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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD - October 2005 Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD - October 2005 October 2005 The purpose of this booklet is to assist individuals of Government agencies who generate or review classified documents to recognize the presence of nuclear information that is potentially classified as Restricted Data (RD) or Formerly Restricted Data (FRD). This book is particularly helpful to document reviewers conducting declassification reviews pursuant to Executive orders. Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD - October 2005 More Documents & Publications Brochure, Classification Overview of RD and FRD - September 2010 Briefing, Restricted Data Classifiers - March 2013

2

Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD - October 2005 Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD - October 2005 October 2005 The purpose of this booklet is to assist individuals of Government agencies who generate or review classified documents to recognize the presence of nuclear information that is potentially classified as Restricted Data (RD) or Formerly Restricted Data (FRD). This book is particularly helpful to document reviewers conducting declassification reviews pursuant to Executive orders. Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD - October 2005 More Documents & Publications Brochure, Classification Overview of RD and FRD - September 2010 Briefing, Restricted Data Classifiers - March 2013

3

Microsoft Word - SRSSaltWasteDisposal.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Disposal - References - §3116 Determination (RWR NDAA of 2005) Salt Waste Disposal - References - §3116 Determination (RWR NDAA of 2005) Doc. No. Filename Title Main Document References 1. 2005 RWR DAA §3116 NDAA.pdf "Ronald W. Regan National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2005," Section 3116, 2004. 2. CBU-PIT-2004-00024 CBU-PIT-2004-00024.pdf Ledbetter, L. S., CBU-PIT-2004-00024, 12/01/04 - December Monthly WCS Curie and Volume Inventory Report," Revision 0, December 9, 2004. 3. CBU-PIT-2005-00031 CBU-PIT-2005-00031.pdf Rios-Armstrong, M. A., CBU-PIT-2005-00031, "Decontaminated Salt Solution Volume to be transferred to the Saltstone Disposal Facility from Salt Treatment and Disposition Activities," Revision 0, February 13, 2005.

4

Microsoft Word - Solid Waste at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use of American Recovery and Use of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Funds on Solid Waste Project Activities at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site OAS-RA-L-11-08 May 2011 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: May19, 2011 Audit Report Number: OAS-RA-L-11-08 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A10RA041) SUBJECT: Report on "Use of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Funds on Solid Waste Project Activities at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site" TO: Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department), Richland Operations Office (Richland), awarded a contract, effective October 1, 2008, to CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to

5

Optimising waste management performance - The key to successful decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: On the 1. of April 2005 the United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority became responsible for the enormous task of decommissioning the UK's civilian nuclear liabilities. The success of the NDA in delivering its key objectives of safer, cheaper and faster decommissioning depends on a wide range factors. It is self-evident, however, that the development of robust waste management practices by those charged with decommissioning liability will be at the heart of the NDA's business. In addition, the implementation of rigorous waste minimisation techniques throughout decommissioning will deliver tangible environmental benefits as well as better value for money and release funds to accelerate the decommissioning program. There are mixed views as to whether waste minimisation can be achieved during decommissioning. There are those that argue that the radioactive inventory already exists, that the amount of radioactivity cannot be minimised and that the focus of activities should be focused on waste management rather than waste minimisation. Others argue that the management and decommissioning of the UK's civilian nuclear liability will generate significant volumes of additional radioactive waste and it is in this area where the opportunities for waste minimisation can be realised. (author)

Keep, Matthew [Entec UK Limited. 17 Angel Gate. City Road. London EC1V 2SH (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Microsoft Word - Tank Waste Report 9-30-05.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerated Tank Waste Retrieval Accelerated Tank Waste Retrieval Activities at the Hanford Site DOE/IG-0706 October 2005 REPORT ON THE ACCELERATED TANK WASTE RETRIEVAL ACTIVITIES AT THE HANFORD SITE TABLE OF CONTENTS Tank Waste Retrieval Details of Finding 1 Recommendations and Comments 4 Appendices Objective, Scope, and Methodology 6 Prior Reports 7 Management Comments 8 Tank Waste Retrieval Page 1 Details of Finding Tank Waste The Department will not meet Tri-Party Agreement (Agreement) Retrieval Activities milestones for the retrieval of waste from the single-shell tanks located at the C-Tank Farm within schedule and cost. Based on the current C-Tank Farm retrieval schedule and the amount of waste retrieved to date, the Department will not accomplish its

7

Microsoft Word - Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Nuclear Fuel Joe T. Carter, SRNL Alan J. Luptak, INL Jason Gastelum, PNNL Christine...

8

Microsoft Word - INL Waste Stream Cleared for Shipment to WIPP...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho National Laboratory Waste Stream Cleared For Shipment to WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., December 12, 2006 - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has authorized the Idaho National...

9

BEAMS Word Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hidden vertically, horizontally, backwards and diagonally in this word search puzzle. Download this Activity Lab Page Puzzle Puzzle Sample AnswersAnswer Key Answer Key Answer Key...

10

Scrambled Science Words  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scrambled Science Words Use the BEAMS Vocabulary List to help you unscramble the following words. Download this Activity Lab Page Puzzle Puzzle Sample AnswersAnswer Key Answer Key...

11

National Low-Level Waste Management Program final summary report of key activities and accomplishments for fiscal year 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 to assist states and compacts in their siting and licensing efforts for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) is the element of the DOE that performs the key support activities under the Act. The NLLWMP`s activities are driven by the needs of the states and compacts as they prepare to manage their low-level waste under the Act. Other work is added during the fiscal year as necessary to accommodate new requests brought on by status changes in states` and compacts` siting and licensing efforts. This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the NLLWMP during FY 1997.

Rittenberg, R.B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Microsoft Word - Tran Waste final report 2-8-05.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transuranic Waste Management at Transuranic Waste Management at Los Alamos National Laboratory DOE/IG-0673 February 2005 REPORT ON TRANSURANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Legacy Transuranic Waste Disposal Details of Finding 1 Recommendations and Comments 4 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology 6 2. Transuranic Waste Storage 8 3. Prior Audit Reports 10 4. Management Comments 11 Legacy Transuranic Waste Disposal Page 1 Details of Finding Background Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has been involved in the development, production, and maintenance of the Nation's nuclear weapons stockpile for over six decades. Research, development, and fabrication of weapons components produced a

13

Advances in Geochemical Testing of Key Contaminants in Residual Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the advances that have been made over the past two years in testing and characterizing waste material in Hanford tanks.

Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Heald, Steve M.; Arey, Bruce W.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

14

Microsoft Word - DOE Exceeds TRU Waste Cleanup Goal at LANL.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Exceeds 2012 TRU Waste Cleanup Goal at DOE Exceeds 2012 TRU Waste Cleanup Goal at Los Alamos National Laboratory CARLSBAD, N.M., October 3, 2012 -The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Central Characterization Project (CCP) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) exceeded a fiscal year 2012 goal of characterizing and shipping 800 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) waste, fulfilling a commitment to the state of New Mexico. The 800 cubic meters goal was exceeded by more than 100 cubic meters, with the vast majority of the TRU waste characterized as defense related TRU and permanently disposed at WIPP. To accomplish this achievement, the WIPP CCP increased the amount of waste that was certified, ensuring it met all the requirements for disposal at WIPP. This resulted in the ability to

15

Microsoft Word - Los Alamos National Laboratory ships remote-handled transuranic waste to WIPP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory Ships Remote-Handled Los Alamos National Laboratory Ships Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste to WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., June 3, 2009 - Cleanup of the nation's defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste has reached an important milestone. Today, the first shipment of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico arrived safely at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the southeast corner of the state. "Shipping this waste to WIPP is important for our national cleanup mission, but this event is especially important for New Mexicans," said DOE Carlsbad Field Office Manager Dave Moody. "It's great to see progress being made right here in our own state." WIPP's mission includes the safe disposal of two types of defense-related

16

Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed  

SciTech Connect

The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

Huber, Heinz J.

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

17

Word sense disambiguation methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Word sense disambiguation is one of the key tasks of text processing. It consists in the determination of senses of words or compound terms in accordance with the context where they were used. The word sense disambiguation problem originated in the 1950s ...

D. Yu. Turdakov

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Integrated Waste Management in Sweden Where incineration is not a dirty word  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the opportunity to visit a Swedish waste-to-energy plant in Malmö and was amazed at how clean and technologically on their own or through public or private contractors. Needless to say, there is a strong economic incentive, rather than deal with it later. By mixing economic incentives, such as garbage collection fees, with easy

Columbia University

19

Interim Models Developed to Predict Key Hanford Waste Glass Properties Using Composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past several years the amount of waste glass property data available in the open literature has increased markedly. We have compiled the data from over 2000 glass compositions, evaluated the data for consistency, and fit glass property models to portions of this database.[1] The properties modeled include normalized releases of boron (rB), sodium (rNa), and lithium (rLi) from glass exposed to the product consistency test (PCT), liquidus temperature (TL) of glasses in the spinel and zircon primary phase field, viscosity (?) at 1150C (?1150) and as a function of temperature (?T), and molar volume (V). These models were compared to some of the previously available models and were found to predict the properties of glasses not used in model fitting better and covered broader glass composition regions than the previous ones. This paper summarizes the data collected and the models that resulted from this effort.

Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

20

Microsoft Word - Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition R5a.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Potential Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Nuclear Fuel Joe T. Carter, SRNL Alan J. Luptak, INL Jason Gastelum, PNNL Christine Stockman, SNL Andrew Miller, SNL July 2012 FCR&D-USED-2010-000031 Rev 5 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

GAO-04-611 Nuclear Waste: Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Committee on Government Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives June 2004 NUCLEAR WASTE Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals GAO-04-611 www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-04-611. To view the full product, including the scope and methodology, click on the link above. For more information, contact Robin M. Nazzaro at (202) 512-3841 or nazzaror@gao.gov. Highlights of GAO-04-611, a report to the Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives June 2004 NUCLEAR WASTE Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals DOE's initial approach called for treating 10 percent of the site's high-level waste by 2018 and for operating the plant until treatment was completed in

22

Assessing recycling versus incineration of key materials in municipal waste: The importance of efficient energy recovery and transport distances  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the environmental impact of recycling and incineration of household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling of paper, glass, steel and aluminium is better than incineration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling and incineration of cardboard and plastic can be equally good alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclables can be transported long distances and still have environmental benefits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper has a higher environmental benefit than recyclables found in smaller amounts. - Abstract: Recycling of materials from municipal solid waste is commonly considered to be superior to any other waste treatment alternative. For the material fractions with a significant energy content this might not be the case if the treatment alternative is a waste-to-energy plant with high energy recovery rates. The environmental impacts from recycling and from incineration of six material fractions in household waste have been compared through life cycle assessment assuming high-performance technologies for material recycling as well as for waste incineration. The results showed that there are environmental benefits when recycling paper, glass, steel and aluminium instead of incinerating it. For cardboard and plastic the results were more unclear, depending on the level of energy recovery at the incineration plant, the system boundaries chosen and which impact category was in focus. Further, the environmental impact potentials from collection, pre-treatment and transport was compared to the environmental benefit from recycling and this showed that with the right means of transport, recyclables can in most cases be transported long distances. However, the results also showed that recycling of some of the material fractions can only contribute marginally in improving the overall waste management system taking into consideration their limited content in average Danish household waste.

Merrild, Hanna [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Larsen, Anna W., E-mail: awla@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Microsoft Word - FINAL 7-12-10 Site Visit Report - LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Facility FCA.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Visit Report Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility - June 2010 This site visit report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of the Facility Centered Assessment (FCA) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLW). This review, conducted June 9-25, 2010, was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) and LANL, and conducted jointly by HSS, LASO, and LANL staff. The Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations was the overall lead organization for evaluation of the FCA process with the participation of the LASO Facility Representative assigned to RLW.

24

Key Words Dietary restriction ? Longevity ? Okinawa ? Infections ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Longevity in Okinawa is considered to be a result of traditional low calorie diet. Le Bourg suggests that Okinawa is an example of severe malnutrition, which is harmful for later generations. We believe that current loss of longevity advantage in Okinawa is a result of diet westernization and that the dietary restriction is a valid way of life extension in humans. Copyright 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel In a recent issue of this journal, Le Bourg questions the usefulness of dietary restriction (DR) as a means of life extension for humans and suggests that Okinawa is an example of severe malnutrition of mothers having devastating effects on younger generations [1]. Indeed, younger generations of Okinawans are losing their longevity advantage. We believe, however, that the most likely cause

Natalia S. Gavrilova; Leonid A. Gavrilov

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

KIDS: keyed intrusion detection system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since most current network attacks happen at the application layer, analysis of packet payload is necessary for their detection. Unfortunately malicious packets may be crafted to mimic normal payload, and so avoid detection if the anomaly detection method ... Keywords: Kerckhoffs' principle, anomaly detection, keyed IDS, network intrusion detection, word model

Sasa Mrdovic; Branislava Drazenovic

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Scrambled Science Words  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scrambled Science Words Welcome to Scrambled Science Words Welcome to Scrambled Science Words The computer will pick a science word or term and then scramble its letters. Once you...

27

KEY PERSONNEL  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

APPENDIX J KEY PERSONNEL 07032013 TITLE NAME President Christopher C. Gentile Vice President, Operations Robin Stubenhofer Director, Sr. Program Management Rick Lavelock...

28

Key Outcomes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG Key Points & Action Items Inaugural Meeting Thursday, August 25, 2011 Renaissance Denver Hotel Denver, Colorado...

29

Key Documents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS by-laws, code of ethics and anti trust policy established during our 100+ legacy. Key Documents AOCS History and Governance about us aocs committees contact us division council fats governing board history oils professionals science value cen

30

Microsoft Word - DOE Subject Area Indic#2C05.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subject Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data July 2005 Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Purpose ...................................................................................................................................... 2 Background................................................................................................................................. 3 Difference Between Restricted Data (RD) and Formerly Restricted Data (FRD) and National Security Information (NSI) ........................................................................................ 4 Access to RD and FRD ...............................................................................................................

31

Medical School Biomedical Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical School Biomedical Waste Labware, gloves, pipets, pipet tips Stock cultures, bacterial with or without needles, razor blades, scalpel blades) Key: Pathological waste BL1 & BL2 waste (low risk ­ LR) BL2 waste (moderate risk - MR)/BL3 waste Blood Blood Autoclave Needle box Metal Cart Must either bleach

Cooley, Lynn

32

Key Outcomes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Key Points & Action Items Key Points & Action Items Inaugural Meeting Thursday, August 25, 2011 Renaissance Denver Hotel Denver, Colorado Participants Tracey LeBeau, Director, Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director, and Brandt Petrasek, Special Assistant, Department of Energy, Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs; Vice Chairman Ronald Suppah and Jim Manion, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; William Micklin, Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians; Councilman Barney Enos, Jr., Jason Hauter, Gila River Indian Community; Mato Standing High, Rosebud Sioux Tribe; R. Allen Urban, Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation; Glen Andersen, Scott Hendrick, Brooke Oleen, Jacquelyn Pless, Jim Reed and Julia Verdi, National Conference of State Legislatures-staff

33

Quasiperiodic and Lyndon episturmian words  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently the second two authors characterized quasiperiodic Sturmian words, proving that a Sturmian word is non-quasiperiodic if and only if, it is an infinite Lyndon word. Here we extend this study to episturmian words (a natural generalization of Sturmian ... Keywords: Arnoux-Rauzy sequence, Episturmian morphism, Episturmian word, Infinite Lyndon word, Lexicographic order, Quasiperiodicity, Sturmian word

Amy Glen; Florence Lev; Gwnal Richomme

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Morphically primitive words  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper, we introduce an alternative notion of the primitivity of words, that-unlike the standard understanding of this term-is not based on the power (and, hence, the concatenation) of words, but on morphisms. For any alphabet @S, we call ... Keywords: Combinatorics on words, Fixed points, Morphisms, Primitivity

Daniel Reidenbach; Johannes C. Schneider

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

A computing with words based approach to multicriteria energy planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exploitation of new and innovative energy alternatives is a key means towards a sustainable energy system. This paper proposes a linguistic energy planning model with computation solely on words as well as considering the policy-maker's preference information. ...

Hong-Bin Yan; Tieju Ma; Yoshiteru Nakamori; Van-Nam Huynh

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Growing Green As part of its strategic plan to foster growth and development in key  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in geomicrobiology, ecosystem health, nuclear waste technology and reactor safety, environmental science and ecology reconstruction, nuclear waste containment and disposal, and photochemical deconstruction of pollutants Key

Christensen, Dan

37

Crypto Key Management Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A Framework for Designing Cryptographic Key Management Systems ... A Framework for Designing Cryptographic Key Management Systems ...

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

38

Waste to Energy Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste to Energy Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Waste to Energy Technologies Place Madrid, Spain Zip 28023 Sector Biomass Product Turn key WtEbiomass plant supplier...

39

ccsd00004520, Key words. Galaxies: clusters: generalgalaxies:intergalactic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fraction shape. Interestingly, these f gas exhibit a level of dispersion consistent with what has been as dispersions around the best fit line. f gas values derived from the local sample reveal a clear trend of cosmological relevance. The fact that the dispersion in f gas measurements in our distant sample is similar

40

Key Words Gas chromatography Liquid chromatography Thermodynamic equilibria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solution and adsorption thermodynamics Gas adsorption isotherms Summary After a brief recall of the chromatographic principles, the different applications of gas chromatographic measurements of thermodynamic equilibria were reviewed. Gas and liquid chromatographies are now well known and elegant methods for measuring the physicochemical properties and phase equilibrium thermodynamic constants. Although fundamentally a dynamical method and mostly known as a powerful separation technique, chromatography can be schematized by a succession of equilibria of a chemical species partitioning between a mobile phase and a fixed liquid or solid stationary phase. It can be operated in either infinite dilution or finite concentration conditions and permits to collect a large number of data for calculating molecular interactions for solutes which are either rare or available at the trace level. Gas chromatography permits the measurement of gas adsorption isotherms, gas-liquid equilibria, molecular diffusion and interaction virials. The modelization of successive partition equilibria occuring in the chromatographic column leads to rather simple expressions of differential enthalpy, entropy, free energy of adsorption or solution, variation of heat capacity, complexation constant, second virial coefficients, gas-solid and gasliquid isotherms and also binary or ternary equilibria. The possibilities of High Performance-Liquid Chromatography to investigate adsorption from solutions and chemical equilibria are also discussed. 1 Present address: D~partement de Chimie, Groupe Masse-Chimie

Cedex France

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Key Words: Power Plants, Hedonic Price Method, Restricted Census Microdata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper uses restricted census microdata to examine housing values and rents for neighborhoods in the United States where power plants were opened during the 1990s. Compared to neighborhoods with similar housing and demographic characteristics, neighborhoods within two miles of plants experienced 3-7 percent decreases in housing values and rents with some evidence of larger decreases within one mile and for large capacity plants. In addition, there is evidence of taste-based sorting with neighborhoods near plants associated with modest but statistically significant decreases in mean household income, educational attainment, and the proportion of homes that is owner occupied.

Lucas W. Davis; Jel D; Michael Greenstone; Matt Kahn; Ian Lange; Matt White; Seminar Participants

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

directed acyclic word graph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and R. Verin, Direct Construction of Compact Directed Acyclic Word Graphs, 8th Annual Symposium, CPM 97, Aarhus, Denmark, 116-129, 1997. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

43

BUDGET KEY DATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BUDGET KEY DATES. For Immediate Release: December 15, 2009. Contact: Diane Belford 301-975-8400. Budget Key Dates.

2013-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

44

Microsoft Word - Document2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hazardous wastes. From 1954 through 1970, the landfill also received wastes from the Rocky Flats Plant in Colorado and other off-site generators. -- ICP-- For more information...

45

Microsoft Word - ORNL RH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRANSURANIC WASTE SHIPMENT ARRIVES SAFELY AT WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT IN NEW MEXICO Energy Department meets regulatory milestone OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The U.S. Department...

46

Microsoft Word - Rev5functionalaccountabilityimplementationplan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Word - Rev5functionalaccountabilityimplementationplan..doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL2007-01.doc Policy Flash 2012-54 OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

47

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment: Foundation of pollution prevention for waste management  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to promote the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) technique as a fundamental of pollution prevention for waste management. All key elements of an effective PPOA program are presented. These key elements include impacts of environmental laws on pollution prevention, PPOA concepts and overview, waste minimization opportunities assessment, reporting and monitoring waste minimization progress, and PPOA program implementation. As environmental laws evolve the focus is shifting from end-of-pipe pollution control to front-end source reduction. Waste minimization was mistakenly interpreted to mean the reduction of hazardous waste after generation in the past. The Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has clearly defined its requirement on resource reduction. Waste reduction can be viewed as a criterion to assess all industrial processes and operations. The fundamental approach of PPOA focuses on a mass balance concept. This concept deals with tracking of chemicals from the point of purchase, through storage, utilization in the process, and waste generation at the end of process. In other words, PPOA is a technique to analyze this input/output process. By applying PPOA techniques, the framework of applicable compliance requirements to the current operation process is established. Furthermore, documentation of PPOA itself can meet as documentation requirements for environmental compliance. In general, the PPOA process consists of two phases. The first phase involves input and output process description and waste characterization. The second phase is an opportunities assessment for waste minimization from input/output waste characterization. These two phases are explained in detail in the paper.

Damewood, R.W.

1994-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

Microsoft Word - ~7453498.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SRS Salt Waste Processing: 5 Years of Success SRS Salt Waste Processing: 5 Years of Success AIKEN, S.C. (April 22, 2013) - Something unique in environmental risk reduction involving the processing of radioactive salt waste is taking place at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Savannah River Remediation (SRR), SRS's liquid waste contractor, is safely and successfully disposing of salt waste from massive underground storage tanks - as the

49

Decorporation: Officially a word  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note is the brief history of a word. Decorporation is a scientific term known to health physicists who have an interest in the removal of internally deposited radionuclides from the body after an accidental or inadvertent intake. Although the word decorporation appears many times in the radiation protection literature, it was only recently accepted by the editors of the Oxford English Dictionary as an entry for their latest edition.

Fisher, D.R.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Decorporation: Officially a word  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note is the brief history of a word. Decorporation is a scientific term known to health physicists who have an interest in the removal of internally deposited radionuclides from the body after an accidental or inadvertent intake. Although the word decorporation appears many times in the radiation protection literature, it was only recently accepted by the editors of the Oxford English Dictionary as an entry for their latest edition.

Fisher, Darrell R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 4 Geothermal electricity net generation. 5 Wood and wood-derived fuels. 6 Solar thermal and...

52

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 8 Wood and wood-derived fuels. 9 Municipal solid waste from biogenic...

53

Microsoft Word - 10-1826 _word format_  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

report contains the results of the audit performed for Summary Category Group S5000 debris waste, August 3-5, 2010. I certify under penalty of law that this document and all...

54

Element Word Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or, if you wish, you can download your very own copy of the Table of Elements. Download this Activity Lab Page Puzzle Puzzle Sample AnswersAnswer Key Answer Key Answer Key...

55

Microsoft Word - test | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

test Microsoft Word - test Microsoft Word - test More Documents & Publications Interested Parties - WAPA Public Comment InterestedPartiesCOPSCoWAPA040309.pdf Microsoft Word -...

56

Group key management  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Distributional word clusters vs. words for text categorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study an approach to text categorization that combines distributional clustering of words and a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. This word-cluster representation is computed using the recently introduced Information Bottleneck method, ...

Ron Bekkerman; Ran El-Yaniv; Naftali Tishby; Yoad Winter

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Definitions of Words with Special Meanings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DEFINITIONS OF WORDS WITH SPECIAL MEANINGS. Definitions of Words with Special Meanings. This section of the VVSG ...

59

Microsoft Word - PMCDP Course Curriculum Registration Guidelines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Course Curriculum Registration Guidelines 2 Microsoft Word - PMCDP Course Curriculum Registration Guidelines 2 Microsoft Word - PMCDP Course Curriculum Registration Guidelines...

60

Factors of characteristic words: Location and decompositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let @a be an irrational number with 0Keywords: Characteristic word, Decomposition, Location, Overlap factor, Return words, Separate factor

Wai-Fong Chuan; Hui-Ling Ho

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microsoft Word - appendices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on buried waste at on buried waste at the INL Site On July 1, 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho announced an agreement on cleaning up transuranic waste buried at DOE's Idaho Site. At the same time, DOE issued a draft record of decision for remediating the buried waste in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho Site. The buried waste has long been a topic of discussion among Idahoans, who are concerned that its presence about 600 feet above the Snake River Plan Aquifer could pose a threat to an important source of drinking and irrigation water for southern Idaho. What does this agreement mean in terms of protecting the aquifer? The bottom line is that DOE and its regulators believe this agreement will ensure the buried transuranic waste poses no safety threat

62

Microsoft Word - Unrelated Accident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Immediate Release For Immediate Release Truck Accident Did Not Involve WIPP Shipment CARLSBAD, N.M., October 1, 2009 - A Wednesday night truck accident north of Albuquerque on Highway 165 that involved an 18-wheeler is not related to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) transuranic waste shipments. Involved in the accident was a load of new, unused 55-gallon drums manufactured in Carlsbad that was en route to Richland, Washington. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a U.S. Department of Energy facility designed to safely isolate defense-related transuranic waste from people and the environment. Waste temporarily stored at sites around the country is shipped to WIPP and permanently disposed in rooms mined out of an ancient salt formation 2,150 feet below the surface. WIPP, which began waste

63

Shuffle of Words and Araucaria Trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shuffle of k words $u_1$,…,$u_k$ is the set of words obtained by interleaving the letters of these words such that the order of appearance of all letters of each word is respected. The study of the shuffle product of words leads to the construction ... Keywords: Automaton, remarkable polynomials, shuffle of words, trees

Ren Schott; Jean-Claude Spehner

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and PV energy used in the commercial, industrial, and electric power sectors. 4 Geothermal heat pump and direct use energy. 5 Municipal solid waste from biogenic sources,...

65

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Wind, petroleum, wood, waste, geothermal, other gases, solar thermal and photovoltaic, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch,...

66

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, 1989-2011 Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Wood and Waste 246 U.S. Energy Information...

67

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Btu per Short Ton) Year Coal Coal Coke Production 1 Waste Coal Supplied 2 Consumption Imports Exports Imports and Exports Residential and Commercial Sectors Industrial...

68

Microsoft Word - 00026774.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1996. 40 CFR 191 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM. 40 CFR Part...

69

Instructions for Word Template  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

26.5. 26.5. 12.7. 12.7. Live Area: 6.417 x 10. 462 x 720. 38.5 x 60. 163 x 254 ... author names should follow on the same line as the first author mentioned, continuing ... In order for the buttons to work, the security settings for Word must be set to...

70

The Key Agreement Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The three key derivation functions include KDF in Counter Mode, KDF in Feedback Mode, and KDF in Double-Pipeline Iteration Mode. ...

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

71

Crypto Key Management Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... responsible to executive-level management (eg, the Chief Information Officer) for the ... entity information, keys, and metadata into a database used by ...

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Cryptographic Key Management Workshop 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryptographic Key Management Workshop 2010. Purpose: ... Related Project(s): Cryptographic Key Management Project. Details: ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Nuclear Utility Mixed Waste Stream Characterization Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents industry experience at nuclear utilities in characterizing the hazardous component of potential mixed waste streams. It identifies key considerations for characterizing mixed waste; provides background information, including actual sample results, on the majority of plant processes with a potential to generate mixed waste; and presents a methodology for characterizing mixed waste.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Answering Key Fuel Cycle Questions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) program has both outcome and process goals because it must address both waste already accumulating as well as completing the fuel cycle in connection with advanced nuclear power plant concepts. The outcome objectives are waste geological repository capacity and cost, energy security and sustainability, proliferation resistance, fuel cycle economics, and safety. The process objectives are readiness to proceed and adaptability and robustness in the face of uncertainties. A classic decision-making approach to such a multi-attribute problem would be to weight individual quantified criteria and calculate an overall figure of merit. This is inappropriate for several reasons. First, the goals are not independent. Second, the importance of different goals varies among stakeholders. Third, the importance of different goals is likely to vary with time, especially the energy future. Fourth, some key considerations are not easily or meaningfully quantifiable at present. Instead, at this point, we have developed 16 questions the AFCI program should answer and suggest an approach of determining for each whether relevant options improve meeting each of the program goals. We find that it is not always clear which option is best for a specific question and specific goal; this helps identify key issues for future work. In general, we suggest attempting to create as many win-win decisions (options that are attractive or neutral to most goals) as possible. Thus, to help clarify why the program is exploring the options it is, and to set the stage for future narrowing of options, we have developed 16 questions, as follows: What are the AFCI program goals? Which potential waste disposition approaches do we plan for? What are the major separations, transmutation, and fuel options? How do we address proliferation resistance? Which potential energy futures do we plan for? What potential external triggers do we plan for? Should we separate uranium? If we separate uranium, should we recycle it, store it or dispose of it? Is it practical to plan to fabricate and handle hot fuel? Which transuranic elements (TRU) should be separated and transmuted? Of those TRU separated, which should be transmuted together? Should we separate and/or transmute Cs and Sr isotopes that dominate near-term repository heating? Should we separate and/or transmute very long-lived Tc and I isotopes? Which separation technology? What mix of transmutation technologies? What fuel technology best supports the above decisions?

Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; J. Stephen Herring; David E. Shropshire; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Optical key system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

Hagans, K.G.; Clough, R.E.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

76

Optical key system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

Hagans, Karla G. (Livermore, CA); Clough, Robert E. (Danville, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output 5 Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output Emissions by Type of Generating Unit, 2010 Emissions by Sector, 1989-2010 314 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 5.0 (s) 0.2 0.2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Million Metric Tons of Gas Sulfur Dioxide ¹ For carbon dioxide: municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources; tire-derived fuel, and geothermal. For sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides: blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels; wood and wood-derived fuels; municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, tires, agricultural byproducts, and other biomass; and chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, sulfur, and tar coal. 2 Includes Commercial Sector. (s)=Less than 0.05 million metric tons.

78

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Hydroelectric Power 1 Geothermal 2 SolarPV 3 Wind 4 Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Total 1949 1,349 NA NA NA 6 NA 6...

79

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants by Sector, 1989-2011 Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Wood and Waste 242 U.S....

80

Microsoft Word - SRS RH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

24, 2009 For Immediate Release REMOTE-HANDLED TRU WASTE SHIPMENTS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ARRIVE SAFELY AT WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Consumption Biomass Total Renewable Energy 4 Hydro- electric Power 5 Geo- thermal 6 SolarPV 7 Wind 8 Biomass Total Renewable Energy Biofuels 2 Total 3 Wood 9 Waste 10...

82

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Petroleum Wood and Waste 236 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Residual Fuel Oil Total Petroleum Source: Table 8.5a. 1989 1992 1995 1998...

83

SR Key Facts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Facts Savannah River Site Budget FY 2011 Budget Summary FY 2011 SRS EM Program Budget Summary FY 2012 Presidential Budget Request for SRS FY 2014 SRS EM Budget Presentation...

84

Key masking using biometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We construct an abstract model based on a fundamental similarity property, which takes into account parametric dependencies and reflects a specific collection of requirements. We consider a method for masking a cryptographic key using biometry, which ...

A. L. Chmora

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Key Emergency Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Emergency Information What to Do if an Emergency Arises DOE is committed to public safety in the event an emergency arises. You will likely be made aware that an emergency is...

86

Using minimal absent words to build phylogeny  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An absent word in a sequence is a segment that does not occur in the given sequence. It is a minimal absent word if all its proper factors occur in the given sequence. In this paper, we review the concept of minimal absent words, which includes the notion ... Keywords: Forbidden words, Minimal absent words, Phylogeny construction, String similarity, Trie of bounded depth

Supaporn Chairungsee; Maxime Crochemore

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Models of translational equivalence among words  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parallel texts (bitexts) have properties that distinguish them from other kinds of parallel data. First, most words translate to only one other word. Second, bitext correspondence is typically only partial---many words in each text have no clear equivalent ...

I. Dan Melamed

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

ARM - Key Science Questions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govScienceKey Science Questions govScienceKey Science Questions Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings User Meetings Annual Meetings of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team and Fall Working Groups Accomplishments Read about the 20 years of accomplishments (PDF, 696KB) from the ARM Program and user facility. Performance Metrics ASR Metrics 2009 2008 2007 2006 Key Science Questions The role of clouds and water vapor in climate change is not well understood; yet water vapor is the largest greenhouse gas and directly affects cloud cover and the propagation of radiant energy. In fact, there may be positive feedback between water vapor and other greenhouse gases. Carbon dioxide and other gases from human activities slightly warm the

89

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy Note. Renewable Energy Production and Consump- tion. In Tables 1.1, 1.3, and 10.1, renewable energy consumption consists of: conventional hydroelectricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat rate-see Table A6); geothermal electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat rate-see Table A6), and geothermal heat pump and geothermal direct use energy; solar thermal and photovoltaic electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat rate -see Table A6), and solar thermal direct use energy; wind electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil- fuels heat rate-see Table A6); wood and wood-derived fuels consumption; biomass waste (municipal solid waste from biogenic sources, landfill gas, sludge waste, agricul-

90

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Figure 8.0 Electricity Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 219 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of

91

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Electricity Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 219 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of

92

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2b 2b Electricity Net Generation by Sector By Sector, 2011 Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 Industrial and Commercial Sectors, 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 223 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). (s) = Less than 0.05 trillion kilowatthours. (ss) = Less than 0.5 billion kilowatthours. Sources: Tables 8.2b-8.2d. 4.0 0.1 (s) Electric Power Industrial Commercial 0 1 2 3 4 5 Trillion Kilowatthours 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 Trillion Kilowatthours Electricity-Only Plants

93

Microsoft Word - Report Cover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resolution of Questioned, Unresolved Resolution of Questioned, Unresolved and Potentially Unallowable Costs Incurred in Support of the Yucca Mountain Project OAS-SR-10-02 JULY 2010 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 29, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR THE UNDER SECRETARY OF ENERGY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: "Resolution of Questioned, Unresolved and Potentially Unallowable Costs Incurred in Support of the Yucca Mountain Project" INTRODUCTION The Nuclear Waste Policy Act Amendments of 1987 designated Yucca Mountain in Southwestern Nevada as the site for a national geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. The Department of Energy assigned management of the program to the Office of Civilian

94

EcoCar Students Spread the Word | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EcoCar Students Spread the Word EcoCar Students Spread the Word EcoCar Students Spread the Word June 16, 2011 - 11:34am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program "If you build it, they will come" is a mantra that might be well suited for rural sporting venues, but the organizers behind the EcoCAR competition realize that in the commercial sector, merely producing a finely tuned product often isn't enough to make it successful. That's why along with challenging students to re-engineer a donated vehicle to minimize gas consumption and emissions while maintaining consumer acceptability, they've made outreach and education key components of the competition. Whether they're speaking to policy makers or elementary school students, each of the teams have worked to convey the benefits of advanced technology

95

Key Research Results Achievement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

daylighting options for specific spaces with sample design layouts · Various HVAC system types that achieve%energysavingsovercode.NREL developedthesimulationtoolsandledthe committeethatproducedtheguides. Key Result TheAdvanced school in Greensburg, Kansas, used many of the energy efficiency measures outlined in the Advanced Energy

96

Microsoft Word - Text  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUBTASK 1.7 - EVALUATION OF KEY FACTORS AFFECTING SUCCESSFUL OIL PRODUCTION IN THE BAKKEN FORMATION, NORTH DAKOTA - PHASE II Final Report (for the period of May 1, 2010, through...

97

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 3 Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 Total (All Sectors) by Source, 2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 By Sector, 2011 228 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). Sources: Tables 8.3a-8.3c. 543 522 296 103 37 36 16 Wood Natural Coal Other Waste Petroleum Other² 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Trillion Btu 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Quadrillion Btu Gases¹ 1.2 0.3 0.1 Industrial Electric Power Commercial 0.0 0.6

98

Microsoft Word - PGF 731.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program PGF 731 Autoclave Waste for PGF Course Syllabus Subject Category:...

99

AP Key Accomplishments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Key Accomplishments Recent Key Accomplishments Reduction of Carbon Dioxide Mechanistic insight into CO2 hydrogenation Rapid Transfer of Hydride Ion from a Ruthenium Complex to C1 Species in Water Reversible Hydrogen Storage using CO2 and a Proton-Switchable Iridium Catalyst in Aqueous Media Nickel(II) Macrocycles: Highly Efficient Electrocatalysts for the Selective Reduction of CO2 to CO Calculation of Thermodynamic Hydricities and the Design of Hydride Donors for CO2 Reduction Mechanisms for CO Production from CO2 Using Re(bpy)(CO)3X Catalysts Hydrogen Production Biomass-derived electrocatalytic composites for hydrogen evolution Hydrogen-Evolution Catalysts Based on NiMo Nitride Nanosheets Water Oxidation Enabling light-driven water oxidation via a low-energy RuIV=O intermediate

100

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by Source Total Energy, 1970-2010 By Energy Type, 2010 Prices³ by Energy Type, Indexed, 1970-2010 By Petroleum Product, 2010 72 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Fuel Oil Gasoline 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Wood and wood-derived fuels, and biomass waste; excludes fuel ethanol and biodiesel. Prior to 2001, also includes non-biomass waste. 3 Based on nominal dollars. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Consumption-weighted average price for asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, kerosene, lubricants, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, special naphthas, waxes, and miscella- neous petroleum products. Source: Table 3.3. Electricity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation Coal by Sector, 1989-2012 Petroleum by Sector, 1989-2012 Natural Gas by Sector, 1989-2012 Other Gases b by Sector, 1989-2012 Wood by Sector, 1989-2012 Waste by Sector, 1989-2012 98 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Commercial Industrial Electric Power Electric Power Industrial Industrial Total a Total a 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.2 Billion Short Tons Total a Electric Power 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Million Barrels Total a Electric Power Industrial a Includes commercial sector. b Blast furnace gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. Through 2010, also includes propane gas . Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#electricity.

102

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a Electric Net Summer Capacity, Total (All Sectors) a Electric Net Summer Capacity, Total (All Sectors) Total, 1949-2011 By Major Category, 2011 By Source, 2011 256 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Total 1 Conventional and pumped storage. 2 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscellaneous technologies. Source: Table 8.11a. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 Million Kilowatts Electric Power 791 140 101 22 Fossil Renewable Nuclear Hydroelectric 0 300 600 900 Million Kilowatts Nuclear Electric Power Fuels Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Energy Pumped Storage Electric Power 413 319 101 101 56 45 7 4 2 1 4 Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Hydro- Petroleum Wind Wood Waste Geothermal Solar/PV

103

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output Coal by Sector, 1989-2012 Petroleum by Sector, 1989-2012 Natural Gas by Sector, 1989-2012 Other Gases b by Sector, 1989-2012 Wood by Sector, 1989-2012 Waste by Sector, 1989-2012 102 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Industrial Commercial Industrial Electric Power Industrial Total a 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.2 Billion Short Tons Total a 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 90 180 270 360 Million Barrels Electric Power a Includes commercial sector. b Blast furnace gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. Through 2010, also includes propane gas . Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#electricity.

104

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 7.2c Electricity Net Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.2a; Million Kilowatthours) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petro- leum d Natural Gas e Biomass Total g Coal c Petro- leum d Natural Gas e Other Gases h Hydro- electric Power i Biomass Total k Waste f Wood j Waste f 1950 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 4,946 NA NA 4,946 1955 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 3,261 NA NA 3,261 1960 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 3,607 NA NA 3,607 1965 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

105

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b Electric Net Summer Capacity by Sector b Electric Net Summer Capacity by Sector Total (All Sectors) and Sectors, 1989-2011 Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 Commercial Sector, 2011 Industrial Sector, 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 257 1 Conventional hydroelectric power, solar/PV, wood, wind, blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, batteries, chemicals, hydro- gen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscellaneous technologies. 2 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels 3 Conventional hydroelectric power. 4 Solar/PV, wind, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscel- laneous technologies. (s)=Less than 0.05 million kilowatts.

106

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Consumption for Electricity Generation By Major Category, 1949-2011 By Major Fuel, 2011 By Major Source, 1949-2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 232 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Conventional hydroelectric power. 2 Geothermal, other gases, electricity net imports, solar thermal and photovoltaic energy, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. Sources: Tables 8.4a-8.4c. Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Quadrillion Btu 18.0 8.3 8.1 3.2 1.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.6 Coal

107

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 11.4 Nitrous Oxide Emissions, 1980-2009 (Thousand Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide) Year Energy Sources Waste Management Agricultural Sources Industrial Processes 3 Total Mobile Combustion 1 Stationary Combustion 2 Total Waste Combustion Human Sewage in Wastewater Total Nitrogen Fertilization of Soils Crop Residue Burning Solid Waste of Domesticated Animals Total 1980 60 44 104 1 10 11 364 1 75 440 88 642 1981 63 44 106 1 10 11 364 2 74 440 84 641 1982 67 42 108 1 10 11 339 2 74 414 80 614 1983 71 43 114 1 11 11 337 1 75 413 79 617 1984 86 45 132 1 11 11 355 2 74 431 87 661 1985 98 46 143 1 11 12 344 2 73 419 88 662 1986 107 45 152 1 11 12 329 2 71 402 86 652 1987 120 46 166 1 12 13 328 1 71 400 90 669 1988 138 48 185 1 12 13 329 1 71 401 95 694 1989 146 49 195 1 12 13 336 1 70 407 98 713 1990 88 47 135 1 12 13 432 1 66 499 96 743 1991 93 46 139 1 13 14 429 1 66 497 98 748 1992 96 47 143 1 13 14 445 2 66 512 95

108

Cryptographic Key Management Workshop 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryptographic Key Management Workshop 2012. Purpose: NIST is conducting a two-day Key Management Workshop on September 10-11. ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 11.3 Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons of Methane) Year Energy Sources Waste Management Agricultural Sources Industrial Processes 9 Total 5 Coal Mining Natural Gas Systems 1 Petroleum Systems 2 Mobile Com- bustion 3 Stationary Com- bustion 4 Total 5 Landfills Waste- water Treatment 6 Total 5 Enteric Fermen- tation 7 Animal Waste 8 Rice Cultivation Crop Residue Burning Total 5 1980 3.06 4.42 NA 0.28 0.45 8.20 10.52 0.52 11.04 5.47 2.87 0.48 0.04 8.86 0.17 28.27 1981 2.81 5.02 NA .27 .45 8.55 10.69 .53 11.22 5.56 2.73 .54 .05 8.88 .18 28.82 1982 3.23 5.04 NA .27 .46 9.01 10.63 .54 11.17 5.50 2.63 .47 .05 8.65 .13 28.97 1983 3.02 5.00 NA .27 .46 8.76 10.67 .54 11.21 5.46 2.68 .31 .04 8.49 .15 28.62 1984 3.61 5.11 NA .27 .48 9.46 10.68 .66 11.33 5.33 2.60 .40 .05 8.38 .16 29.34 1985 3.89 5.16 NA .26 .48 9.79 10.65

110

ZERO WASTE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the thesis was to develop a clear vision on better waste management system. The thesis introduced the sustainable waste management along with (more)

Upadhyaya, Luv

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Microsoft Word - Argonne Release Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

containing a combined total of 70 drums of contact-handled TRU waste sealed inside of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT shipping packages, arrived at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment...

112

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 7.4c Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.4a) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Biomass Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Other Gases g Biomass Other i Waste f Wood h Waste f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1990 Total .................... 1,191 2,056 46 28 27,781 36,159 1,055 275 1,125 41 86 1995 Total .................... 1,419 1,245 78 40 29,363 34,448 1,258 290 1,255 38 95 2000 Total .................... 1,547 1,615 85 47 28,031 30,520 1,386 331 1,244 35 108 2001 Total .................... 1,448 1,832 79 25 25,755 26,817 1,310 248 1,054 27 101 2002 Total ....................

113

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 7.3c Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.3a) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Biomass Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Other Gases g Biomass Other i Waste f Wood h Waste f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1990 Total .................... 417 953 28 15 10,740 13,103 517 104 335 16 36 1995 Total .................... 569 649 43 21 12,171 12,265 601 114 373 13 40 2000 Total .................... 514 823 37 26 11,706 10,459 640 107 369 10 45 2001 Total .................... 532 1,023 36 15 10,636 10,530 654 88 370 7 44 2002 Total .................... 477 834 33 18 11,855 11,608 685 106 464 15 43 2003 Total

114

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Total 1949 187 30 2 NA 30 33 NA NA 250 1 NA 1 1950 206 35 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 278 1 NA 1 1955 324 63 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 424 (s) NA (s) 1960 396 95 2 NA 42 43 NA NA 535 (s) NA (s) 1965 546 127 2 NA 55 57 NA NA 730 (s) NA (s) 1970 678 215 10 2 154 166 NA NA 1,059 (s) (s) (s) 1975 824 172 17 (s) 231 248 NA NA 1,244 (s) (s) (s) 1976 911 167 18 (s) 255 273 NA NA 1,351 (s) (s) (s) 1977 962 174 21 (s) 285 306 NA NA

115

Microsoft Word - Summary.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

handling, processing, and fabrication; stockpile management; materials and manufacturing technologies; nonproliferation programs; and waste management activities. S-3 Draft...

116

Microsoft Word - Summary.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

handling, processing, and fabrication; stockpile management; materials and manufacturing technologies; nonproliferation programs; and waste management activities. Chemistry and...

117

Proceedings: 1994 EPRI International Low Level Waste Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's third annual International Low Level Waste Conference focused on key economic, regulatory, and technical interests associated with low level waste. Topics discussed included advanced wet waste processing and technology, radwaste cost reduction, storage and disposal issues, mixed waste, advanced ion-exchange technology, decontamination, and source term reduction.

1995-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

118

Microsoft Word - National Policy AssurancesAwardTermsREVJuly2005...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Word - National Policy AssurancesAwardTermsREVJuly2005.doc Microsoft Word - National Policy AssurancesAwardTermsREVJuly2005.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word -...

119

Microsoft Word - CERFDOE Final Report - 071204.doc | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CERFDOE Final Report - 071204.doc Microsoft Word - CERFDOE Final Report - 071204.doc Microsoft Word - CERFDOE Final Report - 071204.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word...

120

Microsoft Word - ColleageConsultingWO | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Word - ColleageConsultingWO More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - PMCDP Curriculum Map Jan 2010 Microsoft Word - PMCDP Jan10 Catalog rev6 Professional Skills Program...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Microsoft Word - FWP- Fact Sheet.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc Microsoft Word - National Science Bowl Fact Sheet.doc Microsoft Word - National Science Bowl Fact Sheet.doc...

122

Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc More...

123

Microsoft Word - Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Word - Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx Microsoft Word - Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx Microsoft Word - Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx More Documents & Publications Before...

124

Help:Magic words | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

words words Jump to: navigation, search Magic words are strings of text that MediaWiki associates with a return value or function, such as time, site details, or page names. This page is about usage of standard magic words; for a technical reference, see Manual:Magic words. There are three general types of magic words: Behavior switches: these are uppercase words surrounded by double underscores, e.g. __FOO__ Variables: these are uppercase words surrounded by double braces, e.g. {{FOO}}. As such, they look a lot like templates. Parser functions: these take parameters and are either of the form {{foo:...}} or {{#foo:...}}. See also Help:Extension:ParserFunctions. Page-dependent magic words will affect or return data about the current

125

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS June 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS Aiken, SC - Construction of a key cleanup facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is gaining some serious ground given the remarkable building progress since Fall 2009. Construction and operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is among the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) highest cleanup priorities. When operational, SWPF will treat millions of gallons of salt waste currently stored in 49 underground tanks at SRS by removing radioactive constituents for vitrification at the nearby Defense Waste Processing Facility. Disposition of the salt waste inventory is a

126

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS June 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS Aiken, SC - Construction of a key cleanup facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is gaining some serious ground given the remarkable building progress since Fall 2009. Construction and operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is among the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) highest cleanup priorities. When operational, SWPF will treat millions of gallons of salt waste currently stored in 49 underground tanks at SRS by removing radioactive constituents for vitrification at the nearby Defense Waste Processing Facility. Disposition of the salt waste inventory is a

127

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Nitrous Oxide Emissions Total, 1980-2009 By Source, 2009 Energy Sources by Type, 1980-2009 Agricultural Sources by Major Type, 1980-2009 312 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Adipic acid production (primarily for the manufacture of nylon fibers and plastics) and nitric acid production (primarily for fertilizers). 2 Emissions from passenger cars and trucks; air, rail, and marine transportation; and farm and construction equipment. 3 Consumption of coal, petroleum, natural gas, and wood for heat or electricity. Source: Table 11.4. 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 Million Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 0 50 100 150 200 Thousand Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide 540 143 36 18 Agricultural Energy Industrial Waste 0 200

128

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10 1989 9 7 18 1 36 - 1 2 9 - - - 12 - - - 47 1990 9 6 28 1 45 - 1 2 15 - - - 18 - - - 63 1995 12 4 44 - 60 - 1 1 21 - - - 23 (s) - - 83 1996 14 4 44 (s) 62 - 1 1 31 - - - 33 (s) - - 95 1997 14 5 40 (s) 59 - 1 1 34 - - - 35 (s) - - 94 1998 11 5 42 (s) 57 - 1 1 32 - - - 34 - - - 91 1999 12 6 40 (s) 57 - 1 (s) 33 - - - 35 (s) - - 92 2000

129

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 7.4a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors) (Sum of Tables 7.4b and 7.4c) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total .................... 91,871 5,423 69,998 NA NA 75,421 629 NA 5 NA NA 1955 Total .................... 143,759 5,412 69,862 NA NA 75,274 1,153 NA 3 NA NA 1960 Total .................... 176,685 3,824 84,371 NA NA 88,195 1,725 NA 2 NA NA 1965 Total ....................

130

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 10.2c Renewable Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector (Trillion Btu) Hydro- electric Power a Geo- thermal b Solar/PV c Wind d Biomass Total Wood e Waste f Total 1950 Total .................... 1,346 NA NA NA 5 NA 5 1,351 1955 Total .................... 1,322 NA NA NA 3 NA 3 1,325 1960 Total .................... 1,569 (s) NA NA 2 NA 2 1,571 1965 Total .................... 2,026 2 NA NA 3 NA 3 2,031 1970 Total .................... 2,600 6 NA NA 1 2 4 2,609 1975 Total .................... 3,122 34 NA NA (s) 2 2 3,158 1980 Total .................... 2,867 53 NA NA 3 2 4 2,925 1985 Total .................... 2,937 97 (s) (s)

131

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 12.6 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) Coal Natural Gas b Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste d Total e Distillate Fuel Oil c Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total 1973 Total ............................ 812 199 20 2 254 276 NA NA 1,286 1975 Total ............................ 824 172 17 (s) 231 248 NA NA 1,244 1980 Total ............................ 1,137 200 12 1 194 207 NA NA 1,544 1985 Total ............................ 1,367 166 6 1 79 86 NA NA 1,619 1990 Total ............................ 1,548 176 7 3 92 102 (s) 6 1,831 1995 Total ............................ 1,661 228 8 8 45 61 (s) 10 1,960 1996 Total ............................ 1,752 205 8 8 50 66 (s) 10 2,033

132

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 10.2b Renewable Energy Consumption: Industrial and Transportation Sectors, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Industrial Sector 1 Transportation Sector Hydro- electric Power 2 Geo- thermal 3 Solar/PV 4 Wind 5 Biomass Total Biomass Wood 6 Waste 7 Fuel Ethanol 8 Losses and Co-products 9 Total Fuel Ethanol 10 Biodiesel Total 1949 76 NA NA NA 468 NA NA NA 468 544 NA NA NA 1950 69 NA NA NA 532 NA NA NA 532 602 NA NA NA 1955 38 NA NA NA 631 NA NA NA 631 669 NA NA NA 1960 39 NA NA NA 680 NA NA NA 680 719 NA NA NA 1965 33 NA NA NA 855 NA NA NA 855

133

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 7.2b Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.2a; Million Kilowatthours) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage e Renewable Energy Total j Coal a Petro- leum b Natural Gas c Other Gases d Conven- tional Hydro- electric Power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/ PV i Wind Wood g Waste h 1950 Total .................. 154,520 33,734 44,559 NA 0 f ( ) 95,938 390 NA NA NA NA 329,141 1955 Total .................. 301,363 37,138 95,285 NA 0 f ( ) 112,975 276 NA NA NA NA

134

Microsoft Word - Document1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order to Show Cause Name of Petitioner: C. Lawrence Cornett Date of Filing: June 10, 1996 Case Number: VWX-0009 This Order to Show Cause is issued with regard to a Motion to Dismiss filed by Maria Elena Torano Associates, Inc. (META) on May 21, 1996. In its Motion, META seeks the dismissal of the underlying complaint and hearing request filed by C. Lawrence Cornett (Cornett) under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. I. Background The Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program was established to safeguard "public and employee health and safety; ensur[e] compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations; and prevent[ ] fraud, mismanagement, waste, and abuse" at DOE's

135

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Biomass Resources 6 Biomass Resources U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 113 Notes: * Data are for total biomass per square kilometer. * km 2 = square kilometer. * This study estimates the biomass resources currently available in the United States by county. It includes the following feedstock categories: crop residues (5 year average: 2003-2007), forest and primary mill residues (2007), secondary mill and urban wood waste (2002), methane emis- sions from landfills (2008), domestic wastewater treatment (2007), and animal manure (2002). For more information on the data development, please refer to http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy06osti/39181.pdf. Although, the document contains the methodology for the development of an older assessment,

136

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 12.7 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Consumption (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) By Source By Sector Wood b Biomass Waste c Fuel Ethanol d Bio- diesel Total Resi- dential Com- mercial e Indus- trial f Trans- portation Electric Power g Total 1973 Total ...................... 143 (s) NA NA 143 33 1 109 NA (s) 143 1975 Total ...................... 140 (s) NA NA 141 40 1 100 NA (s) 141 1980 Total ...................... 232 (s) NA NA 232 80 2 150 NA (s) 232 1985 Total ...................... 252 14 3 NA 270 95 2 168 3 1 270 1990 Total ...................... 208 24 4 NA 237 54 8 147 4 23 237 1995 Total ...................... 222 30 8 NA 260 49 9 166 8 28 260 1996 Total ......................

137

Microsoft Word - lbrereleasefinal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Background Radiation Experiment Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results CARLSBAD, N.M., May 18, 2011 - New Mexico State University's Low Background Radiation Experiment (LBRE), which takes place 2,150 feet below the earth's surface at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, recently released some results about the project's first two years of experimentation. The March 2011 edition of Health Physics printed an article titled "Exploring Biological Effects of Low Level Radiation from the Other Side of Background," summarizing some initial data taken from LBRE and from a sister experiment conducted at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute in Albuquerque. "It's nice that we got them published, but they are still very preliminary," said NMSU Professor

138

Microsoft Word - engcovers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DESIGN, PERFORMANCE, AND SUSTAINABILITY OF DESIGN, PERFORMANCE, AND SUSTAINABILITY OF ENGINEERED COVERS FOR URANIUM MILL TAILINGS Final remedies at most uranium mill tailings sites include engineered covers designed to contain metals and radionuclides in the subsurface for hundreds of years. Early cover designs rely on compacted soil layers to limit water infiltration and release of radon, but some of these covers inadvertently created habitats for deep-rooted plants. Root intrusion and soil development increased the saturated hydraulic conductivity several orders of magnitude above design targets. These covers may require high levels of maintenance to sustain long-term performance. Relatively low precipitation, high potential evapotranspiration, and thick unsaturated soils favor long-term hydrologic isolation of buried waste at arid

139

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by Source Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by Source Total Energy, 1970-2010 By Energy Type, 2010 Expenditures³ by Energy Type, Indexed, 1970-2010 By Petroleum Product, 2010 76 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Wood and wood-derived fuels, and biomass waste; excludes fuel ethanol and biodiesel. 3 Based on nominal dollars. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, kerosene, lubricants, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, special naphthas, waxes, and miscellaneous petroleum products. Source: Table 3.5. 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 300 600 900 1,200 1,500 Billion Dollars¹ Electricity Gas 709 366 160 50 6

140

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 10.2a Renewable Energy Consumption: Residential and Commercial Sectors (Trillion Btu) Residential Sector Commercial Sector a Geo- thermal b Solar/ PV c Biomass Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal b Solar/ PV f Wind g Biomass Total Wood d Wood d Waste h Fuel Ethanol i Total 1950 Total .................... NA NA 1,006 1,006 NA NA NA NA 19 NA NA 19 19 1955 Total .................... NA NA 775 775 NA NA NA NA 15 NA NA 15 15 1960 Total .................... NA NA 627 627 NA NA NA NA 12 NA NA 12 12 1965 Total .................... NA NA 468 468 NA NA NA NA 9 NA NA 9 9 1970 Total

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 7.3b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.3a) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total .................... 91,871 5,423 69,998 NA NA 75,421 629 NA 5 NA NA 1955 Total .................... 143,759

142

Nuclear waste transportation: Case studies of identifying stakeholder risk information needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the cleanup of our nations nuclear legacy, involving complex decisions about how and where to dispose of nuclear waste and how to transport it to its ultimate disposal site. It is widely recognized that a broad range of stakeholders and tribes should be involved in this kind of decision. All too frequently, however, stakeholders and tribes are only invited to participate by commenting on processes and activities that are near completion; they are not included in the problem formulation stages. Moreover, it is often assumed that high levels of complexity and uncertainty prevent meaningful participation by these groups. Considering the types of information that stakeholders and tribes need to be able to participate in the full life cycle of decision making is critical for improving participation and transparency of decision making. Toward this objective, the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) participated in three public processes relating to nuclear waste transportation and disposal in 19971998. First, CRESP organized focus groups to identify concerns about nuclear waste transportation. Second, CRESP conducted exit surveys at regional public workshops held by DOE to get input from stakeholders on intersite waste transfer issues. Third, CRESP developed visual tools to synthesize technical information and allow stakeholders and tribes with varying levels of knowledge about nuclear waste to participate in meaningful discussion. In this article we share the results of the CRESP findings, discuss common themes arising from these interactions, and comment on special considerations needed to facilitate stakeholder and tribal participation in similar decision-making processes. Key words: environmental information, hazardous waste, risk communication, risk perception, stakeholders. Environ Health Perspect

Christina H. Drew; Deirdre A. Grace; Susan M. Silbernagel; Erin S. Hemmings; Alan Smith; William C. Griffith; Timothy K. Takaro; Elaine M. Faustman

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

144

Microsoft Word - al2005-06.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - al2005-06.doc Microsoft Word - al2005-06.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL2006-01.doc OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Microsoft Word - AL2005-08...

145

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating Organizations 3 Incentive and Objectives FBSR sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form has been identified as a promising supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Objectives: Reduce the risk associated with implementing the FBSR NAS waste form as a supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Conduct test with actual tank wastes Use the best science to fill key data gaps Linking previous and new results together 4 Outline FBSR NAS waste form processing scales FBSR NAS waste form data/key assumptions FBSR NAS key data gaps FBSR NAS testing program 5 FBSR NAS Waste Form Processing

146

Help:Magic words | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magic words Magic words (Redirected from Help:Variables) Jump to: navigation, search Magic words are strings of text that MediaWiki associates with a return value or function, such as time, site details, or page names. This page is about usage of standard magic words; for a technical reference, see Manual:Magic words. There are three general types of magic words: Behavior switches: these are uppercase words surrounded by double underscores, e.g. __FOO__ Variables: these are uppercase words surrounded by double braces, e.g. {{FOO}}. As such, they look a lot like templates. Parser functions: these take parameters and are either of the form {{foo:...}} or {{#foo:...}}. See also Help:Extension:ParserFunctions.

147

Self-Supervised Chinese Word Segmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new unsupervised training method for acquiring probability models that accurately segment Chinese character sequences into words. By constructing a core lexicon to guide unsupervised word learning, self-supervised segmentation overcomes ...

Fuchun Peng; Dale Schuurmans

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Augmenting WordNet's structure using LDOCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an algorithm that will augment the structure of WordNet with links between the noun and verb hierarchies, by using word definitions extracted from Longman's Dictionary of Contemporary English. The results obtained show that a simple algorithm ...

Vivi Nastase; Stan Szpakowicz

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Microsoft Word - Document2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY1999 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information FY1999 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information Public Benefits and Distributed Generation Outreach Project The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) will hold collaborative workshops with key stakeholders to build consensus on effective policy options for emerging competitive distributed generation markets. (Workshops were held in Philadelphia in April 2000, Santa Fe in June 2000, and Tucson in October 2000.) NARUC will also provide a concise summary of "lessons learned" from state experiences with public benefits programs and distribute an issue paper that describes new types of energy efficiency co-payments that can successfully maintain participation rates while reducing non-participant bill impacts. (NARUC released "Pay-As-You-Save Energy Efficiency

150

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 7.2a Electricity Net Generation: Total (All Sectors) (Sum of Tables 7.2b and 7.2c; Million Kilowatthours) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage e Renewable Energy Total j Coal a Petro- leum b Natural Gas c Other Gases d Conven- tional Hydro- electric Power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/ PV i Wind Wood g Waste h 1950 Total ................ 154,520 33,734 44,559 NA 0 f ( ) 100,885 390 NA NA NA NA 334,088 1955 Total ................ 301,363 37,138 95,285 NA 0 f ( ) 116,236 276 NA NA NA NA 550,299 1960 Total ................ 403,067 47,987 157,970 NA 518 f ( ) 149,440 140 NA 33 NA NA 759,156 1965 Total ................ 570,926 64,801 221,559 NA 3,657 f ( ) 196,984 269 NA 189 NA NA 1,058,386 1970 Total

151

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,573,566 218,384 145,399 363 5,590 1,943,302 14,469 1 984 39 15,493 7,281 495 269 93 8,136 1990 1,592,395 233,852 119,580 384 7,488 1,953,699 14,281 1 937 243 15,462 7,119 513 208 122 7,961 1991 1,592,186 238,084 111,351 398 8,447 1,950,466 14,240 1 856 246 15,342 7,109 498 193 113 7,913 1992 1,617,034 248,149 96,638 400 10,053 1,972,275 14,060 1 704 264 15,030 6,975 477 158 119 7,728 1993 1,687,623 250,411

152

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 11.2b Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Commercial Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity 7 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kerosene LPG 5 Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 8 Waste 9 Fuel Ethanol 10 Total 1949 148 19 16 3 2 7 NA 28 55 58 280 2 NA NA 2 1950 147 21 19 3 2 7 NA 33 66 63 297 2 NA NA 2 1955 76 35 28 4 3 9 NA 38 82 88 281 1 NA NA 1 1960 39 56 36 3 5 5 NA 44 93 124 312 1 NA NA 1 1965 25 79 39 4 6 5 NA 51 106 177 387 1 NA NA 1 1970 16 131 43 4 9 6 NA 56 119 268 534 1 NA NA 1 1975 14 136 43 4 8 6 NA 39 100 333 583 1 NA NA 1 1976 14 144 48 3 9 7 NA 45 111 358 627 1 NA NA 1 1977 14

153

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949-2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949-2012 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total Hydroelectric Power b Other c Renewable Energy a See Table 10.1 for definition. b Conventional hydroelectric power. c Geothermal, solar/PV, and wind. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#renewable. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1-10.2c. Power fuels a Fossil Fuels Biomass a Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 2.7 1.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 0.2 0.2 Hydro- Wood Bio- Wind Waste Solar/ Geo- 0 1 2 3 0.7 0.1 2.2 1.2 4.7 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric 0 1 2 3 4 5 PV a a a a thermal a electric Power

154

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

29 29 Table 8.3a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.3b and 8.3c; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 1989 323 96 462 93 973 546 30 577 39 1,589 1990 363 127 538 141 1,168 651 36 687 40 1,896 1991 352 112 547 148 1,159 623 37 660 44 1,863 1992 367 117 592 160 1,236 658 40 698 42 1,976 1993 373 129 604 142 1,248 668 45 713 41 2,002 1994 388 133 646 144 1,309 722 45 767 42 2,119 1995 386 121 686 145 1,338 721 47 768 44 2,151 1996 392 133 711 150 1,385 701 55 756 43 2,184 1997 389 137 713 150 1,389 731 55 785 53 2,227 1998 382 136 782 167 1,466 700 57 757 46 2,269 1999 386 125 811 179 1,501 690 55 744 48 2,294 2000 384 108 812 184 1,488 707 56 764 50 2,302 2001 354 90 741 133 1,318 557 28 585 55 1,958 2002

155

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatthours) Total (All Sectors), Major Sources, 1949-2012 Total (All Sectors), Major Sources, Monthly Electric Power Sector, Major Sources, 2012 Commercial Sector, Major Sources, 2012 Industrial Sector, Major Sources, 2012 94 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Gases b Gas Gas electric Power c Natural Gas Petroleum Renewable Energy a Natural Gas 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 Coal Nuclear Electric Power 2013 2011 2012 Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy a Coal 1,503 1,138 769 463 20 Coal Natural Nuclear Renewable Petro- 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 50 100 150 200 Petroleum Energy a Gas Electric Power leum 5.9 2.5 0.8 0.1 Natural Waste Coal

156

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Electricity-Only Plants 11 1989 767,378 25,574 241,960 3 517 270,125 2,790,567 - 59 111 - 1990 774,213 14,956 181,231 17 1,008 201,246 2,794,110 (s) 87 162 - 1995 832,928 16,169 86,584 133 1,082 108,297 3,287,571 (s)

157

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 8 1989 14 4 10 (s) 27 (s) 10 10 - 38 1990 15 5 16 (s) 36 (s) 10 11 - 46 1995 17 3 29 - 48 (s) 15 15 (s) 63 1996 20 3 33 R - 55 1 17 18 - 73 1997 22 4 40 (s) 66 1 19 20 - 86 1998 20 5 39 (s) 64 1 18 18 - 82 1999 20 3 37 R - 61 1 17 17 - 78 2000 21 4 39 R - 64 1 17 18 - 82 2001 18 4 35 - 58 1 8 8 6 72 2002 18 3 36 - 57 1 6 7 5 69 2003 23 3 17 - 42 1 8 8 6 57 2004 22 4 22 - 49 (s) 8 9 6 64 2005 23 4 20 - 47 (s) 8 9 6 61 2006 22 2 19 (s) 44 (s) 9 9 6 59 2007 23 2 20 - 44 1 6 7 4 55 2008 23 2 20 - 45 (s) 9 9 6 60 2009 20

158

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

61 61 Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 9 1989 0.3 0.2 0.6 - 1.0 - - (s) (s) 0.2 - - - 0.2 - 1.2 1990 .3 .2 .7 - 1.2 - - (s) (s) .2 - - - .2 - 1.4 1995 .3 .2 1.2 - 1.8 - - (s) (s) .3 - - - .3 - 2.1 1996 .3 .3 1.2 - 1.8 - - (s) (s) .4 - - - .5 - 2.3 1997 .3 .4 1.2 - 1.9 - - (s) (s) .4 - - - .5 - 2.3 1998 .3 .3 1.2 - 1.8 - - (s) (s)

159

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

44 44 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu 1989 639 120 1,471 1 - 1,591 81,670 3 24 6 1 1990 1,266 173 1,630 2 - 1,805 97,330 5 23 8 (s) 1991 1,221 104 995 1 - 1,101 99,868 5 21 11 1 1992 1,704 154 1,045 10 4 1,229 122,908 6 21 10 2 1993 1,794 290 1,074 27 40 1,591 128,743 4 21 10 2 1994 2,241

160

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

59 59 Table 8.11b Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44.9 0.0 5 ( ) 18.5 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 18.5 NA 63.4 1950 NA NA NA NA 50.0 .0 5 ( ) 19.2 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 19.2 NA 69.2 1955 NA NA NA NA 86.8 .0 5 ( ) 27.4 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 27.4 NA 114.2 1960 NA NA NA NA 130.8 .4 5 ( ) 35.8 .1 10 ( ) (s) NA NA 35.9 NA 167.1 1965 NA NA NA NA 182.9 .8 5 ( ) 51.0 .1 10 ( ) (s) NA NA 51.1 NA

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161

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal 5 Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 1,995 415 569 NA 2,979 0 1,349 6 NA NA NA NA 1,355 NA 5 4,339 1950 2,199 472 651 NA 3,322 0 1,346 5 NA NA NA NA 1,351 NA 6 4,679 1955 3,458 471 1,194 NA 5,123 0 1,322 3 NA NA NA NA 1,325 NA 14 6,461 1960 4,228 553 1,785 NA 6,565 6 1,569 2 NA (s) NA NA 1,571 NA 15 8,158 1965

162

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Commercial Sector 8 1989 2,320 1,542 637 - 804 5,303 37 (s) 5 1 43 9 3 2 3 17 1990 2,418 2,294 706 - 959 6,377 39 (s) 4 1 45 10 6 1 4 21 1991 2,680 2,287 544 - 1,014 6,526 32 (s) 3 1 35 10 6 1 4 21 1992 2,552 2,787 474 - 1,258 7,070 32 (s) 3 1 35 10 7 1 4 21 1993 2,988 3,315 616 - 1,285 8,205 40 (s) 3 1 44 12 7 1 4 24 1994 2,932 3,722 654 - 1,292 8,601 39 (s) 3 (s) 42 11 8 1 4 24 1995 3,106 4,070 509 -

163

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

175 175 Table A5. Approximate Heat Content of Coal and Coal Coke (Million Btu per Short Ton) Coal Coal Coke Production a Waste Coal Supplied b Consumption Imports Exports Imports and Exports Residential and Commercial Sectors c Industrial Sector Electric Power Sector e,f Total Coke Plants Other d 1950 ........................ 25.090 NA 24.461 26.798 24.820 23.937 24.989 25.020 26.788 24.800 1955 ........................ 25.201 NA 24.373 26.794 24.821 24.056 24.982 25.000 26.907 24.800 1960 ........................ 24.906 NA 24.226 26.791 24.609 23.927 24.713 25.003 26.939 24.800 1965 ........................ 24.775 NA 24.028 26.787 24.385 23.780 24.537 25.000 26.973 24.800 1970 ........................ 23.842 NA 23.203 26.784 22.983 22.573 23.440 25.000 26.982 24.800 1975 ........................

164

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 11.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal 3 Natural Gas 4 Petroleum Total 2,9 Biomass 2 Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil 5 Jet Fuel Kero- sene LPG 6 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 7 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 8 Total Wood 10 Waste 11 Fuel Ethanol 12 Bio- diesel Total 1949 1,118 270 12 140 NA 42 13 7 329 8 244 25 820 2,207 145 NA NA NA 145 1950 1,152 313 14 168 NA 48 16 9 357 8 273 26 918 2,382 147 NA NA NA 147 1955 1,038 472 24 247 21 48 27 10 473 13 274 38 1,175 2,685 134 NA NA NA 134 1960 915 650 21 291 53 41 42 10 543 29 275 45 1,349 2,914 124 NA NA NA 124 1965 1,075 828 15 330 87 40 57 11 627 39 289 65 1,559 3,462 125 NA NA NA 125 1970 1,134 1,144 7 394 141 39 78 11 789 41 396 85 1,983 4,261

165

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.11a Electric Net Summer Capacity: Total (All Sectors), Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.11b and 8.11d; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44.9 0.0 5 ( ) 18.5 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 18.5 NA 63.4 1950 NA NA NA NA 50.0 .0 5 ( ) 19.2 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 19.2 NA 69.2 1955 NA NA NA NA 86.8 .0 5 ( ) 27.4 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 27.4 NA 114.2 1960 NA NA NA NA 130.8 .4 5 ( ) 35.8 .1 10

166

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

16 16 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,520,230 169,653 133,546 363 4,366 1,828,158 13,815 1 810 7 14,633 7,055 390 246 25 7,717 1990 1,534,141 177,232 101,800 384 5,795 1,819,351 13,576 1 628 13 14,218 6,878 390 175 36 7,480 1991 1,534,559 180,541 95,149 398 7,207 1,817,854 13,590 1 621 15 14,227 6,886 384 165 42 7,476 1992 1,556,741 187,730 79,153 400 8,476 1,832,501

167

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 10.1 Renewable Energy Production and Consumption by Source (Trillion Btu) Production a Consumption Biomass Total Renew- able Energy d Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal f Solar/ PV g Wind h Biomass Total Renew- able Energy Bio- fuels b Total c Wood i Waste j Bio- fuels k Total 1950 Total .................... NA 1,562 2,978 1,415 NA NA NA 1,562 NA NA 1,562 2,978 1955 Total .................... NA 1,424 2,784 1,360 NA NA NA 1,424 NA NA 1,424 2,784 1960 Total .................... NA 1,320 2,928 1,608 (s) NA NA 1,320 NA NA 1,320 2,928 1965 Total .................... NA 1,335 3,396 2,059 2 NA NA 1,335 NA NA 1,335 3,396 1970 Total .................... NA 1,431 4,070 2,634 6 NA NA 1,429 2 NA 1,431 4,070 1975 Total .................... NA

168

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Table 8.2d Electricity Net Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.2a; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- themal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10 1989 0.7 0.6 2.2 0.1 3.6 - - 0.1 0.1 0.5 - - - 0.7 - 4.3 1990 .8 .6 3.3 .1 4.8 - - .1 .1 .8 - - - 1.1 - 5.8 1995 1.0 .4 5.2 - 6.5 - - .1 .1 1.5 - - - 1.7 (s) 8.2 1996 1.1 .4 5.2 (s) 6.7 - - .1 .1 2.2 - - - 2.4 (s) 9.0 1997 1.0 .4 4.7 (s) 6.2 - - .1 (s) 2.3 - - - 2.5 (s) 8.7 1998 1.0 .4 4.9 (s) 6.3 - - .1 (s) 2.3 - - - 2.5 - 8.7 1999 1.0 .4 4.6 (s) 6.0

169

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Table 8.2b Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.2a; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 6 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 9 Wind Total Wood 7 Waste 8 1949 135.5 28.5 37.0 NA 201.0 0.0 6 ( ) 89.7 0.4 NA NA NA NA 90.1 NA 291.1 1950 154.5 33.7 44.6 NA 232.8 .0 6 ( ) 95.9 .4 NA NA NA NA 96.3 NA 329.1 1955 301.4 37.1 95.3 NA 433.8 .0 6 ( ) 113.0 .3 NA NA NA NA 113.3 NA 547.0 1960 403.1 48.0 158.0 NA 609.0 .5 6 ( ) 145.8 .1 NA (s) NA NA 146.0 NA 755.5 1965

170

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Renewable . Renewable Energy Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949-2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949-2012 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total Hydroelectric Power b Other c Renewable Energy a See Table 10.1 for definition. b Conventional hydroelectric power. c Geothermal, solar/PV, and wind. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#renewable. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1-10.2c. Power fuels a Fossil Fuels Biomass a Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 2.7 1.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 0.2 0.2 Hydro- Wood Bio- Wind Waste Solar/ Geo- 0 1 2 3 0.7 0.1 2.2 1.2 4.7 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric 0

171

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5b 5b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation by Sector, 2011 Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Wood and Waste U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 237 7.3 0.6 0.0 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 2 4 6 8 Trillion Cubic Feet -CHP¹ (ss) 1 Combined-heat-and-power plants. ² Combined-heat-and-power and electricity-only plants. (s)=Less than 0.5 million short tons. (ss)=Less than 0.05 trillion cubic feet. (sss)=Less than 0.5 million barrels. Sources: Tables 8.5b-8.5d. Electricity-Only Plants 925 8 0 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 Million Short Tons (s) Electricity-Only Plants CHP¹ -CHP¹ 47 2 0 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 20 40 60 Million Barrels 416 181 24 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 100 200

172

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 1989 13 8 67 2 90 19 5 24 1 114 1990 21 9 80 4 114 18 6 25 (s) 138 1991 21 6 82 4 113 17 9 26 1 140 1992 28 6 102 5 140 17 8 25 2 167 1993 30 8 107 3 147 16 8 24 1 173 1994 37 9 119 5 170 15 10 24 1 195 1995 40 13 118 4 176 15 12 27 (s) 203 1996 43 12 121 4 180 16 16 33 (s) 213 1997 39 12 132 8 191 16 14 30 (s) 221 1998 43 6 142 5 196 10 16 26 (s) 222 1999 52 7 146 4 208 10 20 30 (s) 238 2000 53 7 158 5 223 6 19 26 (s) 249 2001 52 6 164 5 226 8 4 13 3 243 2002 40 4 214 6 264 8 5 13 5 281 2003 38 7 200 9 255 9 11 20 3 278 2004

173

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 2010 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 2010 By Sector Residential Sector by Major Source Commercial Sector by Major Source Industrial Sector by Major Source 74 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 22.40 21.00 20.90 12.04 Residential Transportation Commercial Industrial 0 5 10 15 20 25 Dollars¹ per Million Btu 33.81 23.46 11.13 Retail Petroleum Natural 0 10 20 30 40 Dollars¹ per Million Btu Gas Electricity 19.89 17.58 6.25 3.96 2.74 Retail Petroleum Natural Coal Biomass² 0 5 10 15 20 25 Dollars¹ per Million Btu 29.87 18.69 9.20 Retail Petroleum Natural 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Dollars¹ per Million Btu Gas Gas Electricity Electricity 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Wood and wood-derived fuels, and biomass waste; excludes fuel ethanol and biodiesel.

174

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26 26 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.2c Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.2b; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 6 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 9 Wind Total Wood 7 Waste 8 Electricity-Only Plants 11 1989 1,554.0 158.3 266.9 - 1,979.3 529.4 6 ( ) 269.2 4.2 6.9 14.6 0.3 2.1 297.3 - 2,805.9 1990 1,560.2 117.6 264.7 (s) 1,942.4 576.9 -3.5 289.8 5.6 10.4 15.4 .4 2.8 324.3 - 2,840.0 1995 1,658.0 62.0 317.4 (s) 2,037.4 673.4 -2.7 305.4 5.9 16.3 13.4 .5 3.2 344.7 - 3,052.8 1996 1,742.8 68.5 272.8 (s)

175

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 6.1 Coal Overview (Thousand Short Tons) Production a Waste Coal Supplied b Trade Stock Change d,e Losses and Unaccounted for e,f Consumption Imports Exports Net Imports c 1950 Total .................... 560,388 NA 365 29,360 -28,995 27,829 9,462 494,102 1955 Total .................... 490,838 NA 337 54,429 -54,092 -3,974 -6,292 447,012 1960 Total .................... 434,329 NA 262 37,981 -37,719 -3,194 1,722 398,081 1965 Total .................... 526,954 NA 184 51,032 -50,848 1,897 2,244 471,965 1970 Total .................... 612,661 NA 36 71,733 -71,697 11,100 6,633 523,231 1975 Total .................... 654,641 NA 940 66,309 -65,369 32,154 -5,522 562,640 1980 Total .................... 829,700 NA 1,194 91,742 -90,548 25,595 10,827 702,730 1985 Total ....................

176

Microsoft Word - 09-0661 _2_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

remote-handled waste certification audit performed for Summary Category Group S5000 debris waste comprised of a single waste stream designated as GEVNC.01. An electronic version...

177

Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free April 13, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What activity wastes gasoline, costs money, produces pollutants, and yet doesn't get you anywhere? Idling! And yet, every year, Americans waste 3 billion gallons of fuel by idling their vehicles. Idling is running a vehicle any time that it's not moving. In this condition, the car's fuel economy is exactly zero miles per gallon. Although many people think that restarting the engine too often will wear out the starter, that idea is just an "old husband's tale." In fact, idling places unnecessary wear-and-tear on the engine, and many manufacturers discourage it. Although drivers can't avoid some amount of idling, such as being stuck in

178

Microsoft Word - tennessee.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 2 Other gases includes blast furnace gas, propane...

179

Microsoft Word - kentucky.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 3 Other includes non-biogenic municipal solid...

180

Microsoft Word - texas.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 2 Other includes non-biogenic municipal solid...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Microsoft Word - florida.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 2 Other gases includes blast furnace gas, propane...

182

Microsoft Word - montana.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 2 Other gases includes blast furnace gas, propane...

183

Microsoft Word - oregon.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 2 Other includes non-biogenic municipal solid...

184

Microsoft Word - pennsylvania.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 3 Other includes non-biogenic municipal solid...

185

Microsoft Word - delaware.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 3 Other includes non-biogenic municipal solid...

186

Microsoft Word - washington.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 2 Other gases includes blast furnace gas, propane...

187

Microsoft Word - illinois.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 2 Other gases includes blast furnace gas, propane...

188

Microsoft Word - louisiana.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 3 Other includes non-biogenic municipal solid...

189

Microsoft Word - vermont.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 2 Other gases includes blast furnace gas, propane...

190

Microsoft Word - iowa.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 2 Other includes non-biogenic municipal solid...

191

Microsoft Word - Chapter 05.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

identifying its mixed waste volume, characteristics, treatment capacity, and available technologies and (2) prepare and submit (to the appropriate state or EPA regulators) Site...

192

Microsoft Word - Chapter 08.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Thirty-three years. Facility planning, construction and project management, waste management, nuclear safety specialist. ELIZABETH WITHERS, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY,...

193

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.11c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.11b; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Electricity-Only Plants 9 1989 296.5 78.0 119.3 0.4 494.2 98.2 18.1 73.6 0.9 1.5 2.6 0.2 1.5 80.3 - 690.7 1990 299.9 76.6 121.8 .4 498.6 99.6 19.5 73.3 1.0 1.9 2.7 .3 1.8 80.9 (s) 698.6 1995 301.3 64.7 145.3 .3 511.5 99.5 21.4 77.4 1.5 2.7 3.0 .3 1.7 86.6 - 719.1 1996 303.1 70.6 143.1 .1 516.9 100.8 21.1 75.3 1.4 2.6 2.9 .3 1.7 84.2 - 723.0

194

Hazardous-waste analysis plan for LLNL operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in many facets of research ranging from nuclear weapons research to advanced Biomedical studies. Approximately 80% of all programs at LLNL generate hazardous waste in one form or another. Aside from producing waste from industrial type operations (oils, solvents, bottom sludges, etc.) many unique and toxic wastes are generated such as phosgene, dioxin (TCDD), radioactive wastes and high explosives. One key to any successful waste management program must address the following: proper identification of the waste, safe handling procedures and proper storage containers and areas. This section of the Waste Management Plan will address methodologies used for the Analysis of Hazardous Waste. In addition to the wastes defined in 40 CFR 261, LLNL and Site 300 also generate radioactive waste not specifically covered by RCRA. However, for completeness, the Waste Analysis Plan will address all hazardous waste.

Roberts, R.S.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

195

Directory of Federal Agencies and University Research Centers conducting R D in Environmental and Waste Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 1990 PAR Enterprises, Incorporated was awarded a contract by the Department of Energy to conduct a survey and prepare a Directory of Federal Agencies and University Research Centers involved in environmental restoration and waste management research and development. To conduct the survey and organize the Directory, data from 50 Federal agencies and 100 universities was collected, evaluated and summarized. The purpose of the survey and Directory is to describe the activities and provide a reference base of Federal Agencies and University Research Cantors involved in environmental restoration and waste management research and development. The Directory contains (1) the Foreword, (2) an Introduction, (3) a Description of the Survey Organization and Research Approach, (4) the EM/OTD Key Word Networks, (5) a series of matrices that show the relationship between the OTD technical requirements and the Federal Agency/University EM capabilities, (6) the Federal Agency and University Research Center EM R D Capabilities Profiles, (7) a Glossary, and (8) an Appendix that describes the EM activities of the DOE National Laboratories and related research facilities. The survey and Directory was prepared for the Office of Technology Development (OTD), a major R D component of DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Microsoft Word - EPA_combine_append.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the waste according to waste classifications. Phases I, 11, and I11 would not include any sodium-contaminated waste or waste comingled with fuel pieces, which are present in the...

197

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table 7.1 Coal Overview, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Production 1 Waste Coal Supplied 2 Trade Stock Change 4,5 Losses and Unaccounted for 6 Consumption Imports Exports Net Imports 3 1949 480.6 NA 0.3 32.8 -32.5 7 ( ) 7 -35.1 483.2 1950 560.4 NA .4 29.4 -29.0 R 27.8 R 9.5 494.1 1955 490.8 NA .3 54.4 -54.1 R -4.0 R -6.3 447.0 1960 434.3 NA .3 38.0 -37.7 R -3.2 R 1.7 398.1 1965 527.0 NA .2 51.0 -50.8 R 1.9 R 2.2 472.0 1970 612.7 NA (s) 71.7 -71.7 R 11.1 R 6.6 523.2 1975 654.6 NA .9 66.3 -65.4 32.2 -5.5 562.6 1976 684.9 NA 1.2 60.0 -58.8 8.5 13.8 603.8 1977 697.2 NA 1.6 54.3 -52.7 22.6 -3.4 625.3 1978 670.2 NA 3.0 40.7 -37.8 -4.9 12.1 625.2 1979 781.1 NA 2.1 66.0 -64.0 36.2 .4 680.5 1980 829.7 NA 1.2 91.7 -90.5 25.6 10.8 702.7 1981 823.8 NA 1.0 112.5 -111.5 -19.0 -1.4 732.6 1982 838.1 NA .7 106.3 -105.5 22.6 3.1 706.9 1983 782.1 NA

198

Microsoft Word - Final Annual TRU Waste Inventory Report-2009...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Conservation and Recovery Act rem Roentgen equivalent man RFETS Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site RH Remote-handled RN Radionuclide SNL-A Sandia National Laboratories -...

199

Microsoft Word - SRSSaltWasteDisposal.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site - Tank 48 SRS Review Report 2009 Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site...

200

Microsoft Word - Oneida Waste to Energy Project DOE Final EA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with an array of industries. Oneida applied for SEP funding under Wisconsin's "Job Creation and Retention through Clean Energy Advanced Manufacturing." Wisconsin determined that...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hazardous Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   General refractory disposal options...D landfill (b) Characterized hazardous waste by TCLP

202

Background on Quantum Key Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Background on Quantum Key Distribution. ... If someone, referred to by cryptographers as Eve, tries to eavesdrop on the transmission, she will not ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

203

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Russell, Lynn

204

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619 (9:1) OR Biohazard symbol (if untreated) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address

Firtel, Richard A.

205

Chemical Characterization of Fossil Fuel Combustion Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuel combustion wastes differ considerably in total composition and in the key chemical characteristics of their extracts, making leachate composition difficult to predict. A new mechanistic approach, however, shows promise for more-accurate prediction.

1987-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

Partnership in key exchange protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the notion of partnership as found in security models for key exchange protocols. Several different approaches have been pursued to define partnership, with varying degrees of success. We aim to provide an overview and criticism ... Keywords: key exchange, partnership, session identifier

Kazukuni Kobara; Seonghan Shin; Mario Strefler

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Microsoft Word - Buff Cover in Word.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain Project Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension OAS-M-08-07 April 2008 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 A p r i l 2 8 , 2008 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2 & , / j . 77aF/- FROM: 'JJilliam S . Maharay Deputy Inspector General SUBJECT: DVFORMATION: Audit Report on "Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension" BACKGROUND The Department o r Energy's Office of Civilian Radioaztivc Waste Management (OCRWM) is preparing to obtain a license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct a permanent repository at Yucca Mountain for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. In December 2005, OCRWM identified design process inadequacies and suspended the appro\lal of new7 documents 'important to waste

208

Microsoft Word - PURPA 2009.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) DECEMBER 2009 Background Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility that Title I applies to. Among other things, Subtitle B of PURPA Title I requires each "State regulatory (with respect to each electric utility for which it has ratemaking authority) and each non-[state] regulated electric utility" to consider and then make a determination on whether to adopt by Congressionally-specified dates certain word-for-word regulatory standards that Congress has listed in the original 1978 PURPA,

209

Spread the word about how to help | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spread the word about how to help Spread the word about how to help Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Stamp out energy waste Find cost-effective investments Engage occupants Provide a seat at the table Share energy goals and progress Identify energy-saving actions Spread the word about how to help

210

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

211

Microsoft Word - 2008 Letter Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prepared for Prepared for Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Prepared by 490 L'Enfant Plaza North SW Washington, DC 20024 January 13, 2009 CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT LETTER REPORT This Page Intentionally Left Blank Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Letter Report i Executive Summary This Fiscal Year 2008 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Letter Report presents an evaluation of the adequacy of the one mill per kilowatt-hour fee paid by commercial nuclear power generators for the permanent disposal of their spent nuclear fuel by the Government. This evaluation recommends no fee change.

212

Microsoft Word - WIPPInternationalApproach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory (LANL) scientists involved with the WIPP U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Waste Isolation Pilot Plant P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 Media...

213

A select bibliography with abstracts of reports related to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant geotechnical studies (1972--1990)  

SciTech Connect

This select bibliography contains 941 entries. Each bibliographic entry contains the citation of a report, conference paper, or journal article containing geotechnical information about the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The entries cover the period from 1972, when investigation began for a WIPP Site in southeastern New Mexico, through December 1990. Each entry is followed by an abstract. If an abstract or suitable summary existed, it has been included; 316 abstracts were written for other documents. For some entries, an annotation has been provided to clarify the abstract, comment on the setting and significance of the document, or guide the reader to related reports. An index of key words/phrases is included for all entries.

Powers, D.W. [Powers (Dennis W.), Anthony, TX (United States); Martin, M.L. [International Technology, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Developing Japanese WordNet Affect for analyzing emotions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the development of Japanese WordNet Affect from the English WordNet Affect lists with the help of English SentiWordNet and Japanese WordNet. Expanding the available synsets of the English WordNet Affect ...

Yoshimitsu Torii; Dipankar Das; Sivaji Bandyopadhyay; Manabu Okumura

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Key Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Key Activities Key Activities Key Activities The Water Power Program conducts work in four key areas at the forefront of water power research. The Program is structured to help the United States meet its growing energy demands sustainably and cost-effectively by developing innovative renewable water power technologies, breaking down market barriers to deployment, building the infrastructure to test new technologies, and assessing water power resources for integration into our nation's grid. Research and Development Introduce and advance new marine and hydrokinetic technologies to provide sustainable and cost-effective renewable energy from the nation's waves, tides, currents, and ocean thermal gradients. Research and develop innovative hydropower technologies to sustainably tap our country's diverse water resources including rivers,

216

Key China Energy Statistics 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Title Key China Energy Statistics 2011 Publication Type Chart Year of Publication 2012 Authors Levine, Mark D., David Fridley, Hongyou Lu, and Cecilia Fino-Chen Date Published...

217

Key China Energy Statistics 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Title Key China Energy Statistics 2012 Publication Type Chart Year of Publication 2012 Authors Levine, Mark D., David Fridley, Hongyou Lu, and Cecilia Fino-Chen Date Published...

218

Waste= Capital.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The evolution of manufacturing practices over the last century has led to the creation of excess waste during the production process, depleting resources and overwhelming (more)

Stidham, Steve P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

KWOC (Key-Word-Out-of-Context) Index of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide Series  

SciTech Connect

To meet the objectives of the program funded by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Nuclear Energy (NE) Technology Support Programs, the Performance Assurance Project Office (PAPO) administers a Performance Assurance Information Program that collects, compiles, and distributes program-related information, reports, and publications for the benefit of the DOE-NE program participants. THE KWOC Index of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide Series'' is prepared as an aid in searching for specific topics in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Regulatory Guide Series.

Jennings, S.D.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Microsoft Word - Key-note-Cold climate_HVAC2009-neuer.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

software tools for moisture Protection of buildings in software tools for moisture Protection of buildings in different climate zones Special Example: Control of air humidifier in a cold climate for high comfort and no risk of mould growth in building room Krus Martin 1* , Thierry Nouidui 1 and Sedlbauer Klaus 1 1 Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, Germany * Corresponding email: Martin.Krus@ibp.fraunhofer.de SUMMARY The application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in different climatic zones is demonstrated in this paper. The basics of the programs are presented together with a typical application for a problem specific for the chosen climatic zone. A 1-D calculation has been performed for tropical climate zone with the improvement of a flat roof in Bangkok as an example. For half timbered buildings, which are common in the temperate zone with the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Key Words: Shewanella algae; Fasciitis, Necrotizing; Primary Bacteremia Address for correspondence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shewanella algae infections are rare in humans. Previously reported cases of S. algae have mainly been associated with direct contact with seawater. We report a case of primary S. algae bacteremia occurring after the ingestion of raw seafood in a patient with liver cirrhosis that presented a fulminent course of necrotizing fasciitis.

Primary Shewanella; Bacteremia Mimicking; Vibrio Septicemia; Dae Seong Myung; Young-sun Jung; Seung-ji Kang; Young A Song; Kyung-hwa Park; Sook-in Jung; Soo Hyun Kim; Jong-hee Shin; Sook-in Jung M. D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Microsoft Word - Key-note-Cold climate_HVAC2009-neuer.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the insulation as part of the infill. A newly designed infill assembly with mineral wool as insulation material is presented whose performance has been demonstrated by outdoor...

223

I. Key-Words vgl. a. Glossar Cd-Rom - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Durst machen. (Desire = Wunsch). Den idealen, zuknftigen ..... tingstrategie ber die 4 P. (Product, Place, Price, Pro- motion) versucht das Unternehmen diese...

224

Exploiting links in WordNet hierarchy for word sense disambiguation of nouns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Word Sense Disambiguation is the most critical issue in natural language processing. Although it has been addressed by many researchers, no satisfactory results are reported. Rule based systems alone can not handle this issue due to ambiguous nature ... Keywords: SemCor2, WordNet, ability link, capability link, function link, machine readable dictionary, word sense disambiguation

S. G. Kolte; S. G. Bhirud

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Microsoft Word - 07-1061.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Contact-Handled (CH) summary category group (SCG) S3000 homogeneous solids; S5000 debris; and S4000 soilsgravel waste; and remote-handled (RH) S5000 debris waste, Waste...

226

Directory of Federal Agencies and University Research Centers conducting R&D in Environmental and Waste Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 1990 PAR Enterprises, Incorporated was awarded a contract by the Department of Energy to conduct a survey and prepare a Directory of Federal Agencies and University Research Centers involved in environmental restoration and waste management research and development. To conduct the survey and organize the Directory, data from 50 Federal agencies and 100 universities was collected, evaluated and summarized. The purpose of the survey and Directory is to describe the activities and provide a reference base of Federal Agencies and University Research Cantors involved in environmental restoration and waste management research and development. The Directory contains (1) the Foreword, (2) an Introduction, (3) a Description of the Survey Organization and Research Approach, (4) the EM/OTD Key Word Networks, (5) a series of matrices that show the relationship between the OTD technical requirements and the Federal Agency/University EM capabilities, (6) the Federal Agency and University Research Center EM R&D Capabilities Profiles, (7) a Glossary, and (8) an Appendix that describes the EM activities of the DOE National Laboratories and related research facilities. The survey and Directory was prepared for the Office of Technology Development (OTD), a major R&D component of DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Microsoft Word - AL2005-16.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6.doc Microsoft Word - AL2005-16.doc Microsoft Word - AL2005-16.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL2005-10.doc Audit Report: IG-0860 Policy Flash 2013-33...

228

EERE Roofus' Solar and Efficient Home: Find-a-Word  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Windows Activities Pizza Box Solar Oven Sundial Word Game Coloring Page Printable Version Find-a-Word Can you help Roofus find the words that he uses in his solar house? Find the...

229

Microsoft Word - AL2005-08.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - AL2005-08.doc Microsoft Word - AL2005-08.doc More Documents & Publications Attachment FY2011-28 OPAM OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Microsoft Word - al2004-03...

230

Microsoft Word - al2007-11.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - al2007-11.doc Microsoft Word - al2007-11.doc More Documents & Publications Attachment FY2011-28 OPAM Microsoft Word - AL2005-08.doc OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

231

Microsoft Word - AL2005-12.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - AL2005-12.doc Microsoft Word - AL2005-12.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL2005-11.doc Policy Flash 20012-15 OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

232

Microsoft Word - al2004-03.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - al2004-03.doc Microsoft Word - al2004-03.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL2005-08.doc Attachment FY2011-28 OPAM OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

233

Microsoft Word - AL2006-01.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - AL2006-01.doc Microsoft Word - AL2006-01.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - al2005-06.doc Attachment FY2011-28 OPAM OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

234

DOE Logo, Seal and Word Mark | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphics DOE Logo, Seal and Word Mark DOE Logo, Seal and Word Mark The DOE logo, seal, and word mark are official graphical identifiers of the U.S. Department of Energy and are...

235

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

236

Microsoft Word - IG-0592.RTF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Actions Taken in Response to Missing Actions Taken in Response to Missing Hazardous Waste Containing Cyanide This document provides a summary of an Inspection Report that is not publicly releasable because it contains information that is for Official Use Only and is controlled pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. March 2003 Summary Inspection Report U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections ACTIONS TAKEN IN RESPONSE TO MISSING HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAINING CYANIDE TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 1 BACKGROUND 1 RESULTS OF INSPECTION 2 RECOMMENDATIONS AND LESSONS LEARNED 3 Page 1 Actions Taken in Response to Missing Hazardous Waste Containing Cyanide INTRODUCTION Recently, the U.S. Government has become increasingly

237

Microsoft Word - Technetium.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigations to Identify the Soluble, Non-pertechnetate Species Investigations to Identify the Soluble, Non-pertechnetate Species in the High-level Nuclear Waste at the Hanford Site Wayne W. Lukens 1 , David K. Shuh 1 , Norman C. Schroeder 2 , Kenneth R. Ashley 3 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 2 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 3 Texas A&M University-Commerce, Commerce, TX Technetium ( 99 Tc) is an abundant fission product that presents a number of challenges for the safe, long-term disposal of high-level nuclear waste due to the 213,000 year half-life of 99 Tc and the high environmental mobility of pertechnetate, TcO 4 - , the most stable form of technetium under aerobic conditions. Because of these properties, 99 Tc is often the radionuclide of greatest concern when evaluating the near-term performance of waste repositories.

238

Microsoft Word - 08-1307.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

remote handled waste certification audit performed for Summary Category Group S5000 debris waste. The audit was conducted June 30 through July 2, 2008. I certify under penalty...

239

Immobilization of radioactive and hazardous wastes in a developed sulfur polymer cement (SPC) matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: A process has been developed for the immobilization Cs, Sr, Ce, Pb, and Cr in forms that is non-dispersible and could be safely immobilized. The simulated radioactive wastes of Cs, Sr, and Ce, and the hazardous wastes of Cr, and Pb were immobilized in the stable form of sulfur polymer cement (SPC). In this process, the contaminants (in a single form) were added to the sulfur mixture of sulfur and aromatic /or aliphatic hydrocarbons that used as polymerizing agents for sulfur (95% S, and 5% organic polymer by weight). Durability of the fabricated SPC matrices was assessed in terms of their water of immersion, porosity, and compressive strength. The water immersion, and open porosity were found to be less than 2.5% for all the prepared matrices, whereas the compressive strength was in the range between 62.4 and 142.3 Kg.cm{sup -2}, depending on the composition of the prepared matrix. The prepared SPC matrices that characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the different added contaminants were stabilized during the solidification process during their reaction with sulfur and the organic polymer to form the corresponding metal sulfides. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the IAEA standard method have assessed the leachability of the prepared waste matrices. The TCLP results showed that most the concentration of the contaminants released were under their detection limit. The leach index for the investigated metals from the prepared SPC matrices was in the range of 9-11. The order of release of the investigated metals was Sr>Cs>Pb>Cr>Ce for the aliphatic polymer, and Sr>Cr>Pb>Cs>Ce for the aromatic one. The results obtained revealed a high performance for the prepared SPC matrices, as they are of low cost effect, highly available materials, and possessed good mechanical and leaching properties. Key Words: SPC/ Matrices/ Immobilization/ Wastes/ Leachability. (authors)

Wagdy, M.; Azim, Abdel; El-Gammal, Belal [Atomic Energy Authority, Nasr City, P.O. Box 7551, Cairo (Egypt); Husain, Ahmed [National Research Center, Cairo (Egypt)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL #12;#12;PNNL-SA-69994 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax- Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Partial Word Order Freezing in Dutch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dutch allows for variation as to whether the first position in the sentence is occupied by the subject or by some other constituent, such as the direct object. In particular situations, however, this commonly observed variation in word order is `frozen' ... Keywords: Bidirectional Optimality Theory, Corpus study, Definiteness, Variation, Word order freezing

Gerlof J. Bouma; Petra Hendriks

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Word sense disambiguation in information retrieval revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Word sense ambiguity is recognized as having a detrimental effect on the precision of information retrieval systems in general and web search systems in particular, due to the sparse nature of the queries involved. Despite continued research into the ... Keywords: information retrieval, performance evaluation, word sense disambiguation

Christopher Stokoe; Michael P. Oakes; John Tait

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Operational state complexity of nested word automata  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce techniques to prove lower bounds for the number of states needed by finite automata operating on nested words. We study the state complexity of Boolean operations and obtain lower bounds that are tight within an additive constant. The results ... Keywords: Finite automata, Language operations, Nested words, State complexity

Xiaoxue Piao; Kai Salomaa

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Microsoft Word - National Science Bowl Fact Sheet.doc | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Science Bowl Fact Sheet.doc Microsoft Word - National Science Bowl Fact Sheet.doc Microsoft Word - National Science Bowl Fact Sheet.doc More Documents & Publications...

245

Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environment 100808 FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc More Documents & Publications...

246

Microsoft Word - 338M_Geothermal_Project_Descriptions | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Microsoft Word - 338MGeothermalProjectDescriptions Microsoft Word - 338MGeothermalProjectDescriptions Microsoft...

247

Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESSTutorial_MAINTAIN...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTAINPROJECTHISTORY.doc Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS TutorialMAINTAINPROJECTHISTORY.doc Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS...

248

Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESSTutorial_ROTATION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS TutorialROTATIONWITHINDUSTRY.doc Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS TutorialROTATIONWITHINDUSTRY.doc...

249

Microsoft Word - 1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final Microsoft Word - 1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final Microsoft Word - 1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final More Documents &...

250

Microsoft Word - 564M_Biomass_Project Descriptions FINAL 120409...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

564MBiomassProject Descriptions FINAL 120409 Microsoft Word - 564MBiomassProject Descriptions FINAL 120409 Microsoft Word - 564MBiomassProject Descriptions FINAL 120409 More...

251

Microsoft Word - PMCDP Curriculum Map Jan 2010 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PMCDP Curriculum Map Jan 2010 Microsoft Word - PMCDP Curriculum Map Jan 2010 Microsoft Word - PMCDP Curriculum Map Jan 2010 More Documents & Publications PMCDP Curriculum Map...

252

EERE Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EERE Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and Second Page EERE Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and Second Page This template was designed for...

253

Microsoft Word - Chapter 10_2006_Jun | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

102006Jun Microsoft Word - Chapter 102006Jun Microsoft Word - Chapter 102006Jun More Documents & Publications Policy Flash 2012-8 CHAPTER 3 OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

254

Microsoft Word - Chapter 10_2006_Jun | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - Chapter 102006Jun Microsoft Word - Chapter 102006Jun More Documents & Publications Policy Flash 2012-8 OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Policy Flash 2011-103...

255

Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 More Documents & Publications Job Counting...

256

Microsoft Word - PeerReview_SAR.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Microsoft Word - PeerReviewCCSP.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change...

257

Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc More Documents &...

258

Microsoft Word - Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx Microsoft Word - Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx Microsoft Word - Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx More Documents & Publications Before the...

259

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Terms Key Terms to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on AddThis.com... Home About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Guidance Documents Statutes & Regulations Program Annual Reports Fact Sheets Newsletter Case Studies Workshops Tools Key Terms FAQs Key Terms The Energy Policy Act (EPAct) includes specific terminology related to

260

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Key Federal Statutes to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on AddThis.com... Home About Contacts Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Key Federal Statutes These are excerpts from federal statutes that established key Energy Policy Act (EPAct) transportation regulatory activities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 82.85 83.56 91.25 95.37 99.34 103.03 106.77 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 25.78 26.07 29.82 32.05 34.54 37.05 39.53 1.4% Mobile homes ..................................................... 6.60 6.54 6.45 6.60 6.75 6.88 7.02 0.2% Total ................................................................. 115.23 116.17 127.52 134.02 140.63 146.96 153.32

262

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Total floorspace (billion square feet) Surviving ............................................................. 79.3 80.2 87.0 91.9 96.2 100.7 106.4 1.0% New additions ..................................................... 1.8 1.5 2.1 2.0 2.0 2.3 2.4 1.6% Total ................................................................. 81.1 81.7 89.1 93.9 98.1 103.0 108.8 1.0% Energy consumption intensity (thousand Btu per square foot) Delivered energy consumption ........................... 105.6 105.2 100.4 98.1 97.2 95.8 93.8 -0.4%

263

Key Workplace Documents Federal Publications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the Administration in 2007 concluded agreements with China on toys, food and feed, drugs and medical devicesKey Workplace Documents Federal Publications Cornell University ILR School Year 2008 China/498 #12;Order Code RL33536 China-U.S. Trade Issues Updated March 7, 2008 Wayne M. Morrison Specialist

264

Key technology trends - Satellite systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is based on material extracted from the WTEC Panel Report Global Satellite Communications Technology and Systems, December 1998. It presents an overview of key technology trends in communications satellites in the last few years. After the ... Keywords: Communications satellites, Satellite communications, Satellite technology overview

Charles W. Bostian; William T. Brandon; Alfred U. Mac Rae; Christoph E. Mahle; Stephen A. Townes

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Baseline Glass Development for Combined Fission Products Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

Borosilicate glass was selected as the baseline technology for immobilization of the Cs/Sr/Ba/Rb (Cs), lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) waste steams as part of a cost benefit analysis study.[1] Vitrification of the combined waste streams have several advantages, minimization of the number of waste forms, a proven technology, and similarity to waste forms currently accepted for repository disposal. A joint study was undertaken by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to develop acceptable glasses for the combined Cs + Ln + TM waste streams (Option 1) and Cs + Ln combined waste streams (Option 2) generated by the AFCI UREX+ set of processes. This study is aimed to develop baseline glasses for both combined waste stream options and identify key waste components and their impact on waste loading. The elemental compositions of the four-corners study were used along with the available separations data to determine the effect of burnup, decay, and separations variability on estimated waste stream compositions.[2-5] Two different components/scenarios were identified that could limit waste loading of the combined Cs + LN + TM waste streams, where as the combined Cs + LN waste stream has no single component that is perceived to limit waste loading. Combined Cs + LN waste stream in a glass waste form will most likely be limited by heat due to the high activity of Cs and Sr isotopes.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Billings, Amanda Y.; Lang, Jesse B.; Marra, James C.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Vienna, John D.

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

266

Cermet Waste Packages Using Depleted Uranium Dioxide and Steel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CERMET WASTE PACKAGES USING DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE AND STEEL CERMET WASTE PACKAGES USING DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE AND STEEL Charles W. Forsberg Oak Ridge National Laboratory * P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6180 Tel: (865) 574-6783 Fax: (865) 574-9512 Email: forsbergcw@ornl.gov Manuscript Number: 078 File Name: DuCermet.HLWcon01.article.final Article Prepared for 2001 International High-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference American Nuclear Society Las Vegas, Nevada April 29-May 3, 2001 Limits: 1500 words; 3 figures Actual: 1450 words; 3 figures Session: 3.6 Disposal Container Materials and Designs The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution,

267

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton capacity, it...

268

Answering Key Fuel Cycle Questions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the range of fuel cycle goals and criteria, and the wide range of fuel cycle options, how can the set of options eventually be narrowed in a transparent and justifiable fashion? It is impractical to develop all options. We suggest an approach that starts by considering a range of goals for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and then posits seven questions, such as whether Cs and Sr isotopes should be separated from spent fuel and, if so, what should be done with them. For each question, we consider which of the goals may be relevant to eventually providing answers. The AFCI program has both ''outcome'' and ''process'' goals because it must address both waste already accumulating as well as completing the fuel cycle in connection with advanced nuclear power plant concepts. The outcome objectives are waste geologic repository capacity and cost, energy security and sustainability, proliferation resistance, fuel cycle economics, and safety. The process objectives are rea diness to proceed and adaptability and robustness in the face of uncertainties.

Piet, S.J.; Dixon, B.W.; Bennett, R.G.; Smith, J.D.; Hill, R.N.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

269

Microsoft Word - MAT 0004.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1/02 1/02 ________________________ _____Environment, Health, & Safety _____ ______________________ Training Program MAT0004 ~ Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air Training (International Air Transport Association) Course Syllabus Subject Category: Hazardous Material Handling Course Prerequisite: MAT0002 Course Length: 16 - 24 Hours Medical Approval: No Schedule: As needed Location/Time: Offsite Course Purpose: This Department of Transportation (DOT) IATA course provides shipper training requires training of employees who affect the safe transportation of hazardous materials, including hazardous waste. These employees are defined as Hazmat

270

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table A7.Transportation sector key indicators and delivered energy consumption Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Travel indicators (billion vehicle miles traveled) Light-duty vehicles less than 8,501 pounds .... 2,654 2,629 2,870 3,089 3,323 3,532 3,719 1.2% Commercial light trucks 1 ................................. 65 65 80 87 94 102 110 1.8% Freight trucks greater than 10,000 pounds ..... 235 240 323 350 371 401 438 2.1% (billion seat miles available) Air ................................................................... 999 982 1,082 1,131 1,177 1,222 1,274 0.9%

271

Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

272

Rotating Plasma Finding is Key for ITER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plasma Finding is Key for ITER Rotating Plasma Finding is Key for ITER PlasmaTurbulenceCSChang.png Tokamak turbulence showing inward-propagating streamers from normalized...

273

Modelling the Acquisition of Colour Words  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How Bayesian inference might be used as the basis of a system for learning and representing the meanings of colour words in natural languages was investigated. The paper is primarily concerned with cognitive modelling, but has potential applications ...

Mike Dowman

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Words and rules in the brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Words-and-Rules theory (WR) posits that different mental processes underlie regular and irregular past tense formation: regular forms are rule-generated ('add -ed'), whereas irregular forms are retrieved from memory. ...

Rhee, Jaemin, 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Using word sequences for text summarization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional approaches for extractive summarization score/classify sentences based on features such as position in the text, word frequency and cue phrases These features tend to produce satisfactory summaries, but have the inconvenience of being domain ...

Esa Villatoro-Tello; Luis Villaseor-Pineda; Manuel Montes-y-Gmez

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Activities in Key Activities in Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on AddThis.com... Key Activities Mission, Vision, & Goals Plans, Implementation, & Results Organization & Contacts National Laboratories Budget Partnerships Key Activities in Vehicles We conduct work in four key areas to develop and deploy vehicle technologies that reduce the use of petroleum while maintaining or

277

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Activities to Key Activities to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Key Activities The Fuel Cell Technologies Office conducts work in several key areas to

278

Microsoft Word - CXPosticp10009.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 SECTION A. Project Title: RWMC - Analytical Laboratory Operations SECTION B. Project Description The RWMC Analytical Laboratory operations will be expanded to provide additional sample analyses on an as needed basis. The operations could include sample analysis of operational samples, samples of an emergency nature or from material spills, as examples. The primary focus of the analytical laboratory operations will continue to provide support to WIPP certified TRU waste analysis capabilities. The current analytical functions includes: * VOC analysis * SVOC and HPLC analyses * NHVOC & metals analyses * RH TRU radiochemical analyses The following analytical capabilities could be performed to support the proposed action: * Organic analyses

279

Microsoft Word - CXPosticp10009.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 SECTION A. Project Title: RWMC - Analytical Laboratory Operations SECTION B. Project Description The RWMC Analytical Laboratory operations will be expanded to provide additional sample analyses on an as needed basis. The operations could include sample analysis of operational samples, samples of an emergency nature or from material spills, as examples. The primary focus of the analytical laboratory operations will continue to provide support to WIPP certified TRU waste analysis capabilities. The current analytical functions includes: * VOC analysis * SVOC and HPLC analyses * NHVOC & metals analyses * RH TRU radiochemical analyses The following analytical capabilities could be performed to support the proposed action: * Organic analyses

280

Microsoft Word - EHS 316.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHS 316 ~ Asbestos Class III Worker Course Syllabus Subject Category: Occupational Health Course Prerequisite: No Course Length: 2 Days Medical Approval: No Delivery Mode: Class Schedule: Through Qualified Offsite Vendor Location/Time: Offsite Vendor Course Purpose: This OSHA approved course teaches students how to perform limited asbestos abatement activities related to maintenance work where the amount of asbestos material abated will fit into a standard 60"x60" waste bag or an asbestos glove-bag. By completing this course, students will receive credit as an OSHA training class III worker and a Class III competent person. Course Objectives:  Learn the history and uses of asbestos, health effects, and medical surveillance.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Microsoft Word - EHS 317.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHS 317 ~ Asbestos Class III Worker Refresher Course Syllabus Subject Category: Occupational Health Course Prerequisite: No Course Length: 1 Day Medical Approval: No Delivery Mode: Class Schedule: Through Qualified Offsite Vendor Location/Time: Offsite Vendor Course Purpose: This OSHA approved refresher course is a review course that teaches students two perform limited asbestos abatement activities related to maintenance work where the amount of asbestos material abated will fit into a standard 60"x60" waste bag or an asbestos glove-bag. By completing this review course, students will maintain credit as an OSHA training Class III worker and a Class III competent person. Course Objectives:

282

Key results from SB8 simulant flowsheet studies  

SciTech Connect

Key technically reviewed results are presented here in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) acceptance of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). This report summarizes results from simulant flowsheet studies of the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Results include: Hydrogen generation rate for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles of the CPC on a 6,000 gallon basis; Volume percent of nitrous oxide, N2O, produced during the SRAT cycle; Ammonium ion concentrations recovered from the SRAT and SME off-gas; and, Dried weight percent solids (insoluble, soluble, and total) measurements and density.

Koopman, D. C.

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

283

Understanding Cement Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2009 ... Ongoing nuclear operations, decontamination and decommissioning, salt waste disposal, and closure of liquid waste tanks result in...

284

Waste Minimization Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Waste Minimization Contents...

285

Algorithms for dynamic multicast key distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the problem of multicast key distribution for group security. Secure group communication systems typically rely on a group key, which is a secret shared among the members of the group. This key is used to provide privacy by encrypting all group ... Keywords: Dynamic key distribution, experimental algorithms, multicast

Justin Goshi; Richard E. Ladner

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Multiparty quantum key agreement with single particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two conditions must be satisfied in a secure quantum key agreement (QKA) protocol: (1) outside eavesdroppers cannot gain the generated key without introducing any error; (2) the generated key cannot be determined by any non-trivial subset of the participants. ... Keywords: Quantum cryptography, Quantum information, Quantum key agreement

Bin Liu; Fei Gao; Wei Huang; Qiao-Yan Wen

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Microsoft Word - 08-1315.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for contact- handled Summary Category Group (SCG) S3000 homogeneous solids, S5000 debris, and S4000 soilsgravel waste, and remote-handled S5000 debris waste. The audit was...

288

Microsoft Word - 2011sr06.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

units that are used to dispose of low-level radioactive waste such as construction debris, concrete from reactor demolition and clean-up from jobs involving legacy waste at...

289

SunShot Initiative: Key Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Activities Key Activities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to SunShot Initiative: Key Activities to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Key Activities on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Key Activities on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Key Activities on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Key Activities on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Key Activities on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Key Activities on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Key Activities Under the SunShot Initiative, the DOE Solar Office issues competitive solicitations that fund selective research projects aimed at transforming the ways the United States generates, stores, and utilizes solar energy.

290

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Key Federal Key Federal Legislation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Key Federal Legislation The information below includes a brief chronology and summaries of key federal legislation related to alternative fuels and vehicles, air quality,

291

FAQS Qualification Card - Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Waste Management FAQS Qualification Card - Waste Management A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-WasteManagement.docx Description Waste Management Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Qualification Card - General Technical Base

292

Renewable Energy Community: Key Elements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future A Renewable Energy Community: Key Elements A reinvented community to meet untapped customer needs for shelter and transportation with minimal environmental impacts, stable energy costs, and a sense of belonging N. Carlisle, J. Elling, and T. Penney Technical Report NREL/TP-540-42774 January 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

293

Microsoft Word - DOE Framework Final.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington, D.C. 20585 Washington, D.C. 20585 Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework September 24, 2013 Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework ii This page intentionally left blank. Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework iii CONTENTS 1. Introduction ............................................................................................................................................. 1 Immobilizing Radioactive Tank Waste at the Office of River Protection .................................................. 1 Current System Design ........................................................................................................................... 2 Addressing Technical Risks and Challenges .......................................................................................... 2

294

Microsoft Word - Turbine Manufactures MOU FINAL_5-31-08_.doc...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - Turbine Manufactures MOU FINAL5-31-08.doc Microsoft Word - Turbine Manufactures MOU FINAL5-31-08.doc Microsoft Word - Turbine Manufactures MOU...

295

Axiomatizing WordNet Glosses in the OntoWordNet Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

foundational ontology. Preliminary results provide us with the conviction that a research program aiming that tells us something about the way we use a lexical item in some context for some purpose. In other wordsNet's synsets1 . A formal specification requires a clear semantics for the primitives used to export WordNet 1

Navigli, Roberto

296

The OntoWordNet Project: extension and axiomatization of conceptual relations in WordNet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

results provide us with the conviction that a research program aiming to obtain a consistent, modularized are interpreted according to a formal semantics that tells us something about the way we use a lexical item for the primitives used to export WordNet information into an ontology, and a methodology that explains how Word

Navigli, Roberto

297

Korean stochastic word-spacing with dynamic expansion of candidate words list  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main aim of this work is to implement stochastic Korean Word-Spacing System which is equally robust for both inner-data and external-data. Word-spacing in Korean is influential in deciding semantic and syntactic scope. In order to cope with various ...

Mi-young Kang; Sung-ja Choi; Ae-sun Yoon; Hyuk-chul Kwon

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Defining a metal-based waste form for IFR pyroprocessing wastes  

SciTech Connect

Pyrochemical electrorefining to recover actinides from metal nuclear fuel is a key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. The process separates the radioactive fission products from the long-lived actinides in a molten LiCl-KCl salt, and it generates a lower waste volume with significantly less long-term toxicity as compared to spent nuclear fuel. The process waste forms include a mineral-based waste form that will contain fission products removed from an electrolyte salt and a metal-based waste form that will contain metallic fission products and the fuel cladding and process materials. Two concepts for the metal-based waste form are being investigated: (1) encapsulating the metal constituents in a Cu-Al alloy and (2) alloying the metal constituents into a uniform stainless steel-based waste form. Results are given from our recent studies of these two concepts.

McDeavitt, S.M.; Park, J.Y.; Ackerman, J.P.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

USER GUIDE to the HANSARD WORD STYLE BOOK I ENTRIES IN WORD STYLE BOOK (WSB)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has been prepared in the Hansard Office to function in conjunction with the 10th edition of the Concise Oxford Dictionary as the dictionary for that office, to be consulted in the preparation of the parliamentary debates for publication. It is a guide to how to treat words in the text of Hansard, and not a guide to precedents or setting up members names. The use of hyphens is being kept to a minimum, in line with COD practice as stated in the preface to the 10th edition. For guidance on how a word or expression is treated in Hansard, consult the Word Style Book before the COD. The treatment of words not covered in either reference text will need to be confirmed for inclusion in the Word Style Book updates, which are published regularly.

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Automated Sorting of Transuranic Waste  

SciTech Connect

The HANDSS-55 Transuranic Waste Sorting Module is designed to sort out items found in 55-gallon drums of waste as determined by an operator. Innovative imaging techniques coupled with fast linear motor-based motion systems and a flexible end-effector system allow the operator to remove items from the waste stream by a touch of the finger. When all desired items are removed from the waste stream, the remaining objects are automatically moved to a repackaging port for removal from the glovebox/cell. The Transuranic Waste Sorting Module consists of 1) a high accuracy XYZ Stereo Measurement and Imaging system, 2) a vibrating/tilting sorting table, 3) an XY Deployment System, 4) a ZR Deployment System, 5) several user-selectable end-effectors, 6) a waste bag opening system, 7) control and instrumentation, 8) a noncompliant waste load-out area, and 9) a Human/Machine Interface (HMI). The system is modular in design to accommodate database management tools, additional load-out ports, and other enhancements. Manually sorting the contents of a 55-gallon drum takes about one day per drum. The HANDSS-55 Waste Sorting Module is designed to significantly increase the throughput of this sorting process by automating those functions that are strenuous and tiresome for an operator to perform. The Waste Sorting Module uses the inherent ability of an operator to identify the items that need to be segregated from the waste stream and then, under computer control, picks that item out of the waste and deposits it in the appropriate location. The operator identifies the object by locating the visual image on a large color display and touches the image on the display with his finger. The computer then determines the location of the object, and performing a highspeed image analysis determines its size and orientation, so that a robotic gripper can be deployed to pick it up. Following operator verification by voice or function key, the object is deposited into a specified location.

Shurtliff, Rodney Marvin

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Microsoft Word - CXPosticp10001.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 SECTION A. Project Title: MFC - EBR-II Sodium Removal/RCRA Closure Activities SECTION B. Project Description The proposed action will remove the sodium from the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR)-II piping system and tanks to achieve clean-closure for eventual decommissioning, deactivation and demolition (DD&D). The clean-closure will be completed in compliance with the EBR-II Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Storage and Treatment Permit PER-120. EBR-II is located at the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory. The EBR-II DD&D actions will be addressed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act, specifically, the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the EBR-II End State (DOE/ID-11398) and Action Memorandum.

302

Microsoft Word - Groundwater Discharge Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State Renews Groundwater Discharge Permit for WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., September 11, 2008 - The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) has renewed the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) groundwater discharge permit until 2013. The permit regulates the discharge of water from WIPP facilities and operations to lined ponds, which protect groundwater resources. The permit allows WIPP to discharge domestic wastewater, non-hazardous wastewater and storm water into 13 on-site, synthetically-lined ponds. The new permit also provides for increased daily discharge volumes to allow more flexibility in plant operations. "This permit is the result of a positive year-long effort with the New Mexico Groundwater Quality Bureau," said Jody Plum, DOE Carlsbad Field Office Permitting and

303

Challenges in Modeling the Degradation of Ceramic Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We identify the state of the art, gaps in current understanding, and key research needs in the area of modeling the long-term degradation of ceramic waste forms for nuclear waste disposition. The directed purpose of this report is to define a roadmap for Waste IPSC needs to extend capabilities of waste degradation to ceramic waste forms, which overlaps with the needs of the subconsinuum scale of FMM interests. The key knowledge gaps are in the areas of (i) methodology for developing reliable interatomic potentials to model the complex atomic-level interactions in waste forms; (ii) characterization of water interactions at ceramic surfaces and interfaces; and (iii) extension of atomic-level insights to the long time and distance scales relevant to the problem of actinide and fission product immobilization.

Devanathan, Ramaswami; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany BREFs and their BATs Next Generation of Waste Fired Power Plants: Getting the most out of your trash Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

Columbia University

305

Comparison of Waste Feed Delivery Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Simulant to Hanford Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions' Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems. A series of these tests have used a five-part simulant composed of particles of different size and density and designed to be equal or more challenging than AY-102 waste. This five-part simulant, however, has not been compared with the broad range of Hanford waste, and thus there is an additional uncertainty that this simulant may not be as challenging as the most difficult Hanford waste. The purpose of this study is to quantify how the current five-part simulant compares to all of the Hanford sludge waste, and to suggest alternate simulants that could be tested to reduce the uncertainty in applying the current testing results to potentially more challenging wastes.

Wells, Beric E.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

306

Comparison of Waste Feed Delivery Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Simulant to Hanford Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions' Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems. A series of these tests have used a five-part simulant composed of particles of different size and density and designed to be equal or more challenging than AY-102 waste. This five-part simulant, however, has not been compared with the broad range of Hanford waste, and thus there is an additional uncertainty that this simulant may not be as challenging as the most difficult Hanford waste. The purpose of this study is to quantify how the current five-part simulant compares to all of the Hanford sludge waste, and to suggest alternate simulants that could be tested to reduce the uncertainty in applying the current testing results to potentially more challenging wastes.

Wells, Beric E.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Plutonium-238 Transuranic Waste Decision Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Five transuranic (TRU) waste sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, collectively, have more than 2,100 cubic meters of Plutonium-238 (Pu-238) TRU waste that exceed the wattage restrictions of the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-11). The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is being developed by the DOE as a repository for TRU waste. With the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) opening in 1999, these sites are faced with a need to develop waste management practices that will enable the transportation of Pu-238 TRU waste to WIPP for disposal. This paper describes a decision analysis that provided a logical framework for addressing the Pu-238 TRU waste issue. The insights that can be gained by performing a formalized decision analysis are multifold. First and foremost, the very process. of formulating a decision tree forces the decision maker into structured, logical thinking where alternatives can be evaluated one against the other using a uniform set of criteria. In the process of developing the decision tree for transportation of Pu-238 TRU waste, several alternatives were eliminated and the logical order for decision making was discovered. Moreover, the key areas of uncertainty for proposed alternatives were identified and quantified. The decision analysis showed that the DOE can employ a combination approach where they will (1) use headspace gas analyses to show that a fraction of the Pu-238 TRU waste drums are no longer generating hydrogen gas and can be shipped to WIPP ''as-is'', (2) use drums and bags with advanced filter systems to repackage Pu-238 TRU waste drums that are still generating hydrogen, and (3) add hydrogen getter materials to the inner containment vessel of the TRUPACT-11to relieve the build-up of hydrogen gas during transportation of the Pu-238 TRU waste drums.

Brown, Mike; Lechel, David J.; Leigh, C.D.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

308

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

309

On multi-column foreign key discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A foreign/primary key relationship between relational tables is one of the most important constraints in a database. From a data analysis perspective, discovering foreign keys is a crucial step in understanding and working with the data. Nevertheless, ...

Meihui Zhang; Marios Hadjieleftheriou; Beng Chin Ooi; Cecilia M. Procopiuc; Divesh Srivastava

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Proactive key management protocol for multicast services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A group key management is essential scheme guaranteeing data confidentiality in multicast. To provide the strict secrecy in group communication, the rekeying delay has to be minimized. In this paper, we propose a new group key management protocol, called ...

Dong-Hyun Je; Seung-Woo Seo

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Morphology in Word Recognition: Hindi and Urdu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present research examined whether morphology influences word recognition independently of form-level word properties. Prevailing views attribute cross-linguistic differences in morphological processing to variations in morphological structure and/or productivity. This study tested whether morphological processing is additionally influenced by the orthographic depth of written language, by comparing primed word naming among biliterate readers of Hindu and Urdu, languages written in distinct orthographies but sharing a common morphophonology. Results from five experiments supported the view that morphological processing in orthographically shallow (transparent) Hindi script diverged significantly from that in the deeper (opaque) Urdu orthography. Specifically, morphological priming was differently affected in Hindi vs. Urdu by prim presentation conditions (Exps. 1-3): very briefly exposed (48ms), forward masked morphological primes facilitated word naming in Hindi but not in Urdu. Neither briefly presented, unmasked primes nor longer prime exposures (80ms/240ms) produced priming in Hindi, but Experiment 2 showed priming by unmasked Hindi primes at a 240 ms exposure. By contrast, Urdu exhibited morphological priming only for forward masked primes at the long exposure of 240ms. Thus, early-onset priming in Hindi resembled morpho-orthographic decomposition previously recorded in English, whereas Urdu evinced priming consistent with morpho-semantic effects documented across several languages. Hemispheric asymmetry in morphological priming also diverged across Hindi and Urdu (Exps. 4 and 5); Hindi revealed a non-significant numerical trend for facilitation by morphological primes only in the right visual field (RVF), whereas reliable morphological priming in Urdu was limited to left visual field (LVF) presentation.Disparate patterns in morphological processing asymmetry were corroborated by differences in baseline visual field asymmetries in Hindi vs. Urdu word recognition- filler words elicited a consistent RVF advantage in Hindi, whereas in Urdu, one-syllable fillers, but not two- and three-syllable words revealed the RVF advantage. Taken together, the findings suggest that the variable of orthographic depth be integrated more explicitly into mainstream theoretical accounts of the mechanisms underlying morphological processing in word recognition. In addition, this study highlights the psycholinguistic potential of the languages Hindi and Urdu for advancing our understanding of the role of orthography as well as phonology in morphological processing.

Rao, Chaitra

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Cryptographic Key Managment Workshop 2012-A Draft ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Specify the key generation methods used Specify the random number generators used Specify ... primary and backup facilities ...

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

313

Joint Chinese word segmentation, POS tagging and parsing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a novel decoding algorithm for discriminative joint Chinese word segmentation, part-of-speech (POS) tagging, and parsing. Previous work often used a pipeline method -- Chinese word segmentation followed by POS tagging and parsing, ...

Xian Qian; Yang Liu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

How Do You Spread the Word About Saving Energy? | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spread the Word About Saving Energy? How Do You Spread the Word About Saving Energy? May 25, 2012 - 2:03pm Addthis Earlier this week, Drew talked about how you can follow Energy...

315

Microsoft Word - EERE PSRP 7 23 2010 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EERE PSRP 7 23 2010 Microsoft Word - EERE PSRP 7 23 2010 Microsoft Word - EERE PSRP 7 23 2010 More Documents & Publications Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program...

316

Microsoft Word - AL2005-07.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AL2005-07.doc Microsoft Word - AL2005-07.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL2006-07.doc OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Applications for Certification (Purchasing)...

317

Microsoft Word - GJPPGPracticesDraft.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - GJPPGPracticesDraft.doc More Documents & Publications 1 Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts Microsoft Word - 47C468D4-69BA-281F40.doc...

318

Microsoft Word - chap4.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Four May 2005 Four May 2005 2004 Site Environmental Report 4-1 To assist in the understanding of this chapter, the following key definitions are provided: * Controlled runoff is contaminated storm water that is collected and, under normal circumstances, treated and discharged to the Great Miami River as treated effluent. * Uncontrolled runoff is storm water that is not collected for treatment, but enters the site's natural drainages. * Treated effluent is water from numerous sources at the site, which is treated through one of the site's wastewater treatment facilities, then discharged to the Great Miami River. * Surface water is water that flows within natural drainage features. 4.0 Surface Water and Treated Effluent Pathway This chapter presents the 2004 monitoring activities

319

Microsoft Word - q408.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Fourth Quarter 2008 Key Findings Net Income $5.8 billion Revenues $236.1 billion Highlights Major energy companies reported a 78-percent decrease in net income relative to fourth quarter of 2007. Further, this represents a 73-percent decrease relative to the fourth-quarter average for 2003-2007. Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) decreased from 8.3 percent in the fourth quarter of 2007 to 2.5 percent in the fourth quarter of 2008 due to the 78 percent decrease in net income. The effects of higher U.S. refining margins and foreign oil production were overwhelmed by lower oil and natural gas prices, lower U.S. oil production, and lower worldwide natural gas production. Overview Twelve major energy companies [1] reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $5.8 billion on

320

Microsoft Word - q109.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 First Quarter 2009 Key Findings Net Income $-7.0 billion Revenues $191.5 billion Highlights Major energy companies reported a 126-percent decrease in net income relative to first quarter of 2008. Further, this represents a 131-percent decrease relative to the first- quarter average for 2004-2008. Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) decreased from 8.0 percent in the first quarter of 2008 to -3.7 percent in the first quarter of 2009 due to the 126 percent decrease in net income. The effects of higher worldwide refining margins and worldwide oil and natural gas production were overwhelmed by lower oil and natural gas prices and lower worldwide refinery throughput. Overview Nineteen major energy companies [1] reported an overall net loss (excluding unusual items) of $7.0 billion on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Microsoft Word - q409.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fourth Quarter 2009 Fourth Quarter 2009 Fourth Quarter 2009 Key Findings Net Income $13.7 billion Revenues $261.6 billion Highlights Nineteen major energy companies reported almost a 300- percent increase in net income relative to the fourth quarter of 2008 (Q408). However, net income during the fourth quarter of 2009 (Q409) represents a 37-percent decrease relative to the fourth-quarter average for 2004- 2008. The effects of lower natural gas prices, worldwide refinery throughput, and domestic refining margins were more than offset by the effects of higher crude oil prices, and worldwide production of both crude oil and natural gas, leading to higher revenues and net income. Upstream capital expenditures by these companies declined after a year of lower-than-average (relative to the

322

Microsoft Word - q308.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Third Quarter 2008 Key Findings Net Income $48.0 billion Revenues $428.8 billion Highlights Major energy companies reported an 82-percent increase in net income relative to third quarter of 2007. Further, this represents a 102-percent increase relative to the third-quarter average for 2003-2007. Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) increased from 8.8 percent in the third quarter of 2007 to 11.2 percent in the third quarter of 2008 due to the 82 percent increase in net income. The effects of higher refining margins, oil and natural gas prices, and worldwide natural gas production overwhelmed lower worldwide oil production and refining throughput. Overview Nineteen major energy companies [1] reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $48.0 billion on

323

Microsoft Word - q209.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Second Quarter 2009 Second Quarter 2009 Second Quarter 2009 Key Findings Net Income $10.4 billion Revenues $221.9 billion Highlights Eighteen major energy companies reported a 67-percent decrease in net income relative to second quarter of 2008. Further, this represents a 62-percent decrease relative to the second-quarter average for 2004-2008. Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) decreased from 7.3 percent in the second quarter of 2008 to 4.7 percent in the second quarter of 2009 due to the 67 percent decrease in net income. The effects of higher worldwide oil and gas production from these companies and European and Asia/Pacific refining margins were overwhelmed by the effects of lower oil and natural gas prices and worldwide refinery throughput.

324

Microsoft Word - Matrixpart2.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 11 Clause Matrix for Department Of Energy Management and Operating Contracts Part II -- DEAR Clauses (Parts 952 and 970) (Thru DEAR Final Rule dated 9/25/2005) (1/13/2006) KEY: R = Required A = Required when applicable O = Optional M&O = Management and Operating contract UCF = Uniform Contract Format General instruction: Set forth below are clauses prescribed in DEAR Parts 952 and 970 to be used in addition to the FAR Part 52 contract clauses set forth in Part I. Prior to incorporating a clause identified below, the clause prescription and the "FAR/DEAR Clause Secondary Citation" should be reviewed. This listing does not include solicitation provisions. DEAR Clause Number Title FAR/DEAR 952 Secondary Clause

325

Microsoft Word - q110.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

First Quarter 2010 First Quarter 2010 First Quarter 2010 Key Findings Net Income $17.3 billion Revenues $269.6 billion Highlights Twenty-one major energy companies reported more than a 700-percent increase in net income relative to the loss reported in the first quarter of 2009 (Q109). However, net income during the first quarter of 2010 (Q110) represents a 9-percent decrease relative to the first-quarter average for 2005-2009. The effects of higher crude oil and natural gas prices, and higher worldwide crude oil and natural gas production more than offset the effects of lower worldwide refinery throughput and domestic refining margins, leading to higher revenues and net income. Upstream capital expenditures by these companies declined after a year of lower-than-average (relative to the

326

Microsoft Word - confirmation20010605.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jeanne Lopatto, 202/586-4940 Jeanne Lopatto, 202/586-4940 June 5, 2001 DOE Announces Confirmation of Presidential Appointees WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy announced today that the United States Senate has confirmed key presidential nominees to the department. "I am pleased and excited about those who will be joining me here at the Energy Department. Each of them will serve as a vital part of DOE's commitment to helping Americans deal with the energy crisis as well as securing our energy future," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. Among those confirmed are Francis Blake, Deputy Secretary of Energy; Robert Card, Under Secretary of Energy; Bruce Carnes, Chief Financial Officer; David Garman, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Lee Sarah Liberman Otis, General Counsel.

327

Group-Based Authentication and Key Agreement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an authentication and key agreement protocol to streamline communication activities for a group of mobile stations (MSs) roaming from the same home network (HN) to a serving network (SN). In such a roaming scenario, conventional schemes ... Keywords: Authentication and key agreement, Group key, Roaming, Security, Wireless network

Yu-Wen Chen; Jui-Tang Wang; Kuang-Hui Chi; Chien-Chao Tseng

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source 7. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Marketed renewable energy 1 Residential (wood) ............................................... 0.44 0.45 0.44 0.44 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.1% Commercial (biomass) ........................................ 0.11 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.0% Industrial 2 ............................................................. 2.32 2.18 2.53 2.67 2.82 3.08 3.65 1.8% Conventional hydroelectric ................................. 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.0% Municipal waste 3 ................................................. 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.1%

329

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction: This waste sorting game was originally designed to be one have completed the waste sorting activity quickly, no team was able to complete the waste sorting task who were unfamiliar with Dalhousie's waste management system. Goals: The primary goal of the activity

Beaumont, Christopher

330

University of Waste Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Maryland Hazardous And Regulated Waste Procedures Manual Revised July 2001 #12;Review II. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT III. BIOLOGICAL, PATHOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL WASTE (BPMW) MANAGEMENT IV. LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE (LLRW) MANAGEMENT V. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES VI. WASTE MINIMIZATION VII

Rubloff, Gary W.

331

Microsoft Word - CBFO TRUPACT!!!SA.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Supplement Analysis for the Transportation of Transuranic Waste in TRUPACT-III Containers September 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Supplement Analysis for the Transportation of Transuranic Waste in TRUPACT-III Containers ii This page intentionally blank Supplement Analysis for the Transportation of Transuranic Waste in TRUPACT-III Containers iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...........................................................................................................1 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION...........................................................................1 3.0 PROPOSED ACTION.....................................................................................................1

332

Using properties to compare both words and clauses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many applications that use the semantic similarity of words to compare input to stored data, such as conversational agents. When a human thinks of a word they consider a meaning which has associated attributes and properties. Clauses allow ... Keywords: converstional agents, semantic similarity, word similarity

David M. Pearce; Zuhair Bandar; David McLean

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Expanded bag of words representation for object classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, the bag of visual words (BOW) representation has received wide applications in object categorization. However, the BOW representation ignores the dependency relationship among visual words, which could provide informative knowledge to understand ... Keywords: bag of words, object classification, query expansion, spatial correlation

Tinglin Liu; Jing Liu; Qinshan Liu; Hanqing Lu

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Context representation using word sequences extracted from a news corpus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ambiguity in language is one of the most difficult problems in dealing with word senses using computers. Word senses vary dynamically depending on context. We need to specify the context to identify these. However, context also varies depending on ... Keywords: Conceptual fuzzy sets, Context representation, Word sense disambiguation, n-gram model

Hiroshi Sekiya; Takeshi Kondo; Makoto Hashimoto; Tomohiro Takagi

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Identification of probable real words: an entropy-based approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a method for identifying probable real words among out-of-vocabulary (OOV) words in text. The identification of real words is done based on entropy of probability of character trigrams as well as the morphological rules of English. ...

Youngja Park

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Selective word reading for high performance and low power processor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose Selective Word Reading (SWR) technique for a low power processor without a loss of performance. The development of this technique was motivated by the differences between store unit sizes per storage level. In typical cases, ... Keywords: cache architecture, cache controller, cache memory, low power, selective word, word-interleaved cache

Yun Kyo Cho; Seong Tae Jhang; Chu Shik Jhon

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

EIS-0391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, 391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington EIS-0391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts for the following three key areas: (1) retrieval, treatment, and disposal of waste from 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks and closure of the SST system, (2) decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, a nuclear test reactor, and (3) disposal of Hanford's waste and other DOE sites' low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download December 13, 2013 EIS-0391: Record of Decision Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for

338

Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Minimization Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Mission The team supports efforts that promote a more sustainable environment and implements pollution prevention activities in accordance with Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and EO 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, as approved by LM. The WM/P2 Team advocates environmentally sound waste minimization and pollution prevention practices. Scope Inventory the waste stream. Prevent or reduce pollution and waste at their source. Recycle. Use recycled-content products. Use less toxic or nontoxic products. Key Expectations Monitor and track progress on metrics. Maintain/implement a plan that integrates waste minimization and

339

Microsoft Word - 04-ACRONYM LIST.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GWSB - Glass Waste Storage Building HATF - High Activity TRU Facility HEU - Highly Enriched Uranium HTF - H-Tank Farm HVAC - Heating, ventilation and air-condition HW - Heavy...

340

Microsoft Word - ICP CX determinaton.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with the Hazardous Waste Management ActResource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMARCRA) SPFSSS Permit. The clean-closure action levels will be achieved by removal andor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microsoft Word - DOE Sustainability Awards 2012.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and waste across the DOE complex. "We're very pleased by the Department's Sustainability Awards," said Carlsbad Field Office, which has responsibility for WIPP and the...

342

Microsoft Word - 25A2876 Continued  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil refining is the most efficient industry at converting a chemical feedstock, oil, into finished products. Less waste is produced per ton of product in refining than in...

343

Microsoft Word - Final CSERD Ch 4.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mitigation may be the replacement of wetlands in another suitable location. Most of the waste materials generated by this facility would be disposed of offsite in licensed...

344

Microsoft Word - new_mexico.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 2 Other includes non-biogenic municipal solid...

345

Microsoft Word - west_virginia.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 2 Other includes non-biogenic municipal solid...

346

Microsoft Word - south_dakota.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. 2 Other includes non-biogenic municipal solid...

347

Microsoft Word - CBFO Manager Transition.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

been selected to lead DOE's Office of Environmental Management at the Savannah River Site. Moody has served as DOE Carlsbad Field Office manager, which oversees the Waste...

348

Microsoft Word - 08-0370.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

audit performed for Headspace Gas analysis of Summary Category Group S5000 debris wastes; Analytical Laboratories Department analysis of S3000 homogeneous solids and...

349

Microsoft Word - ARP MCU milestone.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

waste in its Interim Salt Disposition Process (ISDP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Essential components of the ISDP is the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and Modular Caustic...

350

DOE M 200.1-1 Chapter 9, Public Key Cryptography and Key Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The use and management of certificate-based public key cryptography for the Department of Energy (DOE) requires the establishment of a public key ...

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A stochastic process for word frequency distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stochastic model based on insights of Mandelbrot (1953) and Simon (1955) is discussed against the background of new criteria of adequacy that have become available recently as a result of studies of the similarity relations between words as found in ...

Harald Baayen

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Consistent visual words mining with adaptive sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art large-scale object retrieval systems usually combine efficient Bag-of-Words indexing models with a spatial verification re-ranking stage to improve query performance. In this paper we propose to directly discover spatially verified visual ...

Pierre Letessier; Olivier Buisson; Alexis Joly

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Data compactification and computing with words  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The underlying objective of this study is to show how fuzzy sets (and information granules in general) and grammatical inference play an interdependent role in information granularization and knowledge-based problem characterization. The bottom-up organization ... Keywords: Computing with words, Data compactification, Grammars, Information granulation, Information granules, NP-completeness, Randomization

Witold Pedrycz; Stuart H. Rubin

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Learning word vectors for sentiment analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unsupervised vector-based approaches to semantics can model rich lexical meanings, but they largely fail to capture sentiment information that is central to many word meanings and important for a wide range of NLP tasks. We present a model that uses ...

Andrew L. Maas; Raymond E. Daly; Peter T. Pham; Dan Huang; Andrew Y. Ng; Christopher Potts

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

357

Waste Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management Facility ISO 14001 Registered A wide range of wastes are generated during the normal course of business at BNL. These waste streams are common to many businesses...

358

Waste Logic Decommissioning Waste Manager 2.0 Users Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decommissioning Waste Manager, part of EPRI's Waste Logic series of computer programs, analyzes decommissioning waste cost and volume reduction strategies with the intent of quantifying the existing waste management program for any given waste generator.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

359

Solid Waste (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

360

Industrial Waste Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9) Page 2 of 7 Industrial Waste Generation Work with Engineered Nanomaterials Power Consumption Historical Contamination (groundwater, soil) Hazardous Waste Generation Atmospheric...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Recycling Electronic Waste - Website  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2010 ... Joined: 2/13/2007. Below is a link to a website that has articles on recycling electronic waste. http://www.scientificamerican....ectronic-waste-...

362

International Trade with Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis, trade with waste between developed countries and the third world will be presented to analyze whether waste?trading can create a possible (more)

Willn, Jenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Microsoft Word - WIPP ARRA Final Report Cover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance of Recovery Act Funds Performance of Recovery Act Funds at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant OAS-RA-L-11-09 July 2011 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: July 7, 2011 Audit Report Number: OAS-RA-L-11-09 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-35 (A10RA037) SUBJECT: Report on "Performance of Recovery Act Funds at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant" TO: Manager, Carlsbad Field Office, Environmental Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Carlsbad Field Office (Carlsbad) manages the transuranic (TRU) waste activities of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the National TRU Program. The WIPP, located outside Carlsbad, New Mexico, is the final repository for contact-handled and remote-handled TRU waste, and manages the final

364

Waste analysis plan for central waste complex  

SciTech Connect

This waste analysis plan (WAP) has been prepared for the Central Waste Complex which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to characterize, and obtain and analyze representative samples of waste managed at this unit.

Weston, N.L.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

Quantum Key Distribution Protocol with User Authentication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a quantum key distribution protocol with quantum based user authentication. User authentication is executed by validating the correlation of GHZ states. Alice and Bob can distribute a secure key using the remaining GHZ states after authentication. This secret key does not leak even to the arbitrator by the properties of the entanglement. We will show that our protocol is secure against the cloning attack.

Lee, H; Lee, D; Lim, J; Yang, H J; Lee, Hwayean; Lee, Sangjin; Lee, Donghoon; Lim, Jongin; Yang, HyungJin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Unifying classical and quantum key distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assume that two distant parties, Alice and Bob, as well as an adversary, Eve, have access to (quantum) systems prepared jointly according to a tripartite state ?ABE. In addition, Alice and Bob can use local operations and authenticated public classical communication. Their goal is to establish a key which is unknown to Eve. We initiate the study of this scenario as a unification of two standard scenarios: (i) key distillation (agreement) from classical correlations and (ii) key distillation from pure tripartite quantum states. Firstly, we obtain generalisations of fundamental results related to scenarios (i) and (ii), including upper bounds on the key rate, i.e., the number of key bits that can be extracted per copy of ?ABE. Moreover, based on an embedding of classical distributions into quantum states, we are able to find new connections between protocols and quantities in the standard scenarios (i) and (ii). Secondly, we study specific properties of key distillation protocols. In particular, we show that every protocol that makes use of pre-shared key can be transformed into an equally efficient protocol which needs no pre-shared key. This result is of practical significance as it applies to quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols, but it also implies that the key rate cannot be locked with information on Eves side. Finally, we exhibit an arbitrarily large separation between the key rate in the standard setting where Eve is equipped with quantum memory and the key rate in a setting where Eve is only given classical memory. This shows that assumptions on the nature of Eves memory are important in order to determine the correct security threshold in QKD. 1

Matthias Christ; Renato Renner

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

New Quantum Key System Combines Speed, Distance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a prototype high-speed quantum key distribution (QKD) system ... a theoretically unbreakable one-time pad encryption, transmission and decryption ...

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

368

Nanomechanics: New Test Measures Key Properties of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanomechanics: New Test Measures Key Properties of ... Tests using the wrinkle-crack method, however, show ... to the longest duration tested, 10 days ...

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

369

CODATA Key Values for Thermodynamics - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 8, 2007 ... This site includes internationally agreed upon values for thermodynamic properties of key chemical substances established by the Committee...

370

Design and Analysis of Key Comparisons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... new methods, and make statistically best practices available ... to Key Comparisons such as data reporting and ... In the big picture, with the lowering ...

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

371

Cryptographic Key Management Workshop 2009 - A Holistic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... policies Board of Directors CEO Protect critical data CSO/CISO CIO We aren't ... Encrypted Database Management Encrypted Tape Key Management ...

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

372

Quantum key distribution network with wavelength addressing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most traditional applications of quantum cryptography are point-to-point communications, in which only two users can exchange keys. In this letter, we present a network scheme that enable quantum key distribution between multi-user with wavelength addressing. Considering the current state of wavelength division multiplexing technique, dozens or hundreds of users can be connected to such a network and directly exchange keys with each other. With the scheme, a 4-user demonstration network was built up and key exchanges were performed.

Mo, X F; Han, Z F; Xu, F X; Zhang, T; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu; Mo, Xiao-Fan; Xu, Fang-Xing; Zhang, Tao

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Schedules of Key Environmental Impact Statements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document graphically displays the milestone dates and projected schedules of key Environmental Impact Statements (updated monthly).This chart represents anticipated activity and is not a...

374

BIASED RANDOM-KEY GENETIC ALGORITHMS WITH ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook of Metaheuristics. Kluwer. Academic Publishers, 2003. J.F. Gonalves and M.G.C. Resende. Biased random-key genetic algorithms for combinatorial...

375

Two key questions about color superconductivity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We pose two key questions about color superconductivity: What are the effects of the large strange quark mass, and what are the observable consequences of (more)

Kundu, Joydip, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Comment on "Quantum dense key distribution"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Comment we question the security of recently proposed by Degiovanni et al. [Phys. Rev. A 69 (2004) 032310] scheme of quantum dense key distribution.

Antoni Wojcik

2004-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Lyndon words with a fixed standard right factor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given a totally ordered alphabet A, a Lyndon word is a word that is strictly smaller, for the lexicographical order, than any of its conjugates (i.e., all words obtained by a circular permutation on the letters). Lyndon words were introduced by Lyndon [6] under the name of standard lexicographic sequences in order to give a base for the free Lie algebra over A. The set of Lyndon words is denoted by L. For instance, with a binary alphabet A = {a, b}, the first Lyndon words until length five are L = {a, b,ab, aab, abb, aaab, aabb, abbb, aaaab, aaabb, aabab, aabbb, ababb, abbbb,...}. Note that a non-empty word is a Lyndon word if and only if it is strictly smaller than any of its proper suffixes. The standard (suffix) factorization of Lyndon words plays a central role in this framework (see [5], [7], [8]). For w ? L \\ A a Lyndon word not reduced to a letter, the pair (u, v) of Lyndon words such that w = uv and v of maximal length is called the standard factorization. The words u and v are called the left factor and right factor of the standard factorization. Equivalently, the right factor v of the standard factorization of a Lyndon word w which is not reduced to a letter can be defined as the smallest proper suffix of w for the lexicographical order. For instance we have the following standard factorizations: aaabaab = aaab aab aaababb = a aababb aabaabb = aab aabb. One can then associate to a Lyndon word w a binary tree T(w) called its Lyndon tree recursively built in the following way: if w is a letter, then T(w) is a leaf labeled by w, otherwise T(w) is an internal node having T(u) and T(v) as children where u v is the standard factorization of w.

Frdrique Bassino; Julien Clment; Cyril Nicaud

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

1999-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

379

Identity-based authenticated asymmetric group key agreement protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In identity-based public-key cryptography, an entity's public key can be easily derived from its identity. The direct derivation of public keys in identity-based public-key cryptography eliminates the need for certificates and solves certain public key ... Keywords: asymmetric group key agreement, bilinear map, group key agreement, identity-based public-key cryptography

Lei Zhang; Qianhong Wu; Bo Qin; Josep Domingo-Ferrer

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

mhbai@sinica.edu.tw, kchen@iis.sinica.edu.tw, jschang@cs.nthu.edu.tw WordNet (word  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] WordNet "plant" WordNet "plant, works, industrial plant" (power plant/) WordNet [Diab et al 2 evaporation tank evaporation/ tank/ wind-wave tank wind-wave/ tank/ wave tank wave/ tank

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management'' was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois' and the Midwest's solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Unifying classical and quantum key distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assume that two distant parties, Alice and Bob, as well as an adversary, Eve, have access to (quantum) systems prepared jointly according to a tripartite state. In addition, Alice and Bob can use local operations and authenticated public classical communication. Their goal is to establish a key which is unknown to Eve. We initiate the study of this scenario as a unification of two standard scenarios: (i) key distillation (agreement) from classical correlations and (ii) key distillation from pure tripartite quantum states. Firstly, we obtain generalisations of fundamental results related to scenarios (i) and (ii), including upper bounds on the key rate. Moreover, based on an embedding of classical distributions into quantum states, we are able to find new connections between protocols and quantities in the standard scenarios (i) and (ii). Secondly, we study specific properties of key distillation protocols. In particular, we show that every protocol that makes use of pre-shared key can be transformed into an equally efficient protocol which needs no pre-shared key. This result is of practical significance as it applies to quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols, but it also implies that the key rate cannot be locked with information on Eve's side. Finally, we exhibit an arbitrarily large separation between the key rate in the standard setting where Eve is equipped with quantum memory and the key rate in a setting where Eve is only given classical memory. This shows that assumptions on the nature of Eve's memory are important in order to determine the correct security threshold in QKD.

Matthias Christandl; Artur Ekert; Michal Horodecki; Pawel Horodecki; Jonathan Oppenheim; Renato Renner

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

385

Microsoft Word - Survey-All-Groups.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A A Summary of Fermilab Diversity Focus Group The following is a summary of a three-hour discussion held with Fermilab employees some time between November 21, 2008 and January 9, 2009. Ten individuals, all of whom were female, attended this discussion. No responses have been attributed to any individuals and specific information that would personalize a response, such as names or departments have been deleted or generalized, but otherwise this summary represents that actual conversation. All wording in italics represent direction or questions provided by the facilitator. The Fermilab Work Environment Without giving it much thought, I want you to write down the first word or two that comes to mind when you think about the work environment here at Fermilab.

386

General quantum key distribution in higher dimension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a general quantum key distribution protocol in higher dimension. In this protocol, quantum states in arbitrary g+1 (1?g?d) out of all d+1 mutually unbiased bases in a d-dimensional system can be used for the key ...

Shi, Han-Duo

387

Robust key extraction from physical uncloneable functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical Uncloneable Functions (PUFs) can be used as a cost-effective means to store key material in an uncloneable way. Due to the fact that the key material is obtained by performing measurements on a physical system, noise is inevitably present in ... Keywords: authentication, challenge-response pair, error correction, noise, physical uncloneable function, speckle pattern

B. kori?; P. Tuyls; W. Ophey

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

General model of quantum key distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A general mathematical framework for quantum key distribution based on the concepts of quantum channel and Turing machine is suggested. The security for its special case is proved. The assumption is that the adversary can perform only individual (in essence, classical) attacks. For this case an advantage of quantum key distribution over classical one is shown.

A. S. Trushechkin; I. V. Volovich

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

389

Microsoft Word - Yucca PCard Report.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection Report Yucca Mountain Project Purchase Card Programs INS-O-09-04 August 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections MEMORANDUM FOR DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF CILIVIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT FROM: Herbert Richardson Principal Deputy Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Yucca Mountain Purchase Card Programs" BACKGROUND Yucca Mountain Project (Project) is the Nation's first proposed storage facility for spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste. The Project is managed by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). From

390

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Activities Key Activities The Fuel Cell Technologies Office conducts work in several key areas to advance the development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Research, Development, and Demonstration Key areas of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) include the following: Fuel Cell R&D, which seeks to improve the durability, reduce the cost, and improve the performance of fuel cell systems, through advances in fuel cell stack and balance of plant components Hydrogen Fuel R&D, which focuses on enabling the production of low-cost hydrogen fuel from diverse renewable pathways and addressing key challenges to hydrogen delivery and storage Manufacturing R&D, which works to develop and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technologies and processes that will reduce the cost of fuel cell systems and hydrogen technologies

392

residential sector key indicators | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential sector key indicators residential sector key indicators Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2009 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption, part of the Source EIA Date Released March 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO consumption EIA energy residential sector key indicators Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2009 Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption (xls, 55.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment http://www.eia.gov/abouteia/copyrights_reuse.cfm Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

393

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Nuclear waste solidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Key Documents | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Section 180(c) Key Documents Section 180(c) Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Key Documents Key Documents Briefing Package for Section 180(c) Implementation - July 2005 Executive Summary Introduction Appendix A - Funding Distribution Method Appendix B - Timing and Eligibility Appendix C - Allowable Activities/Training Appendix D - Definitions Appendix E - Pass-Through of Funds Appendix F - Contingency Re-Routing Appendix G - Policy on Rulemaking Appendix H - Funding Allocation Method Appendix I - State Fees Appendix J - Funding Operational Activities Appendix K - Matching Funds More Documents & Publications Implementation of Section 180(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal

396

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Eligibility...

397

Business Plan : Residential Solid Waste Collection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Residential solid waste means all the solid wastes produced in household level, which includes bio-waste, metal, mixed wastes, organic and inorganic waste. The inability of (more)

Mazengo, Dorice

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Microsoft Word - 10000th_shipment.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Immediate Release For Immediate Release The Department of Energy Announces Major Cold War Legacy Waste Cleanup Milestone Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment CARLSBAD, N.M., September 28, 2011 - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received its 10,000th shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste over the weekend. This marks an important milestone in DOE's mission to clean up the country's Cold War legacy. "This accomplishment reflects the hard work and dedication of our workers and contractors," said Energy Secretary Steven Chu. "It also demonstrates the Department's commitment to future generations as we continue our cleanup mission as safely and quickly as possible." The 10,000th shipment, which consisted of defense-generated contact-handled

399

Microsoft Word - 11-0649.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

649:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 August 8, 2011 Mr. John Kieling, Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New...

400

Microsoft Word - N01058_LTSM Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

owner is required to meet specific treatment standards andor use specific treatment technologies to treat the waste to certain criteria before it can be disposed of at a RCRA...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Microsoft Word - 2011sr09.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the special concrete used in reactor grouting; and the remediation of P and R Area Ash basins, which received coal-fired power plant ash and waste during the operation of the...

402

Microsoft Word - FINAL Transportation Award.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AWARDS CONTRACT FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE TRANSPORTATION SERVICES Carlsbad, NM, March 14, 2007 - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract...

403

Microsoft Word - 2007_jgi_final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M.O., K. Heguri, K. Hirata, and K. Miyamoto. 2005. Production of alternatives to fuel oil from organic waste by the alkane-producing bacterium, Vibrio furnissii M1. J. Appl....

404

Microsoft Word - DOE news release1.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amy Caver, DOE-SR, (803) 952-7213 August 15, 2013 amy.caver@srs.gov Dean Campbell, SRR, (803) 208-8270 dean.campbell@srs.gov GROUTING TO BEGIN TOMORROW ON TWO ADDITIONAL SRS WASTE...

405

Microsoft Word - SBPM Directory July 17 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rexann.dunn@nrel.gov Idaho Operations Office (NE) Jennifer Cate (208) 526-0631 Idaho Treatment Group, LLC Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project 850 Energy Drive Suite 100...

406

Microsoft Word - Audit Report Repost.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 July 15, 2008 Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico...

407

Microsoft Word - 09-1865.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

65:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 November 4, 2009 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New...

408

Microsoft Word - 09-1602.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

602:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 July 28, 2009 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico...

409

Methods of defining ontologies, word disambiguation methods, computer systems, and articles of manufacture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods of defining ontologies, word disambiguation methods, computer systems, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a word disambiguation method includes accessing textual content to be disambiguated, wherein the textual content comprises a plurality of words individually comprising a plurality of word senses, for an individual word of the textual content, identifying one of the word senses of the word as indicative of the meaning of the word in the textual content, for the individual word, selecting one of a plurality of event classes of a lexical database ontology using the identified word sense of the individual word, and for the individual word, associating the selected one of the event classes with the textual content to provide disambiguation of a meaning of the individual word in the textual content.

Sanfilippo, Antonio P. (Richland, WA); Tratz, Stephen C. (Richland, WA); Gregory, Michelle L. (Richland, WA); Chappell, Alan R. (Seattle, WA); Whitney, Paul D. (Richland, WA); Posse, Christian (Seattle, WA); Baddeley, Robert L. (Richland, WA); Hohimer, Ryan E. (West Richland, WA)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

410

Captured key electrical safety lockout system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety lockout apparatus for an electrical circuit includes an electrical switch, a key, a lock and a blocking mechanism. The electrical switch is movable between an ON position at which the electrical circuit is energized and an OFF position at which the electrical circuit is deactivated. The lock is adapted to receive the key and is rotatable among a plurality of positions by the key. The key is only insertable and removable when the lock is at a preselected position. The lock is maintained in the preselected position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism physically maintains the switch in its OFF position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism preferably includes a member driven by the lock between a first position at which the electrical switch is movable between its ON and OFF positions and a second position at which the member physically maintains the electrical switch in its OFF position. Advantageously, the driven member's second position corresponds to the preselected position at which the key can be removed from and inserted into the lock.

Darimont, Daniel E. (Aurora, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Microsoft Word - 1 Final FY 2009 OCRWM AFR Cover page.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Annual Financial Report Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 November 19, 2009 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Annual Financial Report Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 Table of Contents Page Overview Reporting Entity 1 Organization Chart & Program General Goal 2 Performance Against Key Targets 3 Financial Performance 4 Analysis of Systems, Controls and Legal Compliance 5 Independent Auditors' Report 7 Financial Results Balance Sheets 11 Statements of Net Costs 12 Statements of Changes in Net Position 13 Statements of Budgetary Resources 14 Notes to Financial Statements 15

412

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Raya James Johnson Rad/Mixed Waste** Steve Bakhtiar Leadhazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste at the Hazardoustraining. Radioactive and mixed waste generators must take

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by: Environmental Health and Safety Department Revised February 2012 #12;Waste Minimization Plan Table of Contents Policy Statement........................................................... 3 Centralized Waste Management Program

414

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may: cause or significantly...

415

Impact of Flow Control and Tax Reform on Ownership and Growth in the U.S. Waste-to-Energy Industry  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article analyzes two key issues that could be influencing growth and ownership (both public and private) in the Waste To Energy (WTE) industry.

Information Center

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A chain dictionary method for Word Sense Disambiguation and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large class of unsupervised algorithms for Word Sense Disambiguation (WSD) is that of dictionary-based methods. Various algorithms have as the root Lesk's algorithm, which exploits the sense definitions in the dictionary directly. Our approach uses the lexical base WordNet for a new algorithm originated in Lesk's, namely "chain algorithm for disambiguation of all words", CHAD. We show how translation from a language into another one and also text entailment verification could be accomplished by this disambiguation.

Tatar, Doina; Mihis, Andreea; Lupea, Mihaiela; Lupsa, Dana; Frentiu, Militon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Determinants of sustainability in solid waste management - The Gianyar Waste Recovery Project in Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our assessment tool helps evaluate success factors in solid waste projects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Success of the composting plant in Indonesia is linked to its community integration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appropriate technology is not a main determining success factor for sustainability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structured assessment of 'best practices' can enhance replication in other cities. - Abstract: According to most experts, integrated and sustainable solid waste management should not only be given top priority, but must go beyond technical aspects to include various key elements of sustainability to ensure success of any solid waste project. Aside from project sustainable impacts, the overall enabling environment is the key feature determining performance and success of an integrated and affordable solid waste system. This paper describes a project-specific approach to assess typical success or failure factors. A questionnaire-based assessment method covers issues of: (i) social mobilisation and acceptance (social element), (ii) stakeholder, legal and institutional arrangements comprising roles, responsibilities and management functions (institutional element); (iii) financial and operational requirements, as well as cost recovery mechanisms (economic element). The Gianyar Waste Recovery Project in Bali, Indonesia was analysed using this integrated assessment method. The results clearly identified chief characteristics, key factors to consider when planning country wide replication but also major barriers and obstacles which must be overcome to ensure project sustainability. The Gianyar project consists of a composting unit processing 60 tons of municipal waste per day from 500,000 inhabitants, including manual waste segregation and subsequent composting of the biodegradable organic fraction.

Zurbruegg, Christian, E-mail: zurbrugg@eawag.ch [Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (Sandec), Ueberlandstrasse 133, P.O. Box 611, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Gfrerer, Margareth, E-mail: margareth.gfrerer@gmx.net [Faculty of Engineering, University of Indonesia, Depok Campus, 16424 Jakarta (Indonesia); Ashadi, Henki, E-mail: henki@eng.ui.ac.id [Faculty of Engineering, University of Indonesia, Depok Campus, 16424 Jakarta (Indonesia); Brenner, Werner, E-mail: werner.brenner@gmx.at [Faculty of Engineering, University of Indonesia, Depok Campus, 16424 Jakarta (Indonesia); Kueper, David, E-mail: dkuper@indo.net.id [Yayasan Pemilahan Sampah Temesi, Temsi-Gianyar, Bali (Indonesia)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Anti-counterfeiting, key distribution, and key storage in an ambient world via physical unclonable functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Virtually all applications which provide or require a security service need a secret key. In an ambient world, where (potentially) sensitive information is continually being gathered about us, it is critical that those keys be both securely deployed ... Keywords: Fuzzy extractor, Helper data algorithm, Intrinsic PUF, Key distribution, LC-PUFs, Physical unclonable functions, SRAMs, Sensor nodes

Jorge Guajardo; Boris kori?; Pim Tuyls; Sandeep S. Kumar; Thijs Bel; Antoon H. Blom; Geert-Jan Schrijen

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

NATURE OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The integrated processes of nuclear industry are considered to define the nature of wastes. Processes for recovery and preparation of U and Th fuels produce wastes containing concentrated radioactive materials which present problems of confinement and dispersal. Fundamentals of waste treatment are considered from the standpoint of processes in which radioactive materials become a factor such as naturally occurring feed materials, fission products, and elements produced by parasitic neutron capture. In addition, the origin of concentrated fission product wastes is examined, as well as characteristics of present wastes and the level of fission products in wastes. Also, comments are included on high-level wastes from processes other than solvent extraction, active gaseous wastes, and low- to intermediate-level liquid wastes. (J.R.D.)

Culler, F.L. Jr.

1959-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

420

Password based key exchange with mutual authentication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reasonably efficient password based key exchange (KE) protocol with provable security without random oracle was recently proposed by Katz, et al. [17] and later by Gennaro and Lindell [13]. However, these protocols do not support mutual authentication ...

Shaoquan Jiang; Guang Gong

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cryptographic Key Management Project - Comments on the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... planned digital signature lifetime (based on the key strength ... Will the CAVP provide a standalone DH test that ... for about an eighth of the cost of 2.5 ...

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

Two key questions about color superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We pose two key questions about color superconductivity: What are the effects of the large strange quark mass, and what are the observable consequences of color superconductivity? Motivated by the first question, we study ...

Kundu, Joydip, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Some key Y-12 General Foremen remembered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expanded from K-25 to Y-12 and X-10, they brought their management style with them. Clark Center was a key individual. Clark Center Park, still known by old timers as "Carbide...

424

Jurisdiction Members Contact Info Key Staffers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relevant Jurisdiction Members Contact Info Key Staffers House Science, Space, and Technology, aeronautics, civil aviation, environment, and marine science · America COMPETES · Energy labs · National Science Foundation, including NCAR · National Aeronautics and Space Administration · National Weather

425

Composite keys? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Composite keys? Composite keys? Home > Groups > Databus Does DataBus support using composite keys in a Table definition? If not, is there a way to automatically generate a unique value for each entry that is uploaded? Submitted by Hopcroft on 5 September, 2013 - 17:13 1 answer Points: 0 At this time, no, and no way to generate unique key either right now. You can submit a feature request for this though on github. thanks, Dean Deanhiller on 6 September, 2013 - 06:58 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Go to My Databus->Data Streams... yes, it is done the same way y... Update rows? How to use streaming chart? if you are an administrator, s... more Group members (6) Managers: Deanhiller Recent members: Hopcroft Vikasgoyal Ksearight NickL

426

Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians, Building Operators, and Energy Commissioning AgentsAuditors" Microsoft Word - kDE-FOA-0000090.rtf...

427

Stories of Discovery & Innovation: Just One Word-Plastics | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Just One Word-Plastics Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News EFRC Events DOE Announcements Publications...

428

Microsoft Word - ACQUISITION LETTER.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - ACQUISITION LETTER.doc More Documents & Publications ACQUISITION LETTER DEAR Part 933 OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Chapter 33 - Protests, Disputes and Appeals...

429

Microsoft Word - meritrev.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Word - meritrev.doc More Documents & Publications Policy Flash 2013-38 Revised Merit Review Guide For Financial Assistance Modification PNM Guide OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

430

Quantum Key Distribution Using Quantum Faraday Rotators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol based on the fully quantum mechanical states of the Faraday rotators. The protocol is unconditionally secure against eavesdropping for single-photon source on a noisy environment and robust against impersonation attacks. It also allows for unconditionally secure key distribution for multiphoton source up to two photons. The protocol could be implemented experimentally with the current spintronics technology on semiconductors.

Choi, T; Choi, Mahn-Soo; Choi, Taeseung

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Multipartite secret key distillation and bound entanglement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently it has been shown that quantum cryptography beyond pure entanglement distillation is possible and a paradigm for the associated protocols has been established. Here we systematically generalize the whole paradigm to the multipartite scenario. We provide constructions of new classes of multipartite bound entangled states, i.e., those with underlying twisted Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) structure and nonzero distillable cryptographic key. We quantitatively estimate the key from below with the help of the privacy squeezing technique.

Augusiak, Remigiusz; Horodecki, Pawel [Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland) and ICFO-Institute Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Estimating and understanding DOE waste management costs`  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines costs associated with cleaning up the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) nuclear facilities, with particular emphasis on the waste management program. Life-cycle waste management costs have been compiled and reported in the DOE Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). Waste management costs are a critical issue for DOE because of the current budget constraints. The DOE sites are struggling to accomplish their environmental management objectives given funding scenarios that are well below anticipated waste management costs. Through the BEMR process, DOE has compiled complex-wide cleanup cost estimates and has begun analysis of these costs with respect to alternative waste management scenarios and policy strategies. From this analysis, DOE is attempting to identify the major cost drivers and prioritize environmental management activities to achieve maximum utilization of existing funding. This paper provides an overview of the methodology DOE has used to estimate and analyze some waste management costs, including the key data requirements and uncertainties.

Kang, J.S. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Sherick, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

High Efficient Secret Key Distillation for Long Distance Continuous Variable Quantum Key Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The continuous variable quantum key distribution is expected to provide high secret key rate without single photon source and detector, but the lack of the secure and effective key distillation method makes it unpractical. Here, we present a secure single-bit-reverse-reconciliation protocol combined with secret information concentration and post-selection, which can distill the secret key with high efficiency and low computational complexity. The simulation results show that this protocol can provide high secret key rate even when the transmission fiber is longer than 150km, which may make the continuous variable scheme to outvie the single photon one.

Yi-bo Zhao; Zheng-fu Han; Jin-jian Chen; You-zhen Gui; Guang-can Guo

2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

434

Development of Cementitious Waste Forms for Nuclear Waste ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Development of Cementitious Waste Forms for Nuclear Waste Immobilization.

435

The Left and Right Context of a Word: Overlapping Chinese Syllable Word Segmentation with Minimal Context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since a Chinese syllable can correspond to many characters (homophones), the syllable-to-character conversion task is quite challenging for Chinese phonetic input methods (CPIM). There are usually two stages in a CPIM: 1. segment the syllable sequence ... Keywords: Chinese phonetic input methods, syllable-to-word conversion

Mike Tian-Jian Jiang; Tsung-Hsien Lee; Wen-Lian Hsu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Microsoft Word - EM Major Contracts Summary 093013update.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Cost plus incentive fee Idaho Treatment Group DE-EM0001467 101111-93015 456.4M Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Plant Transuranic waste shipments to the Waste...

438

Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste: Any laboratory waste, whether chemical or biological, containing radioactive material, should be disposed as radioactive waste. Radioactive waste should be removed from the laboratory to the departmental waste area, soon after finishing the experiment

Maoz, Shahar

440

Ten Hundred and One word challenge | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Microsoft Word - Policy Flash_2010-02_Deputy_FPD_Certification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - Policy Flash 2008-06.doc Microsoft Word - Policy Flash2010-01January2011PMCDPCurriculumFINAL.doc Microsoft Word - PolicyFlash 0901L1Safetycourse...

442

Microsoft Word - Policy_Flash_ 09_01_L1_Safety_course.doc | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - PolicyFlash 0903ACOR.doc Microsoft Word - PolicyFlash0902InterimCertification.doc Microsoft Word - Flash09-05PMCDPCourseCurriculumChanges.doc...

443

Handwritten word recognition with character and inter-character neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An off-line handwritten word recognition system is described. Images of handwritten words are matched to lexicons of candidate strings. A word image is segmented into primitives. The best match between sequences of unions of primitives and a lexicon ...

P. D. Gader; M. Mohamed; Jung-Hsien Chiang

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Microsoft Word - 2010SR10.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AIKEN, SC 29802 NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Jim Giusti, DOE, (803) 952-7697 Tuesday, March 23, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 952-6938 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov TRU Waste Remediation Technician Finds Stability in Recovery Act Job Stabile job provides time to fulfill educational goal Aiken, S.C. - If there were a prize at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) for a Recovery Act worker coming from farthest away, Dean Morris would most likely win. Morris, a waste remediation technician, moved south in June all the way from Wasilla, Alaska, to join SRS's highly specialized Solid Waste Management team. Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the team is remediating 55-gallon drums

445

Microsoft Word - 2010SR09.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 23, 2010 March 23, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov John Lindsay, SRR, (803) 208-6253 john02lindsay@srs.gov Recovery Act Funds Move SRS Tank 5 Closer to Final Closure Aiken, SC -- One more radioactive liquid waste tank at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) has moved closer to final closure thanks to American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR), DOE's liquid waste contractor at SRS, safely completed its first Recovery Act project on March 15, 2010, which required refurbishing an internal purge ventilation system as well as removing and replacing a 50-foot long mixing pump located within the 750,000 gallon radioactive liquid waste tank. As many as 50 Recovery Act workers were involved in the $1.4 million project.

446

Microsoft Word - 12-3489, Rev. 0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12-3489 12-3489 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2011 U.S. Department of Energy September 2012 Rev. 0 1 2 This page intentionally left blank Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2011 DOE/WIPP-12-3489 3 2011 Annual Site Environmental Report To our readers: This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2011 presents summary environmental data to (1) characterize site environmental management performance, (2) summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year, (3) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and (4) highlight the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS), significant environmental programs, and accomplishments, including progress toward

447

Microsoft Word - 25A2876 Continued  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil refining is the most efficient industry at converting a chemical feedstock, oil, into finished products. Less waste is produced per ton of product in Oil refining is the most efficient industry at converting a chemical feedstock, oil, into finished products. Less waste is produced per ton of product in refining than in petrochemicals, fine chemicals, or pharmaceuticals. This high level of efficiency is absolutely necessary given the enormous volumes of material processed. Because of the scale of refining in the US, small percentage inefficiencies equate to massive real losses of potential fuel and unnecessarily emitted greenhouse gases. In the US, one such source of loss is the olefin content of refinery off-gas, or ROG. ROG is the waste generated from fluid catalytic cracking and other similar operations. It consists of light paraffins and olefins, particularly ethane and ethylene. For refineries outside the petrochemical hub along the US Gulf Coast, few markets for light olefins

448

Transuranic (TRU) Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste with half-lives greater than 20 years, except for (A)...

449

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to immobilize pretreated Hanford high-level waste and transuranic waste in borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters. Testing is being conducted in the HWVP Technology Development Project to ensure that adapted technologies are applicable to the candidate Hanford wastes and to generate information for waste form qualification. Empirical modeling is being conducted to define a glass composition range consistent with process and waste form qualification requirements. Laboratory studies are conducted to determine process stream properties, characterize the redox chemistry of the melter feed as a basis for controlling melt foaming and evaluate zeolite sorption materials for process waste treatment. Pilot-scale tests have been performed with simulated melter feed to access filtration for solids removal from process wastes, evaluate vitrification process performance and assess offgas equipment performance. Process equipment construction materials are being selected based on literature review, corrosion testing, and performance in pilot-scale testing. 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Larson, D.E.; Allen, C.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Kruger, O.L.; Weber, E.T. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Transuranic Waste Screener  

The TRU waste screener (TRU-WS) is a multifunctional system for the rapid screening of transuranic material for criticality safety or screening for TRU content in open trays or waste containers.

451

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy (DOE) is closing the circle on the generation, management, and disposal of transuranic waste. But the WIPP story is not just about radioactive waste. It is...

452

Immobilization of Nuclear Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010 ... Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms: Michael Ojovan1; Bill Lee2; ... wastes which should be solidified for safe storage and disposal. ... has been vitrifying the Department of Energy's High Level Waste (HLW) at...

453

Pet Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

454

NIST Special Publication 800-57, Recommendation for Key ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... keying material from key backup or archive. ... term random number generator (RNG) is ... Deterministic Random Bit Generators (DRBGs), sometimes ...

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

455

ITL Bulletin Generating Secure Cryptographic Keys: A Critical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... KEYS: A CRITICAL COMPONENT OF CRYPTOGRAPHIC ... relies upon two basic components: an algorithm (or ... and of keys for symmetric algorithms. ...

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

456

The wild wild waste: e-waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-Waste is a popular, informal name for discarded electronic products such as computers, VCRs, cameras, which have reached the end of their "useful life". Discarded electronic products contain a stew of toxic metals and chemicals such as lead, mercury, ... Keywords: donate, e-waste, ecology, efficiency, environment, green computing, hazardous material, re-use, recycle, reduce, thin-client, upgrade, virtualization

Scott E. Hanselman; Mahmoud Pegah

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes in the form of a solidified glass includes fins supported from the center with the tips of the fins spaced away from the wall to conduct heat away from the center without producing unacceptable hot spots in the canister wall.

Duffy, James B. (Fullerton, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Chairs' Recommendation 2013-01.041213...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

has noted with considerable interest and support that the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been remarkably successful in disposing of transuranic waste (TRU) throughout the...

459

Microsoft Word - 11-0656 _signature on file_.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

audit performed for headspace gas analysis of Summary Category Group S5000 debris waste; solids analysis of S3000 homogeneous solids and S4000 soilsgravel wastes;...

460

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-026.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

would occur during removal activities. Project personnel would work with Waste Generator Services (WGS) to properly characterize, store, and dispose all waste according to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-004.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or Waste Handling and Transportation: Project personnel would work with Waste Generator Services (WGS) to properly package and transport regulated, hazardous or radioactive...

462

Mixed Waste Treatment Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing integrated mixed waste program, EPRI has documented nuclear utility industry experience in the on-site treatment of mixed waste. This report reviews all available exclusions/exceptions to EPA permitting requirements for environmentally responsible on-site management of mixed waste. Included is a description of emerging mixed waste treatment technologies along with a detailed evaluation of off-site treatment/disposal facilities.

1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Microsoft Word - supplement Analysis SWEIS82302.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

38SA2 38SA2 Supplement Analysis Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory Modification of Management Methods for Transuranic Waste Characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory August 13, 2002 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office Supplement Analysis for the SWEIS Page 1 August 13, 2002 Introduction This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a waste management proposal for installing and operating modular units for the

464

Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AR No. 5 Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action Separate scrap plastic bag waste from solid waste stream and recycle. This can be accomplished by either arranging for no-cost pick-up of loose waste or by selling baled waste material. Assessment Recommendation Summary Recommended Waste Cost Implementation

Tullos, Desiree

465

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected plants · 8% (non-incinerable waste) and incineration ash goes to the offshore Semakau Landfill · To reach

Columbia University

466

A secure multiple-agent cryptographic key recovery system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symmetric cryptography uses the same session key for message encryption and decryption. Without having it, the encrypted message will never be revealed. In case the session key is unavailable or government authorities need to inspect suspect messages, ... Keywords: key recovery, key recovery agent, key recovery center, secret sharing, session key

Kanokwan Kanyamee; Chanboon Sathitwiriyawong

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 4: Appendix BIR Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of the waste stream profile for the WIPP transuranic waste baseline inventory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The following assumptions/modifications were made by the WTWBIR team in developing the LL waste stream profiles: since only current volumes were provided by LL, the final form volumes were assumed to be the same as the current volumes; the WTWBIR team had to assign identification numbers (IDs) to those LL waste streams not given an identifier by the site, the assigned identification numbers are consistent with the site reported numbers; LL Final Waste Form Groups were modified to be consistent with the nomenclature used in the WTWBID, these changes included word and spelling changes, the assigned Final Waste Form Groups are consistent with the information provided by LL; the volumes for the year 1993 were changed from an annual rate of generation (m{sup 3}/year) to a cumulative value (m{sup 3}).

NONE

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I ' I I t Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan AMs President Mike Lee (left to right), Point Grey M U recycling given high priority on campus By GAVIN WILSON UBC is taking stepsto reduce waste and encourageGellatly,Vice-President,Administration and Finance,to develop and recommend university policies on waste recycling. Another task force has submitted

Farrell, Anthony P.

469

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working be thoroughly familiar with waste handling and emergency procedures ap- plicable to their job responsibilities before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

Dai, Pengcheng

470

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

471

Modified MFCC windowed technique for speaker word recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mel frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) are one of the most popular forms of parameterization of the speech signal in speaker word recognition systems. MFCC's are based on the known variation of the human ear's critical bandwidths. In this paper, ... Keywords: DCT, MFCC, hamming window, kaiser window, modified MFCC, speaker word recognition, windowing techniques

I. Patel; Y. S. Rao

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Dynamic minimization of word-level decision diagrams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Word-Level Decision Diagrams (WLDDs), like *BMDs and K*BMDs, have recently been introduced as a data structure for verification. The size of WLDDs largely depends on the chosen variable ordering, i.e. the ordering in which variables are encountered, ... Keywords: decision diagrams, word-level, variable exchange, reordering, sifting, hybrid graph manipulation, K*BMDs

S. Hreth; R. Drechsler

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Hindi paired word recognition using probabilistic neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automatic speech recognition has been a subject of active research interest since last few decades. In the present paper, spoken Hindi (Indian national language) Paired Word Recognition (HPWR) has been examined with the help of intelligent ... Keywords: HPWR, Hindi, PNN, automatic speech recognition, broad acoustic classes, classification, hybrid computing, paired word recognition, pattern recognition, probabilistic neural networks, wavelet transforms

Dinesh Kumar Rajoriya; R. S. Anand; R. P. Maheshwari

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

PNNL: a supervised maximum entropy approach to word sense disambiguation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we described the PNNL Word Sense Disambiguation system as applied to the English all-word task in SemEval 2007. We use a supervised learning approach, employing a large number of features and using Information Gain for dimension reduction. ...

Stephen Tratz; Antonio Sanfilippo; Michelle Gregory; Alan Chappell; Christian Posse; Paul Whitney

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

An Intelligent Lexicon for Contextual Word Sense Discrimination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a lexical model dedicated to the semantic representation and interpretation of individual words in unrestricted text, where sense discrimination is difficult to assess. We discuss the need of a lexicon including local inference mechanisms ... Keywords: lexical knowledge representation, multi-expert architecture, natural language processing, semantics, word sense discrimination, written text understanding

Violaine Prince

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

User Interaction with Word Prediction: The Effects of Prediction Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Word prediction systems can reduce the number of keystrokes required to form a message in a letter-based AAC system. It has been questioned, however, whether such savings translate into an enhanced communication rate due to the additional overhead (e.g., ... Keywords: Word prediction, communication rate, user study

Keith Trnka; John McCaw; Debra Yarrington; Kathleen F. McCoy; Christopher Pennington

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Refining image annotation using contextual relations between words  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a probabilistic approach to refine image annotations by incorporating semantic relations between annotation words. Our approach firstly predicts a candidate set of annotation words with confidence scores. This is achieved by ... Keywords: image annotation, normalized Google distance, semantic relation

Yong Wang; Shaogang Gong

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Multi-prototype vector-space models of word meaning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current vector-space models of lexical semantics create a single "prototype" vector to represent the meaning of a word. However, due to lexical ambiguity, encoding word meaning with a single vector is problematic. This paper presents a method that uses ...

Joseph Reisinger; Raymond J. Mooney

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Waste acceptance criteria for closure generated waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PORTS Facility has been operating since 1954. The PORTS Facility is used to enrich uranium for nuclear navy applications and commercial nuclear reactors. The PORTS process uses molecular diffusion techniques to separate the U-235 isotope from the U-238 isotope. The PORTS Facility consists of a complex cascade of compressors and converters through which gaseous uranium hexafluoride feed is processed. The feed contains approximately 0.7 percent U-235 by weight while products contain from 4 to 97 percent U-235 by weight, depending on the final application. In general, the majority of the closure wastes generated at PORTS consists of personal protective equipment (PPE), rags, soils, decontamination solutions, and construction related debris. These hazardous wastes will be predominately characterized on the basis of process knowledge. PORTS assumes its conservative waste characterizations that are based on process knowledge are correct unless and until further investigation and/or analysis proves the constituents are not present or are present at concentrations below characteristic regulatory thresholds. Waste Acceptance Criteria for wastes generated by the closure of active and inactive RCRA facilities at PORTS has been developed. The criteria presented in this document govern the activities that are performed during the closure and subsequent generation of waste and relocation from the closure locations to the storage unit. These criteria are intended to ensure the proper handling, classification, processing, and storage of wastes in order to prevent hazardous waste release that may pose a threat to human health or the environment. Any wastes currently stored at each of the facilities that are to be closed will be transferred to the X-326 or X-7725 Storage Units. The waste transfers will be accomplished in accordance with the Container Transfer Plan.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

STGWG Key Outcomes for May 3, 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Key Outcomes-Nashville 2010 Page 1 Key Outcomes-Nashville 2010 Page 1 State and Tribal Government Working Group (STGWG) Nashville, Tennessee - May 3, 2010 KEY OUTCOMES OVERVIEW Members appreciated the participation of all DOE officials at the STGWG meeting in Nashville, and are especially appreciative of the participation of high-level DOE management, such as Sky Gallegos, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs, and Frank Marcinowski, Acting Chief Technical Officer and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Technical and Regulatory Support. Such participation demonstrates a continuing commitment to improve interaction with tribes and states. STGWG looks forward to our next Intergovernmental meeting with DOE in the fall. FULL STGWG ISSUES

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Composite keys? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Composite keys? Home > Groups > Databus Does DataBus support using composite keys in a Table definition? If not, is there a way to automatically generate a unique value for each entry that is uploaded? Submitted by Hopcroft on 5 September, 2013 - 17:13 1 answer Points: 0 At this time, no, and no way to generate unique key either right now. You can submit a feature request for this though on github. thanks, Dean Deanhiller on 6 September, 2013 - 06:58 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Go to My Databus->Data Streams... yes, it is done the same way y... Update rows? How to use streaming chart? if you are an administrator, s... more Group members (7) Managers: Deanhiller Recent members: Bradmin Hopcroft Vikasgoyal Ksearight

482

The competing roles of SV(O) and VS(O) word orders in Xodenie igumena Daniila  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

work together and word order alone does not determine therelatively free word order, as does Modern Russian. However,

McAnallen, Julia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Public key infrastructure for DOE security research  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the Department of Energy`s Second Joint Energy Research/Defence Programs Security Research Workshop. The workshop, built on the results of the first Joint Workshop which reviewed security requirements represented in a range of mission-critical ER and DP applications, discussed commonalties and differences in ER/DP requirements and approaches, and identified an integrated common set of security research priorities. One significant conclusion of the first workshop was that progress in a broad spectrum of DOE-relevant security problems and applications could best be addressed through public-key cryptography based systems, and therefore depended upon the existence of a robust, broadly deployed public-key infrastructure. Hence, public-key infrastructure ({open_quotes}PKI{close_quotes}) was adopted as a primary focus for the second workshop. The Second Joint Workshop covered a range of DOE security research and deployment efforts, as well as summaries of the state of the art in various areas relating to public-key technologies. Key findings were that a broad range of DOE applications can benefit from security architectures and technologies built on a robust, flexible, widely deployed public-key infrastructure; that there exists a collection of specific requirements for missing or undeveloped PKI functionality, together with a preliminary assessment of how these requirements can be met; that, while commercial developments can be expected to provide many relevant security technologies, there are important capabilities that commercial developments will not address, due to the unique scale, performance, diversity, distributed nature, and sensitivity of DOE applications; that DOE should encourage and support research activities intended to increase understanding of security technology requirements, and to develop critical components not forthcoming from other sources in a timely manner.

Aiken, R.; Foster, I.; Johnston, W.E. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Review of Potential Candidate Stabilization Technologies for Liquid and Solid Secondary Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has initiated a waste form testing program to support the long-term durability evaluation of a waste form for secondary wastes generated from the treatment and immobilization of Hanford radioactive tank wastes. The purpose of the work discussed in this report is to identify candidate stabilization technologies and getters that have the potential to successfully treat the secondary waste stream liquid effluent, mainly from off-gas scrubbers and spent solids, produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Down-selection to the most promising stabilization processes/waste forms is needed to support the design of a solidification treatment unit (STU) to be added to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). To support key decision processes, an initial screening of the secondary liquid waste forms must be completed by February 2010.

Pierce, Eric M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Scheele, Randall D.; Um, Wooyong; Qafoku, Nikolla

2010-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

485

Nonorthogonal decoy-state Quantum Key Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In practical quantum key distribution (QKD), weak coherent states as the photon sources have a limit in secure key rate and transmission distance because of the existence of multiphoton pulses and heavy loss in transmission line. Decoy states method and nonorthogonal encoding protocol are two important weapons to combat these effects. Here, we combine these two methods and propose a efficient method that can substantially improve the performance of QKD. We find a 79 km increase in transmission distance over the prior record using decoy states method.

Li, J B; Li, Jing-Bo; Fang, Xi-Ming

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Complementarity, distillable secret key, and distillable entanglement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider controllability of two conjugate observables Z and X by two parties with classical communication. The ability is specified by two alternative tasks, (i) agreement on Z and (ii) preparation of an eigenstate of X with use of an extra communication channel. We prove that their feasibility is equivalent to that of key distillation if the extra channel is quantum, and to that of entanglement distillation if it is classical. This clarifies the distinction between two entanglement measures, distillable key and distillable entanglement.

Masato Koashi

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

487

Microsoft Word - JAS_Bakken_Mar10  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-08NT43291 Project Manager: John Terneus Final Report SUBTASK 1.2 - EVALUATION OF KEY FACTORS AFFECTING SUCCESSFUL OIL PRODUCTION...

488

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste Batteries, used or unwanted including lithium, alkaline, lead ­ acid or lithium aluminum hydride Chemical Waste Check Disposal of Toxics website for disposal options or Take to Bookstore Biological Waste Biological Waste Residential

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

489

Microsoft Word - WIPP Training Program.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i o n P i l o t P l a n t U . S . D e p a r t m e n t O f E n e r g y The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP) has trained more than 32,000 emergency response professionals along...

490

Quantum repeaters and quantum key distribution: the impact of entanglement distillation on the secret key rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate quantum repeaters in the context of quantum key distribution. We optimize the secret key rate per memory per second with respect to different distillation protocols and distillation strategies. For this purpose, we also derive an analytical expression for the average number of entangled pairs created by the quantum repeater, including classical communication times for entanglement swapping and entanglement distillation. We investigate the impact of this classical communication time on the secret key rate. We finally study the effect of the detector efficiency on the secret key rate.

Sylvia Bratzik; Silvestre Abruzzo; Hermann Kampermann; Dagmar Bru

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

491

Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations [Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Analysis, Hazard Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurgical Technology Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Bookmark and Share NE Division personnel had a key role in the creation of the FCF Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), FCF Technical Safety Requirements (TSR)

492

Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy November 1, 2013 - 1:28pm Addthis Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? 1.4 billion pounds of pumpkins are produced in the U.S. each year, many of which end up in landfills or compost piles after Halloween. Oakland's EBMUD collects food waste and uses microbes to convert it into methane gas that is burned to generate electricity. The Energy Department is helping to fund the development of integrated biorefineries, industrial centers dedicated to converting plant material into biofuels and other products. To commemorate National Energy Action Month, we're featuring some scarily

493

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

494

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

495

Waste immobilization demonstration program for the Hanford Site`s Mixed Waste Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the Waste Receiving and Processing facility, Module 2A> waste immobilization demonstration program, focusing on the cooperation between Hanford Site, commercial, and international participants. Important highlights of the development and demonstration activities is discussed from the standpoint of findings that have had significant from the standpoint of findings that have had significant impact on the evolution of the facility design. A brief description of the future direction of the program is presented, with emphasis on the key aspects of the technologies that call for further detailed investigation.

Burbank, D.A.; Weingardt, K.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Basics about CIM technology and key  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basics about CIM® technology and key applications Ales Strancar March, 2011 #12;Leaders in Monolith monolithic technology (CIM®). 4 USA patents granted including their foreign equivalents, more pending. #12;Important Milestones · 2002: First Drug Master File (DMF) for CIM® DEAE supports. · 2002: Pass first FDA

Lebendiker, Mario

497

Key issues of RFID reader network system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RFID system is used widely in different applications and comes in a myriad of forms today. It is doomed to be concerned by people and still be the hot spot of research in the next few years. In this paper, Key issues of RFID reader network system are ... Keywords: RFID, WSN, anti-collision algorithm, taxonomy

Leian Liu; Dashun yan; Jiapei Wu; Hongjiang Wang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Key Management Challenges in Smart Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agenda Awarded in February 2011 Team of industry and research organizations Project Objectives Address difficult issues Complexity Diversity of systems Scale Longevity of solution Participate in standards efforts and working groups Develop innovative key management solutions Modeling and simulation ORNL Cyber Security Econometric Enterprise System Demonstrate effectiveness of solution Demonstrate scalability

Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL; Duren, Mike [Sypris Electronics, LLC

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

ASSEMBLAGES ON WASTE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Natural regeneration on waste rock was investigated at the old Wangaloa coal mine, south-east Otago. A 450-m long waste rock stack had been created 4050 years ago, and has had little anthropogenic intervention since. The stack is made up of a gradient of three main waste rock types, defined as silt-rich, mixed, and quartz-rich, which reflect different proportions of loess siltstone and quartz gravel conglomerate. Plant species assemblages were quantified in four 5-m 2 quadrats in each waste rock type. Invertebrates were heat extracted from substrate cores (7 cm diameter; depth 5 cm) collected from quadrats over an eight-week period in spring 2003. Ordination analysis showed statistically distinct plant and invertebrate assemblages had arisen on each waste rock type. Revegetation patterns were dominated by native, woody individuals on all waste rock types, particularly manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides). Plant cover on silt-rich waste rock was four-fold that on quartz-rich waste rock. Total numbers of invertebrates were highest on quartz-rich waste rock, but richness greatest on silt-rich waste rock. Collembola dominated the fauna but their numbers were proportionally greatest in poorly vegetated areas. Further work is required to explain the absence of plants and invertebrates from local areas of waste rock. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C. G. Rufaut; S. Hammit; D. Craw; S. G. Clearwater

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Mixed waste: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z