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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Key words: STREAMLINE, yeast, scale up, automation, sanitization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adsorption by defining a realistic process example at small scale and taking it all the way up to a fullyKey words: STREAMLINE, yeast, scale up, automation, sanitization. Abstract This application note was evaluated by performing a sanitization study in which the column and system were challenged with culture

Lebendiker, Mario

2

Microsoft Word - SRSSaltWasteDisposal.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salt Waste Disposal - References - §3116 Determination (RWR NDAA of 2005) Salt Waste Disposal - References - §3116 Determination (RWR NDAA of 2005) Doc. No. Filename Title Main Document References 1. 2005 RWR DAA §3116 NDAA.pdf "Ronald W. Regan National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2005," Section 3116, 2004. 2. CBU-PIT-2004-00024 CBU-PIT-2004-00024.pdf Ledbetter, L. S., CBU-PIT-2004-00024, 12/01/04 - December Monthly WCS Curie and Volume Inventory Report," Revision 0, December 9, 2004. 3. CBU-PIT-2005-00031 CBU-PIT-2005-00031.pdf Rios-Armstrong, M. A., CBU-PIT-2005-00031, "Decontaminated Salt Solution Volume to be transferred to the Saltstone Disposal Facility from Salt Treatment and Disposition Activities," Revision 0, February 13, 2005.

3

Microsoft Word - Solid Waste at Hanford  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Use of American Recovery and Use of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Funds on Solid Waste Project Activities at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site OAS-RA-L-11-08 May 2011 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: May19, 2011 Audit Report Number: OAS-RA-L-11-08 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A10RA041) SUBJECT: Report on "Use of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Funds on Solid Waste Project Activities at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site" TO: Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department), Richland Operations Office (Richland), awarded a contract, effective October 1, 2008, to CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to

4

Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD - October 2005 Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD - October 2005 October 2005 The purpose of this booklet is to assist individuals of Government agencies who generate or review classified documents to recognize the presence of nuclear information that is potentially classified as Restricted Data (RD) or Formerly Restricted Data (FRD). This book is particularly helpful to document reviewers conducting declassification reviews pursuant to Executive orders. Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD - October 2005 More Documents & Publications Brochure, Classification Overview of RD and FRD - September 2010 Briefing, Restricted Data Classifiers - March 2013

5

Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD - October 2005 Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD - October 2005 October 2005 The purpose of this booklet is to assist individuals of Government agencies who generate or review classified documents to recognize the presence of nuclear information that is potentially classified as Restricted Data (RD) or Formerly Restricted Data (FRD). This book is particularly helpful to document reviewers conducting declassification reviews pursuant to Executive orders. Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD - October 2005 More Documents & Publications Brochure, Classification Overview of RD and FRD - September 2010 Briefing, Restricted Data Classifiers - March 2013

6

Microsoft Word - Tank Waste Report 9-30-05.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accelerated Tank Waste Retrieval Accelerated Tank Waste Retrieval Activities at the Hanford Site DOE/IG-0706 October 2005 REPORT ON THE ACCELERATED TANK WASTE RETRIEVAL ACTIVITIES AT THE HANFORD SITE TABLE OF CONTENTS Tank Waste Retrieval Details of Finding 1 Recommendations and Comments 4 Appendices Objective, Scope, and Methodology 6 Prior Reports 7 Management Comments 8 Tank Waste Retrieval Page 1 Details of Finding Tank Waste The Department will not meet Tri-Party Agreement (Agreement) Retrieval Activities milestones for the retrieval of waste from the single-shell tanks located at the C-Tank Farm within schedule and cost. Based on the current C-Tank Farm retrieval schedule and the amount of waste retrieved to date, the Department will not accomplish its

7

Microsoft Word - INL Waste Stream Cleared for Shipment to WIPP...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2006 - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has authorized the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to restart shipments from the waste stream that was suspended from transport to the...

8

Key words. Emissions markets, Cap-and-trade schemes, Equilibrium models, Environmental MARKET DESIGN FOR EMISSION TRADING SCHEMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Key words. Emissions markets, Cap-and-trade schemes, Equilibrium models, Environmental Finance. MARKET DESIGN FOR EMISSION TRADING SCHEMES REN´E CARMONA , MAX FEHR , JURI HINZ , AND ARNAUD PORCHET to help policy makers and regulators understand the pros and the cons of the emissions markets. We propose

Carmona, Rene

9

Vit Plant receives and sets key air filtration equipment for Low Activity Waste Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WTP lifted a nearly 100-ton carbon bed absorber into the Low-Activity Waste Facility. This key piece of air-filtration equipment will remove mercury and acidic gases before air is channeled through...

10

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling telluride TEMs. Key words: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites bismuth telluride are considered for thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for conversion of waste heat from

Xu, Xianfan

11

Office Civilian Waste Management Transportation Institutional Program Update on Collaborative Efforts with Key Stakeholders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) created the Office of National Transportation in 2003 recognizing the need to revitalize and accelerate development of the transportation system. The Department has made a commitment to work through a collaborative planning process before developing specific policies and procedures and making transportation decisions. OCRWM has begun to build the institutional framework to support development of this transportation system. Interactions with stakeholders have been initiated. The authors describe the key stakeholders, identified issues, regional and national planning activities, and mechanisms for interaction.

E. Saris; P. Austin; J.J. Offner

2004-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

12

Key Word List Administrative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-Service Energy Efficiency Environment / Sustainability Ethics / Integrity Evaluation - Employee Attitudes Employee Development Employee Info Employee Misconduct/Termination Employee Recognition Employee

Fernandez, Eduardo

13

Key word index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2246 -74 1349 -74 2577 -75 0223 -78 0243 -75 1363 -79 1762 -73 0097 -76 1687 -73...73 1835 HearSJ -74 1661 GreeSA -78 0243 BowmJR -80 0313 BowmJR -81 0592 GreeSA -76...Program: Present status and pets RomaBA -81 0243 GEOSYNCLINE, South Australia / The seismi...

14

National Low-Level Waste Management Program final summary report of key activities and accomplishments for fiscal year 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in fulfilling its responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) outlines the key activities that the NLLWMP will accomplish in the following fiscal year. Additional activities are added during the fiscal year as necessary to accomplish programmatic goals. This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the NLLWMP during fiscal year 1995.

Forman, S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

National Low-Level Waste Management Program final summary report of key activities and accomplishments for fiscal year 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in fulfilling its responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) outlines the key activities tat the NLLWMP will accomplish in the following fiscal year. Additional activities are added during the fiscal year as necessary to accomplish programmatic goals. This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the NLLWMP during Fiscal Year 1996.

Garcia, R.S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Microsoft Word - Tran Waste final report 2-8-05.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transuranic Waste Management at Transuranic Waste Management at Los Alamos National Laboratory DOE/IG-0673 February 2005 REPORT ON TRANSURANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Legacy Transuranic Waste Disposal Details of Finding 1 Recommendations and Comments 4 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology 6 2. Transuranic Waste Storage 8 3. Prior Audit Reports 10 4. Management Comments 11 Legacy Transuranic Waste Disposal Page 1 Details of Finding Background Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has been involved in the development, production, and maintenance of the Nation's nuclear weapons stockpile for over six decades. Research, development, and fabrication of weapons components produced a

17

National Low-Level Waste Management Program final summary report of key activities and accomplishments for fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 to assist states and compacts in their siting and licensing efforts for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) is the element of the DOE that performs the key support activities under the Act. The NLLWMP`s activities are driven by the needs of the states and compacts as they prepare to manage their low-level waste under the Act. Other work is added during the fiscal year as necessary to accommodate new requests brought on by status changes in states` and compacts` siting and licensing efforts. This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the NLLWMP during FY 1997.

Rittenberg, R.B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Microsoft Word - DOE Exceeds TRU Waste Cleanup Goal at LANL.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Exceeds 2012 TRU Waste Cleanup Goal at DOE Exceeds 2012 TRU Waste Cleanup Goal at Los Alamos National Laboratory CARLSBAD, N.M., October 3, 2012 -The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Central Characterization Project (CCP) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) exceeded a fiscal year 2012 goal of characterizing and shipping 800 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) waste, fulfilling a commitment to the state of New Mexico. The 800 cubic meters goal was exceeded by more than 100 cubic meters, with the vast majority of the TRU waste characterized as defense related TRU and permanently disposed at WIPP. To accomplish this achievement, the WIPP CCP increased the amount of waste that was certified, ensuring it met all the requirements for disposal at WIPP. This resulted in the ability to

19

Microsoft Word - Los Alamos National Laboratory ships remote-handled transuranic waste to WIPP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory Ships Remote-Handled Los Alamos National Laboratory Ships Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste to WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., June 3, 2009 - Cleanup of the nation's defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste has reached an important milestone. Today, the first shipment of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico arrived safely at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the southeast corner of the state. "Shipping this waste to WIPP is important for our national cleanup mission, but this event is especially important for New Mexicans," said DOE Carlsbad Field Office Manager Dave Moody. "It's great to see progress being made right here in our own state." WIPP's mission includes the safe disposal of two types of defense-related

20

Microsoft Word - Last Legacy Waste Shipment for EM Weekly 4-7...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

site lead for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). "It reduces the cost of long-term storage, surveillance, and maintenance of waste materials. It frees up space on the site to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Integrated Waste Management in Sweden Where incineration is not a dirty word  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions dramatically, particularly in the case of dioxins. Fifteen years ago, 18 Swedish waste incineration plants emitted a total of about 100 grams of dioxins every year. Today, the collective dioxin

Columbia University

22

Microsoft Word - Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition R5a.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cycle Potential Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Nuclear Fuel Joe T. Carter, SRNL Alan J. Luptak, INL Jason Gastelum, PNNL Christine Stockman, SNL Andrew Miller, SNL July 2012 FCR&D-USED-2010-000031 Rev 5 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial

23

Numerical Zoom for Multiscale Problems with an Application to Nuclear Waste Disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Zoom for Multiscale Problems with an Application to Nuclear Waste Disposal Jean of a nuclear waste repository site. Key words: Multiscale, Finite Element, Domain Decomposition, Chimera, Numerical Zoom, Nuclear Waste. PACS: 02.30.Jr, 47.11.Fg, 28.41.Kw, 47.55.P- 1 Introduction The present paper

24

GAO-04-611 Nuclear Waste: Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Committee on Government Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives June 2004 NUCLEAR WASTE Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals GAO-04-611 www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-04-611. To view the full product, including the scope and methodology, click on the link above. For more information, contact Robin M. Nazzaro at (202) 512-3841 or nazzaror@gao.gov. Highlights of GAO-04-611, a report to the Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives June 2004 NUCLEAR WASTE Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals DOE's initial approach called for treating 10 percent of the site's high-level waste by 2018 and for operating the plant until treatment was completed in

25

Global MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market Assessment 2007, Key Note Publications Ltd ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-gas emissions, water pollution, air pollution and noise/visual impact (of recycling/waste disposal facilities including construction/demolition, mining, quarrying, manufacturing and municipal waste. Much of the focus

Columbia University

26

Microsoft Word - FINAL 7-12-10 Site Visit Report - LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Facility FCA.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Visit Report Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility - June 2010 This site visit report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of the Facility Centered Assessment (FCA) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLW). This review, conducted June 9-25, 2010, was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) and LANL, and conducted jointly by HSS, LASO, and LANL staff. The Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations was the overall lead organization for evaluation of the FCA process with the participation of the LASO Facility Representative assigned to RLW.

27

Word Domain Disambiguation via Word Sense Disambiguation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Word subject domains have been widely used to improve the perform-ance of word sense disambiguation al-gorithms. However, comparatively little effort has been devoted so far to the disambiguation of word subject do-mains. The few existing approaches have focused on the development of al-gorithms specific to word domain dis-ambiguation. In this paper we explore an alternative approach where word domain disambiguation is achieved via word sense disambiguation. Our study shows that this approach yields very strong results, suggesting that word domain disambiguation can be ad-dressed in terms of word sense disam-biguation with no need for special purpose algorithms.

Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

2006-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

28

Microsoft Word - DOE Subject Area Indic#2C05.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Subject Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data July 2005 Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Purpose ...................................................................................................................................... 2 Background................................................................................................................................. 3 Difference Between Restricted Data (RD) and Formerly Restricted Data (FRD) and National Security Information (NSI) ........................................................................................ 4 Access to RD and FRD ...............................................................................................................

29

Key Outcomes:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Key Points & Action Items Key Points & Action Items Inaugural Meeting Thursday, August 25, 2011 Renaissance Denver Hotel Denver, Colorado Participants Tracey LeBeau, Director, Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director, and Brandt Petrasek, Special Assistant, Department of Energy, Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs; Vice Chairman Ronald Suppah and Jim Manion, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; William Micklin, Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians; Councilman Barney Enos, Jr., Jason Hauter, Gila River Indian Community; Mato Standing High, Rosebud Sioux Tribe; R. Allen Urban, Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation; Glen Andersen, Scott Hendrick, Brooke Oleen, Jacquelyn Pless, Jim Reed and Julia Verdi, National Conference of State Legislatures-staff

30

1 Real-time Sign Language Letter and Word Recognition from Depth Data -Supplemental Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the thunder trade us waste wheel wire yes Table 1: Set of 56 words used to test the word recognition system. They have been selected randomly from the lexicon of 900 words known to the system. 3 #12;about able accept balance ball band base basin basket bath be beautiful because bed bee before behaviour belief bell bent

Gall, Juergen

31

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

32

GEOL 106 Writing: Mass Wasting -KEY Name _______________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they fail, whereas unconsolidated slopes usually fail at less steep angles. 2) What is angle of repose? Angle of repose is the steepest angle that unconsolidated material naturally rests. 3) How does angle spilled over this dam, it quickly began to erode the unconsolidated rubble, causing the dam

Kirby, Carl S.

33

When word recognition goes wrong: Acquired dyslexia: brain damage (strokes).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an Ambiguous Sentence in your Face. "Time flies like an arrow." What does it mean? Time (N) moves quickly (V Sentences Phenomena: Parse trees. Garden path sentences. Syntax cues: word order, key words, context school -- happens automatically just to comprehend meaning of sentence. #12;5 Time Flies Like

O'Reilly, Randall C.

34

Microsoft Word - 3m TGM _SRI_07_v4.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

core threshold without resorting to second order light which we demonstrate for Gd doped HfO 2 . PACS: 79.60.Ai, 68.55.Ln, 29.40.Wk, 81.05.J Key words: oxide dielectric layers,...

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - apoptosis key players Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: -publication: http:www.landesbioscience.comjournalsccabstract.php?id3262 KEY WORDS cyclin A, apoptosis, Xenopus... is Sufficient but not Required for the...

36

WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP WASTE-TO-ENERGY ROADMAPPING WORKSHOP The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key...

37

Microsoft Word - ~7453498.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SRS Salt Waste Processing: 5 Years of Success SRS Salt Waste Processing: 5 Years of Success AIKEN, S.C. (April 22, 2013) - Something unique in environmental risk reduction involving the processing of radioactive salt waste is taking place at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Savannah River Remediation (SRR), SRS's liquid waste contractor, is safely and successfully disposing of salt waste from massive underground storage tanks - as the

38

Microsoft Word - fact sheet alternatives and key findings 090214...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

capacity alternatives. Seven alternatives are analyzed in the Draft SEIS: Alternative 1 Watts Bar site only (2,500 TPBARs maximum). This is the preferred alternative. ...

39

LEAST-SQUARES METHODS FOR LINEAR ELASTICITY Key words ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resulting algebraic equations can be efficiently solved by standard multigrid methods. or preconditioned by well-known .... symmetry of the stress stems from the conservation of angular momentum. ... the energy norm is equivalent to the H1 norm for a fixed ?. .... Since the minimum of the quadratic functional G(?, u ; f) is zero,.

40

Waste-to-Energy Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Waste to Energy Roadmapping Workshop was held on November 5, 2014, in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop gathered waste-to-energy experts to identify the key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from wet waste feedstocks.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Microsoft Word - appendices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on buried waste at on buried waste at the INL Site On July 1, 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho announced an agreement on cleaning up transuranic waste buried at DOE's Idaho Site. At the same time, DOE issued a draft record of decision for remediating the buried waste in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho Site. The buried waste has long been a topic of discussion among Idahoans, who are concerned that its presence about 600 feet above the Snake River Plan Aquifer could pose a threat to an important source of drinking and irrigation water for southern Idaho. What does this agreement mean in terms of protecting the aquifer? The bottom line is that DOE and its regulators believe this agreement will ensure the buried transuranic waste poses no safety threat

42

Microsoft Word - Unrelated Accident  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

For Immediate Release For Immediate Release Truck Accident Did Not Involve WIPP Shipment CARLSBAD, N.M., October 1, 2009 - A Wednesday night truck accident north of Albuquerque on Highway 165 that involved an 18-wheeler is not related to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) transuranic waste shipments. Involved in the accident was a load of new, unused 55-gallon drums manufactured in Carlsbad that was en route to Richland, Washington. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a U.S. Department of Energy facility designed to safely isolate defense-related transuranic waste from people and the environment. Waste temporarily stored at sites around the country is shipped to WIPP and permanently disposed in rooms mined out of an ancient salt formation 2,150 feet below the surface. WIPP, which began waste

43

Word Pro - S8  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Flow, 2013 (Quadrillion Btu) 1 Blast furnace gas and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased...

44

Microsoft Word - Document1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

strategy to reduce energy waste and greenhouse gases, the TEAM initiative seeks to reduce energy intensity across DOE's nationwide complex by at least 30 percent and to reduce...

45

A Lifetime of Work Gone to Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Congress chose Yucca Mountain in 1987 over alternatives...nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain is not an option...request for 2010 cuts funding for the repository...nuclear-waste disposal. The last word on Yucca Mountain probably hasn't...

Dan Charles

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

46

Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

far will integrate SWPF with current liquid waste facilities, such as the DWPF and the tanks farms." EM is pleased with the spirit of integration. "A key objective for us over the...

47

Public Key Cryptography and Key Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The use and management of certificate-based public key cryptography for the Department of Energy (DOE) requires the establishment of a public key infrastructure (PKI). This chapter defines the policy related to roles, requirements, and responsibilities for establishing and maintaining a DOE PKI and the documentation necessary to ensure that all certificates are managed in a manner that maintains the overall trust required to support a viable PKI. Canceled by DOE N 251.112.

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Microsoft Word - test | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

test Microsoft Word - test Microsoft Word - test More Documents & Publications Interested Parties - WAPA Public Comment InterestedPartiesCOPSCoWAPA040309.pdf Microsoft Word -...

49

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output 5 Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output Emissions by Type of Generating Unit, 2010 Emissions by Sector, 1989-2010 314 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 5.0 (s) 0.2 0.2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Million Metric Tons of Gas Sulfur Dioxide ¹ For carbon dioxide: municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources; tire-derived fuel, and geothermal. For sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides: blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels; wood and wood-derived fuels; municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, tires, agricultural byproducts, and other biomass; and chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, sulfur, and tar coal. 2 Includes Commercial Sector. (s)=Less than 0.05 million metric tons.

50

Word Pro - S6  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public. d Excludes waste coal. Through 1998, data are for electric utilities only. Beginning in 1999, data are for...

51

Microsoft Word - Copyright Template  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Evans, 1988 Stoffle, R. W., and M. J. Evans, 1988, "American Indians and Nuclear Waste Storage: The Debate at Yucca Mountain, Nevada," Policy Studies Journal, Vol. 16, pp. 751-767....

52

Microsoft Word - ORNL RH  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

move this waste out of Oak Ridge and place it in a permanent repository," said Gerald Boyd, Manager of DOE's Oak Ridge Office. "We have kept our commitment to the State of...

53

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants by Sector, 1989-2011 Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Wood and Waste 242 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011...

54

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). Although disposal of HLW remains...for long-term disposal is through deep...successful waste-disposal program has eluded...geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Authorized...Administration withdrew funding for Yucca Mountain...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

55

Twitter Power:Tweets as Electronic Word of Mouth Bernard J. Jansen and Mimi Zhang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

key elements of the company­customer relationship including brand image and brand awareness. WordWOM). This broad reach of eWOM provides consumers tremen- dous clout to influence brand image and per of electronic word-of-mouth for sharing consumer opinions concerning brands. We ana- lyzed more than 150

56

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy Note. Renewable Energy Production and Consump- tion. In Tables 1.1, 1.3, and 10.1, renewable energy consumption consists of: conventional hydroelectricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat rate-see Table A6); geothermal electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat rate-see Table A6), and geothermal heat pump and geothermal direct use energy; solar thermal and photovoltaic electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat rate -see Table A6), and solar thermal direct use energy; wind electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil- fuels heat rate-see Table A6); wood and wood-derived fuels consumption; biomass waste (municipal solid waste from biogenic sources, landfill gas, sludge waste, agricul-

57

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Figure 8.0 Electricity Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 219 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of

58

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Electricity Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 219 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of

59

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2b 2b Electricity Net Generation by Sector By Sector, 2011 Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 Industrial and Commercial Sectors, 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 223 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). (s) = Less than 0.05 trillion kilowatthours. (ss) = Less than 0.5 billion kilowatthours. Sources: Tables 8.2b-8.2d. 4.0 0.1 (s) Electric Power Industrial Commercial 0 1 2 3 4 5 Trillion Kilowatthours 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 Trillion Kilowatthours Electricity-Only Plants

60

Microsoft Word - Report Cover  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Resolution of Questioned, Unresolved Resolution of Questioned, Unresolved and Potentially Unallowable Costs Incurred in Support of the Yucca Mountain Project OAS-SR-10-02 JULY 2010 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 29, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR THE UNDER SECRETARY OF ENERGY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: "Resolution of Questioned, Unresolved and Potentially Unallowable Costs Incurred in Support of the Yucca Mountain Project" INTRODUCTION The Nuclear Waste Policy Act Amendments of 1987 designated Yucca Mountain in Southwestern Nevada as the site for a national geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. The Department of Energy assigned management of the program to the Office of Civilian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 3 Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 Total (All Sectors) by Source, 2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 By Sector, 2011 228 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). Sources: Tables 8.3a-8.3c. 543 522 296 103 37 36 16 Wood Natural Coal Other Waste Petroleum Other² 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Trillion Btu 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Quadrillion Btu Gases¹ 1.2 0.3 0.1 Industrial Electric Power Commercial 0.0 0.6

62

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1, 2011 By Key State By Region West and East of the Mississippi By Mining Method By Rank 102 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Source: Table...

63

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a Electric Net Summer Capacity, Total (All Sectors) a Electric Net Summer Capacity, Total (All Sectors) Total, 1949-2011 By Major Category, 2011 By Source, 2011 256 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Total 1 Conventional and pumped storage. 2 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscellaneous technologies. Source: Table 8.11a. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 Million Kilowatts Electric Power 791 140 101 22 Fossil Renewable Nuclear Hydroelectric 0 300 600 900 Million Kilowatts Nuclear Electric Power Fuels Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Energy Pumped Storage Electric Power 413 319 101 101 56 45 7 4 2 1 4 Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Hydro- Petroleum Wind Wood Waste Geothermal Solar/PV

64

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output Coal by Sector, 1989-2012 Petroleum by Sector, 1989-2012 Natural Gas by Sector, 1989-2012 Other Gases b by Sector, 1989-2012 Wood by Sector, 1989-2012 Waste by Sector, 1989-2012 102 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Industrial Commercial Industrial Electric Power Industrial Total a 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.2 Billion Short Tons Total a 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 90 180 270 360 Million Barrels Electric Power a Includes commercial sector. b Blast furnace gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. Through 2010, also includes propane gas . Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#electricity.

65

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 7.2c Electricity Net Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.2a; Million Kilowatthours) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petro- leum d Natural Gas e Biomass Total g Coal c Petro- leum d Natural Gas e Other Gases h Hydro- electric Power i Biomass Total k Waste f Wood j Waste f 1950 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 4,946 NA NA 4,946 1955 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 3,261 NA NA 3,261 1960 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 3,607 NA NA 3,607 1965 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

66

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by Source Total Energy, 1970-2010 By Energy Type, 2010 Prices³ by Energy Type, Indexed, 1970-2010 By Petroleum Product, 2010 72 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Fuel Oil Gasoline 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Wood and wood-derived fuels, and biomass waste; excludes fuel ethanol and biodiesel. Prior to 2001, also includes non-biomass waste. 3 Based on nominal dollars. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Consumption-weighted average price for asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, kerosene, lubricants, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, special naphthas, waxes, and miscella- neous petroleum products. Source: Table 3.3. Electricity

67

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation Coal by Sector, 1989-2012 Petroleum by Sector, 1989-2012 Natural Gas by Sector, 1989-2012 Other Gases b by Sector, 1989-2012 Wood by Sector, 1989-2012 Waste by Sector, 1989-2012 98 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Commercial Industrial Electric Power Electric Power Industrial Industrial Total a Total a 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.2 Billion Short Tons Total a Electric Power 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Million Barrels Total a Electric Power Industrial a Includes commercial sector. b Blast furnace gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. Through 2010, also includes propane gas . Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#electricity.

68

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b Electric Net Summer Capacity by Sector b Electric Net Summer Capacity by Sector Total (All Sectors) and Sectors, 1989-2011 Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 Commercial Sector, 2011 Industrial Sector, 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 257 1 Conventional hydroelectric power, solar/PV, wood, wind, blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, batteries, chemicals, hydro- gen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscellaneous technologies. 2 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels 3 Conventional hydroelectric power. 4 Solar/PV, wind, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscel- laneous technologies. (s)=Less than 0.05 million kilowatts.

69

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Consumption for Electricity Generation By Major Category, 1949-2011 By Major Fuel, 2011 By Major Source, 1949-2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 232 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Conventional hydroelectric power. 2 Geothermal, other gases, electricity net imports, solar thermal and photovoltaic energy, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. Sources: Tables 8.4a-8.4c. Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Quadrillion Btu 18.0 8.3 8.1 3.2 1.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.6 Coal

70

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

71

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...06520, USA. Nuclear power is re-emerging...proclaiming a nuclear renaissance...example, plant safety...liabilities, terrorism at plants and in transport...high-level nuclear wastes (HLW...factor in risk perceptions...supporting nuclear power in the abstract...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 11.4 Nitrous Oxide Emissions, 1980-2009 (Thousand Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide) Year Energy Sources Waste Management Agricultural Sources Industrial Processes 3 Total Mobile Combustion 1 Stationary Combustion 2 Total Waste Combustion Human Sewage in Wastewater Total Nitrogen Fertilization of Soils Crop Residue Burning Solid Waste of Domesticated Animals Total 1980 60 44 104 1 10 11 364 1 75 440 88 642 1981 63 44 106 1 10 11 364 2 74 440 84 641 1982 67 42 108 1 10 11 339 2 74 414 80 614 1983 71 43 114 1 11 11 337 1 75 413 79 617 1984 86 45 132 1 11 11 355 2 74 431 87 661 1985 98 46 143 1 11 12 344 2 73 419 88 662 1986 107 45 152 1 11 12 329 2 71 402 86 652 1987 120 46 166 1 12 13 328 1 71 400 90 669 1988 138 48 185 1 12 13 329 1 71 401 95 694 1989 146 49 195 1 12 13 336 1 70 407 98 713 1990 88 47 135 1 12 13 432 1 66 499 96 743 1991 93 46 139 1 13 14 429 1 66 497 98 748 1992 96 47 143 1 13 14 445 2 66 512 95

73

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

74

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating Organizations 3 Incentive and Objectives FBSR sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form has been identified as a promising supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Objectives: Reduce the risk associated with implementing the FBSR NAS waste form as a supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Conduct test with actual tank wastes Use the best science to fill key data gaps Linking previous and new results together 4 Outline FBSR NAS waste form processing scales FBSR NAS waste form data/key assumptions FBSR NAS key data gaps FBSR NAS testing program 5 FBSR NAS Waste Form Processing

75

Handbook of industrial and hazardous wastes treatment. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This expanded Second Edition offers 32 chapters of industry- and waste-specific analyses and treatment methods for industrial and hazardous waste materials - from explosive wastes to landfill leachate to wastes produced by the pharmaceutical and food industries. Key additional chapters cover means of monitoring waste on site, pollution prevention, and site remediation. Including a timely evaluation of the role of biotechnology in contemporary industrial waste management, the Handbook reveals sound approaches and sophisticated technologies for treating: textile, rubber, and timber wastes; dairy, meat, and seafood industry wastes; bakery and soft drink wastes; palm and olive oil wastes; pesticide and livestock wastes; pulp and paper wastes; phosphate wastes; detergent wastes; photographic wastes; refinery and metal plating wastes; and power industry wastes. This final chapter, entitled 'Treatment of power industry wastes' by Lawrence K. Wang, analyses the stream electric power generation industry, where combustion of fossil fuels coal, oil, gas, supplies heat to produce stream, used then to generate mechanical energy in turbines, subsequently converted to electricity. Wastes include waste waters from cooling water systems, ash handling systems, wet-scrubber air pollution control systems, and boiler blowdown. Wastewaters are characterized and waste treatment by physical and chemical systems to remove pollutants is presented. Plant-specific examples are provided.

Lawrence Wang; Yung-Tse Hung; Howard Lo; Constantine Yapijakis (eds.)

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 11.3 Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons of Methane) Year Energy Sources Waste Management Agricultural Sources Industrial Processes 9 Total 5 Coal Mining Natural Gas Systems 1 Petroleum Systems 2 Mobile Com- bustion 3 Stationary Com- bustion 4 Total 5 Landfills Waste- water Treatment 6 Total 5 Enteric Fermen- tation 7 Animal Waste 8 Rice Cultivation Crop Residue Burning Total 5 1980 3.06 4.42 NA 0.28 0.45 8.20 10.52 0.52 11.04 5.47 2.87 0.48 0.04 8.86 0.17 28.27 1981 2.81 5.02 NA .27 .45 8.55 10.69 .53 11.22 5.56 2.73 .54 .05 8.88 .18 28.82 1982 3.23 5.04 NA .27 .46 9.01 10.63 .54 11.17 5.50 2.63 .47 .05 8.65 .13 28.97 1983 3.02 5.00 NA .27 .46 8.76 10.67 .54 11.21 5.46 2.68 .31 .04 8.49 .15 28.62 1984 3.61 5.11 NA .27 .48 9.46 10.68 .66 11.33 5.33 2.60 .40 .05 8.38 .16 29.34 1985 3.89 5.16 NA .26 .48 9.79 10.65

77

Microsoft Word - Chapter 09.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Waste NAC 444.570 - 444.7499 Disposal of Hazardous Waste NAC 444.850 - 444.8746 Storage Tanks NAC 459.9921 - 459.999 Polychlorinated Biphenyl NAC 444.940 - 444.9555 Radioactive...

78

DRAFT EM SSAB Chairs Meeting Waste Disposition Strategies...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from State of New Mexico * Key Regulators * DOE - self regulation for nuclear safety and radioactive waste management * U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Certification to...

79

Hazardous-waste analysis plan for LLNL operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in many facets of research ranging from nuclear weapons research to advanced Biomedical studies. Approximately 80% of all programs at LLNL generate hazardous waste in one form or another. Aside from producing waste from industrial type operations (oils, solvents, bottom sludges, etc.) many unique and toxic wastes are generated such as phosgene, dioxin (TCDD), radioactive wastes and high explosives. One key to any successful waste management program must address the following: proper identification of the waste, safe handling procedures and proper storage containers and areas. This section of the Waste Management Plan will address methodologies used for the Analysis of Hazardous Waste. In addition to the wastes defined in 40 CFR 261, LLNL and Site 300 also generate radioactive waste not specifically covered by RCRA. However, for completeness, the Waste Analysis Plan will address all hazardous waste.

Roberts, R.S.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 7.3c Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.3a) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Biomass Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Other Gases g Biomass Other i Waste f Wood h Waste f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1990 Total .................... 417 953 28 15 10,740 13,103 517 104 335 16 36 1995 Total .................... 569 649 43 21 12,171 12,265 601 114 373 13 40 2000 Total .................... 514 823 37 26 11,706 10,459 640 107 369 10 45 2001 Total .................... 532 1,023 36 15 10,636 10,530 654 88 370 7 44 2002 Total .................... 477 834 33 18 11,855 11,608 685 106 464 15 43 2003 Total

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Total 1949 187 30 2 NA 30 33 NA NA 250 1 NA 1 1950 206 35 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 278 1 NA 1 1955 324 63 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 424 (s) NA (s) 1960 396 95 2 NA 42 43 NA NA 535 (s) NA (s) 1965 546 127 2 NA 55 57 NA NA 730 (s) NA (s) 1970 678 215 10 2 154 166 NA NA 1,059 (s) (s) (s) 1975 824 172 17 (s) 231 248 NA NA 1,244 (s) (s) (s) 1976 911 167 18 (s) 255 273 NA NA 1,351 (s) (s) (s) 1977 962 174 21 (s) 285 306 NA NA

82

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 7.4c Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.4a) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Biomass Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Other Gases g Biomass Other i Waste f Wood h Waste f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1990 Total .................... 1,191 2,056 46 28 27,781 36,159 1,055 275 1,125 41 86 1995 Total .................... 1,419 1,245 78 40 29,363 34,448 1,258 290 1,255 38 95 2000 Total .................... 1,547 1,615 85 47 28,031 30,520 1,386 331 1,244 35 108 2001 Total .................... 1,448 1,832 79 25 25,755 26,817 1,310 248 1,054 27 101 2002 Total ....................

83

ARM - Key Science Questions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govScienceKey Science Questions govScienceKey Science Questions Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings User Meetings Annual Meetings of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team and Fall Working Groups Accomplishments Read about the 20 years of accomplishments (PDF, 696KB) from the ARM Program and user facility. Performance Metrics ASR Metrics 2009 2008 2007 2006 Key Science Questions The role of clouds and water vapor in climate change is not well understood; yet water vapor is the largest greenhouse gas and directly affects cloud cover and the propagation of radiant energy. In fact, there may be positive feedback between water vapor and other greenhouse gases. Carbon dioxide and other gases from human activities slightly warm the

84

EcoCar Students Spread the Word | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EcoCar Students Spread the Word EcoCar Students Spread the Word EcoCar Students Spread the Word June 16, 2011 - 11:34am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program "If you build it, they will come" is a mantra that might be well suited for rural sporting venues, but the organizers behind the EcoCAR competition realize that in the commercial sector, merely producing a finely tuned product often isn't enough to make it successful. That's why along with challenging students to re-engineer a donated vehicle to minimize gas consumption and emissions while maintaining consumer acceptability, they've made outreach and education key components of the competition. Whether they're speaking to policy makers or elementary school students, each of the teams have worked to convey the benefits of advanced technology

85

Cryptographic Key Management System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene#12;ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

No, author

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

86

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 10.2c Renewable Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector (Trillion Btu) Hydro- electric Power a Geo- thermal b Solar/PV c Wind d Biomass Total Wood e Waste f Total 1950 Total .................... 1,346 NA NA NA 5 NA 5 1,351 1955 Total .................... 1,322 NA NA NA 3 NA 3 1,325 1960 Total .................... 1,569 (s) NA NA 2 NA 2 1,571 1965 Total .................... 2,026 2 NA NA 3 NA 3 2,031 1970 Total .................... 2,600 6 NA NA 1 2 4 2,609 1975 Total .................... 3,122 34 NA NA (s) 2 2 3,158 1980 Total .................... 2,867 53 NA NA 3 2 4 2,925 1985 Total .................... 2,937 97 (s) (s)

87

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 12.6 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) Coal Natural Gas b Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste d Total e Distillate Fuel Oil c Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total 1973 Total ............................ 812 199 20 2 254 276 NA NA 1,286 1975 Total ............................ 824 172 17 (s) 231 248 NA NA 1,244 1980 Total ............................ 1,137 200 12 1 194 207 NA NA 1,544 1985 Total ............................ 1,367 166 6 1 79 86 NA NA 1,619 1990 Total ............................ 1,548 176 7 3 92 102 (s) 6 1,831 1995 Total ............................ 1,661 228 8 8 45 61 (s) 10 1,960 1996 Total ............................ 1,752 205 8 8 50 66 (s) 10 2,033

88

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 10.2b Renewable Energy Consumption: Industrial and Transportation Sectors, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Industrial Sector 1 Transportation Sector Hydro- electric Power 2 Geo- thermal 3 Solar/PV 4 Wind 5 Biomass Total Biomass Wood 6 Waste 7 Fuel Ethanol 8 Losses and Co-products 9 Total Fuel Ethanol 10 Biodiesel Total 1949 76 NA NA NA 468 NA NA NA 468 544 NA NA NA 1950 69 NA NA NA 532 NA NA NA 532 602 NA NA NA 1955 38 NA NA NA 631 NA NA NA 631 669 NA NA NA 1960 39 NA NA NA 680 NA NA NA 680 719 NA NA NA 1965 33 NA NA NA 855 NA NA NA 855

89

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 7.2b Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.2a; Million Kilowatthours) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage e Renewable Energy Total j Coal a Petro- leum b Natural Gas c Other Gases d Conven- tional Hydro- electric Power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/ PV i Wind Wood g Waste h 1950 Total .................. 154,520 33,734 44,559 NA 0 f ( ) 95,938 390 NA NA NA NA 329,141 1955 Total .................. 301,363 37,138 95,285 NA 0 f ( ) 112,975 276 NA NA NA NA

90

Microsoft Word - Document1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Order to Show Cause Name of Petitioner: C. Lawrence Cornett Date of Filing: June 10, 1996 Case Number: VWX-0009 This Order to Show Cause is issued with regard to a Motion to Dismiss filed by Maria Elena Torano Associates, Inc. (META) on May 21, 1996. In its Motion, META seeks the dismissal of the underlying complaint and hearing request filed by C. Lawrence Cornett (Cornett) under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. I. Background The Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program was established to safeguard "public and employee health and safety; ensur[e] compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations; and prevent[ ] fraud, mismanagement, waste, and abuse" at DOE's

91

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Biomass Resources 6 Biomass Resources U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 113 Notes: * Data are for total biomass per square kilometer. * km 2 = square kilometer. * This study estimates the biomass resources currently available in the United States by county. It includes the following feedstock categories: crop residues (5 year average: 2003-2007), forest and primary mill residues (2007), secondary mill and urban wood waste (2002), methane emis- sions from landfills (2008), domestic wastewater treatment (2007), and animal manure (2002). For more information on the data development, please refer to http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy06osti/39181.pdf. Although, the document contains the methodology for the development of an older assessment,

92

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 12.7 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Consumption (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) By Source By Sector Wood b Biomass Waste c Fuel Ethanol d Bio- diesel Total Resi- dential Com- mercial e Indus- trial f Trans- portation Electric Power g Total 1973 Total ...................... 143 (s) NA NA 143 33 1 109 NA (s) 143 1975 Total ...................... 140 (s) NA NA 141 40 1 100 NA (s) 141 1980 Total ...................... 232 (s) NA NA 232 80 2 150 NA (s) 232 1985 Total ...................... 252 14 3 NA 270 95 2 168 3 1 270 1990 Total ...................... 208 24 4 NA 237 54 8 147 4 23 237 1995 Total ...................... 222 30 8 NA 260 49 9 166 8 28 260 1996 Total ......................

93

Microsoft Word - lbrereleasefinal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Background Radiation Experiment Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results CARLSBAD, N.M., May 18, 2011 - New Mexico State University's Low Background Radiation Experiment (LBRE), which takes place 2,150 feet below the earth's surface at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, recently released some results about the project's first two years of experimentation. The March 2011 edition of Health Physics printed an article titled "Exploring Biological Effects of Low Level Radiation from the Other Side of Background," summarizing some initial data taken from LBRE and from a sister experiment conducted at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute in Albuquerque. "It's nice that we got them published, but they are still very preliminary," said NMSU Professor

94

Microsoft Word - engcovers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DESIGN, PERFORMANCE, AND SUSTAINABILITY OF DESIGN, PERFORMANCE, AND SUSTAINABILITY OF ENGINEERED COVERS FOR URANIUM MILL TAILINGS Final remedies at most uranium mill tailings sites include engineered covers designed to contain metals and radionuclides in the subsurface for hundreds of years. Early cover designs rely on compacted soil layers to limit water infiltration and release of radon, but some of these covers inadvertently created habitats for deep-rooted plants. Root intrusion and soil development increased the saturated hydraulic conductivity several orders of magnitude above design targets. These covers may require high levels of maintenance to sustain long-term performance. Relatively low precipitation, high potential evapotranspiration, and thick unsaturated soils favor long-term hydrologic isolation of buried waste at arid

95

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Nitrous Oxide Emissions Total, 1980-2009 By Source, 2009 Energy Sources by Type, 1980-2009 Agricultural Sources by Major Type, 1980-2009 312 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Adipic acid production (primarily for the manufacture of nylon fibers and plastics) and nitric acid production (primarily for fertilizers). 2 Emissions from passenger cars and trucks; air, rail, and marine transportation; and farm and construction equipment. 3 Consumption of coal, petroleum, natural gas, and wood for heat or electricity. Source: Table 11.4. 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 Million Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 0 50 100 150 200 Thousand Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide 540 143 36 18 Agricultural Energy Industrial Waste 0 200

96

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10 1989 9 7 18 1 36 - 1 2 9 - - - 12 - - - 47 1990 9 6 28 1 45 - 1 2 15 - - - 18 - - - 63 1995 12 4 44 - 60 - 1 1 21 - - - 23 (s) - - 83 1996 14 4 44 (s) 62 - 1 1 31 - - - 33 (s) - - 95 1997 14 5 40 (s) 59 - 1 1 34 - - - 35 (s) - - 94 1998 11 5 42 (s) 57 - 1 1 32 - - - 34 - - - 91 1999 12 6 40 (s) 57 - 1 (s) 33 - - - 35 (s) - - 92 2000

97

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 7.4a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors) (Sum of Tables 7.4b and 7.4c) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total .................... 91,871 5,423 69,998 NA NA 75,421 629 NA 5 NA NA 1955 Total .................... 143,759 5,412 69,862 NA NA 75,274 1,153 NA 3 NA NA 1960 Total .................... 176,685 3,824 84,371 NA NA 88,195 1,725 NA 2 NA NA 1965 Total ....................

98

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by Source Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by Source Total Energy, 1970-2010 By Energy Type, 2010 Expenditures³ by Energy Type, Indexed, 1970-2010 By Petroleum Product, 2010 76 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Wood and wood-derived fuels, and biomass waste; excludes fuel ethanol and biodiesel. 3 Based on nominal dollars. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, kerosene, lubricants, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, special naphthas, waxes, and miscellaneous petroleum products. Source: Table 3.5. 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 300 600 900 1,200 1,500 Billion Dollars¹ Electricity Gas 709 366 160 50 6

99

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 10.2a Renewable Energy Consumption: Residential and Commercial Sectors (Trillion Btu) Residential Sector Commercial Sector a Geo- thermal b Solar/ PV c Biomass Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal b Solar/ PV f Wind g Biomass Total Wood d Wood d Waste h Fuel Ethanol i Total 1950 Total .................... NA NA 1,006 1,006 NA NA NA NA 19 NA NA 19 19 1955 Total .................... NA NA 775 775 NA NA NA NA 15 NA NA 15 15 1960 Total .................... NA NA 627 627 NA NA NA NA 12 NA NA 12 12 1965 Total .................... NA NA 468 468 NA NA NA NA 9 NA NA 9 9 1970 Total

100

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 7.3b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.3a) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total .................... 91,871 5,423 69,998 NA NA 75,421 629 NA 5 NA NA 1955 Total .................... 143,759

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

AP Key Accomplishments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recent Key Accomplishments Recent Key Accomplishments Reduction of Carbon Dioxide Mechanistic insight into CO2 hydrogenation Rapid Transfer of Hydride Ion from a Ruthenium Complex to C1 Species in Water Reversible Hydrogen Storage using CO2 and a Proton-Switchable Iridium Catalyst in Aqueous Media Nickel(II) Macrocycles: Highly Efficient Electrocatalysts for the Selective Reduction of CO2 to CO Calculation of Thermodynamic Hydricities and the Design of Hydride Donors for CO2 Reduction Mechanisms for CO Production from CO2 Using Re(bpy)(CO)3X Catalysts Hydrogen Production Biomass-derived electrocatalytic composites for hydrogen evolution Hydrogen-Evolution Catalysts Based on NiMo Nitride Nanosheets Water Oxidation Enabling light-driven water oxidation via a low-energy RuIV=O intermediate

102

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS June 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS Aiken, SC - Construction of a key cleanup facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is gaining some serious ground given the remarkable building progress since Fall 2009. Construction and operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is among the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) highest cleanup priorities. When operational, SWPF will treat millions of gallons of salt waste currently stored in 49 underground tanks at SRS by removing radioactive constituents for vitrification at the nearby Defense Waste Processing Facility. Disposition of the salt waste inventory is a

103

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS June 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS Aiken, SC - Construction of a key cleanup facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is gaining some serious ground given the remarkable building progress since Fall 2009. Construction and operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is among the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) highest cleanup priorities. When operational, SWPF will treat millions of gallons of salt waste currently stored in 49 underground tanks at SRS by removing radioactive constituents for vitrification at the nearby Defense Waste Processing Facility. Disposition of the salt waste inventory is a

104

Key Assumptions Policy Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/13/2014 1 Key Assumptions and Policy Issues RAAC Steering Committee November 17, 2014 Portland Supply Limitations 8 Withi h B l i8. Within-hour Balancing 9. Capacity and Energy Values for Wind/Solar t b it d d li d· Thermal: must be sited and licensed · Wind/solar: must be sited and licensed · EE

105

Language as an evolving word web  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Language as an evolving word web S. N. Dorogovtsev 1 2 * J. F. F. Mendes...distinct word in language is a vertex of this web, and interacting words in sentences are...we completely describe the observed word web structure without any fitting. We show...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Key Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

in several key areas to advance the development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Research, Development, and Demonstration Key areas of research,...

107

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Electricity-Only Plants 11 1989 767,378 25,574 241,960 3 517 270,125 2,790,567 - 59 111 - 1990 774,213 14,956 181,231 17 1,008 201,246 2,794,110 (s) 87 162 - 1995 832,928 16,169 86,584 133 1,082 108,297 3,287,571 (s)

108

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 8 1989 14 4 10 (s) 27 (s) 10 10 - 38 1990 15 5 16 (s) 36 (s) 10 11 - 46 1995 17 3 29 - 48 (s) 15 15 (s) 63 1996 20 3 33 R - 55 1 17 18 - 73 1997 22 4 40 (s) 66 1 19 20 - 86 1998 20 5 39 (s) 64 1 18 18 - 82 1999 20 3 37 R - 61 1 17 17 - 78 2000 21 4 39 R - 64 1 17 18 - 82 2001 18 4 35 - 58 1 8 8 6 72 2002 18 3 36 - 57 1 6 7 5 69 2003 23 3 17 - 42 1 8 8 6 57 2004 22 4 22 - 49 (s) 8 9 6 64 2005 23 4 20 - 47 (s) 8 9 6 61 2006 22 2 19 (s) 44 (s) 9 9 6 59 2007 23 2 20 - 44 1 6 7 4 55 2008 23 2 20 - 45 (s) 9 9 6 60 2009 20

109

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

61 61 Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 9 1989 0.3 0.2 0.6 - 1.0 - - (s) (s) 0.2 - - - 0.2 - 1.2 1990 .3 .2 .7 - 1.2 - - (s) (s) .2 - - - .2 - 1.4 1995 .3 .2 1.2 - 1.8 - - (s) (s) .3 - - - .3 - 2.1 1996 .3 .3 1.2 - 1.8 - - (s) (s) .4 - - - .5 - 2.3 1997 .3 .4 1.2 - 1.9 - - (s) (s) .4 - - - .5 - 2.3 1998 .3 .3 1.2 - 1.8 - - (s) (s)

110

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

44 44 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu 1989 639 120 1,471 1 - 1,591 81,670 3 24 6 1 1990 1,266 173 1,630 2 - 1,805 97,330 5 23 8 (s) 1991 1,221 104 995 1 - 1,101 99,868 5 21 11 1 1992 1,704 154 1,045 10 4 1,229 122,908 6 21 10 2 1993 1,794 290 1,074 27 40 1,591 128,743 4 21 10 2 1994 2,241

111

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

59 59 Table 8.11b Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44.9 0.0 5 ( ) 18.5 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 18.5 NA 63.4 1950 NA NA NA NA 50.0 .0 5 ( ) 19.2 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 19.2 NA 69.2 1955 NA NA NA NA 86.8 .0 5 ( ) 27.4 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 27.4 NA 114.2 1960 NA NA NA NA 130.8 .4 5 ( ) 35.8 .1 10 ( ) (s) NA NA 35.9 NA 167.1 1965 NA NA NA NA 182.9 .8 5 ( ) 51.0 .1 10 ( ) (s) NA NA 51.1 NA

112

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal 5 Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 1,995 415 569 NA 2,979 0 1,349 6 NA NA NA NA 1,355 NA 5 4,339 1950 2,199 472 651 NA 3,322 0 1,346 5 NA NA NA NA 1,351 NA 6 4,679 1955 3,458 471 1,194 NA 5,123 0 1,322 3 NA NA NA NA 1,325 NA 14 6,461 1960 4,228 553 1,785 NA 6,565 6 1,569 2 NA (s) NA NA 1,571 NA 15 8,158 1965

113

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Commercial Sector 8 1989 2,320 1,542 637 - 804 5,303 37 (s) 5 1 43 9 3 2 3 17 1990 2,418 2,294 706 - 959 6,377 39 (s) 4 1 45 10 6 1 4 21 1991 2,680 2,287 544 - 1,014 6,526 32 (s) 3 1 35 10 6 1 4 21 1992 2,552 2,787 474 - 1,258 7,070 32 (s) 3 1 35 10 7 1 4 21 1993 2,988 3,315 616 - 1,285 8,205 40 (s) 3 1 44 12 7 1 4 24 1994 2,932 3,722 654 - 1,292 8,601 39 (s) 3 (s) 42 11 8 1 4 24 1995 3,106 4,070 509 -

114

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

175 175 Table A5. Approximate Heat Content of Coal and Coal Coke (Million Btu per Short Ton) Coal Coal Coke Production a Waste Coal Supplied b Consumption Imports Exports Imports and Exports Residential and Commercial Sectors c Industrial Sector Electric Power Sector e,f Total Coke Plants Other d 1950 ........................ 25.090 NA 24.461 26.798 24.820 23.937 24.989 25.020 26.788 24.800 1955 ........................ 25.201 NA 24.373 26.794 24.821 24.056 24.982 25.000 26.907 24.800 1960 ........................ 24.906 NA 24.226 26.791 24.609 23.927 24.713 25.003 26.939 24.800 1965 ........................ 24.775 NA 24.028 26.787 24.385 23.780 24.537 25.000 26.973 24.800 1970 ........................ 23.842 NA 23.203 26.784 22.983 22.573 23.440 25.000 26.982 24.800 1975 ........................

115

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 11.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal 3 Natural Gas 4 Petroleum Total 2,9 Biomass 2 Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil 5 Jet Fuel Kero- sene LPG 6 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 7 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 8 Total Wood 10 Waste 11 Fuel Ethanol 12 Bio- diesel Total 1949 1,118 270 12 140 NA 42 13 7 329 8 244 25 820 2,207 145 NA NA NA 145 1950 1,152 313 14 168 NA 48 16 9 357 8 273 26 918 2,382 147 NA NA NA 147 1955 1,038 472 24 247 21 48 27 10 473 13 274 38 1,175 2,685 134 NA NA NA 134 1960 915 650 21 291 53 41 42 10 543 29 275 45 1,349 2,914 124 NA NA NA 124 1965 1,075 828 15 330 87 40 57 11 627 39 289 65 1,559 3,462 125 NA NA NA 125 1970 1,134 1,144 7 394 141 39 78 11 789 41 396 85 1,983 4,261

116

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.11a Electric Net Summer Capacity: Total (All Sectors), Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.11b and 8.11d; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44.9 0.0 5 ( ) 18.5 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 18.5 NA 63.4 1950 NA NA NA NA 50.0 .0 5 ( ) 19.2 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 19.2 NA 69.2 1955 NA NA NA NA 86.8 .0 5 ( ) 27.4 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 27.4 NA 114.2 1960 NA NA NA NA 130.8 .4 5 ( ) 35.8 .1 10

117

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

16 16 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,520,230 169,653 133,546 363 4,366 1,828,158 13,815 1 810 7 14,633 7,055 390 246 25 7,717 1990 1,534,141 177,232 101,800 384 5,795 1,819,351 13,576 1 628 13 14,218 6,878 390 175 36 7,480 1991 1,534,559 180,541 95,149 398 7,207 1,817,854 13,590 1 621 15 14,227 6,886 384 165 42 7,476 1992 1,556,741 187,730 79,153 400 8,476 1,832,501

118

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 10.1 Renewable Energy Production and Consumption by Source (Trillion Btu) Production a Consumption Biomass Total Renew- able Energy d Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal f Solar/ PV g Wind h Biomass Total Renew- able Energy Bio- fuels b Total c Wood i Waste j Bio- fuels k Total 1950 Total .................... NA 1,562 2,978 1,415 NA NA NA 1,562 NA NA 1,562 2,978 1955 Total .................... NA 1,424 2,784 1,360 NA NA NA 1,424 NA NA 1,424 2,784 1960 Total .................... NA 1,320 2,928 1,608 (s) NA NA 1,320 NA NA 1,320 2,928 1965 Total .................... NA 1,335 3,396 2,059 2 NA NA 1,335 NA NA 1,335 3,396 1970 Total .................... NA 1,431 4,070 2,634 6 NA NA 1,429 2 NA 1,431 4,070 1975 Total .................... NA

119

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Table 8.2d Electricity Net Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.2a; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- themal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10 1989 0.7 0.6 2.2 0.1 3.6 - - 0.1 0.1 0.5 - - - 0.7 - 4.3 1990 .8 .6 3.3 .1 4.8 - - .1 .1 .8 - - - 1.1 - 5.8 1995 1.0 .4 5.2 - 6.5 - - .1 .1 1.5 - - - 1.7 (s) 8.2 1996 1.1 .4 5.2 (s) 6.7 - - .1 .1 2.2 - - - 2.4 (s) 9.0 1997 1.0 .4 4.7 (s) 6.2 - - .1 (s) 2.3 - - - 2.5 (s) 8.7 1998 1.0 .4 4.9 (s) 6.3 - - .1 (s) 2.3 - - - 2.5 - 8.7 1999 1.0 .4 4.6 (s) 6.0

120

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Table 8.2b Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.2a; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 6 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 9 Wind Total Wood 7 Waste 8 1949 135.5 28.5 37.0 NA 201.0 0.0 6 ( ) 89.7 0.4 NA NA NA NA 90.1 NA 291.1 1950 154.5 33.7 44.6 NA 232.8 .0 6 ( ) 95.9 .4 NA NA NA NA 96.3 NA 329.1 1955 301.4 37.1 95.3 NA 433.8 .0 6 ( ) 113.0 .3 NA NA NA NA 113.3 NA 547.0 1960 403.1 48.0 158.0 NA 609.0 .5 6 ( ) 145.8 .1 NA (s) NA NA 146.0 NA 755.5 1965

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 7.2a Electricity Net Generation: Total (All Sectors) (Sum of Tables 7.2b and 7.2c; Million Kilowatthours) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage e Renewable Energy Total j Coal a Petro- leum b Natural Gas c Other Gases d Conven- tional Hydro- electric Power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/ PV i Wind Wood g Waste h 1950 Total ................ 154,520 33,734 44,559 NA 0 f ( ) 100,885 390 NA NA NA NA 334,088 1955 Total ................ 301,363 37,138 95,285 NA 0 f ( ) 116,236 276 NA NA NA NA 550,299 1960 Total ................ 403,067 47,987 157,970 NA 518 f ( ) 149,440 140 NA 33 NA NA 759,156 1965 Total ................ 570,926 64,801 221,559 NA 3,657 f ( ) 196,984 269 NA 189 NA NA 1,058,386 1970 Total

122

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,573,566 218,384 145,399 363 5,590 1,943,302 14,469 1 984 39 15,493 7,281 495 269 93 8,136 1990 1,592,395 233,852 119,580 384 7,488 1,953,699 14,281 1 937 243 15,462 7,119 513 208 122 7,961 1991 1,592,186 238,084 111,351 398 8,447 1,950,466 14,240 1 856 246 15,342 7,109 498 193 113 7,913 1992 1,617,034 248,149 96,638 400 10,053 1,972,275 14,060 1 704 264 15,030 6,975 477 158 119 7,728 1993 1,687,623 250,411

123

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 11.2b Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Commercial Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity 7 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kerosene LPG 5 Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 8 Waste 9 Fuel Ethanol 10 Total 1949 148 19 16 3 2 7 NA 28 55 58 280 2 NA NA 2 1950 147 21 19 3 2 7 NA 33 66 63 297 2 NA NA 2 1955 76 35 28 4 3 9 NA 38 82 88 281 1 NA NA 1 1960 39 56 36 3 5 5 NA 44 93 124 312 1 NA NA 1 1965 25 79 39 4 6 5 NA 51 106 177 387 1 NA NA 1 1970 16 131 43 4 9 6 NA 56 119 268 534 1 NA NA 1 1975 14 136 43 4 8 6 NA 39 100 333 583 1 NA NA 1 1976 14 144 48 3 9 7 NA 45 111 358 627 1 NA NA 1 1977 14

124

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949-2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949-2012 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total Hydroelectric Power b Other c Renewable Energy a See Table 10.1 for definition. b Conventional hydroelectric power. c Geothermal, solar/PV, and wind. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#renewable. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1-10.2c. Power fuels a Fossil Fuels Biomass a Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 2.7 1.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 0.2 0.2 Hydro- Wood Bio- Wind Waste Solar/ Geo- 0 1 2 3 0.7 0.1 2.2 1.2 4.7 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric 0 1 2 3 4 5 PV a a a a thermal a electric Power

125

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

29 29 Table 8.3a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.3b and 8.3c; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 1989 323 96 462 93 973 546 30 577 39 1,589 1990 363 127 538 141 1,168 651 36 687 40 1,896 1991 352 112 547 148 1,159 623 37 660 44 1,863 1992 367 117 592 160 1,236 658 40 698 42 1,976 1993 373 129 604 142 1,248 668 45 713 41 2,002 1994 388 133 646 144 1,309 722 45 767 42 2,119 1995 386 121 686 145 1,338 721 47 768 44 2,151 1996 392 133 711 150 1,385 701 55 756 43 2,184 1997 389 137 713 150 1,389 731 55 785 53 2,227 1998 382 136 782 167 1,466 700 57 757 46 2,269 1999 386 125 811 179 1,501 690 55 744 48 2,294 2000 384 108 812 184 1,488 707 56 764 50 2,302 2001 354 90 741 133 1,318 557 28 585 55 1,958 2002

126

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatthours) Total (All Sectors), Major Sources, 1949-2012 Total (All Sectors), Major Sources, Monthly Electric Power Sector, Major Sources, 2012 Commercial Sector, Major Sources, 2012 Industrial Sector, Major Sources, 2012 94 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Gases b Gas Gas electric Power c Natural Gas Petroleum Renewable Energy a Natural Gas 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 Coal Nuclear Electric Power 2013 2011 2012 Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy a Coal 1,503 1,138 769 463 20 Coal Natural Nuclear Renewable Petro- 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 50 100 150 200 Petroleum Energy a Gas Electric Power leum 5.9 2.5 0.8 0.1 Natural Waste Coal

127

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Renewable . Renewable Energy Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949-2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949-2012 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total Hydroelectric Power b Other c Renewable Energy a See Table 10.1 for definition. b Conventional hydroelectric power. c Geothermal, solar/PV, and wind. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#renewable. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1-10.2c. Power fuels a Fossil Fuels Biomass a Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 2.7 1.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 0.2 0.2 Hydro- Wood Bio- Wind Waste Solar/ Geo- 0 1 2 3 0.7 0.1 2.2 1.2 4.7 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric 0

128

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5b 5b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation by Sector, 2011 Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Wood and Waste U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 237 7.3 0.6 0.0 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 2 4 6 8 Trillion Cubic Feet -CHP¹ (ss) 1 Combined-heat-and-power plants. ² Combined-heat-and-power and electricity-only plants. (s)=Less than 0.5 million short tons. (ss)=Less than 0.05 trillion cubic feet. (sss)=Less than 0.5 million barrels. Sources: Tables 8.5b-8.5d. Electricity-Only Plants 925 8 0 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 Million Short Tons (s) Electricity-Only Plants CHP¹ -CHP¹ 47 2 0 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 20 40 60 Million Barrels 416 181 24 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 100 200

129

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 1989 13 8 67 2 90 19 5 24 1 114 1990 21 9 80 4 114 18 6 25 (s) 138 1991 21 6 82 4 113 17 9 26 1 140 1992 28 6 102 5 140 17 8 25 2 167 1993 30 8 107 3 147 16 8 24 1 173 1994 37 9 119 5 170 15 10 24 1 195 1995 40 13 118 4 176 15 12 27 (s) 203 1996 43 12 121 4 180 16 16 33 (s) 213 1997 39 12 132 8 191 16 14 30 (s) 221 1998 43 6 142 5 196 10 16 26 (s) 222 1999 52 7 146 4 208 10 20 30 (s) 238 2000 53 7 158 5 223 6 19 26 (s) 249 2001 52 6 164 5 226 8 4 13 3 243 2002 40 4 214 6 264 8 5 13 5 281 2003 38 7 200 9 255 9 11 20 3 278 2004

130

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 2010 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 2010 By Sector Residential Sector by Major Source Commercial Sector by Major Source Industrial Sector by Major Source 74 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 22.40 21.00 20.90 12.04 Residential Transportation Commercial Industrial 0 5 10 15 20 25 Dollars¹ per Million Btu 33.81 23.46 11.13 Retail Petroleum Natural 0 10 20 30 40 Dollars¹ per Million Btu Gas Electricity 19.89 17.58 6.25 3.96 2.74 Retail Petroleum Natural Coal Biomass² 0 5 10 15 20 25 Dollars¹ per Million Btu 29.87 18.69 9.20 Retail Petroleum Natural 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Dollars¹ per Million Btu Gas Gas Electricity Electricity 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Wood and wood-derived fuels, and biomass waste; excludes fuel ethanol and biodiesel.

131

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26 26 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.2c Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.2b; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 6 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 9 Wind Total Wood 7 Waste 8 Electricity-Only Plants 11 1989 1,554.0 158.3 266.9 - 1,979.3 529.4 6 ( ) 269.2 4.2 6.9 14.6 0.3 2.1 297.3 - 2,805.9 1990 1,560.2 117.6 264.7 (s) 1,942.4 576.9 -3.5 289.8 5.6 10.4 15.4 .4 2.8 324.3 - 2,840.0 1995 1,658.0 62.0 317.4 (s) 2,037.4 673.4 -2.7 305.4 5.9 16.3 13.4 .5 3.2 344.7 - 3,052.8 1996 1,742.8 68.5 272.8 (s)

132

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 6.1 Coal Overview (Thousand Short Tons) Production a Waste Coal Supplied b Trade Stock Change d,e Losses and Unaccounted for e,f Consumption Imports Exports Net Imports c 1950 Total .................... 560,388 NA 365 29,360 -28,995 27,829 9,462 494,102 1955 Total .................... 490,838 NA 337 54,429 -54,092 -3,974 -6,292 447,012 1960 Total .................... 434,329 NA 262 37,981 -37,719 -3,194 1,722 398,081 1965 Total .................... 526,954 NA 184 51,032 -50,848 1,897 2,244 471,965 1970 Total .................... 612,661 NA 36 71,733 -71,697 11,100 6,633 523,231 1975 Total .................... 654,641 NA 940 66,309 -65,369 32,154 -5,522 562,640 1980 Total .................... 829,700 NA 1,194 91,742 -90,548 25,595 10,827 702,730 1985 Total ....................

133

A DISTRIBUTED SHARED KEY GENERATION PROCEDURE USING FRACTIONAL KEYS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A DISTRIBUTED SHARED KEY GENERATION PROCEDURE USING FRACTIONAL KEYS R. Poovendran, M. S. Corson, J}@isr.umd.edu ABSTRACT W e present a new class of distributed key generation and recovery algorithms suitable for group) with a Group Con- troller (GC) which can generate and distribute the keys. However, in these approaches

Baras, John S.

134

Microsoft Word - HABAdv #170 Hanford Buried Waste.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

causing soil and eventually ground water contamination. There is a risk that ground water contamination could lead to radioactivehazardous constituents reaching the Columbia River...

135

Microsoft Word - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Summary Report May...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was assayed by ion-chromatography (IC) and by a total organictotal inorganic analysis (TICTOC). One eighth section was subjected to a mixed acid (aqua-regia) digestion; the...

136

Microsoft Word - sharifgm-2.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WTS management positions at WIPP. In addition, he was TRU waste program manager for West Valley Nuclear Services Company in New York, a Washington Group subsidiary. Sharif has...

137

Microsoft Word - ML103200124.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determination at the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) addresses stabilized residuals in waste tanks and ancillary structures (including integral equipment) at the time of closure. In...

138

Microsoft Word - Chapter 12.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

per second. decommissioning-Removing facilities such as processing plants, waste tanks, and burial grounds from service and reducing or stabilizing radioactive...

139

Microsoft Word - Chapter 01.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and is designed to treat radioactive waste from the Hanford Site's underground storage tanks. Chapter 1 Introduction and Purpose and Need for Agency Action 1-15 Aerospace...

140

Microsoft Word - WIPPInternationalApproach  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This summer, three graduate students from the Technical University at Clausthal in Germany - all interested in radioactive waste management careers - are working with...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Microsoft Word - Argonne Release Final  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(ANL), near Chicago, Illinois. In September, all legacy TRU waste was removed from the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL), near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Maintained by the DOE,...

142

Microsoft Word - Hg.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The majority of mercury mine wastes at these sites are present as loose, unconsolidated piles, facilitating the transport of mercury-bearing material downstream into...

143

Microsoft Word - Document2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FY1999 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information FY1999 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information Public Benefits and Distributed Generation Outreach Project The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) will hold collaborative workshops with key stakeholders to build consensus on effective policy options for emerging competitive distributed generation markets. (Workshops were held in Philadelphia in April 2000, Santa Fe in June 2000, and Tucson in October 2000.) NARUC will also provide a concise summary of "lessons learned" from state experiences with public benefits programs and distribute an issue paper that describes new types of energy efficiency co-payments that can successfully maintain participation rates while reducing non-participant bill impacts. (NARUC released "Pay-As-You-Save Energy Efficiency

144

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.11c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.11b; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Electricity-Only Plants 9 1989 296.5 78.0 119.3 0.4 494.2 98.2 18.1 73.6 0.9 1.5 2.6 0.2 1.5 80.3 - 690.7 1990 299.9 76.6 121.8 .4 498.6 99.6 19.5 73.3 1.0 1.9 2.7 .3 1.8 80.9 (s) 698.6 1995 301.3 64.7 145.3 .3 511.5 99.5 21.4 77.4 1.5 2.7 3.0 .3 1.7 86.6 - 719.1 1996 303.1 70.6 143.1 .1 516.9 100.8 21.1 75.3 1.4 2.6 2.9 .3 1.7 84.2 - 723.0

145

Key recycling in authentication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In their seminal work on authentication, Wegman and Carter propose that to authenticate multiple messages, it is sufficient to reuse the same hash function as long as each tag is encrypted with a one-time pad. They argue that because the one-time pad is perfectly hiding, the hash function used remains completely unknown to the adversary. Since their proof is not composable, we revisit it using a composable security framework. It turns out that the above argument is insufficient: if the adversary learns whether a corrupted message was accepted or rejected, information about the hash function is leaked, and after a bounded finite amount of rounds it is completely known. We show however that this leak is very small: Wegman and Carter's protocol is still $\\epsilon$-secure, if $\\epsilon$-almost strongly universal$_2$ hash functions are used. This implies that the secret key corresponding to the choice of hash function can be reused in the next round of authentication without any additional error than this $\\epsilon$. We also show that if the players have a mild form of synchronization, namely that the receiver knows when a message should be received, the key can be recycled for any arbitrary task, not only new rounds of authentication.

Christopher Portmann

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

146

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table 7.1 Coal Overview, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Production 1 Waste Coal Supplied 2 Trade Stock Change 4,5 Losses and Unaccounted for 6 Consumption Imports Exports Net Imports 3 1949 480.6 NA 0.3 32.8 -32.5 7 ( ) 7 -35.1 483.2 1950 560.4 NA .4 29.4 -29.0 R 27.8 R 9.5 494.1 1955 490.8 NA .3 54.4 -54.1 R -4.0 R -6.3 447.0 1960 434.3 NA .3 38.0 -37.7 R -3.2 R 1.7 398.1 1965 527.0 NA .2 51.0 -50.8 R 1.9 R 2.2 472.0 1970 612.7 NA (s) 71.7 -71.7 R 11.1 R 6.6 523.2 1975 654.6 NA .9 66.3 -65.4 32.2 -5.5 562.6 1976 684.9 NA 1.2 60.0 -58.8 8.5 13.8 603.8 1977 697.2 NA 1.6 54.3 -52.7 22.6 -3.4 625.3 1978 670.2 NA 3.0 40.7 -37.8 -4.9 12.1 625.2 1979 781.1 NA 2.1 66.0 -64.0 36.2 .4 680.5 1980 829.7 NA 1.2 91.7 -90.5 25.6 10.8 702.7 1981 823.8 NA 1.0 112.5 -111.5 -19.0 -1.4 732.6 1982 838.1 NA .7 106.3 -105.5 22.6 3.1 706.9 1983 782.1 NA

147

Help:Magic words | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

words words Jump to: navigation, search Magic words are strings of text that MediaWiki associates with a return value or function, such as time, site details, or page names. This page is about usage of standard magic words; for a technical reference, see Manual:Magic words. There are three general types of magic words: Behavior switches: these are uppercase words surrounded by double underscores, e.g. __FOO__ Variables: these are uppercase words surrounded by double braces, e.g. {{FOO}}. As such, they look a lot like templates. Parser functions: these take parameters and are either of the form {{foo:...}} or {{#foo:...}}. See also Help:Extension:ParserFunctions. Page-dependent magic words will affect or return data about the current

148

Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free April 13, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What activity wastes gasoline, costs money, produces pollutants, and yet doesn't get you anywhere? Idling! And yet, every year, Americans waste 3 billion gallons of fuel by idling their vehicles. Idling is running a vehicle any time that it's not moving. In this condition, the car's fuel economy is exactly zero miles per gallon. Although many people think that restarting the engine too often will wear out the starter, that idea is just an "old husband's tale." In fact, idling places unnecessary wear-and-tear on the engine, and many manufacturers discourage it. Although drivers can't avoid some amount of idling, such as being stuck in

149

Microsoft Word - Buff Cover in Word.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Yucca Mountain Project Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension OAS-M-08-07 April 2008 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 A p r i l 2 8 , 2008 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2 & , / j . 77aF/- FROM: 'JJilliam S . Maharay Deputy Inspector General SUBJECT: DVFORMATION: Audit Report on "Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension" BACKGROUND The Department o r Energy's Office of Civilian Radioaztivc Waste Management (OCRWM) is preparing to obtain a license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct a permanent repository at Yucca Mountain for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. In December 2005, OCRWM identified design process inadequacies and suspended the appro\lal of new7 documents 'important to waste

150

Microsoft Word - M133 Word _rev3_.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2. Paragraph (b), REVISE DOE Orders 221.1 and 221.2 to now be DOE O 221.1A, Reporting Fraud, Waste and Abuse to the Office of Inspector General, dated April 19, 2008, and DOE O...

151

Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from waste feedstocks. As a part of this effort, BETO is organizing a Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping workshop. Workshop participants will join facilitated breakout sessions to discuss anaerobic digestion, hydrothermal liquefaction, and other processes that make productive use of wastewater residuals, biosolids, foodstuffs, and organic municipal solid waste. These discussions will be synthesized and used in developing a waste-to-energy technology roadmap.

152

Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AIKEN, S.C. Officials with the EM program at Savannah River Site (SRS) recently announced a key milestone in preparation for the startup of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF): workers installed more than 1,200 feet of new transfer lines that will eventually connect existing liquid waste facilities to SWPF.

153

Microsoft Word - Political Activity and the Federal Employee...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Microsoft Word - Political Activity and the Federal Employee.doc Microsoft Word - Political Activity and the Federal Employee.doc Microsoft Word - Political Activity and the...

154

Microsoft Word - Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx Microsoft Word - Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx Microsoft Word - Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx More Documents &...

155

The birth of a word  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A hallmark of a child's first two years of life is their entry into language, from first productive word use around 12 months of age to the emergence of combinatorial speech in their second year. What is the nature of early ...

Roy, Brandon C. (Brandon Cain)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Microsoft Word - 2008 Letter Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Prepared for Prepared for Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Prepared by 490 L'Enfant Plaza North SW Washington, DC 20024 January 13, 2009 CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT LETTER REPORT This Page Intentionally Left Blank Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Letter Report i Executive Summary This Fiscal Year 2008 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Letter Report presents an evaluation of the adequacy of the one mill per kilowatt-hour fee paid by commercial nuclear power generators for the permanent disposal of their spent nuclear fuel by the Government. This evaluation recommends no fee change.

157

Microsoft Word - n0045000.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

100, then continued to a lift station that pumped the liquid to one of three holding tanks (Figure 3). The composition of the health physics waste stream was primarily deionized...

158

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

waste coal. 2 These values represent the energy obtained from uranium when it is used in light water reactors. The total energy content of uranium is much larger, but alternative...

159

Help:Magic words | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magic words Magic words (Redirected from Help:Variables) Jump to: navigation, search Magic words are strings of text that MediaWiki associates with a return value or function, such as time, site details, or page names. This page is about usage of standard magic words; for a technical reference, see Manual:Magic words. There are three general types of magic words: Behavior switches: these are uppercase words surrounded by double underscores, e.g. __FOO__ Variables: these are uppercase words surrounded by double braces, e.g. {{FOO}}. As such, they look a lot like templates. Parser functions: these take parameters and are either of the form {{foo:...}} or {{#foo:...}}. See also Help:Extension:ParserFunctions.

160

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is radioactive material no longer considered valuable...238U, 235U, and 226Ra (where the latter decays to 222Rn gas by emitting an alpha particle) or formed through fission of fissile radioisotopes ...

Rob P. Rechard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Cherokee Clitics: The Word Boundary Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The problem of identifying Cherokee clitics is complicated by the fact that the prosodic word, marked by the presence of a tonal boundary, may not match the morphological word. Clitics may or may not respect the the word boundary as marked by tone...

Haag, Marcia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Microsoft Word - AL2005-14.doc | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

4.doc Microsoft Word - AL2005-14.doc Microsoft Word - AL2005-14.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL-Omnibus FY 2009 Apr 22 2009 all sections.doc Microsoft Word -...

164

Microsoft Word - AL2004-02.doc | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

4-02.doc Microsoft Word - AL2004-02.doc Microsoft Word - AL2004-02.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL2005-02.doc flash2004-07.pdf Microsoft Word - AL-Omnibus FY...

165

Microsoft Word - AL2005-02.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

2.doc Microsoft Word - AL2005-02.doc Microsoft Word - AL2005-02.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL2004-02.doc Microsoft Word - AL-Omnibus FY 2009 Apr 22 2009 all...

166

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

Columbia University

167

Microsoft Word - PURPA 2009.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) DECEMBER 2009 Background Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility that Title I applies to. Among other things, Subtitle B of PURPA Title I requires each "State regulatory (with respect to each electric utility for which it has ratemaking authority) and each non-[state] regulated electric utility" to consider and then make a determination on whether to adopt by Congressionally-specified dates certain word-for-word regulatory standards that Congress has listed in the original 1978 PURPA,

168

Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESSTutorial_INITIAL...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ITIALENTRYOFCOMPETENCYINFORMATION.doc Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS TutorialINITIALENTRYOFCOMPETENCYINFORMATION.doc Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP...

169

Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESSTutorial_REVIEW...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REVIEWUPDATECOMPETENCYINFORMATION.doc Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS TutorialREVIEWUPDATECOMPETENCYINFORMATION.doc Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP...

170

Microsoft Word - Rapanos Guidance FINAL.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the tributary and adjacent wetlands have the capacity to carry pollutants (e.g., petroleum wastes, toxic wastes, sediment) or flood waters to traditional navigable waters, or...

171

Microsoft Word - 99-2194, Rev. 8  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Revision 8 January 2013 This document supersedes DOEWIPP-99-2194, Rev.7 Working Copy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring...

172

Microsoft Word - 05-3318, Rev. 5  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

requirements and expectations related to the EMS as follows: GET (EMS and Conduct of Operations sections) EMS content in Hazardous Waste Worker, Hazardous Waste...

173

A select bibliography with abstracts of reports related to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant geotechnical studies (1972--1990)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This select bibliography contains 941 entries. Each bibliographic entry contains the citation of a report, conference paper, or journal article containing geotechnical information about the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The entries cover the period from 1972, when investigation began for a WIPP Site in southeastern New Mexico, through December 1990. Each entry is followed by an abstract. If an abstract or suitable summary existed, it has been included; 316 abstracts were written for other documents. For some entries, an annotation has been provided to clarify the abstract, comment on the setting and significance of the document, or guide the reader to related reports. An index of key words/phrases is included for all entries.

Powers, D.W. [Powers (Dennis W.), Anthony, TX (United States); Martin, M.L. [International Technology, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Microsoft Word - Technetium.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investigations to Identify the Soluble, Non-pertechnetate Species Investigations to Identify the Soluble, Non-pertechnetate Species in the High-level Nuclear Waste at the Hanford Site Wayne W. Lukens 1 , David K. Shuh 1 , Norman C. Schroeder 2 , Kenneth R. Ashley 3 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 2 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 3 Texas A&M University-Commerce, Commerce, TX Technetium ( 99 Tc) is an abundant fission product that presents a number of challenges for the safe, long-term disposal of high-level nuclear waste due to the 213,000 year half-life of 99 Tc and the high environmental mobility of pertechnetate, TcO 4 - , the most stable form of technetium under aerobic conditions. Because of these properties, 99 Tc is often the radionuclide of greatest concern when evaluating the near-term performance of waste repositories.

175

Microsoft Word - IG-0592.RTF  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Actions Taken in Response to Missing Actions Taken in Response to Missing Hazardous Waste Containing Cyanide This document provides a summary of an Inspection Report that is not publicly releasable because it contains information that is for Official Use Only and is controlled pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. March 2003 Summary Inspection Report U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections ACTIONS TAKEN IN RESPONSE TO MISSING HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAINING CYANIDE TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 1 BACKGROUND 1 RESULTS OF INSPECTION 2 RECOMMENDATIONS AND LESSONS LEARNED 3 Page 1 Actions Taken in Response to Missing Hazardous Waste Containing Cyanide INTRODUCTION Recently, the U.S. Government has become increasingly

176

Audio keyword extraction by unsupervised word discovery Armando Muscariello, Guillaume Gravier, Frederic Bimbot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio keyword extraction by unsupervised word discovery Armando Muscariello, Guillaume Gravier, Fr.surname@irisa.fr Abstract In real audio data, frequently occurring patterns often convey relevant information on the overall such key patterns, can be exploited for providing audio summaries and speeding up the access to relevant

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

177

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

178

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen? Business Overview WOW operates in the energy efficiency field - one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen? and WOWClean? provide more... energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. ? WOWGen? - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat ? WOWClean? - Multi Pollutant emission control system Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel...

Romero, M.

179

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Total floorspace (billion square feet) Surviving ............................................................. 79.3 80.2 87.0 91.9 96.2 100.7 106.4 1.0% New additions ..................................................... 1.8 1.5 2.1 2.0 2.0 2.3 2.4 1.6% Total ................................................................. 81.1 81.7 89.1 93.9 98.1 103.0 108.8 1.0% Energy consumption intensity (thousand Btu per square foot) Delivered energy consumption ........................... 105.6 105.2 100.4 98.1 97.2 95.8 93.8 -0.4%

180

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 82.85 83.56 91.25 95.37 99.34 103.03 106.77 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 25.78 26.07 29.82 32.05 34.54 37.05 39.53 1.4% Mobile homes ..................................................... 6.60 6.54 6.45 6.60 6.75 6.88 7.02 0.2% Total ................................................................. 115.23 116.17 127.52 134.02 140.63 146.96 153.32

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Spread the word about how to help | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spread the word about how to help Spread the word about how to help Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Stamp out energy waste Find cost-effective investments Engage occupants Provide a seat at the table Share energy goals and progress Identify energy-saving actions Spread the word about how to help

182

FAQS Qualification Card - Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Management Waste Management FAQS Qualification Card - Waste Management A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-WasteManagement.docx Description Waste Management Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Qualification Card - General Technical Base

183

International waste management fact book  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many countries around the world are faced with nuclear and environmental management problems similar to those being addressed by the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this Fact Book is to provide the latest information on US and international organizations, programs, activities and key personnel to promote mutual cooperation to solve these problems. Areas addressed include all aspects of closing the commercial and nuclear fuel cycle and managing the wastes and sites from defense-related, nuclear materials production programs.

Amaya, J.P.; LaMarche, M.N.; Upton, J.F.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Microsoft Word - Key-note-Cold climate_HVAC2009-neuer.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

software tools for moisture Protection of buildings in software tools for moisture Protection of buildings in different climate zones Special Example: Control of air humidifier in a cold climate for high comfort and no risk of mould growth in building room Krus Martin 1* , Thierry Nouidui 1 and Sedlbauer Klaus 1 1 Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, Germany * Corresponding email: Martin.Krus@ibp.fraunhofer.de SUMMARY The application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in different climatic zones is demonstrated in this paper. The basics of the programs are presented together with a typical application for a problem specific for the chosen climatic zone. A 1-D calculation has been performed for tropical climate zone with the improvement of a flat roof in Bangkok as an example. For half timbered buildings, which are common in the temperate zone with the

185

Version: September 2012 1 Key Words: list up to four AND check relevant boxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Science Info & Communications Tech Energy Society & Culture Environment Aboriginal/Indigenous Issues Yes No Does This Project Require Research Ethics Board: CDHA Dalhousie IWK Animals Biohazards Name Date Medical Research Development Office Print Name Date VP Research or Delegate CDHA/IWK When

Brownstone, Rob

186

KWOC (Key-Word-Out-of-Context) Index of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide Series  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet the objectives of the program funded by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Nuclear Energy (NE) Technology Support Programs, the Performance Assurance Project Office (PAPO) administers a Performance Assurance Information Program that collects, compiles, and distributes program-related information, reports, and publications for the benefit of the DOE-NE program participants. THE KWOC Index of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide Series'' is prepared as an aid in searching for specific topics in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Regulatory Guide Series.

Jennings, S.D.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Booklet, DOE Subject Area Indicators and Key Word List for RD and FRD- October 2005  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this booklet is to assist individuals of Government agencies who generate or review classified documents to recognize the presence of nuclear information that is potentially classified as Restricted Data (RD) or Formerly Restricted Data (FRD).

188

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE's Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site's waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE`s Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site`s waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Word Order Variables in Patzun Kaqchikel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the previous analysis of word orders in (Patzicia) Kaqchikel by Broadwell (2000).2 In Patzun Kaqchikel, in intransitive clauses, either SV word order or VS word order is possible in statements and questions. (1) a. ri n...-tzih n-anin3 def poss.1sg-dog inc.3sA-run My dog runs. SV+statement Does my dog run? SV+question b. n-anin ri n-tzih inc.3s...

Kim, Sok-Ju

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

191

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Full Document and Summary Versions...

192

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

193

Fossil Energy Word Find | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Word Search More Documents & Publications Fossil Energy Crossword Puzzle Coal Study Guide for Elementary School Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection...

194

Microsoft Word - Intellectual Property Provisions _NRD-1003_...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

& Publications Intellectual Property Provisions (NRD-115) Nonresearch and Development D:WebGCCurrentMaterialtechtransGNP-1003.PDF&0; Microsoft Word - Flash2006-47JulyDeviate...

195

A comparison of homonym and novel word learning: the role of phonotactic probability and word frequency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study compares homonym learning to novel word learning by three- to four-year-old children to determine whether homonyms are learned more rapidly or more slowly than novel words. In addition, the role of form ...

Storkel, Holly Lynn; Maekawa, Junko

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Microsoft Word - MAT 0004.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1/02 1/02 ________________________ _____Environment, Health, & Safety _____ ______________________ Training Program MAT0004 ~ Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air Training (International Air Transport Association) Course Syllabus Subject Category: Hazardous Material Handling Course Prerequisite: MAT0002 Course Length: 16 - 24 Hours Medical Approval: No Schedule: As needed Location/Time: Offsite Course Purpose: This Department of Transportation (DOT) IATA course provides shipper training requires training of employees who affect the safe transportation of hazardous materials, including hazardous waste. These employees are defined as Hazmat

197

Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

three key areas: 1. Retrieval, treatment, and disposal of waste from 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and closure of the SST system. In this TC & WM...

198

1993 baseline solid waste management system description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory has prepared this report under the direction of Westinghouse Hanford Company. The report provides an integrated description of the system planned for managing Hanford`s solid low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, transuranic waste, and transuranic mixed waste. The primary purpose of this document is to illustrate a collective view of the key functions planned at the Hanford Site to handle existing waste inventories, as well as solid wastes that will be generated in the future. By viewing this system as a whole rather than as individual projects, key facility interactions and requirements are identified and a better understanding of the overall system may be gained. The system is described so as to form a basis for modeling the system at various levels of detail. Model results provide insight into issues such as facility capacity requirements, alternative system operating strategies, and impacts of system changes (ie., startup dates). This description of the planned Hanford solid waste processing system: defines a baseline system configuration; identifies the entering waste streams to be managed within the system; identifies basic system functions and waste flows; and highlights system constraints. This system description will evolve and be revised as issues are resolved, planning decisions are made, additional data are collected, and assumptions are tested and changed. Out of necessity, this document will also be revised and updated so that a documented system description, which reflects current system planning, is always available for use by engineers and managers. It does not provide any results generated from the many alternatives that will be modeled in the course of analyzing solid waste disposal options; such results will be provided in separate documents.

Armacost, L.L.; Fowler, R.A.; Konynenbelt, H.S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Key Activities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Key Activities Key Activities Key Activities The Water Power Program conducts work in four key areas at the forefront of water power research. The Program is structured to help the United States meet its growing energy demands sustainably and cost-effectively by developing innovative renewable water power technologies, breaking down market barriers to deployment, building the infrastructure to test new technologies, and assessing water power resources for integration into our nation's grid. Research and Development Introduce and advance new marine and hydrokinetic technologies to provide sustainable and cost-effective renewable energy from the nation's waves, tides, currents, and ocean thermal gradients. Research and develop innovative hydropower technologies to sustainably tap our country's diverse water resources including rivers,

200

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Processing Waste Processing Workers process and repackage waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Centers Cask Processing Enclosure. Workers process and repackage waste at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cermet Waste Packages Using Depleted Uranium Dioxide and Steel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CERMET WASTE PACKAGES USING DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE AND STEEL CERMET WASTE PACKAGES USING DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE AND STEEL Charles W. Forsberg Oak Ridge National Laboratory * P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6180 Tel: (865) 574-6783 Fax: (865) 574-9512 Email: forsbergcw@ornl.gov Manuscript Number: 078 File Name: DuCermet.HLWcon01.article.final Article Prepared for 2001 International High-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference American Nuclear Society Las Vegas, Nevada April 29-May 3, 2001 Limits: 1500 words; 3 figures Actual: 1450 words; 3 figures Session: 3.6 Disposal Container Materials and Designs The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution,

202

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table A7.Transportation sector key indicators and delivered energy consumption Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Travel indicators (billion vehicle miles traveled) Light-duty vehicles less than 8,501 pounds .... 2,654 2,629 2,870 3,089 3,323 3,532 3,719 1.2% Commercial light trucks 1 ................................. 65 65 80 87 94 102 110 1.8% Freight trucks greater than 10,000 pounds ..... 235 240 323 350 371 401 438 2.1% (billion seat miles available) Air ................................................................... 999 982 1,082 1,131 1,177 1,222 1,274 0.9%

203

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

204

Chapter 10 God's Sacred Words  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents different domains of linguistics and language activity. A living system is characterized by having constraints as an inherent part of the system. A group of words that functions together as a unit is called a constituent. A constituent is an important notion in syntactic theory. Moreover, constituents are embedded one inside another and create a hierarchical structure. The power of the linguistic metaphor for biology is raising the awareness about the constraints imposed on tokens in a string of letters as a part of a meaning-making process. The rules that constrain the organization of micro-level particles are just one aspect of meaning making and should be careful not assigned them a hegemonic role in the multifaceted process of meaning making. Grammar can never be a substitute for meaning but just one layer of meaning making.

Yair Neuman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Science has a word for it  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the nature of the world. But scientists even have a word for that; degeneracy.boeing: Not strictly a scientific word, of course, but refers to the behaviour of ... have one person who is always flying off to conferences. He is said to be boeing around. I bo, you bo, he boes; though of course you and I ...

1978-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

206

Chemistry Add-In for Word  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Chemistry Add-In for Word is an Open Source program that allows chemists to create, edit and manipulate chemistry (labels and 2D structures) in the Word environment. the on-screen representation is backed by semantic data in Chemical Markup...

Townsend, Joseph A

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

207

Microsoft Word - CXPosticp10009.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 SECTION A. Project Title: RWMC - Analytical Laboratory Operations SECTION B. Project Description The RWMC Analytical Laboratory operations will be expanded to provide additional sample analyses on an as needed basis. The operations could include sample analysis of operational samples, samples of an emergency nature or from material spills, as examples. The primary focus of the analytical laboratory operations will continue to provide support to WIPP certified TRU waste analysis capabilities. The current analytical functions includes: * VOC analysis * SVOC and HPLC analyses * NHVOC & metals analyses * RH TRU radiochemical analyses The following analytical capabilities could be performed to support the proposed action: * Organic analyses

208

Microsoft Word - CXPosticp10009.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 SECTION A. Project Title: RWMC - Analytical Laboratory Operations SECTION B. Project Description The RWMC Analytical Laboratory operations will be expanded to provide additional sample analyses on an as needed basis. The operations could include sample analysis of operational samples, samples of an emergency nature or from material spills, as examples. The primary focus of the analytical laboratory operations will continue to provide support to WIPP certified TRU waste analysis capabilities. The current analytical functions includes: * VOC analysis * SVOC and HPLC analyses * NHVOC & metals analyses * RH TRU radiochemical analyses The following analytical capabilities could be performed to support the proposed action: * Organic analyses

209

Microsoft Word - EHS 316.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EHS 316 ~ Asbestos Class III Worker Course Syllabus Subject Category: Occupational Health Course Prerequisite: No Course Length: 2 Days Medical Approval: No Delivery Mode: Class Schedule: Through Qualified Offsite Vendor Location/Time: Offsite Vendor Course Purpose: This OSHA approved course teaches students how to perform limited asbestos abatement activities related to maintenance work where the amount of asbestos material abated will fit into a standard 60"x60" waste bag or an asbestos glove-bag. By completing this course, students will receive credit as an OSHA training class III worker and a Class III competent person. Course Objectives:  Learn the history and uses of asbestos, health effects, and medical surveillance.

210

Microsoft Word - EHS 317.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EHS 317 ~ Asbestos Class III Worker Refresher Course Syllabus Subject Category: Occupational Health Course Prerequisite: No Course Length: 1 Day Medical Approval: No Delivery Mode: Class Schedule: Through Qualified Offsite Vendor Location/Time: Offsite Vendor Course Purpose: This OSHA approved refresher course is a review course that teaches students two perform limited asbestos abatement activities related to maintenance work where the amount of asbestos material abated will fit into a standard 60"x60" waste bag or an asbestos glove-bag. By completing this review course, students will maintain credit as an OSHA training Class III worker and a Class III competent person. Course Objectives:

211

Microsoft Word - DOE Framework Final.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Washington, D.C. 20585 Washington, D.C. 20585 Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework September 24, 2013 Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework ii This page intentionally left blank. Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework iii CONTENTS 1. Introduction ............................................................................................................................................. 1 Immobilizing Radioactive Tank Waste at the Office of River Protection .................................................. 1 Current System Design ........................................................................................................................... 2 Addressing Technical Risks and Challenges .......................................................................................... 2

212

Microsoft Word - HABAdv#237EECA.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

schedules, staffing requirements, special equipment needs, estimation of worker radiation dose, and waste disposal volumes. While Brookhaven provides important lessons...

213

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

T-597: WordPress Multiple Security Vulnerabilities | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

7: WordPress Multiple Security Vulnerabilities T-597: WordPress Multiple Security Vulnerabilities April 7, 2011 - 5:42am Addthis PROBLEM: WordPress is prone to multiple security...

215

Microsoft Word - AL2003-04.doc | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Word - AL2003-04.doc Microsoft Word - AL2003-04.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL2006-08.doc AL2004-01r2.pdf City of Tulare Renewable Biogas Fuel Cell Project...

216

Microsoft Word - AL2000-01.doc | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

0-01.doc Microsoft Word - AL2000-01.doc Microsoft Word - AL2000-01.doc More Documents & Publications ALFAL 99-01 Department of Energy No Microsoft Word - al2005...

217

Microsoft Word - Section 311 AL FAL Feb 17 2010 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Section 311 AL FAL Feb 17 2010 Microsoft Word - Section 311 AL FAL Feb 17 2010 Microsoft Word - Section 311 AL FAL Feb 17 2010 More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word -...

218

Microsoft Word - AL2008-05.doc | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

5.doc Microsoft Word - AL2008-05.doc Microsoft Word - AL2008-05.doc More Documents & Publications EXECUTIVE ORDER 13514 Microsoft Word - AL 2010-07 Acquistion Letters Remaining in...

219

Microsoft Word - AL-ARRASafetyALREDO3 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

ARRASafetyALREDO3 Microsoft Word - AL-ARRASafetyALREDO3 Microsoft Word - AL-ARRASafetyALREDO3 More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL-ARRASafetyALREDO3.doc DOE Handbook:...

220

Microsoft Word - AL2007-01.doc | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AL2007-01.doc Microsoft Word - AL2007-01.doc Microsoft Word - AL2007-01.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - Rev5functionalaccountabilityimplementationplan..doc...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Microsoft Word - al93-4.doc | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

3-4.doc Microsoft Word - al93-4.doc Microsoft Word - al93-4.doc More Documents & Publications Draft Policy and Planning Guidance for Community Transition Activities Microsoft Word...

222

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Key Terms Key Terms to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on AddThis.com... Home About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Guidance Documents Statutes & Regulations Program Annual Reports Fact Sheets Newsletter Case Studies Workshops Tools Key Terms FAQs Key Terms The Energy Policy Act (EPAct) includes specific terminology related to

223

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Key Key Federal Statutes to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on AddThis.com... Home About Contacts Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Key Federal Statutes These are excerpts from federal statutes that established key Energy Policy Act (EPAct) transportation regulatory activities.

224

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

225

EIS-0391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, 391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington EIS-0391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts for the following three key areas: (1) retrieval, treatment, and disposal of waste from 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks and closure of the SST system, (2) decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, a nuclear test reactor, and (3) disposal of Hanford's waste and other DOE sites' low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download December 13, 2013 EIS-0391: Record of Decision Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for

226

Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Minimization Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Mission The team supports efforts that promote a more sustainable environment and implements pollution prevention activities in accordance with Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and EO 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, as approved by LM. The WM/P2 Team advocates environmentally sound waste minimization and pollution prevention practices. Scope Inventory the waste stream. Prevent or reduce pollution and waste at their source. Recycle. Use recycled-content products. Use less toxic or nontoxic products. Key Expectations Monitor and track progress on metrics. Maintain/implement a plan that integrates waste minimization and

227

The mixed waste management facility. Monthly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a project summary for the Mixed Waste Management facility from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for June, 1995. Key developments were the installation of the MSO Engineering Development Unit (EDU) which is on schedule for operation in July, and the first preliminary design review. This report also describes budgets and includes a milestone log of activities.

Streit, R.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

230

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

231

Waste?to?Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste?to?Energy Presentation by Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenery Technolgies Office, Department of Energy

232

Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESSTutorial_ROTATION...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS TutorialROTATIONWITHINDUSTRY.doc Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS TutorialROTATIONWITHINDUSTRY.doc...

233

Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESSTutorial_ESTABLISHI...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ESTABLISHINGAPROFILE.doc Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS TutorialESTABLISHINGAPROFILE.doc Microsoft Word - APRIL 2009 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS...

234

Microsoft Word - PMCDP Knowledge Diagram Updates March 26 2009...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Knowledge Diagram Updates March 26 2009.doc Microsoft Word - PMCDP Knowledge Diagram Updates March 26 2009.doc Microsoft Word - PMCDP Knowledge Diagram Updates March 26 2009.doc...

235

EERE Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EERE Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and Second Page EERE Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and Second Page This template was designed for...

236

Microsoft Word - NSRC precompetitive User Agreement amended 1...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NSRC precompetitive User Agreement amended 1-18-07.doc Microsoft Word - NSRC precompetitive User Agreement amended 1-18-07.doc Microsoft Word - NSRC precompetitive User Agreement...

237

Microsoft Word - 564M_Biomass_Project Descriptions FINAL 120409...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

564MBiomassProject Descriptions FINAL 120409 Microsoft Word - 564MBiomassProject Descriptions FINAL 120409 Microsoft Word - 564MBiomassProject Descriptions FINAL 120409 More...

238

Microsoft Word - 338M_Geothermal_Project_Descriptions | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Word - 338MGeothermalProjectDescriptions More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - 564MBiomassProject Descriptions FINAL 120409 564MBiomassProjects.pdf Slide 1...

239

Building Science "Power Words" Translator Vetting Process | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Science "Power Words" Translator Vetting Process Building Science "Power Words" Translator Vetting Process In February 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy convened a group...

240

Microsoft Word - MR_Contingency_Protocol_EM_FINAL.docx | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Microsoft Word - MRContingencyProtocolEMFINAL.docx Microsoft Word - MRContingencyProtocolEMFINAL.docx More Documents & Publications Slide 1 LPP Risk Management Plan...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environment 100808 FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc More Documents & Publications...

242

T-650: Microsoft Word Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

vulnerability has been reported in Microsoft Office Word. The vulnerability is due to memory corruption when parsing a specially crafted Word file. Impact: An attacker can exploit...

243

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Amounts of Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term nuclear waste...embraces all residues from the use of radioactive materials, including uses in medicine and industry. The most highly radioactive of these are the spent fuel or reprocessed wastes from co...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

245

Microsoft Word - CXPosticp10001.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 SECTION A. Project Title: MFC - EBR-II Sodium Removal/RCRA Closure Activities SECTION B. Project Description The proposed action will remove the sodium from the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR)-II piping system and tanks to achieve clean-closure for eventual decommissioning, deactivation and demolition (DD&D). The clean-closure will be completed in compliance with the EBR-II Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Storage and Treatment Permit PER-120. EBR-II is located at the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory. The EBR-II DD&D actions will be addressed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act, specifically, the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the EBR-II End State (DOE/ID-11398) and Action Memorandum.

246

Microsoft Word - Groundwater Discharge Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State Renews Groundwater Discharge Permit for WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., September 11, 2008 - The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) has renewed the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) groundwater discharge permit until 2013. The permit regulates the discharge of water from WIPP facilities and operations to lined ponds, which protect groundwater resources. The permit allows WIPP to discharge domestic wastewater, non-hazardous wastewater and storm water into 13 on-site, synthetically-lined ponds. The new permit also provides for increased daily discharge volumes to allow more flexibility in plant operations. "This permit is the result of a positive year-long effort with the New Mexico Groundwater Quality Bureau," said Jody Plum, DOE Carlsbad Field Office Permitting and

247

Geotechnical characterization of calcareous sediments from the Dry Tortugas Keys and Marquesas Keys CBBL SRP study sites, Lower Florida Keys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geotechnical characteristics of carbonate sediments from two test sites (Dry Tortugas Keys and Marquesas Keys) in the Lower Florida Keys were investigated as part of the Coastal Benthic Boundary Layer Special...

G. Veyera; H. Brandes; A. Silva

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Monroe County Extension Services Key West Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Services: 305-295-1010 Florida Keys Electric Co-op: 305-852-2431 Monroe County Roads & Bridges-292-4501 http://monroe.ifas.ufl.edu Key Largo Office: 102050 Overseas Highway, Room 244 City and County Tree Lower Keys: 305-797-4929 Upper Keys: 305-852-7161 Contact local tree services throughout the Keys

Jawitz, James W.

249

Key-Insulated Symmetric Key Cryptography and Mitigating Attacks against Cryptographic Cloud Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Key-Insulated Symmetric Key Cryptography and Mitigating Attacks against Cryptographic Cloud- sociated cryptographic keys in their entirety. In this paper, we investigate key-insulated symmetric key. To illustrate the feasibility of key-insulated symmetric key cryptography, we also report a proof

Dodis, Yevgeniy

250

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

1999-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

252

Adding New Words into A Chinese Thesaurus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the problem of adding a large number of new words into a Chinese thesaurus according to their definitions in a Chinese ... of defining formats for each class in the thesaurus, which tries ...

Ji Donghong; Gong Junping; Huang Changning

253

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-013.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

volume of waste. All waste will be characterized and disposed at the direction of Waste Generator Services. Releasing Contaminants - Typical construction chemicals such as...

254

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-005.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of industrial waste. All waste will be characterized and dispositioned through Waste Generator Services. SECTION G. Recommended Level of Environmental Review (or...

255

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-023.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

amount of waste that may be generated could include uncontaminated garbage such as plastic water bottles or other miscellaneous waste. All waste would be disposed of in...

256

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-15-001.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contact Waste Generator Services (WGS) prior to start of activity to begin waste identification, classification and characterization. Removed metal strips and other waste...

257

Microsoft Word - FINAL_TWC_Feb08_summary.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

system would provide acceptable low activity waste feed for the early operations of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) andor the operation of the supplemental low activity waste...

258

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Recycling of sodium waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling of sodium waste ... Methods for handling and recycling a dangerous and costly chemical. ...

Bettina Hubler-Blank; Michael Witt; Herbert W. Roesky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

263

Microsoft Word - CBFO TRUPACT!!!SA.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 Supplement Analysis for the Transportation of Transuranic Waste in TRUPACT-III Containers September 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Supplement Analysis for the Transportation of Transuranic Waste in TRUPACT-III Containers ii This page intentionally blank Supplement Analysis for the Transportation of Transuranic Waste in TRUPACT-III Containers iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...........................................................................................................1 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION...........................................................................1 3.0 PROPOSED ACTION.....................................................................................................1

264

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source 7. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Marketed renewable energy 1 Residential (wood) ............................................... 0.44 0.45 0.44 0.44 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.1% Commercial (biomass) ........................................ 0.11 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.0% Industrial 2 ............................................................. 2.32 2.18 2.53 2.67 2.82 3.08 3.65 1.8% Conventional hydroelectric ................................. 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.0% Municipal waste 3 ................................................. 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.1%

265

Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Key Activities in Key Activities in Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on AddThis.com... Key Activities Mission, Vision, & Goals Plans, Implementation, & Results Organization & Contacts National Laboratories Budget Partnerships Key Activities in Vehicles We conduct work in four key areas to develop and deploy vehicle technologies that reduce the use of petroleum while maintaining or

266

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Key Activities to Key Activities to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Key Activities The Fuel Cell Technologies Office conducts work in several key areas to

267

Microsoft Word - SWMU 99newformat1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Kellogg Building Site Solid Waste Assessment Report SWMUAOC NUMBER: 99 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: This SWMU is located along the eastern edge of the Paducah Gaseous...

268

Microsoft Word - ICP CX determinaton.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

be achieved by removal andor decontaminating or treating waste residues in the SPF tanks systems and the SSS pipingcomponents. The system and associated piping and components...

269

Microsoft Word - System Plan R15.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

improvement program. In the first 14 months, retrofitting the melter with bubblers and upgrading tank farm sludge waste feed preparation capacity increases the DWPF production...

270

Microsoft Word - System Plan R16.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

production rate improvement program. First, retrofitting the melter with bubblers and upgrading Tank Farm sludge waste feed preparation capacity increased the DWPF production...

271

Microsoft Word - U0199700_August 2004.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

contaminated regions of the aquifer, ion-exchange pretreatment, distillation treatment, solar evaporation of waste liquids in engineered ponds, and an infiltration trench to return...

272

Microsoft Word - Other Template.docx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Laney 2010 Laney, C., 2010, U.S. Ecology, personal communication (email) to G. Roles, Science Applications International Corporation, "RE: Waste disposal at the LLW site in...

273

Microsoft Word - Airport_EA_Final.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

garbage, refuse, sludge from a waste treatment plant, water supply treatment plant, or air pollution control facility, and other discarded material, including solid, liquid,...

274

Microsoft Word - chap4.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Four May 2005 Four May 2005 2004 Site Environmental Report 4-1 To assist in the understanding of this chapter, the following key definitions are provided: * Controlled runoff is contaminated storm water that is collected and, under normal circumstances, treated and discharged to the Great Miami River as treated effluent. * Uncontrolled runoff is storm water that is not collected for treatment, but enters the site's natural drainages. * Treated effluent is water from numerous sources at the site, which is treated through one of the site's wastewater treatment facilities, then discharged to the Great Miami River. * Surface water is water that flows within natural drainage features. 4.0 Surface Water and Treated Effluent Pathway This chapter presents the 2004 monitoring activities

275

Microsoft Word - q408.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Fourth Quarter 2008 Key Findings Net Income $5.8 billion Revenues $236.1 billion Highlights Major energy companies reported a 78-percent decrease in net income relative to fourth quarter of 2007. Further, this represents a 73-percent decrease relative to the fourth-quarter average for 2003-2007. Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) decreased from 8.3 percent in the fourth quarter of 2007 to 2.5 percent in the fourth quarter of 2008 due to the 78 percent decrease in net income. The effects of higher U.S. refining margins and foreign oil production were overwhelmed by lower oil and natural gas prices, lower U.S. oil production, and lower worldwide natural gas production. Overview Twelve major energy companies [1] reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $5.8 billion on

276

Microsoft Word - q109.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 First Quarter 2009 Key Findings Net Income $-7.0 billion Revenues $191.5 billion Highlights Major energy companies reported a 126-percent decrease in net income relative to first quarter of 2008. Further, this represents a 131-percent decrease relative to the first- quarter average for 2004-2008. Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) decreased from 8.0 percent in the first quarter of 2008 to -3.7 percent in the first quarter of 2009 due to the 126 percent decrease in net income. The effects of higher worldwide refining margins and worldwide oil and natural gas production were overwhelmed by lower oil and natural gas prices and lower worldwide refinery throughput. Overview Nineteen major energy companies [1] reported an overall net loss (excluding unusual items) of $7.0 billion on

277

Microsoft Word - q409.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fourth Quarter 2009 Fourth Quarter 2009 Fourth Quarter 2009 Key Findings Net Income $13.7 billion Revenues $261.6 billion Highlights Nineteen major energy companies reported almost a 300- percent increase in net income relative to the fourth quarter of 2008 (Q408). However, net income during the fourth quarter of 2009 (Q409) represents a 37-percent decrease relative to the fourth-quarter average for 2004- 2008. The effects of lower natural gas prices, worldwide refinery throughput, and domestic refining margins were more than offset by the effects of higher crude oil prices, and worldwide production of both crude oil and natural gas, leading to higher revenues and net income. Upstream capital expenditures by these companies declined after a year of lower-than-average (relative to the

278

Microsoft Word - q308.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Third Quarter 2008 Key Findings Net Income $48.0 billion Revenues $428.8 billion Highlights Major energy companies reported an 82-percent increase in net income relative to third quarter of 2007. Further, this represents a 102-percent increase relative to the third-quarter average for 2003-2007. Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) increased from 8.8 percent in the third quarter of 2007 to 11.2 percent in the third quarter of 2008 due to the 82 percent increase in net income. The effects of higher refining margins, oil and natural gas prices, and worldwide natural gas production overwhelmed lower worldwide oil production and refining throughput. Overview Nineteen major energy companies [1] reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $48.0 billion on

279

Microsoft Word - q209.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Second Quarter 2009 Second Quarter 2009 Second Quarter 2009 Key Findings Net Income $10.4 billion Revenues $221.9 billion Highlights Eighteen major energy companies reported a 67-percent decrease in net income relative to second quarter of 2008. Further, this represents a 62-percent decrease relative to the second-quarter average for 2004-2008. Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) decreased from 7.3 percent in the second quarter of 2008 to 4.7 percent in the second quarter of 2009 due to the 67 percent decrease in net income. The effects of higher worldwide oil and gas production from these companies and European and Asia/Pacific refining margins were overwhelmed by the effects of lower oil and natural gas prices and worldwide refinery throughput.

280

Microsoft Word - Matrixpart2.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11 11 Clause Matrix for Department Of Energy Management and Operating Contracts Part II -- DEAR Clauses (Parts 952 and 970) (Thru DEAR Final Rule dated 9/25/2005) (1/13/2006) KEY: R = Required A = Required when applicable O = Optional M&O = Management and Operating contract UCF = Uniform Contract Format General instruction: Set forth below are clauses prescribed in DEAR Parts 952 and 970 to be used in addition to the FAR Part 52 contract clauses set forth in Part I. Prior to incorporating a clause identified below, the clause prescription and the "FAR/DEAR Clause Secondary Citation" should be reviewed. This listing does not include solicitation provisions. DEAR Clause Number Title FAR/DEAR 952 Secondary Clause

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Microsoft Word - q110.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

First Quarter 2010 First Quarter 2010 First Quarter 2010 Key Findings Net Income $17.3 billion Revenues $269.6 billion Highlights Twenty-one major energy companies reported more than a 700-percent increase in net income relative to the loss reported in the first quarter of 2009 (Q109). However, net income during the first quarter of 2010 (Q110) represents a 9-percent decrease relative to the first-quarter average for 2005-2009. The effects of higher crude oil and natural gas prices, and higher worldwide crude oil and natural gas production more than offset the effects of lower worldwide refinery throughput and domestic refining margins, leading to higher revenues and net income. Upstream capital expenditures by these companies declined after a year of lower-than-average (relative to the

282

Microsoft Word - confirmation20010605.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Jeanne Lopatto, 202/586-4940 Jeanne Lopatto, 202/586-4940 June 5, 2001 DOE Announces Confirmation of Presidential Appointees WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy announced today that the United States Senate has confirmed key presidential nominees to the department. "I am pleased and excited about those who will be joining me here at the Energy Department. Each of them will serve as a vital part of DOE's commitment to helping Americans deal with the energy crisis as well as securing our energy future," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. Among those confirmed are Francis Blake, Deputy Secretary of Energy; Robert Card, Under Secretary of Energy; Bruce Carnes, Chief Financial Officer; David Garman, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Lee Sarah Liberman Otis, General Counsel.

283

Public/private key certification authority and key distribution. Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditional encryption, which protects messages from prying eyes, has been used for many decades. The present concepts of encryption are built from that heritage. Utilization of modern software-based encryption techniques implies much more than simply converting files to an unreadable form. Ubiquitous use of computers and advances in encryption technology coupled with the use of wide-area networking completely changed the reasons for utilizing encryption technology. The technology demands a new and extensive infrastructure to support these functions. Full understanding of these functions, their utility and value, and the need for an infrastructure, takes extensive exposure to the new paradigm. This paper addresses issues surrounding the establishment and operation of a key management system (i.e., certification authority) that is essential to the successful implementation and wide-spread use of encryption.

Long, J.P.; Christensen, M.J.; Sturtevant, A.P.; Johnston, W.E.

1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

284

SunShot Initiative: Key Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Key Activities Key Activities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to SunShot Initiative: Key Activities to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Key Activities on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Key Activities on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Key Activities on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Key Activities on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Key Activities on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Key Activities on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Key Activities Under the SunShot Initiative, the DOE Solar Office issues competitive solicitations that fund selective research projects aimed at transforming the ways the United States generates, stores, and utilizes solar energy.

285

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Key Federal Key Federal Legislation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Key Federal Legislation The information below includes a brief chronology and summaries of key federal legislation related to alternative fuels and vehicles, air quality,

286

Microsoft Word - WM10 ORP - 10241.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at 45 wt% Waste Loading. Oxide High-Al HLW* (wt%) Waste in Glass (wt%) Glass Forming Additives (wt%) Glass Composition HLW-E-Al-27 (wt%) Al 2 O 3 53.27 23.97 - 23.97 B 2 O 3...

287

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

288

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

289

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(ex: organic Rankine cycle) High installed KW capital Low temperature waste heat (<100C) is not practicable Further efficiency loss in electrolytic conversion to...

290

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

291

Microsoft Word - WIPP ARRA Final Report Cover  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance of Recovery Act Funds Performance of Recovery Act Funds at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant OAS-RA-L-11-09 July 2011 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: July 7, 2011 Audit Report Number: OAS-RA-L-11-09 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-35 (A10RA037) SUBJECT: Report on "Performance of Recovery Act Funds at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant" TO: Manager, Carlsbad Field Office, Environmental Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Carlsbad Field Office (Carlsbad) manages the transuranic (TRU) waste activities of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the National TRU Program. The WIPP, located outside Carlsbad, New Mexico, is the final repository for contact-handled and remote-handled TRU waste, and manages the final

292

Renewable Energy Community: Key Elements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Energy of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future A Renewable Energy Community: Key Elements A reinvented community to meet untapped customer needs for shelter and transportation with minimal environmental impacts, stable energy costs, and a sense of belonging N. Carlisle, J. Elling, and T. Penney Technical Report NREL/TP-540-42774 January 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

293

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

294

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from tank waste. * Decreases the volume of water to create room in double-shell tanks, allowing them to accept waste from noncompliant single- shell tanks. * Treats up to 1...

295

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trucks for scale. The DSTs have limited capacity and are aging. Maintaining these tanks is important to ensure that waste is ready to supply the Waste Treatment Plant. The...

296

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

297

Nuclear waste solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Glass and polycrystalline materials for high-level radioactive waste immobilization are discussed. Borosilicate glass has been selected as the waste form for defence high-level radwaste in the US. Since releas...

L. L. Hench; D. E. Clark; A. B. Harker

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. (Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Microsoft Word - Yucca PCard Report.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inspection Report Yucca Mountain Project Purchase Card Programs INS-O-09-04 August 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections MEMORANDUM FOR DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF CILIVIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT FROM: Herbert Richardson Principal Deputy Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Yucca Mountain Purchase Card Programs" BACKGROUND Yucca Mountain Project (Project) is the Nation's first proposed storage facility for spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste. The Project is managed by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). From

302

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

303

Microsoft Word - FOA 0000131 Final 10-11-09.docx | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Word - FOA 0000131 Final 10-11-09.docx More Documents & Publications Recovery Act: Clean Coal Power Initiative Microsoft Word - vDE-FOA-0000042.rtf Microsoft Word -...

304

Assessing the significance of sets of words  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various criteria have been defined to evaluate the significance of sets of words, the computation of them often being difficult. We provide explicit expressions for the waiting time in such a context. In order to assess the significance of a cluster ...

Valentina Boeva; Julien Clment; Mireille Rgnier; Mathias Vandenbogaert

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Management strategies for endangered Florida Key deer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urban development is of particular concern in the management of endangered Key deer (Odocoileous virginianus clavium) because highway mortality is the greatest single cause of deer mortality (? 50%), and the rural community of Big Pine Key, Florida...

Peterson, Markus Nils

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

307

Microsoft Word - 1 Final FY 2009 OCRWM AFR Cover page.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Annual Financial Report Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 November 19, 2009 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Annual Financial Report Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 Table of Contents Page Overview Reporting Entity 1 Organization Chart & Program General Goal 2 Performance Against Key Targets 3 Financial Performance 4 Analysis of Systems, Controls and Legal Compliance 5 Independent Auditors' Report 7 Financial Results Balance Sheets 11 Statements of Net Costs 12 Statements of Changes in Net Position 13 Statements of Budgetary Resources 14 Notes to Financial Statements 15

308

Microsoft Word - 10000th_shipment.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

For Immediate Release For Immediate Release The Department of Energy Announces Major Cold War Legacy Waste Cleanup Milestone Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment CARLSBAD, N.M., September 28, 2011 - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received its 10,000th shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste over the weekend. This marks an important milestone in DOE's mission to clean up the country's Cold War legacy. "This accomplishment reflects the hard work and dedication of our workers and contractors," said Energy Secretary Steven Chu. "It also demonstrates the Department's commitment to future generations as we continue our cleanup mission as safely and quickly as possible." The 10,000th shipment, which consisted of defense-generated contact-handled

309

Microsoft Word - sr-2013-08  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

208-8270 dean.campbell@srs.gov GROUTING TO BEGIN TOMORROW ON TWO ADDITIONAL SRS WASTE TANKS AIKEN, S.C. (August 15, 2013) - Cement trucks hauling specially-formulated grout will...

310

Microsoft Word - 09-3427 Rev 10  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Waste Data System User's Manual U.S. Department of Energy Revision 10 January 2013 This document supersedes DOEWIPP-09-3427, Rev. 9. Working Copy DOEWIPP-09-3427 2...

311

Microsoft Word - 14-3532 - EMENDED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Draft DOEWIPP-14-3532 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2013 - EMENDED U.S. Department of Energy September 2014 DOEWIPP-13-3507 2 This page...

312

Microsoft Word - DOE_science_kits.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

city from co ponding ma o sponsorin s for eleme nt of Energy Office Pilot Plant Mexico Opens r Middle ly 13, 2011 o learn abo bad Field Of e Waste Iso geologic re te...

313

Microsoft Word - HABAdv#230_LTS.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

changes in the Site mission, including an expanded role as an interim or long-term storage site for the Waste Treatment Plant produced glass logs and the spent nuclear fuel...

314

Microsoft Word - M066 SF 30.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for radiological, nuclear, and process safety shall be conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart A and DOE O 414.1C. (ii) QA for process development, waste form...

315

Microsoft Word - Audit Report Repost.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 July 15, 2008 Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico...

316

From an Ethics of Rationing to an Ethics of Waste Avoidance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the United States, ethical debate is now shifting from rationing to the avoidance of waste. This little-noticed shift has important policy implications. Whereas the "R word" is a proverbial third rail in politics, ethicists rush in where politicians fear to tread. The ethics of rationing begins with... Waste in U.S. health care spending on interventions that don't benefit patients amounts to at least 30% of health care spending and is a major driver of cost increases. So the ethical debate about cost containment is shifting focus from rationing to waste avoidance.

Brody H.

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

317

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

318

Microsoft Word - FORM46002.doc | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2.doc Microsoft Word - FORM46002.doc Microsoft Word - FORM46002.doc More Documents & Publications DOE F 4600.2 ATTACHMENT FLASH 2011-46(6) Attachment FY2011-63 OPAM...

319

Modelling out-of-vocabulary words for robust speech recognition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis concerns the problem of unknown or out-of-vocabulary (OOV) words in continuous speech recognition. Most of today's state-of-the-art speech recognition systems can recognize only words that belong to some ...

Bazzi, Issam

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

How Do You Spread the Word About Saving Energy? | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Do You Spread the Word About Saving Energy? How Do You Spread the Word About Saving Energy? May 25, 2012 - 2:03pm Addthis Earlier this week, Drew talked about how you can follow...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Word length and frequency as determinants of stuttering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Word length and Frequency were independently varied to assess their effect on stuttering frequency. The list of test words contained ... low, medium of high frequency of occurrence. Stuttering frequency of 31 you...

I. M. Schlesinger; Rachel Melkman; Ron Levy

1966-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Microsoft Word - EERE PSRP 7 23 2010 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EERE PSRP 7 23 2010 Microsoft Word - EERE PSRP 7 23 2010 Microsoft Word - EERE PSRP 7 23 2010 More Documents & Publications Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program...

323

Microsoft Word - AL2008-06.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Word - AL2008-06.doc Microsoft Word - AL2008-06.doc More Documents & Publications Chapter 9 - Contracting Qualifications AttachmentFlash2011-81(3).pdf AcqGuide9pt2.doc&0;...

324

Microsoft Word - Final MR AL.doc | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Final MR AL.doc Microsoft Word - Final MR AL.doc Microsoft Word - Final MR AL.doc More Documents & Publications DOE F 4220.23 Weighted Guidelines Weighted Guidelines...

325

Overcoming mixed waste management obstacles - A company wide approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dual regulation of mixed waste by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency has significantly complicated the treatment, storage and disposal of this waste. Because of the limited treatment and disposal options available, facilities generating mixed waste are also being forced to acquire storage permits to meet requirements associated with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Due to the burdens imposed by the regulatory climate, Entergy Operations has undertaken a proactive approach to managing its mixed waste. Their approach is company wide and simplistic in nature. Utilizing the peer groups to develop strategies and a company wide procedure for guidance on mixed waste activities, they have focused on areas where they have the most control and can achieve the greatest benefits from their efforts. A key aspect of the program includes training and employee awareness regarding mixed waste minimization practices. In addition, Entergy Operations is optimizing the implementation of regulatory provisions that facilitate more flexible management practices for mixed waste. This presentation focuses on the team approach to developing mixed waste managements programs and the utilization of innovative thinking and planning to minimize the regulatory burdens. It will also describe management practices and philosophies that have provided more flexibility in implementing a safe and effective company wide mixed waste management program.

Buckley, R.N. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Jackson, MS (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy November 1, 2013 - 1:28pm Addthis Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? 1.4 billion pounds of pumpkins are produced in the U.S. each year, many of which end up in landfills or compost piles after Halloween. Oakland's EBMUD collects food waste and uses microbes to convert it into methane gas that is burned to generate electricity. The Energy Department is helping to fund the development of integrated biorefineries, industrial centers dedicated to converting plant material into biofuels and other products. To commemorate National Energy Action Month, we're featuring some scarily

327

Integrated test schedule for buried waste integrated demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Test Schedule incorporates the various schedules the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports into one document. This document contains the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order schedules for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Reservation, Oak Ridge Reservation, and Fernald Environmental Materials Center. Included in the Integrated Test Schedule is the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration ``windows of opportunity`` schedule. The ``windows of opportunity`` schedule shows periods of time in which Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program-sponsored technology demonstrations could support key decisions in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order. Schedules for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration-sponsored technology task plans are categorized by technology area and divided by current fiscal year and out-year. Total estimated costs for Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration-sponsored Technology Task Plans for FY-92 through FY-97 are $74.756M.

Brown, J.T.; McDonald, J.K.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Integrated test schedule for buried waste integrated demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Test Schedule incorporates the various schedules the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports into one document. This document contains the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order schedules for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Reservation, Oak Ridge Reservation, and Fernald Environmental Materials Center. Included in the Integrated Test Schedule is the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration windows of opportunity'' schedule. The windows of opportunity'' schedule shows periods of time in which Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program-sponsored technology demonstrations could support key decisions in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order. Schedules for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration-sponsored technology task plans are categorized by technology area and divided by current fiscal year and out-year. Total estimated costs for Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration-sponsored Technology Task Plans for FY-92 through FY-97 are $74.756M.

Brown, J.T.; McDonald, J.K.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations [Nuclear Waste Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Safety Analysis, Hazard Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurgical Technology Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Bookmark and Share NE Division personnel had a key role in the creation of the FCF Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), FCF Technical Safety Requirements (TSR)

330

Waste immobilization demonstration program for the Hanford Site`s Mixed Waste Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the Waste Receiving and Processing facility, Module 2A> waste immobilization demonstration program, focusing on the cooperation between Hanford Site, commercial, and international participants. Important highlights of the development and demonstration activities is discussed from the standpoint of findings that have had significant from the standpoint of findings that have had significant impact on the evolution of the facility design. A brief description of the future direction of the program is presented, with emphasis on the key aspects of the technologies that call for further detailed investigation.

Burbank, D.A.; Weingardt, K.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A preliminary evaluation of alternatives for disposal of INEL low-level waste and low-level mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility (MLLWDF) project was established in 1992 by the US Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office to provide enhanced disposal capabilities for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level mixed waste and low-level waste. This Preliminary Evaluation of Alternatives for Disposal of INEL Low-Level Waste and Low-Level Mixed Waste identifies and evaluates-on a preliminary, overview basis-the alternatives for disposal of that waste. Five disposal alternatives, ranging from of no-action`` to constructing and operating the MLLWDF, are identified and evaluated. Several subalternatives are formulated within the MLLWDF alternative. The subalternatives involve various disposal technologies as well as various scenarios related to the waste volumes and waste forms to be received for disposal. The evaluations include qualitative comparisons of the projected isolation performance for each alternative, and facility, health and safety, environmental, institutional, schedule, and rough order-of-magnitude life-cycle cost comparisons. The performance of each alternative is evaluated against lists of ``musts`` and ``wants.`` Also included is a discussion of other key considerations for decisionmaking. The analysis of results indicated further study is necessary to obtain the best estimate of long-term future waste volume and characteristics from the INEL Environmental Restoration activities and the expanded INEL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program.

Smith, T.H.; Roesener, W.S.; Jorgenson-Waters, M.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Embodied attention and word learning by toddlers , Linda B. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Embodied attention and word learning by toddlers Chen Yu , Linda B. Smith Department of a heard word and a visual scene. By many analyses (Frank, Goodman, & Tenenbaum, 2009; Quine, 1964; Smith data across many word-scene experiences (Frank et al., 2009; Smith & Yu, 2008; Yu & Smith, 2007

Yu, Chen

333

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda More Documents &...

334

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security More Documents &...

335

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility where the melter is pouring molten glass inside a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a

336

Microsoft Word - BreakoutSummary.doc  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

agreement * Formulized TEC process-new mission, goals, and objectives * Legal and political consequences of DOE if key issues are not resolved * State funding mechanism * DOE...

337

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

338

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

340

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste...

342

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

343

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

6 - Nuclear Waste Regulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most influential national and international bodies providing recommendations on radiation protection are described, including the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Protection philosophies and the ICRP general principles of radiation protection are discussed. Radioactive material regulations and sources of radiation are explained. Criteria of exemption from regulatory control are discussed with examples of exemption levels for naturally occurring and radioactive waste radionuclides. Clearance of both moderate and bulk amounts of materials from regulatory control is also explained, including examples of EU and the UK regulations. Dose limits recommended by the ICRP are given, as well as the main principles of control of radiation hazards. Nuclear waste classification schemes are outlined, including the IAEA classification scheme. A brief explanation of nuclear waste classes including exempt waste, very short-lived waste, very low-level waste, low-level waste, intermediate-level waste and high-level waste is given. Examples of waste classification schemes are given, including that of the UK.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU. The wastes in these twelve (12) tanks are not high-level waste (HLW), and contain more than 100 nanocuries

346

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

347

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU. The mobile feature of WIT allows inspection technologies to be brought to the nuclear waste drum storage site without the need to relocate drums for safe, rapid, and cost-effective characterization of regulated nuclear waste. The combination of these WIT characterization modalities provides the inspector with an unprecedented ability to non-invasively characterize the regulated contents of waste drums as large as 110 gallons, weighing up to 1,600 pounds. Any objects that fit within these size and weight restrictions can also be inspected on WIT, such as smaller waste bags and drums that are five and thirty-five gallons.

Bernardi, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

JOANNES M.O et al. HLA polymorphism and sickle cell disease 1 Abstract: 150 words Text: 1988 words  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOANNES M.O et al. HLA polymorphism and sickle cell disease 1 Abstract: 150 words Text: 1988 words References: 23 (568 words) Table: 3 Title: Infectious complications in sickle cell disease and HLA 62 ­ Fax : 590 48 33 29 tmariann@univ-ag.fr Keywords: sickle cell, infection, polymorphism, genetic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

350

Microsoft Word - Survey-All-Groups.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A A Summary of Fermilab Diversity Focus Group The following is a summary of a three-hour discussion held with Fermilab employees some time between November 21, 2008 and January 9, 2009. Ten individuals, all of whom were female, attended this discussion. No responses have been attributed to any individuals and specific information that would personalize a response, such as names or departments have been deleted or generalized, but otherwise this summary represents that actual conversation. All wording in italics represent direction or questions provided by the facilitator. The Fermilab Work Environment Without giving it much thought, I want you to write down the first word or two that comes to mind when you think about the work environment here at Fermilab.

351

Low-level radioactive waste management: transitioning to off-site disposal at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Facing the closure of nearly all on-site management and disposal capability for low-level radioactive waste (LLW), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is making ready to ship the majority of LLW off-site. In order to ship off-site, waste must meet the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility's (TSDF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). In preparation, LANL's waste management organization must ensure LANL waste generators characterize and package waste compliantly and waste characterization documentation is complete and accurate. Key challenges that must be addressed to successfully make the shift to off-site disposal of LLW include improving the detail, accuracy, and quality of process knowledge (PK) and acceptable knowledge (AK) documentation, training waste generators and waste management staff on the higher standard of data quality and expectations, improved WAC compliance for off-site facilities, and enhanced quality assurance throughout the process. Certification of LANL generators will allow direct off-site shipping of LLW from their facilities.

Dorries, Alison M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

352

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-11-002.doc  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

using the 'Comply Plus' Chemical Tracking System. Project personnel will work with Waste Generator Services (WGS) to dispose of waste generated from chemicals. Construction...

353

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-026.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and lead would occur during removal activities. Project personnel would work with Waste Generator Services (WGS) to properly characterize, store, and dispose all waste according...

354

Microsoft Word - 271C2C7B.doc  

Energy Savers [EERE]

infrastructure and systems to transfer radioactive liquid waste from aging underground tanks to a waste treatment facility for immobilization and disposal beginning in 2019....

355

Microsoft Word - System Plan R17 (Final).docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the currently-approved FFA Meet the waste treatment goals identified in the STP Conduct operations consistent with the Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal...

356

Microsoft Word - System Plan R18 (DOE Final).docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

remaining time-at-risk associated with legacy high level waste storage in aging tanks Conduct operations consistent with the Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal...

357

Microsoft Word - ARRA INVESTMENT RELEASE REVISED FINAL Aug 2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Reinvestment Act funds to expedite the clean up of five transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites and to make important infrastructure improvements at the Waste Isolation Pilot...

358

Microsoft Word - EMAB TWS Summary Report FINAL.docx  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EMAB Tank Waste Subcommittee Summary Report 1 Report of Findings, Conclusions, and Recommendations Concerning the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Project (WTP) at Hanford...

359

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

360

SRS - Programs - Waste Solidification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Solidification Waste Solidification The two primary facilities operated within the Waste Solidification program are Saltstone and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. The largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the world, DWPF converts the high-level liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

High level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Division of Waste Products through a lead office at Savannah River is developing a program to immobilize all US high-level nuclear waste for terminal disposal. DOE high-level wastes include those at the Hanford Plant, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, and the Savannah River Plant. Commercial high-level wastes, for which DOE is also developing immobilization technology, include those at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant and any future commercial fuels reprocessing plants. The first immobilization plant is to be the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River, scheduled for 1983 project submission to Congress and 1989 operation. Waste forms are still being selected for this plant. Borosilicate glass is currently the reference form, but alternate candidates include concretes, calcines, other glasses, ceramics, and matrix forms.

Crandall, J L

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Key Documents | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Section 180(c) Key Documents Section 180(c) Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Key Documents Key Documents Briefing Package for Section 180(c) Implementation - July 2005 Executive Summary Introduction Appendix A - Funding Distribution Method Appendix B - Timing and Eligibility Appendix C - Allowable Activities/Training Appendix D - Definitions Appendix E - Pass-Through of Funds Appendix F - Contingency Re-Routing Appendix G - Policy on Rulemaking Appendix H - Funding Allocation Method Appendix I - State Fees Appendix J - Funding Operational Activities Appendix K - Matching Funds More Documents & Publications Implementation of Section 180(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal

364

Microsoft Word - 2010SR10.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AIKEN, SC 29802 NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Jim Giusti, DOE, (803) 952-7697 Tuesday, March 23, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 952-6938 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov TRU Waste Remediation Technician Finds Stability in Recovery Act Job Stabile job provides time to fulfill educational goal Aiken, S.C. - If there were a prize at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) for a Recovery Act worker coming from farthest away, Dean Morris would most likely win. Morris, a waste remediation technician, moved south in June all the way from Wasilla, Alaska, to join SRS's highly specialized Solid Waste Management team. Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the team is remediating 55-gallon drums

365

Microsoft Word - 2010SR09.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March 23, 2010 March 23, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov John Lindsay, SRR, (803) 208-6253 john02lindsay@srs.gov Recovery Act Funds Move SRS Tank 5 Closer to Final Closure Aiken, SC -- One more radioactive liquid waste tank at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) has moved closer to final closure thanks to American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR), DOE's liquid waste contractor at SRS, safely completed its first Recovery Act project on March 15, 2010, which required refurbishing an internal purge ventilation system as well as removing and replacing a 50-foot long mixing pump located within the 750,000 gallon radioactive liquid waste tank. As many as 50 Recovery Act workers were involved in the $1.4 million project.

366

Microsoft Word - 12-3489, Rev. 0  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12-3489 12-3489 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2011 U.S. Department of Energy September 2012 Rev. 0 1 2 This page intentionally left blank Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2011 DOE/WIPP-12-3489 3 2011 Annual Site Environmental Report To our readers: This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2011 presents summary environmental data to (1) characterize site environmental management performance, (2) summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year, (3) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and (4) highlight the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS), significant environmental programs, and accomplishments, including progress toward

367

Microsoft Word - 25A2876 Continued  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil refining is the most efficient industry at converting a chemical feedstock, oil, into finished products. Less waste is produced per ton of product in Oil refining is the most efficient industry at converting a chemical feedstock, oil, into finished products. Less waste is produced per ton of product in refining than in petrochemicals, fine chemicals, or pharmaceuticals. This high level of efficiency is absolutely necessary given the enormous volumes of material processed. Because of the scale of refining in the US, small percentage inefficiencies equate to massive real losses of potential fuel and unnecessarily emitted greenhouse gases. In the US, one such source of loss is the olefin content of refinery off-gas, or ROG. ROG is the waste generated from fluid catalytic cracking and other similar operations. It consists of light paraffins and olefins, particularly ethane and ethylene. For refineries outside the petrochemical hub along the US Gulf Coast, few markets for light olefins

368

Synthesizing Optimal Waste Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vitrification of tank wastes to form glass is a technique that will be used for the disposal of high-level waste at Hanford. ... Durability restrictions ensure that the resultant glass meets the quantitative criteria for disposal/long-term storage in a repository. ... If glasses are formulated to minimize the volume of glass that would be produced, then the cost of processing the waste and storing the resultant glass would be greatly reduced. ...

Venkatesh Narayan; Urmila M. Diwekar; Mark Hoza

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

369

Two Approaches to the Geologic Disposal of Long-Lived Nuclear Waste: Yucca Mountain, Nevada and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key component of the US energy program is to provide for the safe and permanent isolation of spent nuclear fuel and long-lived radioactive waste produced through programs related to national defense and the generation of electric power by nuclear utilities. To meet this challenge, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a multi-faceted approach to the geologic disposal of long-lived nuclear wastes. Two sites are being developed or studied as current or potential deep geologic repositories for long lived radioactive wastes, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico and Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

Levich, R. A.; Patterson, R. L.; Linden, R. M.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

370

Counterfactual quantum key distribution with high efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a counterfactual quantum key distribution scheme, a secret key can be generated merely by transmitting the split vacuum pulses of single particles. We improve the efficiency of the first quantum key distribution scheme based on the counterfactual phenomenon. This scheme not only achieves the same security level as the original one but also has higher efficiency. We also analyze how to achieve the optimal efficiency under various conditions.

Sun Ying [State Key Laboratory of Networking and SwitchingTechnology, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Beijing Electronic Science and Technology Institute, Beijing 100070 (China); Wen Qiaoyan [State Key Laboratory of Networking and SwitchingTechnology, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Long-Term Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Long-Term Update Draft Report, "Background and Preliminary Assumptions for an Environmental Impact Statement- Long-Term Waste Confidence Update" Elements of the Long-Term Update - Draft environmental impact statement - Draft Waste Confidence Decision - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule based on the EIS and Decision, if applicable 2 Overview of Draft Report Background and assumptions report is first step in process. Basic topics in the report are:

372

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Section 24: Waste Characterization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy (DOE). 1995b. Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (Revision 2, December). DOECAO-95-1121. ERMS 531643. Carlsbad Area Office, Carlsbad, NM. PDF Author U.S....

374

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

training, security) * Closure plan Tank-Related Permit Units New * 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) * 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) Existing * 242-A Evaporator * Waste Treatment...

375

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

376

Electronic Waste Transformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electronic Waste Transformation ... Instead, entrepreneurial individuals and small businesses recover valuable metals such as copper from obsolete equipment through activities such as burning. ...

CHERYL HOGUE

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Waste minimization assessment procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perry Nuclear Power Plant began developing a waste minimization plan early in 1991. In March of 1991 the plan was documented following a similar format to that described in the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. Initial implementation involved obtaining management's commitment to support a waste minimization effort. The primary assessment goal was to identify all hazardous waste streams and to evaluate those streams for minimization opportunities. As implementation of the plan proceeded, non-hazardous waste streams routinely generated in large volumes were also evaluated for minimization opportunities. The next step included collection of process and facility data which would be useful in helping the facility accomplish its assessment goals. This paper describes the resources that were used and which were most valuable in identifying both the hazardous and non-hazardous waste streams that existed on site. For each material identified as a waste stream, additional information regarding the materials use, manufacturer, EPA hazardous waste number and DOT hazard class was also gathered. Once waste streams were evaluated for potential source reduction, recycling, re-use, re-sale, or burning for heat recovery, with disposal as the last viable alternative.

Kellythorne, L.L. (Centerior Energy, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

379

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 19, 2014 - No second release at WIPP September 12, 2014 - Waste hoist transformer replacement September 09, 2014 - Additional areas cleared in WIPP underground...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Microsoft Word - supplement Analysis SWEIS82302.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

38SA2 38SA2 Supplement Analysis Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory Modification of Management Methods for Transuranic Waste Characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory August 13, 2002 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office Supplement Analysis for the SWEIS Page 1 August 13, 2002 Introduction This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a waste management proposal for installing and operating modular units for the

383

Thermal processing system concepts and considerations for RWMC buried waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a preliminary determination of ex situ thermal processing system concepts and related processing considerations for application to remediation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated buried wastes (TRUW) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Beginning with top-level thermal treatment concepts and requirements identified in a previous Preliminary Systems Design Study (SDS), a more detailed consideration of the waste materials thermal processing problem is provided. Anticipated waste stream elements and problem characteristics are identified and considered. Final waste form performance criteria, requirements, and options are examined within the context of providing a high-integrity, low-leachability glass/ceramic, final waste form material. Thermal processing conditions required and capability of key systems components (equipment) to provide these material process conditions are considered. Information from closely related companion study reports on melter technology development needs assessment and INEL Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) research are considered. Five potentially practicable thermal process system design configuration concepts are defined and compared. A scenario for thermal processing of a mixed waste and soils stream with essentially no complex presorting and using a series process of incineration and high temperature melting is recommended. Recommendations for applied research and development necessary to further detail and demonstrate the final waste form, required thermal processes, and melter process equipment are provided.

Eddy, T.L.; Kong, P.C.; Raivo, B.D.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the plan of activities for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program which supports the environmental restoration (ER) objectives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Discussed in this plan are the objectives, organization, roles and responsibilities, and the process for implementing and managing BWID. BWID is hosted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), but involves participants from throughout the DOE Complex, private industry, universities, and the international community. These participants will support, demonstrate, and evaluate a suite of advanced technologies representing a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for applicability and maturity, selecting appropriate technologies for demonstration, field demonstrating, evaluation of results and transferring technologies to environmental restoration programs are also presented. This document further describes the elements of project planning and control that apply to BWID. It addresses the management processes, operating procedures, programmatic and technical objectives, and schedules. Key functions in support of each demonstration such as regulatory coordination, safety analyses, risk evaluations, facility requirements, and data management are presented.

Kostelnik, K.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Waste Loading Enhancements for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE GLASSES Albert A. Kruger, Glass Scientist DOE-WTP Project Office Engineering Division US Department of Energy Richland,...

386

Tank Waste Committee Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of a PA is to examine the final waste disposition at Hanford, such as waste in the tanks at C-Farm. Vince said the quest is to model waste movement over 10,000 years,...

387

Nordisk kernesikkerhedsforskning Norrnar kjarnryggisrannsknir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and handling of used fuel and radioactive waste. Key words Nuclear threats, Nordic countries, nuclear power plants, nuclear ship, nuclear waste, literature database, base of knowledge, web-accessed information, atmospheric transport, decommissioning of submarines, nuclear installations, waste management, radioactive

388

Monroe County Extension Services Key West Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-292-4501 http://monroe.ifas.ufl.edu Key Largo Office: 102050 Overseas Highway, Room 244 City and County Tree Energy Services: 305-295-1010 Florida Keys Electric Co-op: 305-852-2431 Monroe County Roads & Bridges conditions based on USDA zone, water and light requirements, soil conditions, salt and wind tolerance

Florida, University of

389

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Radioactive Waste Source Reduction 1,500 Radioactive Waste $6,000 $2,500 $6,000 Waste Yard Sorting Table surveying to sort clean waste from radioactive waste Radioactive Emissions Emission lives. Radioactive Waste generated through wet chemistry Waste Minimization 30 Mixed waste / Liquid

390

Chapter 19 - Nuclear Waste Fund  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 CHAPTER 19 NUCLEAR WASTE FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the financial, accounting, and budget policies and procedures for civilian and defense nuclear waste activities, as authorized in Public Law 97-425, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, referred to hereafter as the Act. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are funded by the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) or the Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal appropriation. c. Background. The Act established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and assigned it responsibility for the management

391

Solid Waste Rules (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The solid waste statute applies to construction and demolition debris, appliances, recyclables, and the facilities that collect, process, and dispose of solid waste. DES oversees the management of...

392

Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

393

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Management Waste Management Oak Ridge has an onsite CERCLA disposal facility, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, that reduces cleanup and transportation costs....

394

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule establishes requirements for emissions from, and design and operation of, municipal waste combustion units. "Municipal waste"means all materials and substances discarded from residential...

395

Waste Disposal | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Disposal Waste Disposal Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridges cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility....

396

residential sector key indicators | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential sector key indicators residential sector key indicators Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2009 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption, part of the Source EIA Date Released March 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO consumption EIA energy residential sector key indicators Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2009 Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption (xls, 55.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment http://www.eia.gov/abouteia/copyrights_reuse.cfm Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

397

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Key Activities Key Activities The Fuel Cell Technologies Office conducts work in several key areas to advance the development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Research, Development, and Demonstration Key areas of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) include the following: Fuel Cell R&D, which seeks to improve the durability, reduce the cost, and improve the performance of fuel cell systems, through advances in fuel cell stack and balance of plant components Hydrogen Fuel R&D, which focuses on enabling the production of low-cost hydrogen fuel from diverse renewable pathways and addressing key challenges to hydrogen delivery and storage Manufacturing R&D, which works to develop and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technologies and processes that will reduce the cost of fuel cell systems and hydrogen technologies

398

22 - Radioactive waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the disposal of radioactive wastes that arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, beneficial uses of isotopes, and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. The spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. It is anticipated that a multi-barrier system involving packaging and geologic media will provide protection of the public over the centuries. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In some countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is done by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Microsoft Word - westwater_er.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

infrared error that is especially noticeable at night when compared with Vaisala type sensors (Schmidlin et al. 1986). The error of the rod is keyed to the background radiative...

403

Microsoft Word - Vol II_FM.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of skeletal Pb compared to controls, nor did it show a redistribution of Pb to brain. Smith and Flegal (1992) AX5-34 Table AX5-3.6 (cont'd). Key Studies Evaluating Chelation of...

404

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T h e W a s t e I s o l a t i o n P i l o t P l a n t DOE 1980. Final Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1981. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): Record of Decision. Federal Register, Vol. 46, No. 18, p. 9162, (46 Federal Register 9162), January 28, 1981. U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026-FS, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Record of Decision: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Federal Register, Vol. 55, No. 121, 25689-25692, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1994. Comparative Study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transportation Alternatives.

405

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

406

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

407

Captured key electrical safety lockout system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A safety lockout apparatus for an electrical circuit includes an electrical switch, a key, a lock and a blocking mechanism. The electrical switch is movable between an ON position at which the electrical circuit is energized and an OFF position at which the electrical circuit is deactivated. The lock is adapted to receive the key and is rotatable among a plurality of positions by the key. The key is only insertable and removable when the lock is at a preselected position. The lock is maintained in the preselected position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism physically maintains the switch in its OFF position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism preferably includes a member driven by the lock between a first position at which the electrical switch is movable between its ON and OFF positions and a second position at which the member physically maintains the electrical switch in its OFF position. Advantageously, the driven member`s second position corresponds to the preselected position at which the key can be removed from and inserted into the lock. 7 figs.

Darimont, D.E.

1995-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Captured key electrical safety lockout system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A safety lockout apparatus for an electrical circuit includes an electrical switch, a key, a lock and a blocking mechanism. The electrical switch is movable between an ON position at which the electrical circuit is energized and an OFF position at which the electrical circuit is deactivated. The lock is adapted to receive the key and is rotatable among a plurality of positions by the key. The key is only insertable and removable when the lock is at a preselected position. The lock is maintained in the preselected position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism physically maintains the switch in its OFF position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism preferably includes a member driven by the lock between a first position at which the electrical switch is movable between its ON and OFF positions and a second position at which the member physically maintains the electrical switch in its OFF position. Advantageously, the driven member's second position corresponds to the preselected position at which the key can be removed from and inserted into the lock.

Darimont, Daniel E. (Aurora, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC.  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC. WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER EG&G IDAHO, INC. SUBCONTRACT NO. EGG-C93-170221, W(A)-93-005, CH-0757 Under this subcontract, Waste Management Environmental Services, Inc. (WMES) will demonstrate key technical features of its proposed Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Pit-9 remediation program. Pit-9 is an area in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL containing radioactive and hazardous materials in the form of toxic metals and organic materials, including plutonium and americium. Specifically, the subject subcontract is directed toward a Proof-of-Process (POP) demonstration program intended to provide EG&G Idaho, Inc. (EG&G) with additional information that it will use in the

410

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum, may react with liquid in a landfill and cause uncontrolled temperature increases, significant changes

411

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

412

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Microsoft Word - AL2006-11.doc | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Contract Without Full and Open Competition and Site and Utilization Management Planning Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Microsoft Word - Policy Flash 2010-67 Attachment 1...

414

Microsoft Word - al96-09.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Contract Without Full and Open Competition and Site and Utilization Management Planning Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Microsoft Word - Policy Flash 2010-67 Attachment 1...

415

Microsoft Word - PeerReview_SAR.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- PeerReviewCCSP.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change and Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

416

Microsoft Word - CERFDOE Final Report - 071204.doc | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Microsoft Word - CERFDOE Final Report - 071204.doc More Documents & Publications Integrated Project Team RM DOE EIR FM.doc Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application...

417

Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agenda Hotel Register Contacts Event Media Speaker Information Home Agenda Hotel Register Contacts Event Media Speaker Information Home Environmental Management Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010 in Atlanta, GA, November 16 - 18. Over the past eight years, personnel from the three sites, Savannah River/Hanford/Idaho along with others receiving funding from the Environmental Management Office of Waste Processing have met to exchange recent results of on-going field operations and technology development. The purpose of this exchange is to provide a forum for discussion of each Site's efforts to accelerate cleanup operations. Keys to success and lessons learned are openly exchanged in a manner to allow for open discussion between operations, engineering and scientists to accelerate transition of technologies from concepts to field implementation.

418

Depleted uranium waste assay at AWE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) at Aldermaston has recently conducted a Best Practical Means (BPM) study, for solid Depleted Uranium (DU) waste assay, in order to satisfy key stakeholders that AWE is applying best practice. This study has identified portable passive High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (HRGS), combined with an analytical software package called Spectral Nondestructive Assay Platform (SNAP), as the preferred option with the best balance between performance and costs. HRGS/SNAP performance has been assessed by monitoring 200 l DU waste drum standards and also heterogeneous, high density drums from DU firing trials. Accuracy was usually within 30 % with Detection Limits (DL) in the region of 10 g DU for short count times. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations have been used to confirm the shape of the calibration curve generated by the SNAP software procured from Eberline Services Inc. (authors)

Miller, T.J. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, England, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

420

Waste inspection tomography (WIT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The WIT program will provide an inspection system that offers the nuclear waste evaluator a unique combination of tools for regulatory-driven characterization of low-level waste (LLW), transuranic waste (TRU), and mixed waste drums. WIT provides nondestructive, noninvasive, and environmentally safe inspections using X-ray and gamma ray technologies, with reasonable cost and throughput. Two emission imaging techniques will be employed for characterizing materials in waste containers. The first of these is gamma emission tomography, commonly called single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Rather than using an external radiation source, SPECT uses the emission of radioactive materials within the object of interest for imaging. In this case, emission from actual nuclear waste within a container will provide a three-dimensional image of the radioactive substances in the container. The second emission technique will use high-purity germanium detectors for gamma ray spectroscopy. This technique, called nondestructive assay (NDA), can identify the emitting isotopic species and strength. Work in emission tomography and assay of nuclear waste has been undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a technique called Passive Tomography. Results from a process development unit are presented.

Bernardi, R.T.; Han, K.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Microsoft Word - FOIA Log FY 2001.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 FOIA - Request Log 1 FOIA - Request Log 1 Closed/ Date No. Dated Date Rec'd HQ or Dir. Subject Yes/ 3/29/01 001 02/01/01 02/01/01 01-0021C Transfer AL Copies of all documents including studies and memoranda, which may identify or consider WIPP site in Carlsbad, NM as a potential site for storage or disposal of spent reactor fuel or high-level radioactive wastes 2. All documents including studies, memoranda, hypothesizing, considering, recommending, or suggesting the WIPP site in NM as an alternative site to the Yucca Mountain site in NV. 3. All documents or lists setting forth the alternative sites that may potential be considered by DOE if the Yucca Mountain site is for any reason not selected to be the DOE site receiving high level radioactive waste or spent reactor fuel. If alternative potential sites have

422

Microsoft Word - DOE Initiates EPA Recertificaton Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Initiates EPA Recertification Process DOE Initiates EPA Recertification Process CARLSBAD, N.M., March 24, 2009 - Ten years after the start of disposal operations, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will demonstrate its continued compliance with U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations for radioactive waste disposal. Today, DOE submitted its second Compliance Recertification Application (CRA) to EPA, initiating a recertification process required by Congress. "This application is a reflection of the high quality work that has been done at WIPP for a decade," says Carlsbad Field Office Manager Dave Moody. "We operate to strict environmental and safety requirements designed to protect workers, the public and the

423

Microsoft Word - DOE Final ATWIR-2012.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ANNUAL TRANSURANIC WASTE INVENTORY REPORT - 2012 ANNUAL TRANSURANIC WASTE INVENTORY REPORT - 2012 (Data Cutoff Date 12/31/2011) DOE/TRU-12-3425 Revision 0 Date: October 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office DOE/TRU-12-3425 Page 1 of 421 This document has been submitted as required to: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information PO Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Phone: (865) 576-8401 Additional information about this document may be obtained by calling 1-800-336-9477. Unlimited, publicly available full-text scientific and technical reports produced since 1991 are available online at Information Bridge (www.osti.gov/bridge). U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors may obtain full-text reports produced prior to 1991 in paper form, for a processing fee, from:

424

Microsoft Word - 0046.tbh.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 5, 2007 November 5, 2007 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: David K. Isham Date of Filing: June 19, 2007 Case Number: TBH-0046 David Isham filed a retaliation complaint (the Part 708 Complaint or the Complaint) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (2007). As explained below, I have determined that the Complaint should be dismissed. I. Background A. The Complaint Mr. Isham was employed by EG&G Technical Services (EG&G), a subcontractor of Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC (BWXT). Mr. Isham worked as a "Visual Examiner" on the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), where he inspected waste prior to its shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) in New Mexico. A third

425

Microsoft Word - ORNL_first_shipment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WIPP Receives First Shipment From Oak Ridge National Laboratory CARLSBAD, N.M., September 25, 2008 - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee has become the latest site to ship defense-related transuranic waste directly to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A truck with three loaded TRUPACT-II shipping containers departed ORNL yesterday and arrived at WIPP this morning - the 6,894th safe shipment to WIPP since the project opened in 1999. "Safe, responsible cleanup is the bottom line," said DOE Carlsbad Field Office Manager Dr. Dave Moody. "While we make steady progress every day at WIPP, it is milestones like this that highlight the overall success of the DOE clean-up effort. I applaud

426

Microsoft Word - FOIA Log FY 2003.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 FOIA - Request Log 3 FOIA - Request Log 1 Closed/ Date No. Dated Date Rec'd HQ or Dir. Subject Yes/ 11/03/03 001 12/16/02 1/7/03 Transfer from HQ Documentation provided identifying all Waste Isolation Pilot Plant contractors and their sub- contractors, as well as the principals for those entities. Yes 2/20/04 002 12/16/02 1/7/03 Transfer from HQ Documentation provided concerning the following Waste Isolation Pilot Plant related items: 1) Notify as to whether any portion of Westinghouse TRU Solutions work has been outsourced or privatized, and identify the outsource contact affected employees, 2) Notify as to whether environmental work done by Westinghouse TRU Solutions has undergone any changes involving position within company structure, management personnel, addition or deletions to scope of

427

Microsoft Word - ICP CX determinaton.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2-001 2-001 SECTION A. Project Title: MFC - Sodium Processing Facility Tank System Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure SECTION B. Project Description The Sodium Process Facility tank systems and associated piping and components will be closed in compliance with the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) SPF/SSS Permit. The clean-closure action levels will be achieved by removal and/or decontaminating or treating waste residues in the SPF tanks systems and the SSS piping/components. The system and associated piping and components are located in the MFC- 799 and MFC-799A Facilities. The closure will ensure the HWMA units will not require further maintenance and controls after closure, minimize or eliminate any threats to human health and the environment, and post closure release of

428

Microsoft Word - AMB 2008-final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico Page 1-1 1.0 Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Disposal Site 1.1 Compliance Summary The Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on August 27, 2008. The disposal cell and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures were in excellent condition and functioning as designed. The site access road, owned by Rio Algom Mining LLC (Rio Algom), was temporarily realigned in 2006 to allow for construction of a waste haul road; waste hauling operations are complete, and the site access road is scheduled for restoration in 2009. Slight settlement may be recurring at a location on the cell cover that was repaired in 2005; this location will continue to

429

Waste management plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This waste management plan defines the procedures for control and management of waste generated as a result of the removal action of the YS-86O Firing Ranges site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document includes plan objectives; remediation activities; key personnel; waste generation activities; and waste treatment, storage, transportation, and disposal. Methods of control and characterization of waste generated as a result of remediation activities will be within the guidelines and procedures outlined herein. ENTECH personnel will make every effort when conducting remediation and decontamination activities to minimize the amount of generated waste.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Research Summary Key Ingredients of Collaborative Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, wildlife management and water catchments. This project, developed in discussion with stakeholders, soughtResearch Summary Key Ingredients of Collaborative Management It is widely accepted that collaboration amongst stakeholders can lead to more sustainable land-management. Voluntary collaboration

431

Extracting secret keys from integrated circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modern cryptographic protocols are based on the premise that only authorized participants can obtain secret keys and access to information systems. However, various kinds of tampering methods have been devised to extract ...

Lim, Daihyun, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Composite keys? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Composite keys? Composite keys? Home > Groups > Databus Does DataBus support using composite keys in a Table definition? If not, is there a way to automatically generate a unique value for each entry that is uploaded? Submitted by Hopcroft on 5 September, 2013 - 17:13 1 answer Points: 0 At this time, no, and no way to generate unique key either right now. You can submit a feature request for this though on github. thanks, Dean Deanhiller on 6 September, 2013 - 06:58 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Go to My Databus->Data Streams... yes, it is done the same way y... Update rows? How to use streaming chart? if you are an administrator, s... more Group members (6) Managers: Deanhiller Recent members: Hopcroft Vikasgoyal Ksearight NickL

433

Microsoft Word - FOIA Log FY 2005.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 FOIA - Request Log 5 FOIA - Request Log 1 Closed/ Date No. Dated Date Rec'd HQ or Dir. Subject Yes 02/23/05 001 02/16/05 02/16/05 Direct Copies of the 2004 Modifications to the Westinghouse TRU Solutions contract (No. DE-AC- 04-01AL66444) for the management and operation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Yes 04/12/05 002 04/11/05 04/11/05 Direct Copies of the scope of work statement for the EE&G Oversight contract for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, dated 1999 or 2000 Yes 04/29/05 003 04/20/05 04/20/05 Direct (1) A copy of the Winning Proposal for RFP No. DE-AC04-89AL58309 (A036), entitled Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) Oversight Contract for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Subject RFO was issued in FY 2001, and we believe the initials contract was awarded to a company named EG&G.

434

Microsoft Word - 25A2445 Continued  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This ARPA-E program plans to address the vast energy loss and consumption associated with conventional lighting by developing a new This ARPA-E program plans to address the vast energy loss and consumption associated with conventional lighting by developing a new route to large, high-quality, single crystals of gallium nitride. These crystals will serve as substrates for LEDs offering high-efficiency lighting. Around 8% of the energy consumption in the U.S. is from lighting, and by 2025, the U.S. could consume as much as 1,000 TWh per year. In addition, conventional light sources can account for more than 25% of a building's energy demands in the forms of direct energy for lighting, waste heat from the lights, and higher HVAC costs due to the waste heat. With its more efficient light production and minimal waste heat, gallium-nitride (GaN) Solid- State Lighting (SSL) technology has the potential to reduce energy consumption by

435

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

436

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

438

Generating power with waste wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the biomass renewables, waste wood has great potential with environmental and economic benefits highlighting its resume. The topics of this article include alternate waste wood fuel streams; combustion benefits; waste wood comparisons; waste wood ash; pilot scale tests; full-scale test data; permitting difficulties; and future needs.

Atkins, R.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

440

Aspects of Key Largo woodrat ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the last 25 years. Population 6 estimates also suggest that the KLWR population is critically low and at great risk of extinction. INTRODUCTION The manatee (Trichechus manatus), Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi), and Key deer (Odocoileus...). Currently, money, management, man-power, research, and education are focused on Florida?s other more charismatic mega-fauna like the Key deer, manatee, and Florida panther. Similar efforts should be made for the KLWR to determine and eliminate the causes...

McCleery, Robert Alan; Lopez, Roel R.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Multipartite secret key distillation and bound entanglement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently it has been shown that quantum cryptography beyond pure entanglement distillation is possible and a paradigm for the associated protocols has been established. Here we systematically generalize the whole paradigm to the multipartite scenario. We provide constructions of new classes of multipartite bound entangled states, i.e., those with underlying twisted Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) structure and nonzero distillable cryptographic key. We quantitatively estimate the key from below with the help of the privacy squeezing technique.

Augusiak, Remigiusz; Horodecki, Pawel [Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland) and ICFO-Institute Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Multipartite secret key distillation and bound entanglement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently it has been shown that quantum cryptography beyond pure entanglement distillation is possible and a paradigm for the associated protocols has been established. Here we systematically generalize the whole paradigm to the multipartite scenario. We provide constructions of new classes of multipartite bound entangled states, i.e., those with underlying twisted GHZ structure and nonzero distillable cryptographic key. We quantitatively estimate the key from below with help of the privacy squeezing technique.

Remigiusz Augusiak; Pawel Horodecki

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

443

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Tank Waste Strategy Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tank Waste Subcommittee www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 1 Tank Waste Subcommittee Ken Picha Office of Environmental Management December 5, 2011 Background Tank Waste Subcommittee (TWS)originally chartered, in response to Secretary's request to perform a technical review of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) in May 2010. Three tasks: o Verification of closure of WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issues. o WTP Technical Design Review o WTP potential improvements Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 2 Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 Follow-on scope for TWS identified immediately after briefing to DOE and

445

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

446

Waste Steam Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An examination has been made of the recovery of waste steam by three techniques: direct heat exchange to process, mechanical compression, and thermocompression. Near atmospheric steam sources were considered, but the techniques developed are equally...

Kleinfeld, J. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Waste and Recycling  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy talks about nuclear energy, the challenge of nuclear waste and the research aimed at solutions. For more information about nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

McCarthy, Kathy

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

448

Evolving Recurrent Linear-GP for Document Classification and Word Tracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolving Recurrent Linear-GP for Document Classification and Word Tracking Xiao Luo, A. Nur Zincir word sequences. During this process, word sequences of documents are tracked, frequent patterns of temporal sequences within a document. This in return automates the process of word tracking, frequent word

Zincir-Heywood, Nur

449

Citrus Waste Biomass Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

MEASUREMENT OF IMPEDANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF COMPUTER KEYBOARD KEYS1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of computer keyboard keys are commonly used: rubber-dome and coil-spring keys. As indicated by their names, a rubber-dome key has a rubber dome under the keycap whereas a coil-spring key has a coil spring under of keys. From a user's perspective, the rubber-dome and coil-spring keys feel different. The properties

Nagurka, Mark L.

451

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

452

Microsoft Word - Oneida Waste to Energy Project DOE Final EA 1862  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ONEIDA SEVEN GENERATIONS ONEIDA SEVEN GENERATIONS CORPORATION: ENERGY RECOVERY PROJECT, GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office NOVEMBER 2011 DOE/EA-1862 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE ONEIDA SEVEN GENERATIONS CORPORATION: ENERGY RECOVERY PROJECT, GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office NOVEMBER 2011 DOE/EA-1862 DOE/EA-1862 iii November 2011 COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: Environmental Assessment for Oneida Seven Generations Corporation: Energy Recovery Project, Green Bay, Wisconsin (DOE/EA-1862) CONTACT: For more information on this Environmental Assessment (EA), please contact:

453

Microsoft Word - Changes-to-Schedules _Recovered_  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Changes-to-Schedules Changes-to-Schedules REV 5 DOE Administrative Records Schedules Changes Last revised: 12/10/2010 Date DOE Admin Schedule Item(s) Change Authorizing Document 9/15/10 - 12/10/2010 1-6, 9, 11-12, 14, 16-18, 22- 23 Various Removal of items at the end of each schedule for e-mail and word processing copies, which were added to the GRS in Transmittal Number 8. For schedules in which this item is located elsewhere and removal would cause changes in the sequence of item numbers, the item was changed to "Reserved" (Schedules ,4,5, and 14.) GRS Transmittal Number 22 9/15/2010 1 23.b.(3) Deleted citation, 5 CFR 214. GRS Transmittal Number 22 1 25.a. Text deleted "and as described in 29 CFR 1614." GRS Transmittal Number 22

454

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key element of the Hanford waste management strategy is the construction of a new facility, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), to vitrify existing and future liquid high-level waste produced by defense activities at the Hanford Site. The HWVP mission is to vitrify pretreated waste in borosilicate glass, cast the glass into stainless steel canisters, and store the canisters at the Hanford Site until they are shipped to a federal geological repository. The HWVP Technical Manual (Manual) documents the technical bases of the current HWVP process and provides a physical description of the related equipment and the plant. The immediate purpose of the document is to provide the technical bases for preparation of project baseline documents that will be used to direct the Title 1 and Title 2 design by the A/E, Fluor. The content of the Manual is organized in the following manner. Chapter 1.0 contains the background and context within which the HWVP was designed. Chapter 2.0 describes the site, plant, equipment and supporting services and provides the context for application of the process information in the Manual. Chapter 3.0 provides plant feed and product requirements, which are primary process bases for plant operation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes the technology for each plant process. Chapter 5.0 describes the engineering principles for designing major types of HWVP equipment. Chapter 6.0 describes the general safety aspects of the plant and process to assist in safe and prudent facility operation. Chapter 7.0 includes a description of the waste form qualification program and data. Chapter 8.0 indicates the current status of quality assurance requirements for the Manual. The Appendices provide data that are too extensive to be placed in the main text, such as extensive tables and sets of figures. The Manual is a revision of the 1987 version.

Larson, D.E. [ed.; Watrous, R.A.; Kruger, O.L. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Pyrolysis of waste tyres: A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Pyrolysis of waste tyres produces oil, gas and char, and recovered steel. Batch, screw kiln, rotary kiln, vacuum and fluidised-bed are main reactor types. Product yields are influenced by reactor type, temperature and heating rate. Pyrolysis oils are complex and can be used as chemical feedstock or fuel. Research into higher value products from the tyre pyrolysis process is reviewed. - Abstract: Approximately 1.5 billion tyres are produced each year which will eventually enter the waste stream representing a major potential waste and environmental problem. However, there is growing interest in pyrolysis as a technology to treat tyres to produce valuable oil, char and gas products. The most common reactors used are fixed-bed (batch), screw kiln, rotary kiln, vacuum and fluidised-bed. The key influence on the product yield, and gas and oil composition, is the type of reactor used which in turn determines the temperature and heating rate. Tyre pyrolysis oil is chemically very complex containing aliphatic, aromatic, hetero-atom and polar fractions. The fuel characteristics of the tyre oil shows that it is similar to a gas oil or light fuel oil and has been successfully combusted in test furnaces and engines. The main gases produced from the pyrolysis of waste tyres are H{sub 2}, C{sub 1}C{sub 4} hydrocarbons, CO{sub 2}, CO and H{sub 2}S. Upgrading tyre pyrolysis products to high value products has concentrated on char upgrading to higher quality carbon black and to activated carbon. The use of catalysts to upgrade the oil to a aromatic-rich chemical feedstock or the production of hydrogen from waste tyres has also been reported. Examples of commercial and semi-commercial scale tyre pyrolysis systems show that small scale batch reactors and continuous rotary kiln reactors have been developed to commercial scale.

Williams, Paul T., E-mail: p.t.williams@leeds.ac.uk

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Public involvement in radioactive waste management decisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current repository siting efforts focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is conducting exploratory studies to determine if the site is suitable. The state of Nevada has resisted these efforts: it has denied permits, brought suit against DOE, and publicly denounced the federal government`s decision to study Yucca Mountain. The state`s opposition reflects public opinion in Nevada, and has considerably slowed DOE`s progress in studying the site. The Yucca Mountain controversy demonstrates the importance of understanding public attitudes and their potential influence as DOE develops a program to manage radioactive waste. The strength and nature of Nevada`s opposition -- its ability to thwart if not outright derail DOE`s activities -- indicate a need to develop alternative methods for making decisions that affect the public. This report analyzes public participation as a key component of this openness, one that provides a means of garnering acceptance of, or reducing public opposition to, DOE`s radioactive waste management activities, including facility siting and transportation. The first section, Public Perceptions: Attitudes, Trust, and Theory, reviews the risk-perception literature to identify how the public perceives the risks associated with radioactivity. DOE and the Public discusses DOE`s low level of credibility among the general public as the product, in part, of the department`s past actions. This section looks at the three components of the radioactive waste management program -- disposal, storage, and transportation -- and the different ways DOE has approached the problem of public confidence in each case. Midwestern Radioactive Waste Management Histories focuses on selected Midwestern facility-siting and transportation activities involving radioactive materials.

NONE

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Embodied Attention and Word Learning by Toddlers Linda B. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Embodied Attention and Word Learning by Toddlers Chen Yu Linda B. Smith Department, & Tenenbaum, 2009; Quine, 1964; Smith & Yu, 2008; Snedeker & Gleitman, 2004; Waxman & Booth, 2001 mechanisms that evaluate data across many word-scene experiences (Frank et al., 2009; Smith & Yu, 2008; Yu

Yu, Chen

458

Using Rough Sets Theory to predict German Word Stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Rough Sets Theory to predict German Word Stress Stefan Rapp Michael Jessen Grzegorz Dogil 14 Rough Set Theory [Paw82, Paw91] is a framework for reasonably deal­ ing with imprecise or uncertain data application of a Rough Set based machine learning algorithm is presented that can predict german word stress

Reyle, Uwe

459

WALi: Nested-Word Automata Amanda Burton1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WALi: Nested-Word Automata Amanda Burton1 , Aditya Thakur1 , Evan Driscoll1 , and Thomas Reps1,2 1 University of Wisconsin 2 GrammaTech, Inc. {burtona,adi,driscoll,reps}@cs.wisc.edu 1 Nested-Word Automata and Overview of the Library's Organization WALi-NWA is a library for constructing and querying nested

Liblit, Ben

460

Adding Nesting Structure to Words Rajeev Alur1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adding Nesting Structure to Words Rajeev Alur1 and P. Madhusudan2 1 University of Pennsylvania, USA 2 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA 1 Introduction We propose nested words to capture models where there is both a natural linear sequencing of positions and a hierarchically nested matching

Parthasarathy, Madhusudan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Waste management regulatory compliance issues related to D&D activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste management activities at ORNL related to the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of radioactively contaminated buildings are divided into four categories: Operational facilities, inactive or surplus facilities, future facilities planning, and D&D activities. This paper only discusses regulatory issues related to inactive or surplus facilities. Additionally, rather than attempting to address all resulting waste streams and related regulations, this paper highlights only a few of the ORNL waste streams that present key regulatory issues.

Hitch, J.P.; Arnold, S.E.; Burwinkle, T.; Daugherty, D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

463

Microsoft Word - ICP-12-010webpost.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2-004 2-004 SECTION A. Project Title: INTEC - Suspect RH-TRU (AMWTP) SECTION B. Project Description The proposed action involves transferring suspect remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste containers from the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) to the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The suspect containers will be opened and inspected for RH-TRU. All non-RH-TRU (i.e. low level waste, Contact Handled (CH)-TRU, secondary waste, etc.) materials will be returned to AMWTP. The identified RH-TRU waste will be repackaged as necessary and made ready for characterization and shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The specific steps are:  Transfer suspect RH-TRU waste containers from Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) to INTEC for

464

Microsoft Word - First LANL Shipment Arrives at WCS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NWP Media Contacts: Donavan Mager Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC (575) 234-7586 www.wipp.energy.gov For Immediate Release First LANL Shipment Arrives at Waste Control Specialists...

465

Microsoft Word - SWMU 39 Revised SAR CY 2004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4, 2005 the newly discovered waste removed from this area consists of one broken incandescent light bulb. This item was labeled as hazardous waste and placed into a Satellite...

466

Microsoft Word - Draft Agenda 2014-10-09  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and Transport Modeling, Dr. Bob Andrews (INTERA) 2:45 - 3:45 pm NNSS Low Level Waste Landfill Performance Assessment Updates for New Waste Streams, Mr. Greg Shott (NSTec) Draft...

467

Microsoft Word - SWMU 29 Revised SAR CY 2004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4, 2005 the newly discovered waste removed from this area consists of one mercury vapor light bulb. This item was labeled as hazardous waste and placed into a Satellite...

468

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant -...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 February 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality...

469

Rhenium solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glasses Developed for Nuclear Waste Immobilization," 91[12],solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass Ashutoshfor the researchers in nuclear waste community around the

McCloy, John S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant High Level Waste Facility Radioactive Liquid Waste Disposal System Hazards Analysis Activities (EA-WTP-HLW-2014-08-18(a))...

471

Municipal Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMunicipalSolidWaste&oldid...

472

Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007 |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007 Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007 Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007...

473

Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling The Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction and Recycling Program was...

474

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Operators prepare drums of contact-handled transuranic waste for loading into transportation containers Operators prepare...

475

Retrieval process development and enhancements waste simulant compositions and defensibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the physical waste simulant development efforts of the EM-50 Tanks Focus Area at the Hanford Site. Waste simulants are used in the testing and development of waste treatment and handling processes because performing such tests using actual tank waste is hazardous and prohibitively expensive. This document addresses the simulant development work that supports the testing of waste retrieval processes using simulants that mimic certain key physical properties of the tank waste. Development and testing of chemical simulants are described elsewhere. This work was funded through the EM-50 Tanks Focus Area as part of the Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD&E) Project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The mission of RPD&E is to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing processes, gather performance data on those processes, and relate the data to specific tank problems to provide end users with the requisite technical bases to make retrieval and closure decisions. Physical simulants are prepared using relatively nonhazardous and inexpensive materials rather than the chemicals known to be in tank waste. Consequently, only some of the waste properties are matched by the simulant. Deciding which properties need to be matched and which do not requires a detailed knowledge of the physics of the process to be tested using the simulant. Developing this knowledge requires reviews of available literature, consultation with experts, and parametric tests. Once the relevant properties are identified, waste characterization data are reviewed to establish the target ranges for each property. Simulants are then developed that possess the desired ranges of properties.

Powell, M.R.; Golcar, G.R.; Geeting, J.G.H.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Microsoft Word - Final Revised Charter.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CHARTER CHARTER PURPOSE The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) is the mechanism through which DOE engages at a national level with states, tribes, federal agencies and other interested stakeholders about the Department's shipments of radioactive waste and materials, as well as occasional high- visibility shipments that are nonradioactive. The purpose of the NTSF is to bring transparency, openness, and accountability to DOE's offsite transportation activities through collaboration with state and tribal governments. DOE will work through existing agreements and networks to ensure Federal, state, and tribal government participation. The NTSF meetings and webinars will be particularly relevant for personnel with

477

Microsoft Word - 2006_INSF-Overview.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INSF Overview INSF Overview Section 2-5-1 Interfacial and Nanoscale Science Facility The Interfacial & Nanoscale Science Facility (INSF) is a world-class resource for scientific expertise and instrumentation focused on the study of interfacial phenomena and nano- science and technology. This section summarizes the capabilities available in the INSF, along with research programs associated with facility users. Activities in the facility address national needs in environmental restoration, waste management, pollution prevention, energy production and storage, and national and homeland security through research that specializes in preparation, characterization, and reactivity of surfaces and interfaces. The range of scientific expertise and instrumentation within the facility provides a unique

478

Microsoft Word - 2013_Congregations_Poster.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STEWARDSHIP OF THE STEWARDSHIP OF THE EARTH: STEWARDSHIP OF YOUR FUNDS Virtually all faith traditions teach stewardship of financial and, especially, of natural resources which support life on Earth. Energy efficiency improves financial stewardship by reducing utility costs. Greater efficiency in your worship facility, members' homes and workplaces can also help protect the Earth for future generations and make life better for everyone today. PUTTING ENERGY INTO STEWARDSHIP The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's mission protecting human life and health is likely a good match for your stewardship concerns. EPA's ENERGY STAR for Congregations provides free information, technical support, and public recognition for congregations that take significant action against energy waste. ENERGY

479

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Pennsylvania Name Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas, Coal with CCS, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy Storage, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Electric, Hydroelectric, Hydroelectric (Small), Natural Gas, Nuclear, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind energy Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

480

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "key words waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

CRAWFORD TW

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

482

Energy from waste via coal/waste co-firing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews the feasibility of waste-to-energy plants using the cocombustion of coal with refuse-derived fuels. The paper discusses the types of wastes available: municipal solid wastes, plastics, tires, biomass, and specialized industrial wastes, such as waste oils, post-consumer carpet, auto shredder residues, and petroleum coke. The five most common combustion systems used in co-firing are briefly described. They are the stoker boiler, suspension-fired boilers, cyclone furnaces, fluidized bed boilers, and cement kilns. The paper also discusses the economic incentives for generating electricity from waste.

Winslow, J.; Ekmann, J.; Smouse, S. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Harding, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste. The chapter establishes specific regulations for biomass facilities, which includes permitting, siting, operation, safety guidelines, and closing requirements. Siting regulations include setbacks from waste handling areas for state facilities (1000 feet from jails, schools), requirements for not siting

484

Waste Information Management System: One Year After Web Deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) mandated accelerated cleanup program created significant potential technical impediments. The schedule compression required close coordination and a comprehensive review and prioritization of the barriers that impeded treatment and disposition of the waste streams at each site. Many issues related to site waste treatment and disposal were potential critical path issues under the accelerated schedules. In order to facilitate accelerated cleanup initiatives, waste managers at DOE field sites and at DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., needed timely waste forecast information regarding the volumes and types of waste that would be generated by DOE sites over the next 30 years. Each local DOE site has historically collected, organized, and displayed site waste forecast information in separate and unique systems. However, waste information from all sites needed a common application to allow interested parties to understand and view the complete complex-wide picture. A common application allows identification of total waste volumes, material classes, disposition sites, choke points, and technological or regulatory barriers to treatment and disposal. The Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida, has completed the deployment of this fully operational, web-based forecast system. New functional modules and annual waste forecast data updates have been added to ensure the long-term viability and value of this system. In conclusion: WIMS continues to successfully accomplish the goals and objectives set forth by DOE for this project. WIMS has replaced the historic process of each DOE site gathering, organizing, and reporting their waste forecast information utilizing different database and display technologies. In addition, WIMS meets DOE's objective to have the complex-wide waste forecast information available to all stakeholders and the public in one easy-to-navigate system. The enhancements to WIMS made over the year since its web deployment include the addition of new DOE sites, an updated data set, and the ability to easily print the forecast data tables, the disposition maps, and the GIS maps. Future enhancements will include a high-level waste summary, a display of waste forecast by mode of transportation, and a user help module. The waste summary display module will provide a high-level summary view of the waste forecast data based on the selection of sites, facilities, material types, and forecast years. The waste summary report module will allow users to build custom filtered reports in a variety of formats, such as MS Excel, MS Word, and PDF. The user help module will provide a step-by-step explanation of various modules, using screen shots and general tutorials. The help module will also provide instructions for printing and margin/layout settings to assist users in using their local printers to print maps and reports. (authors)

Shoffner, P.A.; Geisler, T.J.; Upadhyay, H.; Quintero, W. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Microsoft Word - N Div Fact Sheet V3.docx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

nuclear materials control and accountability for domestic DOE nuclear facilities, nuclear waste disposal, material stabilization, and international nonproliferation. From...

486

Microsoft Word - Attachment A-1 Performance Work Statement Amended...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Communications Introduction Confined Space Entry Electrical Safety and LockoutTagout Hearing Conservation Blood borne Pathogens Waste Management...

487

Microsoft Word - DOE News Release - 'Deactivation Project Begins...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

include deactivation and stabilization, environmental cleanup, waste disposition, depleted uranium conversion, and eventual decontamination and demolition of the plant. The...

488

Microsoft Word - HAB_FINAL_Feb07_Summ.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 6 Issue Manager Update on the Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (TC&WM EIS) ......

489

STGWG Key Outcomes for May 3, 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Key Outcomes-Nashville 2010 Page 1 Key Outcomes-Nashville 2010 Page 1 State and Tribal Government Working Group (STGWG) Nashville, Tennessee - May 3, 2010 KEY OUTCOMES OVERVIEW Members appreciated the participation of all DOE officials at the STGWG meeting in Nashville, and are especially appreciative of the participation of high-level DOE management, such as Sky Gallegos, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs, and Frank Marcinowski, Acting Chief Technical Officer and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Technical and Regulatory Support. Such participation demonstrates a continuing commitment to improve interaction with tribes and states. STGWG looks forward to our next Intergovernmental meeting with DOE in the fall. FULL STGWG ISSUES

490

Composite keys? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Composite keys? Home > Groups > Databus Does DataBus support using composite keys in a Table definition? If not, is there a way to automatically generate a unique value for each entry that is uploaded? Submitted by Hopcroft on 5 September, 2013 - 17:13 1 answer Points: 0 At this time, no, and no way to generate unique key either right now. You can submit a feature request for this though on github. thanks, Dean Deanhiller on 6 September, 2013 - 06:58 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Go to My Databus->Data Streams... yes, it is done the same way y... Update rows? How to use streaming chart? if you are an administrator, s... more Group members (7) Managers: Deanhiller Recent members: Bradmin Hopcroft Vikasgoyal Ksearight

491

Mediated Semi-Quantum Key Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we design a new quantum key distribution protocol, allowing two limited semi-quantum or "classical" users to establish a shared secret key with the help of a fully quantum server. A semi-quantum user can only prepare and measure qubits in the computational basis and so must rely on this quantum server to produce qubits in alternative bases and also to perform alternative measurements. However, we assume that the sever is untrusted and we prove the unconditional security of our protocol even in the worst case: when this quantum server is an all-powerful adversary. We also compute a lower bound of the key rate of our protocol, in the asymptotic scenario, as a function of the observed error rate in the channel allowing us to compute the maximally tolerated error of our protocol. Our results show that a semi-quantum protocol may hold similar security to a fully quantum one.

Walter O. Krawec

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

492

LANL reaches waste shipment milestone  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL reaches waste shipment milestone LANL reaches waste shipment milestone LANL reaches waste shipment milestone The Lab surpassed 100,000 plutonium-equivalent curies of TRU waste shipped to WIPP, about one-third of the Lab's total. May 31, 2011 A shipment of transuranic waste on its way to the WIPP repository A shipment of transuranic waste on its way to the WIPP repository. Contact Fred deSousa Communicatons Office (505) 665-3430 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, May 31, 2011 - Los Alamos National Laboratory has reached an important milestone in its campaign to ship transuranic (TRU) waste from Cold War-era nuclear operations to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. This month, the Lab surpassed 100,000 plutonium-equivalent curies of TRU waste shipped to WIPP, about one-third of the Lab's total.

493

The largest radioactive waste glassification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

largest radioactive waste glassification largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for treating liquid nuclear waste. By immobilizing the radioactivity in glass, the DWPF reduces the risks associated with the continued storage of liquid nuclear waste at SRS and prepares the waste for final disposal in a federal repository. About 38 million gallons of liquid nuclear wastes are now stored in 49 underground carbon-steel tanks at SRS. This waste has about 300 million curies of radioactivity, of which the vast majority

494

Microsoft Word - Air Products Final EA Word 2010-07-13.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE AIR PRODUCTS AND CHEMICALS, INC. WASTE ENERGY PROJECT AT THE AK STEEL CORPORATION MIDDLETOWN WORKS, MIDDLETOWN, OHIO U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory July 2010 DOE/EA-1743 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE AIR PRODUCTS AND CHEMICALS, INC. WASTE ENERGY PROJECT AT THE AK STEEL CORPORATION MIDDLETOWN WORKS, MIDDLETOWN, OHIO U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory July 2010 DOE/EA-1743 iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Final Environmental Assessment for the Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Waste Energy Project at the AK Steel Corporation Middletown Works, Middletown, Ohio Contact: For additional copies or more information about this environmental assessment (EA),

495

The Road to Re-certification: WIPP TRU Waste Inventory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is a deep geologic repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes generated by atomic energy defense activities. The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) [1] requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to submit documentation to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that demonstrates WIPP's continuing compliance with the disposal regulations in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191 Subparts B and C, not later than five years after initial receipt of waste for disposal at the repository, and every five years thereafter until the decommissioning of the facility is completed. On May 18, 1998, after review of the Compliance Certification Application (CCA) (63 FR 27405), the EPA certified that the WIPP did comply with the final disposal regulations and criteria of 40 CFR parts 191 and 194. On March 26, 1999, the first receipt of contact-handled (CH) TRU waste was received at WIPP thus initiating the 5-year countdown to the first re-certification. Five years after the first receipt of waste at WIPP, on March 26, 2004, the DOE submitted a Compliance Re-certification Application (CRA) [2]. The CRA includes TRU waste inventory as a key factor. The TRU waste inventory defines what is expected to be emplaced in the repository; and, therefore, how the performance of the repository will be affected. Performance of the WIPP is determined via the Performance Assessment (PA), a set of complex algorithms used to model the long-term performance of the repository. The TRU waste inventory data that are important to this assessment include: 1) volumes of stored, projected and emplaced waste; 2) radionuclide activity concentrations; 3) waste material parameter densities; 4) estimates of the masses of chelating agents; 5) estimates of the oxyanions; 6) estimates of expected cement masses; and 7) estimates of the types and amounts of materials that will be used to emplace the waste. The data that are collected and maintained as the TRU waste inventory provide the waste source term used in the PA to model long-term repository performance. (authors)

Crawford, B.A.; Lott, S.A.; Sparks, L.D.; Van Soest, G.; Mclnroy, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory -Carlsbad Operations, 115 N. Main St., Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Waste Treatment Plant - 12508  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

A Comparison of Greedy and Optimal Assessment of Natural Language Student Input Using Word-to-Word Similarity Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparison of Greedy and Optimal Assessment of Natural Language Student Input Using Word-to-word similarity metrics to solve the important task of assessing natural language student input in dialogue of assessing natural language student input in dialogue-based tutoring systems where the primary form

Rus, Vasile

498

Mixed waste characterization reference document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 5: Mass Wasting Name ___KEY______________ Lab section: Monday or Tuesday (circle one)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Once water spilled over this dam, it quickly began to erode the unconsolidated rubble, causing the dam that unconsolidated material naturally rests. Very wet sediment angle before much mass movement occurs? In unconsolidated material, the steeper the slope, the greater the risk

Kirby, Carl S.

500

Microsoft Word - July 2008 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS Tutorial.doc...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Microsoft Word - July 2008 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS Tutorial.doc Microsoft Word - July 2008 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS Tutorial.doc Microsoft Word - July 2008 PMCDP Module CHRIS ESS...