Sample records for kg kilograms km

  1. Scalability, scintillation readout and charge drift in a kilogram scale solid xenon particle detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, J; Jaskierny, W F; Markley, D; Pahlka, R B; Balakishiyeva, D; Saab, T; Filipenko, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  2. MASS AND DENSITY 1 kg = 2.2046 lb 1 lb = 0.4536 kg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    .m = 0.73756 ft.lbf 1 ft.lbf = 1.35582 J 1 kJ = 737.56 ft.lbf 1 Btu = 778.17 ft.lbf 1 kJ = 0.9478 Btu 1 Btu = 1.0551 kJ 1 kJ/kg = 0.42992 Btu/lb 1 Btu/lb = 2.326 kJ/kg 1 kcal = 4.1868 kJ ENERGY TRANSFER RATE 1 W = 1 J/s = 3.413 Btu/h 1 Btu/h = 0.293 W 1kW = 1.341 hp 1 hp =2545 Btu/h 1 hp = 550 ft.lbf/s 1

  3. Basic Properties Radius: = RRSun 109km1096.6 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Shantanu

    of the Sun radius T (K) (kg/m3) Core: 57 106.1106.125.0 ×× SunRr Radiative zone: 46 1021087.025.0 ×× Sun 10810km2000 - ×r Corona: 116 10101.00.01 - - SunSun RRr Upper corona merges into the Solar Wind. #12;Interior Nuclear reactions in core via p-p chain: MeV)(12.9HHHeHeHe MeV)(5.49HeHH MeV)44.1(HHH 11433 312

  4. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2009. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    58 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production 98% of domestic gallium consumption. About 67% of the gallium consumed was used in integrated and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2009. One company in Utah recovered

  5. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2005. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    66 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production, [(703) 648-7719, dkramer@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7975] #12;67 GALLIUM Consolidation of companies and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2005. One company in Utah recovered

  6. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1998. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    66 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production A. Kramer [(703) 648-7719, dkramer@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7722] #12;67 GALLIUM Events, Trends and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1998. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah

  7. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1996. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on world production of primary gallium were unavailable because data on the output of the few producers62 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production in optoelectronic devices, which include light-emitting diodes (LED's), laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar

  8. Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydagis, Matthew Mark; /Chicago U.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

  9. Schnell Z ndstrahlmotoren AG Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump638324°,Schnell Z ndstrahlmotoren AG Co KG Jump

  10. Leopold Kostal GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaorLeopold Kostal GmbH Co KG Jump to:

  11. Campa Sud GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpen EnergyCallaway ElectricCambridge FundsCampa Sud GmbH Co KG

  12. Teleportation of entanglement over 143 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Herbst; Thomas Scheidl; Matthias Fink; Johannes Handsteiner; Bernhard Wittmann; Rupert Ursin; Anton Zeilinger

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    As a direct consequence of the no-cloning theorem, the deterministic amplification as in classical communication is impossible for quantum states. This calls for more advanced techniques in a future global quantum network, e.g. for cloud quantum computing. A unique solution is the teleportation of an entangled state, i.e. entanglement swapping, representing the central resource to relay entanglement between distant nodes. Together with entanglement purification and a quantum memory it constitutes a so-called quantum repeater. Since the aforementioned building blocks have been individually demonstrated in laboratory setups only, the applicability of the required technology in real-world scenarios remained to be proven. Here we present a free-space entanglement-swapping experiment between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife, verifying the presence of quantum entanglement between two previously independent photons separated by 143 km. We obtained an expectation value for the entanglement-witness operator, more than 6 standard deviations beyond the classical limit. By consecutive generation of the two required photon pairs and space-like separation of the relevant measurement events, we also showed the feasibility of the swapping protocol in a long-distance scenario, where the independence of the nodes is highly demanded. Since our results already allow for efficient implementation of entanglement purification, we anticipate our assay to lay the ground for a fully-fledged quantum repeater over a realistic high-loss and even turbulent quantum channel.

  13. Daylight quantum key distribution over 1.6 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. T. Buttler; R. J. Hughes; S. K. Lamoreaux; G. L. Morgan; J. E. Nordholt; C. G. Peterson

    2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) has been demonstrated over a point-to-point $\\sim1.6$-km atmospheric optical path in full daylight. This record transmission distance brings QKD a step closer to surface-to-satellite and other long-distance applications.

  14. Accelerated Aging Effects on Kevlar KM2 Fiber Survivability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Tony

    2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    as an alternative test method to the pneumatic grip setup. ........................................ 87 ix LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1. DuPont?s Kevlar fiber grades and their tensile material properties ranked by ascending tensile modulus.... ................................................................................. 5 Table 2. Kevlar KM2 properties given by DuPont. ........................................................... 6 Table 3. Fiber rapid degradation Design of Experiment factors and levels. .................... 36 Table 4. Recorded experimentally...

  15. An exact sequence for KM /2 with applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vishik, Alexander

    of characteristics zero. For a sequence a = (a1, . . . , an) of invertible elements of k consider the homomorphism KM the authors were members of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. We would like to thank both the small Pfister quadric or the norm quadric associated with the symbol a. Denote by k(Qa) the function

  16. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Chris [ORNL; Yatsandra, Oyola [ORNL; Mayes, Richard [ORNL; none,; Gill, Gary [PNNL; Li-Jung, Kuo [PNNL; Wood, Jordana [PNNL; Sadananda, Das [ORNL

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  17. Version 3.0 SOP 2 --October 12, 2007 SOP 1 kg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Version 3.0 SOP 2 -- October 12, 2007 37 SOP 2 1. SOP 1 kg . (1800-2300 mol ion) #12;October 12, 2007 SOP 2 -- Version 3.0 38 . . 2 2 2 2 2 2CO HO(CH ) NH HO . ± 0.4 . 1 : () (septum port) ( ); () - SOMMA . #12;Version 3.0 SOP 2

  18. GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: 100-kg melter offgas report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)] [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the 100-kg melter offgas report on testing performed by GTS Duratek, Inc., in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The document contains the complete offgas report on the 100-kg melter as prepared by Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. A summary of this report is also contained in the GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford Low-Level Waste Melter Tests: Final Report (WHC-SD-WM-VI-027).

  19. 4-70C Propane (molar mass = 44.1 kg/kmol) poses a greater fire danger than methane (molar mass = 16 kg/kmol) since propane is heavier than air (molar mass = 29 kg/kmol), and it will settle near the floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    4-36 Ideal Gas 4-70C Propane (molar mass = 44.1 kg/kmol) poses a greater fire danger than methane (molar mass = 16 kg/kmol) since propane is heavier than air (molar mass = 29 kg/kmol), and it will settle MATERIAL. © 2008 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Limited distribution permitted only to teachers

  20. Geothermie Unterhaching GmbH und Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlanGmbH und Co KG Jump to: navigation,

  1. Characterization of BG28 and KG3 filter glass for Drive Diagnostic Attenuators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, R H; Weiland, T; Folta, J

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    BG28 and KG3 filter glasses were tested for use as attenuators in the NIF drive diagnostic (DrD) systems. Tests were performed in the Optical Sciences Laser facility with a 351 nm, 2-step, 3-nsec pulse at fluences ranging up to {approx} 1 J/cm{sup 2}. Single-shot measurements showed no solarization when the samples were allowed to relax for a week after exposure. KG3 filters exhibited no luminescence and no transient pulse distortion. BG28 filters luminesced appreciably and imposed a 'droop' (similar to 'square-pulse distortion') on the signals. The droop parameter is estimated at 0.50 {+-} 0.11 cm{sup 2}/J. Droop is explained in terms of known copper-doped-glass spectroscopy and kinetics (buildup of triplet-state populations, with excited-state absorption). Simulation of the distortion ({approx}1.6%) expected on a 1.8 MJ Haan pulse led to a minor redesign of the Drive Diagnostic with reduced fluence on the BG28 filters to reduce the droop distortion to 0.5%.

  2. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  3. afm-12 1-km avhrr: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unsupervised classi ? cation of 1 km monthly Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Di ? erence Vegetation Index (NDVI) composites covering...

  4. Finite Future Cosmological Singularity Times and Maximum Predictability Times in a Nonlinear FRW-KG Scalar Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Max Wilson; Keith Andrew

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the relative time scales associated with finite future cosmological singularities, especially those classified as Big Rip cosmologies, and the maximum predictability time of a coupled FRW-KG scalar cosmology with chaotic regimes. Our approach is to show that by starting with a FRW-KG scalar cosmology with a potential that admits an analytical solution resulting in a finite time future singularity there exists a Lyapunov time scale that is earlier than the formation of the singularity. For this singularity both the cosmological scale parameter a(t) and the Hubble parameter H(t) become infinite at a finite future time, the Big Rip time. We compare this time scale to the predictability time scale for a chaotic FRW-KG scalar cosmology. We find that there are cases where the chaotic time scale is earlier than the Big Rip singularity calling for special care in interpreting and predicting the formation of the future cosmological singularity.

  5. PET 424304 2013 Exercises 1+2 of 4 17 Jan + 31 Jan 2013 1. 1kg ice at 263 K 1 kg water at 293 K. Heat Q at T = T is supplied by the surroundings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    . Heat Q at T = T° is supplied by the surroundings. Specific heat ice : ci = 2,14 kJ/(kgK); water cw = 4 424304 2013 Exercises 1+2 of 4 17 Jan + 31 Jan 2013 5. For cooling T° T1 = 80 K 1 1 1 1 1 ln

  6. High rate, long-distance quantum key distribution over 250km of ultra low loss fibres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Stucki; N. Walenta; F. Vannel; R. T. Thew; N. Gisin; H. Zbinden; S. Gray; C. R. Towery; S. Ten

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fully automated quantum key distribution prototype running at 625 MHz clock rate. Taking advantage of ultra low loss fibres and low-noise superconducting detectors, we can distribute 6,000 secret bits per second over 100 km and 15 bits per second over 250km.

  7. An exact sequence for KM* =2 with applications to quadratic forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) of invertible elements of k consider the homomorphism KM*(k)=2 ! KM*+n(k)=2. In its present form the paper was written while the authors were members of the Institute for Advanced* * or the norm quadric associated with the symbol a_. Denote by k(Qa_) the function field of Qa_and by (Qa_)0

  8. Eleutherodactylus discoidalis BOLIVIA: Departamento Tarija: 12.3 km NW of Entre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castoe, Todd A.

    Eleutherodactylus discoidalis BOLIVIA: Departamento Tarija: 12.3 km NW of Entre Ri´os, on the road to Tarija, MNK-A 3877­97. Eleutherodactylus ibischi BOLIVIA: Departamento Santa Cruz: Km 68.5 on Santa Cruz- Samaipata road, MNK-A 6612. Eleutherodactylus zongoensis BOLIVIA: Departamento La Paz: Valle de Zongo, 1250

  9. Ozone Climatologies Figure 1: Ozone climatology for control run in kg/m(a), percentage change in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Ozone Climatologies (a) (b) (c) Figure 1: Ozone climatology for control run in kg/m³(a), percentage change in ozone for the perturbed runs; tropopause region (b), whole stratosphere (c). Determining the impact of lower stratospheric ozone depletion on Southern Hemisphere climate Sarah P.E. Keeley and Nathan

  10. Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Das, Sadananda [ORNL; Oyola, Yatsandra [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T. [ORNL; Saito, Tomonori [ORNL; Brown, Suree [ORNL; Gill, Gary [PNNL; Kuo, Li-Jung [PNNL; Wood, Jordana [PNNL

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, “Complete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent”. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

  11. First Dark Matter Search Results from a 4-kg CF$_3$I Bubble Chamber Operated in a Deep Underground Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behnke, E.; /Indiana U., South Bend; Behnke, J.; /Indiana U., South Bend; Brice, S.J.; /Fermilab; Broemmelsiek, D.; /Fermilab; Collar, J.I.; /Chicago U., EFI; Conner, A.; /Indiana U., South Bend; Cooper, P.S.; /Fermilab; Crisler, M.; /Fermilab; Dahl, C.E.; /Chicago U., EFI; Fustin, D.; /Chicago U., EFI; Grace, E.; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New data are reported from the operation of a 4.0 kg CF{sub 3}I bubble chamber in the 6800 foot deep SNOLAB underground laboratory. The effectiveness of ultrasound analysis in discriminating alpha decay background events from single nuclear recoils has been confirmed, with a lower bound of >99.3% rejection of alpha decay events. Twenty single nuclear recoil event candidates and three multiple bubble events were observed during a total exposure of 553 kg-days distributed over three different bubble nucleation thresholds. The effective exposure for single bubble recoil-like events was 437.4 kg-days. A neutron background internal to the apparatus, of known origin, is estimated to account for five single nuclear recoil events and is consistent with the observed rate of multiple bubble events. This observation provides world best direct detection constraints on WIMP-proton spin-dependent scattering for WIMP masses >20 GeV/c{sup 2} and demonstrates significant sensitivity for spin-independent interactions.

  12. Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) serves as a centralized repository providing a common interface for all D&D related activities.

  13. Comparison And Discussion Of The 6 Km Temperature Maps Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Discussion Of The 6 Km Temperature Maps Of The Western Us Prepared By The Smu Geothermal Lab And The Usgs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  14. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GIS ... Dataset Activity Stream Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km resolution for Ghana from NREL (Abstract):  Raster GIS data, exported as BIL...

  15. atmosphere 0-70 km: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconduct... Summers, D J; Datta, A; Duraisamy, M; Luo, T; Lyons, G T 2012-01-01 100 A 233 km...

  16. Distribution of Time-Energy Entanglement over 100 km fiber using superconducting single-photon detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Zhang; Hiroki Takesue; Sae Woo Nam; Carsten Langrock; Xiuping Xie; M. M. Fejer; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we report an experimental realization of distributing entangled photon pairs over 100 km of dispersion-shifted fiber. In the experiment, we used a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide to generate the time-energy entanglement and superconducting single-photon detectors to detect the photon pairs after 100 km. We also demonstrate that the distributed photon pairs can still be useful for quantum key distribution and other quantum communication tasks.

  17. 100 km secure differential phase shift quantum key distribution with low jitter up-conversion detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleni Diamanti; Hiroki Takesue; Carsten Langrock; M. M. Fejer; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2006-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a quantum key distribution experiment in which keys that were secure against all individual eavesdropping attacks allowed by quantum mechanics were distributed over 100 km of optical fiber. We implemented the differential phase shift quantum key distribution protocol and used low timing jitter 1.55 um single-photon detectors based on frequency up-conversion in periodically poled lithium niobate waveguides and silicon avalanche photodiodes. Based on the security analysis of the protocol against general individual attacks, we generated secure keys at a practical rate of 166 bit/s over 100 km of fiber. The use of the low jitter detectors also increased the sifted key generation rate to 2 Mbit/s over 10 km of fiber.

  18. a. Lngsamt & adiabatiskt reversibel, dvs en isentropisk process V1 = nRT1 / p1 = (m/M) RT1/p1 , massa m = 1 kg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Svar 1303: a. Långsamt & adiabatiskt reversibel, dvs en isentropisk process V1 = n·R·T1 / p1 = (m/M) ·R·T1/p1 , massa m = 1 kg H2 : M = 0.002 kg/mol; CO : M = 0.028 kg/mol; CO2 : M = 0.044 kg/mol p1 = z bar V1 = (R/M) · (300 + 50·a) / z m3 . t.ex. 30066 : p = 3 bar, gas = CO, T1 = 450 K V1 = 0.445 m3

  19. On the Penetration of the 660 km Phase Change by Mantle Downflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in an upward force which resists the passage of the downwelling through the phase change. Cold material piles up and spreads lat- erally on the phase-change boundary. Eventu- ally, enough cold materialOn the Penetration of the 660 km Phase Change by Mantle Downflows David Bercovici Department

  20. 21 Nordic Seminar on Computational Mechanics T. Kvamsdal, K.M. Mathisen and B. Pettersen (Eds)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLachlan, Robert

    ). A B-series for the system y = f(y) is a formal series in powers of the step size h and in terms 121 Nordic Seminar on Computational Mechanics NSCM-21 T. Kvamsdal, K.M. Mathisen and B. Pettersen symmetric integration methods) versus the preservation of symplecticity. 1 INTRODUCTION Given the system

  1. Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more a plate tectonic framework for the his- tory of the Michigan basin. INTRODUCTION The Michigan basin of the Michigan basin has led to numerous proposals for basin subsidence mechanisms, including thermal contraction

  2. Large-scale (100s km) distributions of tuna larvae (family Scombridae), par-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abundance and fecundity of T. albacares (yellowfin tuna) and K. pelamis (skipjack tuna) in the western. pelamis larvae. Other possible explanations, however, are that previous sampling scales of 100s km between waters (Miller, 1979), and Thunnus spp. and K. pelamis larvae were up to 100 times more concentrated

  3. Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution. This estimate includes all on-site sources and sinks of carbon Agronomic Feedstock Production and Environmental Impact Analyses ORNL uses high-resolution projections of feedstock production in analyses of soil carbon change, soil erosion, energy use, net

  4. Mode-Locking in 25-km Fibre Laser , S.Turitsyn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobtsev, Sergei M.

    generation of ultra-short optical pulses with high energy. The extension of the cavity lengthMode-Locking in 25-km Fibre Laser A.Ivanenko (1,2) , S.Turitsyn (1) , S.Kobsev (2) , M.Dubov (1) (1) Photonics Research Group, Aston University, UK, s.k.turitsyn@aston.ac.uk (2) Laser Systems Laboratory

  5. Four-neutrino analysis of 1.5km-baseline reactor antineutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Sin Kyu; Ko, Young-Ju; Siyeon, Kim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses of sterile neutrinos are not yet known, and depending on the orders of magnitudes, their existence may explain reactor anomalies or the spectral shape of reactor neutrino events at 1.5km-baseline detector. Here, we present four-neutrino analysis of the results announced by RENO and Daya Bay, which performed the definitive measurements of $\\theta_{13}$ based on the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos at km-order baselines. Our results using 3+1 scheme include the exclusion curve of $\\Delta m^2_{41}$ vs. $\\theta_{14}$ and the adjustment of $\\theta_{13}$ due to correlation with $\\theta_{14}$. The value of $\\theta_{13}$ obtained by RENO and Daya Bay with a three-neutrino oscillation analysis is included in the $1\\sigma$ interval of $\\theta_{13}$ allowed by our four-neutrino analysis.

  6. Four-neutrino analysis of 1.5km-baseline reactor antineutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin Kyu Kang; Yeong-Duk Kim; Young-Ju Ko; Kim Siyeon

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses of sterile neutrinos are not yet known, and depending on the orders of magnitudes, their existence may explain reactor anomalies or the spectral shape of reactor neutrino events at 1.5km-baseline detector. Here, we present four-neutrino analysis of the results announced by RENO and Daya Bay, which performed the definitive measurements of $\\theta_{13}$ based on the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos at km-order baselines. Our results using 3+1 scheme include the exclusion curve of $\\Delta m^2_{41}$ vs. $\\theta_{14}$ and the adjustment of $\\theta_{13}$ due to correlation with $\\theta_{14}$. The value of $\\theta_{13}$ obtained by RENO and Daya Bay with a three-neutrino oscillation analysis is included in the $1\\sigma$ interval of $\\theta_{13}$ allowed by our four-neutrino analysis.

  7. Practical free-space quantum key distribution over 10 km in daylight and at night

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard J. Hughes; Jane E. Nordholt; Derek Derkacs; Charles G. Peterson

    2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated quantum key distribution (QKD) over a 10-km, 1-airmass atmospheric range during daylight and at night. Secret random bit sequences of the quality required for the cryptographic keys used to initialize secure communications devices were transferred at practical rates with realistic security. By identifying the physical parameters that determine the system's secrecy efficiency, we infer that free-space QKD will be practical over much longer ranges under these and other atmospheric and instrumental conditions.

  8. Hydrodynamic simulations of a combined hydrogen, helium thermonuclear runaway on a 10-km neutron star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J.W.; Sparks, W.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used a Lagrangian, hydrodynamic stellar-evolution computer code to evolve a thermonuclear runaway in the accreted hydrogen rich envelope of a 1.0M, 10-km neutron star. Our simulation produced an outburst which lasted about 2000 sec and peak effective temperature was 3 keV. The peak luminosity exceeded 2 x 10/sup 5/ L. A shock wave caused a precursor in the light curve which lasted 10/sup -5/ sec.

  9. K.G. Mehrotra et al. (Eds.): IEA/AIE 2011, Part I, LNAI 6703, pp. 186198, 2011. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    K.G. Mehrotra et al. (Eds.): IEA/AIE 2011, Part I, LNAI 6703, pp. 186­198, 2011. © Springer on Industrial, Engineering and other Applications of Applied Intelligent Systems IEA/AIE 2011 6703 (2011)" #12

  10. Quantum key distribution over 25 km with an all-fiber continuous-variable system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Lodewyck; Matthieu Bloch; Raul Garcia-Patron; Simon Fossier; Evgueni Karpov; Eleni Diamanti; Thierry Debuisschert; Nicolas J. Cerf; Rosa Tualle-Brouri; Steven W. McLaughlin; Philippe Grangier

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the implementation of a reverse-reconciliated coherent-state continuous-variable quantum key distribution system, with which we generated secret keys at a rate of more than 2 kb/s over 25 km of optical fiber. Time multiplexing is used to transmit both the signal and phase reference in the same optical fiber. Our system includes all experimental aspects required for a field implementation of a quantum key distribution setup. Real-time reverse reconciliation is achieved by using fast and efficient LDPC error correcting codes.

  11. A 24 km fiber-based discretely signaled continuous variable quantum key distribution system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quyen Dinh Xuan; Zheshen Zhang; Paul L. Voss

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a continuous variable key distribution system that achieves a final secure key rate of 3.45 kb/sec over a distance of 24.2 km of optical fiber. The protocol uses discrete signaling and post-selection to improve reconciliation speed and quantifies security by means of quantum state tomography. Polarization multiplexing and a frequency translation scheme permit transmission of a continuous wave local oscillator and suppression of noise from guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering by more than 27 dB.

  12. Quantum key distribution over 25 km with an all-fiber continuous-variable system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lodewyck, Jerome; Fossier, Simon [Thales Research and Technologies, RD 128, 91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique-CNRS-Universite Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Bloch, Matthieu; McLaughlin, Steven W. [GeorgiaTech-CNRS UMI 2958, 2-3 rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Garcia-Patron, Raul; Karpov, Evgueni; Cerf, Nicolas J. [Centre for Quantum Information and Communication, Ecole Polytechnique, CP 165/59, Universite libre de Bruxelles, 50 av. F. D. Roosevelt, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Diamanti, Eleni; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Grangier, Philippe [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique-CNRS-Universite Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Debuisschert, Thierry [Thales Research and Technologies, RD 128, 91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the implementation of a reverse-reconciliated coherent-state continuous-variable quantum key distribution system, with which we generated secret keys at a rate of more than 2 kb/s over 25 km of optical fiber. Time multiplexing is used to transmit both the signal and phase reference in the same optical fiber. Our system includes all experimental aspects required for a field implementation of a quantum key distribution setup. Real-time reverse reconciliation is achieved by using fast and efficient low-density parity check error correcting codes.

  13. Time-resolved particle velocity measurements at impact velocities of 10 km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Reinhart, W.D.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypervelocity launch capabilities (9--16 km/s) with macroscopic plates have become available in recent years. It is now feasible to conduct instrumented plane-wave tests using this capability. Successfully conducting such tests requires a planar launch and impact at hypervelocities, appropriate triggering for recording systems, and time-resolved measurements of motion or stress at a particular point or set of points within the target or projectile during impact. The authors have conducted the first time-resolved wave-profile experiments using velocity interferometric techniques at impact velocities of 10 km/s. These measurements show that aluminum continues to exhibit normal release behavior to 161 GPa shock pressure, with complete loss of strength of the shocked state. These experiments have allowed a determination of shock-wave window transparency in conditions produced by a hypervelocity impact. In particular, lithium fluoride appears to lose transparency at a shock stress of 200 GPa; this appears to be the upper limit for conventional wave profile measurements using velocity interferometric techniques.

  14. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Thornton, Michele M [ORNL; Mayer, Benjamin W [ORNL; Wilhelmi, Nate [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Devarakonda, Ranjeet [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More information: http://daymet.ornl.gov Presenter: Ranjeet Devarakonda Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data and Climatological Summaries provides gridded estimates of daily weather parameters for North America, including daily continuous surfaces of minimum and maximum temperature, precipitation occurrence and amount, humidity, shortwave radiation, snow water equivalent, and day length. The current data product (Version 2) covers the period January 1, 1980 to December 31, 2013 [1]. The prior product (Version 1) only covered from 1980-2008. Data are available on a daily time step at a 1-km x 1-km spatial resolution in Lambert Conformal Conic projection with a spatial extent that covers the conterminous United States, Mexico, and Southern Canada as meteorological station density allows. Daymet data can be downloaded from 1) the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) search and order tools (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/cart/add2cart.pl?add=1219) or directly from the DAAC FTP site (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/dsviewer.pl?ds_id=1219) and 2) the Single Pixel Tool [2] and THREDDS (Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services) Data Server [3]. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool allows users to enter a single geographic point by latitude and longitude in decimal degrees. A routine is executed that translates the (lon, lat) coordinates into projected Daymet (x,y) coordinates. These coordinates are used to access the Daymet database of daily-interpolated surface weather variables. Daily data from the nearest 1 km x 1 km Daymet grid cell are extracted from the database and formatted as a table with one column for each Daymet variable and one row for each day. All daily data for selected years are returned as a single (long) table, formatted for display in the browser window. At the top of this table is a link to the same data in a simple comma-separated text format, suitable for import into a spreadsheet or other data analysis software. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool also provides the option to download multiple coordinates programmatically. A multiple extractor script is freely available to download at http://daymet.ornl.gov/files/daymet.zip. The ORNL DAAC s THREDDS data server (TDS) provides customized visualization and access to Daymet time series of North American mosaics. Users can subset and download Daymet data via a variety of community standards, including OPeNDAP, NetCDF Subset service, and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map/Coverage Service. The ORNL DAAC TDS also exposes Daymet metadata through its ncISO service to facilitate harvesting Daymet metadata records into 3rd party catalogs. References: [1] Thornton, P.E., M.M. Thornton, B.W. Mayer, N. Wilhelmi, Y. Wei, R. Devarakonda, and R.B. Cook. 2014. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2. Data set. Available on-line [http://daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. [2] Devarakonda R., et al. 2012. Daymet: Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.go/singlepixel.html]. [3] Wei Y., et al. 2014. Daymet: Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.gov/thredds_tiles.html].

  15. Deep sea tests of a prototype of the KM3NeT digital optical module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Aharonian, F; Aiello, S; Albert, A; Ameli, F; Anassontzis, E G; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; de Asmundis, R; Band, H; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F; Baret, B; Baron, S; Belias, A; Berbee, E; Berg, A M van den; Berkien, A; Bertin, V; Beurthey, S; van Beveren, V; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Bianucci, S; Billault, M; Birbas, A; Rookhuizen, H Boer; Bormuth, R; Bouche, V; Bouhadef, B; Bourlis, G; Bouwhuis, M; Bozza, C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Cacopardo, G; Caillat, L; Calamai, M; Calvo, D; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Caruso, F; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Cereseto, R; Champion, C; Chateau, F; Chiarusi, T; Christopoulou, B; Circella, M; Classen, L; Cocimano, R; Colonges, S; Coniglione, R; Cosquer, A; Costa, M; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Curtil, C; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Rosa, G; Deniskina, N; Destelle, J -J; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q; Drakopoulou7, E; Drouhin, D; Drury, L; Durand, D; Eberl, T; Eleftheriadis, C; Elsaesser, D; Enzenhofer, A; Fermani, P; Fusco, L A; Gajana, D; Gal, T; Galata, S; Gallo, F; Garufi, F; Gebyehu, M; Giordano, V; Gizani, N; Ruiz, R Gracia; Graf, K; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Grmek, A; Habel, R; van Haren, H; Heid, T; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Henry, S; Hernandez-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hevinga, M A; van der Hoek, M; Hofestadt, J; Hogenbirk, J; Hugon, C; Hosl, J; Imbesi, M; James, C; Jansweijer, P; Jochum, J; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Kappos, E; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Keller, P; Kieft, G; Koffeman, E; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Koopstra, J; Korporaal, A; Kouchner, A; Koutsoukos, S; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Provost, H Le; Leisos, A; Lenis, D; Leonora, E; Clark, M Lindsey; Liolios, A; Alvarez, C D Llorens; Lohner, H; Presti, D Lo; Louis, F; Maccioni, E; Mannheim, K; Manolopoulos, K; Margiotta, A; Maris, O; Markou, C; Martinez-Mora, J A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Mos, S; Moudden, Y; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolaou, C; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Orzelli, A; Papageorgiou, K; Papaikonomou, A; Papaleo, R; Pavalas, G E; Peek, H; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Petridou, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, Th; Priede, M; Puhlhofer, G; Pulvirenti, S; Racca, C; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Rapidis, P A; Razis, P; Real, D; Resvanis, L; Reubelt, J; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Royon, J; Saldana, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Santangelo, A; Sapienza, P; Savvidis, I; Schmelling, J; Schnabel, J; Sedita, M; Seitz, T; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Siotis, I; Sipala, V; Solazzo, M; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J; Stolarczyk, T; Stransky, D; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Tezier, D; Theraube, S; Thompson, L F; Timmer, P; Trapierakis, H I; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tsirigotis, A; Tzamarias, S; Tzamariudaki, E; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vermeulen, J; Vernin, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D; Werneke, P; Wiggers, L; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; van Wooning, R H L; Yatkin, K; Zachariadou, K; Zonca, E; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; Zwart, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first prototype of a photo-detection unit of the future KM3NeT neutrino telescope has been deployed in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This digital optical module has a novel design with a very large photocathode area segmented by the use of 31 three inch photomultiplier tubes. It has been integrated in the ANTARES detector for in-situ testing and validation. This paper reports on the first months of data taking and rate measurements. The analysis results highlight the capabilities of the new module design in terms of background suppression and signal recognition. The directionality of the optical module enables the recognition of multiple Cherenkov photons from the same $^{40}$K decay and the localization bioluminescent activity in the neighbourhood. The single unit can cleanly identify atmospheric muons and provide sensitivity to the muon arrival directions.

  16. Interpreting Energy and Tracer Spectra of Upper-Ocean Turbulence in the Submesoscale Range (1–200 km)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    Submesoscale (1–200 km) wavenumber spectra of kinetic and potential energy and tracer variance are obtained from in situ observations in the Gulf Stream region and in the eastern subtropical North Pacific. In the Gulf ...

  17. Practical Point-to-Point Free-Space Quantum Key Distribution over 1/2 KM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttler, W.T.; Hughes, R.J.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated point-to-point single-photon quantum key distribution (QKD) over a free-space optical path of {approximately}475 m under daylight conditions. This represents an increase of >1,000 times farther than any reported point-to-point demonstration, and >6 times farther than the previous folded path daylight demonstration. We expect to extend the daylight range to 2 km or more within the next few months. A brief description of the system is given here. The QKD transmitter, a.k.a. ''Alice'' (Fig. 1), consists of three thermoelectrically cooled diode lasers, a single interference filter (IF), two optical attenuators, two linear polarizers, two non-polarization beam-splitters (BSs), and a 27x beam expander. The two data-lasers' (dim-lasers') wavelengths are temperature controlled and constrained by the IF to {approximately}773 {+-} 0.5 nm, while the transmitted wavelength of the bright-laser (timing-laser) is {approximately}768 nm; the data-lasers are configured to emit a weak pulse of approximately 1 ns duration. The transmitter incorporates no active polarization switching--a first in QKD.

  18. Free-Space distribution of entanglement and single photons over 144 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Ursin; F. Tiefenbacher; T. Schmitt-Manderbach; H. Weier; T. Scheidl; M. Lindenthal; B. Blauensteiner; T. Jennewein; J. Perdigues; P. Trojek; B. Oemer; M. Fuerst; M. Meyenburg; J. Rarity; Z. Sodnik; C. Barbieri; H. Weinfurter; A. Zeilinger

    2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Entanglement is the essence of quantum physics and inspires fundamental questions about the principles of nature. Moreover it is also the basis for emerging technologies of quantum information processing such as quantum cryptography, quantum teleportation and quantum computation. Bell's discovery, that correlations measured on entangled quantum systems are at variance with a local realistic picture led to a flurry of experiments confirming the quantum predictions. However, it is still experimentally undecided whether quantum entanglement can survive global distances, as predicted by quantum theory. Here we report the violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality measured by two observers separated by 144 km between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife via an optical free-space link using the Optical Ground Station (OGS) of the European Space Agency (ESA). Furthermore we used the entangled pairs to generate a quantum cryptographic key under experimental conditions and constraints characteristic for a Space-to-ground experiment. The distance in our experiment exceeds all previous free-space experiments by more than one order of magnitude and exploits the limit for ground-based free-space communication; significantly longer distances can only be reached using air- or space-based platforms. The range achieved thereby demonstrates the feasibility of quantum communication in space, involving satellites or the International Space Station (ISS).

  19. A simple theory of cloud spreading at ranges from 1-2000 km

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, F.A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examples support the conclusion that cloud or plume spreading in the troposphere proceeds rapidly and rather steadily for times on the order of a day or two and to distances of several hundreds of kilometers. Subsequently, possibly after a transition to the asymptotic rate of relative diffusion, the cloud begins to develop a streaky structure under the influence of the large-scale, enstrophy-cascade range of motions. The GASP spectra indicate that the transition between these two modes of spreading begins at several hundred kilometers ad is well developed by about 1000 km, in terms of spectral wavelength. The cloud streaks and patches elongate rapidly, evidently at the exponential rate, but spread laterally more slowly, at a rate that represents the effects of the conservation of cloud area under large-scale deformation and the lateral diffusion at the asymptotic rate. Although this relative diffusion occurs at a comparatively slow rate, it is very effective in reducing cloud concentrations in combination with the rapid, large-scale cloud stretching by the 2-D, enstrophy-cascade range eddies. The LANL heavy-methane cloud data indicate that the net result is very rapid decay of cloud concentration, apparently at an exponential rate.

  20. (100 nmol kg21 ), KBr (92 mmol kg21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giron, David - Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, Université François Rabelais

    at 60 8C. CaCO3 was calculated by subtracting POC from TPC. CaCO3 production rates were calculated from growth rates and cellular CaCO3 contents. Owing to the experimental approach used in this study (see­742 (1994). 5. Broecker, W. S. & Peng, T.-H. The role of CaCO3 compen

  1. KG Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa: Energy ResourcesKACO Geraetetechnik GmbH JumpKEM

  2. Design and performance of a 100-kg/h, direct calcine-fed electric-melter system for nuclear-waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierks, R.D.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the physical characteristics of a ceramic-lined, joule-heated glass melter that is directly connected to the discharge of a spray calciner and is currently being used to study the vitrification of simulated nuclear-waste slurries. Melter performance characteristics and subsequent design improvements are described. The melter contains 0.24 m/sup 3/ of glass with a glass surface area of 0.76 m/sup 2/, and is heated by the flow of an alternating current (ranging from 600 to 1200 amps) between two Inconel-690 slab-type electrodes immersed in the glass at either end of the melter tank. The melter was maintained at operating temperature (900 to 1260/sup 0/C) for 15 months, and produced 62,000 kg of glass. The maximum sustained operating period was 122 h, during which glass was produced at the rate of 70 kg/h.

  3. Global coupling at 660 km is proposed to explain plate tectonics and the generation of the earth's magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozsef Garai

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of low viscosity layers in the mantle is supported by line of geological and geophysical observations. Recent high pressure and temperature investigations indicated that partial carbonate melt should exist at the bottom of the lithosphere and at 660 km. The presence of few percent carbonate melt reduces the viscosity by several order of magnitude. The globally existing 660 km very low viscosity layer allows the development of differential rotation between the upper and lower mantle. This differential rotation between the 660 km outer shell and the rest of the earth offers a plausible explanation for plate tectonics and for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. Simple dynamo model is proposed, which able to reproduce all of the features of the contemporary and, within reasonable uncertainty, the paleomagnetic field. The model is also consistent with geological and geophysical observations.

  4. Fabrication of a 1200 kg Ingot of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy for the DIII-D Radiative Divertor Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, W.R.; Smith, J.P.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vanadium chromium titanium alloys are attractive materials for fusion reactors because of their high temperature capability and their potential for low neutron active and rapid activation decay. A V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been selected in the U.S. as the current leading candidate vanadium alloy for future use in fusion reactor structural applications. General Atomics (GA), in conjunction with the Department of Energy`s (DOE) DIII-D Program, is carrying out a plan for the utilization of this vanadium alloy in the DIII-D tokamak. The plan will culminate in the fabrication, installation, and operation of a V-4Ti alloy structure in the DIII-D Radiative Divertor (RD) upgrade. The deployment of vanadium alloy will provide a meaningful step in the development and technology acceptance of this advanced material for future fusion power devices. Under a GA contract and material specification, an industrial scale 1200 kg heat (ingot) of a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been produced and converted into product forms by Wah Chang of Albany, Oregon (WCA). To assure the proper control of minor and trace impurities which affect the mechanical and activation behavior of this vanadium alloy, selected lots of raw vanadium base metal were processed by aluminothermic reduction of high purity vanadium oxide, and were then electron beam melted into two high purity vanadium ingots. The ingots were then consolidated with high purity Cr and Ti, and double vacuum-arc melted to obtain a 1200 kg V-4Cr-4Ti alloy ingot. Several billets were extruded from the ingot, and were then fabricated into plate, sheet, and rod at WCA. Tubing was subsequently processed from plate material. The chemistry and fabrication procedures for the product forms were specified on the basis of experience and knowledge gained from DOE Fusion Materials Program studies on previous laboratory scale heats and a large scale ingot (500 kg)

  5. A robot that walked 65 km on a single charge: energy-effective and reliable locomotion using trajectory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    PRE-PRINT A robot that walked 65 km on a single charge: energy-effective and reliable locomotion environment, that steps towards that goal. Ranger is essentially planar (rather than 3D); it has only 3 of 0.28). The high reliability and low energy use are achieved by: 1) development of an accurate bench

  6. Brillouin optical time-domain analysis over a 240 km-long fiber loop with no repeater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Brillouin optical time-domain analysis over a 240 km-long fiber loop with no repeater Xabier Angulo.angulo@io.cfmac.csic.es; phone +34 915618806 ext.:222 ABSTRACT In this paper we combine the use of optical pulse coding and seeded second-order Raman amplification to extend the sensing distance of Brillouin optical time

  7. CUORE: An Experiment to Investigate for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay by Cooling 750 kg of TeO2 Crystals at 10mK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beeman, J.; Dolinski, M.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Maruyama, R.; Smith, A. R.; Xu, N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Haller, E. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dep. of Material Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 (United States); Giuliani, A.; Pedretti, M.; Sangiorgio, S. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chi., Fis. e Mat. dell'Universita dell'Insubria, Sez. INFN di Milano, 22100 Como (Italy); Barucci, M.; Olivieri, E.; Risegari, L.; Ventura, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Firenze, sez. INFN di Firenze, 50125 Florence (Italy); Balata, M.; Bucci, C.; Nisi, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, 67010 Assergi (L'Aquila) (Italy); Palmieri, V. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro INFN, Via Romea 4, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Waard, A. de [Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Norman, E. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, CA 94550 (United States)] (and others)

    2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) is an experiment proposed to infer the effective Majorana mass of the electron neutrino from measurements on neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}DBD). The goal of CUORE is to achieve a background rate in the range 0.001 to 0.01 counts/keV/kg/y at the 0{nu}DBD transition energy of 130Te (2528 keV). The proposed experiment, to be mounted in the underground Gran Sasso INFN National Laboratory, Italy, is realized by cooling about 1000 TeO2 bolometers, of 750 g each, at a temperature of 10mK. We will describe the experiment, to be cooled by an extremely powerful dilution refrigerator, operating with no liquid helium, and the main experimental features designed to assure the predicted sensitivity. We present moreover the last results of a small scale (40.7 kg) 0{nu}DBD experiment carried on in the Gran Sasso Laboratory (CUORICINO)

  8. Aufgabe 3-7: Luft tritt mit 1 = 2,21 kg/m und v1 = 40 m/s kontinuierlich in eine Dse ein und verlsst diese mit 2 = 0,762 kg/m und v2 = 180 m/s. Die Einlassflche der Dse betrgt 90

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    Aufgabe 3-7: Luft tritt mit 1 = 2,21 kg/m³ und v1 = 40 m/s kontinuierlich in eine Düse ein und, 800 kPa) tritt mit 10 m/s in eine Düse ein (siehe Abbildung 1). In der Düse verliert der Dampf Wärme

  9. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 2003 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 2003 page 1 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2003 , Anton not LBNL 7 11:18.8 Singer, Brett C 30-39 men 3 8 11:20.2 Yegian, Derek 30-39 men 4 9 11:20.4 Nihei 45 13:26.9 card not turned in 46 13:27.4 Elliott, James B 30-39 men 18 #12;LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3

  10. 552 THE WILSON BULLETIN l Vol. 104, No. 3, September1992 On 21 July 1990, I found a second nest of similar construction, approximately 1 km to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurd, Peter L.

    of similar construction, approximately 1 km to the NW. It was located on a tree fern (Cyathea sp., ca 8.8 cm

  11. Research, development and demonstration of lead-acid batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979. [165 Ah, 36. 5 Wh/kg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodamer, G.W.; Branca, G.C.; Cash, H.R.; Chrastina, J.R.; Yurick, E.M.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress during the 1979 fiscal year is reported. All the tooling and capital equipment required for the pilot line production has been installed. A limited amount of plate production has been realized. A highly automated and versatile testing facility was established. The fabrication and testing of the initial calculated design is discussed. Cell component adjustments and the trade-offs associated with those changes are presented. Cells are being evaluated at the 3-hour rate. They have a capacity of 165 Ah and an energy density of 36.5 Wh/kg, and have completed 105 cycles to date. Experimental results being pursued under the advanced battery development program to enhance energy density and cycle life are presented. Data on the effects of different electrolyte specific gravity, separators, retainers, paste densities, battery additives and grid alloy composition on battery performance are presented and evaluated. Advanced battery prototype cells are under construction. Quality Assurance activities are summarized. They include monitoring the cell and battery fabrication and testing operations as well as all relevant documentation procedures. 12 figures, 28 tables.

  12. Abundance, Distribution and Estimated Consumption (kg fish) of Piscivorous Birds Along the Yakima River, Washington State; Implications for Fisheries Management, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Major, III, Walter; Grassley, James M.; Ryding, Kristen E. (University of Washington, Quantitive Ecology Program, Seattle, WA)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is divided into two chapters. The abstract for chapter one is--Understanding of the abundance and spatial and temporal distributions of piscivorous birds and their potential consumption of fish is an increasingly important aspect of fisheries management. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance and distribution and estimated the maximum consumption (kg biomass) of fish-eating birds along the length of the Yakima River in Washington State. Sixteen different species were observed during the 4-yr study, but only half of those were observed during all years. Abundance and estimated consumption of fish within the upper and middle sections of the river were dominated by common mergansers (Mergus merganser) which are known to breed in those reaches. Common mergansers accounted for 78 to 94% of the estimated total fish take for the upper river or approximately 28,383 {+-} 1,041 kg over the 4 yrs. A greater diversity of avian piscivores occurred in the lower river and potential impacts to fish populations was more evenly distributed among the species. In 1999-2000, great blue herons potentially accounted for 29 and 36% of the fish consumed, whereas in 2001-2002 American white pelicans accounted for 53 and 55%. We estimated that approximately 75,878 {+-} 6,616 kg of fish were consumed by piscivorous birds in the lower sections of the river during the study. Bird assemblages differed spatially along the river with a greater abundance of colonial nesting species within the lower sections of the river, especially during spring and the nesting season. The abundance of avian piscivores and consumption estimates are discussed within the context of salmonid supplementation efforts on the river and juvenile out-migration. The abstract for chapter two is--Consumption of fish by piscivorous birds may be a significant constraint on efforts to enhance salmonid populations within tributaries to the Columbia River in Washington State. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance of fish-eating birds, primarily ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) and California (L. californicus) gulls and monitored their behavior at two man-made structures within the Yakima River in eastern Washington: Horn Rapids Dam, a low-head irrigation dam, and the return pipe for the Chandler Juvenile Fish Handling Facility. Earlier observations of congregations of gulls at these structures suggested an increased likelihood of predation of out-migrating juvenile salmonids. We estimated the number of fish consumed and examined the relationship between river flow and gull numbers and fish taken. Numbers of gulls at the structures varied daily between their arrival in Late March-early April and departure in late June (mean ({+-}SE) - Horn Rapids: 11.7 ({+-}2.0), Chandler: 20.1 ({+-}1.5) ). During the 4-yr study, numbers at Horn Rapids peaked dramatically during the last 2 weeks in May (between 132.9 ({+-}4.2) to 36.6 ({+-}2.2) gulls/day) and appeared to the associated with the release of > 1-mil hatchery juvenile fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) above the 2 study sites. A comparable peak in gull abundance was not observed at Chandler. Diurnal patterns of gull abundance also varied among years and sites. The relationship between foraging efficiency and gull numbers was not consistent among years or sites. Gull numbers were not correlated with river flow when year was considered. However, variations in flow among years appeared to be associated with average gull numbers at each site, but trends were not consistent between sites. Low seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Chandler, whereas high seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Horn Rapids. Assuming all fish taken were salmonids, we estimate gulls consumed between 0.1-10.3 % of the juvenile salmonids passing or being released from the Chandler Juvenile Fish Monitoring Facility located above the two structures. Staggered releases of hatchery fish, nocturnal releases of fish entrained in the Chandler facility, changes in the orientation of the outflow from the f

  13. 48Deep Impact Comet Encounter On July 5, 2005 at 5:45 UT the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson Jr., James E.

    ,000,000 kilograms of comet material, we will ignore this effect since the comet's mass was over 45 trillion a blast, whose energy is equal to that of a 7.5 x 10 8 kilogram kilogram Impactor traveling at 10.3 km,000,000 kilograms of comet material, we will ignore this effect since the comet's mass was over 45 trillion

  14. PTG 2010PTG 2010 i i 33 P blP bl 55PTG 2010PTG 2010 vningvning 33 ProblemProblem 55 2 kg of steam at a pressure of 1 bar are contained in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    PTG 2010PTG 2010 ö iö i 33 P blP bl 55PTG 2010PTG 2010 övningövning 33 ProblemProblem 55 2 kg the internal pressure reaches 10 kPa, the tank walls will collapsewill collapse. a) Sketch a p-v diagram University - TkF Heat Engineering - 20500 Turku Finland 1 2 P blP bl 55ProblemProblem 55 Givet: ( )2 2 kg

  15. Assessment of the 60 km rapid update cycle (RUC) with near real-time aircraft reports. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.E.; Richard, C.; Kim, S.; Bailey, D.

    1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the Center-TRA-CON Advisory System (CTAS), a set of Air Traffic Management (ATM) Decision Support Tools (DST) for en route (Center) and terminal (TRACON) airspace designed to enable controllers to increase capacity and flight efficiency. A crucial component of the CTAS, or any ATM DST, is the computation of the time-of-flight of aircraft along flight path segments. Earlier NASA studies show that accurate knowledge of the wind through which the aircraft are flying is required to estimate time-of-flight accurately. There are current envisioned to be two sources of wind data for CTAS: The Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) for the Center airspace, a numerical model developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Forecast System Laboratory (FSL) and run operationally by the National Weather Service (NWS) National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP); and The Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) Terminal Winds (TW) for the TRACON airspace, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory under funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This study has three goals: (1) determine the errors in the baseline 60 km resolution RUC forecast wind fields relative to the needs of en route DSTs such as CTAS, (2) determine the benefit of using the TW algorithm to refine the RUC forecast wind fields with near real-time Meteorological Data Collection and Reporting System (MDCRS) reports, and (3) identify factors that influence wind errors in order to improve accuracy and estimate errors in real time.

  16. Mulching as a countermeasure for crop contamination within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yera, T.S.; Vallejo, R.; Tent, J.; Rauret, G. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain); Omelyanenko, N.; Ivanov, Y. [Ukrainian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of mulch soil cover on crop contamination by {sup 137}Cs was studied within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Experiments were performed with oats (Avena sativa) over a three year period. In 1992 soil surface was covered by a plastic net. In 1993 two straw mulch treatments were applied at a dose rate of 200 g m{sup {minus}2} using {sup 137}Cs contaminated and clean straw, respectively. A similar mulch treatment was applied in 1994, and two mulch doses of clean straw were tested. Protection of the soil with a plastic net significantly increased crop yield and reduced crop contamination. When clean straw was used as a mulch layer, a significant decrease of about 30--40% in {sup 137}Cs activity concentration was observed. Mulching with {sup 137}Cs contaminated straw did not reduce crop contamination, probably due to an increase in soil available {sup 137}Cs released from the contaminated mulch. Mulching has been shown to be an effective treatment both for reducing {sup 137}Cs plant contamination and improving crop yield. Therefore, it can be considered as a potential countermeasure in a post-accident situation.

  17. by the ratio of biogas production to organic matter input : 0.20 to 0.3 M3/kg organic When considering the period of steady operation, i.e. without technical problems such

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by the ratio of biogas production to organic matter input : 0.20 to 0.3 M3/kg organic matter. When of digestible amino acids. The definition of availability is recalled and the methods used to estimate it briefly examined ; that based on measurements of the apparent digestibility being apparently the most

  18. THE 300 km s[superscript –1] STELLAR STREAM NEAR SEGUE 1: INSIGHTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF ITS BRIGHTEST STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunnan, Ragnhild

    We present a chemical abundance analysis of 300S-1, the brightest likely member star of the 300 km s[superscript –1] stream near the faint satellite galaxy Segue 1. From a high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectrum, we determine ...

  19. MARKET BASED K.G. DULEEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF MODEL · Model under development for DOE-EIA is an integrated supply and demand module that forecasts survey data. #12;MODEL - USES · Current parallel work effort focuses on market based strategies to reduce

  20. Cordes Graefe KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergy Offshore Place:WindOil andBasicsKontor

  1. Leitner Hubert KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaor BatteriesLedong Xinyuanreview

  2. fed ad libitum until slaughter at 2 kg live weight, as either pellets, mash (60 p. 100 meal, 4o p. 100 water) or meal in a 2 X3factorial design with 4 replicates.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    fed ad libitum until slaughter at 2 kg live weight, as either pellets, mash (60 p. 100 meal, 4o p week period for 8 M /D mash and meal diets were - 0.264 and — 6.218 g DI,G on 8 M /D pellets 12 M/D pellets, mash and meal were 33.10, 27.90 and z6.si g, respectively (SED ± 2.321 g

  3. On Cipher-Dependent Related-Key Attacks in the Ideal-Cipher Model M.R. Albrecht1, P. Farshim2, K.G. Paterson2, and G.J. Watson3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On Cipher-Dependent Related-Key Attacks in the Ideal-Cipher Model M.R. Albrecht1, P. Farshim2, K.G. Paterson2, and G.J. Watson3 1 INRIA, Paris-Rocquencourt Center, SALSA Project UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7606, Canada T2N 1N4 gjwatson@ucalgary.ca Abstract. Bellare and Kohno introduced a formal framework

  4. Milestone Report - Demonstrate Braided Material with 3.5 g U/kg Sorption Capacity under Seawater Testing Condition (Milestone M2FT-15OR0310041 - 1/30/2015)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Das, Sadananda [ORNL; Oyola, Yatsandra [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Gill, Gary [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wood, Jordana [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-15OR0310041 (1/30/2015) entitled, Demonstrate braided material with 3.5 g U/kg sorption capacity under seawater testing condition . This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent braided materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed four braided fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 3.5 g U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. The braided adsorbents were synthesized by braiding or leno weaving high surface area polyethylene fibers and conducting radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile monomers onto the braided materials followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. The four braided adsorbents demonstrated capacity values ranging from 3.7 to 4.2 g U/kg adsorbent after 56 days of exposure in natural coastal seawater at 20 oC. All data are normalized to a salinity of 35 psu.

  5. Practical quantum key distribution over 60 hours at an optical fiber distance of 20km using weak and vacuum decoy pulses for enhanced security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Dynes; Z. L. Yuan; A. W. Sharpe; A. J. Shields

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental one-way decoy pulse quantum key distribution running continuously for 60 hours is demonstrated over a fiber distance of 20km. We employ a decoy protocol which involves one weak decoy pulse and a vacuum pulse. The obtained secret key rate is on average over 10kbps. This is the highest rate reported using this decoy protocol over this fiber distance and duration.

  6. Configuration studies for a cubic-kilometre deep-sea neutrino telescope - KM3NeT - with NESSY, a fast and flexible approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Carr; D. Dornic; F. Jouvenot; G. Maurin; for the KM3NeT consortium

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical predictions for neutrino fluxes indicate that km$^{3}$ scale detectors are needed to detect certain astrophysical sources. The three Mediterranean experiments, ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR are working together on a design study, KM3NeT, for a large deep-sea neutrino telescope. A detector placed in the Mediterranean Sea will survey a large part of the Galactic disc, including the Galactic Centre. It will complement the IceCube telescope currently under construction at the South Pole. Furthermore, the improved optical properties of sea water, compared to Antarctic ice, will allow a better angular resolution and hence better background rejection. The main work presented in this paper is to evaluate different km$^{3}$ scale detector geometries in order to optimize the muon neutrino sensitivity between 1 and 100 TeV. For this purpose, we have developed a detailed simulation based on the {\\it Mathematica} software - for the muon track production, the light transmission in water, the environmental background and the detector response. To compare different geometries, we have mainly used the effective neutrino area obtained after the full standard reconstruction chain.}

  7. 51Gamma Ray Bubbles in the Milky Way NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has unveiled a previously

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of these bubbles A) in kilograms? B) in solar mass units if 1 SMU = 2.0 x 10 30 kg? Problem 3 - Suppose of these bubbles A) in kilograms? B) in solar mass units if 1 SMU = 2.0 x 10 30 kg? Answer: A) Mass in one cubic) In solar mass units M= 1.4 x 10 27 kg x (1 SMU/2.0x 10 30 kg) = 1.1 x 10 10 solar masses. Problem 3

  8. 217 km long distance photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry based on ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo-Liang Shentu; Qi-Chao Sun; Xiao Jiang; Xiao-Dong Wang; Jason S. Pelc; M. M. Fejer; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry with 42.19 dB dynamic range using an ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector. By employing the long wave pump technique and a volume Bragg grating, we reduce the noise of our up-conversion single photon detector, and achieve a noise equivalent power of -139.7 dBm/sqrt(Hz). We perform the OTDR experiments using a fiber of length 216.95 km, and show that our system can identify defects along the entire fiber length with a distance resolution better than 10 cm in a measurement time of 13 minutes.

  9. The `Skyline' Distance 46km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VOTEDINTOP10OF WORLDTRAILS2004 Croeso i Afan, lleoliad beicio mynydd heb ei ail. Mae gan y lle yma bopeth - o swooping singletrack threading through beautiful forest to exposed rocky doubletrack on wide open hills

  10. xu-km-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development1U CO1) 1 Winter FuelsYOURxinyufuUpdraft

  11. SpaceX 2 Cargo Manifest TOTAL CARGO: 575 kilograms / 1268 pounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supplies Lego MSG gloves #12;12 PIG SCK SPHERES VCAM EXPRESS Rack Stowage Lockers Surplus +4C Ice Supply Pack o Top. & Inj. Medications Pack o Oral Meds Pack ECLSS o H2 Sensor ORU o ACY Urine Filter

  12. Electron-beam processing of kilogram quantities of iridium for radioisotope thermoelectric generator applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huxford, T.J.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel-cladding materials in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Hardware produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been used in Voyagers I and 2, Galilee, and Ulysses spacecraft. An integral part of the production of iridium-sheet metal involves electron-beam (EB) processing. These processes include the degassing of powder-pressed compacts followed by multiple meltings in order to purify 500-g buttons of Ir-0.3% W alloy. Starting in 1972 and continuing into 1992, our laboratory EB processing was Performed (ca. 1970) in a 60-kW (20 kV at 3 A), two-gun system. In 1991, a new 150-kW EB gun facility was installed to complement the older unit. This paper describes how the newly installed system was qualified for production of RTG developmental work is discussed that will potentially improve the existing process by utilizing the capabilities of the new EB system.

  13. Electron-beam processing of kilogram quantities of iridium for radioisotope thermoelectric generator applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huxford, T.J.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel-cladding materials in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Hardware produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been used in Voyagers I and 2, Galilee, and Ulysses spacecraft. An integral part of the production of iridium-sheet metal involves electron-beam (EB) processing. These processes include the degassing of powder-pressed compacts followed by multiple meltings in order to purify 500-g buttons of Ir-0.3% W alloy. Starting in 1972 and continuing into 1992, our laboratory EB processing was Performed (ca. 1970) in a 60-kW (20 kV at 3 A), two-gun system. In 1991, a new 150-kW EB gun facility was installed to complement the older unit. This paper describes how the newly installed system was qualified for production of RTG developmental work is discussed that will potentially improve the existing process by utilizing the capabilities of the new EB system.

  14. conversion ratio (the amount of body weight gained for every kilogram of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    aquaculture systems, offshore systems, aquaponic systems, advances in modelling of aquaculture impacts

  15. Intelligent scraping experience using ultrasonics in two 60in./56in. dual diameter 100 km seawater transmission pipelines in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, A.F.; Chu, K.S.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saudi ARAMCO`s two 60in./56in. (1524/1422 mm) diameter Seawater Injection Pipelines used for secondary oil recovery stretch from the Seawater Treatment Plant across the Arabian Desert for a distance of approximately 100 kilometers. Both lines were put into operation in mid 1978 using over the ditch Plicoflex tape wrap as a means of protection against external corrosion. A significant portion of both pipelines (32 km of each line) runs through Subkha (salty moist) areas. A series of test hole evaluations in 1989 indicated moderate to sever external corrosion particularly in Subkha which necessitated sleeving and external coating application. In 1991 a series of leaks, four (4) in total over a period of two (2) months occurred in Pipeline {number_sign}2 due to external corrosion. This suggested that the line(s) were in urgent need of at least partial replacement or major rehabilitation. Prior to making a final decision on partial replacement it was decided to run an Intelligent Scraper in both pipelines to ascertain both internal and external pipeline conditions. An Ultrasonic Scraper the largest of it`s kind in the world, similar to what was used in the Alyeska Pipeline was developed and successfully run in both pipelines in February 1993. This paper discusses the pipeline history, test hole evaluations, Intelligent Scraping experiences, field evaluation for anomaly verification, and repair of approximately 120 locations as identified by the Intelligent Scraping run. The Intelligent Scraping evaluation played a major role in the cancellation of partial pipeline replacement with cost savings estimated $30 MM.

  16. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can be produced from coal gasification at delivered costs ofper kilogram. Gasification of Coal and Other Hydrocarbons Inkg/day Small Coal Oxygen-blown Gasification 313,090 kg/day

  17. advanced plutonium fuels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offices. In addition to the plutonium, the feed stock also contains about 17 tonnes of depleted uranium, about 600 kg of highly enriched uranium, and many kilograms of neptunium...

  18. , I`..4kg1TORE G Pignataro)il

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bella, Giampaolo

    per il raffreddamento del syngas tramite macchine frigorifere tipo dry-cooler, chiller e macchine ad dry-cooler, chiller e macchine ad assorbimento", - PONO2_00451_33362376/1 (BI04810) - da svolgersi

  19. A study of Kg/Ko values from reservoir performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Gerald Sewall

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this work as the pe'essure and gas-oil ratio history of the remaining two wells indicated, they were still producing undersaturated oil. The portion of ths reservoir studied contained 21, 875 net effective sere-feet of pay over an areal extent of 1, 225... as Indicated by Recent Gas In)ection Experinents and Reservoir- . Perfornance History?2 API and Production P~rt (1946), P. 1 0. Musket? Mep ?Physical Principles of Oil Production?p McGraw-H11I Book Con Inc H , (19/9)p p. A67. Patton, E. Cep Jr...

  20. A study of Kg/Ko values from reservoir performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Gerald Sewall

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    factor at current pressure, barrels reservoir oil per barrel stook tank oil bo = forjsation volune factor at original yressure, barrels reservoir oil per barrel stock tank oil TABLE 3 VOLUEETRIC CALCULATIOEE POR FIELD?A? R-r (36V9 - ISO~ ( ~0 026... absolute. This study was concluded when the average reservoir pressure had decU. ned to 4, , 3Q, pounds per square inch absolute. This pressure deoline was accompanied by the production sf 566, 137 barrels of stock tank oil and 2, ling, 310 standar4 MCF...

  1. MT Energie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECO Auger <SmarTurbineMIT-MRINewMT Energie

  2. GEE Energy GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, NewG2 Energy Jump to:GEE Energy GmbH Co

  3. CIS Solartechnik GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable andBucoda,BurkeNebraska:CDMValencia JumpLtdCIS Solartechnik GmbH

  4. ETBKN GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjinDynetek42EOPEPODESBESPE Jump

  5. Energiefeld Bayern GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to:Emminol Jump to:Energ tica CamposEnergieEnergiefeld Bayern

  6. Fuel 21 GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife EnergyFreight Best

  7. GETproject GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife EnergyFreightFulongFuturoGEA

  8. Fichtner GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Meihui Windpark GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarmsPower CoLongxing WindMaoming ZhongRanchMeihui

  10. RIO Energie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: Wind energy Product:Anatolia Jump to:REpowerRIO

  11. SSB Antriebstechnik GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: WindRiegotec Internacional ltdaSEGSSSB

  12. AVANCIS GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to: navigation, search40 -Solar GmbHASP

  13. RUSOL GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  14. Rapsveredelung Vorpommern GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  15. Renion Biogas GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

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  16. SGL Rotec GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

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  17. Schunk Group GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

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  18. Property:Dry Mass (kg) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType JumpDOEInvolve Jumpallowed values for thisDraft(m) Jump

  19. Property:Dry Mass(kg) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType JumpDOEInvolve Jumpallowed values for thisDraft(m)

  20. Berger Lichttechnik GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/CuriumAguaBBBWind LtdFengliBenjamin Company

  1. Energy age wind ltd Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergy OffshoreDeveloper -NeoEnterprisesUnlimited Incage wind

  2. Europartner Solar GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergy OffshoreDeveloperEnertechEolicaEoloEuropartner Solar

  3. Fuhrlander Pfleiderer GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms A S JumpWindfarm HoldingsFreeFuhrlander AG

  4. Germania Windpark GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms A SUK Place:Georgia Department ofFeaturesGermania

  5. Nordwind Handels GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen EnergyNelsoniXInformationNongqishi

  6. Otag GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThesource HistoryOsram SylvaniaOtag GmbH

  7. Mann Naturenergie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area6612134°,ManisteeEnergyManly, Iowa:

  8. Leonhard Kurz GmbH CO KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Marina Biodiesel GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  10. Stelio Solar GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. Bernt Lorentz GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina: EnergyConnecticut:New York: Energy ResourcesBernt

  12. Wallenborn Projektentwicklung GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. Windkraft Luhrs GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's pictureWind PowerWindStrom

  14. Flabeg GmbH co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County,and Wildlife Service8322°,Five Forks,Flabeg

  15. Hoogen Bioenergie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  16. Imtech Deutschland GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  17. Campa Biodiesel GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpen EnergyCallaway ElectricCambridge Funds

  18. !"#$%&%$#'#()"*)+*,")-./0(1'#$*2$$34'56*'7*8%)395$3*4:*;)3$07 ?9#@)%A7BC*DE*FE*/$77G*=E*HE*8)##$%G*>E.IE*J@'"KG*LE.8E*M0'"5@$#G*,E*/@'0(#'G*DE*/)01'"G*FE*?E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall, David A.

    *DE*FE*/$77G*=E*HE*8)##$%G*>E.IE*J@'"KG*LE.8E*M0'"5@$#G*,E*/@'0(#'G*DE*/)01'"G*FE*?E F'N0(5@G*?E*FE*F$0*=$"()G*OE*F:1"(6)PG*OE*='0("G*FE*L$%%$##G*QE*R$9&G*?E*?E*H'5(7G*IE*H$*S%$9#G TE.JE*H('"KG*LE.2E*>'@+)9+G*ME*LE*>5?P'"$:G*OE*8E*>$0$7@6)G*LE*2E*ME*>(#5@$00G*LE.LE >)%5%$##$G*8E*>E*U)%%(7G*FE*?E*D'"3'00G*HE*D(697G

  19. 1Hinode Satellite Power The Hinode satellite weighs approximately 700 kg (dry) and carries 170 kg of gas for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for up to two years. The satellite has two solar panels (blue) that produce all of the spacecraft's power. The panels are 4 meters long and 1 meter wide, and are covered on both sides by solar cells. Problem 1 - What is the total area of the solar panels covered by solar cells in square centimeters? Problem 2 - If a solar cell

  20. Temperature (oC)! Height(km)!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and forecasting ! ·Temperature decreases in altitude + water vapor > instabilities can develop ·Well mixed + O2 + M = O3 + M to proceed. It is M here that transfers the excess energy to the surrounding created and transported to high latitudes PSCs form in cold, dark, polar lower stratosphere PSCs process

  1. Brazil's Legal Amazon 5 million km2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    effect on atmosphere · Effect cloud formation · Increase cloud cover: aerosols that do not absorb much sunlight · act as seeds for clouds · Decrease cloud cover: aerosols that absorb sunlight · create layer photometer · Direct solar radiation · Calculate columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) · Level 2 data · AOT 500

  2. KM_C364e-20170629133124

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015Just Plain Cool,relocatesm

  3. KM_C654e-20150324133840

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015Just Plain Cool,relocatesm

  4. All-optical remote monitoring of propane gas using a 5-km-long, low-loss optical fiber link and an InGaP light-emitting diode in the 1. 68-. mu. m region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.; Ito, H.; Inaba, H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the fully optical remote detection of low-level propane (C/sub 3/H/sub 8/) gas realized by the scheme based on a long distance, very low-loss silica optical fiber link connected to a compact absorption cell in conjunction with a high radiant InGaP light-emitting diode at 1.68 ..mu..m. For this application, the near-infrared absorption spectrum of propane was measured and studied to find very complicated bands around 1.69, 1.53, and 1.38 ..mu..m. This simple system, employing a 5-km-long silica optical fiber link, was demonstrated to be capable of achieving reproducibly the detection sensitivity less than 2.4 Torr for propane gas in air, i.e., about 14% of the lower explosion limit of propane density. This result verifies a large capability for major applications to various strategic points within the environment, such as industrial complexes as well as urban and residential areas, with considerably increased reliability and safety over the existing techniques.

  5. DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zhao Junwei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ofman, Leon [Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

  6. General Physics I Exam 1 -Chs. 1,2,3 -Units, Motion Sep. 16, 2009 Name Rec. Instr. Rec. Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wysin, Gary

    General Physics I Exam 1 - Chs. 1,2,3 - Units, Motion Sep. 16, 2009 Name Rec. Instr. Rec. Time , M=106 , G=109 , T=1012 . 1. (2) Which of the following is NOT an SI unit? a. meter b. kilogram c), in standard SI units without any prefixes, preserving the number of significant figures. a) 630 µs b) 42400 km

  7. JULY 8, 2013 AUDIT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JULY 8, 2013 AUDIT REPORT REPORT NO. IG-13-019 (ASSIGNMENT NO. A-12-008-00) OFFICE OF AUDITS NASA International Space Station kg kilogram OIG Office of Inspector General #12;JULY 8, 2013 REPORT NO. IG-13'S EFFORTS TO MAXIMIZE RESEARCH ON THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL National

  8. Energy and Society Week 3 Section Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    to office hours soon. Energy versus Power - Work refers to an activity involving a force and movement: Suppose a family spends $100/month on their electricity bill. How much coal (in kilograms) wentWh and the power plant has a conversion efficiency of 30%. Coal has an energy density of 29.3x106 J/kg. Before

  9. GERMANIUM--1997 32.1 By Robert D. Brown, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GERMANIUM--1997 32.1 GERMANIUM By Robert D. Brown, Jr. Germaniumisagrayish production, which amounted to slightly less than one-third of the world refinery production in 1997 in 1997. The USGS estimated domestic germanium reserves at 450,000 kilograms (kg), equivalent to 16 years

  10. Physics 408 --Exam 1 Name___________________________________________ You are graded on your work, with partial credit where it is deserved.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Roland E.

    , with partial credit where it is deserved. Please give clear, well-organized solutions. heat capacity (at not actually calculating it). (f) (5) Show that the heat capacity at low temperatures is proportional to T n constant volume) for liquid water = 4200 J/kg !K , 0! C=273 K 1. (a) (13) A kilogram of liquid water

  11. Daylight quantum key distribution over 1.6 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buttler, W T; Lamoreaux, S K; Morgan, G L; Nordholt, J E; Peterson, C G

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) has been demonstrated over a point-to-point transmission distance brings QKD a step closer to surface-to-satellite and other long-distance applications.

  12. ELECTROMAGNETIC CONSTRUCTION OF A 1 KM-RADIUS RADIATION SHIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the light of recent studies on bootstrapped lunar solar-electric power plants, mass drivers, and autonomous-drivers, (g) teleoperation of lunar and orbital facilities, (h) orbital assembly of lunar-derived solar power presence beyond Earth is limited to a very few government employees and robots who are sent up, entirely

  13. The European Optical Module for Paris, KM-3 electronics meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiebusch, Christopher

    of subsequent hits (> 20ns) (Multiple muon detection) Low afterpulse rate EOM Philips XP-2600 (14") hybrid (+XP;CPUModem Comunication Power & DATA(optical) Q-T DC/DC DMQT Pulse LED XP2600 PhilipsPMT Remote

  14. Microsoft Word - China_10km_solar_documentation.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 June - 5

  15. Microsoft Word - Ethiopia_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 June -

  16. Microsoft Word - Ghana_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 June -of

  17. Microsoft Word - Kenya_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 June -ofKenya

  18. Microsoft Word - Nepal_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 JuneNepal

  19. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2011. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % was used in research and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace, consumer goods, industrial equipment, medical equipment

  20. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2001. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as consumer goods, medical equipment, industrial components, telecommunications, and aerospace applications. Integrated

  1. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2000. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as consumer goods, medical equipment, industrial components, telecommunications, and aerospace applications

  2. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2003. One company in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace

  3. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2006. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace

  4. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2010. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace, consumer goods, industrial equipment, medical equipment, and telecommunications. ICs were used

  5. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2007. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace, consumer goods, industrial equipment, medical equipment, and telecommunications. ICs were used

  6. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2004. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % was used in research and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace, consumer goods, industrial equipment, medical equipment

  7. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2008. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace, consumer goods, industrial equipment, medical equipment, and telecommunications. ICs were used

  8. Kilogram Scale Synthesis of a Triazine-based Dendrimer and the Development of a General Strategy for the Installation of Pharmacophores to Yield Potential Drug Delivery Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditto, Vincent J.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    investigated for macromolecular drug delivery. Upon acylation of each drug with BOC-isonipecotic acid, substitution on the dendrimer may occur with varying levels of success depending on the drug in question. Upon successful substitution to afford the desired...

  9. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,800 10,100 7,100 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 681 1,760 7,190 4,510 4,000 Consumption.S. germanium consumption. The major end uses for germanium, worldwide, were estimated to be polymerization catalysts, 31%; fiber-optic systems, 24%; infrared optics, 23%; electronics/solar electric applications, 12

  10. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,200 13,800 26,500 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 5,730 681 1,760 7,190 5,000 Consumption.S. germanium consumption. The major end uses for germanium, worldwide, were estimated to be polymerization catalysts, 31%; fiber-optic systems, 24%; infrared optics, 23%; electronics/solar electric applications, 12

  11. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1998 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1998 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania Production, refinery 10,000 10,000 18,000 20,000 22,000e Total imports 14,700 16,200 27,500 23,700 20

  12. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2000 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, and Issues: World refinery production of germanium remained steady in 2000. The recycling of scrap continued

  13. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2003 producer. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics, infrared

  14. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2004 producer refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery

  15. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2002 producer price-bearing materials generated from the processing of zinc ores. The germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. The refinery in Oklahoma doubled its production

  16. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2001 producer price-bearing materials generated from the processing of zinc ores. The germanium refineries in New York and Oklahoma and set up in New York. The refinery in Oklahoma expanded, and a new secondary facility was built in North

  17. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1995 producer price, was approximately industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery production Reserves6 Reserve base6 1994

  18. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2008 producer of 2008. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics

  19. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1999 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7757] #12;73 GERMANIUM Events, Trends, and Issues: World refinery production

  20. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1996 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1996 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, and chemotherapy), 5%. Salient Statistics--United States: 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996e Production, refinery 13,000 10

  1. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1997 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1997 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, refinery 10,000 10,000 10,000 18,000 20,000e Total imports 15,000 15,000 16,000 27,000 17,0001 Exports NA

  2. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2007 producer in the fourth quarter of 2007. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production

  3. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1997. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1997. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah in optoelectronic devices, which include light-emitting diodes (LED's), laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar-than-expected increase in demand. The company planned to operate its refineries in France and Germany using stockpiled

  4. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1995. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1995. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah recovered devices, which include light-emitting diodes (LED's), laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells contract to a consortium of private companies to develop gallium nitride technology. Blue LED's are useful

  5. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1999. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1999. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah in optoelectronic devices, which include light-emitting diodes (LED's), laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar in July. The additional facility was expected to double the company's refinery capacity to 100

  6. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2002. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2002. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Integrated circuits represented 65% of gallium demand forecasts of market growth, several companies were consolidating, reducing, or eliminating their Ga

  7. Amino acid supplementation of low-protein sorghum-soybean meal diets for 5 to 20 and 20 to 50 kilogram swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Jeffrey Alan

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; isoleucine content appeared to be marginal in the 12/o protein diet, but was adequate in the 15'/o protein diet. The addition of NaHCOs to the 12'/, protein diet to obtain the electrolyte balance (Na + K - Cl) of the PC did not affect performance... of the amino acid content of sorghum to NRC (1988) requirements, indicates that Met (plus cystine (Cys)) should be the third-limiting and Trp the fourth-limiting amino acid. The addition of Met to Lys- Thr-fortified sorghum based diets has been shown...

  8. K.G. McClements and M. J. Hole CCFE-PR(12)05

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia Copy of Paper submitted to Physics of Plasmas and is reproduced

  9. IT-gesttztes Investitionscontrolling Arno Edinger, SAP Deutschland AG & Co. KG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Rechenwerke #12;Projektsystem (PS) Das PSP-Element als zentrales Stammdatum © SAP 2009 / Page 6 Das Projektsystem ist... eigenständiges Modul und integraler Bestandteil des SAP ERP Systems. der Abbildung Betrachtung aller beteiligten Geschäftsvorfälle. Das PSP-Element im SAP Projektsystem eignet sich als zentra

  10. the Embedded Software Group prof.dr. K.G. Langendoen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanov, Georgi

    · Autarkic computing energy harvesting++ wireless chargingwireless charging 18 | 24 #12;Research theme 4

  11. Surface Chlorophyl Concetration mg/kg3 Plus0.2Plus0.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittenberg, Andrew

    to wind stress,but... ·Changes in atmospheric mean state and response can overwhelm this effect with larger ENSO power (Plus0.2, Green and Noequ) have a wind response with a longer fetch than Blue and Minus impact on tropical Pacific variability is investigated with a fully coupled ocean,atmo- sphere,land

  12. KG>:b0cMV2> Ris-R-660(EN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .6 Diffusive Description of Lattice Gas Models 16 1.7 Analysis of Neutron and X-ray Reflectivity Data is in the field of condensed matter physics. The principal activities of the department in the period from 1 Carlo simulations, and methods for data analysis · Magnetic structures, magnetic phase transitions

  13. Measurements on Mammals Species Body Weight (kg) Brain Weight (g) Gestation (days)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carriquiry, Alicia

    Brazilian Tapir 160.000 169.0 392 Cat 3.300 25.6 63 Chimpanzee 52.160 440.0 230 Chinchilla 0.425 6.4 112

  14. ABO Wind Biogas Sachsen Anhalt GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind6:00-06:00 U.S.ratios in Cenozoic

  15. Elektrizitatswerk Goldbach Hoesbach GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to: navigation,Electrosolar Jump to:

  16. GEE Gesellschaft fuer Erneuerbare Energien mbH Co KG | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife EnergyFreightFulongFuturoGEA Wiegand GmbH

  17. Offshore Burger Windpark Butendiek GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarmsPowerKaitian

  18. AT AGRAR TECHNIK GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to: navigation, search40 -Solar GmbHASP AGAT AGRAR

  19. Reis Robotics GmbH Co KG Maschinenfabrik | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History FacebookRegenesys Holdings Ltd Jump to:and Transfer ofReis

  20. Rheinische Bio Ester GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History FacebookRegenesysRenewableStrategies

  1. Joint Solar Silicon GmbH Co KG JSSI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Joice,JSSI

  2. KvH Projekt GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii9969995°,I Jump to:Kumagai Gumi CoKuwaitKvH

  3. Deutsche Rotor und Turm Service GmbH Co KG DRTS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDaytonDestilaria de Alcool Libra

  4. Wurth Solar GmbH Co KG Wuerth Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy ResourcesWoodsCenters5654°,Huagong TechWujiang

  5. Paradigma Energie und Umwelttechnik GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, NewPalisadesParachute, Colorado: Energy ResourcesEnergie

  6. GEWI Planungs und Vertriebsgesellschaft mbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms A S JumpWindfarmFundicion NodularGermanyNETGEWI

  7. Green Energy Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska:Ethanol LLCEmpowerment JumpGeotherm Power

  8. NUW Nordbrandenburger UmesterungsWerke GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNS Solar Material Co LtdNTDA

  9. PV Eiwa Systemtechnik GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympiaAnalysis) Jump to:PUD No 1 of DouglasPUDPUDPV

  10. Sonnen Solar Park GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonix Japan Inc Jump to: navigation, search

  11. SunWare Solartechnik GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to: navigation,SunElectra Jump to:SunOneSunTergrid SpA

  12. KSP Kluenemann Solar Projekt GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou New Energy CoKERAFOL GmbH Jump to:KR EnergyKSP

  13. Kompass Corporate Finance GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou New EnergyKenosistecKilaraKoRenta AGKomax

  14. MBE Mitteldeutsche BioEnergie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation,LushuiLyme, NewLyonLysandaMMATMBE

  15. Umwelt Windrad GmbH Co KG UWR | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAG Jump to: navigation, search

  16. Voith Siemens Hydro Power Generation GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph Home Wzeng's pictureVivergo FuelsVoith

  17. Habdank PV Montagesysteme GmbH Co KG Habdank PV Mounting Systems | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: EnergyHEROHOMEeHREnergy

  18. Bekon Energy Technologies GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon CaptureAtriaPowerBeanBeijing FSunsBeijingBekon Energy

  19. Integrating Cover Crops into Strip-Till Cropping Systems in a Semi-Arid Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noland, Reagan Lee

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    -Jensen and Schjoerring, 2001). Accumulation of soil organic matter can increase soil organic C (West and Post, 2002). Therefore, establishment and preservation of leguminous residue can also increase carbon sequestration (Reeves, 1997) along with nutrient availability... ingredient a.e. Acid equivalents CP Crude protein DM Dry matter g Gram ha Hectare kg Kilogram MAP Mean annual precipitation MAT Mean annual temperature NDF Neutral detergent fiber NO3-N Nitrate-nitrogen SOC Soil organic carbon vii...

  20. glacial-scale enrichment would result in an air-to-sea flux of about 4.6 mol C m 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an area of 225 km2 . Iron infusions in the north patch of 631 kg and 450 kg were repeated on 16 January, with repeated infusions on 29 January, 1 February, and 5 Feb- ruary. Each infusion involved 315 kg spread over a 225 km2 area. For both patches, initial iron infusions were supple- mented with infusions of SF6 and 3

  1. State Equation For the massspringdamper system shown in Figure 1, the parameters are m = 1 kg, b = 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landers, Robert G.

    step with zero initial conditions. Calculate the unforced response when the initial displacement is 0 force with zero initial conditions. Calculate the forced response to a unit step in the applied force response to a step #12;State Equation 3 with magnitude M. The initial conditions of the states are x1

  2. 1 [2.7 km/s] 3 [2.4; 2.7;2.9 km/s] 8 along the strike 3 along the strike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Fisiche - Universita' degli Studi "Federico II" - Napoli - Italy; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e with Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia). One of the goals is to perform a sensitivity analysis

  3. Relationships between walking and percentiles of adiposity in older and younger men

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Paul T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    old 65-74.9 yrs old Body mass index (kg/m 2) 90th percentile50th percentile10th percentile Weekly walking distance (km) Slope (?kg/m 2

  4. J. C. Fulton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    groundwater to remove 220 kilograms of hexavalent chromium and 1,600 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride this fiscal year. The project also continued Pump-and-Treat...

  5. CONTRIBUTED PAPERS RELATED TO SUMMARY TALKS. MOSSBAUER STUDY OF CUBIC IRON-DOPED KM~F,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CONTRIBUTED PAPERS RELATED TO SUMMARY TALKS. MOSSBAUER STUDY OF CUBIC IRON-DOPED KMFeront ttC Btudiespar spectroscopie Mossbauer avec et sans champ magnetique. L'interaction quadrupolaire by the Mossbauer technique in the presence of a magnetic field. The quadrupole interaction induced by a 50 k

  6. Irregular structures observed below 71 km in the night-time polar D-region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . The payload contained two instru- ments. PIP (positive ion probe) measured positive ion current and CPP (cold plasma probes) measured electron current as well as electron temperature. The latter parameter archipelago. The ®rst instrumented rocket was launched on 20 November, 1997, at 1730 UT during geomagnetically

  7. Results1980 LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 1.87mi-3.01km SEPT 12, 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M 3 EED Solar 4 10:04.6 Steve Shaffer M 4 MMRD 5 10:10 Greg Hirsch M 5 MMRD 6 10:30 Mark Levinson M 3 12:27 No name on stick 4 4 12:28 Phil Nelson M 4 1 ESD 4 5 12:30 Charles K Birdsall M 4 2 EECS

  8. Telecom Implementation In The first long range link testing (34 KM) was done in 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lien, Jyh-Ming

    and days from the nearest highway · 1 I #12;Putting Alvarion radio at Kobang School #12;#12;#12;· S.N at Mohare Relay Station #12;Installing Antennas #12;Tower at Mohare #12;Web Site Nepal Wireless #12;Solar Paners at Mohare Relay Station #12;Power Generation and Backup Systems Used in the Relay Stations · S.N

  9. Chemistry Publications 2008 Shrivastava, RK; Maudru, E; Singh, G; Wightman, RH; Morgan, KM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    - elastic neutron scattering JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B, 2008, 112, 10873-10878 11 Dickson, SJ for simultaneous electrical resistance and neutron diffraction measurements REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS, 2008

  10. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (38)K(m)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, G. C.; Boisvert, G.; Bricault, P.; Churchman, R.; Dombsky, M.; Lindner, T.; Macdonald, J. A.; Vandervoort, E.; Bishop, S.; D'Auria, J. M.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; Leslie, J. R.; Mak, H. -B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . J. Schrewe, and K. S. Sharma, Nucl. Phys. A 405, 29 (1983). [5] A. P. Baerg, Metrologia 1, 131 (1965). [6] J. A. Cameron and B. Singh, Nucl. Data Sheets 109, 1 (2008). [7] G. T. A. Squier, W. E. Burcham, J. M. Freeman, R. J. Petty, S. D. Hoath...

  11. Results1981 LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 1.87 mi= 3.01 km Sept 24, 1981

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8 UCB Campus 5 1 12:22 David Burke M 4 9 BMD 5 2 12:23 Ruben Zelwer M 5 0 ESD 5 3 12:25.3 Karl Saari

  12. New Agroforestry Site: Kotumachigi village About 20 Km from the town of Gadag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    ,000 · Number of Houses 1400 · Population below poverty line ~25% · Drinking water: Only one well with two, onion and cotton · Red and black soil #12;Drudgery for water and fuel is a burden for women and children

  13. Solar: monthly latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south...

  14. -90 -60 -30 0 30 60 90 120 Lenght along the trajectory (km)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veres, Peter

    , especially when the precise all-sky reduction methods are used. Mobility The system is portable (weight of 6 and illumination of the sky. The network TheAMOS cameras systematically monitor meteor activity in the Slovak camera records about 10 000 meteors per year as well as about 50 transient luminous events (sprites

  15. Memo: Estimates of hydrology in small (<80 km2 urbanized watersheds under dry weather and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Johnson, 2004; Hetzel, 2007). The Bay Area Storm Water Management Agencies (BASMAA) that hold National management practices (BMPs) to achieve load reduction and demonstrate at the end of 20 years (2025 Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits have been asked to increase effort and implement best

  16. Fiber-Level Modeling of Dynamic Strength KM2 Ballistic Fabric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    .g., as reinforcements in rigid polymer matrix composites (PMCs) for lightweight vehicle- armor systems). Flexible agile, and more mobile so that they can be quickly transported to operations conducted throughout-amide) fabric and an E-glass fiber/ethyl cellulose composite in body-armor systems can be linked to the Korean

  17. Sensitivity and noise analysis of 4 km laser interferometric gravitational wave antennae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adhikari, Rana, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Around the world, efforts are underway to commission several kilometer-scale laser interferometers to detect gravitational radiation. In the United States, there are two collocated interferometers in Hanford, Washington ...

  18. NOAA Technical Report NESDIS 143 NOAA Coral Reef Watch 50 km Satellite Sea Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and solar-terrestrial sciences. From these sources, it develops and disseminates environmental data, energy development and distribution, global food supplies, and the development of natural resources. Mark Eakin1 William Skirving2,3 Tyler R. L. Christensen1,2 Alan E. Strong1,2 Jianke Li1,2 1 NOAA Coral

  19. Results1983 LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.865 mi) Sept. 23, 1983

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NAME GROUP PLACE PLACE TIME NAME GROUP PLACE 1 9:21.9 Fletcher Miller Tom Trippe 40 40-49 1 8 2 4 11:45.8 Stephen Derenzo 40-49 3 9 1 13:28.7 Dave Fortney 30-39 2 1 2 5 11:47.2 Harry:45.7 Tom Morgan 30-39 2 5 3 9 12:04.7 W. Nazaroff

  20. Why Lean ?y ( QC TQC 5-7 KPI Competency HA-SHA KM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

    ­ Jidoka) 4. (Kaizen ­ Continuous Improvement) etc. #12;Why lean Thinking in Healthcare ? 1. 80 : 80

  1. Cathodoluminescence petrography and isotope geochemistry of KT impact ejecta deposited 360 km from the Chicxulub crater,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claeys, Philippe

    Administration, Headquarters, Code SD, Washington, DC 20546, USA ­Instituto Mexicano del Petro´leo, Eje Lazaro

  2. Cytosolic High Km 5 -Nucleotidase and 5 (3 )-Deoxyribonucleotidase in Substrate Cycles Involved in Nucleotide Metabolism*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchi, Vera

    in Nucleotide Metabolism* Received for publication, August 21, 2000, and in revised form, November 14, 2000 that the hkm-NT is not involved in the regulation of deoxyribo- nucleotide pools but affects IMP and GTP pools. dNT-1, instead, appears to be the catabolic arm of substrate cycles regulating pyrimidine nucleotide

  3. 1000 2000 3000 4000 x [km] -150 -100 -50 0 50 100 150

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experiments with Magnetoacoustic Waves in the Solar Atmosphere C. Nutto1, O. Steiner1, W. Schaffenberger2, M in the photosphere. We have 123 cells in the horizontal direction and 93 cells in the vertical direction is identical for each panel, it can be clearly seen that the transmission coefficient declines with increasing

  4. Solving the Solar Neutrino Problem 2 km Underground -- the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. P. Poon; for the SNO Collaboration

    2003-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is capable of measuring simultaneously the flux of electron-type neutrinos and the total flux of all active flavours of neutrinos originating from the Sun. A model-independent test of neutrino flavour transformation was performed by comparing these two measurements. Assuming an undistorted neutrino energy spectrum, this transformation has been definitively demonstrated in the pure D2O phase of the SNO experiment. In the second phase with dissolved NaCl in the D2O, the total active solar neutrino flux was measured without any assumption on the energy dependence of flavour transformation. In this talk, results from these measurements, their physics implications and the current status of the SNO experiment are presented.

  5. Wind: wind power density maps at 50m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    density for Ghana. (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential in Ghana. Data and Resources Download MapsZIP Download Maps More...

  6. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IMAGEGRID command. (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential in Cuba. Values range from 0 to 547. (Supplemental Information):...

  7. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    file, 50 m wind power density for eastern China. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential in eastern China. Values range from 0 to 3079 Wm2. (Supplemental...

  8. Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    density for Cuba. (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential in Cuba. Data and Resources Download MapsZIP Download Maps More...

  9. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Central America (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential within the following countries in Central America: Belize, El...

  10. Wind: wind power density maps at 50m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Central America. (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential within the following countries in Central America: Belize, El...

  11. Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PDF maps of Eastern China wind mapping. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential in eastern China. Includes maps of full mapping region, and 15...

  12. File:NREL-afg-10km-dir.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,SizeEthiopiametstak.pdfMFSA06-2012 (1).pdfBioMap.pdf

  13. File:NREL-afg-10km-glo.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,SizeEthiopiametstak.pdfMFSA06-2012

  14. File:NREL-afg-10km-tilt.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,SizeEthiopiametstak.pdfMFSA06-2012Afghanistan - Annual

  15. Single-Column Modeling D. A. Randall and K.-M. Xu Colorado State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan McCorkleSingin' in the RainC.J. SomervilleD. A.

  16. Microsoft Word - 802.11i Rec Practices _KM-BL final edit ver 10_.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC) Richard2015MountainLLCFebruary 2014 FORNewsINLSecuring WLANs

  17. Microsoft Word - Sri_Lanka_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 JuneNepalLanka

  18. I?raak Nuke, NXOO Leaa Km&l, NY00

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c* -W. ti.

  19. Comparison And Discussion Of The 6 Km Temperature Maps Of The Western Us

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York:GovernorCommons Capital* NREL/SR-550-28329

  20. 48Deep Impact Comet Encounter On July 4, 2005 at 5:45 UT the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the impact ejected 10,000,000 kilograms of comet material, we will ignore this effect since the comet's mass nucleus and deliver a blast, whose energy is equal to that of a 7.5 x 10 8 kilogram kilogram Impactor,000,000 kilograms of comet material, we will ignore this effect since the comet's mass was over 45 trillion

  1. Criterion for burner design in thermal weed control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Telca Marisa

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that may be achieved for the given speeds, theoretical field capacities (TFC), and fuel dosages. Speed TFC Ener for Ener for 20 kg/ha propane 30 kg/ha propane (km/h) (ha/h) (k ) (kJ/h) (k ) (kJ/h) Ener for 100 kg/ha propane (k /11) (kJ/11) 2. 0 0...

  2. 271 Ernst & Sohn Verlag fr Architektur und technische Wissenschaften GmbH & Co. KG, Berlin Bauphysik 31 (2009), Heft 5 Die Entwicklung energetisch optimierter Lftungsstrategien fr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beschreibungsmittel verwendet werden. Modellierungssprach- standards wie Modelica ermöglichen aufgrund ihrer Modellierungssprache Modelica, für die Simulation und die Analyse der Wechselwirkungen zwischen Raumklima, Bauteil of this work was to develop a flexible, object- oriented, hygrothermal model library based on the Modelica mo

  3. Miller, K.G., Sugarman, P.J., Browning, J.V., et al., 1998 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports, Vol. 174AX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,4 James V. Browning,2 Richard K. Olsson,2 Stephen F. Pekar,2 Timothy J. Reilly,2 Benjamin S. Cramer,2 Uptegrove,4 David Bukry,8 Lloyd H. Burckle,3 James D. Wright,9 Mark D. Feigenson,2 Gilbert J. Brenner,10, Olsson, Pekar, Reilly, Stewart, Uptegrove Biostratigraphy: Foraminifers: Browning, Olsson, Pekar

  4. Miller, K.G., Sugarman, P.J., Browning, J.V., et al. Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports Volume 174AX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Mullikin, Frederick L. Muller, Mark D. Feigenson, Timothy J. Reilly, Gilbert J. Brenner, Don Queen2 SECTION.H., Skinner, E.S., Uptegrove, J., Mullikin, L.G., Muller, F.L., Feigenson, M.D., Reilly, T.J., Brenner, G, Initial Reports Volume 174AX (Suppl.) 1. ANCORA SITE1 Kenneth G. Miller, Peter J. Sugarman, James V

  5. Miller, K.G., and Snyder, S.W. (Eds.), 1997 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 150X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Leg 150X, Miller et al., 1994; Fig. 1). The Atlantic City borehole shows sediments from mid- dle environment. 7. Shark River Formation (1352-1452 ft [412.2-442.7 m]; mid- dle Eocene) is composed of marls

  6. 2013 Presidential Search Committee Anthony K.G. Barbar, of Boca Raton, is currently the Chair of the FAU Board of Trustees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    of Governors Corey King Associate Vice President and Dean of Students Florida Atlantic University Dr. Corey A

  7. the following: 2.23; 2.25; 2.39 and z.!6 kg /day, the first two treatments differing significantly from the two others.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (quantitative or qualitative) and pro- tein source (soya-bean meal alone or combined with lucerne m.eal) were diet being similar. Use of lucerne meal (12 %) as a partial protein supplementation led to good growth.5 per cent, with a diet without lucerne meal. In the case of diets containing 15 per cent protein

  8. partir d'une charge d'1 mg/kg de ma-tire active dans la cire, des rsidus de di-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - nigbiene Die Konditionierung von Gerü- chen und ihre Verarbeitung im Gehirn. Video-Film 1991. D Brückner: The proboscis reflex behaviour of the honeybee. Conditioning to odours and their processing in the brain. Le

  9. Honorary graduates of the University of Southampton His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh KG Doctor of Science (1967)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    of the University (2001) #12;George Cole Doctor of Letters (1988) Robert Templeman Cole Doctor of Science (1980) Sir (2003) Kenneth Francis Dibben Doctor of Science in the Social Sciences (1998) David Vernon Donnison

  10. Observations from 1 km beneath to 25 km above the sea surface reveal the complex interactions in Indian Ocean westerly wind bursts associated with the MaddenJulian oscillation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    velocity profile measurements using W-band Doppler radar and high-resolution Doppler lidar; · continuousC-bandDopplerradarscansmeasuring radial velocity and radar reflectivity; · particle size distributions and chemical composi- tion of aeros by a sustained period of warming moderated by the cooling effect of ocean turbulence. Our pur- pose here

  11. The Savannah River Site is a 803 km2 (310 square mile) industrial complex operated by the Department of Energy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    clearing and frequent burning for agriculture were extensive. European settlement subjected streams to cattle grazing followed by timber harvest, and intensive agriculture. Effects of the latter are evidenced was a monumental task. Networks of roads and railroads, power plants, five nuclear reactors as well as production

  12. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 21, 2011 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13:29.1 Carlo Benedetti 30-39 men 19 57 13:31.2 Jim K Chiu 50-59 men 3 58 13:34.1 Andrew McNeil 30:42.4 Matthias W Reinsch 40-49 men 10 62 13:44.9 Andrew Canning 40-49 men 11 63 13:46.2 Nathan Patrick Craig men 20 64 13:53.1 Norman L Zhu 30-39 men 22 65 13:54.8 Vamsi K Vytla

  13. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 0.2 0.4 Velocity (km/s) Poisson's Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crone, Timothy J.

    with observations. This inconsistency will be corrected in future models, but does not affect the basic conclusions

  14. Void bounds for fluid transport in sea ice K.M. Golden a,*, A.L. Heaton a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    ice is a porous composite of pure ice with brine, air and salt inclusions whose microstructure varies and biological processes. Yet little is known, for example, about bulk flow of brine or diffusive transport dynamics in sea ice: estimating the effective fluid permeability tensor k(/) and its dependence on brine

  15. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 2008 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angelis 9:56.6 Dilworth Y Parkinson 2 14:47.2 Katie Antypas 10:24.3 Gregory L Hura 3 15:28.8 Cindy H Wu 11-39 men 1 2 10:23.6 Ying Wu L Hura 30-39 men 2 4 10:31.2 Ryan C Ogliore:43.5 Emanuele Pedersoli L Fischer 40-49 men 10 53 13:46.2 Scott D Gradia not circled

  16. The operation involved two B3 helicopters using under slung buckets flying the 20 km from a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    on the island 24hrs and 7days after the final drop. Laboratory testing found no residue and the rahui was lifted a public seminar was also given to the Faroese Biologist and Ornithologist Societies, and a television

  17. Mean vertical wind in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere region (80120 km) deduced from the WINDII observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    thermosphere. It is a remote-sensing instrument providing the hori- zontal wind components. In this study at the equator and tropics. Zonal Coriolis acceleration and adiabatic heating and cooling rate associated subsidence heating and adiabatic cool- ing. Thus the knowledge of meridional and vertical winds provides

  18. [Km 100 to 1000 mM (17)] and to S. cerevisiae hexose transporters' apparent affinity for glucose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severson, David

    to biofuel-producing strains of yeast (Fig. 3) over- comes a major bottleneck to fermentation of lignocellulosic feedstocks and probably will help to make cellulosic biofuels economically viable. References, Biocatalysis Biotransform. 27, 27 (2009). 17. M. Chauve et al., Biotechnol. Biofuels 3, 3 (2010). 18. K. A

  19. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 0.2 0.4 Velocity (km/s) Poisson's Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crone, Timothy J.

    ' (10), and Darcy's equation (11). Several studies of submarine hydrothermal systems have shown Medium Inflowing Fluid at Elevated Temperatures Seafloor Figure 9. Steady state temperature and Darcy.42, porosity of 0.25, and a permeability of 10-14 m2 . Figure 10. Darcy velocities of the fluid exiting

  20. KM Central, ICASIT List of Ph.D. Dissertations & Theses, ProQuest Direct -in Knowledge Management from 1991 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lien, Jyh-Ming

    -technical investigation of the determinants of knowledge management systems usage Al-Busaidi, Kamla Ali Ph-level instructional renewal Edge, Karen Ph.D. University of Toronto (Canada) 197 NR02925 12 Knowledge management

  1. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) September 14, 1990 Place Time Name Group Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­49 2 34 12:09.6 Leo Greiner Stephen Christie 30­39 9 36 12:11.7 Jean-Michel Nataf Stephen Derenzo 40­49 6 70 13:27.7 William Jagust 30­39 32 115 14:30.1 Tom Taylor 40­49 15 116 14:31.8 Jason Ross

  2. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 2.95 km (1.84 mi) September 16, 1988 Envelope Time Name Group Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    22 36 12:13.1 Tom Swain 38 70 12:58.6 Mike Kollrack Stephen Derenzo 40-49 7 72 13:07.2 James C. Bartholomew:32.7 Craig Jacobson Tom

  3. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) September 22, 1995 Dummy first body page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 5 10:40.0 Greg Klunder 30-39 4 6 10:40.8 Stephen Lockett 30-39 5 7 10:41.7 Greg Klein 30-39 6 8 10 Huesman Tom West 40-49 3 57 12:48.7 Mohan Kalyanaraman :34.3 Stephen Leland

  4. LBL RUNAROUND 3.00 km (1.865 mi) September 19, 1986 page 1 Place Time Name Group Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :28.8 Daniel Strongin Tom Rucker 12:09.4 Orin Dahl 50-59 1 35 12:10.5 Tom Swain Yaeger 40-49 3 41 12:38.4 Stephen Derenzo 40-49 4 42 12:38.7 Laisheng Wang

  5. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 8, 2010 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -49 men 12 58 13:23.1 Nicholas S Norberg 30-39 men 15 59 13:25.4 Sergi Molins Rafa 30-39 men 16 60 13

  6. Iceberg size and orientation estimation using SeaWinds K.M. Stuart, D.G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    processes. For instance, iceberg positions affect shipping lanes, outline ocean currents, and influence but are unable to penetrate cloud cover and are dependent on solar illumination. Despite the high Ocean has also been documented. Even though SeaWinds was never designed to track icebergs, an extensive

  7. Mesoscale Systems: weather associated with circulation systems of horizontal scales of 5 to 1,000 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    Mesoscale Systems: weather associated with circulation systems of horizontal scales of 5 to 1 faster at night #12;Dispersion in Mesoscale Systems Mesoscale systems can have large effects on pollution

  8. A Proposal for a Detector 2 km Away From the T2K Neutrino May 30, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    energies. High energy muons which exit the water Cherenkov detector will be measured by an iron muon ranger Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Warszawa (Poland): D. Kielczewska1 H.Niewodnicza´nski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krak´ow (Poland): A. Szelc, A. Zalewska Institute for Nuclear Research RAS

  9. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) September 24, 1993 Place Time Name GroupGroup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :49 Charles Taberski 40-49 1 16 11:54 Arild Larsen :10 Keith Lewis 30-39 17 53 13:10 Carlos Solis, Jr.

  10. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 9, 2009 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :55.5 Dilworth Y Parkinson 30-39 men 1 6 10:59.9 Justin Paul Ishida -39 women 1 65 13:57.5 Kang Wei Chou

  11. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 1997 Place Time Name Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9:45.0 Etien, Robert Paul 30-39 1 3 10:04.8 Farias, Leonel 30-39 2 4:06.6 Volfbeyn, Paul , Jens 30-39 28 63 13:18.8 Lewis, Keith 40-49 5 64 13:19.1 Chou, Peter

  12. Multiphase Flow Metering: An Overview Manoj Kumar KM, Senior Scientist, Non-destructive Evaluation Lab, GE Global Research,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.SolarUS DeptMultilateralMultimediaScienceMultiphase

  13. inp_30cm_60x60_1_200Hz_lime_shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... ros(2)= solid grains density (shale)(kg/m^3) used 1.81465889E+10 km(2)= Bulk modulus dry matrix (Pa) used 1.33564722E+10 mum(2)= shear modulus dry

  14. as21 magnesium alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In particular, the aluminum washer offered each kg means approximately an emission reduction of 0.12 g CO2km. Aluminum as a lightweight material Maume-Deschamps, Vronique...

  15. az80 magnesium alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In particular, the aluminum washer offered each kg means approximately an emission reduction of 0.12 g CO2km. Aluminum as a lightweight material Maume-Deschamps, Vronique...

  16. am50 magnesium alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In particular, the aluminum washer offered each kg means approximately an emission reduction of 0.12 g CO2km. Aluminum as a lightweight material Maume-Deschamps, Vronique...

  17. az61 magnesium alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In particular, the aluminum washer offered each kg means approximately an emission reduction of 0.12 g CO2km. Aluminum as a lightweight material Maume-Deschamps, Vronique...

  18. az magnesium alloys: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In particular, the aluminum washer offered each kg means approximately an emission reduction of 0.12 g CO2km. Aluminum as a lightweight material Maume-Deschamps, Vronique...

  19. az31b magnesium alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In particular, the aluminum washer offered each kg means approximately an emission reduction of 0.12 g CO2km. Aluminum as a lightweight material Maume-Deschamps, Vronique...

  20. am60 magnesium alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In particular, the aluminum washer offered each kg means approximately an emission reduction of 0.12 g CO2km. Aluminum as a lightweight material Maume-Deschamps, Vronique...

  1. am60b magnesium alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In particular, the aluminum washer offered each kg means approximately an emission reduction of 0.12 g CO2km. Aluminum as a lightweight material Maume-Deschamps, Vronique...

  2. Analysis on storage off-gas emissions from woody, herbaceous, and torrefied biomass

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Lim, C. Jim; Bi, Xiaotao T.; Kuang, Xingya; Melin, Staffan; Yazdanpanah, Fahimeh; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wood chips, torrefied wood chips, ground switchgrass, and wood pellets were tested for off-gas emissions during storage. Storage canisters with gas-collection ports were used to conduct experiments at room temperature of 20 °C and in a laboratory oven set at 40 °C. Commercially-produced wood pellets yielded the highest carbon monoxide (CO) emissions at both 20 and 40 °C (1600 and 13,000 ppmv), whereas torrefied wood chips emitted the lowest of about more »20 and 40 °C at the end of 11 days of storage. CO emission factors (milligrams per kilogram of biomass) calculated were lowest for ground switchgrass and torrefied wood chips (2.68 and 4.86 mg/kg) whereas wood pellets had the highest CO of about 10.60 mg/kg, respectively, at 40 °C after 11 days of storage. In the case of CO?, wood pellets recorded the lowest value of 55.46 mg/kg, whereas switchgrass recorded the highest value of 318.72 mg/kg. This study concludes that CO emission factor is highest for wood pellets, CO? is highest for switchgrass and CH? is negligible for all feedstocks except for wood pellets, which is about 0.374 mg/kg at the end of 11-day storage at 40 °C.« less

  3. March market review. [Spot market prices for uranium (1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spot market price for uranium in unrestricted markets weakened further during March, and at month end, the NUEXCO Exchange Value had fallen $0.15, to $7.45 per pound U3O8. The Restricted American Market Penalty (RAMP) for concentrates increased $0.15, to $2.55 per pound U3O8. Ample UF6 supplies and limited demand led to a $0.50 decrease in the UF6 Value, to $25.00 per kgU as UF6, while the RAMP for UF6 increased $0.75, to $5.25 per kgU. Nine near-term uranium transactions were reported, totalling almost 3.3 million pounds equivalent U3O8. This is the largest monthly spot market volume since October 1992, and is double the volume reported in January and February. The March 31 Conversion Value was $4.25 per kgU as UF6. Beginning with the March 31 Value, NUEXCO now reports its Conversion Value in US dollars per kilogram of uranium (US$/kgU), reflecting current industry practice. The March loan market was inactive with no transactions reported. The Loan Rate remained unchanged at 3.0 percent per annum. Low demand and increased competition among sellers led to a one-dollar decrease in the SWU Value, to $65 per SWU, and the RAMP for SWU declined one dollar, to $9 per SWU.

  4. Cryogenic Double Beta Decay Experiments: CUORE and CUORICINO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reina Maruyama; for the CUORE Collaboration

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryogenic bolometers, with their excellent energy resolution, flexibility in material, and availability in high purity, are excellent detectors for the search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Kilogram-size single crystals of TeO_2 are utilized in CUORICINO for an array with a total detector mass of 40.7 kg. CUORICINO currently sets the most stringent limit on the halflife of Te-130 of T > 2.4x10^{24} yr (90% C.L.), corresponding to a limit on the effective Majorana neutrino mass in the range of < 0.2-0.9 eV. Based on technology developed for CUORICINO and its predecessors, CUORE is a next-generation experiment designed to probe neutrino mass in the range of 10 - 100 meV. Latest results from CUORICINO and overview of the progress and current status of CUORE are presented.

  5. Intrinsic neutron background of nuclear emulsions for directional Dark Matter searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandrov, A; Buonaura, A; Consiglio, L; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; Di Crescenzo, A; Di Marco, N; Di Vacri, M L; Furuya, S; Galati, G; Gentile, V; Katsuragawa, T; Laubenstein, M; Lauria, A; Loverre, P F; Machii, S; Monacelli, P; Montesi, M C; Naka, T; Pupilli, F; Rosa, G; Sato, O; Tioukov, V; Umemoto, A; Yoshimoto, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments of the nuclear emulsion technology led to the production of films with nanometric silver halide grains suitable to track low energy nuclear recoils with submicrometric length. This improvement opens the way to a directional Dark Matter detection, thus providing an innovative and complementary approach to the on-going WIMP searches. An important background source for these searches is represented by neutron-induced nuclear recoils that can mimic the WIMP signal. In this paper we provide an estimation of the contribution to this background from the intrinsic radioactive contamination of nuclear emulsions. We also report the induced background as a function of the read-out threshold, by using a GEANT4 simulation of the nuclear emulsion, showing that it amounts to about 0.02 neutrons per year per kilogram, fully compatible with the design of a 10 kg$\\times$year exposure.

  6. [1] K.G. Wilson, Phys. Rev. D 10 (1974) 2445. [2] A.A. Belavin, A.M. Polyakov, A.S. Swartz, Yu.S. Tyupkin, Phys. Lett. B 59 (1975) 85.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cvitanovc', Predrag

    motion embedded in plane Couette turbulence: regen- eration cycle and burst," J. Fluid Mech. 449, 291 and Quantization (Cambridge Uni- versity Press, Cambridge, 1988). [26] M. Brack and R.K. Bhaduri, Semiclassical

  7. O.M. Jones, C.A. Michael, K.G. McClements, N.J. Conway, B. Crowley, R.J. Akers, R.J. Lake, S.D. Pinches and the MAST team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    heating including neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance Present address: Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Science and Engineering,

  8. I.-S. Kang K. Jin B. Wang K.-M. Lau J. Shukla V. Krishnamurthy S.D. Schubert D.E. Wailser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, In-Sik

    to the climatological intraseasonal oscillation (CISO). In contrast to the model composite, several models fail- ond. The CISO of precipitation is also examined over the Indian monsoon and the East Asia

  9. Web Note A for "Polymorphic karyotypic suppression of a somatic recombinational pathway for loss of heterozygosity", K.M. Haigis & W.F. Dove Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dove, William

    -210.71 5 8 3 1 2 2 3 1 1 0 1 -212.46 4 4 7 1 2 3 4 1 0 0 0 -210.76 5 9 4 1 2 3 4 1 1 1 1 -212.55 5 40

  10. the Earth's) at a distance of 100 km that lasts for 100 s after an . For Vredefort, these are minimum values because the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet,

    : Vredefort, South Africa. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 137, 232­245 (1999). 8. Hart, R. J., Hargraves, R. B

  11. Dombroski, M.J. and K.M. Carley, October, 2002, "NETEST: Estimating a Terrorist Network's Structure," Computational & Mathematical Organization Theory, 8, pp. 235-241.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    ," Computational & Mathematical Organization Theory, 8, pp. 235 & Mathematical Organization Theory, 8, pp. 235 and asymmetric form of warfare against elusive terrorist organizations. Defense and investigative organizations

  12. Upper mantle seismic velocity variations beneath northern Tanza-nia coupled with the structure of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritsema, Jeroen

    of the litho- sphere or by a broad thermal upwelling extending from the lower mantle into the upper mantle: plume, rift, eastAfrica, craton. INTRODUCTION Although eastAfrica has long been regarded as a classic. 1). In the first study, relative traveltimes from P and S waves were inverted for upper mantle

  13. Development and evolution of detachment faulting along 50 km of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 16.5ºN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Deborah K.; Schouten, Hans; Dick, Henry; Cann, Joe; Salters, Vincent; Marschall, Horst R.; Ji, Fuwu; Yoerger, Dana; Sanfilippo, Alessio; Parnell-Turner, Ross; Palmiotto, Camilla; Zheleznov, Alexei; Bai, Hailong; Junkin, Will; Urann, Ben; Dick, Spencer; Sulanowska, Margaret; Lemmond, Peter; Curry, Scott

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    (CTD) profiler; 5) Seapoint optical backscatter 145 sensor; 6) Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) sensor; 7) An electrochemical (Eh) sensor 146 supplied by K. Nakamura; 8) Digital still camera with 1 megapixel resolution; and 9) Dual 3-147 Axis...

  14. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) September 16, 1994 Place Time Name GroupGroup Place Time Name GroupGroup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blodgett 30-39 4 63 12:59.0 Tom McVeigh 40-49 5 6 10:33.9 Doug Crawford 30-39 5 64 13:00.8 Robert Meierhans:13.3 John Byrd 30-39 30 9 10:52.9 Steve Lindaas Stephen:45.1 Tom Swain 30-39 35 27 11:46.7 Bob Ajemian 30-39 15 85 13:45.9 Mark Turner 30-39 36 28 11:50.9 Bernhard

  15. The Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada, was the site for a 12-kiloton-ton nuclear test

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV&--I33NY&~ '

  16. Distribution of copper, nickel, and cadmium in the surface waters of the North Atlantic and North Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, E.A.; Huested, S.S.; Jones, S.P.

    1981-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of copper, nickel, and cadmium have been determined for about 250 surface water samples. Nonupwelling open-ocean concentrations of these metals are Cu, 0.5-1.4 nmol/kg: Ni, 1-2 nmol/kg; and Cd, less than 10 pmol/kg. In the equatorial Pacific upwelling zone, concentrations of Ni (3 nmol/kg) and Cd (80 pmol/kg) are higher than in the open ocean, but Cu (0.9 nmol/kg) is not significantly enriched. Metal concentrations are higher in cool, nutrient-rich eastern boundary currents: Cu, 1.5 nmol/kg: Ni, 3.5 nmol/kg and Cd, 30-50 pmol/kg. Copper is distinctly higher in the coastal waters of the Gulf of Panama (3--4 nmol/kg) and also higher in the shelf waters north of the Gulf Stream (2.5 nmol/kg): these copper enrichments may be caused by copper remobilized from mildly reducing shelf sediments and maintained by a coastal nutrient trap. In the open ocean, events of high-Cu water (1.5--3.5 nmol/kg) are seen on scales up to 60 km; presumably, these are due to the advection of coastal water into the ocean interior. The lowest copper concentrations in the North Pacific central gyre (0.5 nmol/kg: (Bruland, 1980) are lower than in the Sargasso Sea (1.3 nmol/kg), while for nickel the lowest concentrations are 2 nmol/kg in both the North Pacific and the North Atlantic. Nickel and cadmium, while generally correlated with the nutrients in surface waters, show distinct regional changes in their element-nutrient correlations. The residual concentrations of trace metals in the surface waters of the ocean can be explained if biological discrimination against trace metals relative to phosphorus increases as productivity decreases.

  17. Indices of stress in exercising horses fed diets containing varying amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Alicia Dawn

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    total workload of 11 approximately 4,000 kg:km per day. On d2 and 4 the lope was shortened to 15 min, followed by a prescribed pattern of maneuvers consisting of galloping circles (~390 m/min), spinning and stopping to achieve a total workload... of approximately 4,000 kg:km per day. The pattern began by galloping 4 circles one direction and a change of leads, followed by 4 circles in the opposite direction and a second change of leads. Next, instead of closing this circle, the horses were galloped...

  18. PDRD (SR13046) TRITIUM PRODUCTION FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, P.; Sheetz, S.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing the results of Texas A&M University (TAMU) senior design projects on tritium production in four different small modular reactors (SMR), the Savannah River National Laboratory’s (SRNL) developed an optimization model evaluating tritium production versus uranium utilization under a FY2013 plant directed research development (PDRD) project. The model is a tool that can evaluate varying scenarios and various reactor designs to maximize the production of tritium per unit of unobligated United States (US) origin uranium that is in limited supply. The primary module in the model compares the consumption of uranium for various production reactors against the base case of Watts Bar I running a nominal load of 1,696 tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) with an average refueling of 41,000 kg low enriched uranium (LEU) on an 18 month cycle. After inputting an initial year, starting inventory of unobligated uranium and tritium production forecast, the model will compare and contrast the depletion rate of the LEU between the entered alternatives. This is an annual tritium production rate of approximately 0.059 grams of tritium per kilogram of LEU (g-T/kg-LEU). To date, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license has not been amended to accept a full load of TPBARs so the nominal tritium production has not yet been achieved. The alternatives currently loaded into the model include the three light water SMRs evaluated in TAMU senior projects including, mPower, Holtec and NuScale designs. Initial evaluations of tritium production in light water reactor (LWR) based SMRs using optimized loads TPBARs is on the order 0.02-0.06 grams of tritium per kilogram of LEU used. The TAMU students also chose to model tritium production in the GE-Hitachi SPRISM, a pooltype sodium fast reactor (SFR) utilizing a modified TPBAR type target. The team was unable to complete their project so no data is available. In order to include results from a fast reactor, the SRNL Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) ran a Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) model of a basic SFR for comparison. A 600MWth core surrounded by a lithium blanket produced approximately 1,000 grams of tritium annually with a 13% enriched, 6 year core. This is similar results to a mid-1990’s study where the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), a 400 MWth reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), could produce about 1,000 grams with an external lithium target. Normalized to the LWRs values, comparative tritium production for an SFR could be approximately 0.31 g-T/kg LEU.

  19. Determinants of multiple measures of acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D.J.; Anderson, J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical analyses of the acceleration capability of gasoline vehicles have focused on zero to 97 km/h acceleration rates and have concluded that peak power per kilogram is an appropriate single surrogate for acceleration capability. In this paper, statistical methods are used with data for 107 vehicles tested and reported by Consumers Union for 1986--1988 model years to estimate the determinants of contemporary gasoline vehicle acceleration capability under various conditions, adding new variables to the statistical tests reported by others. Like previous studies, this analysis determined that power and weight provide the most information about acceleration capability. Using a model formulation unlike other studies, this study found that engine displacement also provides statistically significant improvements in explanation of 0-48, 0-97, and 48-97 km/h acceleration times. The coefficients of the equations imply that the use of smaller displacement engines, holding peak power constant, diminishes start-up and 0-97 km/h acceleration capability. A separate equation is estimated to illustrate the effects of advanced engine technologies on displacement, controlling for power. This equation is used in conjunction with the acceleration equations to illustrate a method of estimating performance-equivalent engine substitutions when engine technologies change. Transmission type was important for start-up acceleration, with automatic-transmission-equipped vehicles being significantly slower than stick-shift-equipped vehicles. Fuel injection was found to significantly improve start-up acceleration. Variables proxying aerodynamic-drag effects tended to be significant determinants of acceleration in the higher-speed equations, but not for start-up acceleration. Estimated aerodynamic drag effects indicated that drag slows down 0-97, 48-97, and 72-105 km/h acceleration of pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles more than passenger cars and vans.

  20. Pellet property requirements for future blast-furnace operations and other new ironmaking processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, A.K.; Oshnock, T.W. [U.S. Steel, Monroeville, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements for the physical, chemical and metallurgical properties of pellets have continued to become more stringent as blast-furnace productivity and coke rate have been rapidly improved during the last decade. In addition, the age and deterioration of the North American coke batteries, the lack of capital to sufficiently rebuild them, and the threat of increasingly more stringent environmental controls for the coke batteries has forced North American ironmakers to begin implementing pulverized coal injection to minimize the coke requirements for the blast furnace and to seriously investigate developing other ironmaking processes that use coal instead of coke. Therefore, the next major step in North American ironmaking has included injecting pulverized coal (PC) at 200 kilograms per ton of hot metal (kg/ton) [400 pounds per net ton of hot metal (lb/NTHM)] or greater which will result in the coke rate decreasing to less than 300 kg/ton (600 lb/NTHM) or less. As a result, the pellets will spend more time in the furnace and will be required to support more total weight. Pellets can also be a major iron unit source for other cokeless ironmaking processes such as the COREX process or the AISI direct ironmaking process. This paper will explore the pellet property requirements for future blast-furnace operations and cokeless ironmaking processes.

  1. Folio PreVIEWS - Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from hazardous waste. Concentration: The quantity of a substance in a unit of sample media (e.g., milligrams per liter, or micrograms per kilogram). Confined aquifer: A...

  2. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    500/kW Anode tail gas Hydrogen Engine Gen-Set ICE/Generatorliter V-10 engine and about 26 kilograms of hydrogen, stored

  3. 2D monolayers could yield thinnest solar cells ever

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have shown how using a different type of material could yield thinner, more lightweight solar panels that provide power densities - watts per kilogram of material - orders of...

  4. US, Kazakhstan Cooperate to Eliminate Highly Enriched Uranium...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of 36 kilograms (approximately 80 pounds) of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuel from the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) in Almaty, Kazakhstan. The HEU was...

  5. Microsoft Word - NMMSS Newsletter December 2014 Final.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uranium) or one kilogram or more of foreign-obligated source material (natural uranium, depleted uranium, or thorium). Most NRC licensees report to NMMSS by calendar year. This...

  6. BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMfSSIOd. 63 1806.. ...................................

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    running on the pole. The weight of the rope,which is of hemp, is about 1,450 kilograms. When the harpoon

  7. Pg: 1 February 11, 2009 Surface Water and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    -mesoscale and kinetic energy containing scales -- What is the small- scale (10-100 km) variability of ocean surface/C requirements: ·Payload power, mass: ~1.1KW, ~300Kg ·Stringent Pointing knowledge requirements ·High Data Rate · Use conventional Jason- class altimeter for nadir coverage and radiometer for wet-tropospheric delay

  8. Dynamics of planetary atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Peter L.

    705810Sound speed (m s-1) 3920Scale height (km) 300400Emission-space pressure (hPa) 95124Emission temperature (K) 1.81.7Emitted/absorbed power 26.73.1Orbital inclination(o) 6901310Mean density (kg m-3) 10) Science #12;Jovian Jets · - uyy winds

  9. DOE H2 Program Annual Review, 5-20-2003 Insulated Pressure Vessels for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    range. J. We are generating tank performance data. K. Testing BOP components. L. Low venting losses) car, km 0 1 2 3 4 5 hydrogenlosses,kg low-pressure LH2 tank MLVSI insulated pressure vessel fueled with LH2 LH2 80 K CH2 1998: thermodynamic analysis 1999: cryogenic cycling 2001: DOT/ISO Tests 2003

  10. TECI-INICAL RGPORT A-78-3 MECHANICAL HARVESTING OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    plants from the harvesting site or area to the takeout point on the water-land interface. Once there1I1a'IJ. TECI-INICAL RGPORT A-78-3 MECHANICAL HARVESTING OF AQUATIC PLANTS R.rtl FIELD EVALUATION cubic metre kilograms kilograms per sCluare metre Fl #12;MECHANICAL HARVESTING OF AQUATIC PLANTS FIELD

  11. Autonomous, agile micro-satellites and supporting technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breitfeller, E; Dittman, M D; Gaughan, R J; Jones, M S; Kordas, J F; Ledebuhr, A G; Ng, L C; Whitehead, J C; Wilson, B

    1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper updates the on-going effort at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to develop autonomous, agile micro-satellites (MicroSats). The objective of this development effort is to develop MicroSats weighing only a few tens of kilograms, that are able to autonomously perform precision maneuvers and can be used telerobotically in a variety of mission modes. The required capabilities include satellite rendezvous, inspection, proximity-operations, docking, and servicing. The MicroSat carries an integrated proximity-operations sensor-suite incorporating advanced avionics. A new self-pressurizing propulsion system utilizing a miniaturized pump and non-toxic mono-propellant hydrogen peroxide was successfully tested. This system can provide a nominal 25 kg MicroSat with 200-300 m/s delta-v including a warm-gas attitude control system. The avionics is based on the latest PowerPC processor using a CompactPCI bus architecture, which is modular, high-performance and processor-independent. This leverages commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technologies and minimizes the effects of future changes in processors. The MicroSat software development environment uses the Vx-Works real-time operating system (RTOS) that provides a rapid development environment for integration of new software modules, allowing early integration and test. We will summarize results of recent integrated ground flight testing of our latest non-toxic pumped propulsion MicroSat testbed vehicle operated on our unique dynamic air-rail.

  12. Microsats for On-Orbit Support Missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledebuhr, A G

    2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I appreciate the opportunity to address this conference and describe some of our work and plans for future space missions and capabilities. My presentation will consist of a short overview of our program, some potential missions and enabling technologies, as well as, a description of some of our test vehicles and ongoing docking experiments. The Micro-Satellite Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing technologies for a new generation of a very highly capable autonomous microsats. A microsat is defined here as a vehicle that's less than 100 kilograms in mass. We're looking at a number of different microsat design configurations, between 0.5 to 1 meter in length and less than 40 kg in mass. You'll see several ground-test vehicles that we have been building that are modeled after potential future on-orbit systems. In order to have very aggressive missions, these microsats will require new integrated proximity operation sensors, advanced propulsion, avionics and guidance systems. Then to make this dream a reality a new approach to high fidelity ''hardware-in-the-loop'' ground testing, will be discussed that allows repeated tests with the same vehicle multiple times. This will enable you to ''get it right'' before going into space. I'll also show some examples of our preliminary docking work completed as of today.

  13. Engineering-Scale Liquid Cadmium Cathode Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Vaden; B. R. Westphal; S. X. Li; T. A. Johnson; K. B. Davies; D. M. Pace

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery of transuranic actinides (TRU) using electrorefining is a process being investigated as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). TRU recovery via electrorefining onto a solid cathode is very difficult as the thermodynamic properties of transuranics are not favourable for them to remain in the metal phase while significant quantities of uranium trichloride exist in the electrolyte. Theoretically, the concentration of transuranics in the electrolyte must be approximately 106 greater than the uranium concentration in the electrolyte to produce a transuranic deposit on a solid cathode. Using liquid cadmium as a cathode contained within a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, the co-deposition of uranium and transuranics is feasible because the activity of the transuranics in liquid cadmium is very small. Depositing transuranics and uranium in a liquid cadmium cathode (LCC) theoretically requires the concentration of transuranics to be two to three times the uranium concentration in the electrolyte. Three LCC experiments were performed in an Engineering scale elecdtrorefiner, which is located in the argon hot cell of the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex on the Idaho National Laboratory. Figure 1 contains photographs of the LCC assembly in the hot cell prior to the experiment and a cadmium ingot produced after the first LCC test. Figure 1. Liquid Cadmium Cathode (left) and Cadmium Ingot (right) The primary goal of the engineering-scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments was to electrochemically collect kilogram quantities of uranium and plutonium via a LCC. The secondary goal was to examine fission product contaminations in the materials collected by the LCC. Each LCC experiment used chopped spent nuclear fuel from the blanket region of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II loaded into steel baskets as the anode with the LCC containing 26 kg of cadmium metal. In each experiment, between one and two kilograms of heavy metal was collected in the LCC after passing an integrated current over 500 amp hours. Analysis of samples from the liquid cadmium cathode ingots showed detectable amounts of transuranics and rare-earth elements. Acknowledgements K. B. Davies and D. M. Pace for the mechanical and electrical engineering needed to prepare the equipment for the engineering-scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments.

  14. MFST exam A 424302 23-112011 Short answers 415. a. G = gasoline: pG = yGptot = pGxG = pG, (xG = 1),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ·10-3 ·6000·75·10-3 /(8.314·300) = 20.3 g. b. 10 km/l · 75 l · 0.25 g/km = 187.5 g > 20.3 g: no problem. 416/m2 ·s = 0.0073 mol/m2 ·s 417. a. F = f(L,B,v,,) 6 variables, 3 base units (kg, m, s) 3 dimensionless groups b. F = ··v2 ·L2 ·(B/L) ·Re = K·B·v9/5 for v: 2+ = 9/5, = 1/5, for B: =1 K·B·v9/5 = ··v2

  15. Thiamin supplementation for exercising horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topliff, Donald Ray

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    premix topdressed on each feed- ing to provide thiamin levels of 1. 9, 3. 9 and 28. 0 mg/kg feed. B-vitamins other than thiamin were provided in the premix to meet NRC (1978) recommended allowances. Horses were galloped for 21 days prior to the experi...- ment and rest periods of 7 days were allowed before each of three 14 day experimental periods. During each experimental period horses were galloped 6. 5 km daily to precipitate an average workload of 4. 6 Mg km and fed to maintain zero body weight...

  16. Propulsion engineering study for small-scale Mars missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, J.

    1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Rocket propulsion options for small-scale Mars missions are presented and compared, particularly for the terminal landing maneuver and for sample return. Mars landing has a low propulsive {Delta}v requirement on a {approximately}1-minute time scale, but at a high acceleration. High thrust/weight liquid rocket technologies, or advanced pulse-capable solids, developed during the past decade for missile defense, are therefore more appropriate for small Mars landers than are conventional space propulsion technologies. The advanced liquid systems are characterize by compact lightweight thrusters having high chamber pressures and short lifetimes. Blowdown or regulated pressure-fed operation can satisfy the Mars landing requirement, but hardware mass can be reduced by using pumps. Aggressive terminal landing propulsion designs can enable post-landing hop maneuvers for some surface mobility. The Mars sample return mission requires a small high performance launcher having either solid motors or miniature pump-fed engines. Terminal propulsion for 100 kg Mars landers is within the realm of flight-proven thruster designs, but custom tankage is desirable. Landers on a 10 kg scale also are feasible, using technology that has been demonstrated but not previously flown in space. The number of sources and the selection of components are extremely limited on this smallest scale, so some customized hardware is required. A key characteristic of kilogram-scale propulsion is that gas jets are much lighter than liquid thrusters for reaction control. The mass and volume of tanks for inert gas can be eliminated by systems which generate gas as needed from a liquid or a solid, but these have virtually no space flight history. Mars return propulsion is a major engineering challenge; earth launch is the only previously-solved propulsion problem requiring similar or greater performance.

  17. Greenhouse Gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE): Evaluation of a new method to look at high resolution spatial/temporal distributions of carbon over key sub km sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobler, Jeremy; Zaccheo, T. Scott; Blume, Nathan; Braun, Michael; Perninit, Timothy; McGregor, Doug; Botos, Chris; Dobeck, Laura

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently a new laser based approach for measuring area with potential for producing 2D estimates of the concentration spatial distribution has been developed through a cooperative agreement with the National Energy and Technology Laboratory of the Department of Energy, Exelis Inc. and AER Inc. The new approach is based on a pair of continuous wave intensity modulated laser absorption spectrometer transceivers, combined with a series of retro reflectors located around the perimeter of the area being monitored. The main goal of this cooperative agreement is monitoring, reporting and verification for ground carbon capture and storage projects. The system was recently tested at the Zero Emission Research and Technology site in Bozeman, MT, with underground leak rates ranging from 0.1 – 0.3 metric ton per day (T/d), as well as a 0.8 T/d surface release. Over 200 hours of data were collected over a rectangular grid 180m x 200m between August 18th and September 9th. In addition, multiple days of in situ data were acquired for the same site, using a Licor gas analyzer systems. Initial comparisons between the laser-based system and the in situ agree very well. The system is designed to operate remotely and transmit the data via a 3G/4G connection along with weather data for the site. An all web-based system ingests the data, populates a database, performs the inversion to ppm CO2 using the Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM), and displays plots and statistics for the retrieved data. We will present an overview of the GreenLITE measurement system, outline the retrieval and reconstruction approach, and discuss results from extensive field testing.

  18. Smoke consisting of mixtures of dust and industrial pollution covering the Forbidden City, Beijing, China. BY K.-M. LAU, V. RAMANATHAN, G.-X. WU, Z. LI, S. C. TSAY, C. HSU, R. SIKKA, B. HOLBEN, D. LU,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    ) regions have found that anthropogenic aerosols may signifi- cantly change the energy balance government agencies from China, India, Italy, Japan, and the United States. At the workshop, par- ticipants of related national research programs in China, India, Japan, Italy, and the United States

  19. ... als erstes bilden wir eine 68,6 km lange Menschenkette! Wenn wir uns an den Hnden fassen, knnen wir die Standorte der TUM in Mnchen, Garching und Weihenstephan verbin-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiz, Ulrich

    , können wir die Standorte der TUM in München, Garching und Weihenstephan verbin- den ­ und schaffen es in Munich, Garching and Weihenstephan ­ and even reach as far as the airport. From there, we could jump

  20. PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF SINGLET CAPTURE IN HYDROGEN V.A. Andreev , T. Banks , L. Bonnet , R.M. Carey , T.A. Case , D. Chitwood , S.M. Clayton , K.M. Crowe , P.T. Debevec ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammel, Peter

    magnet which is a specially designed coil wound closely around the Alu vessel containing the TPC well-known of the nucleon charged current form factors, the induced pseudo- scalar "$# , to 7%. Mu detector (Aluminium pressure vessel housing the TPC) with magnetic field coil is retracted for preparing

  1. In the 1st experiment, gilts (LWX LR) belonging to a farm located 15 km away were exposed to the boar immediately after their arrival in the experimental farm. In the second

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    was probably due to an insufficient stimulation of adrenal glands and pituitary as shown by lower plasma levels of cortisol, LH and prolactin. The dexamethasone treatment retarded by about 70 hours the onset of first* Institut Technique du Yorc, 149, rue de Bercy, 75595 Paris Cedex 12 Sperm production of boars subjected

  2. from kidbar until weaning. Kids of both groups B and C were abruptly weaned at 6 weeks of age. The live weight of kids at 10 weeks of age was 12.1, 13.1 and 12.1 kg on an average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    weaned like those of Group A. Skim milk was acidified by adding 0.15 p. 100 acetic acid. Live weight of feeding acidified skim milk from 5 to 10 weeks of age (group 11) was compared to weaning with fermented rate. Key words : Teat feeding, kid, wenning, milk replacer, fermented ntilk. The use of starch

  3. Reduction Chemistry of Rare-Earth Metal Complexes: Toward New Reactivity and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wenliang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elsner, A. ; Milliken, M. As hybrid cars gobble rare metals,rare-earths are heavily used in fuel-efficient hybrid cars.In a leading model of hybrid car, 1 kilogram of neodymium

  4. Analysis of factor productivity in agricultural systems in Zimbabwe and application of Geographic Information Systems in soil erosion prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mugabe, Phanuel

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photographs were digitized into an Arc/Info GIS. This was used to determine the area under crops and grazing. Range forage production figures in kilograms per hectare for the area were obtained from Agricultural Technical and Extension Services inventories...

  5. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trucks converted to hydrogen ICE engines. The goal of theliter V-10 engine and about 26 kilograms of hydrogen, storedcombustion engine that will use the hydrogen for “on-demand”

  6. EA-1255: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to transport 5.26 kilograms of enriched uranium-23 5 in the form of nuclear fuel, from the Republic of Georgia to the United Kingdom.

  7. EA-1123: Transfer of Normal and Low-Enriched Uranium Billets to the United Kingdom, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to transfer approximately 710,000 kilograms (1,562,000 pounds) of unneeded normal and low-enriched uranium to the United Kingdom; thus,...

  8. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Stardust-NExT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Power: Solar panels providing from 170 to 800 watts, depending on distance from the sun. Stardust (2.16 feet) deep; length of solar arrays 4.8 meters (15.9 feet) tip to tip Weight: 385 kilograms (848

  9. 2011 Robotics Challenge Saturday May 21, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    Detection and Removal Robot (BDAR-bot) LEVEL: Middle School ­ All Grades TYPE OF CONTEST: Team COMPOSITION uranium, to make a nuclear bomb. With nearly 2 million kilograms of each in existence in the world today

  10. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    430 million tonnes coal-equivalent energy use by 2025. More187 kilograms of coal equivalent primary energy use for eachof usable acquired energy from coal, oil and natural over

  11. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    ................................................................................................................. 8 #12;iv Conversion Factors Multiply By To obtain Mass metric ton (t, 1,000 kilograms) million to the emergence of new clean- energy and defense-related technologies, combined with China's decisions to restrict

  12. Design and manufacturing of an ion electrospray propulsion system package and passively-fed propellant supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perna, Louis Evan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellites under 500 kilograms have been growing more popular with the miniaturization of high-performance electronics and instruments. Constellations and formations of satellites consisting of thousands of small satellites ...

  13. albicans critical role: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    240 kilograms of plutonium oxide 5 Standards for Quality and the Coordinating Role of Wine Critics CiteSeer Summary: When product quality matters but is not observable before...

  14. 6 Explorations in Materials Science ICE Materials and Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    plastic weigh boats or other disposable containers kilogram weights, lead sinkers or sealable containers safety goggles hot plate Bunsen burner balance tongs aluminum foil plastic wrap petroleum jelly cotton

  15. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan‘s 2007 primary plastics demand of 107.95 kilograms perChina reaches a lower plastic demand level of 75 kilogramsper capita primary plastics demand was used to estimate per

  16. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Farr, L.L.; Loghry, S.L.; Pitt, W.W.; Gibson, M.R.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new, low-temperature (50 to 60C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 to 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted. In this process, aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid which might function as its own waste form. The process may actually be able to utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nearly nitrate-free ceramic-like product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 55% were obtained for the waste form produced, compared to an expected 35 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data extracted from bench-top studies indicate that the process will be very economical to operate, and data were used to cost a batch, 1,200-kg NO{sub 3}/h plant for working off Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Their total process cost analysis presented in the appendix, indicates that between $2.01 to 2.66 per kilogram of nitrate converted will be required. Additionally, data on the fate of select radioelements present in solution are presented in this report as well as kinetic, operational, and control data for a number of experiments. Additionally, if the ceramic product functions as its own waste form, it too will offer other cost savings associated with having a smaller volume of waste form as well as eliminating other process steps such as grouting.

  17. An MHD heat source based on intermetallic reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadjian, H.; Zavitsanos, P. (General Sciences, Inc., Souderton, PA (United States)); Marston, C.H. (Villanova Univ., PA (United States))

    1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this program was the development of an MHD heat source of potential use in Space - Based Multi Megawatt, MHD Power Systems. The approach is based on extension of high temperature chemical/ion release technology developed by the General Sciences, Incorporated (GSI) team and successfully applied in other Space Applications. Solid state reactions have been identified which can deliver energy densities and electrons in excess of those from high energy explosives as well as other conventional fuels. The use of intermetallic reactions can be used to generate hot hydrogen plasma from the reaction, to create a high level of seedant ionization, can be packaged as a cartridge type fuels for discrete pulses. The estimated weight for energizing a (100 MW - 1000 sec) Pulsed MHD Power System can range from 12 to 25 {times} 10{sup 3} kg depending on reaction system and strength of the magnetic field. The program consisted of two major tasks with eight subtasks designed to systematically evaluate these concepts in order to reduce fuel weight requirements. Laboratory measurements on energy release, reaction product identification and levels of ionization were conducted in the first task to screen candidate fuels. The second task addressed the development of a reaction chamber in which conductivity, temperature and pressure were measured. Instrumentation was developed to measure these parameters under high temperature pulsed conditions in addition to computer programs to reduce the raw data. Measurements were conducted at GSI laboratories for fuel weights of up to 120 grams and at the Franklin Research Center* for fuel weights up to 1 kilogram. The results indicate that fuel weight can be scaled using modular packaging. Estimates are presented for fuel weight requirements. 15 refs.

  18. Application of molten salt oxidation for the minimization and recovery of plutonium-238 contaminated wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wishau, R.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molten salt oxidation (MSO) is proposed as a {sup 238}Pu waste treatment technology that should be developed for volume reduction and recovery of {sup 238}Pu and as an alternative to the transport and permanent disposal of {sup 238}Pu waste to the WIPP repository. In MSO technology, molten sodium carbonate salt at 800--900 C in a reaction vessel acts as a reaction media for wastes. The waste material is destroyed when injected into the molten salt, creating harmless carbon dioxide and steam and a small amount of ash in the spent salt. The spent salt can be treated using aqueous separation methods to reuse the salt and to recover 99.9% of the precious {sup 238}Pu that was in the waste. Tests of MSO technology have shown that the volume of combustible TRU waste can be reduced by a factor of at least twenty. Using this factor the present inventory of 574 TRU drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated wastes is reduced to 30 drums. Further {sup 238}Pu waste costs of $22 million are avoided from not having to repackage 312 of the 574 drums to a drum total of more than 4,600 drums. MSO combined with aqueous processing of salts will recover approximately 1.7 kilograms of precious {sup 238}Pu valued at 4 million dollars (at $2,500/gram). Thus, installation and use of MSO technology at LANL will result in significant cost savings compared to present plans to transport and dispose {sup 238}Pu TRU waste to the WIPP site. Using a total net present value cost for the MSO project as $4.09 million over a five-year lifetime, the project can pay for itself after either recovery of 1.6 kg of Pu or through volume reduction of 818 drums or a combination of the two. These savings show a positive return on investment.

  19. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Third quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.; Shoop, K.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Column flotation represents a significant improvement over conventional flotation for many applications. This improvement consists of increased selectivity between hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles, which allows the column to produce higher-purity products. A schematic of the column used is given in Figure 1. The basic procedure for the flotation column experiments was as follows: 500 grams of the sludge from Plant A (prepared as described in the Second Quarterly Report) was suspended at 40% solids in distilled water, to produce 1600 ml of slurry. Reagents were added, and the slurry was agitated vigorously for 1 minute. Frother was added to all of the water to be added to the column, at a rate of 0.03 grams/liter (approximately 0.4 kilograms per metric ton, Kg/mt). The frother used was Dowfroth 200 (a mixture of polypropylene glycol methyl ethers, with a mean molecular weight of 200). The column was started, all of the water flowrates were set as desired, and the drain valve was closed. As soon as the water level had reached the base of the feed inlet tube (approximately 1 minute after closing the drain valve), the 1600 ml feed slurry was added over a 15 second interval. This allowed the feed to be added to the column with a minimum of disturbance to the froth layer, and without causing either surging of the pulp level or large losses to the sinks product. Flotation was carried out for 9 minutes after closing the drain valve. Froth and sinks products were collected, filtered, dried at 45{degrees}C, weighed, and analyzed by thermogravimetic analysis. It is readily seen that, when no collector is added, the column produces a product that is markedly higher purity than that produced by conventional flotation. The addition of oleic acid collector to the column feed is not able to produce any further improvement in product quality, and only results in a loss of product recovery.

  20. Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to Earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

  1. Numerical simulations of quiet Sun magnetism: On the contribution from a small-scale dynamo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rempel, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a series of radiative MHD simulations addressing the origin and distribution of mixed polarity magnetic field in the solar photosphere. To this end we consider numerical simulations that cover the uppermost 2-6 Mm of the solar convection zone and we explore scales ranging from 2 km to 25 Mm. We study how the strength and distribution of magnetic field in the photosphere and subsurface layers depend on resolution, domain size and boundary conditions. We find that 50% of the magnetic energy at the \\tau=1 level comes from field with the less than 500 G strength and that 50% of the energy resides on scales smaller than about 100 km. While probability distribution functions are essentially independent of resolution, properly describing the spectral energy distribution requires grid spacings of 8 km or smaller. The formation of flux concentrations in the photosphere exceeding 1 kG requires a mean vertical field strength greater than 30-40 G at \\tau=1. The filling factor of kG flux concentrations increase...

  2. HYDROGEN STORAGE SOLUTIONS IN SUPPORT OF DOD WARFIGHTER PORTABLE POWER APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motyka, T.

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    From Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) to cell phones our high-tech world, today, is demanding smaller, lighter weight and higher capacity portable power devices. Nowhere has this personal power surge been more evident than in today's U.S Warfighter. The modern Warfighter is estimated to carry from 65 to 95 pounds of supplies in the field with over 30 pounds of this dedicated to portable power devices. These devices include computer displays, infrared sights, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), night vision and a variety of other sensor technologies. Over 80% of the energy needed to power these devices comes from primary (disposable) batteries. It is estimated that a brigade will consume as much as 7 tons of batteries in a 72 hour mission at a cost of $700,000. A recent comprehensive study on the energy needs of the future warrior published by the National Academy of Science in 2004 made a variety of recommendations for average power systems from 20 to 1,000 watts. For lower power systems recommendations included pursuing science and technology initiatives focused on: (1) 300 watt-hours per kilogram (Wh/kg) secondary battery technologies; (2) smart hybrids; and (3) fuel cells (with greater than 6 wt% hydrogen storage). Improved secondary (rechargeable) batteries may be the ideal solution for military power systems due to their ease of use and public acceptance. However, a 3X improvement in their specific energy density is not likely anytime soon. Today's Lithium Ion batteries, at about 150 Wh/kg, fall well short of the energy density that is required. Future battery technology may not be the answer since many experts do not predict more than a 2X improvement in Lithium battery systems over the next 10 years. That is why most auto companies have abandoned all electric vehicles in favor of fuel cells and hybrid vehicles. Fuel cells have very high specific energy densities but achieving high energy values will depend on the energy density and the storage method of its fuel. Improved methods of safely and efficiently storing larger amounts of hydrogen will be a key development area for portable fuel cell power systems. Despite their high potential energy, fuel cells exhibit low power densities. That is why many systems today are going hybrid. Hybrid systems typically combine low energy and high power components with high energy and low power components. Typical configurations include capacitors and fuel cells or batteries and fuel cells. If done correctly, a hybrid system often can have both high energy and high power density even higher than any of the individual components.

  3. The Coupling of the Numerical Heat Transfer Model of the Pauzhetka Hydrothermal System (Kamchatka, USSR) with Hydroisotopic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiryukhin, A.V.; Sugrobov, V.M.

    1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the two-dimensional numerical heat-transfer model to the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system allowed us to establish that: (1) a shallow magma body with the anomalous temperature of 700-1000 C and with a volume of 20-30 km{sup 3} may be a heat source for the formation of the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system. (2) The water feeding source of the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system may be meteoric waters which are infiltrated at an average rate of 5-10 kg/s {center_dot} km{sup 2}. The coupling of the numerical heat-transfer model with hydroisotopic data (D,T,{sup 18}O) obtained from the results of testing of exploitation wells, rivers and springs is the basis to understand more clearly the position of recharge areas and the structure of water flows in the hydrothermal system.

  4. Aquaculture of Uranium in Seawater by a Fabric-Adsorbent Submerged System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seko, Noriaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Katakai, Akio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Hasegawa, Shin [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Tamada, Masao [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Kasai, Noboru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Takeda, Hayato [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Sugo, Takanobu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Saito, Kyoichi [Chiba University (Japan)

    2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The total amount of uranium dissolved in seawater at a uniform concentration of 3 mg U/m{sup 3} in the world's oceans is 4.5 billion tons. An adsorption method using polymeric adsorbents capable of specifically recovering uranium from seawater is reported to be economically feasible. A uranium-specific nonwoven fabric was used as the adsorbent packed in an adsorption cage 16 m{sup 2} in cross-sectional area and 16 cm in height. We submerged three adsorption cages in the Pacific Ocean at a depth of 20 m at 7 km offshore of Japan. The three adsorption cages consisted of stacks of 52 000 sheets of the uranium-specific non-woven fabric with a total mass of 350 kg. The total amount of uranium recovered by the nonwoven fabric was >1 kg in terms of yellow cake during a total submersion time of 240 days in the ocean.

  5. Analysis of data from electric and hybrid electric vehicle student competitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Hill, N.; Larsen, R.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy sponsored several student engineering competitions in 1993 that provided useful information on electric and hybrid electric vehicles. The electrical energy usage from these competitions has been recorded with a custom-built digital meter installed in every vehicle and used under controlled conditions. When combined with other factors, such as vehicle mass, speed, distance traveled, battery type, and type of components, this information provides useful insight into the performance characteristics of electrics and hybrids. All the vehicles tested were either electric vehicles or hybrid vehicles in electric-only mode, and had an average energy economy of 7.0 km/kwh. Based on the performance of the ``ground-up`` hybrid electric vehicles in the 1993 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Challenge, data revealed a I km/kwh energy economy benefit for every 133 kg decrease in vehicle mass. By running all the electric vehicles at a competition in Atlanta at several different constant speeds, the effects of rolling resistance and aerodynamic drag were evaluated. On average, these vehicles were 32% more energy efficient at 40 km/h than at 72 km/h. The results of the competition data analysis confirm that these engineering competitions not only provide an educational experience for the students, but also show technology performance and improvements in electric and hybrid vehicles by setting benchmarks and revealing trends.

  6. The growth and survival of brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) and blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) in ponds receiving heated bay water from an electric power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Robert Andrew

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In the 6 month experiment survival was 3-27/G, growth was 15. 8-18. 5 mm per month, yields were 7. 8-80. 5 kg per ha (6. 9-71. 0 pounds per acre), and food conversion rates were 32. 1-328. 0 g of feed per gram increase of crab. Eleven 0. 1-ha ponds were... separating the north ends of Galveston Bay and Trinity Bay, draws cooling water from the former via Cedar Bayou and an intake canal and discharges it into Trinity Bay through a 9. 8 km (6. 1 mile) canal (Fig. 1). Prior to Z7 April 1972 the discharge canal...

  7. Computer controlled feed delivery system for feed trucks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Gregory Alan

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 11. 2 km/h (7 mph), a delivery rate of 13. 3 kg/m (9 Ibs/ft) and a constant cross-sectional area of 4. 1 m~ (44 ft~), the floor chains must move the feed to the dispersing cylinders at a rate of 1. 66 m/min (5. 46 fpm). This rate exceeds... proportional directional control valve (Continental Hydraulics model EDO3M and model ECM-3-L2-A-X-A, Figures 12 and 13, respectively). AMPLIFIER CARD OP-AMP S PROPORTIONAL CONTROL VALVE GRCLND SPEED SENSOR Figure 9. Schematic drawing of the bed...

  8. Effects of zinc smelter emissions on farms and gardens at Palmerton, PA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaney, R.L.; Beyer, W.N.; Gifford, C.H.; Sileo, L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, before the primary Zn smelter at Palmerton was closed due to excessive Zn and Cd emissions and change in the price of Zn, we were contacted by a local veterinarian regarding death of foals on farms near the smelter. To examine whether Zn or Cd contamination of forage or soils could be providing potentially toxic levels of Zn or other elements in the diets of foals, we measured metals in forages, soils, and feces of grazing livestock on two farms near Palmerton. The farms were about 2.5 and about 10 km northeast of the East stack. Soils, forages, and feces were greatly increased in Zn and Cd. Soil, forage, and fecal Zn were near 1000 mg/kg and Cd, 10-20 mg/kg at farm A (2.5) compared to normal background levels of 43 mg Zn and 0.2 mg Cd/kg, respectively. Liver and kidney of cattle raised on Farm A were increased in Zn and Cd, indicating that at least part of the Zn and Cd in smelter contaminated forages was bioavailable. During the farm sampling, we obtained soil from one garden in Palmerton within 200 m of the primary (West) smelter. The Borough surrounds the smelter facility in a valley. Because soil Cd was near 100 mg/kg, we sampled garden soils and vegetables from over 40 gardens in 6 randomly selected blocks and in rural areas at different distances from the smelter during September, 1980.

  9. Coilgun Launcher for Nanosatellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turman, B.N.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanosatellite space launches could significantly benefit from an electrically powered launch complex, based on an electromagnetic coil launcher. This paper presents results of studies to estimate the required launcher parameters and some fixed facility issues. This study is based on electromagnetic launch, or electromagnetic gun technology, which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. A baseline configuration for analysis considers a payload mass of 10 kg, launch velocity of 6 km/s, a second stage solid booster for orbital insertion, and a payload fraction of about 0.1. The launch facility is envisioned as an inclined track, 1-2 km in length, mounted on a hillside at 25 degrees aimed in the orbital inclination of interest. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 2000 MJ and 2 MW electric. This energy would be supplied by 400 modules of energy storage and magnetic coils. With a prime power generator of 2 MW, a launch rate of some 200 satellites per day is possible. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened to launch acceleration on the order of 1000 gee. Parametric evaluations compare performance parameters for a launcher length of 1-2 km, exit velocity of 4-8 km/s, and payloads of 1-100 kg. The EM launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turn-around time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. Most importantly, such a facility could reduce the cost per launch and could give true launch-on-demand capability for nanosatellites.

  10. Assessment of mercury emissions from the Afton copper smelter, British Columbia, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, J.D.; Price, C.J.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The afton Copper Smelter adjacent to Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada commenced operation in 1978 and employed a mercury scrubbing system. Two years of preproduction studies, which included monitoring for mercury in ambient air, water, soil, and vegetation were performed. The results from similar studies conducted during four full years (1978-81) and two partial years (1982-83) of production are presented in the data analysis. These programs illustrated that the most frequent ground impingement occurred within a 1.6-3.2-km radius of the source, and that the levels decreased with increasing distance from the source to a maximum radius of 8 km. The results of a comprehensive source monitoring program illustrated that the average mercury emission levels ranged from 3.2 to 6.8 kg/calendar day during 1979-81, and that the majority of the emissions were in a vapor form. The ambient monitoring data acquired when smelter operations were significantly reduced indicate a quick recovery to preproduction levels in virtually all monitored parameters and at most monitored sites. The integrated results from all mercury monitoring programs illustrate the environmental impact from mercury emissions which were two to four times the permit standard of 1.8 kg/day.

  11. Modifications and Applications of the HERMES model: June - October 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaugh, J E

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) model has been developed to describe the response of energetic materials to low-velocity mechanical stimulus, referred to as HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response) or BVR (Burn to Violent Reaction). For tests performed with an HMX-based UK explosive, at sample sizes less than 200 g, the response was sometimes an explosion, but was not observed to be a detonation. The distinction between explosion and detonation can be important in assessing the effects of the HE response on nearby structures. A detonation proceeds as a supersonic shock wave supported by the release of energy that accompanies the transition from solid to high-pressure gas. For military high explosives, the shock wave velocity generally exceeds 7 km/s, and the pressure behind the shock wave generally exceeds 30 GPa. A kilogram of explosive would be converted to gas in 10 to 15 microseconds. An HEVR explosion proceeds much more slowly. Much of the explosive remains unreacted after the event. Peak pressures have been measured and calculated at less than 1 GPa, and the time for the portion of the solid that does react to form gas is about a millisecond. The explosion will, however, launch the confinement to a velocity that depends on the confinement mass, the mass of explosive converted, and the time required to form gas products. In many tests, the air blast signal and confinement velocity are comparable to those measured when an amount of explosive equal to that which is converted in an HEVR is deliberately detonated in the comparable confinement. The number of confinement fragments from an HEVR is much less than from the comparable detonation. The HERMES model comprises several submodels including a constitutive model for strength, a model for damage that includes the creation of porosity and surface area through fragmentation, an ignition model, an ignition front propagation model, and a model for burning after ignition. We have used HERMES in computer simulations of US and UK variants of the Steven Test. We have recently improved some of the submodels, and report those developments here, as well as the results of some additional applications.

  12. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Obi

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Closure Report (CR) is to provide documentation of the completed corrective action and to provide data confirming the corrective action. The corrective action was performed following the approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 1999b) and consisted of closure-in-place with partial excavation, disposal, backfilling, administrative controls, and post-closure monitoring. Soil with petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations above the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) Action Level of 100 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996) was removed to a depth of 1.5 meters (m) (5 feet [ft]). The excavations were backfilled with clean fill to restore the site and to prevent contact with deeper, closed-in-place soil that exceeded the NDEP Action Level. According to the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE, 1998), the Mercury Fire Training Pit was used from approximately 1965 to the early 1990s to train fire-fighting and emergency response personnel at the NTS and encompasses an area approximately 85 by 115 m (280 by 380 ft). The location of the Mercury Fire Training Pit is shown in Figure 1 and a site plan is shown in Figure 2. The Mercury Fire Training Pit formerly included a bermed bum pit with four small bum tanks; four large above ground storage tanks (ASTS); an overturned bus, a telephone pole storage area; and several areas for burning sheds, pallets, and cables. During the active life of the Mercury Fire Training Pit, training events were conducted at least monthly and sometimes as often as weekly. Fuels burned during these events included off-specification or rust-contaminated gasoline, diesel, and aviation fuel (JP-4). Other items burned during these events included paint, tires, a pond liner, wood, paper, cloth, and copper cable. Approximately 570 liters (L) (150 gallons [gal]) of fuel were used for each training event resulting in an approximate total of 136,000 L (36,000 gal) of fuel used over the life of the Mercury Fire Training Pit. Unburned fuel was allowed to pool on the ground and was left to eventually volatilize or soak into the soil. In addition, fuels from the ASTS and fuels and fluids from the overturned bus leaked or spilled onto the ground. Approximately 19 L to 38 L (5 to 10 gal) of paint were also burned monthly until sometime in the 1970s.

  13. H:\\Brochures\\HowtoUse02\\How-To-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forbidden 5 kg... 25 kg... 15 kg..... 25 kg..... 100 kg... B A A 13, 75, 106 13, 25, 106 ... STEP 3 DETERMINE PACKAGING STEP 4 LABELING STEP 1...

  14. U.S. Department of the Interior December 2012 U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Greens Creek Mine in Alaska because the Silver Shaft at the Lucky Friday Mine was undergoing). References Cited Coeur d'Alene Mines Corp., 2012, Coeur reports third quarter financial and operating results@usgs.gov Internet: http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals SILVER IN SEPTEMBER 2012 U.S. mines produced 81,400 kilograms

  15. Performance oriented packaging testing of nine Mk 3 Mod 0 signal containers in PPP-B-621 wood box for packing group II solid hazardous materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libbert, K.J.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PPP-B-621 wood box containing nine Mk 3 Mod 0 Signal containers was tested for conformance to Performance Oriented Packaging criteria established by Code of Federal Regulations Title 49 CFR. The container was tested with a gross weight of 123.3 pounds (56 kilograms) and met all requirements.

  16. The Office Air Handling Unit versus the Two Dedicated Air Handling Unit System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, L.; Liu, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both analytical and the numerical methods have been developed to compares the energy performance of the OAHU systems and the two-AHU (TAHU) system. The OAHU system saves up to 1.85 kilojoules heating energy for each kilogram air supplied...

  17. 204 BULLETIN OF TRE UNITEII sfrxrnsFISTI coxaiissIoN. red flesh and are delicious eating. The growth of lhis ish in a place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it passes from a weight of S gmms to S kilograms [$ ounce to 153 pouurls: about], jucreasing a tliousaucl Rhiiid carp and those of Montreuil-sur-lder are highly esteemccl, viliile those of the Lot River pass in big boxes for f'i.01~two to tliree weeks in running river mfer, so as to be rid of` the muddy taste

  18. Detoxification of Organophosphate Nerve Agents by Immobilized Escherichia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    et al., 1989). In the United States over 40 million kilograms of organo- phosphate pesticides, in ap- proximately 100 min, at a specific rate of 0.160 mM min-1 (g cell dry wt)-1 . The immobilized with mus- cular responses, and in vital organs produces serious symp- toms and eventually death (Donarski

  19. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production from Existing Nuclear Power Plants Using Alkaline Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana R. Swalla

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The mid-range industrial market currently consumes 4.2 million metric tons of hydrogen per year and has an annual growth rate of 15% industries in this range require between 100 and 1000 kilograms of hydrogen per day and comprise a wide range of operations such as food hydrogenation, electronic chip fabrication, metals processing and nuclear reactor chemistry modulation.

  20. Licensed fuel facility status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, D.; Brown, C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NRC is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facilities inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of high enriched uranium, low enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233.

  1. Licensed fuel facility status report: Inventory difference data, July 1, 1994--June 30, 1995. Volume 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, D.R.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facility inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material.

  2. Licensed fuel facility status report. Inventory difference data, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992: Volume 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, D.; Brown, C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NRC is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facilities inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of high enriched uranium, low enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233.

  3. Licensed fuel facility status report: Inventory difference data, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1991. Volume 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NRC is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facilities inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of high enriched uranium, low enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233.

  4. THE RISK OF NUCLEAR TERRORISM AND NEXT STEPS TO REDUCE THE DANGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Breach at Necsa on 08 November 2007," Nuclear Energy Corporation of South Africa, 13 November 2007 nuclear facility in South Africa, where hundreds of kilograms of weapon-grade highly enriched uranium (HEU, and then disappeared through the same hole they had cut in the fence. No one on either team was shot or captured. South

  5. News | At Guelph http://www.uoguelph.ca/atguelph/08-10-08/newsharvesting.shtml 1 of 2 10/17/08 7:06 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    grains, food and feed. Raizada will pay for $1,000 worth of the company's storage bags to be sent will be awarded to GrainPro Inc., a Massachusetts-based company whose products -- from 10-kilogram grain sacks, they found a university student who is building energy windmills in his native Malawi. They also found one

  6. REVIEW ARTICLE Guowei CAI, Ben M. CHEN, Tong H. LEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmei, Chen

    a brief review on the historical development of the rotorcraft unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs integration, aerodynamic modeling and automatic flight control system involved in constructing the unmanned with a payload of a few tens of kilograms. Characterized by unique features such as relatively low cost, small

  7. SR -1419 Final Report PREDICTING MOTION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Alan

    ) Unclassified 21. No. of Pages 22. Price #12;vi CONVERSION FACTORS (Approximate conversions to metric measures.................................................................... III TECHNICAL REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE ...................................V CONVERSION FACTORS.2291 foot pounds kilogram meters divide by 7.23285 foot pounds Newton meters multiply by 1.35582 ENERGY foot

  8. Deploying a Sensor Network in an Extreme Environment K.Martinez, P.Padhy, A.Elsaify, G.Zou, A.Riddoch, J.K. Hart*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    powerful distributed processing but many services, such as storage, for sensor networks [6]. This type inside glaciers. This paper describes the solutions to power management, radio communications and other (including small sub- kilogram intelligent tele-robots) [1], aeroplanes [10] and micro-submarines [13

  9. 2009 Guidelines to Defra / DECC's GHG Conversion Factors for Company Reporting Produced by AEA for the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , emissions factors have only been provided for CO2. The 2009 update provides emissions factors for the non-CO to landfill) into kilograms of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2eq). Carbon dioxide equivalent is a universal and refrigeration have been added. v. International electricity emission factors have been added Major changes

  10. Site-specific analysis of glycosylated proteins using mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irungu, Janet W.

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in Telsa, m in kilograms, r in meters, q in Coulombs, and v in meters per second. 25, 28, 30 As shown from equation 2, the cyclotron frequency is inversely proportional to the mass-to-charge ratio (m/q or m/z). All ions of the same m/q rotate...

  11. 24Meteorite Compositions: A matter of density Most people have heard about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the solar system. The above meteorite sample is called the Esquel Pallasite, and was part of a 1000 kilogram was the mass of each of the two ingredients to the pallasite? Problem 2 - Meteorite collectors find and sell Problem 2 - Meteorite collectors find and sell samples by the gram. The price of a gram of the Esquel

  12. Plasma acceleration from radio-frequency discharge in dielectric capillary A. Dunaevskya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1063/1.2214127 Electric propulsion devices for spacecraft with masses of several tens of kilograms are in increasing, weight, and dimensions. Saturation and thermal load on the magnetic system limit miniaturization had only an efficiency of 6% at 100 W consumed power.4 Pulsing propulsion de- vices such as pulsed

  13. The agreement gives the go-ahead for work to start

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . But the rewards, if Iter can be made to work successfully, are extremely attractive. Investment costs One kilogram judged and irresponsible." The European Commission said the investment costs were justified, explaining reactor will take around eight years to build. The EU is to foot about 50% of the cost to build

  14. Revised: 6 November 1991 Trends in the Consumption of Energy-Intensive Basic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised: 6 November 1991 Trends in the Consumption of Energy-Intensive Basic Materials on the consumption, rather than production, of materials. Earlier analyses of trends in basic materials consumption materials consumption patterns on energy use is the recognition that physical units (kilograms) are more

  15. Volume 118 (2013) http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/jres.118.016 Journal of Research of the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Institute of Standards and Technology 353 The New Kilogram Definition and its Implications for High and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 patrick.abbott@nist.gov zeina.kubarych@nist.gov The SI unit of mass (or practicability) of scientific metrology is useless. For instance, specifying a chronometer

  16. Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-110 Heel Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, William S.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-110 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, the sample solids were primarily white to light-brown with minor dark-colored inclusions. The maximum dimension of the majority of the solids was <2 mm; however, numerous pieces of aggregate, microcrystalline, and crystalline solids with maximum dimensions ranging from 5-70 mm were observed. In general, the larger pieces of aggregate solids were strongly cemented. Natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}?19H{sub 2}O] was the dominant solid phase identified in the heel solids. Results of chemical analyses suggested that 85-87 wt% of the heel solids were the fluoridephosphate double salt. The average bulk density measured for the heel solids was 1.689 g/mL; the reference density of natrophosphate is 1.71 g/mL. Dissolution tests on composite samples indicate that 94 to 97 wt% of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids can be retrieved by dissolution in water. Dissolution and recovery of the soluble components in 1 kg (0.59 L) of the heel solids required the addition of ≈9.5 kg (9.5 L) of water at 15 ?C and ≈4.4 kg (4.45 L) of water at 45 ?C. Calculations performed using the Environmental Simulation Program indicate that dissolution of the ≈0.86 kg of natrophosphate in each kilogram of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids would require ≈9.45 kg of water at 15 ?C and ≈4.25 kg of water at 45 ?C. The slightly larger quantities of water determined to be required to retrieve the soluble components in 1 kg of the heel solids are consistent with that required for the dissolution of solids composed mainly of natrophosphate with a major portion of the balance consisting of highly soluble sodium salts. At least 98% of the structural water, soluble phosphate, sodium, fluoride, nitrate, carbonate, nitrite, sulfate, oxalate, and chloride in the test composites was dissolved and recovered in the dissolution tests. Most of the {sup 99}Tc and {sup 137}Cs present in the initial heel solids composites was removed in the water dissolution tests. The estimated activities/weights of {sup 129}I, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, and {sup 238}U in the dry residual solids were <25% of the weights/activities in the initial composite solids. Gibbsite and nordstrandite [both Al(OH){sub 3}] were the major solid phases identified in the solids remaining after completion of the dissolution tests. Chemical analysis indicated that the residual solids may have contained up to 62 wt% Al(OH){sub 3}. Significant quantities of unidentified phosphate-, iron-, bismuth-, silicon-, and strontium- bearing species were also present in the residual solids. The reference density of gibbsite (and nordstrandite) is 2.42 g/mL. The measured density of the residual solids, 2.65 g/mL, would be a reasonable value for solids containing gibbsite as the major component with minor quantities of other, higher density solids. Sieve analysis indicated that 22.2 wt% of the residual solids were discrete particles >710 μm in size, and 77.8 wt% were particulates <710 μm in size. Light-scattering measurements suggested that nearly all of the <710-μm particulates with diameters >12 μm were weakly bound aggregates of particles with diameters <2 μm. The <710-μm residual solids settled very slowly when dispersed in reagent water. The physical appearance of a suspension containing ≈0.4 vol% of the solids in pure water changed very little over a period of 46.5 hours. It should be noted that the distribution of particle sizes in the residual solids and the observed settling behavior were both strongly influenced by the procedures followed in the dissolution tests.

  17. Comparative Metabolism of Carbon Tetrachloride in Rats, Mice and Hamsters Using Gas Uptake and PBPK Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thrall, Karla D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Vucelick, Mark E. (FLUOR HANFORD, INC); Gies, Richard A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Zangar, Richard C. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Weitz, Karl K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Poet, Torka S. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Springer, David L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Grant, Donna M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Benson, Janet M. (Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute)

    2000-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    No study has comprehensively compared the rate of metabolism of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) across species. Therefore, the in vivo metabolism of CCl4 was evaluated using groups of male animals (F344 rats, B6C3F1 mice, and Syrian hamsters) exposed to 40-1800 ppm CCl4 in a closed, recirculating gas-uptake system. For each species, an optimal fit of the family of uptake curves was obtained by adjusting Michaelis-Menten metabolic constants Km (affinity) and Vmax (capacity) using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The results show that the mouse has a slightly higher capacity and lower affinity for metabolizing CCl4 compared to the rat, while the hamster has a higher capacity and lower affinity than either rat or mouse. A comparison of the Vmax to Km ratio, normalized for mg of liver protein (L/hr/mg) across species indicates that hamsters metabolize more CCl4 than either rats or mice, and should be more susceptible to CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. These species comparisons were evaluated against toxicokinetic studies conducted in animals exposed by nose-only inhalation to 20 ppm 14C-labeled CCl4 for 4 hours. The toxicokinetic study results are consistent with the in vivo rates of metabolism, with rats eliminating less radioactivity associated with metabolism (14CO2 and urine/feces) and more radioactivity associated with the parent compound (radioactivity trapped on charcoal) compared to either hamsters or mice. The in vivo metabolic constants determined here, together with in vitro constants determined using rat, mouse, hamster and human liver microsomes, were used to estimate human in vivo metabolic rates of 1.49 mg/hr/kg body weight and 0.25 mg/L for Vmax and Km, respectively. Normalizing the rate of metabolism (Vmax/Km) by mg liver protein, the rate of metabolism of CCl4 differs across species, with hamster > mouse& > rat > human.

  18. Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathenson, M.; Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nehring, N.L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Raft River area of Idaho contains a geothermal system of intermediate temperatures (approx. = 150/sup 0/C) at depths of about 1.5 km. Outside of the geothermal area, temperature measurements in three intermediate-depth drill holes (200 to 400 m) and one deep well (1500 m) indicate that the regional conductive heat flow is about 2.5 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/ sec or slightly higher and that temperature gradients range from 50/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/C/km in the sediments, tuffs, and volcanic debris that fill the valley. Within and close to the geothermal system, temperature gradients in intermediate-depth drill holes (100 to 350 m) range from 120/sup 0/ to more than 600/sup 0/C/km, the latter value found close to an artesian hot well that was once a hot spring. Temperatures measured in three deep wells (1 to 2 km) within the geothermal area indicate that two wells are in or near an active upflow zone, whereas one well shows a temperature reversal. Assuming that the upflow is fault controlled, the flow is estimated to be 6 liter/sec per kilometer of fault length. From shut-in pressure data and the estimated flow, the permeability times thickness of the fault is calculated to be 2.4 darcy m. Chemical analyses of water samples from old flowing wells, recently completed intermediate-depth drill holes, and deep wells show a confused pattern. Geothermometer temperatures of shallow samples suggest significant re-equilibration at temperatures below those found in the deep wells. Silica geothermometer temperatures of water samples from the deep wells are in reasonable agreement with measured temperatures, whereas Na-K-Ca temperatures are significantly higher than measured temperatures. The chemical characteristics of the water, as indicated by chloride concentration, are extremely variable in shallow and deep samples. Chloride concentrations of the deep samples range from 580 to 2200 mg/kg.

  19. COMET 169P/NEAT(=2002 EX{sub 12}): THE PARENT BODY OF THE {alpha}-CAPRICORNID METEOROID STREAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasuga, Toshihiro; Wiegert, Paul A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Balam, David D., E-mail: tkasuga@uwo.c [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council Canada, Government of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jupiter-family comet 169P/NEAT (previously known as asteroid 2002 EX{sub 12}) has a dynamical association with the {alpha}-Capricornid meteoroid stream. In this paper, we present photometric observations of comet 169P/NEAT to further investigate the physical characters of its disintegration state related to the stream. The comet shows a point-like surface brightness profile limiting contamination due to coma emission to {approx}4% at most, indicating no evidence of outgassing. An upper limit on the fraction of the surface that could be sublimating water ice of <10{sup -4} is obtained with an upper limit to the mass loss of {approx}10{sup -2} kg s{sup -1}. The effective radius of nucleus is found to be 2.3 {+-} 0.4 km. Red filter photometry yields a rotational period of 8.4096 {+-} 0.0012 hr, and the range of the amplitude 0.29 {+-} 0.02 mag is indicative of a moderately spherical shape having a projected axis ratio {approx}1.3. The comet shows redder colors than the Sun, being compatible with other dead comet candidates. The calculated lost mass per revolution is {approx}10{sup 9} kg. If it has sustained this mass loss over the estimated 5000 yr age of the {alpha}-Capricornid meteoroid stream, the total mass loss from 169P/NEAT ({approx}10{sup 13} kg) is consistent with the reported stream mass ({approx}10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} kg), suggesting that the stream is the product of steady disintegration of the parent at every return.

  20. Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS), established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly the Nevada Test Site) that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The initial NCNS project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment at the NNSS (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks at the Climax stock in northern Yucca Flat. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The data will be used to improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. The first SPE-N test (SPE-N-1) was a “calibration” shot conducted in May 2011, using 100 kilograms (kg) of explosives at the depth of 54.9 meters (m) (180 feet [ft]) in the U-15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m (150 ft) in the same source hole. Following the SPE-N-2 test, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The desire was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast side, where the core hole penetrated it. The three-dimensional shape and symmetry of the damage zone are unknown at this time. Rather than spherical in shape, the dimensions of the damage zone could be influenced by the natural fracture sets in the vicinity. Geologic characterization of the borehole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for laboratory tests (to be reported by SNL). A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the U-15n#10 angle core hole between the drilled depths of 149 and 155 ft (straight-line distance or range station [RS] from the shot point of 7.5 to 5.7 m). However, several of the fractures observed in the U-15n#10 hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. These fractures are characterized by a “fresh,” mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets. The most distant fracture from the shot point that could be interpreted as having been caused by the explosion was seen at approximately RS 10.0 m. No other possibly explosion-induced fractures are apparent above the fault, but are common starting at RS 5.4 m, which is below the fault. It is unknown how the fault zone might have affected the propagation of seismic waves or how the materials in the fault zone (altered granite, breccia, gouge) were affected by the explosion. From RS 3.3 m to the end of the recovered core at RS 1.6 m, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing.

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 561: Waste Disposal Areas, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 561 comprises 10 CASs: (1) 01-19-01, Waste Dump; (2) 02-08-02, Waste Dump and Burn Area; (3) 03-19-02, Debris Pile; (4) 05-62-01, Radioactive Gravel Pile; (5) 12-23-09, Radioactive Waste Dump; (6) 22-19-06, Buried Waste Disposal Site; (7) 23-21-04, Waste Disposal Trenches ; (8) 25-08-02, Waste Dump; (9) 25-23-21, Radioactive Waste Dump; and (10) 25-25-19, Hydrocarbon Stains and Trench. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 561 with no further corrective action. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the DQO process: (1) Determine whether COCs are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: (1) No contamination exceeding FALs was identified at CASs 01-19-01, 03-19-02, 05-62-01, 12-23-09, and 22-19-06. (2) The surface and subsurface soil within the burn area at CAS 02-08-02 contains arsenic and lead above the FALs of 23 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and 800 mg/kg, respectively. The surface and subsurface soil within the burn area also contains melted lead slag (potential source material [PSM]). The soil within the waste piles contains polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) above the FALs. The contamination within the burn area is spread throughout the area, as it was not feasible to remove all the PSM (melted lead), while at the waste piles, the contamination is confined to the piles. (3) The surface and subsurface soils within Trenches 3 and 5 at CAS 23-21-04 contain arsenic and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) above the FALs of 23 mg/kg and 0.74 mg/kg, respectively. The soil was removed from both trenches, and the soil that remains at this CAS does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. Lead bricks and counterweights were also removed, and the soil below these items does not contain contamination that exceeds the FAL for lead. (4) The concrete-like material at CAS 25-08-02 contains arsenic above the FAL of 23 mg/kg. This concrete-like material was removed, and the soil that remains at this CAS does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. Lead-acid batteries were also removed, and the soil below the batteries does not contain contamination that exceeds the FAL for lead. (5) The surface soils within the main waste dump at the posted southern radioactive material area (RMA) at CAS 25-23-21 contain cesium (Cs)-137 and PCBs above the FALs of 72.9 picocuries per gram (pCi/g) and 0.74 mg/kg, respectively. The soil was removed from the RMA, and the soil that remains at this CAS does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. (6) The surface and subsurface soils at CAS 25-25-19 do not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. In addition, lead bricks were removed, and the soil below these items does not contain contamination that exceeds the FAL for lead. The following best management practices were implemented: (1) Housekeeping debris at CASs 02-08-02, 23-21-04, 25-08-02, 25-23-21, and 25-25-19 was removed and disposed of; (2) The open trenches at CAS 23-21-04 were backfilled; (3) The waste piles at CAS 25-08-02 were removed and the area leveled to ground surface; and (4) The remaining waste piles at the main waste dump at CAS 25-23-21 were leveled to ground surface. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: (1) No further action for CASs 01-19-01, 03-19-02, 05-62-01, 12-23-09, and 22-19-06; (2) Closure in place with an FFACO use restriction (UR) at CAS 02-08-02 for the remaining PAH-, arsenic-, and lead-contaminated soil, and the melted lead PSM. The UR form and map have been filed in the NNSA/NSO Facility Information Management System, the FFACO database, and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files; (3) No further corrective action at CAS 23-21-04, as the lead bricks and counterweights (PSM) have been removed, and the COCs of arsenic and PCBs in soil have be

  2. Plans and Aspirations for Sensor and Platform Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    Petrol ~ 12 500 Watt Hours per kg Glucose ~ 4 450 Watt Hours per kg Fuel Cell Reactants Wh/kg · Metal

  3. The Discovery and History of the Dalgaranga Meteorite Crater, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dalgaranga meteorite crater, 100 km northeast of Yalgoo, Western Australia, was one of the first impact structures identified in Australia, the smallest isolated crater found in Australia, and the only confirmed crater in the world associated with a mesosiderite projectile. 17 years passed before the Dalgaranga meteorites were described in the scientific literature and nearly 40 years passed before a survey of the structure was published. The reasons for the time-gap were never explained and a number of factual errors about the discovery and early history remain uncorrected in the scientific literature. Using historical and archival documents, and discussions with people involved in Dalgaranga research, the reasons for this time gap are explained by a series of minor misidentifications and coincidences. The age of the crater has yet to be determined, but using published data, we estimate the projectile mass to be 500-1000 kg.

  4. Chemistry and dynamics of SF6 injections into the F region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhardt, P.A.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemistry of SF6 vapor reacting in the F region is critically examined. The SF6 molecule dissociatively attaches an electron, producing the SF5 ion. Reaction between an ambient O ion and the SF5 yields mutual neutralization. During the neutralization process, an electronically excited oxygen atom, O( D), may be produced which will subsequently emit a 630.0-nm photon. A release of 20 kg of SF6 into an ambient O ion concentration of 10V cm T at 300-km altitude is considered. The 630.0-nm airglow intensity may increase following the release. The negative ion plasma is shown to be marginally unstable to a gradient drift instability. 37 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

  5. Grazing practices as a major factor in fire occurrence in the longleaf pine region of southeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David Adair

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    c-~ &~a Ferne' eZ ~ oZ ~y 3Yi Rk il OTBBti Km~~lmC' ~ HeL~ ~ak IR4~~~ ~~~~, ~~In@ PQ1~. ~)XX' +&&3y AC 5~3, ~ Mu, 1C'3 SQ~ $72~~ $6Vy ~ ~, ~i. 8 N3g539 5K4%$ @, '6~ Ms"'~. QJ'$ Q 64o9 'i%3. Q ~gQ, '~z" y~k~Kg ~~699 cX8@PX3 99... which the GbudF could. nob have betsE made e The writer wishes to ~atefEEilF aclmowledge assistance rendered to him bF members of Chs Soil Conservat9on Service, Produc&on Karket9ng 9Edministxationx Texas kgricul:bural Extension Servicex Vocational 9...

  6. A New Paradigm in Space Based Experiments Using Rubber Balloons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Palit, Sourav; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Mondal, Sushanta; Bhattacharyya, Arnab; Middya, Susanta; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indian Centre for Space Physics is engaged in long duration balloon borne experiments with typical payloads less than ~ 3kg. Low cost rubber balloons are used. In a double balloon system, the booster balloon lifts the orbiter balloon to its cruising altitude where data is taken for a long time. Here we present results of muon detections and recent solar activities, including the light curves and flare spectra in the 20-100keV range. We not only show that we have successfully obtained several flares and there spectra at different altitudes, we also found that the high energy X-ray flux of strong flares at altitudes of 10-13 km (the flight altitude of commercial planes) could be more than the contribution due to cosmic rays.

  7. Is dark energy an artifact of decoherence?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Fields

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the quantum Darwinist framework introduced by W. H. Zurek ({\\em Nat. Phys.}, 5:181-188, 2009), observers obtain pointer-state information about quantum systems by interacting with the surrounding environment, e.g. the ambient photon field. This framework is applied to the observation of stellar center-of-mass positions, which are assumed to be encoded in a way that is uniformly accessible to all observers regardless of their location. Assuming Landauer's Principle, constructing such environmental encodings requires $\\sim$ kT per bit. For 10$^{25}$ stars and a binary encoding of center-of-mass positions into (10 km)$^{3}$ voxels, the free energy required at T = 2.7 K is $\\sim$ 5 $\\cdot$ 10$^{-27}$ kg $\\cdot$ m$^{-3}$, in striking agreement with the observed value of $\\Omega_{\\Lambda} \\rho_{c}$. Decreasing the voxel size to $l_{P}^{3}$ results in a free energy requirement 10$^{117}$ times larger.

  8. Is dark energy an artifact of decoherence?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fields, Chris

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the quantum Darwinist framework introduced by W. H. Zurek ({\\em Nat. Phys.}, 5:181-188, 2009), observers obtain pointer-state information about quantum systems by interacting with the surrounding environment, e.g. the ambient photon field. This framework is applied to the observation of stellar center-of-mass positions, which are assumed to be encoded in a way that is uniformly accessible to all observers regardless of their location. Assuming Landauer's Principle, constructing such environmental encodings requires $\\sim$ kT per bit. For 10$^{25}$ stars and a binary encoding of center-of-mass positions into 10 km$^{3}$ voxels, the free energy required at T = 2.7 K is $\\sim$ 5 $\\cdot$ 10$^{-27}$ kg $\\cdot$ m$^{-3}$, in striking agreement with the observed value of $\\Omega_{\\Lambda} \\rho_{c}$. Decreasing the voxel size to $l_{P}^{3}$ results in a free energy requirement 10$^{117}$ times larger.

  9. 2003 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; November 2003; v. 31; no. 11; p. 969972; 3 figures. 969

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Audrey D.

    abruptly across the margin over a distance of 50 km, from 35 km beneath the Black Warrior foreland basin

  10. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's petrochemical facilities 1 km to 8 km distant. Such episodes produced sharp increases in all three species

  11. Modellierung Mariner kosysteme am Beispiel der Ostsee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rostock, Universität

    (60km³/Jahr) Flusswassereintrag 480 km³/Jahr Mittlere Tiefe = 52 m Dars.-Schwelle=18 m Volumen= 21000

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - atropine methyl bromide Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methyl nitrate, Sigma-Aldrich, 05 mg kg bolus, followed by 025 mg kg h infusion i... -Aldrich), 5 mg kg bolus i.v. followed by 5 mg kg h continuous infusion...

  13. Historical deposition and fluxes of mercury in Narraguinnep Reservoir, southwestern Colorado,USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, John E.; Fey, David L.; Holmes, Charles W.; Lasorsa, Brenda K.

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Narraguinnep Reservoir has been identified as containing fish with elevated Hg concentrations and has been posted with an advisory recommending against consumption of fish. There are presently no point sources of significant Hg contamination to this reservoir or its supply waters. To evaluate potential historical Hg sources and deposition of Hg to Narraguinnep Reservoir, the authors measured Hg concentrations in sediment cores collected from this reservoir. The cores were dated by the 137Cs method and these dates were further refined by relating water supply basin hydrological records with core sedimentology. Rates of historical Hg flux were calculated (ng/cm(2)/a) based on the Hg concentrations in the cores, sediment bulk densities, and sedimentation rates. The flux of Hg found in Narraguinnep Reservoir increased by approximately a factor of 2 after about 1970. The 3 most likely sources of Hg to Narraguinnep Reservoir are surrounding bedrocks, upstream inactive Au/Ag mines, and several coal-fired electric power plants in the Four Corners region. Patterns of Hg flux do not support dominant Hg derivation from surrounding bedrocks or upstream mining sources. There are 14 coal-fired power plants within 320 km of Narraguinnep Reservoir that produce over 80 x 10(6) MWH of power and about 1640 kg-Hg/a are released through stack emissions, contributing significant Hg to the surrounding environment. Two of the largest power plants, located within 80 km of the reservoir, emit about 950 kg-Hg/a. Spatial and temporal patterns of Hg fluxes for sediment cores collected from Narraguinnep Reservoir suggest that the most likely source of Hg to this reservoir is from atmospheric emissions from the coal-fired electric power plants, the largest of which began operation in this region in the late-1960s and early 1970s.

  14. Arsenic and cadmium exposure in children living near a smelter complex in San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz-Barriga, F.; Santos, M.A.; Mejia, J.J.; Batres, L.; Yanez, L.; Carrizales, L.; Vera, E.; del Razo, L.M.; Cebrian, M.E. (Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this study was to assess environmental contamination by arsenic and cadmium in a smelter community (San Luis Potosi City, Mexico) and its possible contribution to an increased body burden of these elements in children. Arsenic and cadmium were found in the environment (air, soil, and household dust, and tap water) as well as in the urine and hair from children. The study was undertaken in three zones: Morales, an urban area close to the smelter complex; Graciano, an urban area 7 km away from the complex; and Mexquitic, a small rural town 25 km away. The environmental study showed that Morales is the most contaminated of the zones studied. The range of arsenic levels in soil (117-1396 ppm), dust (515-2625 ppm), and air (0.13-1.45 micrograms/m3) in the exposed area (Morales) was higher than those in the control areas. Cadmium concentrations were also higher in Morales. Estimates of the arsenic ingestion rate in Morales (1.0-19.8 micrograms/kg/day) were equal to or higher than the reference dose of 1 microgram/kg/day calculated by the Environmental Protection Agency. The range of arsenic levels in urine (69-594 micrograms/g creatinine) and hair (1.4-57.3 micrograms/g) and that of cadmium in hair (0.25-3.5 micrograms/g) indicated that environmental exposure has resulted in an increased body burden of these elements in children, suggesting that children living in Morales are at high risk of suffering adverse health effects if exposure continues.

  15. Service robotics Prof. Alessandro De Luca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    -mining · PEMEX lightweight anti-personnel mine detector (EPFL, Lausanne) · weight: 16 kg, max 6 kg for wheel

  16. 2008 Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - Imports and Exports Last updated: Jun-05 Total emissions (kg CO2) Total electricity produced Total heat produced kg CO2/kWh elecricity Total emissions (kg CO2) Total electricity produced Total heat produced kg CO2/kWh heat Emissions (in kgCO2) per kWh electricity = twice total emissions (in kgCO2) twice total

  17. Guidelines to Defra's GHG conversion factors for company reporting Annexes updated June 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Exports Last updated: Jun-05 Total emissions (kg CO2) Total electricity produced Total heat produced kg CO2/kWh elecricity Total emissions (kg CO2) Total electricity produced Total heat produced kg CO2/kWh heat Emissions (in kgCO2) per kWh electricity = twice total emissions (in kgCO2) twice total

  18. Texas Hydrogen Highway Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase - Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitchcock, David

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas Hydrogen Highway project has showcased a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus and hydrogen fueling infrastructure that was designed and built through previous support from various public and private sector entities. The aim of this project has been to increase awareness among transit agencies and other public entities on these transportation technologies, and to place such technologies into commercial applications, such as a public transit agency. The initial project concept developed in 2004 was to show that a skid-mounted, fully-integrated, factory-built and tested hydrogen fueling station could be used to simplify the design, and lower the cost of fueling infrastructure for fuel cell vehicles. The approach was to design, engineer, build, and test the integrated fueling station at the factory then install it at a site that offered educational and technical resources and provide an opportunity to showcase both the fueling station and advanced hydrogen vehicles. The two primary technology components include: Hydrogen Fueling Station: The hydrogen fueling infrastructure was designed and built by Gas Technology Institute primarily through a funding grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. It includes hydrogen production, clean-up, compression, storage, and dispensing. The station consists of a steam methane reformer, gas clean-up system, gas compressor and 48 kilograms of hydrogen storage capacity for dispensing at 5000 psig. The station is skid-mounted for easy installation and can be relocated if needed. It includes a dispenser that is designed to provide temperaturecompensated fills using a control algorithm. The total station daily capacity is approximately 50 kilograms. Fuel Cell Bus: The transit passenger bus built by Ebus, a company located in Downey, CA, was commissioned and acquired by GTI prior to this project. It is a fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle which is ADA compliant, has air conditioning sufficient for Texas operations, and regenerative braking for battery charging. It uses a 19.3 kW Ballard PEM fuel cell, will store 12.6 kg of hydrogen at 350 Bar, and includes a 60 kWh battery storage system. The objectives of the project included the following: (a) To advance commercialization of hydrogen-powered transit buses and supporting infrastructure; (b) To provide public outreach and education by showcasing the operation of a 22-foot fuel cell hybrid shuttle bus and Texas first hydrogen fueling infrastructure; and (c) To showcase operation of zero-emissions vehicle for potential transit applications. As mentioned above, the project successfully demonstrated an early vehicle technology, the Ebus plug-in hybrid fuel cell bus, and that success has led to the acquisition of a more advanced vehicle that can take advantage of the same fueling infrastructure. Needed hydrogen station improvements have been identified that will enhance the capabilities of the fueling infrastructure to serve the new bus and to meet the transit agency needs. Over the course of this project, public officials, local government staff, and transit operators were engaged in outreach and education activities that acquainted them with the real world operation of a fuel cell bus and fueling infrastructure. Transit staff members in the Dallas/Ft. Worth region were invited to a workshop in Arlington, Texas at the North Central Texas Council of Governments to participate in a workshop on hydrogen and fuel cells, and to see the fuel cell bus in operation. The bus was trucked to the meeting for this purpose so that participants could see and ride the bus. Austin area transit staff members visited the fueling site in Austin to be briefed on the bus and to participate in a fueling demonstration. This led to further meetings to determine how a fuel cell bus and fueling station could be deployed at Capital Metro Transit. Target urban regions that expressed additional interest during the project in response to the outreach meetings and showcase events include San Antonio and Austin, Texas. In summary, the project objectives wer

  19. Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

  20. Life Cycle Assessment of Gasoline and Diesel Produced via Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, D. D.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a life cycle assessment (LCA) estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and net energy value (NEV) of the production of gasoline and diesel from forest residues via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing, from production of the feedstock to end use of the fuel in a vehicle, is performed. The fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating and hydrocracking processes are based on a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) design report. The LCA results show GHG emissions of 0.142 kg CO2-equiv. per km traveled and NEV of 1.00 MJ per km traveled for a process using grid electricity. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis shows a range of results, with all values better than those of conventional gasoline in 2005. Results for GHG emissions and NEV of gasoline and diesel from pyrolysis are also reported on a per MJ fuel basis for comparison with ethanol produced via gasification. Although pyrolysis-derived gasoline and diesel have lower GHG emissions and higher NEV than conventional gasoline does in 2005, they underperform ethanol produced via gasification from the same feedstock. GHG emissions for pyrolysis could be lowered further if electricity and hydrogen are produced from biomass instead of from fossil sources.

  1. The beryllium hollow-body solar sail: exploration of the Sun's gravitational focus and the inner Oort Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory L. Matloff; Roman Ya. Kezerashvili; Claudio Maccone; Les Johnson

    2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Spacecraft kinematics, peak perihelion temperature and space environment effects during solar-radiation-pressure acceleration for a beryllium hollow-body interstellar solar sail inflated with hydrogen fill gas are investigated. We demonstrate that diffusion is alleviated by an on-board fill gas reserve and electrostatic pressure can be alleviated by increasing perihelion distance. For a 0.1 AU perihelion, a 937 m radius sail with a sail mass of 150 kg and a payload mass of 150 kg, perihelion sail temperature is about 1000 K, peak acceleration is about 0.6 g, and solar-system exit velocity is about 400 km/s. After sail deployments, the craft reaches the 200 AU heliopause in 2.5 years, the Sun's inner gravitational focus at 550 AU in about 6.5 years and 2,550 AU in 30 years. The Be hollow-body sail could be applied in the post 2040 time frame to verify general relativity predictions regarding the Sun's inner gravitational focus and to explore particles and fields in the Sun's inner Oort Comet Cloud.

  2. Hot Spring Monitoring at Lassen Volcanic National Park, California 1983-1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, Michael L.

    1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Data collected on several occasions between 1983 and 1985 as part of a hydrologic monitoring program by the U.S. Geological Survey permit preliminary estimation of the natural variability in the discharge characteristics of hydrothermal features in Lassen Volcanic National Park and the Lassen KGRA in northern California. The total rate of discharge of high-chloride hot springs along Mill Creek and Canyon Creek in the Lassen KGRA has averaged 20.9 {+-} 1.7 L/s, based on seven measurements of the flux of chloride in these streams. Measured chloride flux does not appear to increase with streamflow during the spring-summer snowmelt period, as observed at Yellowstone and Long Valley Caldera. The corresponding fluxes of arsenic in Mill Creek and Canyon Creek decrease within distances of about 2 km downstream from the hot springs by approximately 30%, most likely due to chemical absorption on streambed sediments. Within Lassen Volcanic National Park, measurements of sulfate flux in streams draining steam-heated thermal features at Sulphur Works and Bumpass Hell have averaged 7.5 {+-} 1.0 and 4.0 {+-} 1.5 g/s, respectively. Calculated rates of steam upflow containing, dissolved H{sub 2}S to supply these sulfate fluxes are 1.8 kg/s at Sulphur Works and 1.0 kg/s at Bumpass Hell.

  3. Optimization of a CNG series hybrid concept vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.; Perkins, L.J.; Haney, S.W.; Flowers, D.L.

    1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) has favorable characteristics as a vehicular fuel, in terms of fuel economy as well as emissions. Using CNG as a fuel in a series hybrid vehicle has the potential of resulting in very high fuel economy (between 26 and 30 km/liter, 60 to 70 mpg) and very low emissions (substantially lower than Federal Tier II or CARB ULEV). This paper uses a vehicle evaluation code and an optimizer to find a set of vehicle parameters that result in optimum vehicle fuel economy. The vehicle evaluation code used in this analysis estimates vehicle power performance, including engine efficiency and power, generator efficiency, energy storage device efficiency and state-of-charge, and motor and transmission efficiencies. Eight vehicle parameters are selected as free variables for the optimization. The optimum vehicle must also meet two perfect requirements: accelerate to 97 km/h in less than 10 s, and climb an infinitely long hill with a 6% slope at 97 km/h with a 272 kg (600 lb.) payload. The optimizer used in this work was originally developed in the magnetic fusion energy program, and has been used to optimize complex systems, such as magnetic and inertial fusion devices, neutron sources, and mil guns. The optimizer consists of two parts: an optimization package for minimizing non-linear functions of many variables subject to several non-linear equality and/or inequality constraints and a programmable shell that allows interactive configuration and execution of the optimizer. The results of the analysis indicate that the CNG series hybrid vehicle has a high efficiency and low emissions. These results emphasize the advantages of CNG as a near-term alternative fuel for vehicles.

  4. SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS Autumn Semester MECHANICS 2 hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the mass of the Sun in kilograms. (4 marks) (d) Show that the total energy is E = - 1 2 GMm r , that is(t), kinetic energy T and specific angular momentum h, given by T = 1 2 m r · r, h = r × r, where r dr of kinetic energy due to the force is T = F · r. (4 marks) (ii) (a) Show that the change in kinetic energy

  5. Pesticide fate in an aboveground disposal system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderglas, Brian Richard

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineers, 1979). Prior to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976. , little attention had been given to pesticide waste solutions leading to careless and dangerous disposal practices. Rinsate and washwaters were rarely collected... health as well as to livestock and crops and other vegetation in the affected area. Recent amendments (1984) to RCRA's federal regulations require that pesticide users who generate more than one hundred kilograms per month of acutely hazardous wastes...

  6. Axion Dark Matter Detection using Atomic Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sikivie

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark matter axions may cause transitions between atomic states that differ in energy by an amount equal to the axion mass. Such energy differences are conveniently tuned using the Zeeman effect. It is proposed to search for dark matter axions by cooling a kilogram-sized sample to milliKelvin temperatures and count axion induced transitions using laser techniques. This appears an appropriate approach to axion dark matter detection in the $10^{-4}$ eV mass range.

  7. Conducting polymers as potential active materials in electrochemical supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudge, A.; Davey, J.; Raistrick, I.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ferraris, J.P. [Texas Univ., Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronically,conducting polymers represent an interesting class of materials for use in electrochemical capacitors because of the combination of high capacitive energy density and low materials cost. Three generalized types of electrochemical capacitors can be constructed using conducting polymers as active material, and in the third of these, which utilizes conducting polymers that can be both n- and p-doped, energy densities of up to 40 watt-hours per kilogram of active material on both electrodes have been demonstrated.

  8. Conducting polymers as potential active materials in electrochemical supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudge, A.; Davey, J.; Raistrick, I.; Gottesfeld, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Ferraris, J.P. (Texas Univ., Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronically,conducting polymers represent an interesting class of materials for use in electrochemical capacitors because of the combination of high capacitive energy density and low materials cost. Three generalized types of electrochemical capacitors can be constructed using conducting polymers as active material, and in the third of these, which utilizes conducting polymers that can be both n- and p-doped, energy densities of up to 40 watt-hours per kilogram of active material on both electrodes have been demonstrated.

  9. Light-water reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning the reference PWR reactor system; once-through, low-enrichment uranium-235 fuel, 30 MWD per kilogram (PWR LEU(5)-OT); once-through, low-enrichment, high-burnup uranium fuel (PWR LEU(5)-Mod OT); self-generated plutonium spiked recycle (PWR LEU(5)-Pu-Spiked Recycle); denatured uranium-233/thorium cycle (PWR DU(3)-Th Recycle DU(3)); and plutonium/thorium cycle (Pu/ThO/sub 2/ Burner).

  10. Dawn at Vesta Press Kit/JULY 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    .c.brown@nasa.gov Washington, DC Jia-Rui Cook/Priscilla Vega Dawn Mission 818-354-0850/4-1357 Jet Propulsion Laboratory, jccook-gain antenna is 5 feet (1.52 meters) in diameter. When the solar arrays are deployed, Dawn's wingspan is 64.6 kilograms) hydrazine propellant Power: Two 27-foot-by-8-foot (8.3-meter-by- 2.3-meter) solar panels

  11. Process for the synthesis of aliphatic alcohol-containing mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greene, M.I.; Gelbein, A.P.

    1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the synthesis of mixtures which include saturated aliphatic alcohols is disclosed. In the first step of the process, the first catalyst activation stage, a catalyst, which comprises the oxides of copper, zinc, aluminum, potassium and one or two additional metals selected from the group consisting of chromium, magnesium, cerium, cobalt, thorium and lanthanum, is partially activated. In this step, a reducing gas stream, which includes hydrogen and at least one inert gas, flows past the catalyst at a space velocity of up to 5,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. The partially activated catalyst is then subjected to the second step of the process, second-stage catalyst activation. In this step, the catalyst is contacted by an activation gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide present in a volume ratio of 0.5:1 and 4:1, respectively, at a temperature of 200 to 450 C and a pressure of between 35 and 200 atmospheres. The activation gas flows at a space velocity of from 1,000 to 20,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. Second-stage activation continues until the catalyst is contacted with at least 500,000 liters (STP) of activation gas per kilogram of catalyst. The fully activated catalyst, in the third step of the process, contacts a synthesis gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  12. Process for the synthesis of aliphatic alcohol-containing mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greene, Marvin I. (Oradell, NJ); Gelbein, Abraham P. (Morristown, NJ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the synthesis of mixtures which include saturated aliphatic alcohols is disclosed. In the first step of the process, the first catalyst activation stage, a catalyst, which comprises the oxides of copper, zinc, aluminum, potassium and one or two additional metals selected from the group consisting of chromium, magnesium, cerium, cobalt, thorium and lanthanum, is partially activated. In this step, a reducing gas stream, which includes hydrogen and at least one inert gas, flows past the catalyst at a space velocity of up to 5,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. The partially activated catalyst is then subjected to the second step of the process, second-stage catalyst activation. In this step, the catalyst is contacted by an activation gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide present in a volume ratio of 0.5:1 and 4:1, respectively, at a temperature of 200.degree. to 450.degree. C. and a pressure of between 35 and 200 atmospheres. The activation gas flows at a space velocity of from 1,000 to 20,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. Second-stage activation continues until the catalyst is contacted with at least 500,000 liters (STP) of activation gas per kilogram of catalyst. The fully activated catalyst, in the third step of the process, contacts a synthesis gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 560 comprises seven corrective action sites (CASs): •03-51-01, Leach Pit •06-04-02, Septic Tank •06-05-03, Leach Pit •06-05-04, Leach Bed •06-59-03, Building CP-400 Septic System •06-59-04, Office Trailer Complex Sewage Pond •06-59-05, Control Point Septic System The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 560 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 7, 2008, through February 24, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and Record of Technical Change No. 1. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: •Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. •If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. •Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 560 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. The following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: •No contamination exceeding the FALs was identified at CASs 03-51-01, 06-04-02, and 06-59-04. •The soil at the base of the leach pit chamber at CAS 06-05-03 contains arsenic above the FAL of 23 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) above the FAL of 0.74 mg/kg, confined vertically from a depth of approximately 5 to 20 feet (ft) below ground surface. The contamination is confined laterally to the walls of the leach pit chamber and leach rock. The contamination present at CAS 06-05-03 within the leach pit was not feasible to remove. •The surface and subsurface soils within and surrounding the septic system at CAS 06-05-04 contained PCB concentrations above the FAL of 0.74 mg/kg. The lateral and vertical extent of COCs was determined for this CAS. Contaminated soils were removed up to within 18 ft of the building. The remaining contamination is confined to subsurface soils adjacent to and beneath Building CP-162 and was not feasible to remove. •The solid materials within the septic tank and soils immediately surrounding the inlet end of the tank at CAS 06-59-03 contained benzo(a)pyrene above the FAL of 0.21 mg/kg. The soils, tank contents, and tank were removed. Materials remaining at this CAS do not contain contamination exceeding FALs. •The solids contained within the septic tank and inlet pipe at CAS 06-59-05 contained the following contaminants above their respective FALs: PCBs, arsenic, lead, benzo(a)pyrene, and pesticides. The tank and inlet pipe contents were removed. Materials remaining at this CAS do not contain contamination exceeding FALs. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) provides the following corrective action recommendations: •No further action for CASs 03-51-01, 06-04-02, and 06-59-04, as no contaminants of potential concern were present that exceed FALs. •Closure in place for CAS 06-05-03 under a corrective action with a use restriction (UR) for remaining PCB- and arsenic-impacted potential source material (PSM). The UR form and map have been filed in the NNSA/NSO Facility Information Management System, the FFACO database, and NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. •Closure in place for CAS 06-05-04 under a corrective action with a UR for remaining PCBs in soil adjacent to and beneath Building CP-162. The UR form and map have been filed in the NNSA/NSO Facility Information Management System, the FFACO database, and NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. •No further action for CAS 06-59-0

  14. GLASS FORMULATION TESTING TO INCREASE SULFATE INCORPORATION - Final Report VSL-04R4960-1, Rev 0, 2/28/05, Vitreous State Laboratory, The Catholic University of American, Washington, D.C.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently in storage in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed of in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product will be directed to the national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The Office of River Protection is currently examining options to optimize the Low Activity Waste (LAW) facility and the LAW glass waste form. One option under evaluation is to enhance the waste processing rate of the vitrification plant currently under construction. It is likely that the capacity of the LAW vitrification plant can be increased incrementally by implementation of a variety of low-risk, high-probability changes, either separately or in combination. These changes include: (1) Operating at the higher processing rates demonstrated at the LAW Pilot Melter; (2) Increasing the glass pool surface area within the existing external melter envelope; (3) Increasing plant availability; (4) Increasing the glass waste loading; (5) Removing sulfate from the LAW stream; (6) Operating the melter at slightly higher temperature; (7) Installing the third LAW melter into the WTP plant; and (8) Other smaller impact changes. The melter tests described in this report utilized blended feed (glass formers plus waste simulant) prepared by Optima Chemicals according to VSL specifications. Sufficient feed was prepared to produce over nineteen hundred kilograms of glass during melter tests. The nominal reductant concentration (stoichiometric ratio of 0.5 {approx} 1 mole sucrose per 16 mole NOx or 3 mole carbon per 4 mole NOx) was maintained in all the tests by the addition of sugar at VSL. The DM 10 was used to screen the optimized glass formulation with two alternative aluminum sources (kyanite and zeolite) over a wide range of target sulfur concentrations. Subsequently, based on the DM10 results, nine 12- to 34-hour DM100 tests were conducted; six with kyanite as the aluminum additive at glass sulfur concentrations ranging from 0.75 to 1.5 wt.% SO{sub 3}, and the other three with zeolite as the aluminum additive at glass sulfur concentrations ranging from 0.75 to 1.5 wt. % SO{sub 3}. The DM 100-WV melter was used in order to provide a direct comparison with the LAW tests previously conducted on the same melter. Key operating parameters such as glass temperature and production rate were held constant to investigate the sulfur incorporation into the glass and the effects of varying the aluminum additive source. The bubbling rate was adjusted to achieve a production rate of 2000 kg/m{sup 2}/day with a near-complete cold cap (90-100% of melt surface covered with feed). Quantitative measurements of glass production rates, melter operating conditions (temperatures, pressures, power, flows, etc.), and off-gas characteristics (NOx, SO{sub 2}, CO, particulate load and composition, and acid gases) were made for each test. Glass samples taken from the glass pool and the discharge chamber were inspected throughout testing to determine the limit of salt-free operation in the melter.

  15. December 31, 2003 Contents of NARR output AWIPS GRIB files

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ] * Potential temp. [K] Precipitation rate [kg/m^2/s] * Categorical snow [yes=1;no=0] * Categorical ice pellets * Snow phase-change heat flux [W/m^2] accum * Evaporation [kg/m^2] accum * Potential evaporation [kg/m^2/s] u wind [m/s] v wind [m/s] Cloud water [kg/kg] Ice mixing ratio [kg/kg] Turbulent Kinetic Energy [J

  16. Non-nuclear power sources for deep space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennel, E.B.; Tang, C.; Santarius, J.F.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric propulsion and non-nuclear power can be used in tandem as a replacement for the current chemical booster and radioisotope thermoelectric generators now in use for deep space applications (i.e., to the asteroid belt and beyond). In current generation systems, electric propulsion is usually considered to be impractical because of the lack of high power for deep space, and non-nuclear power is thought to be impractical partly due to its high mass. However, when taken in combination, a solar powered electric upper stage can provide ample power and propulsion capability for use in deep space. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) systems have generally been selected for missions only when other systems are absolutely unavailable. The disadvantages of radioisotopes include the need for nuclear safety as another dimension of concern in payload integration; the lack of assured availability of plutonium in the post-cold-war world; the enormous cost of plutonium-238; and the system complexity introduced by the need to continuously cool the system during the pre-launch phase. A conservative estimate for the total power for the solar array at beginning of life (BOL) may be in the range of 25 kW in order to provide 500 W continuous power at Jupiter. The availability of {approximately} 25 kW(e) in earth orbit raises the interesting possibility of coupling electric propulsion units to this free electric power. If electric propulsion is used to raise the probe from low-earth-orbit to an earth-escape trajectory, the system could actually save on low-earth orbit mass. Electric propulsion could be used by itself in a spiral trajectory orbit raising maneuver to earth escape velocity, or it could be used in conjunction with a chemical upper stage (either solid rocket or liquid), which would boost the payload to an elliptical orbit. The concept is to begin the Earth-Jupiter trip with a swing-by near the Sun close to the orbit of Venus and perhaps even closer if thermal loads can be tolerated. During the solar swing-by, much more power will be produced by the solar panels, allowing the spacecraft's velocity to be increased significantly. The outbound leg of the journey can, therefore, be made much more quickly than with the classical trajectory. For the purposes of a Jupiter mission, it is assumed that 20 km/sec total delta-v would be required. For a payload envelope of 17,304 kg, a 1,900 sec Isp capability means that 11,386 kg of propellant would have to be consumed, leaving 5,917 kg for the mass of the probe plus dry mass of the upper stage. The thruster subsystem would require 765 kg of thruster subsystem mass, and probably less. Assuming tanks, regulators and valves amount to 10% of the propellant mass (very likely a pessimistic assumption), it is possible to assign a mass of 1,150 kg for the tankage subsystem. This results in a mass allowance of at least 4,000 kg for the probe. This compares favorably with the dry mass of 1,637 kg for Galileo, for example, and suggests that more than adequate margin exists. If the payload margin is used for battery storage, flyby missions to the outer planets may be possible.

  17. Atmospheric Mercury Concentrations Near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir - Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. L. Abbott

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elemental and reactive gaseous mercury (EGM/RGM) were measured in ambient air concentrations over a two-week period in July/August 2005 near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir, a popular fishery located 50 km southwest of Twin Falls, Idaho. A fish consumption advisory for mercury was posted at the reservoir in 2002 by the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. The air measurements were part of a multi-media (water, sediment, precipitation, air) study initiated by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 to identify potential sources of mercury contamination to the reservoir. The sampling site is located about 150 km northeast of large gold mining operations in Nevada, which are known to emit large amounts of mercury to the atmosphere (est. 2,200 kg/y from EPA 2003 Toxic Release Inventory). The work was co-funded by the Idaho National Laboratory’s Community Assistance Program and has a secondary objective to better understand mercury inputs to the environment near the INL, which lies approximately 230 km to the northeast. Sampling results showed that both EGM and RGM concentrations were significantly elevated (~ 30 – 70%, P<0.05) compared to known regional background concentrations. Elevated short-term RGM concentrations (the primary form that deposits) were likely due to atmospheric oxidation of high EGM concentrations, which suggests that EGM loading from upwind sources could increase Hg deposition in the area. Back-trajectory analyses indicated that elevated EGM and RGM occurred when air parcels came out of north-central and northeastern Nevada. One EGM peak occurred when the air parcels came out of northwestern Utah. Background concentrations occurred when the air was from upwind locations in Idaho (both northwest and northeast). Based on 2003 EPA Toxic Release Inventory data, it is likely that most of the observed peaks were from Nevada gold mine sources. Emissions from known large natural mercury sources in that area cannot account for the observed EGM peaks due to their diffuse source geometry and the large (170 km) transport distance involved. The EGM peak originating from northwestern Utah air may be from three known mercury sources west of Salt Lake City (Kennecott, US Magnesium, Clean Harbors Aragonite) and/or the 1600 MW coal-fired Intermountain Power plant near Delta. However, the relative importance of these short-term peaks for long-term watershed mercury loading (critical factor affecting fish concentrations) is not known, and there is a need to better quantify the annual frequency and magnitude of these different inputs over a longer period of time.

  18. Nutritive evaluation of two native north Texas legumes (Strophostyles) for goats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Jamie Lee

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , 497 g kg-1 NDF), or cottonseed meal (506 g kg-1 CP, 352 g kg-1 NDF; CSM) upon intake of CBG hay (127 g kg-1 CP, 691 g kg-1 NDF) and apparent digestibility of dietary organic matter (OM), NDF, and true digestibility of CP. Six Boer-Spanish goats (46...

  19. CIVL 498C -LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF UBC BUILDINGS THE BUCHANAN BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . / kg / ft2 . The eutrophication potential was found to be 0.00 kg N eq. / kg / ft2 . The ozone impact on the eutrophication potential of the Buchanan building. An operating energy analysis was also

  20. EFFECT OF GYPSUM ON AVAILABLE PHOSPHORUS EVALUATED BY MEHLICH-1, ION EXCHANGE RESIN, AND Pi-PAPER IN A BRAZILIAN TROPICAL OXISOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Rodrigo Coqui da; Chien, Sen Hsuing; Prochnow, Luís Ignácio

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pure gypsum Source average Phosphate Rock (100 mg kg -1 P)Pure gypsum Source average Phosphate Rock (100 mg kg -1 P) bPure gypsum Source average Phosphate Rock (100 mg kg -1 P)

  1. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  2. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

    2013-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  3. The Critical Density and the Effective Excitation Density of Commonly Observed Molecular Dense Gas Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optically thin critical densities and the effective excitation densities to produce a 1 K km/s (or 0.818 Jy km/s $(\\frac{\

  4. Evaluation of Management of Water Release for Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lere, Mark E. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Missoula, MT)

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baseline fisheries and habitat data were gathered during 1983 and 1984 to evaluate the effectiveness of supplemental water releases from Painted Rocks Reservoir in improving the fisheries resource in the Bitterroot River. Discharge relationships among main stem gaging stations varied annually and seasonally. Flow relationships in the river were dependent upon rainfall events and the timing and duration of the irrigation season. Daily discharge monitored during the summers of 1983 and 1984 was greater than median values derived at the U.S.G.S. station near Darby. Supplemental water released from Painted Rocks Reservoir totaled 14,476 acre feet in 1983 and 13,958 acre feet in 1984. Approximately 63% of a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release of supplemental water conducted during April, 1984 was lost to irrigation withdrawals and natural phenomena before passing Bell Crossing. A similar loss occurred during a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release conducted in August, 1984. Daily maximum temperature monitored during 1984 in the Bitterroot River averaged 11.0, 12.5, 13.9 and 13.6 C at the Darby, Hamilton, Bell and McClay stations, respectively. Chemical parameters measured in the Bitterroot River were favorable to aquatic life. Population estimates conducted in the Fall, 1983 indicated densities of I+ and older rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were significantly greater in a control section than in a dewatered section (p < 0.20). Numbers of I+ and older brown trout (Salmo trutta) were not significantly different between the control and dewatered sections (p > 0.20). Population and biomass estimates for trout in the control section were 631/km and 154.4 kg/km. In the dewatered section, population and biomass estimates for trout were 253/km and 122.8 kg/km. The growth increments of back-calculated length for rainbow trout averaged 75.6 mm in the control section and 66.9mm in the dewatered section. The growth increments of back-calculated length for brown trout averaged 79.5 mm in the control section and 82.3mm in the dewatered section. Population estimates conducted in the Spring, 1984 indicated densities of mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni) greater than 254 mm in total length were not significantly different between the control and dewatered sections (p > 0.20). Young of the year rainbow trout and brown trout per 10m of river edge electrofished during 1984 were more abundant in the control section than the dewatered section and were more abundant in side channel habitat than main channel habitat. Minimum flow recommendations obtained from wetted perimeter-discharge relationships averaged 8.5m{sup 3}/sec in the control section and 10.6m{sup 3}/sec in the dewatered section of the Bitterroot River. The quantity of supplemental water from Painted Rocks Reservoir needed to maintain minimum flow recommendations is discussed in the Draft Water Management Plan for the Proposed Purchase of Supplemental Water from Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana (Lere 1984).

  5. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1996 Site Environmental Report Vol. II Data Appendix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4,4‘-DDE 9/12/96 ND 1 mg/kg 4,4‘-DDT 9/12/96 ND 1 mg/kg 4,6-4,4‘-DDE 9/18/96 ND .1 mg/kg 4,4‘-DDT 9/18/96 ND .1 mg/kg 4-DDE 9/12/96 ND .5 mg/kg 4,4’-DDT 9/12/96 ND .5 mg/kg 4,6-

  6. Ariany > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 9,92 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,006 Kg Durada: 93 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 1,21 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat.120'13 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 1.915,23 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,18 Kg Temps acumulat: 12,71 dies

  7. Santa Eugnia > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    : 4'14 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 4,64 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,003 Kg Durada: 56 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,64 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Despesa per any3 : 1.458'69 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 1.631,72 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,00 Kg

  8. Alar > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 5,44 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,003 Kg Durada: 52 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,64 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat.712,13 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 1.915,23 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,18 Kg Temps acumulat: 12,71 dies

  9. Maria de la Salut > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    '38 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 9,38 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,006 Kg Durada: 83 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 1,21 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públic.951'17 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 3.301,25 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 2,03 Kg Temps acumulat: 20,29 dies

  10. (en transport pblic) Temps total del trajecte: 123 minuts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 13,96 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,009 Kg Durada: 123 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 1,52 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat.392'96 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 4.914,07 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 3,02 Kg Temps acumulat: 30,07 dies

  11. Sller > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 3,33 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,002 Kg Durada: 26 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,64 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat.047,55 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 1.171,82 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,72 Kg Temps acumulat: 6,36 dies

  12. Lloret de Vistalegre > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    ,50 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 7,27 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,004 Kg Durada: 65min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,91 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públic.286'59 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 2.557,84 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,57 Kg Temps acumulat: 15,89 dies

  13. Puigpunyent > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 2,74 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,002 Kg Durada: 50 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,64 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat'70 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 963,91 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,59 Kg Temps acumulat: 12,22 dies

  14. Banyalbufar > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 3,40 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,002 Kg Durada: 35 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,64 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat.070'08 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 1.197,02 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,74 Kg Temps acumulat: 8,56 dies

  15. Sant Lloren des Cardassar > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    : 10'61 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 11,87 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,007 Kg Durada: 108 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 1,52 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Despesa per any3 : 3.734'02 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 4.176,96 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 2,57 Kg

  16. Bger > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 7,79 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,005 Kg Durada: 80 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,91 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat.449'92 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 2.740,54 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,68 Kg Temps acumulat: 19,56 dies

  17. Consell > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    ,30 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 4,81 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,003 Kg Durada: 47 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,64 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públic.515'01 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 1.694,73 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,04 Kg Temps acumulat: 11,49 dies

  18. Fornalutx > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 4,51 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,003 Kg Durada: 46 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,64 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat.188,35 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 1.587,62 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,98 Kg Temps acumulat: 11,24 dies

  19. Selva > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 7,23 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,004 Kg Durada: 74 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,91 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat.275'33 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 2.545,24 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,56 Kg Temps acumulat: 18,09 dies

  20. Estellencs > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 4,69 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,003 Kg Durada: 50 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,91 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat.475'58 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 1.650,63 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,01 Kg Temps acumulat: 12,22 dies

  1. (en transport pblic) Temps total del trajecte: 40 minuts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 3,78 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,002 Kg Durada: 40 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 1,90 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat.188,35 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 1.329,32 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,82 Kg Temps acumulat: 9,78 dies

  2. Algaida > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    : 4,455 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 5,32 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,003 Kg Durada: 55 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,63 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Despesa per any3 : 1.568,16 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 1.871,13 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,15 Kg

  3. Campanet > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 7,79 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,005 Kg Durada: 80 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,91 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat.449'92 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 2.740,54 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,68 Kg Temps acumulat: 19,56 dies

  4. Llub > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 7,86 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,005 Kg Durada: 77 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,91 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat.472'45 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 2.765,74 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,70 Kg Temps acumulat: 18,82dies

  5. Costitx > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 7,79 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,005 Kg Durada: 84 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,91 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat.449'92 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 2.740,54 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,68 Kg Temps acumulat: 20,53 dies

  6. Sencelles > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    ,93 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 5,51 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,003 Kg Durada: 79 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,91 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públic.734'66 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 1.940,43 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,19 Kg Temps acumulat: 19,31 dies

  7. Mancor de la Vall > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    '32 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 7,07 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,004 Kg Durada: 82 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,91 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públic.224'64 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 2.488,54 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,53 Kg Temps acumulat: 20,04 dies

  8. Valldemossa > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 1,88 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,001 Kg Durada: 12 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 1,90 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat,,40 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 661,51 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,41 Kg Temps acumulat: 2,93 dies

  9. Esporles > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    addicionals (CO2): 1,59 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,001 Kg Durada: 15 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,64 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públicTransport privat'25 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 560,71 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,34 Kg Temps acumulat: 3,67 dies

  10. Sant Joan > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    ,90 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 7,71 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,005 Kg Durada: 81 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 0,91 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públic.427'39 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 1.915,23 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 1,18 Kg Temps acumulat: 19,80 dies

  11. Son Servera > UIB (en transport pblic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    '66 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 13,05 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0,008 Kg Durada: 123 min. Cost mitjà del viatge2 : 1,52 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport públic : 4105'73 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 4.592,77 Kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 2,82 Kg Temps acumulat

  12. Relationship of adiposity to the population distribution of plasma triglyceride concentrations in vigorously active men and women

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Paul T.

    2002-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Context and Objective: Vigorous exercise, alcohol and weight loss are all known to increase HDL-cholesterol, however, it is not known whether these interventions raise low HDL as effectively as has been demonstrated for normal HDL. Design: Physician-supplied medical data from 7,288 male and 2,359 female runners were divided into five strata according to their self-reported usual running distance, reported alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference. Within each stratum, the 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles for HDL-cholesterol were then determined. Bootstrap resampling of least-squares regression was applied to determine the cross-sectional relationships between these factors and each percentile of the HDL-cholesterol distribution. Results: In both sexes, the rise in HDL-cholesterol per unit of vigorous exercise or alcohol intake was at least twice as great at the 95th percentile as at the 5th percentile of the HDL-distribution. There was also a significant graded increase in the slopes relating exercise (km run) and alcohol intake to HDL between the 5th and the 95th percentile. Men's HDL-cholesterol decreased in association with fatness (BMI and waist circumference) more sharply at the 95th than at the 5th percentile of the HDL-distribution. Conclusions: Although exercise, alcohol and adiposity were all related to HDL-cholesterol, the elevation in HDL per km run or ounce of alcohol consumed, and reduction in HDL per kg of body weight (men only), was least when HDL was low and greatest when HDL was high. These cross-sectional relationships support the hypothesis that men and women who have low HDL-cholesterol will be less responsive to exercise and alcohol (and weight loss in men) as compared to those who have high HDL-cholesterol.

  13. Beam-powered lunar rover design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, J.E.; Coomes, E.P.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M.; Chiu, M.A.; Dodge, R.E.; Wise, J.A.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manned exploration of our nearest neighbors in the solar systems is the primary goal of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). An integral part of any manned lunar or planetary outpost will be a system for manned excursions over the surface of the planet. This report presents a preliminary design for a lunar rover capable of supporting four astronauts on long-duration excursions across the lunar landscape. The distinguishing feature of this rover design is that power is provided to rover via a laser beam from an independent orbiting power satellite. This system design provides very high power availability with minimal mass on the rover vehicle. With this abundance of power, and with a relatively small power-system mass contained in the rover, the vehicle can perform an impressive suite of mission-related activity. The rover might be used as the first outpost for the lunar surface (i.e., a mobile base). A mobile base has the advantage of providing extensive mission activities without the expense of establishing a fixed base. This concept has been referred to as Rove First.'' A manned over, powered through a laser beam, has been designed for travel on the lunar surface for round-trip distances in the range of 1000 km, although the actual distance traveled is not crucial since the propulsion system does not rely on energy storage. The life support system can support a 4-person crew for up to 30 days, and ample power is available for mission-related activities. The 8000-kg rover has 30 kW of continuous power available via a laser transmitter located at the Earth-moon L1 libration point, about 50,000 km above the surface of the moon. This rover, which is designed to operate in either day or night conditions, has the flexibility to perform a variety of power-intensive missions. 24 refs.

  14. Beam-powered lunar rover design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, J.E.; Coomes, E.P.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M.; Chiu, M.A.; Dodge, R.E.; Wise, J.A.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manned exploration of our nearest neighbors in the solar systems is the primary goal of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). An integral part of any manned lunar or planetary outpost will be a system for manned excursions over the surface of the planet. This report presents a preliminary design for a lunar rover capable of supporting four astronauts on long-duration excursions across the lunar landscape. The distinguishing feature of this rover design is that power is provided to rover via a laser beam from an independent orbiting power satellite. This system design provides very high power availability with minimal mass on the rover vehicle. With this abundance of power, and with a relatively small power-system mass contained in the rover, the vehicle can perform an impressive suite of mission-related activity. The rover might be used as the first outpost for the lunar surface (i.e., a mobile base). A mobile base has the advantage of providing extensive mission activities without the expense of establishing a fixed base. This concept has been referred to as ``Rove First.`` A manned over, powered through a laser beam, has been designed for travel on the lunar surface for round-trip distances in the range of 1000 km, although the actual distance traveled is not crucial since the propulsion system does not rely on energy storage. The life support system can support a 4-person crew for up to 30 days, and ample power is available for mission-related activities. The 8000-kg rover has 30 kW of continuous power available via a laser transmitter located at the Earth-moon L1 libration point, about 50,000 km above the surface of the moon. This rover, which is designed to operate in either day or night conditions, has the flexibility to perform a variety of power-intensive missions. 24 refs.

  15. Ultracapacitor Technologies and Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultracapacitor vs. a High Power Battery for Hybrid Vehiclevarious ranges and motor power Battery 200 Wh/kg 100 Wh/kg

  16. Growth, CO2 Consumption, and H2 Production of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413-U under Different Irradiances and CO2 Concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berberoglu, Halil; Barra, Natasha; Pilon, Laurent; Jay, Jenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase Medium Irradiance ? H2 ? CO2 Maximum Reported Ratesa) Specific CO 2 uptake rate, ? CO2 (kg CO 2 /kg dry cell/h)

  17. Quali prospettive economiche per la montagna bellunese con

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    media di latte (kg/capo/d) 25-30 15-20 consumo alimentare (kg ss/capo/d) 20 15 caratteristiche razione

  18. A comparison of global optimization algorithms with standard benchmark functions and real-world applications using Energy Plus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamph, Jerome Henri

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    position, we varied the cooling supply air temperature usedupper positions (m) Cooling supply air temperature used forthe moisture content of the cooling supply air (kg/(kg dry

  19. Global Carbon Emissions in the Coming Decades: The Case of China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006 kg CO2/kg coal equivalent energy produced Note: LBNLrole in replacing coal, increasing energy demand meansemissions. 8. With coal as the major energy source, and no

  20. G. Christina Caballero 1 Ketamine Sedation in Traumatic Brain Injury: Friend or Foe?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillow, Jonathan

    prophylaxis for 7 days Phenytoin 15-20 mg/kg load followed by 4-5 mg/kg/day Volume Status CPP and MAP

  1. The Environmental Impacts of Electric Bikes in Chinese Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherry, Christopher; Weinert, Jonathan; Ma, Chaktan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use, air pollution, solid waste and water use. A frameworkkg) Waste Water (kg) Solid Waste (kg) The weight of eachconsidered lower bounds. The solid waste only includes solid

  2. PHYS 1114 --College Physics I Sample Exam 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mansell, Edward "Ted"

    is the mass (in kg) of a 640 N person? Problem 3: (a) A 10-kg block is sitting on a slab of ice (an ice rink

  3. alteraciones del transporte: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    total del trajecte: 40 minuts Comparaci transport pblic,90 Emissions addicionals (CO2): 0 kg Emissions addicionals (SO2): 0 kg Transport pblicTransport privat Despesa...

  4. Modified Regge calculus as an explanation of dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. M. Stuckey; T. J. McDevitt; M. Silberstein

    2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Regge calculus, we construct a Regge differential equation for the time evolution of the scale factor $a(t)$ in the Einstein-de Sitter cosmology model (EdS). We propose two modifications to the Regge calculus approach: 1) we allow the graphical links on spatial hypersurfaces to be large, as in direct particle interaction when the interacting particles reside in different galaxies, and 2) we assume luminosity distance $D_L$ is related to graphical proper distance $D_p$ by the equation $D_L = (1+z)\\sqrt{\\overrightarrow{D_p}\\cdot \\overrightarrow{D_p}}$, where the inner product can differ from its usual trivial form. The modified Regge calculus model (MORC), EdS and $\\Lambda$CDM are compared using the data from the Union2 Compilation, i.e., distance moduli and redshifts for type Ia supernovae. We find that a best fit line through $\\displaystyle \\log{(\\frac{D_L}{Gpc})}$ versus $\\log{z}$ gives a correlation of 0.9955 and a sum of squares error (SSE) of 1.95. By comparison, the best fit $\\Lambda$CDM gives SSE = 1.79 using $H_o$ = 69.2 km/s/Mpc, $\\Omega_{M}$ = 0.29 and $\\Omega_{\\Lambda}$ = 0.71. The best fit EdS gives SSE = 2.68 using $H_o$ = 60.9 km/s/Mpc. The best fit MORC gives SSE = 1.77 and $H_o$ = 73.9 km/s/Mpc using $R = A^{-1}$ = 8.38 Gcy and $m = 1.71\\times 10^{52}$ kg, where $R$ is the current graphical proper distance between nodes, $A^{-1}$ is the scaling factor from our non-trival inner product, and $m$ is the nodal mass. Thus, MORC improves EdS as well as $\\Lambda$CDM in accounting for distance moduli and redshifts for type Ia supernovae without having to invoke accelerated expansion, i.e., there is no dark energy and the universe is always decelerating.

  5. Vegetational, edaphic and topographic relationships of a 25-year exclosure on the Edwards Plateau, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Terry Warren

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exclosure expressed in kilograms/hectare. Data from Table 6. 38 An Eriochloa eez'icea stand on the Sonors Ex- periment Station study exclosure. 40 Detail of the production sampling quadrat in an Eriochloa sericea stand on the Sonora Ex- periment... Station study exclosure. 42 An Az'istida wriFhtii stand on the Sonora Experiment Station study exclosure. 44 Microrelief of the /Lrietida un'ightii stand on the Sonora Experiment Station study exclosure. 46 Microrelief of the Erioneuron pilosum stand...

  6. Environmental Aspects of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles: Parametric Modeling and Preliminary Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yancey, Kristina D.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    High-enriched uranium, or uranium that has an enrichment of more than 20% 235U HLW High Level Waste, the highly radioactive materials produced by nuclear reactors MWe Megawatt electric, the amount of power entering the electrical grid LEU Low-enriched... uranium, or uranium that has an enrichment of less than 20% 235U Sievert Unit describing biological effects of radiation such that 1 Sievert is equal to 1 Joule/kilogram, abbreviated Sv tHM tonne Heavy Metal tonne A measurement of mass such that 1...

  7. Nuclear criticality safety in D and D operations: a Los Alamos experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory require the interaction of several disciplines so that the effort to D&D radiological facilities can proceed unencumbered, on schedule, and within budget. Although playing a minor role, the Laboratory`s Nuclear Criticality Safety Group has provided criticality safety guidance to one such D&D team efficiently and cost-effectively. During the first major D&D effort at Los Alamos, a total of about 6 kilograms of uranium [U(93)] was recovered from a facility thought to contain only tens of grams.

  8. Comparison of the INRIM and PTB lattice-spacing standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massa, E; Kuetgens, U

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To base the kilogram definition on the atomic mass of the silicon 28 atom, the present relative uncertainty of the silicon 28 lattice parameter must lowered to 3E-9. To achieve this goal, a new experimental apparatus capable of a centimetre measurement-baseline has been made at the INRIM. The comparison between the determinations of the lattice parameter of crystals MO*4 of INRIM and WASO4.2a of PTB is intended to verify the measurement capabilities and to assess the limits of this experiment.

  9. Growth curve analysis of Rambouillet ewes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathenge, James Mwai

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for this study. However, most of the results were reported for 152 observations; a subset of the 283 records that contained the smst complete set of weighted' Type of birth and rearing was the single most significant source of variation for preweaning body... weights and growth rates. Estimation of mature weight obtained for 184 records was 59. 6 + . 77 kilograms. Based upon analysis of yearly weights, ewes had reached maturity by 42 months of age. Birth and 120-day weight were lower than those reported...

  10. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. M.; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: The rare gases krypton, xenon, and radon pose both an economic opportunity and a potential environmental hazard. Xenon is used in commercial lighting, medical imaging, and anesthesia, and can sell for $5,000 per kilogram. Radon, by contrast, Is naturally radioactive and the second largest cause of lung cancer, and radioactive xenon, 133Xe, was a major pollutant released In the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. We describe an organic cage molecule that can capture xenon and radon with unprecedented selectivity, suggesting new technologies for environmental monitoring, removal of pollutants, or the recovery of rare, valuable elements from air.

  11. A study of the use of feed supplements for prevention of experimental bitterweed (Hymenoxys odorata) poisoning in sheep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridges, Gary Wayne

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in reducing the toxicity of bitterv!eed (~H&!en~ox s odorata). In each of four experiments, sheep were divided into four groups of two and were dosed with bitterweed equal in weight to 0. 1/, 0. 2/, 0. 4'i and 0. 8'/ of their body weight. The median lethal... as above and the LD50 was estimated to be 4. 0 + 0. 3 gm bitterweed per kilogrtln! of body weight. Sodium sulfate, administered to the lambs at a rate of 340 mg per kilogram of body v!eight prior to dosing with bitterv!eed, also affected the toxicity...

  12. A study of the use of feed supplements for prevention of experimental bitterweed (Hymenoxys odorata) poisoning in sheep 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridges, Gary Wayne

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in reducing the toxicity of bitterv!eed (~H&!en~ox s odorata). In each of four experiments, sheep were divided into four groups of two and were dosed with bitterweed equal in weight to 0. 1/, 0. 2/, 0. 4'i and 0. 8'/ of their body weight. The median lethal... as above and the LD50 was estimated to be 4. 0 + 0. 3 gm bitterweed per kilogrtln! of body weight. Sodium sulfate, administered to the lambs at a rate of 340 mg per kilogram of body v!eight prior to dosing with bitterv!eed, also affected the toxicity...

  13. Maintenance Requirements of Chickens and the Effect of Age of Chickens on the Productive Energy of Feeds. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?merits were calculated to the average weight of for the , the experiment, usually 3 weeks. The caloric productive energy consumed in the ration fed less the calories of energy stored in the chicken give the calories of productive energy used... used for maintenance, calories per day per 100 gram =100C + (11 13 X42) = D ... 7.18 Lc.Ab.4.. Layin; quiren chicke A,, ": rl LU1131U In I maintc caloric ._ly 37 grams of the ration per day and kilogram would be required for ntenance...

  14. Active neutron multiplicity counting of bulk uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensslin, N.; Krick, M.S.; Langner, D.G.; Miller, M.C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new nondestructive assay technique being developed to assay bulk uranium containing kilogram quantities of {sup 235}U. The new technique uses neutron multiplicity analysis of data collected with a coincidence counter outfitted with AmLi neutron sources. We have calculated the expected neutron multiplicity count rate and assay precision for this technique and will report on its expected performance as a function of detector design characteristics, {sup 235 }U sample mass, AmLi source strength, and source-to-sample coupling. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. JPL D-33509 Earth Observing System (EOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1000 1200 FWHM / km Nathaniel J. Livesey, William G. Read, Lucien Froidevaux, Alyn Lambert, Gloria L

  16. The Lower Columbia River As a System:The Lower Columbia River As a System: An Oceanographic Point of ViewAn Oceanographic Point of View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Science Foundation US Army EngineersUS Army Engineers Bonneville Power AdministrationBonneville Power Administration NOAANOAA--FisheriesFisheries Miller FoundationMiller Foundation Thanks to: StephanieThanks toSalinity intrusion (~10--60 km in CR)60 km in CR) ­­ Tides (245 km, to Bonneville Dam)Tides (245 km

  17. Ferry-Based Linear Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    of oil, gas, and water pipeline infrastructure using wireless sensor networks. #12;IEEE Globecom 2013 UAE (2006): 2,580 Km of gas pipelines 2,950 Km of oil pipelines 156 Km of refined products pipelines. Desalinated water. Saudi Arabia: 3,800 Km. Oil, Gas, and Water Pipeline UseOil, Gas, and Water

  18. HR 5907: Discovery of the most rapidly rotating magnetic B-type star by the MiMeS Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunhut, J H; Wade, G A; Townsend, R H D; Marcolino, W L F; Bohlender, D A; Szeifert, Th; Petit, V; Matthews, J M; Rowe, J F; Moffat, A F J; Kallinger, T; Kuschnig, R; Guenther, B D; Rucinski, S M; Sasselov, D; Weiss, W W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery and analysis of a very strong magnetic field in the rapidly rotating early B-type star HR 5907, based on observations obtained as part of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project. We infer a rotation period of 0.508276 +0.000015/-0.000012 d from photometric and H{\\alpha} EW measurements, making this the shortest period, non-degenerate, magnetic massive star known to date. From the comparison of IUE UV and optical spectroscopy with LTE BRUCE/KYLIE models we find a solid-angle integrated, uniform black-body temperature of 17 000 \\pm 1000 K, a projected rotational velocity of 290 \\pm 10 km/s, an equatorial radius of 3.1 \\pm 0.2 R_sun, a stellar mass of 5.5 \\pm 0.5 M_sun, and an inclination angle of the rotation axis to our line-of-sight of 70 \\pm 10\\circ. Our measurements of the longitudinal magnetic field, which vary between -500 and -2000 G, phase coherently with the rotation period and imply a surface dipole field strength of \\sim15.7 kG. On the other hand, from fits to mean Leas...

  19. Spitzer Evidence for a Late Heavy Bombardment and the Formation of Urelites in {\\eta} Corvi at ~1 Gyr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisse, C M; Chen, C H; Morlok, A; Watson, D M; Manoj, P; Sheehan, P; Currie, T M; Thebault, P; Sitko, M L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed Spitzer and NASA/IRTF 2 - 35 \\mum spectra of the warm, ~350 K circumstellar dust around the nearby MS star {\\eta} Corvi (F2V, 1.4 \\pm 0.3 Gyr). The spectra show clear evidence for warm, water- and carbon-rich dust at ~3 AU from the central star, in the system's Terrestrial Habitability Zone. Spectral features due to ultra-primitive cometary material were found, in addition to features due to impact produced silica and high temperature carbonaceous phases. At least 9 x 10^18 kg of 0.1 - 100 \\mum warm dust is present in a collisional equilibrium distribution with dn/da ~ a^-3.5, the equivalent of a 130 km radius KBO of 1.0 g/cm^3 density and similar to recent estimates of the mass delivered to the Earth at 0.6 - 0.8 Gyr during the Late Heavy Bombardment. We conclude that the parent body was a Kuiper-Belt body or bodies which captured a large amount of early primitive material in the first Myrs of the system's lifetime and preserved it in deep freeze at ~150 AU. At ~1.4 Gyr they were prompted by...

  20. NUMERICAL MODELING OF THE DISRUPTION OF COMET D/1993 F2 SHOEMAKER-LEVY 9 REPRESENTING THE PROGENITOR BY A GRAVITATIONALLY BOUND ASSEMBLAGE OF RANDOMLY SHAPED POLYHEDRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Movshovitz, Naor; Asphaug, Erik; Korycansky, Donald, E-mail: nmovshov@ucsc.edu [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We advance the modeling of rubble-pile solid bodies by re-examining the tidal breakup of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, an event that occurred during a 1.33 R encounter with Jupiter in 1992 July. Tidal disruption of the comet nucleus led to a chain of sub-nuclei {approx}100-1000 m diameter; these went on to collide with the planet two years later. They were intensively studied prior to and during the collisions, making SL9 the best natural benchmark for physical models of small-body disruption. For the first time in the study of this event, we use numerical codes treating rubble piles as collections of polyhedra. This introduces forces of dilatation and friction, and inelastic response. As in our previous studies we conclude that the progenitor must have been a rubble pile, and we obtain approximately the same pre-breakup diameter ({approx}1.5 km) in our best fits to the data. We find that the inclusion of realistic fragment shapes leads to grain locking and dilatancy, so that even in the absence of friction or other dissipation we find that disruption is overall more difficult than in our spheres-based simulations. We constrain the comet's bulk density at {rho}{sub bulk} {approx} 300-400 kg m{sup -3}, half that of our spheres-based predictions and consistent with recent estimates derived from spacecraft observations.