National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for key factor influencing

  1. KEY FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE PERFORMANCE PROPERTIES OF ARP/MCU SALTSTONE MIXES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

    2009-10-05

    At the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF), decontaminated salt solution (DSS) is combined with premix (a cementitious mixture of portland cement (PC), blast furnace slag (BFS) and Class F fly ash (FA)) in a Readco mixer to produce fresh (uncured) Saltstone. After transfer to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) the hydration reactions initiated during the contact of the premix and salt solution continue during the curing period to produce the hardened waste form product. The amount of heat generated from hydration and the resultant temperature increase in the vaults depend on the composition of the decontaminated salt solution being dispositioned as well as the grout formulation (mix design). This report details the results from Task 3 of the Saltstone Variability Study for FY09 which was performed to identify, and quantify when possible, those factors that drive the performance properties of the projected ARP/MCU Batches. A baseline ARP/MCU mix (at 0.60 water to cementitious materials (w/cm) ratio) was established and consisted of the normal premix composition and a salt solution that was an average of the projected compositions of the last three ARP/MCU batches developed by T. A. Le. This task introduced significant variation in (1) wt % slag, w/cm ratio, and wt % portland cement about the baseline mix and (2) the temperature of curing in order to better assess the dependence of the performance properties on these factors. Two separate campaigns, designated Phase 10 and Phase 11, were carried out under Task 3. Experimental designs and statistical analyses were used to search for correlation among properties and to develop linear models to predict property values based on factors such as w/cm ratio, slag concentration, and portland cement concentration. It turns out that the projected salt compositions contained relatively high amounts of aluminate (0.22 M) even though no aluminate was introduced due to caustic aluminate removal from High Level Waste. Previous

  2. Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

    2009-01-21

    Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictions from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations, supplemented by

  3. Large trees-key climate influencers-die first in drought

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large trees-key climate influencers-die first in drought Large trees-key climate influencers-die first in drought A team of researchers studied forests worldwide, ranging from semi-arid woodlands to tropic rainforests, to determine how a tree's size impacts its response to drought. September 29, 2015 Large trees suffer more than small trees during and after droughts, and while theories had suggested this should be a globally consistent pattern, a new study confirms the concept with a worldwide

  4. Factors influencing specific fuel use in Nebraska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, D.P.; Von Bargen, K.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel use data relating to agricultural field operations were collected and analyzed during the Nebraska fuel use survey. The farms surveyed had a mean size of 598 ha and a mean total tractor power rating of 221 kW. Mean operating depth, field speed, and tractor power rating were determined for the major field operations. Mean field speeds were generally in agreement with commonly accepted values. Total annual fuel energy use increased with increasing farm size. Over 87 percent of this energy was used from April through October. Even though total fuel energy was increased, specific fuel energy use decreased with increasing farm size. Specific fuel use for field operations was influenced by the size of area worked, operation depth, field speed, and tractor power rating.

  5. Factors influencing photocurrent generation in organic bulk heterojunction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solar cells: interfacial energetics and blend microstructure | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Factors influencing photocurrent generation in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells: interfacial energetics and blend microstructure April 29, 2009 at 3pm/36-428 Jenny Nelson Department of Physics Imperial College London jenny-nelson_000 abstract: The efficiency of photocurrent generation in conjugated polymer:small molecule blend solar is strongly influenced both by the energy level alignment

  6. Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NUREG-0711)Revision 3: Update Methodology and Key Revisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; Fleger, S.

    2012-07-22

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. NUREG-0711 is the first document to be addressed. We present the methodology used to update NUREG-0711 and summarize the main changes made. Finally, we discuss the current status of the update program and the future plans.

  7. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-I-003-2016_Key Factors for Assessing Potential Groundwater Impacts.20160128.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Factors for Assessing Potential Groundwater Impacts Due to Leakage from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Reservoirs 28 January 2016 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-I-003-2016 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness,

  8. Factors influencing radiation therapy student clinical placement satisfaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridge, Pete; Carmichael, Mary-Ann

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Radiation therapy students at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) attend clinical placements at five different clinical departments with varying resources and support strategies. This study aimed to determine the relative availability and perceived importance of different factors affecting student support while on clinical placement. The purpose of the research was to inform development of future support mechanisms to enhance radiation therapy students experience on clinical placement. Methods: This study used anonymous Likert-style surveys to gather data from years 1 and 2 radiation therapy students from QUT and clinical educators from Queensland relating to availability and importance of support mechanisms during clinical placements in a semester. Results: The study findings demonstrated student satisfaction with clinical support and suggested that level of support on placement influenced student employment choices. Staff support was perceived as more important than physical resources; particularly access to a named mentor, a clinical educator and weekly formative feedback. Both students and educators highlighted the impact of time pressures. Conclusions: The support offered to radiation therapy students by clinical staff is more highly valued than physical resources or models of placement support. Protected time and acknowledgement of the importance of clinical education roles are both invaluable. Joint investment in mentor support by both universities and clinical departments is crucial for facilitation of effective clinical learning.

  9. Influence of time-dependent factors in the evaluation of critical infrastructure protection measures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buehring, W. A.; Samsa, M. E.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-03-28

    The examination of which protective measures are the most appropriate to be implemented in order to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from attacks on critical infrastructures and key resources typically involves a comparison of the consequences that could occur when the protective measure is implemented to those that could occur when it is not. This report describes a framework for evaluation that provides some additional capabilities for comparing optional protective measures. It illustrates some potentially important time-dependent factors, such as the implementation rate, that affect the relative pros and cons associated with widespread implementation of protective measures. It presents example results from the use of protective measures, such as detectors and pretrained responders, for an illustrative biological incident. Results show that the choice of an alternative measure can depend on whether or not policy and financial support can be maintained for extended periods of time. Choice of a time horizon greatly influences the comparison of alternatives.

  10. Occupancy by key transcription factors is a more accurate predictor of enhancer activity than histone modifications or chromatin accessibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, Nergiz; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Chen, Kuan-Bei; Stonestrom, Aaron; Long, Maria; Keller, Cheryl A.; Cheng, Yong; Jain, Deepti; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2015-04-23

    Regulated gene expression controls organismal development, and variation in regulatory patterns has been implicated in complex traits. Thus accurate prediction of enhancers is important for further understanding of these processes. Genome-wide measurement of epigenetic features, such as histone modifications and occupancy by transcription factors, is improving enhancer predictions, but the contribution of these features to prediction accuracy is not known. Given the importance of the hematopoietic transcription factor TAL1 for erythroid gene activation, we predicted candidate enhancers based on genomic occupancy by TAL1 and measured their activity. Contributions of multiple features to enhancer prediction were evaluated based on the results of these and other studies. Results: TAL1-bound DNA segments were active enhancers at a high rate both in transient transfections of cultured cells (39 of 79, or 56%) and transgenic mice (43 of 66, or 65%). The level of binding signal for TAL1 or GATA1 did not help distinguish TAL1-bound DNA segments as active versus inactive enhancers, nor did the density of regulation-related histone modifications. A meta-analysis of results from this and other studies (273 tested predicted enhancers) showed that the presence of TAL1, GATA1, EP300, SMAD1, H3K4 methylation, H3K27ac, and CAGE tags at DNase hypersensitive sites gave the most accurate predictors of enhancer activity, with a success rate over 80% and a median threefold increase in activity. Chromatin accessibility assays and the histone modifications H3K4me1 and H3K27ac were sensitive for finding enhancers, but they have high false positive rates unless transcription factor occupancy is also included. Conclusions: Occupancy by key transcription factors such as TAL1, GATA1, SMAD1, and EP300, along with evidence of transcription, improves the accuracy of enhancer predictions based on epigenetic features.

  11. Occupancy by key transcription factors is a more accurate predictor of enhancer activity than histone modifications or chromatin accessibility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dogan, Nergiz; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Chen, Kuan-Bei; Stonestrom, Aaron; Long, Maria; Keller, Cheryl A.; Cheng, Yong; Jain, Deepti; Visel, Axel; et al

    2015-04-23

    Regulated gene expression controls organismal development, and variation in regulatory patterns has been implicated in complex traits. Thus accurate prediction of enhancers is important for further understanding of these processes. Genome-wide measurement of epigenetic features, such as histone modifications and occupancy by transcription factors, is improving enhancer predictions, but the contribution of these features to prediction accuracy is not known. Given the importance of the hematopoietic transcription factor TAL1 for erythroid gene activation, we predicted candidate enhancers based on genomic occupancy by TAL1 and measured their activity. Contributions of multiple features to enhancer prediction were evaluated based on the resultsmore » of these and other studies. Results: TAL1-bound DNA segments were active enhancers at a high rate both in transient transfections of cultured cells (39 of 79, or 56%) and transgenic mice (43 of 66, or 65%). The level of binding signal for TAL1 or GATA1 did not help distinguish TAL1-bound DNA segments as active versus inactive enhancers, nor did the density of regulation-related histone modifications. A meta-analysis of results from this and other studies (273 tested predicted enhancers) showed that the presence of TAL1, GATA1, EP300, SMAD1, H3K4 methylation, H3K27ac, and CAGE tags at DNase hypersensitive sites gave the most accurate predictors of enhancer activity, with a success rate over 80% and a median threefold increase in activity. Chromatin accessibility assays and the histone modifications H3K4me1 and H3K27ac were sensitive for finding enhancers, but they have high false positive rates unless transcription factor occupancy is also included. Conclusions: Occupancy by key transcription factors such as TAL1, GATA1, SMAD1, and EP300, along with evidence of transcription, improves the accuracy of enhancer predictions based on epigenetic features.« less

  12. Influence factors on the flue gas desulfurization in the circulating fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, J.; Tang, D.; Liu, H.; Suzuki, Yoshizo; Kito, Nobo

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes a dry SO{sub 2} removal method -- the absorbent (Ca(OH){sub 2}) was injected into the Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) reactor at the coolside of the duct to abate SO{sub 2} in the flue gas -- with the potential to significantly enhance desulfurization performance over that of existing dry/semi-dry Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) technology such as Spray Drying. A patent for coolside Flue Gas Desulfurization in the Circulating Fluidized Bed reactor (CFB-FGD) was approved by the China Patent Bureau in September of 1995 and the additional laboratory experiment was carried out in an electrically heated bench scale quartz circulating fluidized bed reactor of 2350mm in height and 23mm in diameter in January, 1996. The influences of steam, ratio of calcium and sulfur, reactor temperature, and absorbent utilization efficiency were invested. The results show that: (1) Water steam plays a key role in the reaction of Ca(OH){sub 2} and SO{sub 2} in the CFB reactor; (2) There is a positive effect of Ca/S on SO{sub 2} removal efficiency; (3) The temperature is an another key factor for SO{sub 2} removal efficiency for the CFB-FGD process; (4) The absorbent can be enhanced in the CFB reactor; (5) The CFB reactor is better than the dry/semi-dry FDG technology. SO{sub 2} removal efficiency can be as high as 84.8%.

  13. SUBTASK 1.7 EVALUATION OF KEY FACTORS AFFECTING SUCCESSFUL OIL PRODUCTION IN THE BAKKEN FORMATION, NORTH DAKOTA PHASE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darren D. Schmidt; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen; Damion J. Knudsen; John A. Harju; Edward N. Steadman

    2011-10-31

    Production from the Bakken and Three Forks Formations continues to trend upward as forecasts predict significant production of oil from unconventional resources nationwide. As the U.S. Geological Survey reevaluates the 3.65 billion bbl technically recoverable estimate of 2008, technological advancements continue to unlock greater unconventional oil resources, and new discoveries continue within North Dakota. It is expected that the play will continue to expand to the southwest, newly develop in the northeastern and northwestern corners of the basin in North Dakota, and fully develop in between. Although not all wells are economical, the economic success rate has been near 75% with more than 90% of wells finding oil. Currently, only about 15% of the play has been drilled, and recovery rates are less than 5%, providing a significant future of wells to be drilled and untouched hydrocarbons to be pursued through improved stimulation practices or enhanced oil recovery. This study provides the technical characterizations that are necessary to improve knowledge, provide characterization, validate generalizations, and provide insight relative to hydrocarbon recovery in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations. Oil-saturated rock charged from the Bakken shales and prospective Three Forks can be produced given appropriate stimulation treatments. Highly concentrated fracture stimulations with ceramic- and sand-based proppants appear to be providing the best success for areas outside the Parshall and Sanish Fields. Targeting of specific lithologies can influence production from both natural and induced fracture conductivity. Porosity and permeability are low, but various lithofacies units within the formation are highly saturated and, when targeted with appropriate technology, release highly economical quantities of hydrocarbons.

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factor-D is a key molecule that enhances lymphatic metastasis of soft tissue sarcomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanagawa, Takashi; Shinozaki, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Hideomi; Saito, Kenichi; Raz, Avraham; Takagishi, Kenji

    2012-04-15

    Studies on lymph node metastasis of soft tissue sarcomas are insufficient because of its rarity. In this study, we examined the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C and VEGF-D in soft tissue sarcomas metastasized to lymph nodes. In addition, the effects of the two molecules on the barrier function of a lymphatic endothelial cell monolayer against sarcoma cells were analyzed. We examined 7 patients who had soft tissue sarcomas with lymph node metastases and who had undergone neither chemotherapy nor radiotherapy before lymphadenectomy. Immunohistochemistry revealed that 2 of 7 sarcomas that metastasized to lymph nodes expressed VEGF-C both in primary and metastatic lesions. On the other hand, VEGF-D expression was detected in 4 of 7 primary and 7 of 7 metastatic lesions, respectively. Interestingly, 3 cases that showed no VEGF-D expression at primary sites expressed VEGF-D in metastatic lesions. Recombinant VEGF-C at 10{sup -8} and VEGF-D at 10{sup -7}and 10{sup -8} g/ml significantly increased the random motility of lymphatic endothelial cells compared with controls. VEGF-D significantly increased the migration of sarcoma cells through lymphatic endothelial monolayers. The fact that VEGF-D induced the migration of fibrosarcomas through the lymphatic endothelial monolayer is the probable reason for the strong relationship between VEGF-D expression and lymph node metastasis in soft tissue sarcomas. The important propensities of this molecule for the increase of lymph node metastases are not only lymphangiogenesis but also down-regulation of the barrier function of lymphatic endothelial monolayers, which facilitates sarcoma cells entering the lymphatic circulation.

  15. Stress-intensity-factor influence coefficients for semielliptical inner-surface flaws in clad pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeney, J.A.; Bryson, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    A problem of particular interest in pressure vessel technology is the calculation of accurate stress-intensity factors for semielliptical surface cracks in cylinders. Computing costs for direct solution techniques can be prohibitive when applied to three-dimensional (3-D) geometries with time-varying boundary conditions such as those associated with pressurized thermal shock. An alternative superposition technique requires the calculation of a set of influence coefficients for a given 3-D crack model that can be superimposed to obtain mode-I stress-intensity factors. This paper presents stress-intensity-factor influence coefficients (SIFICs) for axially and circumferentially oriented finite-length semielliptical inner-surface flaws with aspect ratios (total crack length (2c) to crack depth (a)) of 2, 6, and 10 for clad cylinders having an internal radius to wall thickness (t) ratio of 10. SIFICs are computed for flaw depths in the range of 0.01 {le} a/t {le} 0.5 and two cladding thicknesses. The incorporate of this SIFIC data base in fracture mechanics codes will facilitate the generation of fracture mechanics solutions for a wide range of flaw geometries as may be required in structural integrity assessments of pressurized-water and boiling-water reactors.

  16. Alternative management structures for municipal waste collection services: The influence of economic and political factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plata-Díaz, Ana María Zafra-Gómez, José Luis Pérez-López, Gemma López-Hernández, Antonio Manuel

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We analyzed the factors that influence on the restructuring of MSW services. • We evaluated five different alternatives for public and private service. • Our analysis covers a broad time horizon, 2002–2010. • We used a conditional fixed-effects logistic regression as the evaluation method. • Municipalities tend to contract out the MSW service in the presence of high costs and fiscal stress. - Abstract: Identifying and characterising the factors that determine why a local authority opts for a particular way of managing its waste collection service is an important issue, warranting research interest in the field of municipal solid waste (MSW) management. This paper presents empirical evidence spanning a broad time horizon (2002–2010) showing that economic and political factors impact in different ways on the provision of waste management services. We examine five alternatives in this area, including public and private service delivery formulas and, within each field, individual and joint options. Our findings highlight the importance of the service cost and that of the various indicators of fiscal stress as determinant factors of management decisions regarding the provision of MSW management services.

  17. Factors influencing the transport of actinides in the groundwater environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Kittrick, J.A.

    1983-07-31

    This report summarizes investigations of factors that significantly influence the transport of actinide cations in the groundwater environment. Briefly, measurements of diffusion coefficients for Am(III), Cm(III), and Np(V) in moist US soils indicated that diffusion is negligible compared to mass transport in flowing groundwater. Diffusion coefficients do, however, indicate that, in the absence of flowing water, actinide elements will migrate only a few centimeters in a thousand years. The remaining investigations were devoted to the determination of distribution ratios (K/sub d/s) for representative US soils, factors influencing them, and chemical and physical processes related to transport of actinides in groundwaters. The computer code GARD was modified to include complex formation to test the importance of humic acid complexing on the rate of transport of actinides in groundwaters. Use of the formation constant and a range of humic acid, even at rather low concentrations of 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -6/ molar, significantly increases the actinide transport rate in a flowing aquifer. These computer calculations show that any strong complexing agent will have a similar effect on actinide transport in the groundwater environment. 32 references, 9 figures.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in high temperature aqueous solutions: Influencing factors, mechanisms and models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szklarska-Smialowska, Z.; Rebak, R.B.

    1996-12-31

    A detailed critical review of the multiple variables affecting stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of in high temperature (deaerated) aqueous solutions is given. Most of the data in the literature deals with the cracking susceptibility in the primary side; however, it is clear that similar factors and to a similar extent influence the SCC susceptibility in both primary and secondary sides. Some factors such as alkalinity of the solution or presence of lead (Pb) may be more in the secondary side and others such as partial pressure of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the primary side. Even though the effect of the variables on SCC susceptibility is more or less established, in models, in most of the cases there is a lack of fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved. The different mechanisms and models proposed to explain the SCC of alloy 600 are briefly reviewed and their validity to explain the influence of the variables and to predict the crack growth rate (CGR), is assessed. It is concluded that several of the proposed models seem to give a fair estimate of the CGR values under certain conditions; however, it appears that a single mechanism cannot explain in detail the complex case of alloy 600 SCC. 113 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. KEY PERSONNEL

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    by Mods 002, 006, 020, 029, 0049, 0065, 0084, 0091, 0106) DE-NA0000622 Section J, Appendix J, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX J KEY PERSONNEL 7/06/2015 TITLE NAME President Christopher C. Gentile Vice President, Engineering Robin Stubenhofer Vice President, Integrated Supply Chain Rick Lavelock Director, Sr. Program Management Org. Vacant Director, Integrated Supply Chain Kurt Lorenzen Director, Engineering Bob Chaney Director, Quality David Schoenherr Director, Information Technology Matt Decker

  20. Key Outcomes:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Points & Action Items Inaugural Meeting Thursday, August 25, 2011 Renaissance Denver Hotel Denver, Colorado Participants Tracey LeBeau, Director, Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director, and Brandt Petrasek, Special Assistant, Department of Energy, Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs; Vice Chairman Ronald Suppah and Jim Manion, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; William Micklin, Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians; Councilman Barney Enos, Jr., Jason Hauter,

  1. Influence of germanium nano-inclusions on the thermoelectric power factor of bulk bismuth telluride alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satyala, Nikhil; Zamanipour, Zahra; Norouzzadeh, Payam; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tahmasbi Rad, Armin; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-05-28

    Nanocomposite thermoelectric compound of bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) with 5 at. % germanium nano-inclusions was prepared via mechanically alloying and sintering techniques. The influence of Ge nano-inclusions and long duration annealing on the thermoelectric properties of nanostructured Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} were investigated. It was found that annealing has significant effect on the carrier concentration, Seebeck coefficient, and the power factor of the thermoelectric compound. The systematic heat treatment also reduced the density of donor type defects thereby decreasing the electron concentration. While the as-pressed nanocomposite materials showed n-type properties, it was observed that with the increase of annealing time, the nanocomposite gradually transformed to an abundantly hole-dominated (p-type) sample. The long duration annealing (∼500 h) resulted in a significantly enhanced electrical conductivity pertaining to the augmentation in the density and the structural properties of the sample. Therefore, a simultaneous enhancement in both electrical and Seebeck coefficient characteristics resulted in a remarkable increase in the thermoelectric power factor.

  2. Controlling Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Patch Size Influences Growth Factor Expression

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vargis, Elizabeth A; Peterson, Cristen B; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, Pat

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown in culture was controlled using micropatterning techniques in order to examine the effect of patch size on cell health and differentiation. Understanding this effect is a critical step in the development of multiplexed high throughput fluidic assays and provides a model for replicating disease states associated with the deterioration of retinal tissue during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Microcontact printing of fibronectin on polystyrene and glass substrates was used to promote cell attachment, forming RPE patches of controlled size and shape. These colonies mimic the effect of atrophy and loss-of-function thatmore » occurs in the retina during degenerative diseases such as AMD. After 72 hours of cell growth, levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an important biomarker of AMD, were measured. Cells were counted and morphological indicators of cell viability and tight junction formation were assessed via fluorescence microscopy. Up to a twofold increase of VEGF expression per cell was measured as colony size decreased, suggesting that the local microenvironment of, and connections between, RPE cells influences growth factor expression leading to the initiation and progression of diseases such as AMD.« less

  3. Geotechnical factors influencing a time-dependent deformation mechanism around an entry in a dipping seam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, M.K.; Maleki, H.

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines and Cyprus Shoshone Coal Corp. conducted a study of deformation mechanisms in strata around a longwall gate road system at two sites in an underground coal mine near Hanna, WY. Of particular interest was time-dependent (on the order of several months) roof deformation. Strata above and below the coal seam are very weak, carbonaceous mudstones that have cohesionless planes of weakness oriented along bedding, which dips approximately 8{degrees} to 16{degrees} at N 49{degrees} E. An extensive array of instrumented roof bolts, roof extensometers, and biaxial stressmeters were installed during development mining at these two sites under variable depth of cover [183 to 335 in (600 to 1,100 ft)], seam dip (10{degrees} to 16{degrees}), and top coal thickness [estimated to be 0.30 to 0.61 in (1 to 2 ft) on the downdip side of the entry]. Bolt load and roof deformation histories during the entry development periods were compared. Bolt loads at site 2 were less than those at site 1, which is consistent with the amount of overburden. Deformation magnitudes at site 2 were similar to those at site 1, but deformation rates were approximately 44% greater and nearly constant over time, whereas the deformation rates at site 1 decreased exponentially over time. Also, most deformation occurred above the bolt horizon at site two, but extensometer measurements at site 1 showed that a significant amount of deformation occurred within the bolt horizon. The most significant factor that influenced bolt tension and time-dependent strata deformation was strength and Young`s modulus of the strata. Finite-difference models support this conclusion.

  4. NSR Key Number Retrieval

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSR Key Number Retrieval Pease enter key in the box Submit

  5. Influence of graphene on quality factor variation in a silicon ring resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Rai; Tanabe, Shinichi; Hibino, Hiroki; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Yamada, Koji; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Hirochika

    2014-03-03

    Selectively patterned graphene is integrated onto a silicon ring resonator to investigate the quality factor (Q factor) variation. The Q factor sharply decreases from 7900 to 1200 as the patterned graphene length increases from 0 to 20??m. A numerical estimation, which takes into account optical absorption by graphene, shows an exponential damping of the Q factor with increasing graphene length and is consistent with the experimental result. We expect these fundamental characterizations to be helpful in developing graphene-integrated silicon photonics applications.

  6. Assessment of Factors Influencing Effective CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity and Injectivity in Eastern Gas Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godec, Michael

    2013-06-30

    Building upon advances in technology, production of natural gas from organic-rich shales is rapidly developing as a major hydrocarbon supply option in North America and around the world. The same technology advances that have facilitated this revolution - dense well spacing, horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing - may help to facilitate enhanced gas recovery (EGR) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in these formations. The potential storage of CO {sub 2} in shales is attracting increasing interest, especially in Appalachian Basin states that have extensive shale deposits, but limited CO{sub 2} storage capacity in conventional reservoirs. The goal of this cooperative research project was to build upon previous and on-going work to assess key factors that could influence effective EGR, CO{sub 2} storage capacity, and injectivity in selected Eastern gas shales, including the Devonian Marcellus Shale, the Devonian Ohio Shale, the Ordovician Utica and Point Pleasant shale and equivalent formations, and the late Devonian-age Antrim Shale. The project had the following objectives: (1) Analyze and synthesize geologic information and reservoir data through collaboration with selected State geological surveys, universities, and oil and gas operators; (2) improve reservoir models to perform reservoir simulations to better understand the shale characteristics that impact EGR, storage capacity and CO{sub 2} injectivity in the targeted shales; (3) Analyze results of a targeted, highly monitored, small-scale CO{sub 2} injection test and incorporate into ongoing characterization and simulation work; (4) Test and model a smart particle early warning concept that can potentially be used to inject water with uniquely labeled particles before the start of CO{sub 2} injection; (5) Identify and evaluate potential constraints to economic CO{sub 2} storage in gas shales, and propose development approaches that overcome these constraints; and (6) Complete new basin

  7. A Multi-institutional Study of Factors Influencing the Use of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgson, David C.; Charpentier, Anne-Marie; Cigsar, Candemir; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Ng, Angela; Bahl, Guarav; Zadeh, Gelareh; San Miguel, John; Menard, Cynthia; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases is a relatively well-studied technology with established guidelines regarding patient selection, although its implementation is technically complex. We evaluated the extent to which local availability of SRS affected the treatment of patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We identified 3030 patients who received whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for brain metastases in 1 of 7 cancer centers in Ontario. Clinical data were abstracted for a random sample of 973 patients. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with the use of SRS as a boost within 4 months following WBRT or at any time following WBRT. Results: Of 898 patients eligible for analysis, SRS was provided to 70 (7.8%) patients at some time during the course of their disease and to 34 (3.8%) patients as a boost following WBRT. In multivariable analyses, factors significantly associated with the use of SRS boost following WBRT were fewer brain metastases (odds ratio [OR] = 6.50), controlled extracranial disease (OR = 3.49), age (OR = 0.97 per year of advancing age), and the presence of an on-site SRS program at the hospital where WBRT was given (OR = 12.34; all P values were <.05). Similarly, availability of on-site SRS was the factor most predictive of the use of SRS at any time following WBRT (OR = 5.98). Among patients with 1-3 brain metastases, good/fair performance status, and no evidence of active extracranial disease, SRS was provided to 40.3% of patients who received WBRT in a hospital that had an on-site SRS program vs 3.0% of patients who received WBRT at a hospital without SRS (P<.01). Conclusions: The availability of on-site SRS is the factor most strongly associated with the provision of this treatment to patients with brain metastases and appears to be more influential than accepted clinical eligibility factors.

  8. A review of the factors influencing the physicochemical characteristics of underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, L.H.

    2008-07-01

    In this article, the physicochemical characteristics of the oxidation zone, the reduction zone, and the destructive distillation and dry zone in the process of underground coal gasification (UCG) were explained. The effect of such major factors as temperature, coal type, water-inrush or -intake rate, the quantity and quality of wind blasting, the thickness of coal seams, operational pressure, the length, and the section of gasification gallery on the quality of the underground gas and their interrelationship were discussed. Research showed that the temperature conditions determined the underground gas compositions; the appropriate water-inrush or -intake rate was conducive to the improvement in gas heat value; the properties of the gasification agent had an obvious effect on the compositions and heat value of the product gas. Under the cyclically changing pressure, heat losses decreased by 60%, with the heat efficiency and gasification efficiency being 1.4 times and 2 times those of constant pressure, respectively. The test research further proved that the underground gasifier with a long channel and a big cross-section, to a large extent, improved the combustion-gasification conditions.

  9. Public Key Cryptography and Key Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-02-15

    The use and management of certificate-based public key cryptography for the Department of Energy (DOE) requires the establishment of a public key infrastructure (PKI). This chapter defines the policy related to roles, requirements, and responsibilities for establishing and maintaining a DOE PKI and the documentation necessary to ensure that all certificates are managed in a manner that maintains the overall trust required to support a viable PKI. Canceled by DOE N 251.112.

  10. Group key management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  11. Key Milestones/Outlook

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Key Milestones/Outlook per the Department of Energy 2015 Congressional Budget Request, Environmental Management, March 2014

  12. Towards large-cohort comparative studies to define the factors influencing the gut microbial community structure of ASD patients

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McDonald, Daniel; Hornig, Mady; Lozupone, Catherine; Debelius, Justine; Gilbert, Jack A.; Knight, Rob

    2015-03-09

    Differences in the gut microbiota have been reported between individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and neurotypical controls, although direct evidence that changes in the microbiome contribute to causing ASD has been scarce to date. Here we summarize some considerations of experimental design that can help untangle causality in this complex system. In particular, large cross-sectional studies that can factor out important variables such as diet, prospective longitudinal studies that remove some of the influence of interpersonal variation in the microbiome (which is generally high, especially in children), and studies transferring microbial communities into germ-free mice may be especially useful.more » Controlling for the effects of technical variables, which have complicated efforts to combine existing studies, is critical when biological effect sizes are small. Large citizen-science studies with thousands of participants such as the American Gut Project have been effective at uncovering subtle microbiome effects in self-collected samples and with self-reported diet and behavior data, and may provide a useful complement to other types of traditionally funded and conducted studies in the case of ASD, especially in the hypothesis generation phase.« less

  13. Towards large-cohort comparative studies to define the factors influencing the gut microbial community structure of ASD patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Daniel; Hornig, Mady; Lozupone, Catherine; Debelius, Justine; Gilbert, Jack A.; Knight, Rob

    2015-03-09

    Differences in the gut microbiota have been reported between individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and neurotypical controls, although direct evidence that changes in the microbiome contribute to causing ASD has been scarce to date. Here we summarize some considerations of experimental design that can help untangle causality in this complex system. In particular, large cross-sectional studies that can factor out important variables such as diet, prospective longitudinal studies that remove some of the influence of interpersonal variation in the microbiome (which is generally high, especially in children), and studies transferring microbial communities into germ-free mice may be especially useful. Controlling for the effects of technical variables, which have complicated efforts to combine existing studies, is critical when biological effect sizes are small. Large citizen-science studies with thousands of participants such as the American Gut Project have been effective at uncovering subtle microbiome effects in self-collected samples and with self-reported diet and behavior data, and may provide a useful complement to other types of traditionally funded and conducted studies in the case of ASD, especially in the hypothesis generation phase.

  14. Quantum dense key distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degiovanni, I.P.; Ruo Berchera, I.; Castelletto, S.; Rastello, M.L.; Bovino, F.A.; Colla, A.M.; Castagnoli, G.

    2004-03-01

    This paper proposes a protocol for quantum dense key distribution. This protocol embeds the benefits of a quantum dense coding and a quantum key distribution and is able to generate shared secret keys four times more efficiently than the Bennet-Brassard 1984 protocol. We hereinafter prove the security of this scheme against individual eavesdropping attacks, and we present preliminary experimental results, showing its feasibility.

  15. Key Events Timeline

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document lists key events beginning with the April 20 fire on the Deepwater Horizon through July 28th. Updated July 28, 2010.

  16. SSH Key Fingerprints

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSH Key Fingerprints SSH Key Fingerprints Occasionally maintenance on NERSC systems results in the SSH host key changing. On the first time you attempt to log in after this, ssh will stop with a warning like: "WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED!" (Linux/Mac) or "WARNING - POTENTIAL SECURITY BREACH!" (Windows) Do not ignore these warnings! The correct host key fingerprint for Cori is: 2048 SHA256:mR3sHwHorgjqRlUbggtfOCa768/uKdbNb2TOH8xDMn8 You can replace entries

  17. Optical key system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagans, Karla G.; Clough, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  18. Optical key system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagans, K.G.; Clough, R.E.

    2000-04-25

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  19. Public Key FPGA Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-07-25

    The Public Key (PK) FPGA software performs asymmetric authentication using the 163-bit Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA) on an embedded FPGA platform. A digital signature is created on user-supplied data, and communication with a host system is performed via a Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) bus. Software includes all components necessary for signing, including custom random number generator for key creation and SHA-256 for data hashing.

  20. Key Activities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    About the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Key Activities Key Activities The Fuel Cell Technologies Office conducts work in several key areas to advance the development and ...

  1. Cryptographic Key Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No, author

    2014-02-21

    This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

  2. NREL Makes Key Appointments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Makes Key Appointments Staffing for Distributed Energy and Tech Management Announced For more information contact: Gary Schmitz, 303-275-4050 email: Gary Schmitz Golden, Colo., Feb. 28, 2001 - Two veterans of energy research have been named to newly created positions at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Jack Darnell was named Deputy Associate Director for NREL's recently reorganized Planning and Technology Management Division. Anthony Schaffhauser has been

  3. Key Terms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Terms Key Terms Three Door Keys data-key-571156_960_720.png Key Terms Low Vision: non-correctable reduced vision Blindness: lack of visual perception Hearing Impairment: full or partial decrease in the ability to detect or understand sounds Physical Impairment: a physical condition that permanently prevents normal body movement or control Cognitive Disabilities: difficulty with one or more types of mental tasks

  4. Factors influencing the development and implementation of advanced radiographer practice in Australia – a qualitative study using an interpretative phenomenological approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Barbara A; Bernoth, Maree; Davidson, Rob

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors influencing the implementation or the lack of implementation of advanced practitioner role in Australia. This study uses an interpretative phenomenological approach to explore the in-depth real life issues, which surround the advanced practitioner as a solution to radiologist workforce shortages in Australia. Research participants are radiographers, radiation therapists and health managers registered with the Australian Institute of Radiography (AIR) and holding senior professional and AIR Board positions with knowledge of current advanced practice. In total, seven interviews were conducted revealing education, governance, technical, people issues, change management, government, costs and timing as critical factors influencing advanced practice in Australia. Seven participants in this study perceived an advanced practice role might have major benefits and a positive impact on the immediate and long-term management of patients. Another finding is the greater respect and appreciation of each other's roles and expertise within the multidisciplinary healthcare team. Engagement is required of the critical stakeholders that have been identified as ‘blockers’ (radiologists, health departments) as well as identified allies (e.g. emergency clinicians, supportive radiologists, patient advocacy groups). The research supports that the AIR has a role to play for the professional identity of radiographers and shaping the advanced practice role in Australia.

  5. The role of amenities and other factors in influencing the location of nonmanufacturing industry in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, T.; Calzonetti, F.J.

    1990-07-01

    Consumer and producer services, the latter in particular, are expected to become an important means of diversification and employment growth to the economy of Nevada. It has been suggested that the siting of the nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will lead to a significant reduction in the amenity value of the state and, consequently, the ability of the state to attract these nonmanufacturing industries. This report reviews the literature dealing with factors important to the location of services, with an emphasis on producer services, to determine whether amenities, which have been shown to be an important locational consideration for some manufacturing firms, similarly affect the location of services. The report finds little substantive evidence to link amenities with the location of service firms, although the process by which these firms` locations are chosen is not well understood. Research in this area is comparatively recent, and although a number of theories of service location have been developed, the majority of research is exploratory in scope.

  6. Key management for large scale end-to-end encryption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witzke, E.L.

    1994-07-01

    Symmetric end-to-end encryption requires separate keys for each pair of communicating confidants. This is a problem of Order N{sup 2}. Other factors, such as multiple sessions per pair of confidants and multiple encryption points in the ISO Reference Model complicate key management by linear factors. Public-key encryption can reduce the number of keys managed to a linear problem which is good for scaleability of key management, but comes with complicating issues and performance penalties. Authenticity is the primary ingredient of key management. If each potential pair of communicating confidants can authenticate data from each other, then any number of public encryption keys of any type can be communicated with requisite integrity. These public encryption keys can be used with the corresponding private keys to exchange symmetric cryptovariables for high data rate privacy protection. The Digital Signature Standard (DSS), which has been adopted by the United States Government, has both public and private components, similar to a public-key cryptosystem. The Digital Signature Algorithm of the DSS is intended for authenticity but not for secrecy. In this paper, the authors will show how the use of the Digital Signature Algorithm combined with both symmetric and asymmetric (public-key) encryption techniques can provide a practical solution to key management scaleability problems, by reducing the key management complexity to a problem of order N, without sacrificing the encryption speed necessary to operate in high performance networks.

  7. Secure key storage and distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Punit

    2015-06-02

    This disclosure describes a distributed, fault-tolerant security system that enables the secure storage and distribution of private keys. In one implementation, the security system includes a plurality of computing resources that independently store private keys provided by publishers and encrypted using a single security system public key. To protect against malicious activity, the security system private key necessary to decrypt the publication private keys is not stored at any of the computing resources. Rather portions, or shares of the security system private key are stored at each of the computing resources within the security system and multiple security systems must communicate and share partial decryptions in order to decrypt the stored private key.

  8. An application of the theory of planned behaviour to study the influencing factors of participation in source separation of food waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karim Ghani, Wan Azlina Wan Ab.; Rusli, Iffah Farizan; Biak, Dayang Radiah Awang; Idris, Azni

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ? Theory of planned behaviour (TPB) has been conducted to identify the influencing factors for participation in source separation of food waste using self administered questionnaires. ? The findings suggested several implications for the development and implementation of waste separation at home programme. ? The analysis indicates that the attitude towards waste separation is determined as the main predictors where this in turn could be a significant predictor of the repondents actual food waste separation behaviour. ? To date, none of similar have been reported elsewhere and this finding will be beneficial to local Authorities as indicator in designing campaigns to promote the use of waste separation programmes to reinforce the positive attitudes. - Abstract: Tremendous increases in biodegradable (food waste) generation significantly impact the local authorities, who are responsible to manage, treat and dispose of this waste. The process of separation of food waste at its generation source is identified as effective means in reducing the amount food waste sent to landfill and can be reused as feedstock to downstream treatment processes namely composting or anaerobic digestion. However, these efforts will only succeed with positive attitudes and highly participations rate by the public towards the scheme. Thus, the social survey (using questionnaires) to analyse publics view and influencing factors towards participation in source separation of food waste in households based on the theory of planned behaviour technique (TPB) was performed in June and July 2011 among selected staff in Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor. The survey demonstrates that the public has positive intention in participating provided the opportunities, facilities and knowledge on waste separation at source are adequately prepared by the respective local authorities. Furthermore, good moral values and situational factors such as storage convenience and collection times

  9. Key Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About the Bioenergy Technologies Office » Key Activities Key Activities The Bioenergy Technologies Office's key activities are aimed at producing a viable, sustainable domestic biomass industry that produces renewable biofuels, bioproducts and biopower; enhances U.S. energy security; reduces U.S. oil dependence; provides environmental benefits (e.g., reduced greenhouse gas emissions); and creates nationwide economic opportunities. Meeting these goals requires significant and rapid advances in

  10. Diversity & Flexibility Key to Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsDiversity & Flexibility Key to SustainabilityDavid Babson, Senior Fuels Engineer, Union of...

  11. Distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in human breast milk from various locations in Tunisia: Levels of contamination, influencing factors, and infant risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ennaceur, S. Gandoura, N.; Driss, M.R.

    2008-09-15

    The concentrations of dichlorodiphenytrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), dieldrin, and 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in 237 human breast milk samples collected from 12 locations in Tunisia. Gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) was used to identify and quantify residue levels on a lipid basis of organochlorine compounds (OCs). The predominant OCs in human breast milk were PCBs, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, HCHs, and HCB. Concentrations of DDTs in human breast milk from rural areas were significantly higher than those from urban locations (p<0.05). With regard to PCBs, we observed the predominance of mid-chlorinated congeners due to the presence of PCBs with high K{sub ow} such as PCB 153, 138, and 180. Positive correlations were found between concentrations of OCs in human breast milk and age of mothers and number of parities, suggesting the influence of such factors on OC burdens in lactating mothers. The comparison of daily intakes of PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, and HCB to infants through human breast milk with guidelines proposed by WHO and Health Canada shows that some individuals accumulated OCs in breast milk close to or higher than these guidelines.

  12. Key Issues | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Issues Key Issues The following presentations offer information about other key topics related to high performance homes. wall_system_innovations_kochkin.pdf (1.48 MB) removing_codes_barriers_cole.pdf (479.86 KB) testing_residential_ariconditioners_booten_winkler.pdf (5.21 MB) code_gaps_combustion_safety.pdf (1.34 MB) automated_utility_bill_calibration_polly.pdf (1.64 MB) predicting_envelope_leakage_griffiths.pdf (1.63 MB) More Documents & Publications Code Gaps and Future Research Needs

  13. Probing the Mechanism of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis [beta]-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III mtFabH: Factors Influencing Catalysis and Substrate Specificity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Alistair K.; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Kremer, Laurent; Lindenberg, Sandra; Dover, Lynn G.; Sacchettini, James C.; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2010-11-30

    Mycolic acids are the dominant feature of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall. These {alpha}-alkyl, {beta}-hydroxy fatty acids are formed by the condensation of two fatty acids, a long meromycolic acid and a shorter C{sub 24}-C{sub 26} fatty acid. The component fatty acids are produced via a combination of type I and II fatty acid synthases (FAS) with FAS-I products being elongated by FAS-II toward meromycolic acids. The {beta}-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III encoded by mtfabH (mtFabH) links FAS-I and FAS-II, catalyzing the condensation of FAS-I-derived acyl-CoAs with malonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP). The acyl-CoA chain length specificity of mtFabH was assessed in vitro; the enzyme extended longer, physiologically relevant acyl-CoA primers when paired with AcpM, its natural partner, than with Escherichia coli ACP. The ability of the enzyme to use E. coli ACP suggests that a similar mode of binding is likely with both ACPs, yet it is clear that unique factors inherent to AcpM modulate the substrate specificity of mtFabH. Mutation of proposed key mtFabH residues was used to define their catalytic roles. Substitution of supposed acyl-CoA binding residues reduced transacylation, with double substitutions totally abrogating activity. Mutation of Arg{sup 46} revealed its more critical role in malonyl-AcpM decarboxylation than in the acyl-CoA binding role. Interestingly, this effect was suppressed intragenically by Arg{sup 161} {yields} Ala substitution. Our structural studies suggested that His{sup 258}, previously implicated in malonyl-ACP decarboxylation, also acts as an anchor point for a network of water molecules that we propose promotes deprotonation and transacylation of Cys{sup 122}.

  14. Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is developing a science-based toolset for the analysis of potential impacts to groundwater chemistry from CO2 injection ...

  15. Key China Energy Statistics 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, Mark; Fridley, David; Lu, Hongyou; Fino-Chen, Cecilia

    2012-01-15

    The China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) was established in 1988. Over the years the Group has gained recognition as an authoritative source of China energy statistics through the publication of its China Energy Databook (CED). In 2008 the Group published the Seventh Edition of the CED (http://china.lbl.gov/research/chinaenergy-databook). This handbook summarizes key statistics from the CED and is expressly modeled on the International Energy Agency’s “Key World Energy Statistics” series of publications. The handbook contains timely, clearly-presented data on the supply, transformation, and consumption of all major energy sources.

  16. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, Mark; Fridley, David; Lu, Hongyou; Fino-Chen, Cecilia

    2012-05-01

    The China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) was established in 1988. Over the years the Group has gained recognition as an authoritative source of China energy statistics through the publication of its China Energy Databook (CED). The Group has published seven editions to date of the CED (http://china.lbl.gov/research/chinaenergy-databook). This handbook summarizes key statistics from the CED and is expressly modeled on the International Energy Agency’s “Key World Energy Statistics” series of publications. The handbook contains timely, clearly-presented data on the supply, transformation, and consumption of all major energy sources.

  17. NREL: Energy Analysis - Key Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Activities NREL conducts a broad range of energy analysis in support of the laboratory's programs and initiatives, DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), technology transfer, and the greater energy analysis community. NREL's recent analysis activities include: Analysis of Project Finance Electric Sector Integration Energy-Water Nexus Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Manufacturing Analysis Resource Assessment Printable Version Energy Analysis Home Capabilities &

  18. Key Steps | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Steps The Postdoctoral Program Office welcomes you to Argonne National Laboratory. Your academic achievements and demonstrated research capabilities will undoubtedly contribute to the continuing scientific and technological success of the Laboratory. It is our intention that your tenure at Argonne be as productive and rewarding as possible. Your goals and needs may evolve as you progress through your appointment. We take the approach of providing guidance, resources and programs targeted to

  19. Factors Influencing Oil Prices: A Survey of the Current State of Knowledge in the Context of the 2007-08 Oil Price Volatility Interactions in the U.S. Crude Oil Market

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Factors Influencing Oil Prices: A Survey of the Current State of Knowledge in the Context of the 2007-08 Oil Price Volatility Louis H. Ederington, University of Oklahoma Chitru S. Fernano, University of Oklahoma Thomas K. Lee, U.S. Energy Information Administration Scott C. Linn, University of Oklahoma Anthony D. May, Wichita State University August 2011 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to

  20. Keys to improving environmental performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreau, R.L.; Raught, D.L.

    1996-11-01

    Environmental protection is a mainstream issue in today`s society. Both internal and external drivers motivate the oil and ms industry to continuously improve environmental performance. Companies are integrating environmental considerations into their business plans to a greater extent, and are directing proportionally more resources toward managing these issues. This paper addresses several environmental management focus areas in Exxon`s domestic E&P sector to: (1) manage risks, (2) ensure compliance, (3) improve performance, and (4) assist in the development of balanced legislation and regulations. Specific examples of Production Department programs are discussed, along with keys to success for continued progress in improving performance.

  1. Public/private key certification authority and key distribution. Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J.P.; Christensen, M.J.; Sturtevant, A.P.; Johnston, W.E.

    1995-09-25

    Traditional encryption, which protects messages from prying eyes, has been used for many decades. The present concepts of encryption are built from that heritage. Utilization of modern software-based encryption techniques implies much more than simply converting files to an unreadable form. Ubiquitous use of computers and advances in encryption technology coupled with the use of wide-area networking completely changed the reasons for utilizing encryption technology. The technology demands a new and extensive infrastructure to support these functions. Full understanding of these functions, their utility and value, and the need for an infrastructure, takes extensive exposure to the new paradigm. This paper addresses issues surrounding the establishment and operation of a key management system (i.e., certification authority) that is essential to the successful implementation and wide-spread use of encryption.

  2. Key Opportunities and Challenges for Program Sustainability ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Opportunities and Challenges for Program Sustainability Key Opportunities and Challenges for Program Sustainability Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Peer Exchange Call: ...

  3. 'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes 'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes Computations at NERSC show how multiply charged metal ions impact battery capacity ...

  4. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print Wednesday, 28 January 2015 00:00 With an aging population in ...

  5. Multi-factor authentication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-10-21

    Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  6. Bioenergy Key Publications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Publications Bioenergy Key Publications This overview highlights key publications issued by the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office. bioenergy_key_publications.pdf (333.56 KB) More Documents & Publications 2013 Peer Review Presnentations-Plenaries Technology Pathway Selection Effort 2015 Peer Review Presentations-Plenaries

  7. Answering Key Fuel Cycle Questions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; J. Stephen Herring; David E. Shropshire; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

    2003-10-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) program has both “outcome” and “process” goals because it must address both waste already accumulating as well as completing the fuel cycle in connection with advanced nuclear power plant concepts. The outcome objectives are waste geological repository capacity and cost, energy security and sustainability, proliferation resistance, fuel cycle economics, and safety. The process objectives are readiness to proceed and adaptability and robustness in the face of uncertainties. A classic decision-making approach to such a multi-attribute problem would be to weight individual quantified criteria and calculate an overall figure of merit. This is inappropriate for several reasons. First, the goals are not independent. Second, the importance of different goals varies among stakeholders. Third, the importance of different goals is likely to vary with time, especially the “energy future.” Fourth, some key considerations are not easily or meaningfully quantifiable at present. Instead, at this point, we have developed 16 questions the AFCI program should answer and suggest an approach of determining for each whether relevant options improve meeting each of the program goals. We find that it is not always clear which option is best for a specific question and specific goal; this helps identify key issues for future work. In general, we suggest attempting to create as many win-win decisions (options that are attractive or neutral to most goals) as possible. Thus, to help clarify why the program is exploring the options it is, and to set the stage for future narrowing of options, we have developed 16 questions, as follows: · What are the AFCI program goals? · Which potential waste disposition approaches do we plan for? · What are the major separations, transmutation, and fuel options? · How do we address proliferation resistance? · Which potential energy futures do we plan for? · What potential external triggers do we

  8. Factors influencing the sustained-performance capabilities of 155-mm howitzer sections in simulated conventional and chemical warfare environments. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauch, T.M.; Banderet, L.E.; Tharion, W.J.; Munro, I.; Lussier, A.R.

    1986-04-01

    Factors that limit the performance capabilities of sustained artillery operations in simulated conventional and chemical warfare environments were studied. The results show that perceptions of psychological (mental) fatigue, rather than perceptions of muscular fatigue, were primary factors affecting sustained artillery performance. Furthermore, variations in these psychological states were correlated with artillery task performance during the period. In the simulated chemical warfare environment, extreme symptom and mood changes resulted in medical casualties, combat ineffectiveness, and early termination of all testing. Significant perosnality differences existed between casualties and survivors. The majority of casualties voluntarily terminated operational duties because of intense symptoms associated with wearing the chemical protective mask and clothing system. These symptoms were manifestations of respiratory and thermal stress.

  9. The Brain: Key To a Better Computer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain: Key To a Better Computer - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations ... Twitter Google + Vimeo Newsletter Signup SlideShare The Brain: Key To a Better Computer ...

  10. Adapting to sea-level rise in the US Southeast: The influence of built infrastructure and biophysical factors on the inundation of coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R. C.; Gornitz, V. M.; Mehta, A. J.; Lee, Saychong

    1992-11-01

    The earth' s global mean surface air temperature has increased by 0.5°C over the past 100 years. This warming trend has occurred concurrently with increases in the concentration and number of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These gases may cause this trend to accelerate in the future and result in a net increase in the earth's global mean surface air temperature of 1.5 to 4.5°C by the year 2100. An increase of this magnitude could cause sea surface temperatures to increase would cause sea levels to rise -from thermal expansion of the sea, and the addition of melt waters from alpine glaciers and continental ice sheets. To allow for the cost-effective analysis of the impacts that sea-level rise may have on the US Southeast, a method is needed that will allow sites that are potentially at risk to be identified for study. Previously, no objective method was available to identify such sites. This project addresses this problem by using a geographic data base with information on both physical and climatological factors to identify coastal areas of the US Southeast that are at risk to inundation or accelerated erosion due to sea-level rise. The following six areas were selected for further study from the many identified as being at high risk: Galveston, Texas; Caminada Pass, Louisiana; Bradenton Beach, Florida; Daytona Beach, Florida; McClellanville, South Carolina; and Nags Head, North Carolina. For each study area the amount of land, by land use type, in danger from inundation from three sea-level-rise scenarios was calculated. The calculated values were based on elevation alone.

  11. Adapting to sea-level rise in the US Southeast: The influence of built infrastructure and biophysical factors on the inundation of coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R.C. |; Gornitz, V.M.; Mehta, A.J.; Lee, Saychong; Cushman, R.M.

    1992-11-01

    The earth` s global mean surface air temperature has increased by 0.5{degrees}C over the past 100 years. This warming trend has occurred concurrently with increases in the concentration and number of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These gases may cause this trend to accelerate in the future and result in a net increase in the earth`s global mean surface air temperature of 1.5 to 4.5{degrees}C by the year 2100. An increase of this magnitude could cause sea surface temperatures to increase would cause sea levels to rise -from thermal expansion of the sea, and the addition of melt waters from alpine glaciers and continental ice sheets. To allow for the cost-effective analysis of the impacts that sea-level rise may have on the US Southeast, a method is needed that will allow sites that are potentially at risk to be identified for study. Previously, no objective method was available to identify such sites. This project addresses this problem by using a geographic data base with information on both physical and climatological factors to identify coastal areas of the US Southeast that are at risk to inundation or accelerated erosion due to sea-level rise. The following six areas were selected for further study from the many identified as being at high risk: Galveston, Texas; Caminada Pass, Louisiana; Bradenton Beach, Florida; Daytona Beach, Florida; McClellanville, South Carolina; and Nags Head, North Carolina. For each study area the amount of land, by land use type, in danger from inundation from three sea-level-rise scenarios was calculated. The calculated values were based on elevation alone.

  12. Key Actions for Optimizing for KNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Actions for Optimizing for KNL Key Actions for Optimizing for KNL This webinar consisted of a presentation by Nathan Wichmann of Cray entitled, "Key Actions When Optimizing for KNL." Nathan is a Principal Performance Engineer responsible for tackling performance problems at Cray for many years and he is our contact for the NERSC/Cray Cori Applications Center of Excellence. Nathan's presentation results, in part, from his participation in several "brainstorming" telecons

  13. Schedules of Key Environmental Impact Statements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document graphically displays the milestone dates and projected schedules of key Environmental Impact Statements (updated monthly). This chart represents anticipated activity and is not a...

  14. Florida Keys Electric Cooperative- Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The Florida Keys Electric Cooperative rebates were depleted in June of 2015. According to the website, rebates will be offered again dependent upon future funding.

  15. Carotenoid Pigment is the Key to Photoprotection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS researchers have recently discovered a surprising key event in this energy-quenching process. Photoprotection Through Shifting Pigments Through photosynthesis, plants are able...

  16. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in ... diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. ...

  17. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases...

  18. Patient Dose During Carotid Artery Stenting With Embolic-Protection Devices: Evaluation With Radiochromic Films and Related Diagnostic Reference Levels According to Factors Influencing the Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Ercole, Loredana; Quaretti, Pietro; Cionfoli, Nicola; Klersy, Catherine; Bocchiola, Milena; Rodolico, Giuseppe; Azzaretti, Andrea; Lisciandro, Francesco; Cascella, Tommaso; Zappoli Thyrion, Federico

    2013-04-15

    To measure the maximum entrance skin dose (MESD) on patients undergoing carotid artery stenting (CAS) using embolic-protection devices, to analyze the dependence of dose and exposure parameters on anatomical, clinical, and technical factors affecting the procedure complexity, to obtain some local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), and to evaluate whether overcoming DRLs is related to procedure complexity. MESD were evaluated with radiochromic films in 31 patients (mean age 72 {+-} 7 years). Five of 33 (15 %) procedures used proximal EPD, and 28 of 33 (85 %) procedures used distal EPD. Local DRLs were derived from the recorded exposure parameters in 93 patients (65 men and 28 women, mean age 73 {+-} 9 years) undergoing 96 CAS with proximal (33 %) or distal (67 %) EPD. Four bilateral lesions were included. MESD values (mean 0.96 {+-} 0.42 Gy) were <2 Gy without relevant dependence on procedure complexity. Local DRL values for kerma area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT), and number of frames (N{sub FR}) were 269 Gy cm{sup 2}, 28 minutes, and 251, respectively. Only simultaneous bilateral treatment was associated with KAP (odds ratio [OR] 10.14, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1-102.7, p < 0.05) and N{sub FR} overexposures (OR 10.8, 95 % CI 1.1-109.5, p < 0.05). Type I aortic arch decreased the risk of FT overexposure (OR 0.4, 95 % CI 0.1-0.9, p = 0.042), and stenosis {>=} 90 % increased the risk of N{sub FR} overexposure (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.1-7.4, p = 0.040). At multivariable analysis, stenosis {>=} 90 % (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.1-7.4, p = 0.040) and bilateral treatment (OR 10.8, 95 % CI 1.1-109.5, p = 0.027) were associated with overexposure for two or more parameters. Skin doses are not problematic in CAS with EPD because these procedures rarely lead to doses >2 Gy.

  19. Renewable: A key component of our global energy future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, D.

    1995-12-31

    Inclusion of renewable energy sources in national and international energy strategies is a key component of a viable global energy future. The global energy balance is going to shift radically in the near future brought about by significant increases in population in China and India, and increases in the energy intensity of developing countries. To better understand the consequences of such global shifts in energy requirements and to develop appropriate energy strategies to respond to these shifts, we need to look at the factors driving choices among supply options by geopolitical consumers and the impact these factors can have on the future energy mix.

  20. Captured key electrical safety lockout system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darimont, Daniel E. (Aurora, IL)

    1995-01-01

    A safety lockout apparatus for an electrical circuit includes an electrical switch, a key, a lock and a blocking mechanism. The electrical switch is movable between an ON position at which the electrical circuit is energized and an OFF position at which the electrical circuit is deactivated. The lock is adapted to receive the key and is rotatable among a plurality of positions by the key. The key is only insertable and removable when the lock is at a preselected position. The lock is maintained in the preselected position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism physically maintains the switch in its OFF position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism preferably includes a member driven by the lock between a first position at which the electrical switch is movable between its ON and OFF positions and a second position at which the member physically maintains the electrical switch in its OFF position. Advantageously, the driven member's second position corresponds to the preselected position at which the key can be removed from and inserted into the lock.

  1. Captured key electrical safety lockout system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darimont, D.E.

    1995-10-31

    A safety lockout apparatus for an electrical circuit includes an electrical switch, a key, a lock and a blocking mechanism. The electrical switch is movable between an ON position at which the electrical circuit is energized and an OFF position at which the electrical circuit is deactivated. The lock is adapted to receive the key and is rotatable among a plurality of positions by the key. The key is only insertable and removable when the lock is at a preselected position. The lock is maintained in the preselected position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism physically maintains the switch in its OFF position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism preferably includes a member driven by the lock between a first position at which the electrical switch is movable between its ON and OFF positions and a second position at which the member physically maintains the electrical switch in its OFF position. Advantageously, the driven member`s second position corresponds to the preselected position at which the key can be removed from and inserted into the lock. 7 figs.

  2. Identification and Control of Factors that Affect EGR Cooler Fouling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Key factors that cause exhaust gas recirculation cooler fouling were identified through extensive literature search and controlled experiment was devised to study the impact of a few key factors on deposition.

  3. PARKING KEY: State Handicap Medically Permitted

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    PARKING KEY: State Handicap Medically Permitted Preferred (LEED) Visitor Motorcycle New Parking Spots / Parallel Parking NATIONAL SECURITY CAMPUS The DOE's National Security Campus is managed and operated by Honeywell. REVISED: August 2014

  4. Understanding the Key to Henipavirus Infection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding the Key to Henipavirus Infection Understanding the Key to Henipavirus Infection Print Wednesday, 15 June 2016 00:00 In 1994, a virus emerged in Hendra, Australia, causing respiratory and neurological diseases. It was transmissible from horses to humans, with a mortality rate of 57% in humans and 89% in horses. In 1999, a similar virus, transmitted through domesticated pigs, caused over 100 human deaths in Sungai Nipah, a Malaysian village. The Hendra and Nipah viruses are

  5. Explosives performance key to stockpile stewardship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosives performance key to stockpile stewardship Explosives performance key to stockpile stewardship A new video shows how researchers use scientific guns to induce shock waves into explosive materials to study their performance and properties. November 3, 2014 Adam Pacheco of shock and detonation physics presses the "fire" button during an experiment at the two-stage gas gun facility. Adam Pacheco of shock and detonation physics presses the "fire" button during an

  6. Carotenoid Pigment is the Key to Photoprotection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carotenoid Pigment is the Key to Photoprotection Print Overexposure to sunlight, which is damaging to natural photosynthetic systems of green plants and cyanobacteria, is also expected to be damaging to artificial photosynthetic systems. Nature has solved the problem through a photoprotective mechanism called "nonphotochemical quenching," in which excess solar energy is safely dissipated as heat. ALS researchers have recently discovered a surprising key event in this energy-quenching

  7. Explosives performance key to stockpile stewardship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosives performance key to stockpile stewardship Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit Explosives performance key to stockpile stewardship A new video shows how researchers use scientific guns to induce shock waves into explosive materials to study their performance and properties January 1, 2015 Adam Pacheco of shock and detonation physics presses the "fire" button during an experiment at the

  8. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print Wednesday, 28 January 2015 00:00 With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function.

  9. Carotenoid Pigment is the Key to Photoprotection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carotenoid Pigment is the Key to Photoprotection Print Overexposure to sunlight, which is damaging to natural photosynthetic systems of green plants and cyanobacteria, is also expected to be damaging to artificial photosynthetic systems. Nature has solved the problem through a photoprotective mechanism called "nonphotochemical quenching," in which excess solar energy is safely dissipated as heat. ALS researchers have recently discovered a surprising key event in this energy-quenching

  10. Carotenoid Pigment is the Key to Photoprotection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carotenoid Pigment is the Key to Photoprotection Print Overexposure to sunlight, which is damaging to natural photosynthetic systems of green plants and cyanobacteria, is also expected to be damaging to artificial photosynthetic systems. Nature has solved the problem through a photoprotective mechanism called "nonphotochemical quenching," in which excess solar energy is safely dissipated as heat. ALS researchers have recently discovered a surprising key event in this energy-quenching

  11. Carotenoid Pigment is the Key to Photoprotection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carotenoid Pigment is the Key to Photoprotection Print Overexposure to sunlight, which is damaging to natural photosynthetic systems of green plants and cyanobacteria, is also expected to be damaging to artificial photosynthetic systems. Nature has solved the problem through a photoprotective mechanism called "nonphotochemical quenching," in which excess solar energy is safely dissipated as heat. ALS researchers have recently discovered a surprising key event in this energy-quenching

  12. Carotenoid Pigment is the Key to Photoprotection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carotenoid Pigment is the Key to Photoprotection Carotenoid Pigment is the Key to Photoprotection Print Wednesday, 30 September 2015 00:00 Overexposure to sunlight, which is damaging to natural photosynthetic systems of green plants and cyanobacteria, is also expected to be damaging to artificial photosynthetic systems. Nature has solved the problem through a photoprotective mechanism called "nonphotochemical quenching," in which excess solar energy is safely dissipated as heat. ALS

  13. 'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes 'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes Computations at NERSC show how multiply charged metal ions impact battery capacity June 30, 2014 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov PCCPxantheascover Imagine a cell phone battery that lasted a whole week on a single charge. A car battery that worked for months between charges. A massive battery that stores the intermittent electricity from wind turbines and releases it when

  14. Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... or greater, although a few samples with Hg concentrations below 100 ppm were also successfully analyzed using EXAFS spectroscopy. Effect of Geological Background on Hg Speciation ...

  15. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rail Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents KEY DOCUMENTS Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Intermodal Subgroup Planning Subgroup Current FRA State Rail Safety ...

  16. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Key Documents ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Key Documents Key Documents Briefing Package for Section 180(c) Implementation - July 2005 PDF icon Executive Summary...

  17. 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Slideshow 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Slideshow 2015 Key Water Power ...

  18. Key Activities in Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About Key Activities in Energy Efficiency Key Activities in Energy Efficiency The Building Technologies Office conducts work in three key areas in order to continually develop ...

  19. Public key infrastructure for DOE security research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aiken, R.; Foster, I.; Johnston, W.E.

    1997-06-01

    This document summarizes the Department of Energy`s Second Joint Energy Research/Defence Programs Security Research Workshop. The workshop, built on the results of the first Joint Workshop which reviewed security requirements represented in a range of mission-critical ER and DP applications, discussed commonalties and differences in ER/DP requirements and approaches, and identified an integrated common set of security research priorities. One significant conclusion of the first workshop was that progress in a broad spectrum of DOE-relevant security problems and applications could best be addressed through public-key cryptography based systems, and therefore depended upon the existence of a robust, broadly deployed public-key infrastructure. Hence, public-key infrastructure ({open_quotes}PKI{close_quotes}) was adopted as a primary focus for the second workshop. The Second Joint Workshop covered a range of DOE security research and deployment efforts, as well as summaries of the state of the art in various areas relating to public-key technologies. Key findings were that a broad range of DOE applications can benefit from security architectures and technologies built on a robust, flexible, widely deployed public-key infrastructure; that there exists a collection of specific requirements for missing or undeveloped PKI functionality, together with a preliminary assessment of how these requirements can be met; that, while commercial developments can be expected to provide many relevant security technologies, there are important capabilities that commercial developments will not address, due to the unique scale, performance, diversity, distributed nature, and sensitivity of DOE applications; that DOE should encourage and support research activities intended to increase understanding of security technology requirements, and to develop critical components not forthcoming from other sources in a timely manner.

  20. Key Management Challenges in Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldon, Frederick T; Duren, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Agenda Awarded in February 2011 Team of industry and research organizations Project Objectives Address difficult issues Complexity Diversity of systems Scale Longevity of solution Participate in standards efforts and working groups Develop innovative key management solutions Modeling and simulation ORNL Cyber Security Econometric Enterprise System Demonstrate effectiveness of solution Demonstrate scalability

  1. Diversity and Flexibility: Key to Sustainability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Babson, Ph.D. Senior Engineer Union of Concerned Scientists Diversity & Flexibility Key to Sustainability Biofuels Pathways are Diverse * General perception of biofuels are limited to corn ethanol and soybean biodiesel Biofuels Pathways are Diverse * General perception of biofuels are limited to corn ethanol and soybean biodiesel * Biofuels are important and they are so much more than corn ethanol and soybean biodiesel Biofuels Pathways are Diverse * General perception of biofuels are

  2. Milling of key slots on long shafts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agadzhanyan, R.A.; Bogdanenko, Yu.G.

    1987-03-01

    The authors look for and test methods and tool materials for milling key slots into rod pump shafts made of steel-03KH14N7V and K Monel alloy which not only increase the precision of the milling process but also extend the life of the milling tool. Their test parameters include various methods for introduction of the cutting fluid into the milling process, the effect of carbonitridation of the tool material, and the productivity of the machine itself.

  3. Identification of Key Barriers in Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the identification of key barriers in the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed under a Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration grant. Many barriers exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of propertly trained national security personnel. Some barriers can be eliminated in a short-term manner, whereas others will involve a long-term strategy that takes into account public policy.

  4. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function. These molecules transmit signals between nerve cells and are critical to learning and

  5. Key Physical Mechanisms in Nanostructured Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Stephan Bremner

    2010-07-21

    The objective of the project was to study both theoretically and experimentally the excitation, recombination and transport properties required for nanostructured solar cells to deliver energy conversion efficiencies well in excess of conventional limits. These objectives were met by concentrating on three key areas, namely, investigation of physical mechanisms present in nanostructured solar cells, characterization of loss mechanisms in nanostructured solar cells and determining the properties required of nanostructured solar cells in order to achieve high efficiency and the design implications.

  6. Key Issues in Tribal Energy Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Issues in Tribal Energy Development Common Issues, Causes and Solutions Douglas C. MacCourt, Ater Wynne LLP Chair Chair, Executive Committee Indian Law Practice Group Indian Law Section Ater Wynne LLP Oregon State Bar Association dcm@aterwynne.com www.aterwynne.com US DOE Tribal Energy Program/NREL Denver, Colorado October 25-28, 2010 Overview of Presentation * Overview of Handbook * A note on Alaska * Common development issues and solutions 1. Finding Early Stage Risk Capital * Necessary

  7. Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    KEY RENEWABLE ENERGY OPPORTUNITIES FOR OKLAHOMA TRIBES August 13, 2012 COX CONVENTION CENTER 100 West Sheridan Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73102 (405) 602-8500 The fifth in a series of planned U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development & investment forums, this forum is designed to give Oklahoma tribal leaders the opportunity to receive the latest updates on DOE's energy development efforts in Indian Country. The Forum will provide a venue for tribal leaders to

  8. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function. These molecules transmit signals between nerve cells and are critical to learning and

  9. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function. These molecules transmit signals between nerve cells and are critical to learning and

  10. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function. These molecules transmit signals between nerve cells and are critical to learning and

  11. New Security Results on Encrypted Key Exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bresson, Emmanuel; Chevassut, Olivier; Pointcheval, David

    2003-12-15

    Schemes for encrypted key exchange are designed to provide two entities communicating over a public network, and sharing a (short) password only, with a session key to be used to achieve data integrity and/or message confidentiality. An example of a very efficient and ''elegant'' scheme for encrypted key exchange considered for standardization by the IEEE P1363 Standard working group is AuthA. This scheme was conjectured secure when the symmetric-encryption primitive is instantiated via either a cipher that closely behaves like an ''ideal cipher,'' or a mask generation function that is the product of the message with a hash of the password. While the security of this scheme in the former case has been recently proven, the latter case was still an open problem. For the first time we prove in this paper that this scheme is secure under the assumptions that the hash function closely behaves like a random oracle and that the computational Diffie-Hellman problem is difficult. Furthermore, since Denial-of-Service (DoS) attacks have become a common threat we enhance AuthA with a mechanism to protect against them.

  12. 5 - Codes DNS-LES-RANS.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 t 6 t 1 t 2 t 3 t 4 t 5 t 6 Y. Dhue PhD IMFT 22 Columbian movie: image by D. Mejia, music by Shakira Response to music: LeConte, J. On the influence of musical sounds on the...

  13. CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS June 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP ...

  14. Method for encryption and transmission of digital keying data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mniszewski, Susan M.; Springer, Edward A.; Brenner, David P.

    1988-01-01

    A method for the encryption, transmission, and subsequent decryption of digital keying data. The method utilizes the Data Encryption Standard and is implemented by means of a pair of apparatus, each of which is selectable to operate as either a master unit or remote unit. Each unit contains a set of key encryption keys which are indexed by a common indexing system. The master unit operates upon command from the remote unit to generate a data encryption key and encrypt the data encryption key using a preselected key encryption key. The encrypted data encryption key and an index designator are then downloaded to the remote unit, where the data encryption key is decrypted for subsequent use in the encryption and transmission data. Downloading of the encrypted data encryption key enables frequent change of keys without requiring manual entry or storage of keys at the remote unit.

  15. Cryptographic Key Management and Critical Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, Robert K

    2014-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) CyberSecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CSEDS) industry led program (DE-FOA-0000359) entitled "Innovation for Increasing CyberSecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (12CSEDS)," awarded a contract to Sypris Electronics LLC to develop a Cryptographic Key Management System for the smart grid (Scalable Key Management Solutions for Critical Infrastructure Protection). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sypris Electronics, LLC as a result of that award entered into a CRADA (NFE-11-03562) between ORNL and Sypris Electronics, LLC. ORNL provided its Cyber Security Econometrics System (CSES) as a tool to be modified and used as a metric to address risks and vulnerabilities in the management of cryptographic keys within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) domain of the electric sector. ORNL concentrated our analysis on the AMI domain of which the National Electric Sector Cyber security Organization Resource (NESCOR) Working Group 1 (WG1) has documented 29 failure scenarios. The computational infrastructure of this metric involves system stakeholders, security requirements, system components and security threats. To compute this metric, we estimated the stakes that each stakeholder associates with each security requirement, as well as stochastic matrices that represent the probability of a threat to cause a component failure and the probability of a component failure to cause a security requirement violation. We applied this model to estimate the security of the AMI, by leveraging the recently established National Institute of Standards and Technology Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7628 guidelines for smart grid security and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 63351, Part 9 to identify the life cycle for cryptographic key management, resulting in a vector that assigned to each stakeholder an estimate of their average loss in terms of dollars per day of system

  16. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Key Discoveries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Discoveries Fermilab produced its first high-energy particle beam on March 1, 1972. Since then hundreds of experiments have used Fermilab's accelerators to study matter at ever smaller scales and its detectors to study the universe at great distances. Here an overview of the top achievements so far. Discovery of the Higgs boson Discovery of the top quark Discovery of the bottom quark Observation of tau neutrino Discovery of a quasar at a distance of 27 billion light-years Observation of

  17. Spotlight on Key Program Strategies from the Better Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spotlight on Key Program Strategies from the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 6 Spotlight on Key Program Strategies from the Better Buildings Neighborhood ...

  18. Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes August 13, 2012 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Cox Convention Center The...

  19. Turbulence may be key to "fast magnetic reconnection" mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbulence may be key to "fast magnetic reconnection" mystery Turbulence may be key to "fast magnetic reconnection" mystery The new research could lead to better understanding of ...

  20. Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as input to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (Redacted) Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key ...

  1. Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as input to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (Redacted) Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key ...

  2. Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve Water Efficiency Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve ...

  3. Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs (101) Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs (101) January 28...

  4. Focus Series: Program Finds Community "Readiness" Is the Key...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Finds Community "Readiness" Is the Key to More Retrofits Focus Series: Program Finds Community "Readiness" Is the Key to More Retrofits Focus Series: Program Finds ...

  5. Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. ...

  6. Physicists in China Nail a Key Neutrino Measurement (Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in China Nail a Key Neutrino Measurement (Science) External Link: http:news.sciencemag.orgsciencenow201203physicists-in-china-nail-a-key.htm... By jlabadmin on Thu, ...

  7. Building America Expert Meeting: Key Innovations for Adding Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Key Innovations for Adding Energy Efficiency to Maintenance Projects Building America Expert Meeting: Key Innovations for Adding Energy Efficiency to Maintenance Projects This ...

  8. Self-Referenced Continuous-Variable Quantum Key Distribution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Self-Referenced Continuous-Variable Quantum Key Distribution Protocol Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Self-Referenced Continuous-Variable Quantum Key Distribution ...

  9. Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs (101) Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs (101) Better Buildings Residential Network ...

  10. PEM Fuel Cell Technology, Key Research Needs and Approaches ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology, Key Research Needs and Approaches (Presentation) PEM Fuel Cell Technology, Key Research Needs and Approaches (Presentation) Presented at the DOE Fuel Cell ...

  11. Together with Key Allies, DOE Launches New Data Collaborative...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Together with Key Allies, DOE Launches New Data Collaborative to Help Cities and States Advance Building Efficiency Together with Key Allies, DOE Launches New Data Collaborative to ...

  12. 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments | 1 | 2015 Key Water Power Program and National ...

  13. Low-Power Public Key Cryptography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BEAVER,CHERYL L.; DRAELOS,TIMOTHY J.; HAMILTON,VICTORIA A.; SCHROEPPEL,RICHARD C.; GONZALES,RITA A.; MILLER,RUSSELL D.; THOMAS,EDWARD V.

    2000-11-01

    This report presents research on public key, digital signature algorithms for cryptographic authentication in low-powered, low-computation environments. We assessed algorithms for suitability based on their signature size, and computation and storage requirements. We evaluated a variety of general purpose and special purpose computing platforms to address issues such as memory, voltage requirements, and special functionality for low-powered applications. In addition, we examined custom design platforms. We found that a custom design offers the most flexibility and can be optimized for specific algorithms. Furthermore, the entire platform can exist on a single Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) or can be integrated with commercially available components to produce the desired computing platform.

  14. SECTION L -ATTACHMENT B - LISTING OF KEY PERSONNEL

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    H SECTION J APPENDIX H KEY PERSONNEL [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after

  15. Investigation of key parameters influencing the efficient photocatalytic oxidation of indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quici, Natalia; Kibanova, Daria; Vera, Maria Laura; Choi, Hyeok; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Litter, Marta I.; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Destaillats, Hugo

    2008-06-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation of indoor VOCs has the potential to eliminate pollutants from indoor environments, thus effectively improving and/or maintaining indoor air quality while reducing ventilation energy costs. Design and operation of UV photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners requires optimization of various parameters to achieve highest pollutant removal efficiencies while avoiding the formation of harmful secondary byproducts and maximizing catalyst lifetime.

  16. Large trees-key climate influencers-die first in drought

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecosystem Living trees soak up greenhouse gas and store it for a long time in their woody tissues, but dying trees release it-a carbon sink becomes a carbon source. Morever,...

  17. Wind Powering America: A Key Influence on U.S. Wind Market (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Dell, K.

    2013-09-01

    This fact sheet summarizes an evaluation of the effectiveness of the Wind Powering America initiative conducted by an independent consultant funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. Identification and Control of Factors that Affect EGR Cooler...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Key factors that cause exhaust gas recirculation cooler fouling were identified through extensive literature search and controlled experiment was devised to study the impact of a ...

  19. Florida Keys El Coop Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Keys El Coop Assn, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Florida Keys El Coop Assn, Inc Place: Florida Phone Number: 305-852-2431 Website: www.fkec.com Twitter: @FLKeysElectric...

  20. Solid Electrolyte: the Key for High-Voltage Lithium Batteries...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Solid Electrolyte: the Key for High-Voltage Lithium Batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solid Electrolyte: the Key for High-Voltage Lithium Batteries Authors: Li, ...

  1. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Key Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About the Fuel Cell Technologies Office » Fuel Cell Technologies Office Key Activities Fuel Cell Technologies Office Key Activities The Fuel Cell Technologies Office conducts work in several key areas to advance the development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Research, Development, and Demonstration Key areas of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) include the following: Fuel Cell R&D, which seeks to improve the durability, reduce the cost, and

  2. Key Dates | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Key Dates DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Program SCGSR Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Information for Laboratory Scientists and Thesis Advisors Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Key Dates Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page The SCGSR Program Key Dates are noted below. At the submission deadline (shown in red), the online application system will close after which no additional materials will be accepted. The

  3. June2010KeyEISChart.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June2010KeyEISChart.pdf June2010KeyEISChart.pdf June2010KeyEISChart.pdf (59.25 KB) More Documents & Publications Schedules of Key Environmental Impact Statements Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchhill Co., NV

  4. Residential Energy Efficiency Financing: Key Elements of Program Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents key programmatic elements and context of financing initiatives, including contractor support, rebates, quality assurance, and more.

  5. 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Slideshow | Department of Energy 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Slideshow 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Slideshow Addthis 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Report 1 of 28 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Report By accelerating the development of markets for hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects, the Water Power Program is striving

  6. 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Slideshow |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Slideshow 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Slideshow Addthis 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments 1 of 32 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program is committed to helping the nation secure cost-competitive sources of renewable energy through the development and deployment of innovative

  7. 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Slideshow | Department of Energy 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Slideshow 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Slideshow 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Report 1 of 28 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Report By accelerating the development of markets for hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects, the Water Power Program is striving to

  8. 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments 1 of 32 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program is committed to helping the nation secure cost-competitive sources of renewable energy through the development and deployment of innovative wind power technologies. By investing in

  9. Key Dates | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Dates Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship (AEF) Program Einstein Fellowship Home Eligibility Benefits Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Fellows Central Contact WDTS Home Key Dates Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Key Dates for the 2017-2018 AEF Program Application process. On-line Application Opens August 17, 2016 Application Deadline 8:00pm EST November 17, 2016 Application Review 8 - 9 weeks Notification to Semi-Finalists [Travel

  10. Key Dates | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Dates DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Program SCGSR Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Information for Laboratory Scientists and Thesis Advisors Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Key Dates Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page The SCGSR Program Key Dates are noted below. At the submission deadline (shown in red), the online application system will close after which no additional materials will be accepted. The

  11. SECTION L -ATTACHMENT B - LISTING OF KEY PERSONNEL

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B, Page 1 SECTION L ATTACHMENT B LISTING OF KEY PERSONNEL TITLE NAME Note: Addremove extra rows if needed...

  12. Key Activities of the Geothermal Technologies Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About the Geothermal Technologies Office » Key Activities of the Geothermal Technologies Office Key Activities of the Geothermal Technologies Office Key activities for the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) include research, development and demonstration; system validation; technology validation; strategic planning, analysis, and R&D integration. Specific activities are summarized below. Program Area Activities Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) GTO conducts research, development and

  13. FE-Funded Study Released on Key Factors Affecting China Shale...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Chinese government gives priority to the development of China's shale gas sector to help fight air pollution and reduce reliance on natural gas imports; and The U.S. government ...

  14. Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carroll, Susan A.; Keating, Elizabeth; Mansoor, Kayyum; Dai, Zhenxue; Sun, Yunwei; Trainor-Guitton, Whitney; Brown, Chris; Bacon, Diana

    2014-09-07

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is developing a science-based toolset for the analysis of potential impacts to groundwater chemistry from CO2 injection (www.netldoe.gov/nrap). The toolset adopts a stochastic approach in which predictions address uncertainties in shallow groundwater and leakage scenarios. It is derived from detailed physics and chemistry simulation results that are used to train more computationally efficient models, referred to here as reduced-order models (ROMs), for each component system. In particular, these tools can be used to help regulators and operators understand the expected sizes and longevity of plumes in pH, TDS, and dissolved metals that could resultmore » from a leakage of brine and/or CO2 from a storage reservoir into aquifers. This information can inform, for example, decisions on monitoring strategies that are both effective and efficient. We have used this approach to develop predictive reduced-order models for two common types of reservoirs, but the approach could be used to develop a model for a specific aquifer or other common types of aquifers. In this paper we describe potential impacts to groundwater quality due to CO2 and brine leakage, discuss an approach to calculate thresholds under which no impact to groundwater occurs, describe the time scale for impact on groundwater, and discuss the probability of detecting a groundwater plume should leakage occur. To facilitate this, multi-phase flow and reactive transport simulations and emulations were developed for two classes of aquifers, considering uncertainty in leakage source terms and aquifer hydrogeology. We targeted an unconfined fractured carbonate aquifer based on the Edwards aquifer in Texas and a confined alluvium aquifer based on the High Plains Aquifer in Kansas, which share characteristics typical of many drinking water aquifers in the United States. The hypothetical leakage scenarios centered on the notion that wellbores are the most likely conduits for brine and CO2 leaks. Leakage uncertainty was based on hypothetical injection of CO2 for 50 years at a rate of 5 million tons per year into a depleted oil/gas reservoir with high permeability and, one or more wells provided leakage pathways from the storage reservoir to the overlying aquifer. This scenario corresponds to a storage site with historical oil/gas production and some poorly completed legacy wells that went undetected through site evaluation, operations, and post-closure. For the aquifer systems and leakage scenarios studied here, CO2 and brine leakage are likely to drive pH below and increase total dissolved solids (TDS) above the “no-impact thresholds;” and the subsequent plumes, although small, are likely to persist for long periods of time in the absence of remediation. In these scenarios, however, risk to human health may not be significant for two reasons. First, our simulated plume volumes are much smaller than the average inter-well spacing for these representative aquifers, so the impacted groundwater would be unlikely to be pumped for drinking water. Second, even within the impacted plume volumes little water exceeds the primary maximum contamination levels.« less

  15. FE-Funded Study Released on Key Factors Affecting China Shale Gas Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As many people know, over the past decade the United States has experienced a shale gas revolution that has beneficially transformed its energy landscape. In witnessing this transformation, other nations with significant shale resources are understandably interested in pursuing the responsible development of their domestic reserves, and achieving for their people accompanying economic, energy security and environmental benefits.

  16. Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Susan A.; Keating, Elizabeth; Mansoor, Kayyum; Dai, Zhenxue; Sun, Yunwei; Trainor-Guitton, Whitney; Brown, Chris; Bacon, Diana

    2014-09-07

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is developing a science-based toolset for the analysis of potential impacts to groundwater chemistry from CO2 injection (www.netldoe.gov/nrap). The toolset adopts a stochastic approach in which predictions address uncertainties in shallow groundwater and leakage scenarios. It is derived from detailed physics and chemistry simulation results that are used to train more computationally efficient models, referred to here as reduced-order models (ROMs), for each component system. In particular, these tools can be used to help regulators and operators understand the expected sizes and longevity of plumes in pH, TDS, and dissolved metals that could result from a leakage of brine and/or CO2 from a storage reservoir into aquifers. This information can inform, for example, decisions on monitoring strategies that are both effective and efficient. We have used this approach to develop predictive reduced-order models for two common types of reservoirs, but the approach could be used to develop a model for a specific aquifer or other common types of aquifers. In this paper we describe potential impacts to groundwater quality due to CO2 and brine leakage, discuss an approach to calculate thresholds under which no impact to groundwater occurs, describe the time scale for impact on groundwater, and discuss the probability of detecting a groundwater plume should leakage occur. To facilitate this, multi-phase flow and reactive transport simulations and emulations were developed for two classes of aquifers, considering uncertainty in leakage source terms and aquifer hydrogeology. We targeted an unconfined fractured carbonate aquifer based on the Edwards aquifer in Texas and a confined alluvium aquifer based on the High Plains Aquifer in Kansas, which share characteristics typical of many drinking water aquifers in the United States. The hypothetical leakage scenarios centered on the notion that wellbores are the most likely conduits for brine and CO2 leaks. Leakage uncertainty was based on hypothetical injection of CO2 for 50 years at a rate of 5 million tons per year into a depleted oil/gas reservoir with high permeability and, one or more wells provided leakage pathways from the storage reservoir to the overlying aquifer. This scenario corresponds to a storage site with historical oil/gas production and some poorly completed legacy wells that went undetected through site evaluation, operations, and post-closure. For the aquifer systems and leakage scenarios studied here, CO2 and brine leakage are likely to drive pH below and increase total dissolved solids (TDS) above the “no-impact thresholds;” and the subsequent plumes, although small, are likely to persist for long periods of time in the absence of remediation. In these scenarios, however, risk to human health may not be significant for two reasons. First, our simulated plume volumes are much smaller than the average inter-well spacing for these representative aquifers, so the impacted groundwater would be unlikely to be pumped for drinking water. Second, even within the impacted plume volumes little water exceeds the primary maximum contamination levels.

  17. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-I-003-2016_Key Factors for Assessing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has been reviewed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National ... Brown 3 , Diana Bacon 3 1 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, ...

  18. Tree Mortality following Prescribed Fire and a Storm Surge Event in Slash Pine ( Pinus elliottii var. densa ) Forests in the Florida Keys, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sah, Jay P.; Ross, Michael S.; Snyder, James R.; Ogurcak, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    In fire-dependent forests, managers are interested in predicting the consequences of prescribed burning on postfire tree mortality. We examined the effects of prescribed fire on tree mortality in Florida Keys pine forests, using a factorial design with understory type, season, and year of burn as factors. We also used logistic regression to model the effects of burn season, fire severity, and tree dimensions on individual tree mortality. Despite limited statistical power due to problems in carrying out the full suite of planned experimental burns, associations with tree and fire variables were observed. Post-fire pine tree mortality was negatively correlated withmore » tree size and positively correlated with char height and percent crown scorch. Unlike post-fire mortality, tree mortality associated with storm surge from Hurricane Wilma was greater in the large size classes. Due to their influence on population structure and fuel dynamics, the size-selective mortality patterns following fire and storm surge have practical importance for using fire as a management tool in Florida Keys pinelands in the future, particularly when the threats to their continued existence from tropical storms and sea level rise are expected to increase.« less

  19. Tree Mortality following Prescribed Fire and a Storm Surge Event in Slash Pine (Pinus elliottiivar.densa) Forests in the Florida Keys, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sah, Jay P.; Ross, Michael S.; Snyder, James R.; Ogurcak, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    In fire-dependent forests, managers are interested in predicting the consequences of prescribed burning on postfire tree mortality. We examined the effects of prescribed fire on tree mortality in Florida Keys pine forests, using a factorial design with understory type, season, and year of burn as factors. We also used logistic regression to model the effects of burn season, fire severity, and tree dimensions on individual tree mortality. Despite limited statistical power due to problems in carrying out the full suite of planned experimental burns, associations with tree and fire variables were observed. Post-fire pine tree mortality was negatively correlated withmoretree size and positively correlated with char height and percent crown scorch. Unlike post-fire mortality, tree mortality associated with storm surge from Hurricane Wilma was greater in the large size classes. Due to their influence on population structure and fuel dynamics, the size-selective mortality patterns following fire and storm surge have practical importance for using fire as a management tool in Florida Keys pinelands in the future, particularly when the threats to their continued existence from tropical storms and sea level rise are expected to increase.less

  20. A key management concept for the CTBT International Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrington, P.; Draelos, T.; Craft, R.; Brickell, E.; Frankel, Y.; Silvestri, M.

    1997-08-01

    Cryptographic authentication (commonly referred to as ``technical authentication`` in Working Group B) is an enabling technology which ensures the integrity of sensor data and security of digital networks under various data security compromise scenarios. The use of cryptographic authentication,however, implies the development of a key management infrastructure for establishing trust in the generation and distribution of cryptographic keys. This paper proposes security and operational requirements for a CTBT (Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty) key management system and, furthermore, presents a public key based solution satisfying the requirements. The key management system is instantiated with trust distribution technologies similar to those currently implemented in industrial public key infrastructures. A complete system solution is developed.

  1. Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Across U.S. Industry | Department of Energy Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry eip_report_pg9.pdf (2.52 MB) More Documents & Publications ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry Energy Technology Solutions Energy Technology Solutions: Public-Private

  2. Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes August 13, 2012 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Cox Convention Center The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes was held August 13, 2012, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The forum gave Oklahoma tribal leaders the opportunity to receive the latest updates on DOE's energy development efforts in Indian Country and

  3. Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs (101) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs (101) Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs (101) Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Keys to Successful Quality Assurance and Quality Control Programs (101), call slides and discussion summary. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (1.79 MB) More Documents & Publications Quality Control, Standardization of Upgrades, and Workforce Expectations Home

  4. 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 5 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program is committed to helping the nation secure cost-competitive sources of renewable energy through the development and deployment of innovative wind power technologies. By investing in improvements to wind plant design, technology development, and operation

  5. DOE Announces More Key Administration Posts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Key Administration Posts DOE Announces More Key Administration Posts March 27, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, President Barack Obama announced his intent to nominate the following individuals to key administration posts: Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy, Department of Defense; Donald Remy, General Counsel of the Army, Department of Defense; J. Randolph Babbitt, Administrator, Federal Aviation Administration; Jose D. Riojas, Assistant Secretary for Operations, Security and

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy About the Vehicle Technologies Office » Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles We conduct work in four key areas to develop and deploy vehicle technologies that reduce the use of petroleum while maintaining or improving performance, power, and comfort. Research and development (R&D); testing and analysis; government and community stakeholder support; and education help people access and use efficient, clean

  7. Hydrodynamic experiment provides key data for Stockpile Stewardship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrodynamic experiment provides Stockpile Stewardship key data Los Alamos hydrodynamic experiment provides key data for Stockpile Stewardship Hydrodynamic experiments such as Leda involve non-nuclear surrogate materials that mimic many of the properties of nuclear materials. December 22, 2014 Los Alamos hydrodynamic experiment provides key data for Stockpile Stewardship "Leda," experimental vessel in the "Zero Room" at the underground U1a facility, at the Nevada National

  8. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Key Documents | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Key Documents Key Documents Security TG Work Plan August 7, 2006 (24.31 KB) Security Lessons Learned Document August 2, 2006 (40.77 KB) Security Module (635.1 KB) STG Terms and Definitions from DOE 470.4 (18.54 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Meeting Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - April 2005 Presentations TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Conference Call Summaries

  9. Key Dates | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Activities Key Activities Key Activities Bringing Innovative Manufacturing Technologies and Materials to Full "To Scale" Industrial Use Innovation is inherent in all of AMO's investment activities helping small, medium, and large manufacturers develop cutting-edge clean energy products and technology that reduce energy consumption in every stage or place it is used in industry. Built upon a foundation of strong public-private partnerships, our support of advanced manufacturing

  10. Key Dates | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Dates Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) VFP Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Key Dates Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page At the submission deadline (shown in red) the application system will close, and no materials will be accepted after the submission deadline has passed. The Application System closes at 5:00 PM Eastern Time. VFP Term: Summer 2015 On-line Application Opens October 15, 2015 Applications

  11. DOE Announces More Key Administration Posts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Administration Posts DOE Announces More Key Administration Posts March 20, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, President Barack Obama announced his intent to nominate the following individuals to key administration posts: Dr. Steven E. Koonin, Under Secretary for Science, Department of Energy; David Sandalow, Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs, Department of Energy; Ambassador Johnnie Carson, Assistant Secretary for African Affairs, State Department; Kathy

  12. Key Board Products and Special Reports - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Board Products and Special Reports Hanford Advisory Board Convening Report SSAB Guidance Memorandum of Understanding Membership Nomination and Appointment Process Operating Ground Rules Calendars Advice and Responses Full Board Meeting Information Committee Meeting Information Outgoing Board Correspondence Key Board Products and Special Reports HAB Annual Report HAB and Committee Lists Points of Contact Related Links Key Board Products and Special Reports Email Email Page | Print Print Page

  13. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Thursday, 21 August 2014 10:43 Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were

  14. Geothermal Regulations in Colorado - Land Ownership is the Key...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Regulations in Colorado - Land Ownership is the Key Abstract Geothermal resources in...

  15. President Obama Announces More Key Administration Posts | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addthis THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary WASHINGTON - Today, President Barack Obama announced his intent to nominate the following individuals to key Administration ...

  16. California Energy Incentive Programs: An Annual Update on Key...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Incentive Programs: An Annual Update on Key Energy Issues and Financial Opportunities for Federal Sites in California California Energy Incentive Programs: An Annual Update ...

  17. Key Practical Issues in Strengthening Safety Culture, INSAG-15

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Key Pratical Issues in Strengthening Safety Culture, INSAG-15. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Gorup, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 2002.

  18. Key Parameters Governing the Energy Density of Rechargeable Li...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Rechargeable LiS Batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Key Parameters Governing the Energy Density of Rechargeable LiS Batteries Authors: Gao, Jie ; ...

  19. LANL breaks ground on key sediment control project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sediment control project LANL breaks ground on key sediment control project Called "grade-control" structures, the approximately 2 million features are up to eight feet high and...

  20. Pantex Plant Achieves Key Safety Milestone Ahead of Schedule...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Achieves Key Safety Milestone Ahead of Schedule | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  1. SECTION L -ATTACHMENT B - LISTING OF KEY PERSONNEL

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B, Page 1 SECTION L ATTACHMENT B LISTING OF KEY PERSONNEL TITLE NAME [Note: Add/remove extra rows if needed]

  2. Two Key NNSA Site Offices Registerd Under International Quality Standard |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Two Key NNSA Site Offices Registerd Under International Quality Standard June 24, 2005 PDF icon NR06-05.pdf

  3. Geothermal regulations in Colorado---land ownership is the key...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ownership is the key Author P. Morgan Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council- Transactions, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  4. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup PDF icon Draft Work Plan - February 4,...

  5. Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding Chemical Reactions in the Brain Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical Reactions in the Brain Print Wednesday, 09 December 2015 00:00 ...

  6. Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy ...

  7. Key Energy-Saving Projects for Smaller Facilities | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    save energy and how the Industrial Assessment Centers can help. Briggs & Stratton provides examples of projects and implementation plans which worked for them. Key Energy-Saving ...

  8. Hydrodynamic experiment provides key data for Stockpile Stewardship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    weapon performance in the absence of full-scale underground nuclear testing," said Webster. Los Alamos hydrodynamic experiment provides key data for Stockpile Stewardship In...

  9. Liquid Water the Key to Arctic Cloud Radiative Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water the Key to Arctic Cloud Radiative Closure For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research Highlight...

  10. Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as input to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (Redacted) May 2007 Department of Energy Energy Sector ...

  11. NREL Fills Key Leadership Role for Energy Systems Security and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fills Key Leadership Role for Energy Systems Security and Resilience April 6, 2015 Dr. ... a smart home, electricity storage, an electric vehicle charging station and solar panels. ...

  12. Rapid Compression Machine … A Key Experimental Device to Effectively...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Effectively Collaborate with Basic Energy Sciences Rapid Compression Machine A Key Experimental Device to Effectively Collaborate with Basic Energy Sciences 2011 DOE ...

  13. PEM Fuel Cell Technology, Key Research Needs and Approaches ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PEM FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGY Key Research Needs and Approaches Tom Jarvi UTC Power South ... Stationary CHP 40-80,000 hr components - seals, membranes Water management Robust systems ...

  14. Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-01-29

    A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

  15. 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Report The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Water Power Program is committed to developing and deploying a ...

  16. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Intermodal Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup Intermodal Subgroup Draft Work Plan (206.83 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Intermodal Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group

  17. Practical issues in quantum-key-distribution postprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, C.-H. Fred; Chau, H. F. [Department of Physics and Center of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Ma Xiongfeng [Institute for Quantum Computing and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a secure key generation method between two distant parties by wisely exploiting properties of quantum mechanics. In QKD, experimental measurement outcomes on quantum states are transformed by the two parties to a secret key. This transformation is composed of many logical steps (as guided by security proofs), which together will ultimately determine the length of the final secret key and its security. We detail the procedure for performing such classical postprocessing taking into account practical concerns (including the finite-size effect and authentication and encryption for classical communications). This procedure is directly applicable to realistic QKD experiments and thus serves as a recipe that specifies what postprocessing operations are needed and what the security level is for certain lengths of the keys. Our result is applicable to the BB84 protocol with a single or entangled photon source.

  18. Apparatus, system, and method for synchronizing a timer key

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condit, Reston A; Daniels, Michael A; Clemens, Gregory P; Tomberlin, Eric S; Johnson, Joel A

    2014-04-22

    A timer key relating to monitoring a countdown time of a countdown routine of an electronic device is disclosed. The timer key comprises a processor configured to respond to a countdown time associated with operation of the electronic device, a display operably coupled with the processor, and a housing configured to house at least the processor. The housing has an associated structure configured to engage with the electronic device to share the countdown time between the electronic device and the timer key. The processor is configured to begin a countdown routine based at least in part on the countdown time, wherein the countdown routine is at least substantially synchronized with a countdown routine of the electronic device when the timer key is removed from the electronic device. A system and method for synchronizing countdown routines of a timer key and an electronic device are also disclosed.

  19. Douglas Factors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as “Douglas Factors” and have been incorporated into the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Personnel Management System and various FAA Labor Agreements.

  20. Authenticated group Diffie-Hellman key exchange: theory and practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chevassut, Olivier

    2002-10-03

    Authenticated two-party Diffie-Hellman key exchange allows two principals A and B, communicating over a public network, and each holding a pair of matching public/private keys to agree on a session key. Protocols designed to deal with this problem ensure A (B resp.)that no other principals aside from B (A resp.) can learn any information about this value. These protocols additionally often ensure A and B that their respective partner has actually computed the shared secret value. A natural extension to the above cryptographic protocol problem is to consider a pool of principals agreeing on a session key. Over the years several papers have extended the two-party Diffie-Hellman key exchange to the multi-party setting but no formal treatments were carried out till recently. In light of recent developments in the formalization of the authenticated two-party Diffie-Hellman key exchange we have in this thesis laid out the authenticated group Diffie-Hellman key exchange on firmer foundations.

  1. Unveiling Microbial Carbon Cycling Processes in Key U.S. Soils using ''Omics''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrold, David D.; Bottomely, Peter J.; Jumpponen, Ari; Rice, Charles W.; Zeglin, Lydia H.; David, Maude M.; Jansson, Janet K.; Prestat, Emmanuel; Hettich, Robert L.

    2014-09-17

    Soils process and store large amounts of C; however, considerable uncertainty still exists about the details of that influence microbial partitioning of C into soil C pools, and what are the main influential forces that control the fraction of the C input that is stabilized. The soil microbial community is genotypically and phenotypically diverse. Despite our ability to predict the kinds of regional environmental changes that will accompany global climate change, it is not clear how the microbial community will respond to climate-induced modification of precipitation and inter-precipitation intervals, and if this response will affect the fate of C deposited into soil by the local plant community. Part of this uncertainty lies with our ignorance of how the microbial community adapts genotypically and physiologically to changes in soil moisture brought about by shifts in precipitation. Our overarching goal is to harness the power of multiple meta-omics tools to gain greater understanding of the functioning of whole-soil microbial communities and their role in C cycling. We will do this by meeting the following three objectives: 1. Further develop and optimize a combination of meta-omics approaches to study how environmental factors affect microbially-mediated C cycling processes. 2. Determine the impacts of long-term changes in precipitation timing on microbial C cycling using an existing long-term field manipulation of a tallgrass prairie soil. 3. Conduct laboratory experiments that vary moisture and C inputs to confirm field observations of the linkages between microbial communities and C cycling processes. We took advantage of our state-of-the-art expertise in community “omics” to better understand the functioning soil C cycling within the Great Prairie ecosystem, including our ongoing Konza Prairie soil metagenome flagship project at JGI and the unique rainfall manipulation plots (RaMPs) established at this site more than a decade ago. We employed a systems

  2. Development of a public key infrastructure across multiple enterprises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharick, T.M.; Long, J.P.; Desind, B.J.

    1997-05-01

    Main-stream applications are beginning to incorporate public key cryptography. It can be difficult to deploy this technology without a robust infrastructure to support it. It can also be difficult to deploy a public key infrastructure among multiple enterprises when different applications and standards must be supported. This discussion chronicles the efforts by a team within the US Department of Energy`s Nuclear Weapons Complex to build a public key infrastructure and deploy applications that use it. The emphasis of this talk will be on the lessons learned during this effort and an assessment of the overall impact of this technology.

  3. Key Mobility Challenges in Indian Cities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from the LEDS Global Partnership. When to Use This Tool While building a low emission strategy for your country's transportation system, this tool is most useful during these key...

  4. Copper is Key in Burning Fat, New Study Finds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Copper is Key in Burning Fat, New Study Finds A new study led by a Berkeley Lab scientist ... Researchers want to explore if a copper deficiency is linked to obesity and obesity ...

  5. Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from International Energy Agency (IEA) Indicator Analysis in Support of the Group of Eight (G8) Plan of Action Jump to:...

  6. Key energy efficiency measures signed into law by President Obama...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Key energy efficiency measures signed into law by President Obama Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 2...

  7. Quantum key distribution using card, base station and trusted authority

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Hughes, Richard John; Newell, Raymond Thorson; Peterson, Charles Glen; Rosenberg, Danna; McCabe, Kevin Peter; Tyagi, Kush T; Dallman, Nicholas

    2015-04-07

    Techniques and tools for quantum key distribution ("QKD") between a quantum communication ("QC") card, base station and trusted authority are described herein. In example implementations, a QC card contains a miniaturized QC transmitter and couples with a base station. The base station provides a network connection with the trusted authority and can also provide electric power to the QC card. When coupled to the base station, after authentication by the trusted authority, the QC card acquires keys through QKD with a trusted authority. The keys can be used to set up secure communication, for authentication, for access control, or for other purposes. The QC card can be implemented as part of a smart phone or other mobile computing device, or the QC card can be used as a fillgun for distribution of the keys.

  8. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected...

  9. Reply to 'Comment on 'Quantum dense key distribution''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degiovanni, I.P.; Berchera, I. Ruo; Castelletto, S.; Rastello, M.L.; Bovino, F.A.; Colla, A.M.; Castagnoli, G.

    2005-01-01

    In this Reply we propose a modified security proof of the quantum dense key distribution protocol, detecting also the eavesdropping attack proposed by Wojcik in his Comment [Wojcik, Phys. Rev. A 71, 016301 (2005)].

  10. EnergySmart Schools National Financing Roundtable - Key Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-01

    This document presents key outcomes from the EnergySmart Schools National Financing Roundtable as a follow-up to the release of its Guide to FInancing EnergySmart Schools

  11. Potential for Hydrogen Production from Key Renewable Resources...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential for Hydrogen Production from Key Renewable Resources in the United States A. Milbrandt and M. Mann Technical Report NRELTP-640-41134 February 2007 NREL is operated by...

  12. Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND CORE CAPABILITIES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND CORE CAPABILITIES CCEI 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction and Overview of Discoveries and Breakthroughs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Core Capabilities: Multiscale Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Solution-phase Chemistry with Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  13. NREL: Wind Research - NREL and Partners Review Key Issues, Lessons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL and Partners Review Key Issues, Lessons Learned from U.S. Wind Integration Studies and Operating Practices April 17, 2015 As a complement to DOE's recently released Wind...

  14. Missing Oxygen Atoms Are Key to Robust Spintronic Material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Missing Oxygen Atoms Are Key to Robust Spintronic Material Missing Oxygen Atoms Are Key to Robust Spintronic Material Print Friday, 01 April 2016 11:44 The endless pursuit of faster, more energy-efficient computers has led to the emergence of the field of spintronics, where the manipulation and detection of electron spins are utilized in electronic circuits. A particular class of materials called dilute magnetic oxides are promising candidates for spintronics applications because they exhibit

  15. NERSC Played Key Role in Nobel Laureate's Discovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Played Key Role in Nobel Laureate's Discovery NERSC Played Key Role in Nobel Laureate's Discovery NERSC, Berkeley Lab Now Centers for Computational Cosmology Community October 4, 2011 Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 5849 In the 1990s, Saul Perlmutter discovered that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate. He confirmed his observational conclusions by running thousands of simulations at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence

  16. Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactions in the Brain Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical Reactions in the Brain Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical Reactions in the Brain Print Wednesday, 09 December 2015 00:00 Most people have heard of adrenaline, the chemical that causes the "fight or flight" reaction in humans. Most people have also heard of the chemical substances cocaine and methamphetamine, which also elicit a particular (perhaps

  17. Single, Key Gene Discovery Could Streamline Production of Biofuels |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Single, Key Gene Discovery Could Streamline Production of Biofuels Single, Key Gene Discovery Could Streamline Production of Biofuels August 11, 2011 - 3:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- A team of researchers at the Department of Energy's BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) have pinpointed the exact, single gene that controls ethanol production capacity in a microorganism. This discovery could be the missing link in developing biomass crops that produce higher concentrations

  18. What Are the Computational Keys to Future Scientific Discoveries?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What are the Computational Keys to Future Scientific Discoveries? What Are the Computational Keys to Future Scientific Discoveries? NERSC Develops a Data Intensive Pilot Program to Help Scientists Find Out August 23, 2012 Linda Vu,lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 ALS.jpg Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. (Photo by: Roy Kaltschmidt, Berkeley Lab) A new camera at the hard x-ray tomography beamline of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (Berkeley Lab's) Advanced

  19. Key Publications - Natural Gas Regulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » Natural Gas Regulation » Key Publications - Natural Gas Regulation Key Publications - Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Quarterly Reports May 11, 2016 Natural Gas Imports and Exports Fourth Quarter Report 2015 February 3, 2016 Natural Gas Imports and Exports Third Quarter Report 2015 October 30, 2015 Natural Gas Imports and Exports Second Quarter Report 2015 August 13, 2015 Natural Gas Imports and Exports First Quarter Report 2015 More Quarterly Reports LNG

  20. Key-and-keyway coupling for transmitting torque

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blue, S.C.; Curtis, M.T.; Orthwein, W.C.; Stitt, D.H.

    1975-11-18

    The design of an improved key-and-keyway coupling for the transmission of torque is given. The coupling provides significant reductions in stress concentrations in the vicinity of the key and keyway. The keyway is designed with a flat-bottomed u-shaped portion whose inboard end terminates in a ramp which is dished transversely, so that the surface of the ramp as viewed in transverse section defines an outwardly concave arc.

  1. Porous Framework Electrocatalysts Are Key to Carbon Dioxide Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Porous Framework Electrocatalysts Are Key to Carbon Dioxide Conversion Porous Framework Electrocatalysts Are Key to Carbon Dioxide Conversion Print Friday, 19 February 2016 13:11 The burning of fossil fuels and the consequent rising levels of atmospheric CO-2 has led to a number of negative environmental consequences, including global warming and ocean acidification. Converting CO2 to fuels or chemical feedstock, ideally through the use of renewable energy, can simultaneously reduce atmospheric

  2. Midstream Infrastructure Improvements Key to Realizing Full Potential of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Domestic Natural Gas | Department of Energy Midstream Infrastructure Improvements Key to Realizing Full Potential of Domestic Natural Gas Midstream Infrastructure Improvements Key to Realizing Full Potential of Domestic Natural Gas October 30, 2014 - 9:20am Addthis Natural gas provides numerous benefits to millions of Americans daily, whether it's being used to heat or air condition homes and businesses, cook meals, or power vehicles. But most people who take advantage of this versatile and

  3. 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments | 1 | 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Water Power Program is committed to developing and deploying a portfolio of innovative technologies and market solutions for clean, domestic power generation from water resources across the United States. By accelerating the development of markets for

  4. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Subgroup | Department of Energy Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 (114.02 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup

  5. Energy Storage: The Key to a Reliable, Clean Electricity Supply |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Storage: The Key to a Reliable, Clean Electricity Supply Energy Storage: The Key to a Reliable, Clean Electricity Supply February 22, 2012 - 4:52pm Addthis Improved energy storage technology offers a number of economic and environmental benefits. Improved energy storage technology offers a number of economic and environmental benefits. Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? ARPA-E's GRIDS program

  6. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  7. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  8. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  9. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  10. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  11. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  12. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  13. Secret Key Generation via a Modified Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith IV, Amos M; Evans, Philip G; Lawrie, Benjamin J; Legre, Matthieu; Lougovski, Pavel; Ray, William R; Williams, Brian P; Qi, Bing; Grice, Warren P

    2015-01-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over 6km of telecom. ber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N > 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and signicantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  14. A Key Enzyme to the Potency of an Anticancer Agent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Key Enzyme to the Potency of an Anticancer Agent A Key Enzyme to the Potency of an Anticancer Agent Print Wednesday, 28 May 2008 00:00 Incorporation of halogen atoms into drug molecules often increases biological activity. This is the case with salinosporamide A (sal A), a natural product from the marine bacterium Salinispora tropica that is 500 times more active than sal B, its nonchlorinated analog. Sal A is in phase I human clinical trials for the treatment of multiple myeloma and solid

  15. GE Key Partner in Innovation Institutes | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is Key Partner in Manufacturing Innovation Institutes Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) GE Is Key Partner in Manufacturing Innovation Institutes GE Global Research 2014.02.25 President Obama today announced two new manufacturing innovation institutes. One is focused on digital manufacturing and design

  16. Energy Secretary Bodman Commends Key Milestone In MOX Program | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Commends Key Milestone In MOX Program Energy Secretary Bodman Commends Key Milestone In MOX Program April 1, 2005 - 11:28am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - In response to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) authorization of the construction of a U.S. Mixed-Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in South Carolina, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released the following statement: "Issuing the permit for construction of a

  17. SimTable key tool for preparing, responding to wildfire

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SimTable key tool for preparing, responding to wildfire SimTable key tool for preparing, responding to wildfire Camera tracks movement and objects and project them onto a sand table. May 30, 2012 SimTable: Stephen Guerin (L) and Chip Garner (R) with SimTable, a Santa Fe company helping firefighters model and predict where a fire is most likely to spread, received support for their business through Lab economic development programs: VAF, NMSBA, Springboard. SimTable: Stephen Guerin (L) and Chip

  18. Factorization using the quadratic sieve algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.A.; Holdridge, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    Since the cryptosecurity of the RSA two key cryptoalgorithm is no greater than the difficulty of factoring the modulus (product of two secret primes), a code that implements the Quadratic Sieve factorization algorithm on the CRAY I computer has been developed at the Sandia National Laboratories to determine as sharply as possible the current state-of-the-art in factoring. Because all viable attacks on RSA thus far proposed are equivalent to factorization of the modulus, sharper bounds on the computational difficulty of factoring permit improved estimates for the size of RSA parameters needed for given levels of cryptosecurity. Analysis of the Quadratic Sieve indicates that it may be faster than any previously published general purpose algorithm for factoring large integers. The high speed of the CRAY I coupled with the capability of the CRAY to pipeline certain vectorized operations make this algorithm (and code) the front runner in current factoring techniques.

  19. Factorization using the quadratic sieve algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.A.; Holdridge, D.B.

    1983-12-01

    Since the cryptosecurity of the RSA two key cryptoalgorithm is no greater than the difficulty of factoring the modulus (product of two secret primes), a code that implements the Quadratic Sieve factorization algorithm on the CRAY I computer has been developed at the Sandia National Laboratories to determine as sharply as possible the current state-of-the-art in factoring. Because all viable attacks on RSA thus far proposed are equivalent to factorization of the modulus, sharper bounds on the computational difficulty of factoring permit improved estimates for the size of RSA parameters needed for given levels of cryptosecurity. Analysis of the Quadratic Sieve indicates that it may be faster than any previously published general purpose algorithm for factoring large integers. The high speed of the CRAY I coupled with the capability of the CRAY to pipeline certain vectorized operations make this algorithm (and code) the front runner in current factoring techniques.

  20. Self-referenced continuous-variable quantum key distribution protocol

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Soh, Daniel B. S.; Brif, Constantin; Coles, Patrick J.; Lutkenhaus, Norbert; Camacho, Ryan M.; Urayama, Junji; Sarovar, Mohan

    2015-10-21

    Here, we introduce a new continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) protocol, self-referenced CV-QKD, that eliminates the need for transmission of a high-power local oscillator between the communicating parties. In this protocol, each signal pulse is accompanied by a reference pulse (or a pair of twin reference pulses), used to align Alice’s and Bob’s measurement bases. The method of phase estimation and compensation based on the reference pulse measurement can be viewed as a quantum analog of intradyne detection used in classical coherent communication, which extracts the phase information from the modulated signal. We present a proof-of-principle, fiber-based experimental demonstration ofmore » the protocol and quantify the expected secret key rates by expressing them in terms of experimental parameters. Our analysis of the secret key rate fully takes into account the inherent uncertainty associated with the quantum nature of the reference pulse(s) and quantifies the limit at which the theoretical key rate approaches that of the respective conventional protocol that requires local oscillator transmission. The self-referenced protocol greatly simplifies the hardware required for CV-QKD, especially for potential integrated photonics implementations of transmitters and receivers, with minimum sacrifice of performance. As such, it provides a pathway towards scalable integrated CV-QKD transceivers, a vital step towards large-scale QKD networks.« less

  1. Self-referenced continuous-variable quantum key distribution protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soh, Daniel B. S.; Brif, Constantin; Coles, Patrick J.; Lutkenhaus, Norbert; Camacho, Ryan M.; Urayama, Junji; Sarovar, Mohan

    2015-10-21

    Here, we introduce a new continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) protocol, self-referenced CV-QKD, that eliminates the need for transmission of a high-power local oscillator between the communicating parties. In this protocol, each signal pulse is accompanied by a reference pulse (or a pair of twin reference pulses), used to align Alice’s and Bob’s measurement bases. The method of phase estimation and compensation based on the reference pulse measurement can be viewed as a quantum analog of intradyne detection used in classical coherent communication, which extracts the phase information from the modulated signal. We present a proof-of-principle, fiber-based experimental demonstration of the protocol and quantify the expected secret key rates by expressing them in terms of experimental parameters. Our analysis of the secret key rate fully takes into account the inherent uncertainty associated with the quantum nature of the reference pulse(s) and quantifies the limit at which the theoretical key rate approaches that of the respective conventional protocol that requires local oscillator transmission. The self-referenced protocol greatly simplifies the hardware required for CV-QKD, especially for potential integrated photonics implementations of transmitters and receivers, with minimum sacrifice of performance. As such, it provides a pathway towards scalable integrated CV-QKD transceivers, a vital step towards large-scale QKD networks.

  2. An investigation of DUA caching strategies for public key certificates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, T.C.

    1993-11-01

    Internet Privacy Enhanced Mail (PEM) provides security services to users of Internet electronic mail. PEM is designed with the intention that it will eventually obtain public key certificates from the X.500 directory service. However, such a capability is not present in most PEM implementations today. While the prevalent PEM implementation uses a public key certificate-based strategy, certificates are mostly distributed via e-mail exchanges, which raises several security and performance issues. In this thesis research, we changed the reference PEM implementation to make use of the X.500 directory service instead of local databases for public key certificate management. The thesis discusses some problems with using the X.500 directory service, explores the relevant issues, and develops an approach to address them. The approach makes use of a memory cache to store public key certificates. We implemented a centralized cache server and addressed the denial-of-service security problem that is present in the server. In designing the cache, we investigated several cache management strategies. One result of our study is that the use of a cache significantly improves performance. Our research also indicates that security incurs extra performance cost. Different cache replacement algorithms do not seem to yield significant performance differences, while delaying dirty-writes to the backing store does improve performance over immediate writes.

  3. Small Modular Reactors - Key to Future Nuclear Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Small Modular Reactors - Key to Future Nuclear Power Generation in the U.S. 1,2 Robert Rosner ... b,c Wind (On-shore) 90 9 Solar PV 180 18 Solar Thermal 250 25 Biomass 90-180 9-18 a. ...

  4. LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Key Actions/Develop Alternative...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Plan Prioritize alternative development scenarios based on factors such as economic, environmental, and social benefits & costs, technical & institutional capacity & barriers,...

  5. LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Key Actions/Assess Opportunities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Plan Prioritize alternative development scenarios based on factors such as economic, environmental, and social benefits & costs, technical & institutional capacity & barriers,...

  6. LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Key Actions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Plan Prioritize alternative development scenarios based on factors such as economic, environmental, and social benefits & costs, technical & institutional capacity & barriers,...

  7. Evolution of Florida Bay islands from a supratidal precursor: evidence from westernmost Bob Allen Key and Sid Key

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, T.M.; Merriam, D.F.

    1988-05-01

    Cores from the interior portions of westernmost Bob Allen Key and Sid Key document island nucleation from a supratidal precursor developed on a paralic peat deposit; whereas cores from exterior portions of these islands document development of marine mudbanks, progradation or colonization by mangroves, and supratidal sedimentation. The supratidal precursor beneath these islands consists of eroded remnants of coastal tidal flats or local topographic highs that remained supratidal throughout the Holocene sea-level rise. Sedimentologic and biostratigraphic evidence suggest erosion of mangroves by storms or inundation of mangroves by storm deposits is a common precursor to subsequent sediment aggradation on both islands. If other Florida Bay islands develop from mangrove colonization of marine mudbanks, then data from westernmost Bob Allen Key and Sid Key indicate that nucleation from a supratidal precursor and mangrove colonization of marine mudbanks are both viable mechanisms for island initiation. The absence of evidence of a supratidal nucleus beneath an island can result from (a) island migration and subsequent erosion or (b) insufficient sampling density. Stratigraphic data from Florida Bay are insufficient to discriminate between the relative importance of these two models of island evolution; the authors contend that any model of the evolution of Florida Bay islands must incorporate island nucleation from a supratidal precursor as a viable mechanism for island evolution.

  8. Key statistics related to CO/sub 2/ emissions: Significant contributing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellogg, M.A.; Edmonds, J.A.; Scott, M.J.; Pomykala, J.S.

    1987-07-01

    This country selection task report describes and applies a methodology for identifying a set of countries responsible for significant present and anticipated future emissions of CO/sub 2/ and other radiatively important gases (RIGs). The identification of countries responsible for CO/sub 2/ and other RIGs emissions will help determine to what extent a select number of countries might be capable of influencing future emissions. Once identified, those countries could potentially exercise cooperative collective control of global emissions and thus mitigate the associated adverse affects of those emissions. The methodology developed consists of two approaches: the resource approach and the emissions approach. While conceptually very different, both approaches yield the same fundamental conclusion. The core of any international initiative to control global emissions must include three key countries: the US, USSR, and the People's Republic of China. It was also determined that broader control can be achieved through the inclusion of sixteen additional countries with significant contributions to worldwide emissions.

  9. Public-key data authentication for treaty verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draelos, T.J.; Goldsmith, S.Y.

    1992-08-01

    A public-key Treaty Data Authentication Module (TDAM) based on the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Digital Signature Standard (DSS) has been developed to support treaty verification systems. The TDAM utilizes the Motorola DSP56001 Digital Signal Processor as a coprocessor and supports both the STD Bus and PC-AT Bus platforms. The TDAM is embedded within an Authenticated Data Communication Subsystem (ADCS) which provides transparent data authentication and communications, thereby concealing the details of securely authenticating and communicating compliance data and commands. The TDAM has been designed according to the NIST security guidelines for cryptographic modules. Public-key data authentication is important for support of both bilateral and multi-lateral treaties. 8 refs.

  10. Public-key data authentication for treaty verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draelos, T.J.; Goldsmith, S.Y.

    1992-01-01

    A public-key Treaty Data Authentication Module (TDAM) based on the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Digital Signature Standard (DSS) has been developed to support treaty verification systems. The TDAM utilizes the Motorola DSP56001 Digital Signal Processor as a coprocessor and supports both the STD Bus and PC-AT Bus platforms. The TDAM is embedded within an Authenticated Data Communication Subsystem (ADCS) which provides transparent data authentication and communications, thereby concealing the details of securely authenticating and communicating compliance data and commands. The TDAM has been designed according to the NIST security guidelines for cryptographic modules. Public-key data authentication is important for support of both bilateral and multi-lateral treaties. 8 refs.