograms

  13. Carlsbad Field Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acrot: Kilograms Per Hour: Metric T 011t Per CUbic Meters; Hectates; CUbic T82 Lime Day; MeUic TOllS Per HOur; Sllart TOll II Yardt Per Day: BTU Per H1111r: Lllers Per...

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - 7_GARY_LANGLIE_NMMSS 2014 NRC HEU Report...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 Kilograms Figure 1: Exports of U.S. HEU 1957 - 2012 used as fuel or targets in a nuclear research or test reactor HEU Exports HEU exports began in the 1957 time frame...

  15. Reduction Chemistry of Rare-Earth Metal Complexes: Toward New Reactivity and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wenliang

    2013-01-01

    Elsner, A. ; Milliken, M. As hybrid cars gobble rare metals,rare-earths are heavily used in fuel-efficient hybrid cars.In a leading model of hybrid car, 1 kilogram of neodymium

  16. CuriosityMars Science Laboratory NASA's JOURNEY TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Mineralogy Environmental Instruments REMS -- Rover Environmental Monitoring Station RAD -- Radiation Assessment Detector DAN -- Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons Rover Size Length --10 feet (3 meters), not including -- 2000 pounds (900 kilograms) Heating and Electrical Power Radioisotope Power System -- a Multi

  17. Tuesday, March 14, 2006 IMPACT CRATERING: MODELING AND EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    R. M. Swift W. R. A Probable Taurid Impact on the Moon [#1731] On November 7, 2005, at 23:41:52 UT, observers located at the Marshall Space Flight Center captured the flash produced by a kilogram

  18. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the 2014 IAEA General Conference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Assembly. Since 2009, the United States has partnered with 26 countries and Taiwan to eliminate more than 3,000 kilograms of HEU and plutonium - enough material for well...

  19. Midterm review sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-03-03

    A tank starts out with 50 gallons of water with a salt concentration of 2 ... the air resistance force has magnitude |v| kilograms meters per second squared, where v ...

  20. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    required to evaporate water to the energy needed to overcomeproduce fresh water at the cost of energy and produce afrom sea water requires 3.5 kJ of energy per kilogram of

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2_Thursday 5-23 9 NMMSS_2013_Obligations...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    on 812012 from the Australian facility AUSFAC1 which contain 75,000 grams of Uranium (3000 grams of U235) and 5 kilograms of Plutonium. This shipment is subject to the...

  2. EA-1123: Transfer of Normal and Low-Enriched Uranium Billets to the United Kingdom, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to transfer approximately 710,000 kilograms (1,562,000 pounds) of unneeded normal and low-enriched uranium to the United Kingdom; thus,...

  3. Strategies to reduce energy demand in manufacturing processes are becoming necessary due to the growing concern of carbon emissions and the expected rise of electricity prices over time. To guide the development of these strategies, the results of a life-cycle energy consumption analysis of milling machine tools are first highlighted to show the effect of several factors such as degree of automation, manufacturing environment, transportation, material inputs, and facility inputs on environmental impact. An overview of design and operation strategies to reduce energy consumption is thereafter presented including the implementation of a Kinetic Energy Recovery System (KERS), a process parameter selection strategy, and a web-based energy estimation tool.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dornfeld, David; Wright, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The 1.7 kilogram microchip: Energy and material use in the2002) describing the energy and materials that go into athe cost of materials and manufacturing (in terms of energy

  4. EA-1255: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to transport 5.26 kilograms of enriched uranium-23 5 in the form of nuclear fuel, from the Republic of Georgia to the United Kingdom.

  5. 2011 September NNSA News Viewable.pmd

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    6.3 kilograms (13.8 pounds) of U.S.- origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuel from a nuclear research facility in South Africa. "With this return, we have taken...

  6. Development of a Seismic Snow Streamer and Use of Multi-Offset Reflection for Determining Glacier Ice Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velez Gonzalez, Jose Antonio

    2012-12-31

    source was 0.5 kilograms of pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN) placed in shot holes buried 10 meters below the surface. For this experiment, the recording array of geophones remained stationary and twenty- two seismic sources were deployed at offsets... source was 0.5 kilograms of pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN) placed in shot holes buried 10 meters below the surface. For this experiment, the recording array of geophones remained stationary and twenty- two seismic sources were deployed at offsets...

  7. Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1987-01-01

    To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to Earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

  8. Do yield and quality of big bluestem and switchgrass feedstock decline over winter?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane M.F. Johnson; Garold L. Gresham

    2014-03-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and big bluestem (Andropogon gerdardii Vitman) are potential perennial bioenergy feedstocks. Feedstock storage limitations, labor constraints for harvest, and environmental benefits provided by perennials are rationales for developing localized perennial feedstock as an alternative or in conjunction with annual feedstocks (i.e., crop residues). Little information is available on yield, mineral, and thermochemical properties of native species as related to harvest time. The study’s objectives were to compare the feedstock quantity and quality between grasses harvested in the fall or the following spring. It was hypothesized that biomass yield may decline, but translocation and/or leaching of minerals from the feedstock would improve feedstock quality. Feedstock yield did not differ by crop, harvest time, or their interactions. Both grasses averaged 6.0 Mg ha-1 (fall) and 5.4 Mg ha-1 (spring) with similar high heating value (17.7 MJ kg-1). The K/(Ca + Mg) ratio, used as a quality indicator declined to below a 0.5 threshold, but energy yield (Megajoule per kilogram) decreased 13% by delaying harvest until spring. Only once during the four study-years were conditions ideal for early spring harvest, in contrast during another spring, very muddy conditions resulted in excessive soil contamination. Early spring harvest may be hampered by late snow, lodging, and muddy conditions that may delay or prevent harvest, and result in soil contamination of the feedstock. However, reducing slagging/fouling potential and the mass of mineral nutrients removed from the field without a dramatic loss in biomass or caloric content are reasons to delay harvest until spring.

  9. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Third quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.; Shoop, K.

    1994-06-01

    Column flotation represents a significant improvement over conventional flotation for many applications. This improvement consists of increased selectivity between hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles, which allows the column to produce higher-purity products. A schematic of the column used is given in Figure 1. The basic procedure for the flotation column experiments was as follows: 500 grams of the sludge from Plant A (prepared as described in the Second Quarterly Report) was suspended at 40% solids in distilled water, to produce 1600 ml of slurry. Reagents were added, and the slurry was agitated vigorously for 1 minute. Frother was added to all of the water to be added to the column, at a rate of 0.03 grams/liter (approximately 0.4 kilograms per metric ton, Kg/mt). The frother used was Dowfroth 200 (a mixture of polypropylene glycol methyl ethers, with a mean molecular weight of 200). The column was started, all of the water flowrates were set as desired, and the drain valve was closed. As soon as the water level had reached the base of the feed inlet tube (approximately 1 minute after closing the drain valve), the 1600 ml feed slurry was added over a 15 second interval. This allowed the feed to be added to the column with a minimum of disturbance to the froth layer, and without causing either surging of the pulp level or large losses to the sinks product. Flotation was carried out for 9 minutes after closing the drain valve. Froth and sinks products were collected, filtered, dried at 45{degrees}C, weighed, and analyzed by thermogravimetic analysis. It is readily seen that, when no collector is added, the column produces a product that is markedly higher purity than that produced by conventional flotation. The addition of oleic acid collector to the column feed is not able to produce any further improvement in product quality, and only results in a loss of product recovery.

  10. Comparison of explosive and vibroseis source energy penetration during COCORP deep seismic reflection profiling in the Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steer, D.N.; Brown, L.D.; Knapp, J.H.; Baird, D.J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Comparison of high-fold (50) vibroseis recordings with coincident low-fold (6) explosive source data from deep reflection surveys in the Williston Basin indicates that while vibroseis generated energy decays to ambient noise levels at 7--9 s two-way traveltime (twtt) (20--30 km depth), energy from explosive sources remains above ambient levels to 35--60 s twtt (105--180 km depth). Moreover, single, moderately sized (30 kg) and well-placed charges proved to be as effective as larger (90 kg) sources at penetrating to mantle traveltimes in this area. However, the explosive source energy proved highly variable, with source-to-ground coupling being a major limiting factor in shot efficacy. Stacked results from the vibroseis sources provide superior imagery of shallow and moderate crustal levels by virtue of greater redundancy and shot-to-shot uniformity; shot statics, low fold, and ray-path distortion across the relatively large (24--30 km aperture) spreads used during the explosive recording have proven to be especially problematic in producing conventional seismic sections. In spite of these complications, the explosive source recording served its primary purpose in confirming Moho truncation and the presence of a dipping reflection fabric in the upper mantle along the western flank of the Trans-Hudson orogen buried beneath the Williston Basin.

  11. QUAOAR: A ROCK IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraser, Wesley C.; Brown, Michael E. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, MC 150-21. 1200 E. California Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2010-05-10

    Here we report Wide-Field Planetary Camera 2 observations of the Quaoar-Weywot Kuiper Belt binary. From these observations, we find that Weywot is on an elliptical orbit with an eccentricity of 0.14 {+-} 0.04, a period of 12.438 {+-} 0.005 days, and a semimajor axis of 1.45 {+-} 0.08 x 10{sup 4} km. The orbit reveals a surprisingly high-Quaoar-Weywot system mass of (1.6 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup 21} kg. Using the surface properties of the Uranian and Neptunian satellites as a proxy for Quaoar's surface, we reanalyze the size estimate from Brown and Trujillo. We find, from a mean of available published size estimates, a diameter for Quaoar of 890 {+-} 70 km. We find Quaoar's density to be {rho} = 4.2 {+-} 1.3gcm{sup -3}, possibly the highest density in the Kuiper Belt.

  12. Coilgun Launcher for Nanosatellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turman, B.N.

    1999-03-23

    Nanosatellite space launches could significantly benefit from an electrically powered launch complex, based on an electromagnetic coil launcher. This paper presents results of studies to estimate the required launcher parameters and some fixed facility issues. This study is based on electromagnetic launch, or electromagnetic gun technology, which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. A baseline configuration for analysis considers a payload mass of 10 kg, launch velocity of 6 km/s, a second stage solid booster for orbital insertion, and a payload fraction of about 0.1. The launch facility is envisioned as an inclined track, 1-2 km in length, mounted on a hillside at 25 degrees aimed in the orbital inclination of interest. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 2000 MJ and 2 MW electric. This energy would be supplied by 400 modules of energy storage and magnetic coils. With a prime power generator of 2 MW, a launch rate of some 200 satellites per day is possible. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened to launch acceleration on the order of 1000 gee. Parametric evaluations compare performance parameters for a launcher length of 1-2 km, exit velocity of 4-8 km/s, and payloads of 1-100 kg. The EM launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turn-around time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. Most importantly, such a facility could reduce the cost per launch and could give true launch-on-demand capability for nanosatellites.

  13. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T. S.

    1998-11-06

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt percent graphite, 15 wt percent calcium fluoride (CaF2), and 12 wt percent plutonium oxide (PuO2). Approximately 950 kilograms of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 degrees C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO2 concentration in the residue averages 12 wt percent, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF2 dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO2) as a surrogate for PuO2 and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF2 and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.In general, the recovery of cerium from the full-scale waste forms was higher than for smaller scale experiments. The presence of CaF2 also caused a dramatic increase in cerium recovery not seen in the small-scale experiments. However, the results from experiments with actual graphite fines were encouraging. A 4:1 frit to residue ratio, a temperature of 700 degrees C, and a 2 hr heating time produced waste forms with plutonium recoveries of 4 plus/minus 1 g/kg. With an increase in the frit to residue ratio, waste forms fabricated at this scale should meet the Rocky Flats product specification. The scale-up of the waste form fabrication process to nominally 3 kg is expected to require a 5:1 to 6:1 frit to residue ratio and maintaining the waste form centerline temperature at 700 degrees C for 2 hr.

  14. A Proposed Exact Integer Value for Avogadro's Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronald F. Fox; Theodore P. Hill

    2007-04-28

    An exact value for Avodagro's number, namely NA* = (84446888)^3, is proposed. The number 84446888 represents the side length of a cube of atoms whose volume is closest, among all integral side lengths, to the current official NIST value of Avogadro's number. This value NA* is nearly dead center of the estimated range for the value of Avogadro's number, and is within the official standard level of uncertainty. Adoption of this value as the fixed value for NA would eliminate the current time-dependent definition of Avogadro's number, which depends on the definition of kilogram via an unstable physical artifact. It would also eliminate the need for the kilogram artifact altogether, since then, by definition, a kilogram would be exactly 1000/12 the mass of NA* atoms of carbon-12.

  15. Nuclear electric propulsion /NEP/ spacecraft for the outer planet orbiter mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, P.W.; Nock, K.T.

    1982-01-01

    The design, operating features, and a possible Neptune orbit for the spacecraft powered by the SP-100 nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) system under study by NASA and the DOE are described. The system features a reactor and a payload situated on opposite ends of a 0.5 m diam, 11 m long astromast. Mercury-ion thrusters are located beneath the reactor for side thrusting, and no contamination of the payload or obstruction of the viewing angles for scientific objectives occurs with the system, which would not degrade in performance even under high insolation during near-sun maneuvers. Results of a theoretical study of earth escapes are presented to show that an NEP powered spiral trajectory out of a 700 km Shuttle orbit and using a Triton gravity assist would be superior to departing from a 300 km orbit with a Centaur boost. The mission profile includes a 1249 kg Galileo payload. The SP-100 has a 1.4 MWth reactor with UO2 fuel tiles and weighs 19,904 kg.

  16. Please cite this article in press as: Kam KM, et al. On assessing spatial uniformity of particle distributions in quality control of manufacturing processes. J Manuf Syst (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmsy.2012.07.018

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    , in the metal matrix nanocomposite (MMNC) fabrication processes where nano-sized ceramic particles are embedded strengthen the metal matrix, and the more uniformly the nanoparticles disperse, the bet- ter the composite matrix nanocomposite (MMNC) Tissue-engineered scaffolds a b s t r a c t There are many situations

  17. Site-specific analysis of glycosylated proteins using mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irungu, Janet W.

    2008-01-16

    in Telsa, m in kilograms, r in meters, q in Coulombs, and v in meters per second. 25, 28, 30 As shown from equation 2, the cyclotron frequency is inversely proportional to the mass-to-charge ratio (m/q or m/z). All ions of the same m/q rotate... in Telsa, m in kilograms, r in meters, q in Coulombs, and v in meters per second. 25, 28, 30 As shown from equation 2, the cyclotron frequency is inversely proportional to the mass-to-charge ratio (m/q or m/z). All ions of the same m/q rotate...

  18. ORBITS, MASSES, AND EVOLUTION OF MAIN BELT TRIPLE (87) SYLVIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rojo, Patricio [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-08-15

    Sylvia is a triple asteroid system located in the main belt. We report new adaptive optics observations of this system that extend the baseline of existing astrometric observations to a decade. We present the first fully dynamical three-body model for this system by fitting to all available astrometric measurements. This model simultaneously fits for individual masses, orbits, and primary oblateness. We find that Sylvia is composed of a dominant central mass surrounded by two satellites orbiting at 706.5 {+-} 2.5 km and 1357 {+-} 4.0 km, i.e., about 5 and nearly 10 primary radii. We derive individual masses of 1.484{sup +0.016}{sub -0.014} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} kg for the primary (corresponding to a density of 1.29 {+-} 0.39 g cm{sup -3}), 7.33{sup +4.7}{sub -2.3} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} kg for the inner satellite, and 9.32{sup +20.7}{sub -8.3} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} kg for the outer satellite. The oblateness of the primary induces substantial precession and the J{sub 2} value can be constrained to the range of 0.0985-0.1. The orbits of the satellites are relatively circular with eccentricities less than 0.04. The spin axis of the primary body and the orbital poles of both satellites are all aligned within about 2 deg of each other, indicating a nearly coplanar configuration and suggestive of satellite formation in or near the equatorial plane of the primary. We also investigate the past orbital evolution of the system by simulating the effects of a recent passage through 3:1 mean-motion eccentricity-type resonances. In some scenarios this allow us to place constraints on interior structure and past eccentricities.

  19. Numerical simulations of quiet sun magnetism: On the contribution from a small-scale dynamo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempel, M.

    2014-07-10

    We present a series of radiative MHD simulations addressing the origin and distribution of the mixed polarity magnetic field in the solar photosphere. To this end, we consider numerical simulations that cover the uppermost 2-6 Mm of the solar convection zone and we explore scales ranging from 2 km to 25 Mm. We study how the strength and distribution of the magnetic field in the photosphere and subsurface layers depend on resolution, domain size, and boundary conditions. We find that 50% of the magnetic energy at the ? = 1 level comes from fields with the less than 500 G strength and that 50% of the energy resides on scales smaller than about 100 km. While the probability distribution functions are essentially independent of resolution, properly describing the spectral energy distribution requires grid spacings of 8 km or smaller. The formation of flux concentrations in the photosphere exceeding 1 kG requires a mean vertical field strength greater than 30-40 G at ? = 1. The filling factor of kG flux concentrations increases with overall domain size as the magnetic field becomes organized by larger, longer-lived flow structures. A solution with a mean vertical field strength of around 85 G at ? = 1 requires a subsurface rms field strength increasing with depth at the same rate as the equipartition field strength. We consider this an upper limit for the quiet Sun field strength, which implies that most of the convection zone is magnetized close to the equipartition. We discuss these findings in view of recent high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of quiet Sun magnetism.

  20. Modifications and Applications of the HERMES model: June - October 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaugh, J E

    2010-11-16

    The HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) model has been developed to describe the response of energetic materials to low-velocity mechanical stimulus, referred to as HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response) or BVR (Burn to Violent Reaction). For tests performed with an HMX-based UK explosive, at sample sizes less than 200 g, the response was sometimes an explosion, but was not observed to be a detonation. The distinction between explosion and detonation can be important in assessing the effects of the HE response on nearby structures. A detonation proceeds as a supersonic shock wave supported by the release of energy that accompanies the transition from solid to high-pressure gas. For military high explosives, the shock wave velocity generally exceeds 7 km/s, and the pressure behind the shock wave generally exceeds 30 GPa. A kilogram of explosive would be converted to gas in 10 to 15 microseconds. An HEVR explosion proceeds much more slowly. Much of the explosive remains unreacted after the event. Peak pressures have been measured and calculated at less than 1 GPa, and the time for the portion of the solid that does react to form gas is about a millisecond. The explosion will, however, launch the confinement to a velocity that depends on the confinement mass, the mass of explosive converted, and the time required to form gas products. In many tests, the air blast signal and confinement velocity are comparable to those measured when an amount of explosive equal to that which is converted in an HEVR is deliberately detonated in the comparable confinement. The number of confinement fragments from an HEVR is much less than from the comparable detonation. The HERMES model comprises several submodels including a constitutive model for strength, a model for damage that includes the creation of porosity and surface area through fragmentation, an ignition model, an ignition front propagation model, and a model for burning after ignition. We have used HERMES in computer simulations of US and UK variants of the Steven Test. We have recently improved some of the submodels, and report those developments here, as well as the results of some additional applications.

  1. Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-110 Heel Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, William S.

    2013-09-30

    Nine samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-110 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, the sample solids were primarily white to light-brown with minor dark-colored inclusions. The maximum dimension of the majority of the solids was <2 mm; however, numerous pieces of aggregate, microcrystalline, and crystalline solids with maximum dimensions ranging from 5-70 mm were observed. In general, the larger pieces of aggregate solids were strongly cemented. Natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}?19H{sub 2}O] was the dominant solid phase identified in the heel solids. Results of chemical analyses suggested that 85-87 wt% of the heel solids were the fluoridephosphate double salt. The average bulk density measured for the heel solids was 1.689 g/mL; the reference density of natrophosphate is 1.71 g/mL. Dissolution tests on composite samples indicate that 94 to 97 wt% of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids can be retrieved by dissolution in water. Dissolution and recovery of the soluble components in 1 kg (0.59 L) of the heel solids required the addition of ≈9.5 kg (9.5 L) of water at 15 ?C and ≈4.4 kg (4.45 L) of water at 45 ?C. Calculations performed using the Environmental Simulation Program indicate that dissolution of the ≈0.86 kg of natrophosphate in each kilogram of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids would require ≈9.45 kg of water at 15 ?C and ≈4.25 kg of water at 45 ?C. The slightly larger quantities of water determined to be required to retrieve the soluble components in 1 kg of the heel solids are consistent with that required for the dissolution of solids composed mainly of natrophosphate with a major portion of the balance consisting of highly soluble sodium salts. At least 98% of the structural water, soluble phosphate, sodium, fluoride, nitrate, carbonate, nitrite, sulfate, oxalate, and chloride in the test composites was dissolved and recovered in the dissolution tests. Most of the {sup 99}Tc and {sup 137}Cs present in the initial heel solids composites was removed in the water dissolution tests. The estimated activities/weights of {sup 129}I, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, and {sup 238}U in the dry residual solids were <25% of the weights/activities in the initial composite solids. Gibbsite and nordstrandite [both Al(OH){sub 3}] were the major solid phases identified in the solids remaining after completion of the dissolution tests. Chemical analysis indicated that the residual solids may have contained up to 62 wt% Al(OH){sub 3}. Significant quantities of unidentified phosphate-, iron-, bismuth-, silicon-, and strontium- bearing species were also present in the residual solids. The reference density of gibbsite (and nordstrandite) is 2.42 g/mL. The measured density of the residual solids, 2.65 g/mL, would be a reasonable value for solids containing gibbsite as the major component with minor quantities of other, higher density solids. Sieve analysis indicated that 22.2 wt% of the residual solids were discrete particles >710 μm in size, and 77.8 wt% were particulates <710 μm in size. Light-scattering measurements suggested that nearly all of the <710-μm particulates with diameters >12 μm were weakly bound aggregates of particles with diameters <2 μm. The <710-μm residual solids settled very slowly when dispersed in reagent water. The physical appearance of a suspension containing ≈0.4 vol% of the solids in pure water changed very little over a period of 46.5 hours. It should be noted that the distribution of particle sizes in the residual solids and the observed settling behavior were both strongly influenced by the procedures followed in the dissolution tests.

  2. THE RISK OF NUCLEAR TERRORISM AND NEXT STEPS TO REDUCE THE DANGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    nuclear facility in South Africa, where hundreds of kilograms of weapon-grade highly enriched uranium (HEU nuclear weapon and every cache of potential nuclear bomb material worldwide is secured against the kinds terrorism. Do terrorists want nuclear weapons? For a small set of terrorists, the answer is clearly "yes

  3. The Gravity Field of the Earth and Coriolis Effects.... The gravity field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    The Gravity Field of the Earth and Coriolis Effects.... The gravity field Stationary particles #12;Gravity.... Newton's Universal Law of Gravitation: The force between any two particles having.673 ×10-11 newton-meter2/kilogram2) #12;Gravity.... In vector form, or, 21 è force on 2 due to 1 12 è

  4. EXTRUSION SIMULATION AND EXPERIMENTAL VALIDATION TO OPTIMIZE PRECISION DIE DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    and precision of final extrudate profiles for plastic scintillators. Plastic Scintillator Properties of extruded plastic scintillators for large-scale accelerator detectors. For example, MINOS (Main Injector tons of finished plastic scintillators [1]. At about $40 per kilogram cost of cast plastic scintillator

  5. Deploying a Sensor Network in an Extreme Environment K.Martinez, P.Padhy, A.Elsaify, G.Zou, A.Riddoch, J.K. Hart*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    powerful distributed processing but many services, such as storage, for sensor networks [6]. This type inside glaciers. This paper describes the solutions to power management, radio communications and other (including small sub- kilogram intelligent tele-robots) [1], aeroplanes [10] and micro-submarines [13

  6. LITHIUM--1997 46.1 By Joyce A. Ober

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the production shift to South America. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were important sources of lithium ore at its Trail, British Columbia, Canada, plant. Each battery weighs more than 1,200 kilograms and Tox on its coal, copper, and molybdenum operations (Platt's Metals Week, 1997). FMC Corp., Lithium Div

  7. Mars Science Laboratory Launch Contingency Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermoelectric Gen- erator (MMRTG). Essentially a nuclear battery, the MMRTG contains 10.6 pounds (4.8 kilograms systems during the frigid Martian night. The MMRTG is an evolutionary design of the power sources missions for more than 40 years. As with the previous seven generations of such devices, the MMRTG

  8. EPOXI COMET ENCOUNTER Nov. 2, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (9-foot-by-9 foot) solar panel providing up to 750 watts, depending on distance from sun. Power) fuel. On 10/25/10 there was 4 kilograms (8.8 pounds) of fuel remaining. Power: 2.8-meter-by-2.8-meter, a flyby spacecraft, acted as the mother ship, carrying and powering the impactor until 24 hours before

  9. ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014 Energy Units & Conversions, Global Energy Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    points) e. How many kilograms of wood? (3 points) f. How many cubic feet of natural gas? (Note on the highway and 40% in the city, calculate average daily gas consumption in gallons per person, and yearly gas/1756211/Energy-and-Society-Fall-2014 2. ENERGY USE IN CHINA: In 2012, China's electric power sector generated 4

  10. Revised: 6 November 1991 Trends in the Consumption of Energy-Intensive Basic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materials consumption patterns on energy use is the recognition that physical units (kilograms) are moreRevised: 6 November 1991 Trends in the Consumption of Energy-Intensive Basic Materials. 1. INTRODUCTION} Industry accounts for 50% of total energy use in developing countries

  11. Osprey: A Practical Type System for Validating Dimensional Unit Correctness of C Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Zhendong

    .S.A. {jiangl, su}@cs.ucdavis.edu ABSTRACT Misuse of measurement units is a common source of errors in sci units, type systems 1. INTRODUCTION Scientific applications use measurement units such as meters, seconds, or kilograms. Misuse of measurement units in these ap- plications can be disastrous

  12. LLNL Site plan for a MOX fuel lead assembly mission in support of surplus plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, M.C.

    1997-10-01

    The principal facilities that LLNL would use to support a MOX Fuel Lead Assembly Mission are Building 332 and Building 334. Both of these buildings are within the security boundary known as the LLNL Superblock. Building 332 is the LLNL Plutonium Facility. As an operational plutonium facility, it has all the infrastructure and support services required for plutonium operations. The LLNL Plutonium Facility routinely handles kilogram quantities of plutonium and uranium. Currently, the building is limited to a plutonium inventory of 700 kilograms and a uranium inventory of 300 kilograms. Process rooms (excluding the vaults) are limited to an inventory of 20 kilograms per room. Ongoing operations include: receiving SSTS, material receipt, storage, metal machining and casting, welding, metal-to-oxide conversion, purification, molten salt operations, chlorination, oxide calcination, cold pressing and sintering, vitrification, encapsulation, chemical analysis, metallography and microprobe analysis, waste material processing, material accountability measurements, packaging, and material shipping. Building 334 is the Hardened Engineering Test Building. This building supports environmental and radiation measurements on encapsulated plutonium and uranium components. Other existing facilities that would be used to support a MOX Fuel Lead Assembly Mission include Building 335 for hardware receiving and storage and TRU and LLW waste storage and shipping facilities, and Building 331 or Building 241 for storage of depleted uranium.

  13. Detoxification of Organophosphate Nerve Agents by Immobilized Escherichia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    et al., 1989). In the United States over 40 million kilograms of organo- phosphate pesticides, in ap- proximately 100 min, at a specific rate of 0.160 mM min-1 (g cell dry wt)-1 . The immobilized with mus- cular responses, and in vital organs produces serious symp- toms and eventually death (Donarski

  14. Simple Harmonic Motion and Newton's 3rd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jaehoon

    Simple Harmonic Motion and Newton's 3rd Law Theory Simple Harmonic Motion is not as simpleperiod where m is the mass of the object in kilograms and k is the spring constant. Newton's 3rd Law Newton's 3rd Law using two Force sensors. Procedure: Simple Harmonic Motion Getting the data 1. Open

  15. Plasma acceleration from radio-frequency discharge in dielectric capillary A. Dunaevskya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1063/1.2214127 Electric propulsion devices for spacecraft with masses of several tens of kilograms are in increasing, weight, and dimensions. Saturation and thermal load on the magnetic system limit miniaturization had only an efficiency of 6% at 100 W consumed power.4 Pulsing propulsion de- vices such as pulsed

  16. 24Meteorite Compositions: A matter of density Most people have heard about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the solar system. The above meteorite sample is called the Esquel Pallasite, and was part of a 1000 kilogram was the mass of each of the two ingredients to the pallasite? Problem 2 - Meteorite collectors find and sell Problem 2 - Meteorite collectors find and sell samples by the gram. The price of a gram of the Esquel

  17. Magnesium oxide inserts for the LECO Carbon Analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagaasen, L.M.; Jensen, C.M.

    1991-01-16

    LECO carbon analysis of plutonium metal and plutonium oxide at the Rocky Flats Plant generates several hundred kilograms of high silica residues each year. The plutonium in these residues is difficult and expensive to recover using production dissolution processes. A magnesium oxide (MgO) insert has been developed that significantly lowers the plutonium recovery costs without adversely affecting accuracy of the carbon analysis.

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Reporting Small Quantities to NMMSS_Brian...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    units depend on the type of material 3 Reportable Units Source Material - Depleted Uranium * kg Uranium * kg U-235 - Natural Uranium * kg Uranium * No U-235 reported - Thorium...

  19. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 561: Waste Disposal Areas, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-08-01

    CAU 561 comprises 10 CASs: (1) 01-19-01, Waste Dump; (2) 02-08-02, Waste Dump and Burn Area; (3) 03-19-02, Debris Pile; (4) 05-62-01, Radioactive Gravel Pile; (5) 12-23-09, Radioactive Waste Dump; (6) 22-19-06, Buried Waste Disposal Site; (7) 23-21-04, Waste Disposal Trenches ; (8) 25-08-02, Waste Dump; (9) 25-23-21, Radioactive Waste Dump; and (10) 25-25-19, Hydrocarbon Stains and Trench. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 561 with no further corrective action. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the DQO process: (1) Determine whether COCs are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: (1) No contamination exceeding FALs was identified at CASs 01-19-01, 03-19-02, 05-62-01, 12-23-09, and 22-19-06. (2) The surface and subsurface soil within the burn area at CAS 02-08-02 contains arsenic and lead above the FALs of 23 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and 800 mg/kg, respectively. The surface and subsurface soil within the burn area also contains melted lead slag (potential source material [PSM]). The soil within the waste piles contains polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) above the FALs. The contamination within the burn area is spread throughout the area, as it was not feasible to remove all the PSM (melted lead), while at the waste piles, the contamination is confined to the piles. (3) The surface and subsurface soils within Trenches 3 and 5 at CAS 23-21-04 contain arsenic and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) above the FALs of 23 mg/kg and 0.74 mg/kg, respectively. The soil was removed from both trenches, and the soil that remains at this CAS does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. Lead bricks and counterweights were also removed, and the soil below these items does not contain contamination that exceeds the FAL for lead. (4) The concrete-like material at CAS 25-08-02 contains arsenic above the FAL of 23 mg/kg. This concrete-like material was removed, and the soil that remains at this CAS does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. Lead-acid batteries were also removed, and the soil below the batteries does not contain contamination that exceeds the FAL for lead. (5) The surface soils within the main waste dump at the posted southern radioactive material area (RMA) at CAS 25-23-21 contain cesium (Cs)-137 and PCBs above the FALs of 72.9 picocuries per gram (pCi/g) and 0.74 mg/kg, respectively. The soil was removed from the RMA, and the soil that remains at this CAS does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. (6) The surface and subsurface soils at CAS 25-25-19 do not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. In addition, lead bricks were removed, and the soil below these items does not contain contamination that exceeds the FAL for lead. The following best management practices were implemented: (1) Housekeeping debris at CASs 02-08-02, 23-21-04, 25-08-02, 25-23-21, and 25-25-19 was removed and disposed of; (2) The open trenches at CAS 23-21-04 were backfilled; (3) The waste piles at CAS 25-08-02 were removed and the area leveled to ground surface; and (4) The remaining waste piles at the main waste dump at CAS 25-23-21 were leveled to ground surface. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: (1) No further action for CASs 01-19-01, 03-19-02, 05-62-01, 12-23-09, and 22-19-06; (2) Closure in place with an FFACO use restriction (UR) at CAS 02-08-02 for the remaining PAH-, arsenic-, and lead-contaminated soil, and the melted lead PSM. The UR form and map have been filed in the NNSA/NSO Facility Information Management System, the FFACO database, and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files; (3) No further corrective action at CAS 23-21-04, as the lead bricks and counterweights (PSM) have been removed, and the COCs of arsenic and PCBs in soil have be

  20. Compounds from Sorindeia juglandifolia (Anacardiaceae) exhibit potent anti-plasmodial activities in vitro and in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    of infected mice receiving quinine sulfate at 24 mg/kg.test Additional file Quinine sulfate (24 mg/kg) c SD 5044.9 ± 1.6 mg/kg Curative test Quinine sulfate (24 mg/kg) c

  1. An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

    2010-01-01

    H 2 compressor and gas storage Other (site prep. Engineeringpump 42 kg/h) 358 kg H2 667 kg compressed gas storage 100kg compressed gas storage 1 dispenser 2 dispenser each

  2. Service robotics Prof. Alessandro De Luca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    -mining · PEMEX lightweight anti-personnel mine detector (EPFL, Lausanne) · weight: 16 kg, max 6 kg for wheel

  3. Nanotechnology for Teachers Dr. John S. Hutchinson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering? Nanobots? Science Fiction! #12;"Nano": How small is that, really? Mountain 1 km 1000 m 0.001 km

  4. Hot Spring Monitoring at Lassen Volcanic National Park, California 1983-1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, Michael L.

    1986-01-21

    Data collected on several occasions between 1983 and 1985 as part of a hydrologic monitoring program by the U.S. Geological Survey permit preliminary estimation of the natural variability in the discharge characteristics of hydrothermal features in Lassen Volcanic National Park and the Lassen KGRA in northern California. The total rate of discharge of high-chloride hot springs along Mill Creek and Canyon Creek in the Lassen KGRA has averaged 20.9 {+-} 1.7 L/s, based on seven measurements of the flux of chloride in these streams. Measured chloride flux does not appear to increase with streamflow during the spring-summer snowmelt period, as observed at Yellowstone and Long Valley Caldera. The corresponding fluxes of arsenic in Mill Creek and Canyon Creek decrease within distances of about 2 km downstream from the hot springs by approximately 30%, most likely due to chemical absorption on streambed sediments. Within Lassen Volcanic National Park, measurements of sulfate flux in streams draining steam-heated thermal features at Sulphur Works and Bumpass Hell have averaged 7.5 {+-} 1.0 and 4.0 {+-} 1.5 g/s, respectively. Calculated rates of steam upflow containing, dissolved H{sub 2}S to supply these sulfate fluxes are 1.8 kg/s at Sulphur Works and 1.0 kg/s at Bumpass Hell.

  5. DEAP-3600 Dark Matter Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. -A. Amaudruz; M. Batygov; B. Beltran; J. Bonatt; M. G. Boulay; B. Broerman; J. F. Bueno; A. Butcher; B. Cai; M. Chen; R. Chouinard; B. T. Cleveland; K. Dering; J. DiGioseffo; F. Duncan; T. Flower; R. Ford; P. Giampa; P. Gorel; K. Graham; D. R. Grant; E. Guliyev; A. L. Hallin; M. Hamstra; P. Harvey; C. J. Jillings; M. Ku?niak; I. Lawson; O. Li; P. Liimatainen; P. Majewski; A. B. McDonald; T. McElroy; K. McFarlane; J. Monroe; A. Muir; C. Nantais; C. Ng; A. J. Noble; C. Ouellet; K. Palladino; P. Pasuthip; S. J. M. Peeters; T. Pollmann; W. Rau; F. Retière; N. Seeburn; K. Singhrao; P. Skensved; B. Smith; T. Sonley; J. Tang; E. Vázquez-Jáuregui; L. Veloce; J. Walding; M. Ward

    2014-10-27

    The DEAP-3600 experiment is located 2 km underground at SNOLAB, in Sudbury, Ontario. It is a single-phase detector that searches for dark matter particle interactions within a 1000-kg fiducial mass target of liquid argon. A first generation prototype detector (DEAP-1) with a 7-kg liquid argon target mass demonstrated a high level of pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) for reducing $\\beta$/$\\gamma$ backgrounds and helped to develop low radioactivity techniques to mitigate surface-related $\\alpha$ backgrounds. Construction of the DEAP-3600 detector is nearly complete and commissioning is starting in 2014. The target sensitivity to spin-independent scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) on nucleons of 10$^{-46}$ cm$^2$ will allow one order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over current searches at 100 GeV WIMP mass. This paper presents an overview and status of the DEAP-3600 project and discusses plans for a future multi-tonne experiment, DEAP-50T.

  6. The beryllium hollow-body solar sail: exploration of the Sun's gravitational focus and the inner Oort Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory L. Matloff; Roman Ya. Kezerashvili; Claudio Maccone; Les Johnson

    2008-09-20

    Spacecraft kinematics, peak perihelion temperature and space environment effects during solar-radiation-pressure acceleration for a beryllium hollow-body interstellar solar sail inflated with hydrogen fill gas are investigated. We demonstrate that diffusion is alleviated by an on-board fill gas reserve and electrostatic pressure can be alleviated by increasing perihelion distance. For a 0.1 AU perihelion, a 937 m radius sail with a sail mass of 150 kg and a payload mass of 150 kg, perihelion sail temperature is about 1000 K, peak acceleration is about 0.6 g, and solar-system exit velocity is about 400 km/s. After sail deployments, the craft reaches the 200 AU heliopause in 2.5 years, the Sun's inner gravitational focus at 550 AU in about 6.5 years and 2,550 AU in 30 years. The Be hollow-body sail could be applied in the post 2040 time frame to verify general relativity predictions regarding the Sun's inner gravitational focus and to explore particles and fields in the Sun's inner Oort Comet Cloud.

  7. Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

  8. Petrology and geochemistry of Alto Peak, a vapor-cored hydrothermal system, Leyte Province, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, A.G.; Giggenbach, W.F.; Saleras, J.R.M.; Salonga, N.D.; Vergara, M.C.

    1993-10-01

    Based on detailed petrological information on secondary mineral assemblages and the composition of fluids trapped in inclusions and discharged from five wells, the Alto Peak geothermal field was found to represent a combined vapor and liquid-dominated system. A central core or chimney, with a diameter of about 1 km, a height of some 3 km and occupied by a high gas vapor (1.1 to 5.6 molal CO{sub 2}), is surrounded by an envelope of intermediate salinity water (7,000 mg/kg Cl) with temperatures between 250 and 350 C. The transition from purely vapor-dominated to liquid-dominated zones takes place via two-phase zones occupied by fluid mixtures of highly variable compositions. Much of the lower temperature, mature neutral pH Cl water is likely to have formed during an earlier stage in the evolution of the system. High temperatures of > 300 C, and associated alteration, are limited to wells AP-1D and the lower parts of AP-2D and are ascribed to re-heating by recent magmatic intrusions. The isotopic composition of the well discharges suggests that they contain some 40 to 50% of magmatic water. Alto Peak is considered a typical example of hydrothermal systems associated with many dormant volcanoes.

  9. Life Cycle Assessment of Gasoline and Diesel Produced via Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, D. D.

    2011-03-01

    In this work, a life cycle assessment (LCA) estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and net energy value (NEV) of the production of gasoline and diesel from forest residues via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing, from production of the feedstock to end use of the fuel in a vehicle, is performed. The fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating and hydrocracking processes are based on a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) design report. The LCA results show GHG emissions of 0.142 kg CO2-equiv. per km traveled and NEV of 1.00 MJ per km traveled for a process using grid electricity. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis shows a range of results, with all values better than those of conventional gasoline in 2005. Results for GHG emissions and NEV of gasoline and diesel from pyrolysis are also reported on a per MJ fuel basis for comparison with ethanol produced via gasification. Although pyrolysis-derived gasoline and diesel have lower GHG emissions and higher NEV than conventional gasoline does in 2005, they underperform ethanol produced via gasification from the same feedstock. GHG emissions for pyrolysis could be lowered further if electricity and hydrogen are produced from biomass instead of from fossil sources.

  10. Optimization of a CNG series hybrid concept vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.; Perkins, L.J.; Haney, S.W.; Flowers, D.L.

    1995-09-22

    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) has favorable characteristics as a vehicular fuel, in terms of fuel economy as well as emissions. Using CNG as a fuel in a series hybrid vehicle has the potential of resulting in very high fuel economy (between 26 and 30 km/liter, 60 to 70 mpg) and very low emissions (substantially lower than Federal Tier II or CARB ULEV). This paper uses a vehicle evaluation code and an optimizer to find a set of vehicle parameters that result in optimum vehicle fuel economy. The vehicle evaluation code used in this analysis estimates vehicle power performance, including engine efficiency and power, generator efficiency, energy storage device efficiency and state-of-charge, and motor and transmission efficiencies. Eight vehicle parameters are selected as free variables for the optimization. The optimum vehicle must also meet two perfect requirements: accelerate to 97 km/h in less than 10 s, and climb an infinitely long hill with a 6% slope at 97 km/h with a 272 kg (600 lb.) payload. The optimizer used in this work was originally developed in the magnetic fusion energy program, and has been used to optimize complex systems, such as magnetic and inertial fusion devices, neutron sources, and mil guns. The optimizer consists of two parts: an optimization package for minimizing non-linear functions of many variables subject to several non-linear equality and/or inequality constraints and a programmable shell that allows interactive configuration and execution of the optimizer. The results of the analysis indicate that the CNG series hybrid vehicle has a high efficiency and low emissions. These results emphasize the advantages of CNG as a near-term alternative fuel for vehicles.

  11. Texas Hydrogen Highway Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase - Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitchcock, David

    2012-06-29

    The Texas Hydrogen Highway project has showcased a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus and hydrogen fueling infrastructure that was designed and built through previous support from various public and private sector entities. The aim of this project has been to increase awareness among transit agencies and other public entities on these transportation technologies, and to place such technologies into commercial applications, such as a public transit agency. The initial project concept developed in 2004 was to show that a skid-mounted, fully-integrated, factory-built and tested hydrogen fueling station could be used to simplify the design, and lower the cost of fueling infrastructure for fuel cell vehicles. The approach was to design, engineer, build, and test the integrated fueling station at the factory then install it at a site that offered educational and technical resources and provide an opportunity to showcase both the fueling station and advanced hydrogen vehicles. The two primary technology components include: Hydrogen Fueling Station: The hydrogen fueling infrastructure was designed and built by Gas Technology Institute primarily through a funding grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. It includes hydrogen production, clean-up, compression, storage, and dispensing. The station consists of a steam methane reformer, gas clean-up system, gas compressor and 48 kilograms of hydrogen storage capacity for dispensing at 5000 psig. The station is skid-mounted for easy installation and can be relocated if needed. It includes a dispenser that is designed to provide temperaturecompensated fills using a control algorithm. The total station daily capacity is approximately 50 kilograms. Fuel Cell Bus: The transit passenger bus built by Ebus, a company located in Downey, CA, was commissioned and acquired by GTI prior to this project. It is a fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle which is ADA compliant, has air conditioning sufficient for Texas operations, and regenerative braking for battery charging. It uses a 19.3 kW Ballard PEM fuel cell, will store 12.6 kg of hydrogen at 350 Bar, and includes a 60 kWh battery storage system. The objectives of the project included the following: (a) To advance commercialization of hydrogen-powered transit buses and supporting infrastructure; (b) To provide public outreach and education by showcasing the operation of a 22-foot fuel cell hybrid shuttle bus and Texas first hydrogen fueling infrastructure; and (c) To showcase operation of zero-emissions vehicle for potential transit applications. As mentioned above, the project successfully demonstrated an early vehicle technology, the Ebus plug-in hybrid fuel cell bus, and that success has led to the acquisition of a more advanced vehicle that can take advantage of the same fueling infrastructure. Needed hydrogen station improvements have been identified that will enhance the capabilities of the fueling infrastructure to serve the new bus and to meet the transit agency needs. Over the course of this project, public officials, local government staff, and transit operators were engaged in outreach and education activities that acquainted them with the real world operation of a fuel cell bus and fueling infrastructure. Transit staff members in the Dallas/Ft. Worth region were invited to a workshop in Arlington, Texas at the North Central Texas Council of Governments to participate in a workshop on hydrogen and fuel cells, and to see the fuel cell bus in operation. The bus was trucked to the meeting for this purpose so that participants could see and ride the bus. Austin area transit staff members visited the fueling site in Austin to be briefed on the bus and to participate in a fueling demonstration. This led to further meetings to determine how a fuel cell bus and fueling station could be deployed at Capital Metro Transit. Target urban regions that expressed additional interest during the project in response to the outreach meetings and showcase events include San Antonio and Austin, Texas. In summary, the project objectives wer

  12. Further studies on the role of unidentified factors and gossypol in the nutrition of the domestic fowl 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willingham, Haskell Eugene

    1956-01-01

    protein (Drackett C-7) Soybean oil Salts T-Il 65?00 22?V5 2?76 8?00 The following amount of vitamins and amino acids were added per kilogram of dietJ Thiamine hydroch1oride, 4 mg, J ribof18vin? 6 mg?J calcium pantothenatc, 16 mg ~ J niacin, 100 mg.... U ~ J vitamin A, 10, 000 IFf. J methionine? V, S gm?J giycine, 4 gms ~ J and penicillins 55 mg? 2 Mineral mixture supplied the following psr kilogram of diet J CaC05? 14?6 gm?J CaHPOA 2E20? 42 1 gms ~ J KaCI? Q, 6 gms?J EnSO&? 5 ~? 1?I gms ~ J...

  13. Investigating Environmental Benefits of Biologically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .47 kg kg kg kg kg kg m3 MJ Soil Emissions Water Emissions Air Emissions Nitrogen Dioxide Methane Carbon mixing Approximate as energy to heat ethanol Emissions from electricity kg0.196Carbon Dioxide MJ1.4Energy.00160Carbon Dioxide m30.0015Water Consumed kJ11.323Energy Consumed Cleaning of 1m2 of surface with fog ( )Area

  14. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2010-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit 560 comprises seven corrective action sites (CASs): •03-51-01, Leach Pit •06-04-02, Septic Tank •06-05-03, Leach Pit •06-05-04, Leach Bed •06-59-03, Building CP-400 Septic System •06-59-04, Office Trailer Complex Sewage Pond •06-59-05, Control Point Septic System The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 560 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 7, 2008, through February 24, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and Record of Technical Change No. 1. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: •Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. •If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. •Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 560 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. The following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: •No contamination exceeding the FALs was identified at CASs 03-51-01, 06-04-02, and 06-59-04. •The soil at the base of the leach pit chamber at CAS 06-05-03 contains arsenic above the FAL of 23 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) above the FAL of 0.74 mg/kg, confined vertically from a depth of approximately 5 to 20 feet (ft) below ground surface. The contamination is confined laterally to the walls of the leach pit chamber and leach rock. The contamination present at CAS 06-05-03 within the leach pit was not feasible to remove. •The surface and subsurface soils within and surrounding the septic system at CAS 06-05-04 contained PCB concentrations above the FAL of 0.74 mg/kg. The lateral and vertical extent of COCs was determined for this CAS. Contaminated soils were removed up to within 18 ft of the building. The remaining contamination is confined to subsurface soils adjacent to and beneath Building CP-162 and was not feasible to remove. •The solid materials within the septic tank and soils immediately surrounding the inlet end of the tank at CAS 06-59-03 contained benzo(a)pyrene above the FAL of 0.21 mg/kg. The soils, tank contents, and tank were removed. Materials remaining at this CAS do not contain contamination exceeding FALs. •The solids contained within the septic tank and inlet pipe at CAS 06-59-05 contained the following contaminants above their respective FALs: PCBs, arsenic, lead, benzo(a)pyrene, and pesticides. The tank and inlet pipe contents were removed. Materials remaining at this CAS do not contain contamination exceeding FALs. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) provides the following corrective action recommendations: •No further action for CASs 03-51-01, 06-04-02, and 06-59-04, as no contaminants of potential concern were present that exceed FALs. •Closure in place for CAS 06-05-03 under a corrective action with a use restriction (UR) for remaining PCB- and arsenic-impacted potential source material (PSM). The UR form and map have been filed in the NNSA/NSO Facility Information Management System, the FFACO database, and NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. •Closure in place for CAS 06-05-04 under a corrective action with a UR for remaining PCBs in soil adjacent to and beneath Building CP-162. The UR form and map have been filed in the NNSA/NSO Facility Information Management System, the FFACO database, and NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. •No further action for CAS 06-59-0

  15. Current experimental activities for solid breeder development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.E.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Roux, N.; Watanabe, H.

    1988-01-01

    The current data base for ceramic breeder materials does not exhibit any negative features as regards to thermophysical, mechanical, and irradiation behavior. All candidate materials show excellent stability for irradiation testing to 3% burnup. In-situ tritium recovery tests show very low tritium inventories for all candidates. Theoretical models are being developed to accurately predict real time release rates. Fabrication of kilogram quantities of materials has been achieved and technology is available for further scale-up.

  16. SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS Autumn Semester MECHANICS 2 hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the mass of the Sun in kilograms. (4 marks) (d) Show that the total energy is E = - 1 2 GMm r , that is(t), kinetic energy T and specific angular momentum h, given by T = 1 2 m r · r, h = r × r, where r dr of kinetic energy due to the force is T = F · r. (4 marks) (ii) (a) Show that the change in kinetic energy

  17. Process for the synthesis of aliphatic alcohol-containing mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greene, Marvin I. (Oradell, NJ); Gelbein, Abraham P. (Morristown, NJ)

    1984-01-01

    A process for the synthesis of mixtures which include saturated aliphatic alcohols is disclosed. In the first step of the process, the first catalyst activation stage, a catalyst, which comprises the oxides of copper, zinc, aluminum, potassium and one or two additional metals selected from the group consisting of chromium, magnesium, cerium, cobalt, thorium and lanthanum, is partially activated. In this step, a reducing gas stream, which includes hydrogen and at least one inert gas, flows past the catalyst at a space velocity of up to 5,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. The partially activated catalyst is then subjected to the second step of the process, second-stage catalyst activation. In this step, the catalyst is contacted by an activation gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide present in a volume ratio of 0.5:1 and 4:1, respectively, at a temperature of 200.degree. to 450.degree. C. and a pressure of between 35 and 200 atmospheres. The activation gas flows at a space velocity of from 1,000 to 20,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. Second-stage activation continues until the catalyst is contacted with at least 500,000 liters (STP) of activation gas per kilogram of catalyst. The fully activated catalyst, in the third step of the process, contacts a synthesis gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  18. Process for the synthesis of aliphatic alcohol-containing mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greene, M.I.; Gelbein, A.P.

    1984-10-16

    A process for the synthesis of mixtures which include saturated aliphatic alcohols is disclosed. In the first step of the process, the first catalyst activation stage, a catalyst, which comprises the oxides of copper, zinc, aluminum, potassium and one or two additional metals selected from the group consisting of chromium, magnesium, cerium, cobalt, thorium and lanthanum, is partially activated. In this step, a reducing gas stream, which includes hydrogen and at least one inert gas, flows past the catalyst at a space velocity of up to 5,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. The partially activated catalyst is then subjected to the second step of the process, second-stage catalyst activation. In this step, the catalyst is contacted by an activation gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide present in a volume ratio of 0.5:1 and 4:1, respectively, at a temperature of 200 to 450 C and a pressure of between 35 and 200 atmospheres. The activation gas flows at a space velocity of from 1,000 to 20,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. Second-stage activation continues until the catalyst is contacted with at least 500,000 liters (STP) of activation gas per kilogram of catalyst. The fully activated catalyst, in the third step of the process, contacts a synthesis gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  19. GLASS FORMULATION TESTING TO INCREASE SULFATE INCORPORATION - Final Report VSL-04R4960-1, Rev 0, 2/28/05, Vitreous State Laboratory, The Catholic University of American, Washington, D.C.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS

    2012-02-07

    About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently in storage in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed of in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product will be directed to the national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The Office of River Protection is currently examining options to optimize the Low Activity Waste (LAW) facility and the LAW glass waste form. One option under evaluation is to enhance the waste processing rate of the vitrification plant currently under construction. It is likely that the capacity of the LAW vitrification plant can be increased incrementally by implementation of a variety of low-risk, high-probability changes, either separately or in combination. These changes include: (1) Operating at the higher processing rates demonstrated at the LAW Pilot Melter; (2) Increasing the glass pool surface area within the existing external melter envelope; (3) Increasing plant availability; (4) Increasing the glass waste loading; (5) Removing sulfate from the LAW stream; (6) Operating the melter at slightly higher temperature; (7) Installing the third LAW melter into the WTP plant; and (8) Other smaller impact changes. The melter tests described in this report utilized blended feed (glass formers plus waste simulant) prepared by Optima Chemicals according to VSL specifications. Sufficient feed was prepared to produce over nineteen hundred kilograms of glass during melter tests. The nominal reductant concentration (stoichiometric ratio of 0.5 {approx} 1 mole sucrose per 16 mole NOx or 3 mole carbon per 4 mole NOx) was maintained in all the tests by the addition of sugar at VSL. The DM 10 was used to screen the optimized glass formulation with two alternative aluminum sources (kyanite and zeolite) over a wide range of target sulfur concentrations. Subsequently, based on the DM10 results, nine 12- to 34-hour DM100 tests were conducted; six with kyanite as the aluminum additive at glass sulfur concentrations ranging from 0.75 to 1.5 wt.% SO{sub 3}, and the other three with zeolite as the aluminum additive at glass sulfur concentrations ranging from 0.75 to 1.5 wt. % SO{sub 3}. The DM 100-WV melter was used in order to provide a direct comparison with the LAW tests previously conducted on the same melter. Key operating parameters such as glass temperature and production rate were held constant to investigate the sulfur incorporation into the glass and the effects of varying the aluminum additive source. The bubbling rate was adjusted to achieve a production rate of 2000 kg/m{sup 2}/day with a near-complete cold cap (90-100% of melt surface covered with feed). Quantitative measurements of glass production rates, melter operating conditions (temperatures, pressures, power, flows, etc.), and off-gas characteristics (NOx, SO{sub 2}, CO, particulate load and composition, and acid gases) were made for each test. Glass samples taken from the glass pool and the discharge chamber were inspected throughout testing to determine the limit of salt-free operation in the melter.

  20. The Influence of Trickle Irrigation on the Quality of Irrigation Return Flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, K. W.; Gerard, C. J.; DeMichele, D. W.; Sharpe, P. J. H.; Hipp, B. W.

    1976-01-01

    of 14 kg/ha from a lysimeter treated with 112kg/ha to a high of a- bout 75 kg/ha from a lysimeter treated with 224 kg/ha of N. Nitrate losses were negligible compared to checks when N application rates to sorghum were 112 kg/ha. Most of the N03-N losses...

  1. Min Zhou,and Gerard T.Schuster,University of Utah ComparisonbetweenReducedTimeMigrationandInterferometricMigrationofCDPData

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .5 km/s Depth(km) Offset (km) True velocity model Depth(km) Offset (km) Migration velocity model Figure 2. Kirchhoff depth migration image (a), RTM depth image (b), and IM depth imageReducedTimeMigrationandInterferometricMigrationofCDPData ABSTRACT One of the difficulties in seeing beneath salt is that the migration velocity in the salt

  2. Energy 28 (2003) 11831202 www.elsevier.com/locate/energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordonez, Juan C.

    2003-01-01

    for environmental control of aircraft Juan Carlos Ordonez, Adrian Bejan Department of Mechanical Engineering/(kg K) C capacity rate, J/(Kg K) ex specific flow exergy, J/kg G function, Eq. (15) h specific enthalpy

  3. TOWARD A STANDARD IGNITION SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volkingburg, David R. Van

    2011-01-01

    grass cutti ngs 1. 55 kg, Eucalyptus duff 2.47 kg. 0,04 kg~grass cuttings. and Eucalyptus duff in a Mobil Korditeand grass along with Eucalyptus leaves burn first leaving

  4. Isomer-Specific Biodegradation and Chemical Oxidation of Nonylphenol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhijiang

    2014-01-01

    at 3 sites (near the rivermouth, 7 km offshore, and12 km offshore) in the Ariake Sea, Japan. As expected, thefrom the rivermouth to 7 km offshore while the concentration

  5. Numerical Modeling of CO2 Sequestration in Geologic Formations - Recent Results and Open Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-01-01

    crustal conditions of a geothermal gradient of 30 ?C/km andwater in a normal geothermal gradient of 30 ?C/km with ais held in a normal geothermal gradient of 30 ?C/km and is

  6. Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Current Stack Voltage Drive Cycle (atm. ) (A) (V) (km/Hr)Current Stack Voltage Drive Cycle (atm. ) ( )A) (V) (km/Hr)Current Battery Voltage Drive Cycle (A) (V) (km/Hr) and load

  7. Tolerance of 'Tifton 85', 'Jiggs', and 'Coastal' bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) to postemergence herbicides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, John Robert

    1997-01-01

    . Treatments evaluated included picloram + 2,4-D at 0.35 and 0.71 kg ha-', dicamba + 2,4-D at 0.54 and 1.08 kg ha-', 2,4-D at 0.53 and 1.06 kg ha-', metsulfuron at 0.004 and 0.008 kg ha-1', triasulfuron at 0.01 5 and 0.03 kg ha-, picloram at 0. 14 kg ha...

  8. Aalborg Universitet Development of a 400 W High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Power Pack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    and compressed hydrogen (200 bars) is shown. Hydrogen (200 bars) Methanol Density 16,27 kg/m3 793,8 kg/m3 Lower Heating Value 120,1 MJ/kg 19,9 MJ/kg Energy density (grav.) 33,4 kWh/kg 5,53 kWh/kg Energy density (vol Equation Solver] It is seen that in spite of the high energy content per unit mass of hydrogen; methanol

  9. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.

    2008-01-01

    used, with additional unit conversions into kg CO 2 emittedto units of kg per kBTU using the conversion factor of 3414

  10. 12 October 2006s c i e n c e s c o p e C H A R A C T E R I S T I C P R O P E R T I E S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandrasekhar, Meera

    and Rebecca Litherland W hich one could you carry more easily: 10 kg of Styrofoam peanuts or 10 kg of steel

  11. Quali prospettive economiche per la montagna bellunese con

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    media di latte (kg/capo/d) 25-30 15-20 consumo alimentare (kg ss/capo/d) 20 15 caratteristiche razione

  12. Growth, CO2 Consumption, and H2 Production of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413-U under Different Irradiances and CO2 Concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berberoglu, Halil; Barra, Natasha; Pilon, Laurent; Jay, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    Phase Medium Irradiance ? H2 ? CO2 Maximum Reported Ratesa) Specific CO 2 uptake rate, ? CO2 (kg CO 2 /kg dry cell/h)

  13. Solar Radiation Map of the U.S. - Annual (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Maps that provide monthly average daily total solar resource information on grid cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size.

  14. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  15. Adjusted proof of Theorem 4.19 from the book "Complex-Valued Neural Networks with Multi-Valued Neurons by Igor Aizenberg", Springer 2011. The proof is adjusted by the author.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenberg, Igor

    neurons: 0 0 1 , 1 1 1 ; ( 1) ; 1,..., . ( 1) km km km km m km km km i i km i m m m C w w N C w w Y i N N,..., ; 2,..., 1. kjkj kj kj j kj kjkj kj i i kj i j j kj j C w w N z C w w Y N z i N j m k k k k k k i i k i k C w w n z C w w x i n n z = + + =+ = + (4.136) where jN is the number

  16. On CO2 Behavior in the Subsurface, Following Leakage from a Geologic Storage Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-01-01

    respectively, and a geothermal gradient of 30 ?C per km thatwater in a normal geothermal gradient of 30 ?C/km with a

  17. Techno-Economic Models for Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage & Correlations for Estimating Carbon Dioxide Density and Viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Ogden, Joan M

    2006-01-01

    well [ o C] G g = geothermal gradient [ o C/km] T res =injection well) and a geothermal gradient of 25 o C/km [ 8],

  18. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilson,Cathy; Rowland,Joel; Gangodagamage,Chandana

    2013-12-08

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  19. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications: Conceptual vehicle design report pure fuel cell powertrain vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oei, D.; Kinnelly, A.; Sims, R.; Sulek, M.; Wernette, D.

    1997-02-01

    In partial fulfillment of the Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this preliminary report addresses the conceptual design and packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle. Three classes of vehicles are considered in this design and packaging exercise, the Aspire representing the small vehicle class, the Taurus or Aluminum Intensive Vehicle (AIV) Sable representing the mid-size vehicle and the E-150 Econoline representing the van-size class. A fuel cell system spreadsheet model and Ford`s Corporate Vehicle Simulation Program (CVSP) were utilized to determine the size and the weight of the fuel cell required to power a particular size vehicle. The fuel cell power system must meet the required performance criteria for each vehicle. In this vehicle design and packaging exercise, the following assumptions were made: fuel cell power system density of 0.33 kW/kg and 0.33 kg/liter, platinum catalyst loading less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total and hydrogen tanks containing gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The fuel cell power system includes gas conditioning, thermal management, humidity control, and blowers or compressors, where appropriate. This conceptual design of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle will help in the determination of the propulsion system requirements for a vehicle powered by a PEMFC engine in lieu of the internal combustion (IC) engine. Only basic performance level requirements are considered for the three classes of vehicles in this report. Each vehicle will contain one or more hydrogen storage tanks and hydrogen fuel for 560 km (350 mi) driving range. Under these circumstances, the packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle is increasingly difficult as the vehicle size diminishes.

  20. Comparison of {sup 241}Am, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 137}Cs concentrations in soil around Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulse, S.E.; Ibrahim, S.A.; Whicker, F.W.; Chapman, P.L.

    1999-03-01

    Gamma spectroscopy measurements were used to estimate concentrations of {sup 241}Am and {sup 137}Cs in soil profiles to depths of 21 cm at on-site and off-site locations around the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and at regional background locations east of the Front Range between Colorado`s borders with New Mexico and Wyoming. Concentrations of these radionuclides were compared with concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu in the same samples. Concentrations of {sup 241}Am in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm decreased in an easterly direction from more than 5.3 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} 5 to 7 km away at a rate that was nearly proportional to the inverse square of distance. Deposits of {sup 137}Cs were ubiquitous, averaging 0.12 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm, but were unevenly distributed around Rocky Flats and the regional background locations. Deviations from the uniform exponential rate at which soil concentrations of {sup 137}Cs typically decreased with depth, {minus}0.25 cm{sup {minus}1} at undisturbed sites, enabled the authors to determine that about 10% of their sampling sites had been disturbed by erosion, tillage, or other factors. The mean rate at which {sup 239,240}Pu decreased with depth was about the same, {minus}0.23 cm{sup {minus}1}, throughout the study area. Soil concentrations of {sup 241}Am decreased with depth at a similar mean rate of {minus}0.22 cm{sup {minus}1} at locations close to the 903 pad where measurements were robust. Ratios between {sup 241}Am or {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 137}Cs proved more useful for delineating the extent and pattern of contamination from Rocky Flats than did activity concentrations in soil.

  1. Optical and Physical Properties from Primary On-Road Vehicle ParticleEmissions And Their Implications for Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Hallar, A.G.; Ban-Weiss, G.A.; McLaughlin, J.P.; Harley, R.A.; Lunden, M.M.

    2009-01-23

    During the summers of 2004 and 2006, extinction and scattering coefficients of particle emissions inside a San Francisco Bay Area roadway tunnel were measured using a combined cavity ring-down and nephelometer instrument. Particle size distributions and humidification were also measured, as well as several gas phase species. Vehicles in the tunnel traveled up a 4% grade at a speed of approximately 60 km h{sup -1}. The traffic situation in the tunnel allows the apportionment of emission factors between light duty gasoline vehicles and diesel trucks. Cross-section emission factors for optical properties were determined for the apportioned vehicles to be consistent with gas phase and particulate matter emission factors. The absorption emission factor (the absorption cross-section per mass of fuel burned) for diesel trucks (4.4 {+-} 0.79 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1}) was 22 times larger than for light-duty gasoline vehicles (0.20 {+-} 0.05 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1}). The single scattering albedo of particles - which represents the fraction of incident light that is scattered as opposed to absorbed - was 0.2 for diesel trucks and 0.3 for light duty gasoline vehicles. These facts indicate that particulate matter from motor vehicles exerts a positive (i.e., warming) radiative climate forcing. Average particulate mass absorption efficiencies for diesel trucks and light duty gasoline vehicles were 3.14 {+-} 0.88 m{sup 2} g{sub PM}{sup -1} and 2.9 {+-} 1.07 m{sup 2} g{sub PM}{sup -1}, respectively. Particle size distributions and optical properties were insensitive to increases in relative humidity to values in excess of 90%, reinforcing previous findings that freshly emitted motor vehicle particulate matter is hydrophobic.

  2. A three-dimensional spatial model of plutonium in soil near Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, S.B.; Ibrahim, S.A.; Whicker, F.W.

    1997-08-01

    The horizontal and depth distribution of plutonium was measured in soil east of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (formerly the Rocky Flats Plant) near Denver, Colorado, during 1992-1994. The study area was centered on the eastern plume of plutonium contamination and included transacts extending from 0.2 km east of the primary origin of the contamination (the 903 Pad) to distances of up to 19 km northeast, east, southeast and south-southeast of the 903 Pad. Soil was collected in 3 cm layers down to 21 cm at exponentially increasing distances along the four transacts. Plutonium concentrations decreased rapidly with depth, distance from the 903 Pad, and angle from due east. Depth distributions were independent of distance and angle from the 903 Pad, and our profile model can be used to adjust to a common basis, historical measurements made from sampling to different depths. Based on a total of {approximately}1,400 independent measurements, mathematical functions were developed to describe the distance, directional, and depth relationships. These equations, combined with soil density and rock measurements, provided a new method to estimate the plutonium concentration or total deposition per unit area anywhere within the study area. Total deposition per unit area measurements at 50 sites provided an independent test of the model`s predictive accuracy. Sampling coefficients of variation based on replicate samples at the main sampling locations averaged 33%, but ranged from 12 to 98%. The analytical measurement coefficient of variation averaged 8%. Mean 0-3 cm soil concentrations of {sup 239}Pu among 10 Front Range {open_quotes}background{close_quotes} and 11 community locations near Rocky Flats were 2.1 and 2.3 Bq kg{sup -1}, respectively. 45 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVE MAIN BELT OBJECT P/2012 F5 (GIBBS): A POSSIBLE IMPACTED ASTEROID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, R.; Kramer, E. A.; Bauer, J. M.; Masiero, J. R.; Mainzer, A. K., E-mail: Rachel.A.Stevenson@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    In this work, we characterize the recently discovered active main belt object P/2012 F5 (Gibbs), which was discovered with a dust trail >7' in length in the outer main belt, 7 months prior to aphelion. We use optical imaging obtained on UT 2012 March 27 to analyze the central condensation and the long trail. We find B-band and R-band apparent magnitudes of 20.96 {+-} 0.04 mag and 19.93 {+-} 0.02 mag, respectively, which give an upper limit on the radius of the nucleus of 2.1 km. The geometric scattering cross-section of material in the trail was {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} m{sup 2}, corresponding to a mass of {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} kg. Analysis of infrared images taken by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in 2010 September reveals that the object was below the detection limit, suggesting that it was less active than it was during 2012, or possibly inactive, just six months after it passed through perihelion. We set a 1{sigma} upper limit on its radius during this time of 2.9 km. P/2012 F5 (Gibbs) is dynamically stable in the outer main belt on timescales of {approx}1 Gyr, pointing toward an asteroidal origin. We find that the morphology of the ejected dust is consistent with it being produced by a single event that occurred on UT 2011 July 7 {+-} 20 days, possibly as the result of a collision with a small impactor.

  4. SPITZER EVIDENCE FOR A LATE-HEAVY BOMBARDMENT AND THE FORMATION OF UREILITES IN {eta} CORVI At {approx}1 Gyr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisse, C. M. [JHU-APL, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Wyatt, M. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Chen, C. H. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Morlok, A. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The Open University, Milton-Keynes (United Kingdom); Watson, D. M.; Manoj, P.; Sheehan, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Currie, T. M. [NASA-GSFC, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Thebault, P. [Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France); Sitko, M. L., E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: wyatt@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: cchen@stsci.edu, E-mail: a.morlok@open.ac.uk, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: manoj@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: psheeha2@mail.rochester.edu, E-mail: thayne.m.currie@nasa.gov, E-mail: philippe.thebault@obspm.fr, E-mail: sitko@spacescience.org [Space Science Institute, 475 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We have analyzed Spitzer and NASA/IRTF 2-35 {mu}m spectra of the warm, {approx}350 K circumstellar dust around the nearby MS star {eta} Corvi (F2V, 1.4 {+-} 0.3 Gyr). The spectra show clear evidence for warm, water- and carbon-rich dust at {approx}3 AU from the central star, in the system's terrestrial habitability zone. Spectral features due to ultra-primitive cometary material were found, in addition to features due to impact produced silica and high-temperature carbonaceous phases. At least 9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} kg of 0.1-100 {mu}m warm dust is present in a collisional equilibrium distribution with dn/da {approx} a{sup -3.5}, the equivalent of a 130 km radius Kuiper Belt object (KBO) of 1.0 g cm{sup 3} density and similar to recent estimates of the mass delivered to the Earth at 0.6-0.8 Gyr during the late-heavy bombardment. We conclude that the parent body was a Kuiper Belt body or bodies which captured a large amount of early primitive material in the first megayears of the system's lifetime and preserved it in deep freeze at {approx}150 AU. At {approx}1.4 Gyr they were prompted by dynamical stirring of their parent Kuiper Belt into spiraling into the inner system, eventually colliding at 5-10 km s{sup -1} with a rocky planetary body of mass {<=}M{sub Earth} at {approx}3 AU, delivering large amounts of water (>0.1% of M{sub Earth'sOceans}) and carbon-rich material. The Spitzer spectrum also closely matches spectra reported for the Ureilite meteorites of the Sudan Almahata Sitta fall in 2008, suggesting that one of the Ureilite parent bodies was a KBO.

  5. Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) The SMT is the most accurate submillimeter astronomical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    Spaceframe support: Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) Tubes with invar steel joints (3040 kg weight

  6. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbo-contaminated soils, comprehensive report, December 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    2000-01-01

    52-641 mg/kg soil/day), biopiles (20-60 mg TPH/kg soil/day),up technique known as “biopiles”. The biopile process is52-641 mg/kg soil/day), biopiles (20-60 mg TPH/kg soil/day),

  7. Name: dhr. prof. dr. C.J. Kalkman Anesthesiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    , Brekelmans GJ, Moons KG, Leenen LP, Kalkman CJ. Effect of intracranial pressure monitoring and targeted

  8. Advanced Powder Technol., Vol. 17, No. 5, pp. 543565 (2006) VSP and Society of Powder Technology, Japan 2006.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christakis, Nikolaos

    2006-01-01

    humidity of air Rv individual gas constant for water vapor (J/kg/K) T temperature of air or granular sugar sugar (J/ C kg) C1, C2 constants in (10) To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: mark humidity (kg water/kg dry air) #12;Aggregation and caking of granular materials 545 Greek constant in (14

  9. Evaluating the Impacts of Gender, Fatness, Muscling, and Weight on Yield Grade 4 Beef Carcasses. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, James T.

    2010-01-14

    (n = 20) and steers (n = 40), and weight groups: lightweight heifers (315.5 - 362.9 kg) and steers (362.9 - 408.2 kg), and heavy weight heifers (362.9 - 408.2 kg) steers (408.2 - 453.6 kg). Within weight classes, carcasses were separated according...

  10. Demonstration of the CDMS II ZIP technology at a shallow underground site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    10.7 kg of polyethylene and 42.6 kg of Pb shielding, and the six ZIPs stacked on top of each other. The detectors are surrounded by 10.7 kg of polyehtylene and 42.6 kg of lead shielding. temperature electronics

  11. Photochemistry and Photobiology, 2006, 82: 12791284 Research Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yodh, Arjun G.

    . Three patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer received 2 mg/ kg motexafin lutetium (MLu) 3 h

  12. Effects of composted dairy manure on soil chemical properties and forage yield and nutritive value of coastal Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helton, Thomas J.

    2005-02-17

    and nutritive value. Composted dairy manure was surface applied at rates of 14 (125 kg N ha-1), 29 (250 kg N ha-1) and 57 (500 kg N ha-1) Mg dry matter (DM) ha-1, and raw dairy manure was surface applied at a rate of 54 (420 kg N ha-1) Mg DM ha-1 to established...

  13. Effect of bypass protein and lasalocid on reproductive function in the postpartum Brahman cow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpena, Mario Luis

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-six fall-calving, pluriparous suckled Brahman cows were allotted randomly within sex of calf to receive: (d O= parturition) 2.6 kg corn and 0.60 kg soybean meal (SBM, n=ll), or 2.80 kg corn and 0.40 kg Menhaden fish meal (FM,n=ll) alone...

  14. Gender-specific modulation of cocaine-induced place preference by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diller, Anna Jean

    2013-02-22

    to the case where each drug was administered alone, and it was predicted this effect would be amplified in females relative to males. Adult male and female rats received one of three doses of cocaine (0 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg) followed by MDMA (0 mg/kg, 5...

  15. Effects of undegraded intake protein supplementation on milk production, calf weight gain and reproductive performance in Brahman cows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triplett, Brian Lee

    1993-01-01

    , 10 and 12 after an observed estrus. Mean milk production was greater for mature cows (1.27 .03 kg/4h) than for heifers (1.06 .?04 kg/4h) (P kg/4h) than Low (1.06 .?08 kg/4...

  16. To be filled out by EVERY APPLICANT Date: __________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    cruise missile systems, target drones, and reconnaissance drones) capable of delivering at least 500 Kg

  17. Robotica 1 1 Corso di Robotica 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    ) Robotica 1 9 #12;Sminamento · PEMEX (EPFL, Lausanne), rilevatore leggero di mine antiuomo · peso: 16 kg

  18. Study of the properties of Cosmic rays and solar X-Ray Flares by balloon borne experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarti, S K; Chakraborty, S; Palit, S; Mondal, S K; Bhattacharya, A; Midya, S; Chakrabarti, S

    2013-01-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics is engaged in pioneering balloon borne experiments with typical payloads less than ~ 3.5kg. Low cost rubber balloons are used to fly them to a height of about 40km. In a double balloon system, the booster balloon lifts the orbiter balloon to its cruising altitude where data is taken for a longer period of time. In this Paper, we present our first scientific report on the variation of Cosmic Rays and muons with altitude and detection of several solar flares in X-rays between 20keV and 100keV. We found the altitude of the Pfotzer maximum at Tropic of Cancer for cosmic rays and muons and catch several solar flares in hard X-rays. We find that the hard X-ray (> 40keV) sky becomes very transparent above Pfotzer maximum. We find the flare spectrum to have a power-law distribution. From these studies, we infer that valuable scientific research could be carried out in near space using low cost balloon borne experiments. Published in Online version of Indian Journal of Physics.

  19. Development potential of the Dauin geothermal prospect, Negros Oriental, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayrante, L.F.; Hermoso, D.Z.; Candelaria, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    The Dauin geothermal prospect, situated 5 km southeast of the Palinpinon I and II sectors, was drilled between 1982 and 1983 to test its viability for development. Drilling results indicated that DN-1 was drilled closer to the source region than DN-2 where permeability, temperature, and alteration mineralogy were generally unpromising. DN-1 encountered temperatures of at least 240{degrees}C and a neutral-pH fluid with reservoir chloride of 3000 mg/kg. In particular, the presence of sulphur in the DN-1 discharge provoked debates and many speculation on the nature of the fluid in the area. The area was re-evaluated in 1996 for the following reasons: (1) Renewed interests on other geothermal prospects within Negros Island from an economic point of view and the success of modular plant developments are Pal II and other areas in the Philippines; (2) Reinterpretation of the genesis of sulphur contained in the DN-1 discharge fluid; (3) Encouraging temperature, permeability and neutral-pH alterations at depth and the neutral character of DN-1 discharge fluid; and (4) Reinterpretation of the hydrological model from a geochemical and geological point of view. The study indicates good potential for modular power development.

  20. Galactic disc warps due to intergalactic accretion flows onto the disc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Corredoira, M; Beckman, J E

    2007-01-01

    The accretion of the intergalactic medium onto the gaseous disc is used to explain the generation of galactic warps. A cup-shaped distortion is expected, due to the transmission of the linear momentum; but, this effect is small for most incident inflow angles and the predominant effect turns out to be the transmission of angular momentum, i.e. a torque giving an integral-sign shaped warp. The torque produced by a flow of velocity ~100 km/s and baryon density ~10^{-25} kg/m^3, which is within the possible values for the intergalactic medium, is enough to generate the observed warps and this mechanism offers quite a plausible explanation. The inferred rate of infall of matter, ~1 M_sun/yr, to the Galactic disc that this theory predicts agrees with the quantitative predictions of chemical evolution resolving key issues, notably the G-dwarf problem. Sanchez-Salcedo (2006) suggests that this mechanism is not plausible because it would produce a dependence of the scaleheight of the disc with the Galactocentric azim...

  1. Galactic disc warps due to intergalactic accretion flows onto the disc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Lopez-Corredoira; J. Betancort-Rijo; J. E. Beckman

    2007-06-11

    The accretion of the intergalactic medium onto the gaseous disc is used to explain the generation of galactic warps. A cup-shaped distortion is expected, due to the transmission of the linear momentum; but, this effect is small for most incident inflow angles and the predominant effect turns out to be the transmission of angular momentum, i.e. a torque giving an integral-sign shaped warp. The torque produced by a flow of velocity ~100 km/s and baryon density ~10^{-25} kg/m^3, which is within the possible values for the intergalactic medium, is enough to generate the observed warps and this mechanism offers quite a plausible explanation. The inferred rate of infall of matter, ~1 M_sun/yr, to the Galactic disc that this theory predicts agrees with the quantitative predictions of chemical evolution resolving key issues, notably the G-dwarf problem. Sanchez-Salcedo (2006) suggests that this mechanism is not plausible because it would produce a dependence of the scaleheight of the disc with the Galactocentric azimuth in the outer disc, but rather than being an objection this is another argument in favour of the mechanism because this dependence is actually observed in our Galaxy.

  2. Quiescent and Eruptive Prominences at Solar Minimum: A Statistical Study via an Automated Tracking System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loboda, I P

    2015-01-01

    We employ an automated detection algorithm to perform a global study of solar prominence characteristics. We process four months of TESIS observations in the He II 304 A line taken close to the solar minimum of 2008-2009 and focus mainly on quiescent and quiescent-eruptive prominences. We detect a total of 389 individual features ranging from 25x25 to 150x500 Mm in size and obtain distributions of many their spatial characteristics, such as latitudinal position, height, size and shape. To study their dynamics, we classify prominences as either stable or eruptive and calculate their average centroid velocities, which are found to be rarely exceeding 3 km/s. Besides, we give rough estimates of mass and gravitational energy for every detected prominence and use these values to evaluate the total mass and gravitational energy of all simultaneously existing prominences (10e12-10e14 kg and 10e29-10e31 erg, respectively). Finally, we investigate the form of the gravitational energy spectrum of prominences and derive...

  3. Spitzer Evidence for a Late Heavy Bombardment and the Formation of Urelites in {\\eta} Corvi at ~1 Gyr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisse, C M; Chen, C H; Morlok, A; Watson, D M; Manoj, P; Sheehan, P; Currie, T M; Thebault, P; Sitko, M L

    2011-01-01

    We have analyzed Spitzer and NASA/IRTF 2 - 35 \\mum spectra of the warm, ~350 K circumstellar dust around the nearby MS star {\\eta} Corvi (F2V, 1.4 \\pm 0.3 Gyr). The spectra show clear evidence for warm, water- and carbon-rich dust at ~3 AU from the central star, in the system's Terrestrial Habitability Zone. Spectral features due to ultra-primitive cometary material were found, in addition to features due to impact produced silica and high temperature carbonaceous phases. At least 9 x 10^18 kg of 0.1 - 100 \\mum warm dust is present in a collisional equilibrium distribution with dn/da ~ a^-3.5, the equivalent of a 130 km radius KBO of 1.0 g/cm^3 density and similar to recent estimates of the mass delivered to the Earth at 0.6 - 0.8 Gyr during the Late Heavy Bombardment. We conclude that the parent body was a Kuiper-Belt body or bodies which captured a large amount of early primitive material in the first Myrs of the system's lifetime and preserved it in deep freeze at ~150 AU. At ~1.4 Gyr they were prompted by...

  4. Preliminary reservoir engineering studies of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haukwa, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Mainieri, A.

    1992-01-01

    The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in cooperation with the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad is conducting a reservoir engineering study of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica. Using data from eight exploration wells, a two-dimensional areal, natural-state model of Miravalles has been developed. The model was calibrated by fitting the observed temperature and pressure distributions and requires a geothermal upflow zone in the northern part of the field, associated with the Miravalles volcano and an outflow towards the south. The total hot (about 260 C) water recharge is 130 kg/s, corresponding to a thermal input of about 150 MWt. On the basis of the natural-state model a two-dimensional exploitation model was developed. The field has a production area of about 10 km{sup 2}, with temperatures exceeding 220 C. The model indicated that power generation of 55 MWe can be maintained for 30 years, with or without injection of the separated geothermal brine. Generation of 110 MWe could be problematic. Until more information becomes available on the areal extent of the field and the properties of the reservoir rocks, especially their relative permeability characteristics, it is difficult to ascertain if 110 MWe can be sustained during a 30-year period.

  5. Isotopic Tracking of Hanford 300 Area Derived Uranium in the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, John N.; Dresel, P. Evan; Conrad, Mark E.; Patton, Gregory W.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2010-10-31

    Our objectives in this study are to quantify the discharge rate of uranium (U) to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site's 300 Area, and to follow that U down river to constrain its fate. Uranium from the Hanford Site has variable isotopic composition due to nuclear industrial processes carried out at the site. This characteristic makes it possible to use high-precision isotopic measurements of U in environmental samples to identify even trace levels of contaminant U, determine its sources, and estimate discharge rates. Our data on river water samples indicate that as much as 3.2 kg/day can enter the Columbia River from the 300 Area, which is only a small fraction of the total load of dissolved natural background U carried by the Columbia River. This very low-level of Hanford derived U can be discerned, despite dilution to < 1 percent of natural background U, 350 km downstream from the Hanford Site. These results indicate that isotopic methods can allow the amounts of U from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site entering the Columbia River to be measured accurately to ascertain whether they are an environmental concern, or are insignificant relative to natural uranium background in the Columbia River.

  6. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 13 (2002) 644652 PII: S0957-4484(02)35105-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    Km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste, Italy 2 NNL (National Nanotecnology Laboratory), INFM, Universit

  7. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 7 January 5, 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    ) ­­­­­ CC Cocos (Keeling) Islands b­u­­ CO Colombia (Republic of) ­­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic Federal Republic

  8. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 10 February 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    (Indian Ocean) ­­­­­ CC Cocos (Keeling) Islands B­u­­ CO Colombia (Republic of) ­­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic

  9. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 16 June 15, 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    ) Islands Iu­ CO Colombia (Republic of) ­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic Federal Republic of the) ­­­ CG Congo

  10. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 8 April 15, 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    (Republic of) ­­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic Federal Republic of the) ­­u­­ CG Congo (Republic of the) ­­­­­ CK

  11. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 13 February 15, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Colombia (Republic of) ­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic Federal Republic of the) ­­U­ CG Congo (Republic of the

  12. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 9 August 1, 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    (Indian Ocean) ­­­­­ CC Cocos (Keeling) Islands B­u­­ CO Colombia (Republic of) ­­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic

  13. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 12 November 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    (Keeling) Islands BIu­ CO Colombia (Republic of) ­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic Federal Republic of the) ­­u­ CG

  14. Energy Management in Microgrids: Algorithms and System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    1.5MW 0.3MW 1.9km wind 3000kW 0.3MW diesel 0.2km 1000kW1.5MW 0.3MW 1.9km wind 3000kW 0.3MW diesel 0.2km 1000kW

  15. WILDLAND WEEDS 19 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Sharon Ewe Mei

    " (small fruit orchards) were examined. Ewe and her partners traveled approximately 600 km in the urban

  16. 1. Introduction There exists a belief that addition of nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Sustentable (CIQS), Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Km. 12 de la carretera

  17. Middle Pleistocene climate and habitat change at Zhoukoudian, China, from the carbon and oxygen isotopic record from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Paleoecology Introduction Zhoukoudian, located about 50 km to the southwest of Beijing (see Fig. 1

  18. University of Hawai`i at Mnoa INFORMASI UNTUK MAHASISWA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    riset kelautan sendiri yang bernama Coconut Island (Pulau Kelapa), terletak 24 km di lepas pantai timur

  19. Journal of species lists and distribution Chec ListNotesoNGeoGraphicDistributioN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Windsor E.

    Litoral, Facultad de Ingenieria Marítima, Ciencias Biológicas Oceánicas y Recursos Naturales. Km 30.5 Via

  20. Supp. Info of Aiken et al. (2010) Page 1 of 15 Supplementary Information for Aiken et al. "Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Supp. Info of Aiken et al. (2010) Page 1 of 15 Supplementary Information for Aiken et al. "Mexico Supersite (T0). Part 2: Analysis of the Biomass Burning Contribution and the Modern Carbon Fraction." #12 MODIS fire counts from March to April of 2006 for each radius: (c) 60 km, 120 km, 250 km, (d) 500 km

  1. Commercial exploitation of nanophase powder formed with exploding wire technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    In this report, the region of the energy density under the uniform heating conditions, of the lower pressures of the gas environment and of the smaller wire diameter have been studied. Here, the theoretical investigations of exploding wire and powder formation processes are presented, the results of experimental investigations are discussed. It is demonstrated that exploding wire technique is able to produce nanophase powders of aluminum and iron oxides with the mean surface size of 30 nm or less at commercial quantities per hour and the cost of no more than $1,000 per kilogram. Here too, decisions for theoretical and technical activity during future program are recommended.

  2. TRITIUM EXTRACTION FACILITY ALARA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joye, BROTHERTON

    2005-04-19

    The primary mission of the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) is to extract tritium from tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) that have been irradiated in a commercial light water reactor and to deliver tritium-containing gas to the Savannah River Site Facility 233-H. The tritium extraction segment provides the capability to deliver three (3) kilograms per year to the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The TEF includes processes, equipment and facilities capable of production-scale extraction of tritium while minimizing personnel radiation exposure, environmental releases, and waste generation.

  3. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. M.; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-31

    Abstract: The rare gases krypton, xenon, and radon pose both an economic opportunity and a potential environmental hazard. Xenon is used in commercial lighting, medical imaging, and anesthesia, and can sell for $5,000 per kilogram. Radon, by contrast, Is naturally radioactive and the second largest cause of lung cancer, and radioactive xenon, 133Xe, was a major pollutant released In the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. We describe an organic cage molecule that can capture xenon and radon with unprecedented selectivity, suggesting new technologies for environmental monitoring, removal of pollutants, or the recovery of rare, valuable elements from air.

  4. A comparative study of seating for the elderly and arthritic 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gueths, Ellen Ann

    1985-01-01

    96 31. 32. Kilograms (lbs. ) of Force at 25. 4 cm (10. 0 in. ) Armrest Height for Height Category = Average. Maximum Pressure in mmHg (lbs/in ) - Duncans Multiple Range 2 Test ~ 98 104 33. Mean Pressure in mmHg (lbs/in ) ? Duncans Multiple... by Finlay, Bayles, Rosen, and Milling. Finlay et al. (1983) has shown that ambulatory women (average age of 80) could rise more easily from a seat 40. 6 cm (16. 0 in. ) to 43. 2 cm (17. 0 in. ) high than from a lower seat. Finlay et al. also found...

  5. A study of the use of feed supplements for prevention of experimental bitterweed (Hymenoxys odorata) poisoning in sheep 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridges, Gary Wayne

    1977-01-01

    in reducing the toxicity of bitterv!eed (~H&!en~ox s odorata). In each of four experiments, sheep were divided into four groups of two and were dosed with bitterweed equal in weight to 0. 1/, 0. 2/, 0. 4'i and 0. 8'/ of their body weight. The median lethal... as above and the LD50 was estimated to be 4. 0 + 0. 3 gm bitterweed per kilogrtln! of body weight. Sodium sulfate, administered to the lambs at a rate of 340 mg per kilogram of body v!eight prior to dosing with bitterv!eed, also affected the toxicity...

  6. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1996 Site Environmental Report Vol. II Data Appendix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    10/8/96 N D 4000 mg/kg Crude/Waste Oil 10/8/96 N D 40CX) mg/10/4/96 N D 1000 mg/kg Cmde/Waste Oil 10/4/96 N D 1000 mg/kg10/8/96 N D 400 mg/kg Crude/Waste Oil 10/8/96: N D 400 mg/kg

  7. Differences among Beefmaster sires in their offspring in birth, growth and carcass traits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehr, Harry Bartel

    2002-01-01

    were 37.38 ± 0.26 kg, 220.40 ± 1.68 kg, 398.57 ± 7.03 kg, and 471.46 ± 8.89 kg, respectively. The carcass traits averaged 290.38 ± 2.36 kg, 74.175 ± .624 cm², 2.51 ± 0.04 %, 525.90 ± 6.91, 3.22 ± 0.06, respectively, for hot carcass weight, longissimus...

  8. Operation of a bushing melter system designed for actinide vitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, W.G.

    1996-03-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company is developing a melter system to vitrify actinide materials. The melter system will used to vitrify the americium and curium solution which is currently stored in one of the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) processing canyons. This solution is one of the materials designated by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) to be dispositioned as part of the DNFSB recommendation 94-1. The Am/Cm solution contains an extremely large fraction (>2 kilograms of Cm and 10 kilograms of Am) of t he United States`s total inventory of both elements. They have an estimated value on the order of one billion dollars - if they are processed through the DOE Isotope Sales program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is therefore deemed highly desirable to transfer the material to Oak Ridge in a form which can allow for recovery of the material. A commercial glass composition has been demonstrated to be compatible with up to 40 weight percent of the Am/Cm solution contents. This glass is also selectively attacked by nitric acid. This allows the actinide to be recovered by common separation processes.

  9. Nonpoint pollution of surface waters with phosphorus and nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, S. R.; Caraco, N. F.; Correll, D. L.; Howarth, R. W.; Sharpley, A. N.; Smith, Val H.

    1998-08-01

    uptake of P for the United States (N.R.C. 1993b) and several European countries (Isermann 1991). Nation Area in agriculture (106 ha) P input (kg·ha21·yr21) Fertilizer Feed P output (kg·ha21·yr21) Animal Plant P surplus (kg·ha21·yr21) Efficiency of uptake... uptake of P for the United States (N.R.C. 1993b) and several European countries (Isermann 1991). Nation Area in agriculture (106 ha) P input (kg·ha21·yr21) Fertilizer Feed P output (kg·ha21·yr21) Animal Plant P surplus (kg·ha21·yr21) Efficiency of uptake...

  10. Effect of Blending on High-Pressure Laminar Flame Speed Measurements, Markstein Lengths, and Flame Stability of Hydrocarbons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowry, William Baugh

    2012-02-14

    for teaching me what hard work means and how to do it. vi NOMENCLATURE Abbreviations g1855g3043 Specific heat (KJ/kg-K) Di,j Diffusivity of species i into j (m 2/s) g1860 Specific enthalpy (KJ/kg) Le Lewis Number g1865g4662 " Mass... burning rate per unit area (kg/m2-s) g1839g3050 Molecular weight (kg/kmol) X Mole fraction (kmol/kmol) g1851 Mass fraction (kg/kg) Subscripts b Burned condition i For species i L Laminar flame u Unburned condition Superscripts o Un...

  11. Pre-shot simulations of far-field ground motion for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Explosions at the Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site: SPE2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellors, R J; Rodgers, A; Walter, W; Ford, S; Xu, H; Matzel, E; Myers, S; Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B; Hauk, T; Wagoner, J

    2011-10-18

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is planning a 1000 kg (TNT equivalent) shot (SPE2) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in a granite borehole at a depth (canister centroid) of 45 meters. This shot follows an earlier shot of 100 kg in the same borehole at a depth 60 m. Surrounding the shotpoint is an extensive array of seismic sensors arrayed in 5 radial lines extending out 2 km to the north and east and approximately 10-15 to the south and west. Prior to SPE1, simulations using a finite difference code and a 3D numerical model based on the geologic setting were conducted, which predicted higher amplitudes to the south and east in the alluvium of Yucca Flat along with significant energy on the transverse components caused by scattering within the 3D volume along with some contribution by topographic scattering. Observations from the SPE1 shot largely confirmed these predictions although the ratio of transverse energy relative to the vertical and radial components was in general larger than predicted. A new set of simulations has been conducted for the upcoming SPE2 shot. These include improvements to the velocity model based on SPE1 observations as well as new capabilities added to the simulation code. The most significant is the addition of a new source model within the finite difference code by using the predicted ground velocities from a hydrodynamic code (GEODYN) as driving condition on the boundaries of a cube embedded within WPP which provides a more sophisticated source modeling capability linked directly to source site materials (e.g. granite) and type and size of source. Two sets of SPE2 simulations are conducted, one with a GEODYN source and 3D complex media (no topography node spacing of 5 m) and one with a standard isotropic pre-defined time function (3D complex media with topography, node spacing of 5 m). Results were provided as time series at specific points corresponding to sensor locations for both translational (x,y,z) and rotational components. Estimates of spectral scaling for SPE2 are provided using a modified version of the Mueller-Murphy model. An estimate of expected aftershock probabilities were also provided, based on the methodology of Ford and Walter, [2010].

  12. Orbits and photometry of Pluto's satellites: Charon, S/2005 P1 and S/2005 P2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. W. Buie; W. M. Grundy; E. F. Young; L. A. Young; S. A. Stern

    2006-03-18

    We present new astrometry of Pluto's three satellites from images taken of the Pluto system during 2002-3 with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) mode of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. The observations were designed to produce an albedo map of Pluto but they also contain images of Charon and the two recently discovered satellites, S/2005 P1 and S/2005 P2. Orbits fitted to all three satellites are nearly co-planar and, for Charon and P2, have eccentricities consistent with zero. The orbit of the outermost satellite, P1, has a significant eccentricity of 0.0052 +/- 0.0011. Orbital periods of P1, P2, and Charon are 38.2065 +/- 0.0014, 24.8562 +/- 00013, and 6.3872304 +/- 0.0000011 days, respectively. The total system mass based on Charon's orbit is 1.4570 +/- 0.0009 x 10^22 kg. We confirm previous results that orbital periods are close to the ratio of 6:4:1 (P1:P2:Charon) indicative of mean-motion resonances, but our results formally preclude precise integer period ratios. The orbits of P1 and P2, being about the barycenter rather than Pluto, enable us to measure the Charon/Pluto mass ratio as 0.1165 +/- 0.0055. This new mass ratio implies a density of 1.65 +/- 0.06 g cm^-3 for Charon (603.6 km radius) and 2.03 +/- 0.06 g cm^-3 for Pluto (1153 km radius) thus adding confirmation that Charon is significantly less dense than Pluto. Finally, by stacking all images, we can extract globally averaged photometry. P1 has a mean opposition magnitude of V=24.39 +/- 0.09 and color of (B-V) = 0.64 +/- 0.12. P2 has a mean opposition magnitude of V=24.55 +/- 0.10 and color of (B-V) = 0.91 +/- 0.15.

  13. 2007 TY430: A COLD CLASSICAL KUIPER BELT TYPE BINARY IN THE PLUTINO POPULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Ragozzine, Darin; Trujillo, Chadwick

    2012-03-15

    Kuiper Belt object 2007 TY430 is the first wide, equal-sized, binary known in the 3:2 mean motion resonance with Neptune. The two components have a maximum separation of about 1 arcsec and are on average less than 0.1 mag different in apparent magnitude with identical ultra-red colors (g - i = 1.49 {+-} 0.01 mag). Using nearly monthly observations of 2007 TY430 from 2007 to 2011, the orbit of the mutual components was found to have a period of 961.2 {+-} 4.6 days with a semi-major axis of 21000 {+-} 160 km and eccentricity of 0.1529 {+-} 0.0028. The inclination with respect to the ecliptic is 15.68 {+-} 0.22 deg and extensive observations have allowed the mirror orbit to be eliminated as a possibility. The total mass for the binary system was found to be 7.90 {+-} 0.21 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} kg. Equal-sized, wide binaries and ultra-red colors are common in the low-inclination 'cold' classical part of the Kuiper Belt and likely formed through some sort of three-body interactions within a much denser Kuiper Belt. To date 2007 TY430 is the only ultra-red, equal-sized binary known outside of the classical Kuiper Belt population. Numerical simulations suggest 2007 TY430 is moderately unstable in the outer part of the 3:2 resonance and thus 2007 TY430 is likely an escaped 'cold' classical object that later got trapped in the 3:2 resonance. Similar to the known equal-sized, wide binaries in the cold classical population, the binary 2007 TY430 requires a high albedo and very low density structure to obtain the total mass found for the pair. For a realistic minimum density of 0.5 g cm{sup -3} the albedo of 2007 TY430 would be greater than 0.17. For reasonable densities, the radii of either component should be less than 60 km, and thus the relatively low eccentricity of the binary is interesting since no tides should be operating on the bodies at their large distances from each other. The low prograde inclination of the binary also makes it unlikely that the Kozai mechanism could have altered the orbit, making the 2007 TY430 binary orbit likely one of the few relatively unaltered primordial binary orbits known. Under some binary formation models, the low-inclination prograde orbit of the 2007 TY430 binary indicates formation within a relatively high velocity regime in the Kuiper Belt.

  14. Fire Woman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Keisha-Gaye

    2012-01-01

    at www.keishagaye.com Anderson, K-G. “Fire Woman”. http://20: 156-160 ISSN: 2159-2926 Fire Woman Keisha-Gaye AndersonAnderson, K-G. “Fire Woman”. http://escholarship.org/uc/

  15. Toxicity of Nickel to a Soil-Dwelling Springtail, Folsomia metaria (Collembola: Isotomidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkin, Steve

    J. Scott-Fordsmand,*,1 Paul Henning Krogh,* and Stephen P. Hopkin{ *Department of Terrestrial/kg, but juvenile growth was reduced at concentrations above 480 mg Ni/kg (EC10). # 1999 Academic Press Key Words

  16. AME 436 Assigned: Friday 3/13/2015 Problem Set #3 Due Friday 3/27/2015 at 4:30 pm in the drop box in OHE 430N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) What is the Pumping Mean Effective Pressure (PMEP)? c) If the volumetric efficiency is 100%, what, and the expansion work per kg of mixture d) Net work per kg of mixture (gross indicated work ­ pumping work) e

  17. Switchgrass for Forage and Bioenergy: II. Effects of P and K fertilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guretzky, John A; Kering, Maru K; Biermacher, Jon T; Cook, Billy J

    2009-01-01

    2001. Biomass production of 'Alamo' switchgrass in responsePanicum virgatum L. cv. Alamo) was seeded at 4.5 kg/ha purelowland varieties such as Alamo yielded close to 14,970 kg

  18. Short Communication Algal cell disruption using microbubbles to localize ultrasonic energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    107 J/kg of dry biomass for hydrodynamic cavitation up to 5:3 Â 108 J/kg for high state-of-the-art hydrodynamic cavitation (Lee et al., 2013). Theoretical estimates based upon individual

  19. WIMP EXCLUSION RESULTS FROM THE CDMS EXPERIMENT P.L. BRINK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    detector technology, utilizing athermal phonon signals, to perform a Dark Matter search at the Soudan mine increased the net exposure from 10.6 kg-days to 15.8 kg-days, without introducing a degradation

  20. Analysis of Senate Bill 1508: Use of Propofol for Colonscopies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2006-01-01

    alfentanil (12 µg) PCS (no lockout) vs. diazepam (0.1 mg/0.3 mg/kg boluses, no lockout) vs. midazolam (0.05 mg/kg,then boluses per patient (no lockout) vs. pethidine (50 mg)/

  1. An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

    2010-01-01

    steam reformer, onsite electrolyzer or liquid hydrogen)methane reformer, onsite electrolyzer o Locate hydrogenkg/d, 1000 kg/d) Onsite Electrolyzer stations (100 kg/d; 250

  2. Embodied Energy and Off-Grid Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alstone, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Analaysis of Injection Molding. Proceedings of the 2006 IEEEe.g. MJ/kg for injection molding). In this report, we areet al. 2005 Injection Molding (Hydraulic) MJ/kg Raw plastic

  3. Charles A. Tracy Columbia River Fisheries Laboratory. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    were landed (Craig and Hacker, 1940). After 1892, catches declined, and by 1899 the annual catch was less than 33,250 kg. Annual catches during the early 1900's were less than 104,930 kg (Craig and Hacker

  4. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Navier-Stokes calculations are performed for a Mach 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Chris

    , with separation occurring at the cone-cone juncture. The simulations ac- count for thermochemical nonequilibrium general solution variable Ho stagnation or total enthalpy, J/kg h specific enthalpy, J/kg p pressure, N/m2

  5. NUMERICAL PREDICTION OF LOCAL TEMPERATURE AND CURRENT DENSITY IN A PEM FUEL CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Zee, John W.

    University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208 ABSTRACT The heat generation inside polymer electrolyte in the membrane µ dynamic viscosity, kg-s m-2 m, dry density of a dry membrane, kg m-3 Submitted to: 2000IMECE

  6. Hydrogen Production & Delivery

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Current Conversion Price of H 2 kg delivered furanone Cost of Hydrogen From Bio-oil Conversion (Relative to 2012 Target of 3.80kg H 2 ) Ongoing Focus: * Acetic acid in...

  7. UQM Patents Non-Rare Earth Magnet Motor under DOE-Supported Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (PEVs) use motors with rare earth metals, these materials are expensive, their prices have been highly volatile (from 80kg to 750kg), and their supply may fall short...

  8. Dietary iron intake and serum ferritin concentration in 213 patients homozygous for the HFEC282Y hemochromatosis mutation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    alcohol consump- tion, tea consumption, liver function testsmg/kg/day Alcohol, g/kg/day Tea consumed during past year,excluded; † Maximum of black tea, or herbal/green/other tea.

  9. An Integrated Hydrogen Vision for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Tim; Kammen, Daniel; Ogden, Joan; Sperling, Dan

    2004-01-01

    Vision for California Gasifier 24,000 kg/day Medium $of Water Biomass Battelle Gasifier $0.95-1.60/kg ($6.69-Pyrolysis Battelle/FERCO Gasifier Battelle/FERCO Gasifier

  10. The Precursors and Outcomes of Goal Choice and Attainment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stimson, Tierra Starr

    2009-01-01

    Russell Sage Foundation. Elliot A.J. , & Sheldon, K.M. (Psychology, 73, 171-185. Elliot, A.J. , Sheldon, K.M. , &471-491. Sheldon, K. M. , & Elliot, A. J. (1998). Not all

  11. Radiative conductivity in the Earth's lower mantle Alexander F. Goncharov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steven D.

    . The lower mantle extends from the 660-km seismic discontinuity to the core­mantle boundary at 2,900 km depth,10 . Thermal conductivity in metals is dominated by electron transport, whereas heat conduction in insulators

  12. Surface deformation of Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka, recorded by GPS: The eruptions from 2005 to 2010 and long-term, long-wavelength subsidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grapenthin, Ronni

    . The network-wide subsidence cannot be explained by tectonic deformation related to the build to about 0.023 km3 /yr of ba- salt, (Fedotov et al., 2010)) about 10 km to the north

  13. Steady state deformation of the Coso Range, east central California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    an area approximately 10 km by 15 km. The deformation is most likely the result of subsidence in an area around the Coso geothermal field. The deformation signal has a...

  14. GEOMETRIC ACCURACY ASSESSMENT OF MSG-SEVIRI LEVEL 1.5 Sultan Kocaman Aksakal, Emmanuel Baltsavias, Konrad Schindler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    -Resolution Visible (HRV) band with 1-km Ground Sample Distance (GSD) and several multispectral (MS) bands with 3-km and absolute accuracy of the HRV images and band-to-band registration (BBR) accuracy between the HRV and 6 MS

  15. Seismic interpretation and regional geologic correlation established for offshore Togo, West Africa: a preliminary evaluation of hydrocarbon potential in deep water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Max Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Offshore Togo, West Africa provides exciting potential for hydrocarbon exploration. Previous exploration is limited to four wells, drilled prior to 1986 in shallow water. This investigation focuses on a 625 km² section of 3100 km² of high quality...

  16. Nocturnal temperature structure in the mesopause region over the Arecibo Observatory (18.35N, 66.75W): Seasonal variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Xinzhao

    around equinoxes, particularly late autumn when it is near 195 K, while the spring mesopause temperature in summer ($100 km), a medium altitude in late autumn and winter ($96 km), and a low altitude in early

  17. The 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Silvia

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear accident: the Risk Policy Aftermath 3 #12;Personal experience in March 2011 Tsukuba 170km Tokyo 230km Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power

  18. Mantle structure beneath the western United States and its implications for convection processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    River Plain (ESRP) and the High Lava Plains, and a deep low velocity anomaly (>600 km) beneath the ESRP and dips toward the northwest; (3) shallow low velocity anomalies (upper 200 km) beneath the eastern Snake

  19. vec l'hritage de deux grands foyers de peu-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    140 km2 , soit une densité moyenne de 658 habitants/km2 . Les deux États de l'extrême sud, le Kerala démographiques différenciées. Les quatre États du sud - Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pra- desh et Karnataka ­ ont

  20. Magma Flow through Elastic-Walled Dikes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Mountain · · · · · Yucca Mountain ~300 m ~200 m ~ 10 km ~ 1 m~ 3 km Repository tunnels Magma dike Magma.g., frozen dike Eppelsberg #12;Eiffel 2002 boccas? #12;Ship Rock U.S.A. #12;Proposed repository site at Yucca

  1. Thermodynamic model for mineral solubility in aqueous fluids: theory, calibration and application to model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Craig

    show a steady increase in solubility along constant geothermal gradients or water isochores, at a geothermal gradient of 20°C km)1 . For subduction zones, modeled by a geotherm of 7°C km)1 , the required

  2. Mineralogy and Petrology (2007) 91: 1124 DOI 10.1007/s00710-007-0183-7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cartigny, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    to 90 km along a cold geothermal gradient (8 C=km). Unmetamor- phosed and HP metasediments show is available for mafic rocks and metasediments sub- ducted along warm geothermal gradients (Moran et al., 1992

  3. LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    m at 45°C, with a geothermal gradient of 25°C per km and abut with the same geothermal gradient of 25°C per km. While

  4. A FEMTOSECOND-LEVEL FIBER-OPTICS TIMING DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM USING FREQUENCY-OFFSET INTERFEROMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Figure 3: 2.8 km SLAC klystron gallery phase variation (km ?ber loop in the SLAC klystron gallery, exposed to fullperturbation of the klystron modulators. Mea- surement were

  5. Identification and analysis of residues contained on b fi a loops of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fülöp, Vilmos

    Nacional de Geno´ mica para la Biodiversidad (Langebio), CINVESTAV-IPN, Km 9.6 Libramiento Norte, Carretera Diversity Laboratory, Laboratorio Nacional de Geno´ mica para la Biodiversidad (Langebio), CINVESTAV-IPN, Km

  6. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    at Yuzovska in the eastern Dniepr-Donets Basin covers an area of 7,886 km 2 and assigns oil and gas rights to all strata to a depth of 10 km, including tight and basin-centered...

  7. Towards Developing a Calibrated EGS Exploration Methodology Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the following three principal EGS parameters of interest: temperature, rock type, and stress, at depths from +1km to -4km above sea level. Trust maps provide a data reliability...

  8. The Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff, Valles Caldera, New Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volume of 316 km3. Assuming approximately equal caldera fill, outflow, and distal ash volumes in large ignimbrites to the Otowi Member yields a value of 474 km3 DRE for the...

  9. A Comparative Study of Estimation Models for Satellite Relative Motion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Uri

    2013-01-31

    The problem of relative spacecraft motion estimation is considered with application to various reference and relative orbits. Mean circular and elliptic orbits are analyzed, with relative orbits ranging in size from 1 km to 10 km. Estimators...

  10. An intercomparison of lidar-derived aerosol optical properties with airborne measurements near Tokyo during ACE-Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Antony

    and 6 km over Sagami Bay southwest of Tokyo. The C-130 observation package included a tracking Sun extinction coefficients (sa $ 0.03 kmÀ1 ) derived from the airborne tracking Sun photometer, in situ optical

  11. Coordinated avifaunal roadCounts (Car) Animal Demography Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    ". Agriculture List types of agriculture practised along the route, if possible in this form: "From km 10 to km features Mention other features of the route which are relevant or interesting, e.g. wetlands, dams

  12. Setting Metsovo the navel of touristic development of Pindos T.D. Papazissis, Civil Engineer N.T.U.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psarrakos, Panayiotis

    , Meteora in Thessalia (which are just 75 km. away), Kastoria in Macedonia (122 km) and the island the capital of Macedonia, Salonica, the time will be shortened to 2 hours and 15 min- utes. So mountain lovers

  13. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30

    piezoelectric transducer to produce a controllable optical phase shift at the 2 km point of a 12 km path length. Interrogation of the distributed sensor was accomplished by repetitively gating light pulses from the stable laser into the sensing fiber...

  14. PHOTONIC TEXTILES: OVERVIEW OF THE TECHNOLOGY, APPLICATIONS AND COMMERCIALISATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    . Distributed sensing (T, P, ...) over 1m-1km X 1m-1km areas without any point sensors 2. Electrically passive structures such as bridges, houses, etc. for long term structural integrity monitoring with minimal servicing

  15. Steel slag carbonation in a flow-through reactor system: The role of fluid-flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steel Association, 2010), comprising ~275 kg of slag from the iron-making stage (namely, blast furnace

  16. Majors in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Flight - World record holder in the 5 kg electric aircraft long endurance UAV - 1st flight of a high

  17. Vrme-och strmningsteknik Thermal and Flow Engineering Processteknikens grunder (PTG) 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ) kg is vid -5°C. Isen smälts genom att droppa vatten med temperaturen (z + a) °C med en hastighet på

  18. Molecular Level Characterization and Mobility of Radionuclide-Carrying Natural Organic Matter in Aquatic Environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Chen

    2012-10-19

    reactor accident (1986, ~1.3 kg); ____________ This dissertation follows the style of Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta. 2 has been overwhelmed by anthropogenic release, which included atmospheric bomb atmospheric release by the Hanford nuclear... facility in Washington (1944-1972, ~260 kg); fuel reprocessing releases from facilities in La Hague in France and Sellafield in England (~2600 kg) to the ocean and about a decade ago, ~ 6 kg/yr to the atmosphere (Santschi and Schwehr, 2004). From 1944...

  19. Energy Storage for Long Endurance AUVs Gwyn Griffiths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    energy batteries · Manganese alkaline 110 Wh.kg-1 £71 per kWh Rayovac · Lithium ion & Lithium polymer 100 - 195 Wh.kg-1 ~£1400 per kWh Capital cost · Lithium manganese dioxide 270 Wh.kg-1 £667 per kWh SAFT LM Eagle Pitcher LCF111 r=6.4 r=108 · Energy & cost for 700 kg energy payload Manganese alkaline: 77 kWh £5

  20. Supporting Information Single step fabrication using a phase inversion method of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -based cathode with platinum catalyst (ETEK C1-10 10% Pt on Vulcan XC-72) and a PTFE diffusion layer was prepared://www.sidrich.com/products-and- pricing/pricing/carbon-black-pricing/ PTFE powder $25/Kg $10-40/Kg http://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/Virgin-Molding- PTFE-Powder_797829147.html PVDF powder $24/Kg $22.5-25.5/Kg http

  1. SCHEDULE OF FEES Wet Milling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    approximately 15 kg starch. A Bauer mill is used for first and second grind and a hydrocyclone is used

  2. Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    is reported to be 0.1-1 pCi/g. (The Health Physics SocietyDigested Sludge ND I 8.06d 1.7 pCi/gr(62.9 Bq/kg) 0.025pCi/lMartin JE ND Reference ND 45 pCi/kg(1.665 Bq/kg) pCi/kg(

  3. Lead Transformation, Contamination,Lead Transformation, Contamination, and Remediation at Shooting Rangeand Remediation at Shooting Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    --yard pistol shooting rangesyard pistol shooting ranges Soil depths (cm) pH DOC (mg/kg) Total Pb (mg

  4. Effects of a carbon tax on combined heat and power adoption by a microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Siddidqui, Afzal S.; Stadler, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Carbon emissions rate from burning natural gas to meet heating and cooling loads (kg/kWh) Natural gas price

  5. Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Carbon emissions rate from burning natural gas to meet heating and cooling loads (kg/kWh) Natural gas price

  6. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2005-01-01

    Carbon emissions rate from burning natural gas to meet heating and cooling loads (kg/kWh) Natural gas price

  7. Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Carbon emissions rate from burning natural gas to meet heating and cooling loads (kg/kWh) Natural gas price

  8. Clean Fuel Advanced Technology Awarded Projects Organization Project Descriptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COSTSHARE TOTAL COST (includes costshare) Nox (kg/yr) VOC (kg/yr) CO (kg/yr) PM (kg/yr) 2006 CFAT Projects(7 Energy Alternatives, LLC Biodiesel refueling infrastructure1,3 $150,000 $147,520 $297,520 -496 385 900,004 $1,097,397 3143 -285 25900 147 2009 CFAT Project(1 project) North Carolina Solar Center 1

  9. Atmospheric Pollution Research 3 (2012) 279288 Atmospheric Pollution Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aneja, Viney P.

    2012-01-01

    a commercial anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoon and from an on­site finishing swine confinement house.32±0.32 kg NH3­N animal ­1 yr ­1 , 0.78±0.49 kg NH 3 ­N animal ­1 yr ­1 , 1.55±1.40 kg NH3­N animal ­1 yr ­1 , and 1.35±0.61 kg NH 3 ­N animal ­1 yr ­1 in summer, fall, winter, and spring respectively

  10. 4-60 EES Problem 4-59 is reconsidered. Using EES, the indicated properties of compressed liquid are to be determined, and they are to be compared to those obtained using the saturated liquid approximation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    J/kg] u_app=419.1 [kJ/kg] v=0.001036 [m^3/kg] v_app=0.001043 [m^3/kg] 4-61 Superheated steam in a piston approximation. Analysis The problem is solved using EES, and the solution is given below. Fluid$='Steam) h_app_2 = ENTHALPY(Fluid$,T=T,x=0)+v_app*(P-pressure(Fluid$,T=T,x=0)) SOLUTION Fluid$='Steam

  11. In Vitro Glucuronidation of the Antibacterial Triclocarban and Its Oxidative MetabolitesS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    /kg were found in sludge, as shown in the Targeted National Sewage Sludge Survey, published by the U

  12. The discovery of cometary activity in near-Earth asteroid (3552) Don Quixote

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mommert, Michael; Harris, Alan W.; Hora, Joseph L.; Smith, Howard A.; Reach, William T.; Emery, Joshua P.; Thomas, Cristina A.; Mueller, Michael; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Trilling, David E.; Delbo, Marco

    2014-01-20

    The near-Earth object (NEO) population, which mainly consists of fragments from collisions between asteroids in the main asteroid belt, is thought to include contributions from short-period comets as well. One of the most promising NEO candidates for a cometary origin is near-Earth asteroid (3552) Don Quixote, which has never been reported to show activity. Here we present the discovery of cometary activity in Don Quixote based on thermal-infrared observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope in its 3.6 and 4.5 ?m bands. Our observations clearly show the presence of a coma and a tail in the 4.5 ?m but not in the 3.6 ?m band, which is consistent with molecular band emission from CO{sub 2}. Thermal modeling of the combined photometric data on Don Quixote reveals a diameter of 18.4{sub ?0.4}{sup +0.3} km and an albedo of 0.03{sub ?0.01}{sup +0.02}, which confirms Don Quixote to be the third-largest known NEO. We derive an upper limit on the dust production rate of 1.9 kg s{sup –1} and derive a CO{sub 2} gas production rate of (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10{sup 26} molecules s{sup –1}. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectroscopic observations indicate the presence of fine-grained silicates, perhaps pyroxene rich, on the surface of Don Quixote. Our discovery suggests that CO{sub 2} can be present in near-Earth space over a long time. The presence of CO{sub 2} might also explain that Don Quixote's cometary nature remained hidden for nearly three decades.

  13. Generation of galactic disc warps due to intergalactic accretion flows onto the disc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Lopez-Corredoira; J. Betancort-Rijo; J. E. Beckman

    2002-02-07

    A new method is developed to calculate the amplitude of the galactic warps generated by a torque due to external forces. This takes into account that the warp is produced as a reorientation of the different rings which constitute the disc in order to compensate the differential precession generated by the external force, yielding a uniform asymptotic precession for all rings. Application of this method to gravitational tidal forces in the Milky Way due to the Magellanic Clouds leads to a very low amplitude of the warp. If the force were due to an extragalactic magnetic field, its intensity would have to be very high, to generate the observed warps. An alternative hypothesis is explored: the accretion of the intergalactic medium over the disk. A cup-shaped distortion is expected, due to the transmission of the linear momentum; but, this effect is small and the predominant effect turns out to be the transmission of angular momentum, i.e. a torque giving an integral-sign shape warp. The torque produced by a flow of velocity ~100 km/s and baryon density \\~10^{-25} kg/m^3 is enough to generate the observed warps and this mechanism offers quite a plausible explanation. First, because this order of accretion rate is inferred from other processes observed in the Galaxy, notably its chemical evolution. The inferred rate of infall of matter, ~1 solar-mass/yr, to the Galactic disc that this theory predicts agrees with the quantitative predictions of this chemical evolution resolving key issues, notably the G-dwarf problem. Second, because the required density of the intergalactic medium is within the range of values compatible with observation. By this mechanism, we can explain the warp phenomenon in terms of intergalactic accretion flows onto the disk of the galaxy.

  14. MAIN-BELT COMET P/2008 R1 (GARRADD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jewitt, David; Yang Bin; Haghighipour, Nader [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)], E-mail: jewitt@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: yangbin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: nader@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2009-05-15

    We present a study of the newly discovered main-belt comet P/2008 R1 (Garradd), an object with the dynamical characteristics of an asteroid and the physical characteristics of a comet. Photometry sets a limit to the effective radius of the nucleus at r{sub e} < 0.7 km (red geometric albedo 0.05 assumed). The coma shows a secular fading in our data caused by the escape of dust particles from the near-nucleus environment. The optical reflection spectrum is a nearly neutral continuum devoid of gaseous emission lines, from which we derive a limit to the cyanide (CN) radical production rate of Q {sub CN}< 1.4 x 10{sup 23} s{sup -1} and infer a mass-loss rate <1.5 kg s{sup -1} at the time of our observations. Unlike the first-reported main-belt comets, P/2008 R1 is not dynamically stable. The nearby 8:3 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter induces dynamical instability on timescales 20-30 Myr. Hence, we conclude that P/2008 R1 has recently arrived from a more stable source elsewhere. The high Tisserand parameter of the orbit (in fact, with T{sub J} = 3.216 it is the highest of any comet) points to a source in the asteroid belt itself, instead of in the Kuiper belt (putative source of the Jupiter family comets). We infer that P/2008 R1 is an icy body from the outer asteroid belt in which sublimation has been triggered by rising temperatures resulting from a decreasing perihelion distance.

  15. CHALLENGE TO ARM AND ASP Determine aerosol radiative forcings at ARM site(s).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    aerosol optical thickness is 0.1: 3 W m-2 cooling. ~50 km Drone Radiometers AMF DIRECT DETERMINATION

  16. Translating peter.e.clark@boeing.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lifschitz, Vladimir

    represents the function that turns every Volkswagen into its electric sys­ tem. In KM, it turns into a slot

  17. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 14 June 15, 1995

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    Liblit, Ben

    (Keeling) Islands bIu­ CO Colombia (Republic of) ­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic Federal Republic of the) ­­U­ CG

  18. Research and Development Facility at Black Rock Hills Utah for a next

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the sites. 13 km to the west, the US department of Fish and Wildlife operates the Fish Springs Wildlife

  19. Pressure perturbations from geologic carbon sequestration: Area-of-review boundaries and borehole leakage driving forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicot, J.-P.

    2010-01-01

    geothermal gradient is 30°C/km; vertical lines represent possible water density profiles in a borehole:

  20. Demography in an increasingly variable world

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    Kalisz, Susan

    mesoscale (2­2000 km) temperature and precipitation to disturbances such as hurricanes [11,12]. Glossary

  1. Ageostrophic, anticyclonic instability of a geostrophic, barotropic boundary current

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    Yavneh, Irad

    -called atmospheric mesoscale (with L between about 1 and 1000 km) and oceanic mesoscale and "submesoscale" (with L

  2. The 1 April 2014 Iquique, Chile, M w 8.1 earthquake rupture sequence

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    Lay, Thorne; Yue, Han; Brodsky, Emily E; An, Chao

    2014-01-01

    zones. Improved onshore and offshore geodetic and seismican ~100 km long region offshore of southeastern Peru just

  3. Morphological and Genetic Divergence of Hoplias microlepis (Characiformes: Erythrinidae) in Rivers and Artificial Impoundments of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Windsor E.

    drainage primarily for the generation of hydroelectric power. It has a surface area of 270 km2 , contains

  4. Data from CREL, from the SHEBA experiment, western Arctic How to define it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    - summer 2005, no replenishment of MY ice - Fram Strait export 40% of MY ice loss (rest = melting) #12;But in the game? ASSUME 1m thick ~ 2 x 1012 m3 (extra volume lost) (i.e. 2 x 103 km3) Energy needed for melt 106 km2 2006 ~ 0.16 x 106 km2 2007 ~ 0.28 x 106 km2 Ice export only ~ 15% of sea ice retreat Extra

  5. A STUDY OF REGIONAL TEMPERATURE AND THERMOHYDROLOGICAL EFFECTS OF AN UNDERGROUND REPOSITORY FOR NUCLEAR WASTES IN HARD ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    geothermal gradient of 30°C/km is assumed. By imposing a constant pressure boundary condition in equation (

  6. Assessing surface water consumption using remotely-sensed groundwater, evapotranspiration, and precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Ray G; Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S

    2012-01-01

    Energy Balance ALgorithm (SEBAL) run using 250 m and 1 km observations with automatic pixel selec- tion, dynamic wind

  7. Facing the Coastal Challenge: Modeling Coastal Erosion in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Douglas L.; Masters, Patricia M.; Jenkins, Scott A.

    2002-01-01

    vertical exaggeration 23x seabed paleo wave-cut platform Distance, km Figure 2. Generalized seismic profile

  8. Hydrographisches Amt der autonomen Provinz Bozen -Sdtirol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerschner, Hanns

    -3.16 >3.16-7.51 area classes (km2 ) numberofglaciers 1km2 There were 259 glaciers in 1997, covering 109 km 2 Area-altitude distribution 2100 2300 2500 2700 2900 3100 3300 3500 3700 3900 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 km2 Most of the area is concentrated around 2800 - 3300 m. Areas above 3400 m are small

  9. MOUNT ALLISON UNIVERSITY S a c k v i l l e , N e w B r u n s w i c k , C a n a d a

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    Hutcheon, James M.

    , are both within two hours of Sackville, and beautiful Prince Edward Island is just 65km (40 miles) away

  10. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Regionally accentuated reversible brain grey

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    Gaser, Christian

    . It was the second European transcontinental multistage ultra marathon race and covered 4487 km (2788 miles) from

  11. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn Stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air [kg NOx-Equiv.]. Production and processes of corn and petroleum from crude oils are also observed ­ Global Warming Air [kg CO2-Equiv.], 3) TRACI, Acidification Rain [kg mol H + Equiv.], and 4) TRACI, Smog for ethanol production (corn versus corn stover) had little effect on the life cycle emissions of E85, however

  12. Google:[Leonid Zakharov] http://w3.pppl.gov/~zakharov How far is magnetic fusion from being

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    .2) Monetary value of electricity Cel kg = 6.29 3 Ccost of electricity 0.04 CDT electricity 0.33 · 106 [$ ] $2M, (1.3) and the cost of tritium (2003) CT kg $30M. (1.4) Consumption of 1 kg of T per m2

  13. Effect of prepartum protein restriction on brown adipose tissue thermogenic activity in newborn calves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Travis Lyn

    1997-01-01

    (26.4 kg) or thermoneutral metabolic rates (TMR) which averaged 33.3 cal/kg/min. In support of these findings, visceral organ mass was similar for PA and PR calves. Peak metabolic rates (PMR), which averaged 66.2 cal/kg/min, as well as BAT weight...

  14. Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    such thing as "carbon neutral" · You Can't Quit ­We have to do something #12;Carbon Footprint Perspective · Asphalt Mixture ­60 g C02e/ kg #12;Carbon Footprint Perspective · Asphalt Mixture ­60 g C02e/ kg · Orange Juice ­1600 g C02e/ kg Jan Th. van der Zwan #12;Carbon Footprint Perspective · Asphalt Mixture ­60 g C02

  15. EFFECTS OF ANISOMYCIN ON RETENTION OF THE PASSIVE-AVOIDANCE HABIT AS A FUNCTION OF AGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Hasker P.

    2013-01-01

    control group. + p(O.OS as compared with ANI (120 mg/kg).of protein synthesis by ANI (120 mg/kg) :young (Qr-----10) ,hr ®me after injection of ANI (120mg/kg) N I Fig. 2 XBL 809-

  16. Name/Description: Newsprint, printing and publishing papers Mill location(s): Longview, WA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -controversial(4) 100% Country of harvest United States and Canada Certifications See reverse PRODUCT COMPOSITION.35 kg/admt WATER Total suspended solids (TSS): 2.58 kg/admt Biological oxygen demand (BOD): 1.19 kg/admt Water discharged: 30 m3 /admt NORPAC ProductEnvironmentalProfile Beneficiallyreused

  17. Nutritive evaluation of two native north Texas legumes (Strophostyles) for goats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Jamie Lee

    2004-11-15

    The objective of this study was to determine effects of supplementing coastal bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon; CBG) hay with Strophostyles helvula (98 g kg-1 crude protein (CP), 476 g kg-1 neutral detergent fiber (NDF)), S. leiosperma (117 g kg-1 CP...

  18. Registration of `HS03243' Soybean Soybean cultivar HS03243 [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] (Reg.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    yield of HS0­3243 was 6% greater than that of `Dilworth' (Fioritto et al., 2004), a cur- rent public, compared with 403 g kg21 for Dilworth and 419 g kg21 for Kottman. Oil content has averaged 203 g kg21

  19. Evaluation of F1 Cows Sired by Brahman, Boran, and Tuli Bulls for Reproductive and Maternal Performance Traits and Cow Longevity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muntean, Carl

    2011-08-08

    .5, and 197.2 kg, respectively, and were significantly different. For both BWT and WWT, male calves were heavier (P < 0.05) than females, by 2.13 kg and 10.39 kg, on average. Least squares means for PR for females sired by B, Bo, and T bulls were 0.900, 0...

  20. ABET Criterion 3: Outcomes Met By Course Content This brief content assessment should be consistent with the updated Course Syllabet

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    Walter, M.Todd

    , 2007 Instructor: K.G. Gebremedhin Identify the outcomes associated with this course. Place a "P" or "S.: BEE 3310 Semester: F, 2007 Name of Instructor: K.G. Gebremedhin Course Outcomes Specific to Course ____________________________ Instructor: ____ K.G. Gebremedhin___________________________________ Semester: ____Fall, 2007