Sample records for kev resolving power

  1. The 0.3-30 keV Spectra of Powerful Starburst Galaxies: NuSTAR and Chandra Observations of NGC 3256 and NGC 3310

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmer, B D; Hornschemeier, A E; Wik, D R; Yukita, M; Antoniou, V; Boggs, S; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Maccarone, T J; Ptak, A; Stern, D; Zezas, A; Zhang, W W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present nearly simultaneous Chandra and NuSTAR observations of two actively star-forming galaxies within 50 Mpc: NGC 3256 and NGC 3310. Both galaxies are detected by both Chandra and NuSTAR, which together provide the first-ever spectra of these two galaxies spanning 0.3-30 keV. The X-ray emission from both galaxies is spatially resolved by Chandra; we find that hot gas dominates the E 1-3 keV. The NuSTAR galaxy-wide spectra of both galaxies follow steep power-law distributions with Gamma ~ 2.6 at E > 5-7 keV, similar to the spectra of bright individual ULXs and other galaxies that have been studied by NuSTAR. We find that both NGC 3256 and NGC 3310 have X-ray detected sources coincident with nuclear regions; however, the steep NuSTAR spectra of both galaxies restricts these sources to be either low luminosity AGN or non-AGN in nature (e.g., ULXs or crowded X-ray sources that reach L2-10 keV ~ 10^40 erg/s cannot be ruled out). Combining our constraints on the 0.3-30 keV spectra of NGC 3256 and NGC 3310 wi...

  2. High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Biological Tissue Imaging. High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR...

  3. Mass Resolving Power Requirement for Molecular Formula Determination of Fossil Oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Mass Resolving Power Requirement for Molecular Formula Determination of Fossil Oils Chang Samuel numbers based on the molecular formulas determined from accurate mass measurement.1 We have reported of molecular formulas of the components is reviewed. The resolving power required for overlapping compound

  4. Set-up for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction using a femtosecond laser-plasma keV x-ray-source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    -ray-source C. Blome, K. Sokolowski-Tinten* , C. Dietrich, A. Tarasevitch, D. von der Linde Inst. for Laser. Tarasevitch, D. von der Linde Abstract. A short-pulse 4.51keV Ti K femtosecond laser-plasma driven hard x

  5. Fourier-Resolved Spectroscopy of AGN using XMM-Newton data: I. The 3-10 keV band results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. E. Papadakis; Z. Ioannou; D. Kazanas

    2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results from the Fourier Resolved Spectroscopy of archival XMM-Newton data of five AGN, namely, Mrk 766, NGC 3516, NGC 3783, NGC 4051 and Ark 564. This work supplements the earlier study of MCG-6-30-15 as well as those of several Galactic Black Hole Candidate sources. Our results exhibit much larger diversity than those of Galactic sources, a fact we attribute to the diversity of their masses. When we take into account this effect and combine our results with those from Cyg X-1, it seems reasonable to conclude that, at high frequencies, the slope of the Fourier-resolved spectra in accreting black hole systems decreases with increasing frequency as proportional to f^{-0.25}, irrespective of whether the system is in its High or Low state. This result implies that the flux variations in AGN are accompanied by complex spectral slope variations as well. We also find that the Fe Ka line in Mrk 766, NGC 3783 and NGC 4051 is variable on time scales ~day - 1 hour. The iron fluorescence line is absent in the spectra of the highest frequencies,and there is an indication that, just like in Cyg X-1, the equivalent width of the line in the Fourier-resolved of AGN decreases with increasing frequency.

  6. Method for enhancing the resolving power of ion mobility separations over a limited mobility range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for raising the resolving power, specificity, and peak capacity of conventional ion mobility spectrometry is disclosed. Ions are separated in a dynamic electric field comprising an oscillatory field wave and opposing static field, or at least two counter propagating waves with different parameters (amplitude, profile, frequency, or speed). As the functional dependencies of mean drift velocity on the ion mobility in a wave and static field or in unequal waves differ, only single species is equilibrated while others drift in either direction and are mobility-separated. An ion mobility spectrum over a limited range is then acquired by measuring ion drift times through a fixed distance inside the gas-filled enclosure. The resolving power in the vicinity of equilibrium mobility substantially exceeds that for known traveling-wave or drift-tube IMS separations, with spectra over wider ranges obtainable by stitching multiple segments. The approach also enables low-cutoff, high-cutoff, and bandpass ion mobility filters.

  7. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugh, M. J., E-mail: haughmj@nv.doe.gov; Jacoby, K. D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Wu, M.; Loisel, G. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  8. An Investigation to Resolve the Interaction Between Fuel Cell, Power Conditioning System and Application Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudip K. Mazumder

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of high-performance and durable solidoxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and a SOFC power-generating system requires knowledge of the feedback effects from the power-conditioning electronics and from application-electrical-power circuits that may pass through or excite the power-electronics subsystem (PES). Therefore, it is important to develop analytical models and methodologies, which can be used to investigate and mitigate the effects of the electrical feedbacks from the PES and the application loads (ALs) on the reliability and performance of SOFC systems for stationary and non-stationary applications. However, any such attempt to resolve the electrical impacts of the PES on the SOFC would be incomplete unless one utilizes a comprehensive analysis, which takes into account the interactions of SOFC, PES, balance-of-plant system (BOPS), and ALs as a whole. SOFCs respond quickly to changes in load and exhibit high part- and full-load efficiencies due to its rapid electrochemistry, which is not true for the thermal and mechanical time constants of the BOPS, where load-following time constants are, typically, several orders of magnitude higher. This dichotomy can affect the lifetime and durability of the SOFCSs and limit the applicability of SOFC systems for load-varying stationary and transportation applications. Furthermore, without validated analytical models and investigative design and optimization methodologies, realizations of cost-effective, reliable, and optimal PESs (and power-management controls), in particular, and SOFC systems, in general, are difficult. On the whole, the research effort can lead to (a) cost-constrained optimal PES design for high-performance SOFCS and high energy efficiency and power density, (b) effective SOFC power-system design, analyses, and optimization, and (c) controllers and modulation schemes for mitigation of electrical impacts and wider-stability margin and enhanced system efficiency.

  9. Time-resolved temperature study in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britun, Nikolay; Palmucci, Maria; Konstantinidis, Stephanos [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Universite de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Gaillard, Mireille [Groupe de Recherches sur l'Energetique des Milieux Ionises (GREMI), UMR 7344, Universite d'Orleans, 14 rue d'Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Snyders, Rony [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Universite de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The gas heating dynamics is studied in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge operating in Ar-N{sub 2} gas mixtures. The time-resolved rotational temperature analysis based on the spectral transition between the B{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}-X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} energy levels in molecular nitrogen ion (N{sub 2}{sup +} First Negative Band) is undertaken for this purpose. The rotational temperature in the discharge is found to increase linearly during the plasma pulse being roughly independent on the nitrogen content in the examined range. Such a temperature increase is attributed to the bulk gas heating which is the result of collisions with the sputtered species. Two sputtered materials, Ti and W, are examined during the study. In the case of W sputtering, the gas heating is found to be more pronounced than in the Ti case, which is explained by more efficient energy exchange between the sputtered W atoms and the bulk gas atoms during the plasma on-time. The obtained temperature data are compared to the laser-induced fluorescence study of Ar metastable atoms performed recently in the same discharge in our group. The particularities related to gas thermalization as well as to validity of the utilized approach for characterization of the pulsed sputtering discharges are discussed.

  10. AN INVESTIGATION TO RESOLVE THE INTERACTION BETWEEN FUEL CELL, POWER CONDITIONING SYSTEM AND APPLICATION LOADS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudip K. Mazumder; Chuck McKintyre; Dan Herbison; Doug Nelson; Comas Haynes; Michael von Spakovsky; Joseph Hartvigsen; S. Elangovan

    2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stacks respond quickly to changes in load and exhibit high part- and full-load efficiencies due to its rapid electrochemistry. However, this is not true for the thermal, mechanical, and chemical balance-of-plant subsystem (BOPS), where load-following time constants are, typically, several orders of magnitude higher. This dichotomy diminishes the reliability and performance of the electrode with increasing demand of load. Because these unwanted phenomena are not well understood, the manufacturers of SOFC use conservative schemes (such as, delayed load-following to compensate for slow BOPS response or expensive inductor filtering) to control stack responses to load variations. This limits the applicability of SOFC systems for load-varying stationary and transportation applications from a cost standpoint. Thus, a need exists for the synthesis of component- and system-level models of SOFC power-conditioning systems and the development of methodologies for investigating the system-interaction issues (which reduce the lifetime and efficiency of a SOFC) and optimizing the responses of each subsystem, leading to optimal designs of power-conditioning electronics and optimal control strategies, which mitigate the electrical-feedback effects. Equally important are ''multiresolution'' finite-element modeling and simulation studies, which can predict the impact of changes in system-level variables (e.g., current ripple and load-transients) on the local current densities, voltages, and temperature (these parameters are very difficult or cumbersome, if not impossible to obtain) within a SOFC cell. Towards that end, for phase I of this project, sponsored by the U.S. DOE (NETL), we investigate the interactions among fuel cell, power-conditioning system, and application loads and their effects on SOFC reliability (durability) and performance. A number of methodologies have been used in Phase I to develop the steady-state and transient nonlinear models of the SOFC stack subsystem (SOFCSS), the power-electronics subsystem (PES), and the BOPS. Such an approach leads to robust and comprehensive electrical, electrochemical, thermodynamic, kinetic, chemical, and geometric models of the SOFSS, PES and application loads, and BOPS. A comprehensive methodology to resolve interactions among SOFCSS, PES and application loads and to investigate the impacts of the fast- and slow-scale dynamics of the power-conditioning system (PCS) on the SOFCSS has been developed by this team. Parametric studies on SOFCSS have been performed and the effects of current ripple and load transients on SOFC material properties are investigated. These results are used to gain insights into the long-term performance and reliability of the SOFCSS. Based on this analysis, a novel, efficient, and reliable PES for SOFC has been developed. Impacts of SOFC PCS control techniques on the transient responses, flow parameters, and current densities have also been studied and a novel nonlinear hybrid controller for single/parallel DC-DC converter has been developed.

  11. Steps being taken to resolve questions on natural gas use for power generation in the New England region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulick, C. [Boston Gas Company, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Steps being taken to resolve questions on natural gas use for power generation in the New England Region are outlined. The following topics are discussed: bridging the gap, gas/electric discussion group, energy consumption by fuel, NEPOOL energy mix forecast, the players and their needs, pipelines serving New England, evaluation of pipeline reliability, industry survey, summary of survey conclusions, communications, operational differences, recommended red alert information sequence, handling a crisis, and major accomplishments to date.

  12. Using graph theory to resolve state estimator issues faced by deregulated power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei, Jiansheng

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Jiansheng Lei, B.S., Tsinghua University, Beijing, China; M.S., Tsinghua University, Beijing, China Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Garng M. Huang Power industry is undergoing a transition from the traditional regulated environment to the competitive... even under a contingency.............................................................................................1 B. Challenge 2: Run state estimator over a grid with extremely large size ...2 1.2 Topic 1: Network observability...

  13. Fabrication and Evaluation of a Multilayer Laminar-Type Holographic Grating and Its Application to a High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Monochromator for the 1-8 keV Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koike, Masato; Ishino, Masahiko; Imazono, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1 Umemidai, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Heimann, Phil A.; Gullikson, Eric H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Takenaka, Hisataka; Hatayama, Masatoshi [NTT Advanced Technology Corp., 2-1-1, Nishi-shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 163-0431 (Japan); Sasai, Hiroyuki [Shimadzu Corp., 1 Nishinokyo-Kuwabaramachi, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto, 614-0051 (Japan); Sano, Kazuo [Shimadzu Emit Co., Ltd., 2-5-23, Kitahama, Chuo-ku, Osaka 541-0041 (Japan)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A W/C multilayer laminar-type holographic grating was fabricated and its diffraction efficiency was evaluated in the 1-8 keV region. Taking advantage of its high diffraction efficiency a monochromator equipped with a multilayer varied-line-spacing plane grating was designed. The throughput of the monochromator based on the experimental diffraction efficiency of the multilayer grating and resolving power were calculated in comparison with those of a monochromator equipped with a Au coated grating.

  14. Time-resolved x-ray imaging of high-power laser-irradiated under-dense silica aerogels and agar foams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J.A.; Estabrook, K.G.; Bauer, J.D. [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of experiments in which a high-power laser was used to irradiate low density (4 - 9 mg/cm{sup 3}) silica aerogel and agar foam targets. The laser-solid interaction and energy transport through the material were monitored with time-resolved imaging diagnostics, and the data show the production and propagation of an x-ray emission front in the plasma. The emission-front trajectory data are found to be in significant disagreement with detailed simulations, which predict a much more rapid heating of the cold material, and the data suggest that this discrepancy is not explainable by target inhomogeneities. Evidence suggests that energy transport into the cold material may be dominated by thermal conduction; however, no completely satisfactory explanation for the discrepancies is identified, and further experimental and theoretical research is necessary in order to resolve this important problem in laser-plasma interaction physics.

  15. Galaxy Clusters in the Swift/BAT era II: 10 more Clusters detected above 15 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajello, M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Rebusco, P.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Cappelluti, N.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Maryland U., Baltimore County; Reimer, O.; /SLAC /Palermo Observ.; Boehringer, H.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; /Palermo Observ.; ,

    2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the discovery of 10 additional galaxy clusters detected in the ongoing Swift/BAT all-sky survey. Among the newly BAT-discovered clusters there are: Bullet, Abell 85, Norma, and PKS 0745-19. Norma is the only cluster, among those presented here, which is resolved by BAT. For all the clusters we perform a detailed spectral analysis using XMM-Newton and Swift/BAT data to investigate the presence of a hard (non-thermal) X-ray excess. We find that in most cases the clusters emission in the 0.3-200 keV band can be explained by a multi-temperature thermal model confirming our previous results. For two clusters (Bullet and Abell 3667) we find evidence for the presence of a hard X-ray excess. In the case of the Bullet cluster, our analysis confirms the presence of a non-thermal, power-law like, component with a 20-100 keV flux of 3.4 x 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} as detected in previous studies. For Abell 3667 the excess emission can be successfully modeled as a hot component (kT = {approx}13 keV). We thus conclude that the hard X-ray emission from galaxy clusters (except the Bullet) has most likely thermal origin.

  16. Development of an Optimum Tracer Set for Apportioning Emissions of Individual Power Plants Using Highly Time-Resolved Measurements and Advanced Receptor Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Ondov; Gregory Beachley

    2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous studies, 11 elements (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn) were determined in 30-minute aerosol samples collected with the University of Maryland Semicontinuous Elements in Aerosol Sampler (SEAS; Kidwell and Ondov, 2001, 2004; SEAS-II) in several locations in which air quality is influenced by emissions from coal- or oil-fired power plants. At this time resolution, plumes from stationary high temperature combustion sources are readily detected as large excursions in ambient concentrations of elements emitted by these sources (Pancras et al. ). Moreover, the time-series data contain intrinsic information on the lateral diffusion of the plume (e.g., {sigma}{sub y}), which Park et al. (2005 and 2006) have exploited in their Pseudo-Deterministic Receptor Model (PDRM), to calculate emission rates of SO{sub 2} and 11 elements (mentioned above) from four individual coal- and oil-fired power plants in the Tampa Bay area. In the current project, we proposed that the resolving power of source apportionment methods might be improved by expanding the set of maker species and that there exist some optimum set of marker species that could be used. The ultimate goal was to determine the utility of using additional elements to better identify and isolate contributions of individual power plants to ambient levels of PM and its constituents. And, having achieved better resolution, achieve, also, better emission rate estimates. In this study, we optimized sample preparation and instrumental protocols for simultaneous analysis of 28 elements in dilute slurry samples collected with the SEAS with a new state-of-the-art Thermo-Systems, Inc., X-series II, Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and reanalyzed the samples previously collected in Tampa during the modeling period studied by Park et al. (2005) in which emission rates from four coal- and oil-fired power plants affected air quality at the sampling site. In the original model, Park et al. (2005), included 6 sources. Herein, we reassessed the number of contributing sources in light of the new data. A comprehensive list of sources was prepared and both our Gaussian Plume model and PMF were used to identify and predict the relative strengths of source contributions at the receptor sites. Additionally, PDRM was modified to apply National Inventory Emissions, Toxic Release Inventory, and Chemical Mass Balance source profile data to further constrain solutions. Both the original Tampa data set (SO{sub 2} plus 11 elements) and the new expanded data set (SO{sub 2} plus 23 elements) were used to resolve the contributions of particle constituents and PM to sources using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) and PDRM.

  17. Neutron Total Cross Sections of {sup 235}U From Transmission Measurements in the Energy Range 2 keV to 300 keV and Statistical Model Analysis of the Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, H.; Harvey, J.A.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Wright, R.Q.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The average {sup 235}U neutron total cross sections were obtained in the energy range 2 keV to 330 keV from high-resolution transmission measurements of a 0.033 atom/b sample.1 The experimental data were corrected for the contribution of isotope impurities and for resonance self-shielding effects in the sample. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data of Poenitz et al.4 in the energy range 40 keV to 330 keV and are the only available accurate experimental data in the energy range 2 keV to 40 keV. ENDF/B-VI evaluated data are 1.7% larger. The SAMMY/FITACS code 2 was used for a statistical model analysis of the total cross section, selected fission cross sections and data in the energy range 2 keV to 200 keV. SAMMY/FITACS is an extended version of SAMMY which allows consistent analysis of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The Reich-Moore resonance parameters were obtained 3 from a SAMMY Bayesian fits of high resolution experimental neutron transmission and partial cross section data below 2.25 keV, and the corresponding average parameters and covariance data were used in the present work as input for the statistical model analysis of the high energy range of the experimental data. The result of the analysis shows that the average resonance parameters obtained from the analysis of the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those obtained in the resolved energy region. Another important result is that ENDF/B-VI capture cross section could be too small by more than 10% in the energy range 10 keV to 200 keV.

  18. Time resolved measurement of film growth during reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) of titanium nitride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitschker, Felix; Benedikt, Jan; Maszl, Christian; von Keudell, Achim

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth rate during reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) of titanium nitride is measured with a temporal resolution of up to 25 us using a rotating shutter concept. According to that concept a 200 um slit is rotated in front of the substrate synchronous with the HIPIMS pulses. Thereby, the growth flux is laterally distributed over the substrate. By measuring the resulting deposition profile with profilometry and with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the temporal variation of the titanium and nitrogen growth flux per pulse is deduced. The analysis reveals that film growth occurs mainly during a HIPIMS pulse, with the growth rate following the HIPIMS phases ignition, current rise, gas rarefaction, plateau and afterglow. The growth fluxes of titanium and nitrogen follow slightly different behaviors with titanium dominating at the beginning of the HIPIMS pulse and nitrogen at the end of the pulse. This is explained by the gas rarefaction effect resulting in a dense initial metal plasma and...

  19. On the 17-keV neutrino

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hime, A.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review on the status of the 17-keV neutrino is presented. Several different experiments found spectral distortions which were consistently interpreted as evidence for a heavy neutrino admixture in [beta] decay. Recent experiments, however, rule out the existence of a 17-keV neutrino as well as escaping criticisms of earlier null results. Moreover, the majority of positive results have been reinterpreted in terms of instrumental effects, despite the need for a different explanation in each case. Anomalies persist in the low energy region of the tritium spectrum which deserve further investigation.

  20. On the 17-keV neutrino

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hime, A.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review on the status of the 17-keV neutrino is presented. Several different experiments found spectral distortions which were consistently interpreted as evidence for a heavy neutrino admixture in {beta} decay. Recent experiments, however, rule out the existence of a 17-keV neutrino as well as escaping criticisms of earlier null results. Moreover, the majority of positive results have been reinterpreted in terms of instrumental effects, despite the need for a different explanation in each case. Anomalies persist in the low energy region of the tritium spectrum which deserve further investigation.

  1. Fourier resolved spectroscopy of 4U 1543-47 during the 2002 outburst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Reig; I. E. Papadakis; C. R. Shrader; D. Kazanas

    2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained Fourier-resolved spectra of the black-hole binary 4U 1543-47 in the canonical states (high/soft, very high, intermediate and low/hard) observed in this source during the decay of an outburst that took place in 2002. Our objective is to investigate the variability of the spectral components generally used to describe the energy spectra of black-hole systems, namely a disk component, a power-law component attributed to Comptonization by a hot corona and the contribution of the iron line due to reprocessing of the high energy (E > 7 keV) radiation. We find that i) the disk component is not variable on time scales shorter than ~100 seconds, ii) the reprocessing emission as manifest by the variability of the Fe Kalpha line responds to the primary radiation variations down to time scales of ~70 ms in the high and very-high states, but longer than 2 s in the low state, iii) the low-frequency QPOs are associated with variations of the X-ray power law spectral component and not to the disk component and iv) the spectra corresponding to the highest Fourier frequency are the hardest (show the flatter spectra) at a given spectral state. These results question models that explain the observed power spectra as due to modulations of the accretion rate alone, as such models do not provide any apparent reason for a Fourier frequency dependence of the power law spectral indices.

  2. Direct Observations of the (Alpha to Gamma) Transformation at Different Input Powers in the Heat Affected Zone of 1045 C-Mn Steel Arc Welds Observed by Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W

    2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) experiments have been performed during Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel at input powers ranging from 1000 W to 3750 W. In situ diffraction patterns taken at discreet locations across the width of the heat affected zone (HAZ) near the peak of the heating cycle in each weld show regions containing austenite ({gamma}), ferrite and austenite ({alpha}+{gamma}), and ferrite ({alpha}). Changes in input power have a demonstrated effect on the resulting sizes of these regions. The largest effect is on the {gamma} phase region, which nearly triples in width with increasing input power, while the width of the surrounding two phase {alpha}+{gamma} region remains relatively constant. An analysis of the diffraction patterns obtained across this range of locations allows the formation of austenite from the base metal microstructure to be monitored. After the completion of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation, a splitting of the austenite peaks is observed at temperatures between approximately 860 C and 1290 C. This splitting in the austenite peaks results from the dissolution of cementite laths originally present in the base metal pearlite, which remain after the completion of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation, and represents the formation of a second more highly alloyed austenite constituent. With increasing temperatures, carbon, originally present in the cementite laths, diffuses from the second newly formed austenite constituent to the original austenite constituent. Eventually, a homogeneous austenitic microstructure is produced at temperatures of approximately 1300 C and above, depending on the weld input power.

  3. Secondary ion emission under keV carbon cluster bombardment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locklear, Jay Edward

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a surface analysis technique capable of providing isotopic and molecular information. SIMS uses keV projectiles to impinge upon a sample resulting in secondary ion emission from ...

  4. Compact, maintainable 80-KeV neutral beam module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fink, Joel H. (Livermore, CA); Molvik, Arthur W. (Livermore, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, maintainable 80-keV arc chamber, extractor module for a neutral beam system immersed in a vacuum of <10.sup.-2 Torr, incorporating a nested 60-keV gradient shield located midway between the high voltage ion source and surrounding grounded frame. The shield reduces breakdown or arcing path length without increasing the voltage gradient, tends to keep electric fields normal to conducting surfaces rather than skewed and reduces the peak electric field around irregularities on the 80-keV electrodes. The arc chamber or ion source is mounted separately from the extractor or ion accelerator to reduce misalignment of the accelerator and to permit separate maintenance to be performed on these systems. The separate mounting of the ion source provides for maintaining same without removing the ion accelerator.

  5. Time-Resolved Molecular Characterization of Limonene/Ozone Aerosol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    time intervals using a cascade impactor. The SOA samples were extracted into acetonitrile and analyzed using a HR-ESI-MS instrument with a resolving power of 100,000 (m...

  6. Fourier Resolved Spectroscopy of the XMM-Newton Observations of MCG -6-30-15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. E. Papadakis; D. Kazanas; A. Akylas

    2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Frequency Resolved Spectra of the Seyfert galaxy MCG -6-30-15 obtained during two recent XMM-Newton observations. Splitting the Fourier spectra in soft (2 keV) bands, we find that the soft band has a variability amplitude larger than the hard one on time scales longer than 10 ksec, while the opposite is true on time scales shorter than 3 ksec. Both the soft and hard band spectra are well fitted by power laws of different indices. The spectra of the hard band become clearly softer as the Fourier Frequency decreases from 7x10^{-4} Hz to 10^{-5} Hz, while the spectral slope of the soft band power law component is independent of the Fourier frequency. The well known broad Fe Ka feature is absent at all frequency bins; this result implies that this feature is not variable on time scales shorter than ~10^5 sec, in agreement with recent line variability studies. Strong spectral features are also present in the soft X-ray band (at E~0.7), clearly discernible in all Fourier Frequency bins. This fact is consistent with the assumption that they are due to absorption by intervening matter within the source.

  7. Hydrogen-Atom Excitation and Ionization by Proton Impact in 50-Kev to 200-Kev Energy Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitchard, E.; Ford, A. Lewis; Reading, John F.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PH YSICAL RE VIE% A VOLUME 16, N UMBER 8 SEPTEMBER 1977 Hydrogen-atom excitation and ionization by proton impact in the 50- to 200-keV energy region E. Fitchard, A. L. Ford, and J. F. Reading Cyclotron Institute and Department of Physics, Texas A..., and include all terms in the Born series. For projectile energies between SO and 200 keV the results are in excellent agreement with rec'ent experiments. The excitation and ionization of a hydrogen atom by proton impact has been for many years, and still...

  8. First limits on the 3-200 keV X-ray spectrum of the quiet Sun using RHESSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iain G. Hannah; G. J Hurford; H. S. Hudson; R. P. Lin; K. van Bibber

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first results using the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, RHESSI, to observe solar X-ray emission not associated with active regions, sunspots or flares (the quiet Sun). Using a newly developed chopping technique (fan-beam modulation) during seven periods of offpointing between June 2005 to October 2006, we obtained upper limits over 3-200 keV for the quietest times when the GOES12 1-8A flux fell below $10^{-8}$ Wm$^{-2}$. These values are smaller than previous limits in the 17-120 keV range and extend them to both lower and higher energies. The limit in 3-6 keV is consistent with a coronal temperature $\\leq 6$ MK. For quiet Sun periods when the GOES12 1-8A background flux was between $10^{-8}$ Wm$^{-2}$ and $10^{-7}$ Wm$^{-2}$, the RHESSI 3-6 keV flux correlates to this as a power-law, with an index of $1.08 \\pm 0.13$. The power-law correlation for microflares has a steeper index of $1.29 \\pm 0.06$. We also discuss the possibility of observing quiet Sun X-rays due to solar axions and use the RHESSI quiet Sun limits to estimate the axion-to-photon coupling constant for two different axion emission scenarios.

  9. A keV String Axion from High Scale Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Henning; John Kehayias; Hitoshi Murayama; David Pinner; Tsutomu T. Yanagida

    2015-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Various theoretical and experimental considerations motivate models with high scale supersymmetry breaking. While such models may be difficult to test in colliders, we propose looking for signatures at much lower energies. We show that a keV line in the X-ray spectrum of galaxy clusters (such as the recently disputed 3.5 keV observation) can have its origin in a universal string axion coupled to a hidden supersymmetry breaking sector. A linear combination of the string axion and an additional axion in the hidden sector remains light, obtaining a mass of order 10 keV through supersymmetry breaking dynamics. In order to explain the X-ray line, the scale of supersymmetry breaking must be about $10^{11-12}$ GeV. This motivates high scale supersymmetry as in pure gravity mediation or minimal split supersymmetry and is consistent with all current limits. Since the axion mass is controlled by a dynamical mass scale, this mass can be much higher during inflation, avoiding isocurvature (and domain wall) problems associated with high scale inflation. In an appendix we present a mechanism for dilaton stabilization that additionally leads to $\\mathcal{O}(1)$ modifications of the gaugino mass from anomaly mediation.

  10. The positron density in the intergalactic medium and the galactic 511 keV line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vecchio, A; Miralda-Escude, J; Pena-Garay, C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 511 keV electron-positron annihilation line, most recently characterized by the INTEGRAL/SPI experiment, is highly concentrated towards the Galactic centre. Its origin remains unknown despite decades of scrutiny. We propose a novel scenario in which known extragalactic positron sources such as radio jets of active galactic nuclei (AGN) fill the intergalactic medium with MeV e+e- pairs, which are then accreted into the Milky Way. We show that interpreting the diffuse cosmic radio background (CRB) as arising from radio sources with characteristics similar to the observed cores and radio lobes in powerful AGN jets suggests that the intergalactic positron-to-electron ratio could be as high as 10^{-5}, although this can be decreased if the CRB is not all produced by pairs and if not all positrons escape to the intergalactic medium. Assuming an accretion rate of one solar mass per year of matter into the Milky Way, a positron-to-electron ratio of only 10^{-7} is already enough to account for much of the 511 keV...

  11. The positron density in the intergalactic medium and the galactic 511 keV line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Vecchio; A. C. Vincent; J. Miralda-Escude; C. Pena-Garay

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 511 keV electron-positron annihilation line, most recently characterized by the INTEGRAL/SPI experiment, is highly concentrated towards the Galactic centre. Its origin remains unknown despite decades of scrutiny. We propose a novel scenario in which known extragalactic positron sources such as radio jets of active galactic nuclei (AGN) fill the intergalactic medium with MeV e+e- pairs, which are then accreted into the Milky Way. We show that interpreting the diffuse cosmic radio background (CRB) as arising from radio sources with characteristics similar to the observed cores and radio lobes in powerful AGN jets suggests that the intergalactic positron-to-electron ratio could be as high as 10^{-5}, although this can be decreased if the CRB is not all produced by pairs and if not all positrons escape to the intergalactic medium. Assuming an accretion rate of one solar mass per year of matter into the Milky Way, a positron-to-electron ratio of only 10^{-7} is already enough to account for much of the 511 keV emission of the Galaxy. A simple spherical accretion model predicts an emission profile highly peaked in the central bulge, consistent with INTEGRAL observations. However, a realistic model of accretion with angular momentum would likely imply a more extended emission over the disk, with uncertainties depending on the magnetic field structure and turbulence in the galactic halo.

  12. KeV Warm Dark Matter and Composite Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean J Robinson; Yuhsin Tsai

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Elementary keV sterile Dirac neutrinos can be a natural ingredient of the composite neutrino scenario. For a certain class of composite neutrino theories, these sterile neutrinos naturally have the appropriate mixing angles to be resonantly produced warm dark matter (WDM). Alternatively, we show these sterile neutrinos can be WDM produced by an entropy-diluted thermal freeze-out, with the necessary entropy production arising not from an out-of-equilibrium decay, but rather from the confinement of the composite neutrino sector, provided there is sufficient supercooling.

  13. 12.6 keV Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugland, N; Constantin, C G; Niemann, C; Neumayer, P; Chung, H; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Glenzer, S H; Girard, F

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A high contrast 12.6 keV Kr K{alpha} source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility. The contrast ratio (K{alpha} to continuum) is 65, with a competitive ultra short pulse laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 10{sup -5}. Filtered shadowgraphy indicates that the Kr K{alpha} and K{beta} x-rays are emitted from a roughly 1 x 2 mm emission volume, making this source suitable for area backlighting and scattering. Spectral calculations indicate a typical bulk electron temperature of 50-70 eV (i.e. mean ionization state 13-16), based on the observed ratio of K{alpha} to K{beta}. Kr gas jets provide a debris-free high energy K{alpha} source for time-resolved diagnosis of dense matter.

  14. New Observations of the Solar 0.5-5 keV Soft X-ray Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar corona is orders of magnitude hotter than the underlying photosphere, but how the corona attains such high temperatures is still not understood. Soft X-ray (SXR) emission provides important diagnostics for thermal processes in the high-temperature corona, and is also an important driver of ionospheric dynamics at Earth. There is a crucial observational gap between ~0.2 and ~4 keV, outside the ranges of existing spectrometers. We present observations from a new SXR spectrometer, the Amptek X123-SDD, which measured the spatially-integrated solar spectral irradiance from ~0.5 to ~5 keV, with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution, during sounding rocket flights on 2012 June 23 and 2013 October 21. These measurements show that the highly variable SXR emission is orders of magnitude greater than that during the deep minimum of 2009, even with only weak activity. The observed spectra show significant high-temperature (5-10 MK) emission and are well fit by simple power-law temperature distributions with indices of ~6, ...

  15. Contrasting physics in wire array z pinch sources of 1-20?keV emission on the Z facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ampleford, D. J., E-mail: damplef@sandia.gov; Jones, B.; Jennings, C. A.; Hansen, S. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Rochau, G. A.; Coverdale, C. A.; Laspe, A. R.; Flanagan, T. M.; Moore, N. W.; Sinars, D. B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Harding, E. C.; Sygar, W. A.; Savage, M. E.; Moore, J. K.; Focia, R.; Wagoner, T. C.; Killebrew, K. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Imploding wire arrays on the 20 MA Z generator have recently provided some of the most powerful and energetic laboratory sources of multi-keV photons, including ?375?kJ of Al K-shell emission (h????1–2?keV), ?80?kJ of stainless steel K-shell emission (h????5–9?keV) and a kJ-level of Mo K-shell emission (h????17?keV). While the global implosion dynamics of these different wire arrays are very similar, the physical process that dominates the emission from these x-ray sources fall into three broad categories. Al wire arrays produce a column of plasma with densities up to ?3?×?10{sup 21} ions/cm{sup 3}, where opacity inhibits the escape of K-shell photons. Significant structure from instabilities can reduce the density and increase the surface area, therefore increase the K-shell emission. In contrast, stainless steel wire arrays operate in a regime where achieving a high pinch temperature (achieved by thermalizing a high implosion kinetic energy) is critical and, while opacity is present, it has less impact on the pinch emissivity. At higher photon energies, line emission associated with inner shell ionization due to energetic electrons becomes important.

  16. Absolute Time-Resolved Emission of Non-LTE L-Shell Spectra from Ti-Doped Aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back,C.; Feldman, U.; Weaver, J.; Seely, J.; Constantin, C.; Holland, G.; Lee, R.; Chung, H.; Scott, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outstanding discrepancies between data and calculations of laser-produced plasmas in recombination have been observed since the 1980s. Although improvements in hydrodynamic modeling may reduce the discrepancies, there are indications that non-LTE atomic kinetics may be the dominant cause. Experiments to investigate non-LTE effects were recently performed at the NIKE KrF laser on low-density Ti-doped aerogels. The laser irradiated a 2 mm diameter, cylindrical sample of various lengths with a 4-ns square pulse to create a volumetrically heated plasma. Ti L-shell spectra spanning a range of 0.47-3 keV were obtained with a transmission grating coupled to Si photodiodes. The diagnostic can be configured to provide 1-dimensional spatial resolution at a single photon energy, or 18 discrete energies with a resolving power, {gamma}/{delta}{gamma} of 3-20. The data are examined and compared to calculations to develop absolute emission measurements that can provide new tests of the non-LTE physics.

  17. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Tennessee October 22, 2010 Outline * The -ray instruments at ATLAS * The people * The physics * The future 2 Huge progress in 25 years in resolving power of -ray...

  18. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT (Conference Chair) [Conference Chair; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE�s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE�s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  19. Experimental Determination of the HPGe Spectrometer Efficiency Calibration Curves for Various Sample Geometry for Gamma Energy from 50 keV to 2000 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saat, Ahmad [Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam (Malaysia); Hamzah, Zaini; Yusop, Mohammad Fariz; Zainal, Muhd Amiruddin [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam (Malaysia)

    2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection efficiency of a gamma-ray spectrometry system is dependent upon among others, energy, sample and detector geometry, volume and density of the samples. In the present study the efficiency calibration curves of newly acquired (August 2008) HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry system was carried out for four sample container geometries, namely Marinelli beaker, disc, cylindrical beaker and vial, normally used for activity determination of gamma-ray from environmental samples. Calibration standards were prepared by using known amount of analytical grade uranium trioxide ore, homogenized in plain flour into the respective containers. The ore produces gamma-rays of energy ranging from 53 keV to 1001 keV. Analytical grade potassium chloride were prepared to determine detection efficiency of 1460 keV gamma-ray emitted by potassium isotope K-40. Plots of detection efficiency against gamma-ray energy for the four sample geometries were found to fit smoothly to a general form of {epsilon} = A{Epsilon}{sup a}+B{Epsilon}{sup b}, where {epsilon} is efficiency, {Epsilon} is energy in keV, A, B, a and b are constants that are dependent on the sample geometries. All calibration curves showed the presence of a ''knee'' at about 180 keV. Comparison between the four geometries showed that the efficiency of Marinelli beaker is higher than cylindrical beaker and vial, while cylindrical disk showed the lowest.

  20. Measurement of the differential neutron-deuteron scattering cross section in the energy range from 100 keV to 600 keV using a proportional counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolte, R; Plompen, A; Röttger, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The angular distribution of neutron-deuteron scattering was investigated using the proportional counter P2 simultaneously as scattering target and detector for the recoil deuterons. The measurements were carried out using monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range from 150 keV to 500 keV. Various techniques were employed to reduce distortions of the experimental pulse-height distribution by photon-induced events. The experimental data were compared with realistic simulations which were carried out using different evaluated data sets. This comparison allows to conclude on inconsistencies in the evaluations.

  1. Efficient laser-induced 6-8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel and foil-lined cavity targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, F.; Kay, J. J.; Patterson, J. R.; Kane, J.; May, M.; Emig, J.; Colvin, J.; Gammon, S.; Satcher, J. H. Jr.; Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Villette, B.; Girard, F.; Reverdin, C. [CEA DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Sorce, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of Rochester - Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 E. River Rd, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Jaquez, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of new iron-based laser-driven x-ray sources has been tested at the OMEGA laser facility for production of x rays in the 6.5-8.5 keV range. Two types of targets were experimentally investigated: low-density iron oxide aerogels (density 6-16 mg/cm{sup 3}) and stainless steel foil-lined cavity targets (steel thickness 1-5 {mu}m). The targets were irradiated by 40 beams of the OMEGA laser (500 J/beam, 1 ns pulse, wavelength 351 nm). All targets showed good coupling with the laser, with <5% of the incident laser light backscattered by the resulting plasma in all cases (typically <2.5%). The aerogel targets produced T{sub e}=2 to 3 keV, n{sub e}=0.12-0.2 critical density plasmas yielding a 40%-60% laser-to-x-ray total conversion efficiency (CE) (1.2%-3% in the Fe K-shell range). The foil cavity targets produced T{sub e}{approx} 2 keV, n{sub e}{approx} 0.15 critical density plasmas yielding a 60%-75% conversion efficiency (1.6%-2.2% in the Fe K-shell range). Time-resolved images illustrate that the volumetric heating of low-density aerogels allow them to emit a higher K-shell x-ray yield even though they contain fewer Fe atoms. However, their challenging fabrication process leads to a larger shot-to-shot variation than cavity targets.

  2. Position and energy-resolved particle detection using phonon-mediated microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, D. C.; Golwala, S. R.; Cornell, B. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bumble, B.; Day, P. K.; LeDuc, H. G. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Zmuidzinas, J. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate position and energy-resolved phonon-mediated detection of particle interactions in a silicon substrate instrumented with an array of microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The relative magnitude and delay of the signal received in each sensor allow the location of the interaction to be determined with < or approx. 1mm resolution at 30 keV. Using this position information, variations in the detector response with position can be removed, and an energy resolution of {sigma}{sub E} = 0.55 keV at 30 keV was measured. Since MKIDs can be fabricated from a single deposited film and are naturally multiplexed in the frequency domain, this technology can be extended to provide highly pixelized athermal phonon sensors for {approx}1 kg scale detector elements. Such high-resolution, massive particle detectors would be applicable to rare-event searches such as the direct detection of dark matter, neutrinoless double-beta decay, or coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  3. Improved refractories for IGCC power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, Cynthia P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennet, James P.; Chinn, Richard E.; Dahlin, Cheryl L.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain advantages make coal gasification a key element in the US Department of Energy's Vision 21 power system. However, issues of reliability and gasifier operation economics need to be resolved before gasification is widely adopted by the power generation industry.

  4. Hyper-filter-fluorescer spectrometer for x-rays above 120 keV

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Ching L. (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus utilizing filter-fluorescer combinations is provided to measure short bursts of high fluence x-rays above 120 keV energy, where there are no practical absorption edges available for conventional filter-fluorescer techniques. The absorption edge of the prefilter is chosen to be less than that of the fluorescer, i.e., E.sub.PRF E.sub.F. In this way, the response function is virtually zero between E.sub.PRF and E.sub.F and well defined and enhanced in an energy band of less than 1000 keV above the 120 keV energy.

  5. A New Way to Resolve Cepheid Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nancy Remage Evans; Derck Massa

    2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the centroid shift of low resolution HST FOC spectra as the dominant star changes from the Cepheid to the hot companion. With this approach we have resolved the AW Per system and marginally resolved the U Aql system.

  6. A Dynamical Framework for KeV Dirac Neutrino Warm Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean J. Robinson; Yuhsin Tsai

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    If the source of the reported $3.5$ keV x-ray line is a sterile neutrino, comprising an $\\mathcal{O}(1)$ fraction of the dark matter (DM), then it exhibits the property that its mass times mixing angle is $\\sim \\mbox{few} \\times 10^{-2}$ eV, a plausible mass scale for the active neutrinos. This property is a common feature of Dirac neutrino mixing. We present a framework that dynamically produces light active and keV sterile Dirac neutrinos, with appropriate mixing angles to be the x-ray line source. The central idea is that the right-handed active neutrino is a composite state, while elementary sterile neutrinos gain keV masses similarly to the quarks in extended Technicolor. The entire framework is fixed by just two dynamical scales and may automatically exhibit a warm dark matter (WDM) production mechanism -- dilution of thermal relics from late decays of a heavy composite neutrino -- such that the keV neutrinos may comprise an $\\mathcal{O}(1)$ fraction of the DM. In this framework, the WDM is typically quite cool and within structure formation bounds, with temperature $\\sim \\mbox{few}\\times 10^{-2}~T_\

  7. 5 (Upgradable to 25 keV) Free Electron Laser (FEL) Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, R C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility utilizing a recirculated Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) provides the opportunity to achieve about five times greater photon energy than an unrecirculated linac of similar cost. > A 4 GeV SRF, cw, electron linac can be used to drive an FEL producing 5 keV photons. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, a Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) laboratory, proposes to utilize a 4 GeV unrecirculated, SRF, linac in a segment of existing linac tunnel. > For an initial investment similar to that of the proposed SLAC strategy, a recirculated SRF linac system could deliver the 4 GeV electrons for photon energies of 5 keV and provide an upgrade path to photon energies of 25 keV. > Further support amounting to about a third of the initial investment would provide upgrade funds for additional SRF linac and cryogenic capacity sufficient to provide electron energies appropriate for 25 keV photons matching the European XFEL.

  8. Time-Resolved Photoluminescence and Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, W. K.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Dippo, P.; Geisz, J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) technique and its ability to characterize recombination in bulk photovoltaic semiconductor materials are reviewed. Results from a variety of materials and a few recent studies are summarized and compared.

  9. Measurements of the neutron-proton and neutron-carbon total cross section from 150 to 800 keV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daub, B. H.

    There have been very few measurements of the total cross section for np scattering below 500 keV. To differentiate among NN potential models, improved cross section data between 20 and 600 keV are required. We measured the ...

  10. DOE Successfully Resolves Three Enforcement Cases and Files Yet...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Successfully Resolves Three Enforcement Cases and Files Yet Another DOE Successfully Resolves Three Enforcement Cases and Files Yet Another September 29, 2010 - 5:24pm Addthis The...

  11. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cold C60- Anions. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved...

  12. Note: On the generation of sub-300 keV flash-X-rays using rod-pinch diode: An experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satyanarayana, N.; Rajawat, R. K.; Basu, Shibaji [Facility for Electromagnetic Systems, BARCF(V), B-Block, Autonagar, Visakhapatnam 530012, Andhra Pradesh (India); Rao, A. Durga Prasad [Department of Nuclear Physics, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam 530001, Andhra Pradesh (India); Mittal, K. C. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of flash X-rays (FXRs) at less than 500 keV is described with emphasis on experimental investigation. The pulser is a Tesla transformer-Water transmission line based pulsed power generator operating in double resonance mode to power a rod-pinch diode. The configuration of aspect ratio reported here falls much below the normally reported ratios for the rod-pinch diode operation. Experimental investigation at such low pulsed voltage has revealed “flowering” of the anode tip and “pitting” of the perspex window. A possible explanation in terms of Lorentz body force is discussed rather than the pinch mechanism generally suggested in literature. The experimental investigation for the FXR generation is corroborated by measuring the radiation dose using CaSO{sub 4} (Dy) thermo luminescent dosimeters.

  13. Spatially resolved measurement of high doses in microbeam radiation therapy using samarium doped fluorophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okada, Go; Morrell, Brian; Koughia, Cyril; Kasap, Safa [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Edgar, Andy; Varoy, Chris [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences and MacDiarmid Institute, Victoria University of Wellington, Kelburn Parade (New Zealand); Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz [Canadian Light Source Inc., University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Chapman, Dean [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E5 (Canada)

    2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of spatially resolved high doses in microbeam radiation therapy has always been a challenging task, where a combination of high dose response and high spatial resolution (microns) is required for synchrotron radiation peaked around 50 keV. The x-ray induced Sm{sup 3+}{yields} Sm{sup 2+} valence conversion in Sm{sup 3+} doped fluorophosphates glasses has been tested for use in x-ray dosimetry for microbeam radiation therapy. The conversion efficiency depends almost linearly on the dose of irradiation up to {approx}5 Gy and saturates at doses exceeding {approx}80 Gy. The conversion shows strong correlation with x-ray induced absorbance of the glass which is related to the formation of phosphorus-oxygen hole centers. When irradiated through a microslit collimator, a good spatial resolution and high ''peak-to-valley'' contrast have been observed by means of confocal photoluminescence microscopy.

  14. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Vecchio, K. S. [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Huskins, E. L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Casem, D. T. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Gruner, S. M. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Woll, A. R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ?10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup ?1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (?40??s) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  15. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63Cu and 65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobes, Vladimir [ORNL] [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL] [ORNL; Guber, Klaus H [ORNL] [ORNL; Forget, Benoit [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kopecky, S. [EC-JRC-IRMM, Geel, Belgium] [EC-JRC-IRMM, Geel, Belgium; Schillebeeckx, P. [EC-JRC-IRMM, Geel, Belgium] [EC-JRC-IRMM, Geel, Belgium; Siegler, P. [EC-JRC-IRMM, Geel, Belgium] [EC-JRC-IRMM, Geel, Belgium

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63Cu and 65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at ORELA and one from MITR, and two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identied for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope was based on the identied resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) were determined to match the dierential thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Double dierential elastic scattering cross sections were calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  16. Pixel array detector for time-resolved x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodricks, B.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Barna, S.L.; Gruner, S.M.; Shepherd, J.A.; Tate, M.W.; Wixted, R.L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of a large-area hybrid pixel detector designed for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray scattering experiments where limited frames, with a high framing rate, is required. The final design parameters call for a 1024{times}1O24 pixel array device with 150-micron pixels that is 100% quantum efficient for x-rays with energy up to 20 keV, with a framing rate in the microsecond range. The device will consist of a fully depleted diode array bump bonded to a CMOS electronic storage capacitor array with eight frames per pixel. The two devices may be separated by a x-ray blocking layer that protects the radiation-sensitive electronics layer from damage. The signal is integrated in the electronics layer and stored in one of eight CMOS capacitors. After eight frames are taken, the data are then read out, using clocking electronics external to the detector, and stored in a RAM disk. Results will be presented on the development of a prototype 4{times}4 pixel electronics layer that is capable of storing at least 10,000 12-keV x-ray photons for a capacity of over 50 million electrons with a noise corresponding to 2 x-ray photons per pixel. The diode detective layer, electronics storage layer along with the radiation damage and blocking layers will be discussed.

  17. Energy resolved X-ray grating interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thuering, T.; Stampanoni, M. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland) [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Barber, W. C.; Iwanczyk, J. S. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)] [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States); Seo, Y.; Alhassen, F. [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)] [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

    2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Although compatible with polychromatic radiation, the sensitivity in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a grating interferometer is strongly dependent on the X-ray spectrum. We used an energy resolving detector to quantitatively investigate the dependency of the noise from the spectral bandwidth and to consequently optimize the system-by selecting the best energy band matching the experimental conditions-with respect to sensitivity maximization and, eventually, dose. Further, since theoretical calculations of the spectrum are usually limited due to non-ideal conditions, an energy resolving detector accurately quantifies the spectral changes induced by the interferometer including flux reduction and beam hardening.

  18. Power Factor Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    motor power: 117.7 V x 5.1 A = 600 W? = 0.6 kW? NOT the power measured by meter #12;Page 9 PSERC: displacement power factor: angle between voltage and current = 0 degrees pf = cos(0 degrees) = 1.0 true powerPage 1 PSERC Power Factor and Reactive Power Ward Jewell Wichita State University Power Systems

  19. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observation of the 1809 keV line from Galactic 26Al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Smith

    2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of the central radian of the Galaxy by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopy Imager (RHESSI) have yielded a high-resolution measurement of the 1809 keV line from 26Al, detected at 11 sigma significance in nine months of data. The RHESSI result for the width of the cosmic line is 2.03 (+0.78, -1.21) keV FWHM. The best fit line width of 5.4 keV FWHM reported by Naya et al. (1996) using the Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) balloon instrument is rejected with high confidence.

  20. Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models RMetS Conference 4th September 2007 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations What is the distribution of cloud lifetimes? What factors determine the lifetime of an individual

  1. 6, 1184511875, 2006 A new SIze REsolved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the aerosol size distribution into sections and solves the GDE by splitting coagulation and condensation Interactive Discussion EGU that affect the aerosol size/composition distribution are therefore crucial. ThreeACPD 6, 11845­11875, 2006 A new SIze REsolved Aerosol Model E. Debry et al. Title Page Abstract

  2. R-Matrix Analysis of 238U High Resolution Neutron Transmissions and Capture Cross Sections in the Energy Range 0 keV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, Herve [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL; Larson, Nancy M [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron resonance parameters of 238U were obtained from a SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements and high-resolution capture cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the years 1970-1990 and from more recent transmission and capture cross section measurements performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA). Compared with previous evaluations, the energy range for this resonance analysis was extended from 10 to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high resolution of the most recent ORELA transmission measurements. The experimental database and the method of analysis are described in this report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared with the experimental data. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters and of the recommended values of the average parameters. The new evaluation results in a slight decrease of the effective capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks by 70 to 200 pcm.

  3. E0 = 20 keV EDS records the entire spectrum. It is very appealing to directly and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Label: Substrate steel 1 20 keV/0.5 nA/300kX 6-29-94 offset=-30 Standardless Analysis Take-Off Angle: 40 beam energy Ec = excitation energy = EDS efficiency Measure this Calculate this #12;Spectrum Label: Substrate steel 1 20 keV/0.5 nA/300kX 6-29-94 offset=-30 Standardless Analysis Take-Off Angle: 40.00 Beam

  4. Improving accuracy and reliability of 186-keV measurements for unattended enrichment monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goda, Joetta M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lombardi, Marcie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Paffett, Mark T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacArthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving the quality of safeguards measurements at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants (GCEPs), whilst reducing the inspection effort, is an important objective given the number of existing and new plants that need to be safeguarded. A useful tool in many safeguards approaches is the on-line monitoring of enrichment in process pipes. One aspect of this measurement is a simple, reliable and precise passive measurement of the 186-keV line from {sup 235}U. (The other information required is the amount of gas in the pipe. This can be obtained by transmission measurements or pressure measurements). In this paper we describe our research efforts towards such a passive measurement system. The system includes redundant measurements of the 186-keV line from the gas and separately from the wall deposits. The design also includes measures to reduce the effect of the potentially important background. Such an approach would practically eliminate false alarms and can maintain the operation of the system even with a hardware malfunction in one of the channels. The work involves Monte Carlo modeling and the construction of a proof-of-principle prototype. We will carry out experimental tests with UF{sub 6} gas in pipes with and without deposits in order to demonstrate the deposit correction.

  5. Interstitial defects in silicon from 1{endash}5 keV Si{sup +} ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, A.; Haynes, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Eaglesham, D.J.; Gossmann, H.; Jacobson, D.C.; Poate, J.M. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Erokhin, Y.E. [Eaton Corporation, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)] [Eaton Corporation, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extended defects from 5-, 2-, and 1-keV Si{sup +} ion implantation are investigated by transmission electron microscopy using implantation doses of 1 and 3{times}10{sup 14}cm{sup {minus}2} and annealing temperatures from 750 to 900{degree}C. Despite the proximity of the surface, {l_brace}311{r_brace}-type defects are observed even for 1 keV. Samples with a peak concentration of excess interstitials exceeding {approximately}1{percent} of the atomic density also contain some {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects which are corrugated across their width. These so-called zig-zag {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects are more stable than the ordinary {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects, having a dissolution rate at 750{degree}C which is ten times smaller. Due to their enhanced stability, the zig-zag {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects grow to lengths that are many times longer than their distance from the surface. It is proposed that zig-zag {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects form during the early stages of annealing by coalescence the high volume density of {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects confined within a very narrow implanted layer. These findings indicate that defect formation and dissolution will continue to control the interstitial supersaturation from ion implantation down to very low energies. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Nanoscale spatially resolved infrared spectra from single microdroplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Thomas; Kulik, Andrzej J; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Mason, Thomas O; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Dietler, Giovanni

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Droplet microfluidics has emerged as a powerful platform allowing a large number of individual reactions to be carried out in spatially distinct microcompartments. Due to their small size, however, the spectroscopic characterisation of species encapsulated in such systems remains challenging. In this paper, we demonstrate the acquisition of infrared spectra from single microdroplets containing aggregation-prone proteins. To this effect, droplets are generated in a microfluidic flow-focussing device and subsequently deposited in a square array onto a ZnSe prism using a micro stamp. After drying, the solutes present in the droplets are illuminated locally by an infrared laser through the prism, and their thermal expansion upon absorption of infrared radiation is measured with an atomic force microscopy tip, granting nanoscale resolution. Using this approach, we resolve structural differences in the amide bands of the spectra of monomeric and aggregated lysozyme from single microdroplets with picolitre volume.

  7. aur spatially resolved: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nearest star-forming regions (140 pc). Large, 6-10m ground-based telescopes with mid-infrared instruments can resolve these systems. In this paper, we spatially resolve the 0.88"...

  8. Polarization- and Azimuth-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Azimuth-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Water on TiO2(110): Anisotropy and the Hydrogen-Bonding Network. Polarization- and Azimuth-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Water on...

  9. Prospects for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope Sensitivity to 14.4 keV Axions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kresimir Jakovcic; for the CAST Collaboration

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is searching for solar axions using the 9.0 T strong and 9.26 m long transverse magnetic field of a twin aperture LHC test magnet, where axions could be converted into X-rays via reverse Primakoff process. Here we explore the potential of CAST to search for 14.4 keV axions that could be emitted from the Sun in M1 nuclear transition between the first, thermally excited state, and the ground state of 57Fe nuclide. Calculations of the expected signals, with respect to the axion-photon coupling, axion-nucleon coupling and axion mass, are presented in comparison with the experimental sensitivity.

  10. Double-beta-decay mass constraints on 17-keV neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haxton, W.C. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (USA))

    1991-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts to reconcile a 17-keV neutrino with constraints from astrophysics and double beta decay have led to model Majorana neutrino mass matrices with vanishing (or nearly vanishing) electron-electron components. A simple parametrization is presented of the higher-order mass effects on the intermediate-state propagator through which 0{nu} {beta}{beta} decay can still occur. For light-mass eigenstates, the 0{nu} and 2{nu} rates are proportional, with the ratio depending on a weighted sum over mass eigenstates {l angle}{ital m}{sub {nu}}{sup 3}{r angle}{sub {ital L}{ital L}}{sup Maj}. Thus, model 0{nu} {beta}{beta} decay rates can be predicted with confidence.

  11. Fourier resolved spectroscopy of 4U 1728-34: New Insights into Spectral and Temporal Properties of Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Shrader; P. Reig; D. Kazanas

    2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Using archival RXTE data we derive the 2-16 keV Fourier-resolved spectra of the Atoll source 4U 1728-34 in a sequence of its timing states as its low QPO frequency spans the range between 6 and 94 Hz. The increase in the QPO frequency accompanies a spectral transition of the source from its island to its banana states. The banana-states' Fourier-resolved spectra are well fitted by a single blackbody component with $kT \\sim 2-3$ keV depending on the source position in the color -- color diagram and the Fourier frequency, thus indicating that this spectral component is responsible for the source variability on these timescales. This result is in approximate agreement with similar behavior exhibited by the Z sources, suggesting that, as in that case, the boundary layer -- the likely source of the thermal component -- is supported by radiation pressure. Furthermore, it is found that the iron line at $\\sim$6.6 keV, clearly present in the averaged spectra, not apparent within the limitations of our measurements in the frequency-resolved spectra irrespective of the frequency range. This would indicate that this spectral component exhibits little variability on time scales comprising the interval $10^{-2}-10^2$ seconds. In the island state the single blackbody model proved inadequate, particularly notable in our lowest frequency band ($0.008-0.8$ Hz). An absorbed powerlaw or an additive blackbody plus hard powerlaw model was required to obtain a satisfactory fit. Statistics do not allow unambiguous discrimination between these possible scenarios.

  12. Resolving the BLR in NGC 3783

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Lira; M. Kishimoto; A. Robinson; S. Young; D. Axon; M. Elvis; A. Lawrence; B. Peterson

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from very high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3783. Position Angle (PA) changes across the Balmer lines show that the scatterer is resolving the Broad-Emission Line Region (BLR). A broad component seen in polarized light and located bluewards from the H$\\beta$ line very likely corresponds to HeII$\\lambda4686$. The lack of PA changes across this line suggests that the region responsible for this emission appears to the scatterer as unresolved as the continuum source, in agreement with the stratified BLR structure determined from reverberation mapping.

  13. Time-resolved ion energy distribution meas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (NextTime-Resolved Study of Bondingresolved

  14. Power Plant Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

  15. Resolved Sideband Cooling of a Micromechanical Oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Schliesser; R. Rivière; G. Anetsberger; O. Arcizet; T. J. Kippenberg

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro- and nanoscale opto-mechanical systems provide radiation pressure coupling of optical and mechanical degree of freedom and are actively pursued for their ability to explore quantum mechanical phenomena of macroscopic objects. Many of these investigations require preparation of the mechanical system in or close to its quantum ground state. Remarkable progress in ground state cooling has been achieved for trapped ions and atoms confined in optical lattices. Imperative to this progress has been the technique of resolved sideband cooling, which allows overcoming the inherent temperature limit of Doppler cooling and necessitates a harmonic trapping frequency which exceeds the atomic species' transition rate. The recent advent of cavity back-action cooling of mechanical oscillators by radiation pressure has followed a similar path with Doppler-type cooling being demonstrated, but lacking inherently the ability to attain ground state cooling as recently predicted. Here we demonstrate for the first time resolved sideband cooling of a mechanical oscillator. By pumping the first lower sideband of an optical microcavity, whose decay rate is more than twenty times smaller than the eigen-frequency of the associated mechanical oscillator, cooling rates above 1.5 MHz are attained. Direct spectroscopy of the motional sidebands reveals 40-fold suppression of motional increasing processes, which could enable reaching phonon occupancies well below unity (cooling as reported here should find widespread use in opto-mechanical cooling experiments. Apart from ground state cooling, this regime allows realization of motion measurement with an accuracy exceeding the standard quantum limit.

  16. The Swift/Fermi GRB 080928 from 1 eV to 150 keV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, A; Klose, S; Kann, D A; Rau, A; Krimm, H A; Jóhannesson, G; Panaitescu, A; Yuan, F; Ferrero, P; Krühler, T; Greiner, J; Schady, P; Pandey, S B; Amati, L; Afonso, P M J; Akerlof, C W; Arnold, L; Clemens, C; Filgas, R; Hartmann, D H; Yolda?, A Küpcü; McBreen, S; McKay, T A; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; E., F Olivares; Paciesas, B; Rykoff, E S; Szokoly, G; Updike, A C; Yolda?, A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a comprehensive study of the Gamma-Ray Burst 080928 and of its afterglow. GRB 080928 was a long burst detected by Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM. It is one of the exceptional cases where optical emission was already detected when the GRB itself was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. For nearly 100 seconds simultaneous optical, X-ray and gamma-ray data provide a coverage of the spectral energy distribution of the transient source from about 1 eV to 150 keV. Here we analyze the prompt emission, constrain its spectral properties, and set lower limits on the initial Lorentz factor of the relativistic outflow. In particular, we show that the SED during the main prompt emission phase is in agreement with synchrotron radiation. We construct the optical/near-infrared light curve and the spectral energy distribution based on Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIa (Australia) and GROND (La Silla) data and compare it to the X-ray light curve retrieved from the Swift/XRT repository. We show that its bumpy shape ca...

  17. A DATABASE OF >20 keV ELECTRON GREEN'S FUNCTIONS OF INTERPLANETARY TRANSPORT AT 1 AU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agueda, N.; Sanahuja, B. [Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Vainio, R. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use interplanetary transport simulations to compute a database of electron Green's functions, i.e., differential intensities resulting at the spacecraft position from an impulsive injection of energetic (>20 keV) electrons close to the Sun, for a large number of values of two standard interplanetary transport parameters: the scattering mean free path and the solar wind speed. The nominal energy channels of the ACE, STEREO, and Wind spacecraft have been used in the interplanetary transport simulations to conceive a unique tool for the study of near-relativistic electron events observed at 1 AU. In this paper, we quantify the characteristic times of the Green's functions (onset and peak time, rise and decay phase duration) as a function of the interplanetary transport conditions. We use the database to calculate the FWHM of the pitch-angle distributions at different times of the event and under different scattering conditions. This allows us to provide a first quantitative result that can be compared with observations, and to assess the validity of the frequently used term beam-like pitch-angle distribution.

  18. keV Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter from Singlet Scalar Decays: Basic Concepts and Subtle Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merle, Alexander

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a detailed and illustrative study of the production of keV sterile neutrino Dark Matter (DM) by decays of singlet scalars in the early Universe. In the current study we focus on providing a clear and general overview of this production mechanism. For the first time we study all regimes possible on the level of momentum distribution functions, which we obtain by solving a system of Boltzmann equations. These quantities contain the full information about the production process, which allows us to not only track the evolution of the DM generation but to also take into account all bounds related to the spectrum, such as constraints from structure formation or from avoiding too much dark radiation. In particular we show that this simple production mechanism can, depending on the regime, lead to strongly non-thermal DM spectra which may even feature more than one peak in the momentum distribution. These cases could have particularly interesting consequences for cosmological structure formation, as their ...

  19. 3.55 keV photon lines from axion to photon conversion in the Milky Way and M31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph P. Conlon; Francesca V. Day

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We further explore a scenario in which the recently observed 3.55 keV photon line arises from dark matter decay to an axion-like particle (ALP) of energy 3.55 keV, which then converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. This ALP scenario is well-motivated by the observed morphology of the 3.55 keV flux. For this scenario we study the expected flux from dark matter decay in the galactic halos of both the Milky Way and Andromeda (M31). The Milky Way magnetic field is asymmetric about the galactic centre, and so the resulting 3.55 keV flux morphology differs significantly from the case of direct dark matter decay to photons. However the Milky Way magnetic field is not large enough to generate an observable signal, even with ASTRO-H. In contrast, M31 has optimal conditions for ALP to photon conversion and the intrinsic signal from M31 becomes two orders of magnitude larger than for the Milky Way, comparable to that from clusters and consistent with observations.

  20. ANGLE-RESOLVED PHOTOEMISSION STUDIES OF Ag, Au, AND Pt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, R.F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    under Contract W-7405-ENG-48 ANGLE-RESOLVED PHOTOEMISSIONEnergy under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. It was performed at

  1. Determination of Surface Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved Atomic Desorption. Abstract: We have developed a new method for determining surface exciton band energies in alkali halides based on...

  2. angle resolved thermal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectroscopy ARPES groups have Lombardi, John R. 18 Molecular dynamics simulations of thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes: Resolving the effects of computational parameters...

  3. Time-resolved measurements of the hot-electron population in ignition-scale experiments on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohenberger, M., E-mail: mhoh@lle.rochester.edu; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Albert, F.; Palmer, N. E.; Döppner, T.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Bachmann, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; LaCaille, G.; Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Lee, J. J. [National Security Technologies LLC, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In laser-driven inertial confinement fusion, hot electrons can preheat the fuel and prevent fusion-pellet compression to ignition conditions. Measuring the hot-electron population is key to designing an optimized ignition platform. The hot electrons in these high-intensity, laser-driven experiments, created via laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by hot electrons interacting with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)], the filter-fluorescer x-ray (FFLEX) diagnostic–a multichannel, hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20–500 keV range–has been upgraded to provide fully time-resolved, absolute measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum with ?300 ps resolution. Initial time-resolved data exhibited significant background and low signal-to-noise ratio, leading to a redesign of the FFLEX housing and enhanced shielding around the detector. The FFLEX x-ray sensitivity was characterized with an absolutely calibrated, energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector using the high-energy x-ray source at NSTec Livermore Operations over a range of K-shell fluorescence energies up to 111 keV (U K{sub ?}). The detectors impulse response function was measured in situ on NIF short-pulse (?90 ps) experiments, and in off-line tests.

  4. A CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF 3C 288—REHEATING THE COOL CORE OF A 3 keV CLUSTER FROM A NUCLEAR OUTBURST at z = 0.246

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lal, D. V.

    We present results from a 42 ks Chandra/ACIS-S observation of the transitional FR I/FR II radio galaxy 3C 288 at z = 0.246. We detect ~3 keV gas extending to a radius of ~0.5 Mpc with a 0.5-2.0 keV luminosity of 6.6 × ...

  5. RESOLVE Upgrades for on Line Lattice Error Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.; Corbett, J.; White, G.; /SLAC; Zambre, Y.; /Unlisted

    2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have increased the speed and versatility of the orbit analysis process by adding a command file, or 'script' language, to RESOLVE. This command file feature enables us to automate data analysis procedures to detect lattice errors. We describe the RESOLVE command file and present examples of practical applications.

  6. Sterile neutrino dark matter in B-L extension of the standard model and galactic 511 keV line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Shaaban [Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No. 11837, PO Box 43 (Egypt)] [Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No. 11837, PO Box 43 (Egypt); Seto, Osamu, E-mail: skhalil@bue.edu.eg, E-mail: seto@physics.umn.edu [Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)] [Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sterile right-handed neutrinos can be naturally embedded in a low scale gauged U(1){sub B-L} extension of the standard model. We show that, within a low reheating scenario, such a neutrino is an interesting dark matter candidate. We emphasize that if the neutrino mass is of the order of MeV, then it accounts for the measured dark matter relic density and also accommodates the observed flux of 511 keV photons from the galactic bulge.

  7. On quasi-free dynamics on the resolvent algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajime Moriya

    2014-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The resolvent algebra is a new C*-algebra of the canonical commutation relations of a boson field given by Buchholz-Grundling. We study analytic properties of quasi-free dynamics on the resolvent algebra. Subsequently we consider a supersymmetric quasi-free dynamics on the graded C*-algebra made of a Clifford (fermion) algebra and a resolvent (boson) algebra. We establish an infinitesimal supersymmetry formula upon the GNS Hilbert space for any regular state satisfying some mild requirement which is standard in quantum field theory. We assert that the supersymmetric dynamics is given as a C*-dynamics.

  8. D-brane Potentials in the Warped Resolved Conifold and Natural Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachary Kenton; Steven Thomas

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we obtain a model of Natural Inflation from string theory with a Planckian decay constant. We investigate D-brane dynamics in the background of the warped resolved conifold (WRC) throat approximation of Type IIB string compactifications on Calabi-Yau manifolds. When we glue the throat to a compact bulk Calabi-Yau, we generate a D-brane potential which is a solution to the Laplace equation on the resolved conifold. We can exactly solve this equation, including dependence on the angular coordinates. The solutions are valid down to the tip of the resolved conifold, which is not the case for the more commonly used deformed conifold. This allows us to exploit the effect of the warping, which is strongest at the tip. We inflate near the tip using an angular coordinate of a D5-brane in the WRC which has a discrete shift symmetry, and feels a cosine potential, giving us a model of Natural Inflation, from which it is possible to get a Planckian decay constant whilst maintaining control over the backreaction. This is because the decay constant for a wrapped brane contains powers of the warp factor, and so can be made large, while the wrapping parameter can be kept small enough so that backreaction is under control.

  9. TXS 1828+487 (z = 0.692) 0.5-7 keV image, 4.8 GHz contours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelbord, Jonathan

    TXS 1828+487 (z = 0.692) 0.5-7 keV image, 4.8 GHz contours Extended X-ray emission. PKS 1655-776 (z = 0.094) 0.5-7 keV image, 8.6 GHz contours Extended X-ray emission is not detected. PKS 2052-474 (z = 1.489) 0.5-7 keV image, 8.6 GHz contours Extended X-ray emission is not detected. PKS 1655+077 (z

  10. Time-Resolved Research (XSD) | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14-ID-B is operated as a partnership between BioCARS and XSD and is specialized in ultrafast time resolved techniques such as laser pump high-flux x-ray probe in both pink...

  11. Proceedings of the RESOLVE Workshop 2006 Blacksburg, VA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Stephen H.

    #12;ii #12;iii Preface and Grade Resolve/C++ Programs ....................................6 Stephen H. Edwards, Virginia Tech Some Joan Krone, Denison University, and William F. Ogden, The Ohio State University Issues in the Creation

  12. Passive background correction method for spatially resolved detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for passive background correction during spatially or angularly resolved detection of emission that is based on the simultaneous acquisition of both the passive background spectrum and the spectrum of the target of interest.

  13. Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standards Issues...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Energy Innovations Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standards Issues to Energy Innovations May 20, 2015 3:00PM to 4:30PM EDT Join us for a free webinar that will...

  14. EGR Spatial Uniformity & Cylinder-Resolved Transients-Measurements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an EGR probe for assessing steady-state spatial uniformity and cylinder-resolved EGR dynamics. p-27yoo.pdf More Documents & Publications CumminsORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control &...

  15. A tool for phase resolved spectroscopy with ISGRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Segreto; C. Ferrigno

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    INTEGRAL observations provide a large amount of data on accreting binary systems. The interpretation of the spectral emission of these sources needs timing analysis and phase resolved spectroscopy, which are really cumbersome tasks if performed with tools based on the imaging extraction methods usually used for coded mask instruments. Here we present a software for the ISGRI instrument which allows to extract in a fast way, light curves, pulse profiles, and phase resolved spectra, making data reduction a much easier task.

  16. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  17. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  18. Search for Anomalous Scattering of keV Neutrons from H2O-D2O Mixtures R. Moreh,1,2,* R. C. Block,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Search for Anomalous Scattering of keV Neutrons from H2O-D2O Mixtures R. Moreh,1,2,* R. C. Block,2 (Received 20 January 2005; published 12 May 2005) We measured the neutron scattering intensities from pure Linac and the final energy of the scattered neutrons was fixed at 24.3 keV using a 20 cm thick pure iron

  19. Neutron Capture and Total Cross-Section Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Zirconium up to 2.5 keV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    up to 2.5 keV G. Leinweber,* J. Burke, C. R. Lubitz, H. D. Knox, and N. J. Drindak Lockheed Martin resonances up to 2.5 keV. The zirconium reso- nance parameters Gg and Gn, determined in the present- rameter extraction. Recent work at RPI using the up- graded equipment is given by Danon et al.5 for rare

  20. Chain-oxygen ordering in twin-free YBa2Cu3O7-single crystals driven by 20-keV electron irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    Chain-oxygen ordering in twin-free YBa2Cu3O7- single crystals driven by 20-keV electron irradiation 2005 We have examined the effects of 20-keV electron irradiation on the -Cu 1 -O 1 - n chain-oxygen arrange- ments in oxygen-deficient but otherwise twin-free YBa2Cu3O7- single crystals. Comparison

  1. A survey for Fe 6.4 keV emission in young stellar objects in rho Oph: the strong fluorescence from Elias 29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Favata; G. Micela; B. Silva; S. Sciortino; M. Tsujimoto

    2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a search for 6.4 keV Fe fluorescent emission in Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) with measured accretion luminosities in the rho Oph cloud, using all existing chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the region. A total of nine such YSOs have X-ray data with sufficiently high S/N for the 6.4 keV line to be potentially detected if present. A positive detection of the Fe 6.4 keV line is reported for one object, Elias 29, in both the XMM-Newton and the chandra data. The 6.4 keV line is detected in Elias 29 both during quiescent and flaring emission, unlikely all previously reported detections of 6.4 keV Fe fluorescence in YSOs which were made during intense flaring. The observed equivalent width of the fluorescent line is large, at W_alpha approx 140 eV, ruling out fluorescence from diffuse circumstellar material. It is also larger than expected for simple reflection from a solar-composition photosphere or circumstellar disk, but it is compatible with being due to fluorescence from a centrally illuminated circumstellar disk. The X-ray spectrum of Elias 29 is also peculiar in terms of its high (ionized) Fe abundance, as evident from the very intense Fe xxv 6.7 keV line emission; we speculate on the possible mechanism leading to the observed high abundance.

  2. Strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV in the $^{22}$Ne(p,$?$)$^{23}$Na reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosanna Depalo; Francesca Cavanna; Federico Ferraro; Alessandra Slemer; Tariq Al-Abdullah; Shavkat Akhmadaliev; Michael Anders; Daniel Bemmerer; Zoltán Elekes; Giovanni Mattei; Stefan Reinicke; Konrad Schmidt; Carlo Scian; Louis Wagner

    2015-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction is included in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. A number of narrow resonances in the Gamow window dominates the thermonuclear reaction rate. Several resonance strengths are only poorly known. As a result, the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na thermonuclear reaction rate is the most uncertain rate of the cycle. Here, a new experimental study of the strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV proton beam energy is reported. The data have been obtained using a tantalum target implanted with $^{22}$Ne. The strengths $\\omega\\gamma$ of the resonances at 436, 639, and 661 keV have been determined with a relative approach, using the 479 and 1279 keV resonances for normalization. Subsequently, the ratio of resonance strengths of the 479 and 1279 keV resonances was determined, improving the precision of these two standards. The new data are consistent with, but more precise than, the literature with the exception of the resonance at 661 keV, which is found to be less intense by one order of magnitude. In addition, improved branching ratios have been determined for the gamma decay of the resonances at 436, 479, and 639 keV.

  3. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of amore »unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm?¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ?40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ?100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. This new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.« less

  4. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grills, David C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Farrington, Jaime A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Layne, Bobby H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Preses, Jack M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bernstein, Herbert J. [Dowling College, Shirley, NY (United States); Wishart, James F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm?¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ?40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ?100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. This new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  5. A possible cyclotron resonance scattering feature near 0.7 keV in X1822-371

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iaria, R; Matranga, M; Galiano, C G; D'Aì, A; Riggio, A; Burderi, L; Sanna, A; Ferrigno, C; Del Santo, M; Pintore, F; Robba, N R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse all available X-ray observations of X1822-371 made with XMM-Newton, Chandra, Suzaku and INTEGRAL satellites. The observations were not simultaneous. The Suzaku and INTEGRAL broad band energy coverage allows us to constrain the spectral shape of the continuum emission well. We use the model already proposed for this source, consisting of a Comptonised component absorbed by interstellar matter and partially absorbed by local neutral matter, and we added a Gaussian feature in absorption at $\\sim 0.7$ keV. This addition significantly improves the fit and flattens the residuals between 0.6 and 0.8 keV. We interpret the Gaussian feature in absorption as a cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) produced close to the neutron star surface and derive the magnetic field strength at the surface of the neutron star, $(8.8 \\pm 0.3) \\times 10^{10}$ G for a radius of 10 km. We derive the pulse period in the EPIC-pn data to be 0.5928850(6) s and estimate that the spin period derivative of X1822-371 is $(-2.55...

  6. BROADBAND TIME-RESOLVED E{sub p,i}-L{sub iso} CORRELATION IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frontera, F.; Guidorzi, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Amati, L.; Landi, R. [INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); In't Zand, J., E-mail: frontera@fe.infn.it [Space Research Organization in the Netherlands, Sorbonnelaan 2, NL-3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a systematic study of the broadband (2-2000 keV) time-resolved prompt emission spectra of a sample of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with both Wide Field Cameras on board the BeppoSAX satellite and the BATSE experiment on board CGRO. In this first paper, we study the time-resolved dependence of the intrinsic peak energy E{sub p,i} of the E F(E) spectrum on the corresponding isotropic bolometric luminosity L{sub iso}. The E{sub p,i}-L{sub iso} relation or the equivalent relation between E{sub p,i} and the bolometric released energy E{sub iso}, derived using the time-averaged spectra of long GRBs with known redshift, is well established, but its physical origin is still a subject of discussion. In addition, some authors maintain that these relations are the result of instrumental selection effects. We find that not only a relation between the measured peak energy E{sub p} and the corresponding energy flux, but also a strong E{sub p,i} versus L{sub iso} correlation are found not only within each burst, but also are merging together the time-resolved data points from different GRBs. We do not expect significant instrumental selection effects that can affect the results obtained, apart from the fact that the GRBs in our sample are sufficiently bright to perform a time-resolved spectroscopy and that they have known redshift. If the fundamental physical process that gives rise to the GRB phenomenon does not depend on its brightness, we conclude that the E{sub p,i} versus L{sub iso} correlation found within each GRB is intrinsic to the emission process and that the correlations discovered by Amati et al. and Yonetoku et al. are likely not the result of selection effects. We also discuss the properties of the correlations found.

  7. THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND {gamma} DORADUS RESOLVED WITH HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C.; Booth, Mark; Kavelaars, J. J.; Koning, Alice [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Kennedy, Grant M.; Wyatt, Mark C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Sibthorpe, Bruce [UK Astronomy Technology Center, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [UK Astronomy Technology Center, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Lawler, Samantha M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Qi, Chenruo [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)] [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)] [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Wilner, David J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Greaves, Jane S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of the debris disk around {gamma} Doradus, an F1V star, from the Herschel Key Programme DEBRIS (Disc Emission via Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre). The disk is well resolved at 70, 100, and 160 {mu}m, resolved along its major axis at 250 {mu}m, detected but not resolved at 350 {mu}m, and confused with a background source at 500 {mu}m. It is one of our best resolved targets and we find it to have a radially broad dust distribution. The modeling of the resolved images cannot distinguish between two configurations: an arrangement of a warm inner ring at several AU (best fit 4 AU) and a cool outer belt extending from {approx}55 to 400 AU or an arrangement of two cool, narrow rings at {approx}70 AU and {approx}190 AU. This suggests that any configuration between these two is also possible. Both models have a total fractional luminosity of {approx}10{sup -5} and are consistent with the disk being aligned with the stellar equator. The inner edge of either possible configuration suggests that the most likely region to find planets in this system would be within {approx}55 AU of the star. A transient event is not needed to explain the warm dust's fractional luminosity.

  8. Improving the energy response of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} dosimetry films at low energies (?100 keV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekerat, H., E-mail: hamed.bekerat@mail.mcgill.ca; Devic, S.; DeBlois, F. [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Québec H3T 1E2 (Canada)] [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Québec H3T 1E2 (Canada); Singh, K.; Sarfehnia, A.; Seuntjens, J. [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4 (Canada)] [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Shih, Shelley; Yu, Xiang; Lewis, D. [Ashland Specialty Ingredients, 1361 Alps Road, Wayne, New Jersey 07470 (United States)] [Ashland Specialty Ingredients, 1361 Alps Road, Wayne, New Jersey 07470 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of varying the active layer composition of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} films on the energy dependence of the film, as well as try to develop a new prototype with more uniform energy response at low photon energies (?100?keV). Methods: First, the overall energy response (S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q)) of different commercial EBT type film models that represent the three different generations produced to date, i.e., EBT, EBT2, and EBT3, was investigated. Pieces of each film model were irradiated to a fixed dose of 2 Gy to water for a wide range of beam qualities and the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) was measured using a flatbed document scanner. Furthermore, the DOSRZnrc Monte Carlo code was used to determine the absorbed dose to water energy dependence of the film, f(Q). Moreover, the intrinsic energy dependence, k{sub bq}(Q), for each film model was evaluated using the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) and f(Q). In the second part of this study, the authors investigated the effects of changing the chemical composition of the active layer on S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Finally, based on these results, the film manufacturer fabricated several film prototypes and the authors evaluated their S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Results: The commercial EBT film model shows an under response at all energies below 100 keV reaching 39% ± 4% at about 20 keV. The commercial EBT2 and EBT3 film models show an under response of about 27% ± 4% at 20 keV and an over response of about 16% ± 4% at 40?keV.S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) of the three commercial film models at low energies show strong correlation with the corresponding f{sup ?1}(Q) curves. The commercial EBT3 model with 4% Cl in the active layer shows under response of 22% ± 4% at 20 keV and 6% ± 4% at about 40?keV. However, increasing the mass percent of chlorine makes the film more hygroscopic which may affect the stability of the film's readout. The EBT3 film prototype with 7.5% Si shows a significant improvement in the energy response at very low energies compared to the commercial EBT3 films with 4% Cl. It shows under response of 15% ± 5% at about 20 keV to 2% ± 5% at about 40?keV. However, according to the manufacturer, the addition of 7.5% Si as SiO{sub 2} adversely affected the viscosity of the active fluid and therefore affected the potential use in commercial machine coating. The latest commercial EBT3 film model with 7% Al as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows an overall improvement in S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) compared to previous commercial EBT3 films. It shows under response at all energies <100 keV, varying from 20% ± 4% at 20 keV to 6% ± 4% at 40?keV. Conclusions: The energy response of films in the energy range <100 keV can be improved by adjusting the active layer chemical composition. Removing bromine eliminated the over response at about 40?keV. The under response at energies ?30 keV is improved by adding 7% Al to the active layer in the latest commercial EBT3 film models.

  9. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, Elton J.; Hietbrink, Earl H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This section includes some historical background of the rise and fall and subsequent rebirth of the electric vehicle; and a brief discussion of current transportation needs, and environmental and energy utilization issues that resulted in the renewed interest in applying electrochemical energy conversion technology to electric vehicle applications. Although energy utilization has evolved to be the most significant and important issue, the environmental issue will be discussed first in this section only because of its chronological occurrence. The next part of the chapter is a review of passenger and commercial electric vehicle technology with emphasis on vehicle design and demonstrated performance of vehicles with candidate power sources being developed. This is followed by a discussion of electrochemical power source requirements associated with future electric vehicles that can play a role in meeting modern transportation needs. The last part of the chapter includes first a discussion of how to identify candidate electrochemical systems that might be of interest in meeting electric vehicle power source requirements. This is then followed by a review of the current technological status of these systems and a discussion of the most significant problems that must be resolved before each candidate system can be a viable power source.

  10. THE ALGOL TRIPLE SYSTEM SPATIALLY RESOLVED AT OPTICAL WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavala, R. T.; Hutter, D. J. [U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 W. Naval Obs. Rd., Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Hummel, C. A. [European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Boboltz, D. A.; Ojha, R. [U.S. Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington DC 20392 (United States); Shaffer, D. B. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Rd., Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Tycner, C. [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Richards, M. T., E-mail: bzavala@nofs.navy.mi, E-mail: djh@nofs.navy.mi, E-mail: chummel@eso.or, E-mail: dboboltz@usno.navy.mi, E-mail: rojha@usno.navy.mi, E-mail: shaffer@alumni.caltech.ed, E-mail: c.tycner@cmich.ed, E-mail: mrichards@astro.psu.ed [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 19104 (United States)

    2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Interacting binaries typically have separations in the milliarcsecond regime, and hence it has been challenging to resolve them at any wavelength. However, recent advances in optical interferometry have improved our ability to discern the components in these systems and have now enabled the direct determination of physical parameters. We used the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer to produce for the first time images resolving all three components in the well-known Algol triple system. Specifically, we have separated the tertiary component from the binary and simultaneously resolved the eclipsing binary pair, which represents the nearest and brightest eclipsing binary in the sky. We present revised orbital elements for the triple system, and we have rectified the 180{sup 0} ambiguity in the position angle of Algol C. Our directly determined magnitude differences and masses for this triple star system are consistent with earlier light curve modeling results.

  11. Absolute calibration of image plates for electrons at energy between 100 keV and 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Hui; Back, Norman L.; Eder, David C.; MacPhee, Andrew G.; Ping Yuan; Song, Peter M.; Throop, Alan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550-9234 (United States); Bartal, Teresa; Beg, F. N. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Link, Anthony J.; Van Woerkom, Linn [Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the absolute response of image plate (Fuji BAS SR2040) for electrons at energies between 100 keV and 4 MeV using an electron spectrometer. The electron source was produced from a short pulse laser irradiated on solid density targets. This paper presents the calibration results of image plate photon stimulated luminescence per electron at this energy range. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX results are also presented for three representative incident angles onto the image plates and corresponding electron energy depositions at these angles. These provide a complete set of tools that allows extraction of our absolute calibration to other spectrometer setting at this electron energy range.

  12. The 14C(n,g) cross section between 10 keV and 1 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Reifarth; M. Heil; C. Forssen; U. Besserer; A. Couture; S. Dababneh; L. Doerr; J. Goerres; R. C. Haight; F. Kaeppeler; A. Mengoni; S. O'Brien; N. Patronis; R. Plag; R. S. Rundberg; M. Wiescher; J. B. Wilhelmy

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron capture cross section of 14C is of relevance for several nucleosynthesis scenarios such as inhomogeneous Big Bang models, neutron induced CNO cycles, and neutrino driven wind models for the r process. The 14C(n,g) reaction is also important for the validation of the Coulomb dissociation method, where the (n,g) cross section can be indirectly obtained via the time-reversed process. So far, the example of 14C is the only case with neutrons where both, direct measurement and indirect Coulomb dissociation, have been applied. Unfortunately, the interpretation is obscured by discrepancies between several experiments and theory. Therefore, we report on new direct measurements of the 14C(n,g) reaction with neutron energies ranging from 20 to 800 keV.

  13. One-sided imaging of large, dense objects using the 511 keV photons from induced pair production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavora, L.M.; Gilboy, W.B.; Morton, E.J. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom). Physics Dept.; Morgado, R.E.; Estep, R.J.; Rawool-Sullivan, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of annihilation photons from photon-induced electron-positron pair production as a means of inspecting objects when only one side is accessible is described. The Z2 dependence of the pair production cross section and the high penetration of 511 keV photons suggest that this method should be capable of localizing high Z materials in lower Z matrices. The experimental results for the dependence of the back streaming photon yield on Z indicate that dynamic ranges of the order of 20 may be obtained for materials with 4 < Z < 82. Results for point to point images obtained in line scans of representative geometries are also shown. Simulation studies based on the EGS4 Monte Carlo code were also performed and their results show an agreement with experimental data of the order of 5%.

  14. Characterizations of MCP performance in the hard x-ray range (6–25 keV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Ming, E-mail: minwu@sandia.gov; Rochau, Greg [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Moy, Ken [Special Technology Laboratories, NSTec, Santa Barbara, California 93111-2335 (United States); Kruschwitz, Craig [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    MCP detector performance at hard x-ray energies from 6 to 25 keV was recently investigated using NSLS beamline X15A at BNL. Measurements were made with an NSTec Gen-II (H-CA-65) framing camera, based on a Photonis MCP with ?10 ?m in diameter pores, ?12 ?m center-center spacing, an L/D ratio of 46, and a bias angle of 8°. The MCP characterizations were focused on (1) energy and angle dependent sensitivity, (2) energy and angle dependent spatial resolution, (3) energy dependent gain performance, and (4) energy dependent dynamic range. These measurement corroborated simulation results using a Monte Carlo model that included hard x-ray interactions and the subsequent electron cascade in the MCP.

  15. Differential cross sections for single ionization of H{sub 2} by 75-keV proton impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, U.; Schulz, M.; Madison, D. H. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics and Laboratory for Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Research, Rolla, Missouri 65401 (United States)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have calculated triply differential cross sections (TDCS) and doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) for single ionization of H{sub 2} by 75-keV proton impact using the molecular three-body distorted-wave-eikonal initial-state (M3DW-EIS) approach. Previously published measured DDCS (differential in the projectile scattering angle and integrated over the ejected electron angles) found pronounced structures at relatively large angles that were interpreted as an interference resulting from the two-centered potential of the molecule. Theory treating H{sub 2} as atomic H multiplied by a molecular interference factor only predicts the observed structure when assumptions are made about the molecular orientation. Here we apply the M3DW-EIS method, which does not rely on such an ad hoc approach, but rather treats the interference from first principles.

  16. A survey for Fe 6.4 keV emission in young stellar objects in rho Oph: the strong fluorescence from Elias 29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Favata, F; Silva, B; Sciortino, S; Tsujimoto, M

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a search for 6.4 keV Fe fluorescent emission in Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) with measured accretion luminosities in the rho Oph cloud, using all existing chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the region. A total of nine such YSOs have X-ray data with sufficiently high S/N for the 6.4 keV line to be potentially detected if present. A positive detection of the Fe 6.4 keV line is reported for one object, Elias 29, in both the XMM-Newton and the chandra data. The 6.4 keV line is detected in Elias 29 both during quiescent and flaring emission, unlikely all previously reported detections of 6.4 keV Fe fluorescence in YSOs which were made during intense flaring. The observed equivalent width of the fluorescent line is large, at W_alpha approx 140 eV, ruling out fluorescence from diffuse circumstellar material. It is also larger than expected for simple reflection from a solar-composition photosphere or circumstellar disk, but it is compatible with being due to fluorescence from a centrally...

  17. Strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV in the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Depalo, Rosanna; Ferraro, Federico; Slemer, Alessandra; Al-Abdullah, Tariq; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Anders, Michael; Bemmerer, Daniel; Elekes, Zoltán; Mattei, Giovanni; Reinicke, Stefan; Schmidt, Konrad; Scian, Carlo; Wagner, Louis

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction is included in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. A number of narrow resonances in the Gamow window dominates the thermonuclear reaction rate. Several resonance strengths are only poorly known. As a result, the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na thermonuclear reaction rate is the most uncertain rate of the cycle. Here, a new experimental study of the strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV proton beam energy is reported. The data have been obtained using a tantalum target implanted with $^{22}$Ne. The strengths $\\omega\\gamma$ of the resonances at 436, 639, and 661 keV have been determined with a relative approach, using the 479 and 1279 keV resonances for normalization. Subsequently, the ratio of resonance strengths of the 479 and 1279 keV resonances was determined, improving the precision of these two standards. The new data are consistent with, but more precise than, the literature with the exception of the resonance at 661 keV, which i...

  18. Time resolved ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy of pulsed fluorocarbon plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleason, Karen K.

    Time resolved ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy of pulsed fluorocarbon plasmas Brett A. Cruden.1063/1.1334936 I. INTRODUCTION The study of fluorocarbon plasmas is of great interest for their applications in silicon dioxide etching.1,2 Recently, at- tention has been paid to using fluorocarbon plasmas to pro- duce

  19. Measurement of high-energy (10–60 keV) x-ray spectral line widths with eV accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seely, J. F., E-mail: seelyjf@gmail.com; Feldman, U. [Artep Inc., 2922 Excelsior Springs Court, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Glover, J. L.; Hudson, L. T.; Ralchenko, Y.; Henins, Albert [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Pereira, N. [Ecopulse Inc., P. O. Box 528, Springfield, Virginia 22152 (United States); Di Stefano, C. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chen, Hui; Williams, G. J.; Park, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution crystal spectrometer utilizing a crystal in transmission geometry has been developed and experimentally optimized to measure the widths of emission lines in the 10–60 keV energy range with eV accuracy. The spectrometer achieves high spectral resolution by utilizing crystal planes with small lattice spacings (down to 2d = 0.099 nm), a large crystal bending radius and Rowland circle diameter (965 mm), and an image plate detector with high spatial resolution (60 ?m in the case of the Fuji TR image plate). High resolution W L-shell and K-shell laboratory test spectra in the 10–60 keV range and Ho K-shell spectra near 47 keV recorded at the LLNL Titan laser facility are presented. The Ho K-shell spectra are the highest resolution hard x-ray spectra recorded from a solid target irradiated by a high-intensity laser.

  20. Spatially resolved determination of the short-circuit current density of silicon solar cells via lock-in thermography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fertig, Fabian, E-mail: fabian.fertig@ise.fraunhofer.de; Greulich, Johannes; Rein, Stefan [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a spatially resolved method to determine the short-circuit current density of crystalline silicon solar cells by means of lock-in thermography. The method utilizes the property of crystalline silicon solar cells that the short-circuit current does not differ significantly from the illuminated current under moderate reverse bias. Since lock-in thermography images locally dissipated power density, this information is exploited to extract values of spatially resolved current density under short-circuit conditions. In order to obtain an accurate result, one or two illuminated lock-in thermography images and one dark lock-in thermography image need to be recorded. The method can be simplified in a way that only one image is required to generate a meaningful short-circuit current density map. The proposed method is theoretically motivated, and experimentally validated for monochromatic illumination in comparison to the reference method of light-beam induced current.

  1. A Spatially Resolved Study of the Synchrotron Emission and Titanium in Tycho's Supernova Remnant with NuSTAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Laura A; Reynolds, Stephen P; An, Hongjun; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Eriksen, Kristoffer A; Fryer, Chris L; Hailey, Charles J; Harrison, Fiona A; Madsen, Kristin K; Stern, Daniel K; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results from deep observations (750 ks) of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) with NuSTAR. Using these data, we produce narrow-band images over several energy bands to identify the regions producing the hardest X-rays and to search for radioactive decay line emission from 44Ti. We find that the hardest (>10 keV) X-rays are concentrated in the southwest of Tycho, where recent Chandra observations have revealed high emissivity "stripes" associated with particles accelerated to the knee of the cosmic-ray spectrum. We do not find evidence of 44Ti, and we set tight limits on its presence which exclude the reported Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL detections and correspond to an upper-limit 44Ti mass of M44 < 8.4e-5 Msun for a distance of 2.3 kpc. We perform spatially resolved spectroscopic analysis of sixty-six regions across Tycho. We map the best-fit rolloff frequency of the hard X-ray spectra, and we compare these results to measurements of the shock expansion and ambient density. We find that the highest energ...

  2. Comment to the paper: 'Seeded quantum FEL at 478 keV' AIP Conf. Proc. 'Light at Extreme Intensities' 1462 173-176 (2012)'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vittoria Petrillo

    2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We criticize the thesis exposed the paper 'Seeded quantum FEL at 478 keV' AIP Conf. Proc. 'Light at Extreme Intensities,' 1462 173-176 (2012), which presents the possibility of producing gamma rays at 478 KeV by means of a seeded quantum FEL driven by an electron beam at 125 MeV, current I=40 A, interacting with an infrared laser. We show that, in the case analyzed, the FEL Pierce parameter has a value two orders of magnitude less than what claimed in the paper in question, overturning the conclusions of the analysis.

  3. (239)Pu neutron resonance parameters revisited and covariance matrix in the neutron energy range from thermal to 2.5 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, Herve [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL; Larson, Nancy M [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range up to 2.5 keV neutron energy and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the analysis code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The experimental data were renormalized, aligned on a common energy scale, and corrected for residual background. Average neutron transmission and cross sections calculated with the new resonance parameters were compared to the corresponding experimental data and to ENDF/B-VI.

  4. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 238U and the Calculated Cross Sections from the Reich-Moore Analysis of Experimental Data in the Neutron Energy Range from 0 keV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, H

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron resonance parameters of {sup 238}U were obtained from a SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements and high-resolution capture cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the years 1970-1990, and from more recent transmission and capture cross section measurements performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA). Compared with previous evaluations, the energy range for this resonance analysis was extended from 10 to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high resolution of the most recent ORELA transmission measurements. The experimental database and the method of analysis are described in this report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared with the experimental data. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters and of the recommended values of the average parameters. The new evaluation results in a slight decrease of the effective capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks by 70 pcm to 200 pcm.

  5. New XAFS spectroscopic investigations in the 1-2 keV region. Final report on LDRD program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, J.; Froba, M.; Tamura, E.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements in the 1-2 keV region remained a challenging experimental task. This was primarily due to the lack of an adequate monochromator crystal that possessed both the required x-ray properties (large d-spacing, high resolution and reflectivity) and materials properties (ultra-high vacuum (UHV) capability, damage resistance in a synchrotron radiation beam, absence of constituent element absorption edges and stability, both thermal and mechanical). Traditionally, XAFS spectra in this photon energy range have been measured in a piece-wise fashion using a combination of monochromator crystals. Very recently, we have an experimental breakthrough in XAFS spectroscopy in this soft x-ray region. This energy region is of great importance for materials and basic research since the K-edges of Na (1070 eV), Mg (1303 eV), Al (1557 eV) and Si (1839 eV), the L-edges of some 4p elements from Ga to Sr and the M-edges of the rare-earth elements fall within this energy window of the electromagnetic spectrum. YB{sub 66}, a complex binary semiconducting yttrium boride having a cubic crystal structure with a lattice constant of 23.44 {angstrom} has been singled out as a candidate monochromator material for synchrotron radiation in the 1-2 keV region. There is no intrinsic absorption by the constituent elements in this region, which can adequately be dispersed by the (400) reflection having a 2d value of 11.76 {angstrom}. In terms of vacuum compatibility, resistance to radiation damage, thermal and mechanical stability, YB{sub 66} satisfies all the material requirements for use as a monochromator in a synchrotron beam. In the past few years, LLNL in collaboration with a number of other research institutes has pioneered the development of this unique man-made crystal for use as soft x-ray monochromator with synchrotron light sources for materials science studies. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  6. ANL/APS/LS-313 Short-Period APPLE II Undulator for Generating 12-15 keV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    regarding power management even in the future for high-current storage ring operations at 200 mA. The code APPLE II design. In this note, we present magnet design calculations and radiation calculations over four times more power in the central cone of the first harmonic than Undulator A at 12.9 ke

  7. NAME GRADING KEV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Critical} numberfsr §/( ' (XZ++)22 - (xZ/4)2>material for the sides costs 10 cents/ft27 and the material for the top costs 20

  8. Search for 14.4 keV solar axions from M1 transition of Fe-57 with CUORE crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Cuore Collaboration; F. Alessandria; R. Ardito; D. R. Artusa; F. T. Avignone III; O. Azzolini; M. Balata; T. I. Banks; G. Bari; J. Beeman; F. Bellini; A. Bersani; M. Biassoni; T. Bloxham; C. Brofferio; C. Bucci; X. Z. Cai; L. Canonica; S. Capelli; L. Carbone; L. Cardani; M. Carrettoni; N. Casali; N. Chott; M. Clemenza; C. Cosmelli; O. Cremonesi; R. J. Creswick; I. Dafinei; A. Dally; V. Datskov; A. De Biasi; M. P. Decowski; M. M. Deninno; S. Di Domizio; M. L. di Vacri; L. Ejzak; R. Faccini; D. Q. Fang; H. A. Farach; E. Ferri; F. Ferroni; E. Fiorini; M. A. Franceschi; S. J. Freedman; B. K. Fujikawa; A. Giachero; L. Gironi; A. Giuliani; J. Goett; P. Gorla; C. Gotti; E. Guardincerri; T. D. Gutierrez; E. E. Haller; K. Han; K. M. Heeger; H. Z. Huang; R. Kadel; K. Kazkaz; G. Keppel; L. Kogler; Yu. G. Kolomensky; D. Lenz; Y. L. Li; C. Ligi; X. Liu; Y. G. Ma; C. Maiano; M. Maino; M. Martinez; R. H. Maruyama; N. Moggi; S. Morganti; T. Napolitano; S. Newman; S. Nisi; C. Nones; E. B. Norman; A. Nucciotti; F. Orio; D. Orlandi; J. L. Ouellet; M. Pallavicini; V. Palmieri; L. Pattavina; M. Pavan; M. Pedretti; G. Pessina; S. Pirro; E. Previtali; V. Rampazzo; F. Rimondi; C. Rosenfeld; C. Rusconi; S. Sangiorgio; N. D. Scielzo; M. Sisti; A. R. Smith; L. Taffarello; M. Tenconi; W. D. Tian; C. Tomei; S. Trentalange; G. Ventura; M. Vignati; B. S. Wang; H. W. Wang; C. A. Whitten Jr.; T. Wise; A. Woodcraft; L. Zanotti; C. Zarra; B. X. Zhu; S. Zucchelli

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a search for axions from the 14.4 keV M1 transition from Fe-57 in the core of the sun using the axio-electric e?ect in TeO2 bolometers. The detectors are 5x5x5 cm3 crystals operated at about 10 mK in a facility used to test bolometers for the CUORE experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. An analysis of 43.65 kg d of data was made using a newly developed low energy trigger which was optimized to reduce the detectors energy threshold. An upper limit of 0.63 c kg-1 d-1 was established at 95% C.L.. From this value, a lower bound at 95% C.L. was placed on the Peccei-Quinn energy scale of fa >= 0.76 10**6 GeV for a value of S=0.55 for the flavor-singlet axial vector matrix element. Bounds are given for the interval 0.15 < S < 0.55.

  9. Cross-field diffusion of energetic (100 keV to 2 MeV) protons in interplanetary space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa Jr, Edio da [Instituto Federal de Minas Gerais-IFMG, Ouro Preto, MG, 35400-000 (Brazil); Tsurutani, Bruce T. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Alves, Maria Virgínia; Echer, Ezequiel [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais-INPE, São José dos Campos, SP, 12227-010 (Brazil); Lakhina, Gurbax S., E-mail: edio.junior@ifmg.edu.br, E-mail: costajr.e@gmail.com [Indian Institute for Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai 410 218 (India)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic field magnitude decreases (MDs) are observed in several regions of the interplanetary medium. In this paper, we characterize MDs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft instrumentation over the solar south pole by using magnetic field data to obtain the empirical size, magnetic field MD, and frequency of occurrence distribution functions. The interaction of energetic (100 keV to 2 MeV) protons with these MDs is investigated. Charged particle and MD interactions can be described by a geometrical model allowing the calculation of the guiding center shift after each interaction. Using the distribution functions for the MD characteristics, Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain the cross-field diffusion coefficients as a function of particle kinetic energy. It is found that the protons under consideration cross-field diffuse at a rate of up to ?11% of the Bohm rate. The same method used in this paper can be applied to other space regions where MDs are observed, once their local features are well known.

  10. 60 keV Ar{sup +}-ion induced modification of microstructural, compositional, and vibrational properties of InSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datta, D. P.; Garg, S. K.; Som, T., E-mail: tsom@iopb.res.in [SUNAG Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751005 (India); Satpati, B. [Surface Physics and Materials Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sahoo, P. K. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar 751005, Odisha (India); Kanjilal, A. [Department of Physics, Shiv Nadar University, Uttar Pradesh 203207 (India); Dhara, S. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Room temperature irradiation of InSb(111) by 60?keV Ar{sup +}-ions at normal (0°) and oblique (60°) angles of incidence led to the formation of nanoporous structure in the high fluence regime of 1?×?10{sup 17} to 3?×?10{sup 18} ions cm{sup ?2}. While a porous layer comprising of a network of interconnected nanofibers was generated by normal ion incidence, evolution of plate-like structures was observed for obliquely incident ions. Systematic studies of composition and structure using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman mapping, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed a high degree of oxidation of the ion-induced microstructures with the presence of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases and presence of nanocrystallites within the nanoporous structures. The observed structural evolution was understood in terms of processes driven by ion-induced defect accumulation within InSb.

  11. Capture of a neutron to excited states of a {sup 9}Be nucleus taking into account resonance at 622 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B., E-mail: dubovichenko@gmail.com [National Space Agency of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Fessenkov Astrophysical Institute, National Space Research and Technologies Center (Kazakhstan)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative capture of a neutron to the ground and excited states of the 9Be nucleus is considered using the potential cluster model with forbidden states and with classification of cluster states by the Young schemes taking into account resonance at 622 keV for thermal and astrophysical energies.

  12. Implementation of low-energy surface-induced dissociation (eV SID) and high-energy collision-induced dissociation (keV CID)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wysocki, Vicki H.

    Implementation of low-energy surface-induced dissociation (eV SID) and high-energy collision is that the instrument implements both high-energy collision-induced dissociation (keV CID) and low-energy surface energy expression, E mv2 /2. As pointed out in the foreword to Cotter's book on TOF mass spectrometry [1

  13. Finite-Hilbert-basis-set calculations for the angular distribution of ionized electrons produced in p+H impact at 20 keV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, John F.; Fu, J.; Fitzpatrick, M. J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a different method of extracting the angular distribution of ejected electrons in an ion-atom collision from a two-centered finite Hilbert basis-set calculation. We obtain good agreement with experiment for a p+H collision at 20 keV if we...

  14. Quantum Efficiency Calibration of AXAF CCDs from 2 10 keV Herbert L. Manning, Stephen E. Jones, Steve E. Kissel,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­Technishe Bundesanstalt (PTB) laboratory at the Berlin Electron Storage ring BESSY 5 for this purpose. The synchrotron for calibration measurements. 6 A full discussion of the CCD calibration at PTB/BESSY will be presented elsewhereV and as a comparison to the BESSY calibration for energies from 2 ­ 10 keV. The response of the SSD in the range 2 ­ 10

  15. Scattering of 64 eV to 3 keV Neutrons from Polyethylene and Graphite and the Coherence Length Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Scattering of 64 eV to 3 keV Neutrons from Polyethylene and Graphite and the Coherence Length 12180, USA (Received 31 August 2005; published 8 February 2006) We measured the neutron scattering by the neutron coherence length. The scattered intensity ratios were found to conform to conventional

  16. Selection effects in resolving Galactic binaries with LISA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Benacquista; S. L. Larson; B. E. Taylor

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using several realisations of the Galactic population of close white dwarf binaries, we have explored the selection bias for resolved binaries in the LISA data stream. We have assumed a data analysis routine that is capable of identifying binaries that have a signal to noise ratio of at least 5 above a confusion foreground of unresolved binaries. The resolved population of binaries is separated into a subpopulation over 1000 binaries that have a measureable chirp and another subpopulation over 20,000 binaries that do not. As expected, the population of chirping binaries is heavily skewed toward high frequency, high chirp mass systems, with little or no preference for nearby systems. The population of non-chirping binaries is still biased toward frequencies above about 1 mHz. There is an overabundance of higher mass systems than is present in the complete Galactic population.

  17. Resolvent estimates and local decay of waves on conic manifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Baskin; Jared Wunsch

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider manifolds with conic singularites that are isometric to $\\mathbb{R}^{n}$ outside a compact set. Under natural geometric assumptions on the cone points, we prove the existence of a logarithmic resonance-free region for the cut-off resolvent. The estimate also applies to the exterior domains of non-trapping polygons via a doubling process. The proof of the resolvent estimate relies on the propagation of singularities theorems of Melrose and the second author to establish a "very weak" Huygens' principle, which may be of independent interest. As applications of the estimate, we obtain a exponential local energy decay and a resonance wave expansion in odd dimensions, as well as a lossless local smoothing estimate for the Schr{\\"o}dinger equation.

  18. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC; Rudakov, F.M.; /Brown U.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC; Cardoza, J.D.; /Brown U.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; /SLAC; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  19. Resolving to Make Earth Day Last All Year

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What was your New Year's resolution this year? Maybe you resolved to get back into the gym and finally lose those last pesky pounds. Maybe, like me, you resolved to finally break down and buy that new furnace. Or maybe you liked Chris' idea, and you resolved do whatever you could to save energy and money this year. When we talk about saving energy throughout the year, it's easy to forget that we're not just energy users when we're at home. Many of us spend a large part of our days at work, and the energy we use there is significant. According to ENERGY STAR, the energy needed to support just one office worker for a day produces twice as much greenhouse gas emissions as that person's drive to work. Handily, there are a lot of resources available to help you tackle that energy usage at work, and Earth Day (coming up on April 22nd) can be the perfect time to launch a campaign to make the change.

  20. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Heinemann; Karol Palczynski; Joachim Dzubiella; Sabine H. L. Klapp

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van-der-Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  1. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K. W., E-mail: khill@pppl.gov; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lu, J. [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/?E of order 10?000 and spatial resolution better than 10 ?m. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  2. Nuclear Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilhena and Bardo E.J. Bodmann Carbon-#1;? in Terrestrial and Aquatic Environment of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant: Sources of Production, Releases and Dose Estimates #3;?? Jonas Mazeika Impact of radionuclide discharges from Temel?n Nuclear Power... (chapter 5), ? Instrumentation and control (chapter 6), ? Diagnostics (chapter 7), ? Safety evaluation methods (chapters 6, 8, 9 and 10), ? Environment and nuclear power plants (chapters 11 - 15), ? Human factors (chapter 16), ? Software development...

  3. Evaluation of the ²³?Pu prompt fission neutron spectrum induced by neutrons of 500 keV and associated covariances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Neudecker, D.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Smith, D. L.; Capote, R.; Rising, M. E.; Kahler, A. C.

    2015-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evaluations of the prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) of ²³?Pu induced by 500 keV neutrons, and associated covariances. In a previous evaluation by Talou et al. 2010, surprisingly low evaluated uncertainties were obtained, partly due to simplifying assumptions in the quantification of uncertainties from experiment and model. Therefore, special emphasis is placed here on a thorough uncertainty quantification of experimental data and of the Los Alamos model predicted values entering the evaluation. In addition, the Los Alamos model was extended and an evaluation technique was employed that takes into account the qualitative differences between normalized model predicted valuesmore »and experimental shape data. These improvements lead to changes in the evaluated PFNS and overall larger evaluated uncertainties than in the previous work. However, these evaluated uncertainties are still smaller than those obtained in a statistical analysis using experimental information only, due to strong model correlations. Hence, suggestions to estimate model defect uncertainties are presented, which lead to more reasonable evaluated uncertainties. The calculated keff of selected criticality benchmarks obtained with these new evaluations agree with each other within their uncertainties despite the different approaches to estimate model defect uncertainties. The keff one standard deviations overlap with some of those obtained using ENDF/B-VII.1, albeit their mean values are further away from unity. Spectral indexes for the Jezebel critical assembly calculated with the newly evaluated PFNS agree with the experimental data for selected (n,?) and (n,f) reactions, and show improvements for high-energy threshold (n,2n) reactions compared to ENDF/B-VII.1.« less

  4. Comparative Dosimetric Estimates of a 25 keV Electron Micro-beam with three Monte Carlo Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mainardi, Enrico; Donahue, Richard J.; Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2002-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The calculations presented compare the different performances of the three Monte Carlo codes PENELOPE-1999, MCNP-4C and PITS, for the evaluation of Dose profiles from a 25 keV electron micro-beam traversing individual cells. The overall model of a cell is a water cylinder equivalent for the three codes but with a different internal scoring geometry: hollow cylinders for PENELOPE and MCNP, whereas spheres are used for the PITS code. A cylindrical cell geometry with scoring volumes with the shape of hollow cylinders was initially selected for PENELOPE and MCNP because of its superior simulation of the actual shape and dimensions of a cell and for its improved computer-time efficiency if compared to spherical internal volumes. Some of the transfer points and energy transfer that constitute a radiation track may actually fall in the space between spheres, that would be outside the spherical scoring volume. This internal geometry, along with the PENELOPE algorithm, drastically reduced the computer time when using this code if comparing with event-by-event Monte Carlo codes like PITS. This preliminary work has been important to address dosimetric estimates at low electron energies. It demonstrates that codes like PENELOPE can be used for Dose evaluation, even with such small geometries and energies involved, which are far below the normal use for which the code was created. Further work (initiated in Summer 2002) is still needed however, to create a user-code for PENELOPE that allows uniform comparison of exact cell geometries, integral volumes and also microdosimetric scoring quantities, a field where track-structure codes like PITS, written for this purpose, are believed to be superior.

  5. LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION OF A SIZE-RESOLVED CPC BATTERY TO INFER THE COMPOSITION OF FRESHLY FORMED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION OF A SIZE-RESOLVED CPC BATTERY TO INFER THE COMPOSITION OF FRESHLY. #12;Laboratory Characterization of a Size-Resolved CPC Battery to Infer the Composition of Freshly Abstract. A size-resolved condensation particle counter battery (SR-CPCb) was developed to infer

  6. Mesoscale-resolving simulations of summer and winter bora events in the Adriatic Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

    Mesoscale-resolving simulations of summer and winter bora events in the Adriatic Sea Benoit CushmanCAST model on a 1.2-min grid (about 2-km resolution) and resolve the mesoscale variability because the grid-Roisin, B., and K. A. Korotenko (2007), Mesoscale-resolving simulations of summer and winter bora events

  7. Power LCAT

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Drennen, Thomas

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    POWER LCAT is a software tool used to compare elements of efficiency, cost, and environmental effects between different sources of energy.

  8. Power LCAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drennen, Thomas

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    POWER LCAT is a software tool used to compare elements of efficiency, cost, and environmental effects between different sources of energy.

  9. Spatially resolving the very high energy emission from MGRO J2019+37 with VERITAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Behera, B.; Chen, X.; Federici, S. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Berger, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Bird, R. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Dumm, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dwarkadas, V. V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Falcone, A., E-mail: ealiu@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: nahee@uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); and others

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present very high energy (VHE) imaging of MGRO J2019+37 obtained with the VERITAS observatory. The bright extended (?2°) unidentified Milagro source is located toward the rich star formation region Cygnus-X. MGRO J2019+37 is resolved into two VERITAS sources. The faint, point-like source VER J2016+371 overlaps CTB 87, a filled-center remnant (SNR) with no evidence of a supernova remnant shell at the present time. Its spectrum is well fit in the 0.65-10 TeV energy range by a power-law model with photon index 2.3 ± 0.4. VER J2019+378 is a bright extended (?1°) source that likely accounts for the bulk of the Milagro emission and is notably coincident with PSR J2021+3651 and the star formation region Sh 2–104. Its spectrum in the range 1-30 TeV is well fit with a power-law model of photon index 1.75 ± 0.3, among the hardest values measured in the VHE band, comparable to that observed near Vela-X. We explore the unusual spectrum and morphology in the radio and X-ray bands to constrain possible emission mechanisms for this source.

  10. Resolving the High Energy Universe with Strong Gravitational Lensing: The Case of PKS 1830-211

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnacka, Anna; Dell'Antonio, Ian P; Benbow, Wystan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational lensing is a potentially powerful tool for elucidating the origin of gamma-ray emission from distant sources. Cosmic lenses magnify the emission from distance sources and produce time delays between mirage images. Gravitationally-induced time delays depend on the position of the emitting regions in the source plane. The Fermi/LAT satellite continuously monitors the entire sky and detects gamma-ray flares, including those from gravitationally-lensed blazars. Therefore, temporal resolution at gamma-ray energies can be used to measure these time delays, which, in turn, can be used to resolve the origin of the gamma-ray flares spatially. We provide a guide to the application and Monte Carlo simulation of three techniques for analyzing these unresolved light curves: the Autocorrelation Function, the Double Power Spectrum, and the Maximum Peak Method. We apply these methods to derive time delays from the gamma-ray light curve of the gravitationally-lensed blazar PKS 1830-211. The result of temporal an...

  11. Power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

  12. Time resolved spectroscopy of the variable brown dwarf Kelu-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. J. Clarke; C. G. Tinney; S. T. Hodgkin

    2003-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of observations designed to investigate the spectroscopic signatures of dust clouds on the L2 brown dwarf Kelu-1. Time resolved medium resolution spectra show no significant evidence of variability in the dust sensitive TiO, CrH and FeH bandheads on the timescale of 1--24 hours. We do however report periodic variability in the psuedo-equivelent width of H-alpha consistent with the 1.8 hour rotation period previously reported for this object Clarke, Tinney & Tolley (2002). Near-contemporaneous I-band photometry shows evidence for non-periodic variability at the level of 2%.

  13. The Dark Energy Survey: Prospects for Resolved Stellar Populations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rossetto, Bruno M; Santiago, Basilio X; Girardi, Leo; Camargo, Julio I.B.; Balbinot, Eduardo; da Costa, Luiz N; Yanny, Brian; Maia, Marcio A.G.; Makler, Martin; Ogando, Ricardo L.C.; et al

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Wide angle and deep surveys, regardless of their primary purpose, always sample a large number of stars in the Galaxy and in its satellite system. We here make a forecast of the expected stellar sample resulting from the Dark Energy Survey and the perspectives that it will open for studies of Galactic structure and resolved stellar populations in general. An estimated 1.2 x 10{sup 8} stars will be sampled in DES grizY filters in the southern equatorial hemisphere. This roughly corresponds to 20% of all DES sources. Most of these stars belong to the stellar thick disk and halo ofmore »the Galaxy.« less

  14. Variational theory for site resolved protein folding free energy surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John J. Portman; Shoji Takada; Peter G. Wolynes

    1999-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a microscopic variational theory for the free energy surface of a fast folding protein that allows folding kinetics to be resolved to the residue level using Debye-Waller factors as local order parameters. We apply the method to lambda-repressor and compare with site directed mutagenesis experiments. The formation of native structure and the free energy profile along the folding route are shown to be well described by the capillarity approximation but with some fine structure due to local folding topology.

  15. High intrinsic energy resolution photon number resolving detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lolli, L; Portesi, C; Monticone, E; Rajteri, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) are characterized by the intrinsic figure of merit to resolve both the energy and the statistical distribution of the incident photons. These properties lead TES devices to become the best single photon detector for quantum technology experiments. For a TES based on titanium and gold has been reached, at telecommunication wavelength, an unprecedented intrinsic energy resolution (0.113 eV). The uncertainties analysis of both energy resolution and photon state assignment has been discussed. The thermal properties of the superconductive device have been studied by fitting the bias curve to evaluate theoretical limit of the energy resolution.

  16. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  17. The Dark Energy Survey: Prospects for Resolved Stellar Populations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rossetto, Bruno M [Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Santiago, Basilio X [Rio Grande do Sul U.; Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Girardi, Leo [Padua Observ.; Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Camargo, Julio I.B. [Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Balbinot, Eduardo [Rio Grande do Sul U.; Rio de Janeiro Observ.; da Costa, Luiz N [Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Yanny, Brian [Fermilab; Maia, Marcio A.G. [Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Makler, Martin [Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Ogando, Ricardo L.C. [Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Pellegrini, Paulo S [Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Rio de Janeiro Observ.

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Wide angle and deep surveys, regardless of their primary purpose, always sample a large number of stars in the Galaxy and in its satellite system. We here make a forecast of the expected stellar sample resulting from the Dark Energy Survey and the perspectives that it will open for studies of Galactic structure and resolved stellar populations in general. An estimated 1.2 x 10{sup 8} stars will be sampled in DES grizY filters in the southern equatorial hemisphere. This roughly corresponds to 20% of all DES sources. Most of these stars belong to the stellar thick disk and halo of the Galaxy.

  18. Resolve to Save Energy This Year | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for| DepartmentReduce Hot Water UseComplexResolve to

  19. Resolve to Save Energy This Year | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,Award RecipientsActMission toResearchResolve to Save Energy This

  20. Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (NextTime-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid

  1. Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (NextTime-Resolved Study of Bonding in

  2. Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (NextTime-Resolved Study of Bonding

  3. Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis ofwas publishedThreeTime-Resolved Study of

  4. Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis ofwas publishedThreeTime-Resolved Study

  5. Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis ofwas publishedThreeTime-Resolved

  6. New limit on the mass of 14.4-keV solar axions emitted in an M1 transition in {sup 57}Fe nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbin, A. V., E-mail: derbin@pnpi.spb.ru; Muratova, V. N.; Semenov, D. A.; Unzhakov, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Axions of energy 14.4 keV that originated from the M1 transition in {sup 57}Fe nuclei in the Sun were sought by using the resonance-absorption reaction A+{sup 57}Fe {yields} {sup 57}Fe* {yields} {sup 57}Fe+{gamma} (14.4 keV). Asectioned Si(Li) detector arranged in a low-background facility was used to record photons from this reaction. This resulted in setting a new limit on the axion couplings to nucleons, vertical bar -1.19g{sub AN}{sup 0} + g{sub AN}{sup 3} vertical bar {<=} 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}. Within the hadronic-axion model, the respective constraint on the axion mass is m{sub A} {<=} 145 eV (at a 95% C.L.).

  7. Strathclyde powerS ahead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Strathclyde powerS ahead the future of renewable energy SHARING AND ENHANCING RESEARCH Discover the vision of Principal Professor Jim McDonald THE FUTURE OF ENERGY Strathclyde pioneers renewableEdicinE Snapshot the reSearcher Following a decade of environmental research in her native egypt, nabila saleem

  8. Electron collisional detachment processes for a 250 keV D/sup -/ ion beam in a partially ionized hydrogen target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savas, S.E.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutral atom beams with energies above 200 keV may be required for various purposes in magnetic fusion devices following TFTR, JET and MFTF-B. These beams can be produced much more efficiently by electron detachment from negative ion beams than by electron capture by positive ions. We have investigated the efficiency with which such neutral atoms can be produced by electron detachment in partially ionized hydrogen plasma neutralizers.

  9. Fast and Furious: Shock heated gas as the origin of spatially resolved hard X-ray emission in the central 5 kpc of the galaxy merger NGC 6240

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Junfeng; Nardini, Emanuele; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Karovska, Margarita; Elvis, Martin; Risaliti, Guido; Zezas, Andreas [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pellegrini, Silvia [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universitá di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Max, Claire [Center for Adaptive Optics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); U, Vivian, E-mail: jfwang@northwestern.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained a deep, subarcsecond resolution X-ray image of the nuclear region of the luminous galaxy merger NGC 6240 with Chandra, which resolves the X-ray emission from the pair of active nuclei and the diffuse hot gas in great detail. We detect extended hard X-ray emission from kT ? 6 keV (?70 MK) hot gas over a spatial scale of 5 kpc, indicating the presence of fast shocks with a velocity of ?2200 km s{sup –1}. For the first time, we obtain the spatial distribution of this highly ionized gas emitting Fe XXV, which shows a remarkable correspondence to the large-scale morphology of H{sub 2}(1-0) S(1) line emission and H? filaments. Propagation of fast shocks originating in the starburst-driven wind into the ambient dense gas can account for this morphological correspondence. With an observed L {sub 0.5-8} {sub keV} = 5.3 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup –1}, the diffuse hard X-ray emission is ?100 times more luminous than that observed in the classic starburst galaxy M82. Assuming a filling factor of 1% for the 70 MK temperature gas, we estimate its total mass (M {sub hot} = 1.8 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ?}) and thermal energy (E {sub th} = 6.5 × 10{sup 57} erg). The total iron mass in the highly ionized plasma is M {sub Fe} = 4.6 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ?}. Both the energetics and the iron mass in the hot gas are consistent with the expected injection from the supernovae explosion during the starburst that is commensurate with its high star formation rate. No evidence for fluorescent Fe I emission is found in the CO filament connecting the two nuclei.

  10. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glownia, James; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Cryan, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Andreasson, J.; /Uppsala U.; Belkacem, A.; /LBNL, Berkeley; Berrah, N.; /Western Michigan U.; Blaga, C.L.; /Ohio State U.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; /SLAC; DiMauro, L.F.; /Ohio State U.; Fang, L.; /Western Michigan U.; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Gessner, O.; /LBNL; Guhr, M.; /SLAC; Hajdu, J.; /Uppsala U.; Hertlein, M.P.; /LBNL; Hoener, M.; /Western Michigan U. /LBNL; Huang, G.; Kornilov, O.; /LBNL; Marangos, J.P.; /Imperial Coll., London; March, A.M.; /Argonne; McFarland, B.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /IRAMIS, Saclay /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Georgia Tech /Argonne /Kansas State U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /LBNL /Argonne /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; ,

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  11. Issues in microwave power systems engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, R.M. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The key issues in microwave power system engineering are beam safety, frequency allocation, and affordability. These major issues are presented, discussed, and suggestions for resolving them are offered. The issue of beam safety can be captured in the phrase ``Fear of Frying.`` Can a properly engineered beamed power safety system allay the public perception of microwave radiation dangers? Openness, visibility, and education may be keys to resolving this issue satisfactorily. ``Not in my Spectrum`` is a phrase that is frequently encountered in connection with the issue of where can the microwave power beam frequency be located. International cooperation may provide a part of the solution to this issue. ``Wow, that much?`` is a phrase encountered when dealing with the issue of economic affordability of large beamed power systems. A phased engineering approach for multiple uses even during construction is presented to aid in garnering revenue during the system build phase. Also, dual mode dc-RF converters are encouraged for bi-directional power flow utility and economies of scale in production.

  12. Common Origin of 3.55 keV X-Ray Line and Galactic Center Gamma Ray Excess in a Radiative Neutrino Mass Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borah, Debasish; Adhikari, Rathin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We attempt to simultaneously explain the recently observed 3.55 keV X-ray line in the analysis of XMM-Newton telescope data and the galactic center gamma ray excess observed by the Fermi gamma ray space telescope within an abelian gauge extension of standard model. We consider a two component dark matter scenario with a mass difference 3.55 keV such that the heavier one can decay into the lighter one and a photon with energy 3.55 keV. The lighter dark matter candidate is protected from decaying into the standard model particles by a remnant $Z_2$ symmetry into which the abelian gauge symmetry gets spontaneously broken. If the mass of the dark matter particle is chosen to be within $31-40$ GeV, then this model can also explain the galactic center gamma ray excess if the dark matter annihilation into $b\\bar{b}$ pairs has a cross section of $\\langle \\sigma v \\rangle \\simeq (1.4-2.0) \\times 10^{-26} \\; \\text{cm}^3/\\text{s}$. We constrain the model from the requirement of producing correct dark matter relic densit...

  13. Measurement of the 10 keV resonance in the $^{10}$B($p, ?_0$)$^7$Be reaction via the Trojan Horse Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Spitaleri; L. Lamia; S. M. R. Puglia; S. Romano; M. La Cognata; V. Crucilla; R. G. Pizzone; G. G. Rapisarda; M. L. Sergi; M. Gimenez Del Santo; N. Carlin; M. G. Munhoz; F. A. Souza; A. Szanto de Toledo; A. Tumino; B. Irgaziev; A. Mukhamedzhanov; G. Tabacaru; V. Burjan; V. Kroha; Z. Hons; J. Mrazek; Shu-Hua Zhou; Chengbo Li; Qungang Wen; Y. Wakabayashi; H. Yamaguchi

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{10}$B(p,$\\alpha_0$)$^7$Be bare nucleus astrophysical S(E)-factor has been measured for the first time at energies from about 100 keV down to about 5 keV by means of the Trojan Horse Method (THM). In this energy region, the S(E)-factor is strongly dominated by the 8.699 MeV $^{11}$C level (J$^{\\pi}$=$\\frac{5}{2}$$^+$), producing an s-wave resonance centered at about 10 keV in the entrance channel. Up to now, only the high energy tail of this resonant has been measured, while the low-energy trend is extrapolated from the available direct data. The THM has been applied to the quasi-free $^2$H($^{10}$B,$\\alpha_0$$^7$Be)n reaction induced at a boron-beam energy of 24.5 MeV. An accurate analysis brings to the determination of the $^{10}$B(p,$\\alpha_0$)$^7$Be S(E)-factor and of the corresponding electron screening potential $U_e$, thus giving for the first time an independent evaluation of it.

  14. DETERMINING NEUTRON STAR MASSES AND RADII USING ENERGY-RESOLVED WAVEFORMS OF X-RAY BURST OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Ka Ho; Lamb, Frederick K. [Center for Theoretical Astrophysics and Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801-3080 (United States); Miller, M. Coleman [Department of Astronomy and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Bhattacharyya, Sudip, E-mail: fkl@illinois.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous, precise measurements of the mass M and radius R of neutron stars can yield uniquely valuable information about the still uncertain properties of cold matter at several times the density of nuclear matter. One method that could be used to measure M and R is to analyze the energy-dependent waveforms of the X-ray flux oscillations seen during some thermonuclear bursts from some neutron stars. These oscillations are thought to be produced by X-ray emission from hotter regions on the surface of the star that are rotating at or near the spin frequency of the star. Here we explore how well M and R could be determined by generating and analyzing, using Bayesian techniques, synthetic energy-resolved X-ray data that we produce assuming a future space mission having 2-30 keV energy coverage and an effective area of 10 m{sup 2}, such as the proposed Large Observatory for X-Ray Timing or Advanced X-Ray Timing Array missions. We find that waveforms from hot spots within 10° of the rotation equator usually constrain both M and R with an uncertainty of about 10%, if there are 10{sup 6} total counts from the spot, whereas waveforms from spots within 20° of the rotation pole provide no useful constraints. The constraints we report can usually be achieved even if the burst oscillations vary with time and data from multiple bursts must be used to obtain 10{sup 6} counts from the hot spot. This is therefore a promising method to constrain M and R tightly enough to discriminate strongly between competing models of cold, high-density matter.

  15. Power combiner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Mobius; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A power combiner for the combining of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy comprises a feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for reflecting launched wave energy, and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of launched wave energy. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which comprises a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which comprises a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

  16. Temporally and spatially resolved characterization of microwave induced argon plasmas: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baeva, M., E-mail: baeva@inp-greifswald.de; Andrasch, M.; Ehlbeck, J.; Loffhagen, D.; Weltmann, K.-D. [INP Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments and modeling of the plasma-microwave interaction have been performed in a coaxial microwave plasma source at a field frequency of 2.45 GHz generating argon plasmas at pressures of 20 and 40 millibars and a ratio of flow rate to pressure of 0.125 sccm/Pa. The incident microwave power between 100?W and 300?W is supplied in a regime of a pulse-width modulation with cycle duration of 110?ms and a power-on time of 23?ms. The experiments are based on heterodyne reflectometry and microwave interferometry at 45.75?GHz. They provide the temporal behaviour of the complex reflection coefficient, the microwave power in the plasma, as well as the electron density in the afterglow zone of the discharge. The self-consistent spatially two-dimensional and time-dependent modeling complements the analysis of the plasma-microwave interaction delivering the plasma and electromagnetic field parameters. The consolidating experimental observations and model predictions allow further characterizing the plasma source. The generated plasma has a core occupying the region close to the end of the inner electrode, where maximum electron densities above 10{sup 20}?m{sup ?3} and electron temperatures of about 1?eV are observed. Due to a longer outer electrode of the coaxial structure, the plasma region is extended and fills the volume comprised by the outer electrode. The electron density reaches values of the order of 10{sup 19}?m{sup ?3}. The heating of the gas occurs in its great part due to elastic collisions with the plasma electrons. However, the contribution of the convective heating is important especially in the extended plasma region, where the gas temperature reaches its maximum values up to approximately 1400?K. The temporally and spatially resolved modeling enables a thorough investigation of the plasma-microwave interaction which clearly shows that the power in-coupling occurs in the region of the highest electron density during the early stage of the discharge. In the steady state phase, however, the power in-coupling occurs close to the source walls where the electron density is significantly lower than on the discharge axis.

  17. Safety of nuclear power reactors in the former Eastern European countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, S. [Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the safety of nuclear power plants in the former Eastern European countries (including the former Soviet Union). The current international design fabrication, construction, operation, safely, regulatory standards and practices, and ways to resolve plant problems are addressed in light of experience with the Western nuclear power development programs. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Cleco Power- Power Miser New Home Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Louisiana's Cleco Power offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible customers. Cleco Power offers a rate discount for residential customers building homes that meet the Power Miser Program...

  19. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tremsin, A S; Tittelmeier, K; Schillinger, B; Schulz, M; Lerche, M; Feller, W B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and...

  20. Electronic properties of linear carbon chains: Resolving the controversy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Backri, Amaal [Physics Department, Lancaster University, LA1 4YB Lancaster (United Kingdom) [Physics Department, Lancaster University, LA1 4YB Lancaster (United Kingdom); College of Science, Baghdad University, Al-Jaderyia Campus, Baghdad (Iraq); Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J. [Physics Department, Lancaster University, LA1 4YB Lancaster (United Kingdom)] [Physics Department, Lancaster University, LA1 4YB Lancaster (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Literature values for the energy gap of long one-dimensional carbon chains vary from as little as 0.2 eV to more than 4 eV. To resolve this discrepancy, we use the GW many-body approach to calculate the band gap E{sub g} of an infinite carbon chain. We also compute the energy dependence of the attenuation coefficient ? governing the decay with chain length of the electrical conductance of long chains and compare this with recent experimental measurements of the single-molecule conductance of end-capped carbon chains. For long chains, we find E{sub g} = 2.16 eV and an upper bound for ? of 0.21 Å{sup ?1}.

  1. Electrically Detected Electron-Spin-Echo Envelope Modulation: A Highly Sensitive Technique for Resolving Complex Interface Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    for Resolving Complex Interface Structures Felix Hoehne,* Jinming Lu, Andre R. Stegner, Martin Stutzmann

  2. Efficient laser-induced 6 - 8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Managementand

  3. Spectrally resolved detection of sodium in the atmosphere of HD189733b with the HARPS spectrograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyttenbach, A; Lovis, C; Udry, S; Pepe, F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric properties of exoplanets can be constrained with transit spectroscopy. The signature of atomic sodium NaI, known to be present above the clouds, is a powerful probe of the upper atmosphere, where it can be best detected and characterized at high spectral resolution. Our goal is to obtain a high-resolution transit spectrum of HD189733b in the region around the resonance doublet of NaI at 589 nm, to characterize the absorption signature previously detected from space at low resolution. We analyze archival transit data of HD189733b obtained with the HARPS spectrograph. We retrieve the transit spectrum and light curve of the planet, implementing corrections for telluric contamination and planetary orbital motion. We spectrally resolve the NaI D doublet and measure line contrasts of $0.64\\pm0.07\\%$ (D2) and $0.40\\pm0.07\\%$ (D1) and FWHMs of $0.52\\pm0.08~\\AA$. This corresponds to a detection at the 10-$\\sigma$ level of excess of absorption of $0.32\\pm0.03\\%$ in a passband of $2\\times0.75\\ \\AA$ centered ...

  4. Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

  5. Star Power

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  6. Star Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  7. Reduction in the intensity of solar X-ray emission in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range and heating of the solar corona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirzoeva, I. K., E-mail: colombo2006@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The time profiles of the energy spectra of low-intensity flares and the structure of the thermal background of the soft X-ray component of solar corona emission over the period of January-February, 2003, are investigated using the data of the RHESSI project. A reduction in the intensity of X-ray emission of the solar flares and the corona thermal background in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range is revealed. The RHESSI data are compared with the data from the Interball-Geotail project. A new mechanism of solar corona heating is proposed on the basis of the results obtained.

  8. Earth X-ray albedo for cosmic X-ray background radiation in the 1--1000 keV band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Churazov; S. Sazonov; R. Sunyaev; M. Revnivtsev

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present calculations of the reflection of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) by the Earth's atmosphere in the 1--1000 keV energy range. The calculations include Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescent emission and are based on a realistic chemical composition of the atmosphere. Such calculations are relevant for CXB studies using the Earth as an obscuring screen (as was recently done by INTEGRAL). The Earth's reflectivity is further compared with that of the Sun and the Moon -- the two other objects in the Solar system subtending a large solid angle on the sky, as needed for CXB studies.

  9. Facilities and techniques for x-ray diagnostic calibration in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, J.L.; Wittmayer, F.J.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a pioneer in the field of x-ray diagnostic calibration for more than 20 years. We have built steady state x-ray sources capable of supplying fluorescent lines of high spectral purity in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range, and these sources have been used in the calibration of x-ray detectors, mirrors, crystals, filters, and film. This paper discusses our calibration philosophy and techniques, and describes some of our x-ray sources. Examples of actual calibration data are presented as well.

  10. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen P. (Cambridge, GB)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  11. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and...

  12. Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind Awards Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind...

  13. Study of Multi-Scale Cloud Processes Over the Tropical Western Pacific Using Cloud-Resolving Models Constrained by Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudhia, Jimy

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds in the tropical western Pacific are an integral part of the large scale environment. An improved understanding of the multi-scale structure of clouds and their interactions with the environment is critical to the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) program for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations, understanding the consequences of model biases, and providing a context for interpreting the observational data collected over the ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. Three-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs) are powerful tools for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations. However, a significant challenge in using CRMs in the TWP is that the region lacks conventional data, so large uncertainty exists in defining the large-scale environment for clouds. This project links several aspects of the ARM program, from measurements to providing improved analyses, and from cloud-resolving modeling to climate-scale modeling and parameterization development, with the overall objective to improve the representations of clouds in climate models and to simulate and quantify resolved cloud effects on the large-scale environment. Our objectives will be achieved through a series of tasks focusing on the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and ARM data. Our approach includes: -- Perform assimilation of COSMIC GPS radio occultation and other satellites products using the WRF Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation system to represent the tropical large-scale environment at 36 km grid resolution. This high-resolution analysis can be used by the community to derive forcing products for single-column models or cloud-resolving models. -- Perform cloud-resolving simulations using WRF and its nesting capabilities, driven by the improved regional analysis and evaluate the simulations against ARM datasets such as from TWP-ICE to optimize the microphysics parameters for this region. A cirrus study (Mace and co-authors) already exists for TWP-ICE using satellite and ground-based observations. -- Perform numerical experiments using WRF to investigate how convection over tropical islands in the Maritime Continent interacts with large-scale circulation and affects convection in nearby regions. -- Evaluate and apply WRF as a testbed for GCM cloud parameterizations, utilizing the ability of WRF to run on multiple scales (from cloud resolving to global) to isolate resolution and physics issues from dynamical and model framework issues. Key products will be disseminated to the ARM and larger community through distribution of data archives, including model outputs from the data assimilation products and cloud resolving simulations, and publications.

  14. Resolved Atomic Super-clouds in Spiral Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Braun

    1995-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    High quality data are presented of neutral hydrogen emission and absorption in the fields of eleven of the nearest spiral galaxies. Multi-configuration VLA observations have provided angular resolution of 6~arcsec (corresponding to about 100~pc at the average galaxy distance of 3.5~Mpc) and velocity resolution of 6~km~s$^{-1}$, while accurately recovering the total line flux detected previously with filled apertures. Previous experience suggests that this physical resolution is sufficient to at least marginally resolve the \\ion{H}{1} super-cloud population which delineates regions of active star formation. A high brightness filamentary network of \\ion{H}{1} super-clouds is seen in each galaxy. Emission brightness temperatures in excess of 200~Kelvin are sometimes detected at large radii, even in relatively face-on systems. All galaxies display a systematic increase in the observed brightness temperature of super-clouds with radius, followed by a flattening and subsequent decline. In the few instances where background continuum sources allow detection of \\ion{H}{1} absorption, the indicative spin temperatures are consistent with the super-cloud brightness temperature seen in emission at similar radii. These data suggest substantial opacity of the \\ion{H}{1} in the super-cloud network.

  15. DUST GRAIN EVOLUTION IN SPATIALLY RESOLVED T TAURI BINARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Close, Laird M.; Hinz, Philip M.; Hoffmann, William F.; Males, Jared R. [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Greene, Thomas P. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Core-accretion planet formation begins in protoplanetary disks with the growth of small, interstellar medium dust grains into larger particles. The progress of grain growth, which can be quantified using 10 {mu}m silicate spectroscopy, has broad implications for the final products of planet formation. Previous studies have attempted to correlate stellar and disk properties with the 10 {mu}m silicate feature in an effort to determine which stars are efficient at grain growth. Thus far there does not appear to be a dominant correlated parameter. In this paper, we use spatially resolved adaptive optics spectroscopy of nine T Tauri binaries as tight as 0.''25 to determine if basic properties shared between binary stars, such as age, composition, and formation history, have an effect on dust grain evolution. We find with 90%-95% confidence that the silicate feature equivalent widths of binaries are more similar than those of randomly paired single stars, implying that shared properties do play an important role in dust grain evolution. At lower statistical significance, we find with 82% confidence that the secondary has a more prominent silicate emission feature (i.e., smaller grains) than the primary. If confirmed by larger surveys, this would imply that spectral type and/or binarity are important factors in dust grain evolution.

  16. Resolving the physics of anisotropy, flow and chaotic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Stuart

    September 2012 [1] Australian National University, ACT 0200, Australia [2] Princeton Plasma Physics Research Facility · Australia's only fusion-relevant facility · $30 million (ANU contribution ~$20 million 20 kW pulsed RF power to provide P ~ 1MW m-2 · Material target holder currently in production. #12

  17. Tidal power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammons, T.J. (Glasgow Univ., Scotland (United Kingdom))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the physics of tidal power considering gravitational effects of moon and sun; semidiurnal, diurnal, and mixed tides; and major periodic components that affect the tidal range. Shelving, funneling, reflection, and resonance phenomena that have a significant effect on tidal range are also discussed. The paper then examines tidal energy resource for principal developments estimated from parametric modeling in Europe and worldwide. Basic parameters that govern the design of tidal power schemes in terms of mean tidal range and surface area of the enclosed basin are identified. While energy extracted is proportional to the tidal amplitude squared, requisite sluicing are is proportional to the square root of the tidal amplitude. Sites with large tidal amplitudes are therefore best suited for tidal power developments, whereas sites with low tidal amplitudes have sluicing that may be prohibitive. It is shown that 48% of the European tidal resource is in the United Kingdom, 42% in France and 8% in Ireland, other countries having negligible potential. Worldwide tidal resource is identified. Tidal barrage design and construction using caissons is examined, as are alternative operating modes (single-action generation, outflow generation, flood generation, two-way generation, twin basin generation, pumping, etc), development trends and possibilities, generation cost at the barrage boundary, sensitivity to discount rates, general economics, and markets. Environmental effects, and institutional constraints to the development of tidal barrage schemes are also discussed.

  18. Frequency domain phase-resolved optical Doppler and Doppler variance tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhongping

    ), is capable of measuring micro- flows using the optical Doppler effect [1,2]. Early ODT systems were unableFrequency domain phase-resolved optical Doppler and Doppler variance tomography Lei Wang a phase-resolved optical Doppler tomography (ODT) was developed with Doppler variance imag- ing capability

  19. Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1 1 Department of Meteorology, University. INTRODUCTION In recent years Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) have become an increasingly important tool for CRM data, which allows one to investigate statistical prop- erties of the lifecycles of the "clouds

  20. Reduction of transient diffusion from 1{endash}5 keV Si{sup +} ion implantation due to surface annihilation of interstitials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, A.; Gossmann, H.-.; Eaglesham, D.J.; Pelaz, L.; Jacobson, D.C. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Haynes, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Erokhin, Y.E. [Eaton Corporation, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01950 (United States)] [Eaton Corporation, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01950 (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reduction of transient enhanced diffusion (TED) with reduced implantation energy has been investigated and quantified. A fixed dose of 1{times}10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2} Si{sup +} was implanted at energies ranging from 0.5 to 20 keV into boron doping superlattices and enhanced diffusion of the buried boron marker layers was measured for anneals at 810, 950, and 1050{degree}C. A linearly decreasing dependence of diffusivity enhancement on decreasing Si{sup +} ion range is observed at all temperatures, extrapolating to {approximately}1 for 0 keV. This is consistent with our expectation that at zero implantation energy there would be no excess interstitials from the implantation and hence no TED. Monte Carlo modeling and continuum simulations are used to fit the experimental data. The results are consistent with a surface recombination length for interstitials of {lt}10 nm. The data presented here demonstrate that in the range of annealing temperatures of interest for p-n junction formation, TED is reduced at smaller ion implantation energies and that this is due to increased interstitial annihilation at the surface. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Observations of a mode transition in a hydrogen hollow cathode discharge using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Sam, E-mail: sam.dixon@anu.edu.au; Charles, Christine; Dedrick, James; Boswell, Rod [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah [Department of Physics, York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Two distinct operational modes are observed in a radio frequency (rf) low pressure hydrogen hollow cathode discharge. The mode transition is characterised by a change in total light emission and differing expansion structures. An intensified CCD camera is used to make phase resolved images of Balmer ? emission from the discharge. The low emission mode is consistent with a typical ? discharge, and appears to be driven by secondary electrons ejected from the cathode surface. The bright mode displays characteristics common to an inductive discharge, including increased optical emission, power factor, and temperature of the H{sub 2} gas. The bright mode precipitates the formation of a stationary shock in the expansion, observed as a dark region adjacent to the source-chamber interface.

  2. Time-Resolved Molecular Characterization of Limonene/Ozone Aerosol using High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, Adam P.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular composition of limonene/O3 secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) as a function of reaction time. SOA was generated by ozonation of D-limonene in a reaction chamber and sampled at different time intervals using a cascade impactor. The SOA samples were extracted into acetonitrile and analyzed using a HR-ESI-MS instrument with a resolving power of 100,000 (m/?m). The resulting mass spectra provided detailed information about the extent of oxidation inferred from the O:C ratios, double bond equivalency (DBE) factors, and aromaticity indexes (AI) in hundreds of identified individual SOA species.

  3. NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio-galaxy Cygnus A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Christopher S; Ogle, Patrick M; Harrison, Fiona A; Madsen, Kristin K; Fabian, Andrew C; Wik, Daniel R; Madejski, Grzegorz; Ballantyne, David R; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Fuerst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J; Lanz, Lauranne; Miller, Jon M; Saez, Cristian; Stern, Daniel; Walton, Dominic J; Zhang, William

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A, focusing on the central absorbed active galactic nucleus (AGN). Cygnus A is embedded in a cool-core galaxy cluster, and hence we also examine archival XMM-Newton data to facilitate the decomposition of the spectrum into the AGN and intracluster medium (ICM) components. NuSTAR gives a source-dominated spectrum of the AGN out to >70keV. In gross terms, the NuSTAR spectrum of the AGN has the form of a power law (Gamma~1.6-1.7) absorbed by a neutral column density of N_H~1.6x10^23 cm^-2. However, we also detect curvature in the hard (>10keV) spectrum resulting from reflection by Compton-thick matter out of our line-of-sight to the X-ray source. Compton reflection, possibly from the outer accretion disk or obscuring torus, is required even permitting a high-energy cutoff in the continuum source; the limit on the cutoff energy is E_cut>111keV (90% confidence). Interestingly, the absorbed power-law plus reflection model leaves residuals suggesting...

  4. Spatially resolved measurements of ion density and electron temperature in a dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma by complete floating double probe technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Xiangzhan; Liu Yongxin; Yang Shuo; Lu Wenqi; Bi Zhenhua; Li Xiaosong; Wang Younian [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatially resolved measurements of the ion density and electron temperature in a dual-frequency capacitively coupled Ar discharge plasma are performed with a newly developed complete floating double probe. Axial and radial distributions of the ion density and electron temperature under various high-frequency (HF) power and gas pressure were studied in detail. Both the ion density and the electron temperature increased with increasing HF power. With increasing gas pressure from 1.3 to 9.3 Pa, the radial profile of ion density below the driven electrode experienced a change from ''bimodal'' to ''unimodal'' shape, with better uniformity being achieved at the optimal pressure of about 5 Pa. In addition, changing the axial profile of ion density was also observed with the peak shift toward the powered electrode at higher pressures. The measured results showed satisfying consistency with that of improved two dimensional fluid simulations.

  5. Resolving and probing the circumstellar disk of the Herbig Ae star MWC 480 at 1.4 mm: Evolved dust?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murad Hamidouche; Leslie W. Looney; Lee G. Mundy

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high resolution 0.45" x 0.32" observations from the BIMA array toward the Herbig Ae system MWC 480 in the lambda = 1.4 mm dust continuum. We resolve a circumstellar disk of radius ~170 AU and constrain the disk parameters by comparing the observations to flat disk models. These results show that the typical fit parameters of the disk, such as the mass, Md ~ 0.04-0.18 Mo, and the surface density power law index, p=0.5 or 1, are comparable to those of the lower mass T Tauri stars. The dust in the MWC 480 disk can be modeled as processed dust material (beta ~ 0.8), similar to the Herbig Ae star CQ Tau disk; the fitted disk parameters are also consistent with less-evolved dust (beta ~ 1.2). The possibility of grain growth in the MWC 480 circumstellar disk is supported by the acceptable fits with beta ~ 0.8. The surface density power-law profiles of p=0.5 and p=1 can be easily fit to the MWC 480 disk; however, a surface density power-law profile similiar to the minimum mass solar nebula model p=1.5 is ruled out at an 80% confidence level.

  6. Wind power and Wind power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jørgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

  7. Resolving the Hard X-ray Emission of GX 5-1 with INTEGRAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Paizis; K. Ebisawa; T. Tikkanen; J. Rodriguez; J. Chenevez; E. Kuulkers; O. Vilhu; T. J. -L. Courvoisier

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the study of one year of INTEGRAL data on the neutron star low mass X-ray binary GX 5-1. Thanks to the excellent angular resolution and sensitivity of INTEGRAL, we are able to obtain a high quality spectrum of GX 5-1 from ~5 keV to ~100 keV, for the first time without contamination from the nearby black hole candidate GRS 1758-258 above 20 keV. During our observations, GX 5-1 is mostly found in the horizontal and normal branch of its hardness intensity diagram. A clear hard X-ray emission is observed above ~30 keV which exceeds the exponential cut-off spectrum expected from lower energies. This spectral flattening may have the same origin of the hard components observed in other Z sources as it shares the property of being characteristic to the horizontal branch. The hard excess is explained by introducing Compton up-scattering of soft photons from the neutron star surface due to a thin hot plasma expected in the boundary layer. The spectral changes of GX 5-1 downward along the "Z" pattern in the hardness intensity diagram can be well described in terms of monotonical decrease of the neutron star surface temperature. This may be a consequence of the gradual expansion of the boundary layer as the mass accretion rate increases.

  8. Time-resolved diagnostics for concrete target response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baum, D.W.; Kuklo, R.M.; Reaugh, J.E.; Simonson, S.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to facilitate the design of advanced penetrating weapons for defeating land targets, the interaction of concrete with high-velocity penetrators needs to be better characterized. To aid in this effort, three new types of time-resolved diagnostics are being developed and have been used in two experiments and one demonstration: fiber optic arrays to localize penetrators in space and time, Fabry-Perot velocimetry to record the concrete particle velocity, which is related to the pressure, at specific locations within concrete targets, and micropower impulse radar to provide a non-intrusive measure of the penetrator position-time history in a target. The two experiments used the fiber optic array and the Fabry-Perot velocimeter to diagnose the response of concrete to penetration by a Viper shaped charge jet. The results were analyzed using the CALE continuum mechanics simulation program, for which a preliminary model of the material properties of concrete was developed. The fiber optic arrays recorded the bow shock at locations 6.4 and 16.9 cm from the front surfaces. The Fabry-Perot velocimeter measured a free-surface velocity of 0.13 km/s at a distance of 3 cm and obliquity 70{degree} from the jet, which was moving at an interface velocity of 4.0 km/s at a depth of 29 cm. These values imply a pressure of about 6.6 kbar at that location. The demonstration used micropower impulse radar with a pulse repetition frequency of 0.25 MHz and a cell size of 30 ps to detect and record the motion of a metal penetrator simulant moving inside a cylindrical concrete target.

  9. Power Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, F.

    , will be the use of the ASTM Theoretical Steam Rate Tables. In addition, the author's experience regarding the minimum size for power recovery units that are economic in a Culf Coast plant will be presented. INTROD\\Jr.'rION When surveying an operation... will be discussed in detail. Each term in the equation will be considered in English units. Secondly, the use of Mollier diagrams to estimate the enthalphy change between the initial and final conditions will be considered. The last method, specific to steam...

  10. Yakama Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhatY-12 recognized for ...BER/NERSCYakama Power May

  11. Fusion Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding Opportunity fromFusion Links Fusion

  12. Power management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

  13. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008, uses concentrated solar power to split water. Figurethe main reason the potential for solar power is boundless.a clean energy source, solar power is inexhaustible, fairly

  14. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric power generating plant, and the distributionrequired on the power-generating plant and not on the vehi-in either power-generating plants or combustion engines,

  15. Southwestern Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Courses Instructors NERC Continuing Education Power Operations Training Center You'll find the "Power" of learning at Southwestern's Power Operations Training Center (POTC). POTC's...

  16. POWER PURCHASE AGREEMENT DELMARVA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    POWER PURCHASE AGREEMENT between DELMARVA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY ("Buyer") and BLUEWATER WIND 3.5 Energy Forecasts, Scheduling and Balancing.......................................... 39 3

  17. A compact dusty disk around the Herbig Ae star HR 5999 resolved with VLTI / MIDI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Preibisch; Stefan Kraus; Thomas Driebe; Roy van Boekel; Gerd Weigelt

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used mid-infrared long-baseline interferometry with MIDI at the VLTI to resolve the circumstellar material around the Herbig Ae star HR 5999, providing the first direct measurement of its angular size, and to derive constraints on the spatial distribution of the dust. A set of ten spectrally dispersed (8-13 micron) interferometric measurements of HR 5999 was obtained. The characteristic size of the emission region depends on the projected baseline length and position angle, and it ranges between ~ 5-15 milliarcseconds (Gauss FWHM), corresponding to remarkably small physical sizes of ~ 1-3 AU. To derive constraints on the geometrical distribution of the dust, we compared our interferometric measurements to 2D, frequency-dependent radiation transfer simulations of circumstellar disks and envelopes. For disk models with radial power-law density distributions, the relatively weak but very extended emission from outer disk regions (>~ 3 AU) leads to model visibilities that are significantly lower than the observed visibilities, making these models inconsistent with the MIDI data. Disk models in which the density is truncated at outer radii of ~ 2-3 AU, on the other hand, provide good agreement with the data. A satisfactory fit to the observed MIDI visibilities of HR 5999 is found with a model of a geometrically thin disk that is truncated at 2.6 AU and seen under an inclination angle of 58 degr. Neither models of a geometrically thin disk seen nearly edge-on, nor models of spherical dust shells can achieve agreement between the observed and predicted visibilities. The reason why the disk is so compact remains unclear; we speculate that it has been truncated by a close binary companion.

  18. RESOLVING THE BONDI ACCRETION FLOW TOWARD THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE OF NGC 3115 WITH CHANDRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Ka-Wah; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Yukita, Mihoko; Million, Evan T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Mathews, William G. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bregman, Joel N., E-mail: kwong@ua.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States)

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas undergoing Bondi accretion onto a supermassive black hole (SMBH) becomes hotter toward smaller radii. We searched for this signature with a Chandra observation of the hot gas in NGC 3115, which optical observations show has a very massive SMBH. Our analysis suggests that we are resolving, for the first time, the accretion flow within the Bondi radius of an SMBH. We show that the temperature is rising toward the galaxy center as expected in all accretion models in which the black hole is gravitationally capturing the ambient gas. There is no hard central point source that could cause such an apparent rise in temperature. The data support that the Bondi radius is at about 4''-5'' (188-235 pc), suggesting an SMBH of 2 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun} that is consistent with the upper end of the optical results. The density profile within the Bondi radius has a power-law index of 1.03{sup +0.23}{sub -0.21}, which is consistent with gas in transition from the ambient medium and the accretion flow. The accretion rate at the Bondi radius is determined to be M-dot{sub B} = 2.2x10{sup -2} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. Thus, the accretion luminosity with 10% radiative efficiency at the Bondi radius (10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) is about six orders of magnitude higher than the upper limit of the X-ray luminosity of the nucleus.

  19. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CuO{sub 6+{delta}} (Tl2201) T{sub c,max} {approx} 95 K and (Bi{sub 1.35}Pb{sub 0.85})(Sr{sub 1.47}La{sub 0.38})CuO{sub 6+{delta}} (Bi2201) T{sub c,max} {approx} 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to ({pi},0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher T{sub c} Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO{sub 2}/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is consistent with a charge density wave (CDW) origin of the pseudogap, similar to STM checkerboard patterns in the pseudogap state.

  20. Power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Montgomery Village, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  1. ASCA Discovery of Diffuse 6.4 keV Emission Near the Sgr C Complex: A New X-ray Reflection Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Murakami; K. Koyama; M. Tsujimoto; Y. Maeda; M. Sakano

    2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an ASCA discovery of diffuse hard X-ray emission from the Sgr C complex with its peak in the vicinity of the molecular cloud core. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a strong 6.4-keV line and large absorption. These properties suggest that Sgr C is a new X-ray reflection nebula which emits fluorescent and scattered X-rays via irradiation from an external X-ray source. We found no adequately bright source in the immediate Sgr C vicinity to fully account for the fluorescence. The irradiating source may be the Galactic nucleus Sgr A*, which was brighter in the past than it is now as is suggested from observations of the first X-ray reflection nebula Sgr B2.

  2. First result of the experimental search for the 9.4 keV solar axion reactions with Kr-83 in the copper proportional counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. M. Gavrilyuk; A. M. Gangapshev; A. V. Derbin; V. V. Kazalov; H. J. Kim; Y. D. Kim; V. V. Kobychev; V. V. Kuzminov; Luqman Ali; V. N. Muratova; S. I. Panasenko; S. S. Ratkevich; D. A. Semenov; D. A. Tekueva; S. P. Yakimenko; E. V. Unzhakov

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental search for solar hadronic axions is started at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory of the Institute for Nuclear Researches Russian Academy of Science. It is assumed that axions are created in the Sun during M1-transition between the first thermally excited level at 9.4 keV and the ground state in Kr-83. The experiment is based on axion detection via resonant absorption process by the same nucleus in the detector. The big copper proportional counter filled with krypton is used to detect signals from axions. The experimental setup is situated in the deep underground low background laboratory. No evidence of axion detection were found after the 26.5 days data collection. Resulting new upper limit on axion mass is m_{A} < 130 eV at 95% C.L.

  3. A 3.55 keV line from $\\text{DM}\\rightarrow a \\rightarrow ?$: predictions for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph P. Conlon; Andrew J. Powell

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We further study a scenario in which a 3.55 keV X-ray line arises from decay of dark matter to an axion-like particle (ALP), that subsequently converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. We perform numerical simulations of Gaussian random magnetic fields with radial scaling of the magnetic field magnitude with the electron density, for both cool-core `Perseus' and non-cool-core `Coma' electron density profiles. Using these, we quantitatively study the resulting signal strength and morphology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our study includes the effects of fields of view that cover only the central part of the cluster, the effects of offset pointings on the radial decline of signal strength and the effects of dividing clusters into annuli. We find good agreement with current data and make predictions for future analyses and observations.

  4. Search for 14.4-KeV Solar Axions Emitted in the M1-Transition of Fe-57 Nuclei with CAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andriamonje, S.; Aune, S.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Autiero, D.; /CERN /Lyon, IPN; Barth, K.; /CERN; Belov, A.; /Moscow, INR; Beltran, B.; /Zaragoza U. /Queen's U., Kingston; Brauninger, H.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; /Zaragoza U.; Collar, J.I.; /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U., KICP; Dafni, T.; /DAPNIA, Saclay /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch. /Zaragoza U.; Davenport, M.; /CERN; Di Lella, L.; /CERN /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore; Eleftheriadis, C.; /Aristotle U., Thessaloniki; Englhauser, J.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Fanourakis, G.; /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; /Freiburg U.; Friedrich, P.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Geralis, T.; /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /DAPNIA, Saclay /Moscow, INR /Zaragoza U. /British Columbia U. /Freiburg U. /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch. /DAPNIA, Saclay /Zaragoza U. /Frankfurt U. /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb /Freiburg U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb /CERN /Aristotle U., Thessaloniki /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zaragoza U. /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U., KICP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Zaragoza U. /CERN /DAPNIA, Saclay /CERN /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch. /Zaragoza U. /Aristotle U., Thessaloniki /Patras U. /Brookhaven /CERN /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /CERN /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U., KICP /Zaragoza U. /Freiburg U. /CERN /CERN /Patras U.

    2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for 14.4 keV solar axions or more general axion-like particles (ALPs), that may be emitted in the M1 nuclear transition of 57Fe, by using the axion-to-photon conversion in the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) with evacuated magnet bores (Phase I). From the absence of excess of the monoenergetic X-rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun, we set model-independent constraints on the coupling constants of pseudoscalar particles that couple to two photons and to a nucleon g{sub ay}|-1.19g{sub aN}{sup 0}+g{sub aN}{sup 3}| < 1.36 x 10{sup -16} GeV{sup -1} for ma < 0.03 eV at the 95% confidence level.

  5. Modelling of partially-resolved oceanic symmetric instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachman, S. D.; Taylor, J. R.

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    –27 Contents lists availab Ocean Mo els2008a,b,c; Fox-Kemper et al., 2008; Klein et al., 2008), (3) the Rossby (Ro) and Richardson (Ri) numbers are Oð1Þ, meaning that balanced models are not appropriate to describe the motion As computational power increases... sign of f (Hoskins, 1974). Fronts in the surface mixed layer of the ocean feature strong lateral density gradients, which in conjunction with wind forcing and/or buoy- ancy fluxes create conditions favorable to the development of SI (Thomas and Taylor...

  6. The 3.5 keV X-ray line signature from annihilating and decaying dark matter in Weinberg model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seungwon Baek; P. Ko; Wan-Il Park

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently two groups independently observed unidentified X-ray line signal at the energy 3.55 keV from the galaxy clusters and Andromeda galaxy. We show that this anomalous signal can be explained in annihilating dark matter model, for example, fermionic dark matter model in hidden sector with global $U(1)_X$ symmetry proposed by Weinberg. There are two scenarios for the production of the annihilating dark matters. In the first scenario the dark matters with mass 3.55 keV decouple from the interaction with Goldstone bosons and go out of thermal equilibrium at high temperature ($>$ 1 TeV) when they are still relativistic, their number density per comoving volume being essentially fixed to be the current value. The correct relic abundance of this warm dark matter is obtained by assuming that about ${\\cal O}(10^3)$ relativistic degrees of freedom were present at the decoupling temperature or alternatively large entropy production occurred at high temperature. In the other scenario, the dark matters were absent at high temperature, and as the universe cools down, the SM particles annihilate or decay to produce the dark matters non-thermally as in `freeze-in' scenario. It turns out that the DM production from Higgs decay is the dominant one. In the model we considered, only the first scenario can explain both X-ray signal and relic abundance. The X-ray signal arises through $p$-wave annihilation of dark matter pair into two photons through the scalar resonance without violating the constraints from big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background, and astrophysical objects such as red giants or white dwarfs. We also discuss the possibility that the signal may result from a decaying dark matter in a simple extension of Weinberg model.

  7. 3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Barker; Jason Cole

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

  8. Automatic Selection of Mask and Arterial Phase Images for Temporally Resolved MR Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabih, Ramin

    angiography (CEMRA) has become a routine clinical tool for pretreat- ment mapping of vasculature (1). Among data acquisition techniques for CEMRA, the time-resolved strategy offers a very useful option for many

  9. Layer resolved magnetic domain imaging of epitaxial heterostructures in large applied magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zohar, S.; Choi, Y.; Love, D. M.; Mansell, R.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Keavney, D. J.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We use X-ray Excited Luminescence Microscopy to investigate the elemental and layer resolved magnetic reversal in an interlayer exchange coupled (IEC) epitaxial Fe/Cr wedge/Co heterostructure. The transition from strongly coupled parallel Co...

  10. Resolving Cancer Heterogeneity by Single Cell Sequencing (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Xu, Xun [BGI

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Xun Xu on "Resolving Cancer Heterogeneity by Single Cell Sequencing" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  11. Undersampling to accelerate time-resolved MRI velocity measurement of carotid blood flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Yuehui

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved velocity information of carotid blood flow can be used to estimate haemodynamic conditions associated with carotid artery disease leading to stroke. MRI provides high-resolution measurement of such information ...

  12. Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    here. Addthis Related Articles DOE Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models and Allows Sale of Another Air-Con Agrees to Pay Civil Penalty to Resolve...

  13. Space-time resolved electrokinetics in cylindrical and semi-cylindrical microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Campisi

    2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown show how to employ Bessel-Fourier series in order to obtain a complete space-time resolved description of electrokinetic phenomena in cylindrical and semi-cylindrical microfluidic channels.

  14. SciTech Connect: Validations of Time-Resolved X-Ray Emissions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Validations of Time-Resolved X-Ray Emissions Spectroscopy for Analysis of Mn-Based Natural and Artifical Sunlight-to-Energy Assemblies Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  15. Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS XIV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstracts of presentations made at the Fourteenth International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS XIV) held May 9-14, 2009 in Meredith, New Hampshire. TRVS is a series of biennial conferences ...

  16. Automation of the Laguerre Expansion Technique for Analysis of Time-resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabir, Aditi Sandeep

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    AUTOMATION OF THE LAGUERRE EXPANSION TECHNIQUE FOR ANALYSIS OF TIME-RESOLVED FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY DATA A Thesis by ADITI SANDEEP DABIR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2009 Major Subject: Biomedical Engineering AUTOMATION OF THE LAGUERRE EXPANSION TECHNIQUE FOR ANALYSIS OF TIME-RESOLVED FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY DATA A Thesis...

  17. Final Report Spacially-Resolved Diagnostics and Modeling of Micro-Discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent M. Donnelly; Demetre J. Economou

    2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical emission spectroscopy measurements were performed with added trace probe gases in an atmospheric pressure direct current (DC) helium microplasma. Spatially resolved measurements (resolution {approx} 6 {micro}m) were taken across a 200 {micro}m slot-type discharge. Stark splitting of the hydrogen Balmer-line was used to investigate the electric field distribution in the cathode sheath region. Electron densities were evaluated from the analysis of the spectral line broadenings of H-{beta} emission. The electron density in the bulk plasma was in the range 3-8 x 1013 cm-3. The electric field peaked at the cathode ({approx}60 kV/cm) and decayed to small values over a distance of {approx} 50 {micro}m (sheath edge) from the cathode. These experimental data were in good agreement with a self-consistent one-dimensional model of the discharge. The dependence of gas temperature on gas flow through the slot-type, atmospheric pressure microplasma in helium or argon was investigated by a combination of experiments and modeling. Spatially-resolved gas temperature profiles across the gap between the two electrodes were obtained from rotational analysis of N{sub 2} (C{sup 3}II{sub u} {yields} B{sup 3} II{sub g}) emission spectra, with small amounts of N{sub 2} added as actinometer gas. Under the same input power of 20 kW/cm{sup 3}, the peak gas temperature in helium ({approx}650 K) was significantly lower than that in argon (over 1200 K). This reflects the much higher thermal conductivity of helium gas. The gas temperature decreased with increasing gas flow rate, more so in argon compared to helium. This was consistent with the fact that conductive heat losses dominate in helium microplasmas, while convective heat losses play a major role in argon microplasmas. A plasma-gas flow simulation of the microdischarge, including a chemistry set, a compressible Navier-Stokes (and mass continuity) equation, and a convective heat transport equation, was also performed. Experimental measurements were in good agreement with simulation predictions. Finally, laser scattering experiments were performed at pressures of 100s of Torr in argon or nitrogen. Laser Thomson Scattering (LTS) and Rotational Raman Scattering were employed in a novel, backscattering, confocal configuration. LTS allows direct and simultaneous measurement of both electron density (ne) and electron temperature (Te). For 50 mA current and over the pressure range of 300-700 Torr, LTS yielded Te = 0.9 {+-} 0.3 eV and ne = (6 {+-} 3) 1013 cm-3, in reasonable agreement with the predictions of a mathematical model. Rotational Raman spectroscopy (RRS) was employed for absolute calibration of the LTS signal. RRS was also applied to measure the 3D gas temperature (Tg) in nitrogen DC microdischarges. In addition, diode laser absorption spectroscopy was employed to measure the density of argon metastables (1s5 in Paschen notations) in argon microdischarges. The gas temperature, extracted from the width of the absorption profile, was compared with Tg values obtained by optical emission spectroscopy.

  18. Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vu, B.T.V.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (10{sup 4}-10{sup 6}K) and high density plasmas (10{sup 22}-10{sup 24}cm{sup {minus}3}) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (10{sup 13} - 10{sup 15}W/cm{sup 2}) and subpicosecond (10{sup {minus}12}-10{sup {minus}13}s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature ({approximately}40eV) super-critical density ({approximately}10{sup 23}/cm{sup 3}) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical ({approximately}10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3}) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films.

  19. ANGLE-RESOLVED PHOTOEMISSION STUDIES OF Ag, Au, AND Pt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, R.F.; Mills, K.A.; Thornton, G.; Kevan, S.D.; Shirley, D.A.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important question regarding the technique of angle-resolved photoemission (ARP) is the extent to which it can be used to determine experimental valence-band dispersion relations E{sub i}({rvec k}) for single crystalline solids. In the case of the 3d and 4d transition metals, studies of copper, nickel, palladium, and silver, show that a model based on the assumption of direct interband transitions (direct-transition model) may be used, in conjunction with an appropriate final-state dispersion relation E{sub f}({rvec k}), to elucidate E{sub i}({rvec k}) for these materials along several high symmetry lines (primarily {Gamma}{Lambda}L) in k-space. To answer this question more generally, we have undertaken an extensive study of the valence band structures of other transition metals along various k-space lines. To date, studies have been extended to the (111) faces of the 5d metals Pt and Au along with the Pt(100) ((5 x 20) surface structure) face, and the (110) and (100) faces of Ag. The experiments were all conducted at SSRL, using synchrotron radiation in the range 6 eV < h{nu} < 34 eV. The results of these studies, combined with our previous Ag(111) work at these energies, allow us to invoke important conclusions concerning the relationships between ARP data, E{sub i}({rvec k}) and E{sub f}({rvec k}) for these materials. Several are summarized. For each crystal face investigated, the direct-transition model, along with a simple quasi-free-electron E{sub f}({rvec k}), was sufficient to determine experimental E{sub i}({rvec k}) relations along the appropriate k-space line that were in general agreement with theoretical RAPW band structure calculations. Essentially, we required E{sub f}({rvec k}) to be of the form (h{sup 2}/2m*)|{rvec k} + {rvec G}|{sup 2} + V{sub o}, where {rvec G} is a reciprocal lattice vector, fitting this relation to the appropriate calculated bulk conduction band near the center of the line under investigation, with the inner potential V{sub o} and the reduced mass m* as free parameters. An additional shift of V{sub o} was necessary for Ag(110) and Pt(100) data, to obtain better agreement with theoretical bands. While generally excellent agreement between experimental and theoretical bands was found for Ag, as was the case for other 3d and 4d metals, substantial disagreement was observed for Pt and Au in parts of the Brillouin zone. This is probably an indication that further theoretical work is needed for these more complicated elements. The agreement in Ag is illustrated by Fig. 1, where experimental and theoretical bands are compared for all three high-symmetry directions. The determinations of E{sub i}({rvec k}) for the {Lambda} directions were relatively simple because peaks in the ARP spectra of (111) faces were essentially all attributable to primary direct transition. However, the {Sigma}, {Sigma}{prime}, and {Delta} directions were complicated by secondary emission peaks and dispersionless density-of-states (DOS) features in the spectra of the (100) and (110) faces. Peak intensity resonances associated with the bulk conduction band structure near {Lambda} were observed for each crystal face, and these simplified the assignment of peaks in the ARP spectra. The relationship between these resonances, which appear to be rather general phenomena, and E{sub f}({rvec k}), will be discussed. In summary, it is clear from these and other studies that the ARP technique, in conjunction with the direct-transition model, is generally applicable to valence band mapping in single crystals, provided that a suitable final-state dispersion relation can be calculated. However, complications like those observed in the ARP spectra of Ag, Pt, and Au may make the determination of E{sub i}({rvec k}) relations considerably more difficult for more complicated systems.

  20. LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates December 14, 2011 Mike Dunne LLNL #12;NIf-1111-23714.ppt LIFE power plant 2 #12;LIFE delivery timescale NIf-1111-23714.ppt 3 #12;Timely delivery is enabled dpa) § Removes ion threat and mitigates x-ray threat ­ allows simple steel piping § No need

  1. A Search for a keV Signature of Radiatively Decaying Dark Matter with Suzaku XIS Observations of the X-ray Diffuse Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekiya, Norio; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed the deepest search for an X-ray emission line between 0.5 and 7 keV from non-baryonic dark matter with the Suzaku XIS. Dark matter associated with the Milky Way galaxy was selected as the target to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio. From the Suzaku archive, we selected 187 data sets of blank sky regions which were dominated by the X-ray diffuse background. The data sets were from 2005 to 2013. Instrumental responses were adjusted by multiple calibration data sets of the Crab Nebula. We also improved the technique of subtracting lines of instrumental origin. These energy spectra were well described by X-ray emission due to charge exchange around the Solar System, hot plasma in and around the Milky Way and superposition of extra-galactic point sources. A signal of a narrow emission line was searched for, and the significance of detection was evaluated in consideration of the blind search method (the Look-elsewhere Effect). Our results exhibited no significant detection of an emission line featu...

  2. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility injector acceptance tests at CEA/Saclay: 140 mA/100 keV deuteron beam characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gobin, R., E-mail: rjgobin@cea.fr; Bogard, D.; Chauvin, N.; Chel, S.; Delferrière, O.; Harrault, F.; Mattei, P.; Senée, F. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France)] [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France); Cara, P. [Fusion for Energy, BFD Department, Garching (Germany)] [Fusion for Energy, BFD Department, Garching (Germany); Mosnier, A. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France) [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France); Fusion for Energy, BFD Department, Garching (Germany); Shidara, H. [IFMIF/EVEDA Project Team, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)] [IFMIF/EVEDA Project Team, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Okumura, Y. [JAEA, Division of Rokkasho BA Project, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)] [JAEA, Division of Rokkasho BA Project, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the ITER broader approach, the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) deuteron accelerator (2 × 125 mA at 40 MeV) is an irradiation tool dedicated to high neutron flux production for future nuclear plant material studies. During the validation phase, the Linear IFMIF Prototype Accelerator (LIPAc) machine will be tested on the Rokkasho site in Japan. This demonstrator aims to produce 125 mA/9 MeV deuteron beam. Involved in the LIPAc project for several years, specialists from CEA/Saclay designed the injector based on a SILHI type ECR source operating at 2.45 GHz and a 2 solenoid low energy beam line to produce such high intensity beam. The whole injector, equipped with its dedicated diagnostics, has been then installed and tested on the Saclay site. Before shipment from Europe to Japan, acceptance tests have been performed in November 2012 with 100 keV deuteron beam and intensity as high as 140 mA in continuous and pulsed mode. In this paper, the emittance measurements done for different duty cycles and different beam intensities will be presented as well as beam species fraction analysis. Then the reinstallation in Japan and commissioning plan on site will be reported.

  3. Atom penetration from a thin film into the substrate during sputtering by polyenergetic Ar{sup +} ion beam with mean energy of 9.4 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalin, B.A.; Gladkov, V.P.; Volkov, N.V.; Sabo, S.E. [Moscow Engineering Physics Inst. (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Penetration of alien atoms (Be, Ni) into Be, Al, Zr, Si and diamond was investigated under Ar{sup +} ion bombardment of samples having thermally evaporated films of 30--50 nm. Sputtering was carried out using a wide energy spectrum beam of Ar{sup +} ions of 9.4 keV to dose D = 1 {times} 10{sup 16}--10{sup 19} ion/cm{sup 2}. Implanted atom distribution in the targets was measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) of H{sup +} and He{sup +} ions with energy of 1.6 MeV as well as secondary ion mass-spectrometry (SIMS). During the bombardment, the penetration depth of Ar atoms increases with dose linearly. This depth is more than 3--20 times deeper than the projected range of bombarding ions and recoil atoms. This is a deep action effect. The analysis shows that the experimental data for foreign atoms penetration depth are similar to the data calculated for atom migration through the interstitial site in a field of internal (lateral) compressive stresses created in the near-surface layer of the substrate as a result of implantation. Under these experimental conditions atom ratio r{sub i}/r{sub m} (r{sub i} -- radius of dopant, r{sub m} -- radius target of substrate) can play a principal determining role.

  4. An in-vacuum x-ray diffraction microscope for use in the 0.7-2.9 keV range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vine, D. J. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science (Australia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Williams, G. J. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science (Australia); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Clark, J. N. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science (Australia); Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086 (Australia); London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Putkunz, C. T.; Abbey, B.; Nugent, K. A. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science (Australia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Pfeifer, M. A. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science (Australia); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Legnini, D.; Roehrig, C.; Wrobel, E.; McNulty, I. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Huwald, E. [Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Riessen, G. van; Peele, A. G. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science (Australia); Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Beetz, T.; Irwin, J.; Feser, M.; Hornberger, B. [Xradia, Inc., 4385 Hopyard Road, Pleasanton, California 94588 (United States)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A dedicated in-vacuum coherent x-ray diffraction microscope was installed at the 2-ID-B beamline of the Advanced Photon Source for use with 0.7-2.9 keV x-rays. The instrument can accommodate three common implementations of diffractive imaging; plane wave illumination; defocused-probe (Fresnel diffractive imaging) and scanning (ptychography) using either a pinhole, focused or defocused probe. The microscope design includes active feedback to limit motion of the optics with respect to the sample. Upper bounds on the relative optics-to-sample displacement have been measured to be 5.8 nm(v) and 4.4 nm(h) rms/h using capacitance micrometry and 27 nm/h using x-ray point projection imaging. The stability of the measurement platform and in-vacuum operation allows for long exposure times, high signal-to-noise and large dynamic range two-dimensional intensity measurements to be acquired. Finally, we illustrate the microscope's stability with a recent experimental result.

  5. RESOLVING THE COSMIC FAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND AT 450 AND 850 ?m WITH SCUBA-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B.; Williams, Jonathan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Wang, Wei-Hao [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the SCUBA-2 submillimeter camera mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to obtain extremely deep number counts at 450 and 850 ?m. We combine data on two cluster lensing fields, A1689 and A370, and three blank fields, CDF-N, CDF-S, and COSMOS, to measure the counts over a wide flux range at each wavelength. We use statistical fits to broken power law representations to determine the number counts. This allows us to probe to the deepest possible level in the data. At both wavelengths our results agree well with the literature in the flux range over which they have been measured, with the exception of the 850 ?m counts in CDF-S, where we do not observe the counts deficit found by previous single-dish observations. At 450 ?m, we detect significant counts down to ?1 mJy, an unprecedented depth at this wavelength. By integrating the number counts above this flux limit, we measure 113.9{sup +49.7}{sub -28.4} Jy deg{sup –2} of the 450 ?m extragalactic background light (EBL). The majority of this contribution is from sources with S{sub 450{sub ?m}} between 1-10 mJy, and these sources are likely to be the ones that are analogous to the local luminous infrared galaxies. At 850 ?m, we measure 37.3{sup +21.1}{sub -12.9} Jy deg{sup –2} of the EBL. Because of the large systematic uncertainties on the COBE measurements, the percentage of the EBL we resolve could range from 48%-153% (44%-178%) at 450 (850) ?m. Based on high-resolution Submillimeter Array observations of around half of the 4 ? 850 ?m sample in CDF-N, we find that 12.5{sup +12.1}{sub -6.8}% of the sources are blends of multiple fainter sources. This is a low multiple fraction, and we find no significant difference between our original SCUBA-2 850 ?m counts and the multiplicity-corrected counts.

  6. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are many solar photovoltaic power plants internationally andUSA, Blythe, CA Solar electric power plant, Blythe USA, SanTX Blue Wing solar electric power plant USA, Jacksonville,

  7. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the electrical power output to the solar power input), aSolar Energy Calculator using Google Maps 23 Table 1.24: PV System Power Production Average Daily Irradiance (kWh/m2) Instillation Efficiency Labeled Efficiency Output

  8. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 30, 2013, Santa Clara, CA 2 Outline * Introduction Power Electronics in Electric Drive Vehicles Automotive Power Electronics Module Operation Automotive...

  9. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PROGRAM REVIEW 2013 Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power Principal Investigator: Prof. Gang Chen Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA...

  10. TVA- Green Power Providers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and participating power distributors of TVA power offer a performance-based incentive program to homeowners and businesses for the installation of renewable...

  11. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

  12. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, Narayan (Albuquerque, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids.

  13. Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic power price (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Flex power perspectives of indirect...

  14. New Horizons Mission Powered by Space Radioisotope Power Systems...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Horizons Mission Powered by Space Radioisotope Power Systems New Horizons Mission Powered by Space Radioisotope Power Systems January 30, 2008 - 6:47pm Addthis Artist's concept...

  15. HST resolved image and spectra of z=2 QSO 1345+584

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. B. Hutchings

    1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The QSO 1345+584 has been spatially resolved by direct images and in spectral images, and has extended flux asymmetrically to the W, where its inner radio structure is seen. The brightest knots in the resolved flux correspond closely with knots in the curved radio jet, and the brightest knot has velocity of approach of some 3000 km/s with respect to the nucleus. Other parts of the line-emitting material appear to follow a systematic velocity field with values up to 1000 km/s with respect to the nucleus. The signal from the resolved continuum is not detected spectroscopically but accounts for 2/3 of the (rest UV) flux, so that it is likely to originate in hot stars. The QSO lies in or behind a compact group of galaxies of comparable brightness and irregular and knotty morphology, which probably form a dense physical group with very young stellar populations.

  16. Resolving Remoter Nuclear Spins in a Noisy Bath by Dynamical Decoupling Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenchao Ma; Fazhan Shi; Kebiao Xu; Pengfei Wang; Xiangkun Xu; Xing Rong; Chenyong Ju; Chang-Kui Duan; Nan Zhao; Jiangfeng Du

    2015-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally resolve several weakly coupled nuclear spins in diamond using a series of novelly designed dynamical decoupling controls. Some nuclear spin signals, hidden by decoherence under ordinary dynamical decoupling controls, are shifted forward in time domain to the coherence time range and thus rescued from the fate of being submerged by the noisy spin bath. In this way, more and remoter single nuclear spins are resolved. Additionally, the field of detection can be continuously tuned on sub-nanoscale. This method extends the capacity of nanoscale magnetometry and may be applicable in other systems for high-resolution noise spectroscopy.

  17. Time-resolved photoluminescence from defects in n-type GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reshchikov, M. A., E-mail: mreshchi@vcu.edu [Physics Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Point defects in GaN were studied with time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). The effects of temperature and excitation intensity on defect-related PL have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. A phenomenological model, based on rate equations, explains the dependence of the PL intensity on excitation intensity, as well as the PL lifetime and its temperature dependence. We demonstrate that time-resolved PL measurements can be used to find the concentrations of free electrons and acceptors contributing to PL in n-type semiconductors.

  18. The INTEGRAL - HESS/MAGIC connection: a new class of cosmic high energy accelerators from keV to TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietro Ubertini

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent completion and operation of the High Energy Stereoscopic System, an array of ground based imaging Cherenkov telescopes, has provided a survey with unprecedented sensitivity of the inner part of the Galaxy and revealed a new population of very high energy gamma-rays sources emitting at E$>$100 GeV. Most of them were reported to have no known radio or X-ray counterpart and hypothesised to be representative of a new class of dark nucleonic cosmic sources. In fact, very high energy gamma-rays with energies E $>$ 10$^{11}$ eV are the best proof of non-thermal processes in the universe and provide a direct in-site view of matter-radiation interaction at energies by far greater than producible in ground accelerators. At lower energy INTEGRAL has regularly observed the entire galactic plane during the first 1000 day in orbit providing a survey in the 20-100 keV range resulted in a soft gamma-ray sky populated with more than 200 sources, most of them being galactic binaries, either BHC or NS. Very recently, the INTEGRAL new source IGR J18135-1751 has been identified as the soft gamma-ray counterpart of HESS J1813-178 and AXJ1838.0-0655 as the X/gamma-ray counterpart of HESS J1837-069. Detection of non thermal radio, X and gamma-ray emission from these TeV sources is very important to discriminate between various emitting scenarios and, in turn, to fully understand their nature. The implications of these new findings in the high energy Galactic population will be addressed.

  19. Search for 14.4 keV solar axions from M1 transition of {sup 57}Fe with CUORE crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a search for axions from the 14.4 keV M1 transition from {sup 57}Fe in the core of the sun using the axio-electric effect in TeO{sub 2} bolometers. The detectors are 5 × 5 × 5 cm{sup 3} crystals operated at about 10 mK in a facility used to test bolometers for the CUORE experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. An analysis of 43.65 kg?d of data was made using a newly developed low energy trigger which was optimized to reduce the energy threshold of the detector. An upper limit of 0.58 c?kg{sup ?1}?d{sup ?1} is established at 95% C.L., which translates into lower bounds f{sub A} ? 3.12 × 10{sup 5} GeV 95% C.L. (DFSZ model) and f{sub A} ? 2.41 × 10{sup 4} GeV 95% C.L. (KSVZ model) on the Peccei-Quinn symmetry-breaking scale, for a value of S = 0.5 of the flavor-singlet axial vector matrix element. These bounds can be expressed in terms of axion masses as m{sub A} ? 19.2 eV and m{sub A} ? 250 eV at 95% C.L. in the DFSZ and KSVZ models respectively. Bounds are given also for the interval 0.35 ? S ? 0.55.

  20. Discovery of Water Maser Emission in Five AGN and a Possible Correlation Between Water Maser and Nuclear 2-10 keV Luminosities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul T. Kondratko; Lincoln J. Greenhill; James M. Moran

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of water maser emission in five active galactic nuclei (AGN) with the 100-m Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The positions of the newly discovered masers, measured with the VLA, are consistent with the optical positions of the host nuclei to within 1 sigma (0.3 arcsec radio and 1.3 arcsec optical) and most likely mark the locations of the embedded central engines. The spectra of three sources, 2MASX J08362280+3327383, NGC 6264, and UGC 09618 NED02, display the characteristic spectral signature of emission from an edge-on accretion disk with maximum orbital velocity of ~700, ~800, and ~1300 km s^-1, respectively. We also present a GBT spectrum of a previously known source MRK 0034 and interpret the narrow Doppler components reported here as indirect evidence that the emission originates in an edge-on accretion disk with orbital velocity of ~500 km s^-1. We obtained a detection rate of 12 percent (5 out of 41) among Seyfert 2 and LINER systems with 10000 km s^-1 water masers with available hard X-ray data, we report a possible relationship between unabsorbed X-ray luminosity (2-10 keV) and total isotropic water maser luminosity, L_{2-10} proportional to L_{H2O}^{0.5+-0.1}, consistent with the model proposed by Neufeld and Maloney in which X-ray irradiation and heating of molecular accretion disk gas by the central engine excites the maser emission.

  1. Developing a Compton Polarimeter to Measure Polarization of Hard X-Rays in the 50-300 keV Energy Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. S. Legere; P. Bloser; J. R. Macri; M. L. McConnell; T. Narita; J. M. Ryan

    2005-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the latest progress in the development of GRAPE (Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment), a hard X-ray Compton Polarimeter. The purpose of GRAPE is to measure the polarization of hard X-rays in the 50-300 keV energy range. We are particularly interested in X-rays that are emitted from solar flares and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Accurately measuring the polarization of the emitted radiation from these sources will lead, to a better understating of both the emission mechanisms and source geometries. The GRAPE design consists of an array of plastic scintillators surrounding a central high-Z crystal scintillator. We can monitor individual Compton scatters that occur in the plastics and determine whether the photon is photo absorbed by the high-Z crystal or not. A Compton scattered photon that is immediately photo absorbed by the high-Z crystal constitutes a valid event. These valid events provide us with the interaction locations of each incident photon and ultimately produces a modulation pattern for the Compton scattering of the polarized radiation. Comparing with Monte Carlo simulations of a 100% polarized beam, the level of polarization of the measured beam can then be determined. The complete array is mounted on a flat-panel multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) that can measure the deposited energies resulting from the photon interactions. The design of the detector allows for a large field-of-view (>pi steradian), at the same time offering the ability to be close-packed with multiple modules in order to reduce deadspace. We plan to present in this paper the latest laboratory results obtained from GRAPE using partially polarized radiation sources.

  2. Power Series Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    Power Series 16.4 Introduction In this section we consider power series. These are examples of infinite series where each term contains a variable, x, raised to a positive integer power. We use the ratio test to obtain the radius of convergence R, of the power series and state the important result

  3. Offshore Wind Power USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

  4. Dispersed power and renewables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Sullivan, J.B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed power generation and renewable energy sources are discussed: The following topics are discussed: distributed resources, distributed generation, commercialization requirements, biomass power, location of existing biomass feedstocks, biomass business plan components, North Carolina BGCC partnership, New York biomass co-firing project, alfalfa for power and feed, Hawaii Pioneer Mill LOI project, next steps for biomass, wind power activity, photovoltaic modules and arrays, lead-acid batteries, superconducting magnetic energy storage, fuel cells, and electric power industry trends.

  5. A Lagrangian VOF tensorial penalty method for the DNS of resolved particle-laden flows.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    for incompressible flows interacting with resolved particles on a fixed structured grid. A specific Eulerian volume laden flows are simulated, namely the flow across a fixed array of cylinders and the fluidization method, Lagrangian VOF, fluidized beds, collision and lubrication models 1 hal-00678353,version1-12Mar

  6. Distribution and direct radiative forcing of carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols in an interactive size-resolving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution and direct radiative forcing of carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols in an interactive size-resolving aerosol­climate model Dongchul Kim,1 Chien Wang,1 Annica M. L. Ekman,2 Mary C. Barth,3 August 2008. [1] A multimode, two-moment aerosol model has been incorporated in the NCAR CAM3 to develop

  7. Convective-Resolving Regional Climate Simulations for the Amazon Basin: Comparison with TRMM Rainfall Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Nichole 1987-

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are computed at 4-km grid spacing, which reasonably resolves most convective systems. Simulations are computed for both the DJF and MAM seasons as averaged over 2005-2008, with a model domain covering...

  8. Resolving a distribution of charge into intrinsic multipole moments: A rankwise distributed multipole analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourne, Philip E.

    Resolving a distribution of charge into intrinsic multipole moments: A rankwise distributed multipole analysis Apostol Gramada* and Philip E. Bourne Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical multipole analysis of an arbitrary distribution of charge and its surrounding field. Using the superposition

  9. Deep and optically resolved imaging through scattering media by space-reversed propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peyré, Gabriel

    Deep and optically resolved imaging through scattering media by space-reversed propagation W to the objective working distance. By combining Laser Optical Feedback Imaging (LOFI) with Acoustic Photon Taging. © 2010 Optical Society of America OCIS Codes: (090.1995) , (170.0110), (170.1065), (180.1790), (290

  10. Vibrationally resolved transitions in ion-molecule and atom-molecular ion slow collisions

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The data tables and interactive graphs made available here contain theoretical integral cross sections for vibrational excitation and vibrationally resolved charge transfer from vibrationally excited states of H2 and H2+ with protons and hydrogen atoms, respectively. [From http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/h2mol/home.html] (Specialized Interface)

  11. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechOH:OH_Mead_C CARVER A. MEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechOH:OH_Mead_C CARVER A. MEAD (1934­ ) INTERVIEWED BY SHIRLEY K in the 1960s with Amnon Yariv and Charles Wilts. Discusses his friendship with Gordon Moore and work on design must be submitted in writing to the University Archivist. Preferred citation Mead, Carver A. Interview

  12. Measuring sheet resistance of CIGS solar cell's window layer by spatially resolved electroluminescence imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1/12 Measuring sheet resistance of CIGS solar cell's window layer by spatially resolved model to simulate the behavior of CIGS solar cells based on the spread sheet resistance effect on the determination of the window layer sheet resistance in CIGS solar cells, but our approach could be transferred

  13. Time-resolved photoelectron imaging of large anionic methanol clusters: ,,Methanol...n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    Time-resolved photoelectron imaging of large anionic methanol clusters: ,,Methanol...n - ,,nÈ145; published online 27 June 2007 The dynamics of an excess electron in size-selected methanol clusters electron6­11 and its cluster counterparts,12­18 water n - . The solvated electron in liquid methanol has

  14. Fossil mammals resolve regional patterns of Eurasian climate change over 20 million years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jernvall, Jukka

    Fossil mammals resolve regional patterns of Eurasian climate change over 20 million years Mikael Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia and 7 Department of Geography, Beijing University proxy that can be used to constrain the regional details of vegetation and climate models. Keywords

  15. The archetypal one-neutron halo nucleus 11Be: controversy resolved.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over the purity of states in 11Be resolved using measurements at different energies. · Impressive statistics and resolution achieved using a "batch-mode" beam of the long-lived isotope 10Be. · Transfer, 865-974-4022, kgrzywac@utk.edu Funding sources: DOE Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics

  16. Molecularly Resolved Images of Peptide-Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Lauren J.

    Molecularly Resolved Images of Peptide-Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling propargylglycine unnatural functional groups 20 Å apart and an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a gold-terminated surfaces were imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) using a low tunneling current of 10 p

  17. Structure in Nascent Carbon Nanotubes Revealed by Spatially Resolved Raman Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or filtration [1], supercapacitors [2], composite materials [3,4]. They are mainly prepared by CVD (Chemical1 Structure in Nascent Carbon Nanotubes Revealed by Spatially Resolved Raman Spectroscopy Périne: The understanding of carbon nanotubes (CNT) growth is crucial for the control of their production. In particular

  18. Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dommenget, Dietmar

    Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model Dietmar on the surface energy balance by very simple repre- sentations of solar and thermal radiation, the atmospheric and cold regions to warm more than other regions. Keywords Climate dynamics Á Climate change Á Climate

  19. The uses of alternative dispute resolution to resolve genetic disputes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Robert E.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report sets out lessons learned while carrying out the study. It concludes that genetic disputes will increase in number and that ADR processes including mediation, arbitration, the use of independent experts and court-appointed masters can be helpful in resolving them. It suggests additional effort on bioremediation, and workplace disputes and training for ADR neutrals.

  20. Time-Resolved Magnetic Flux and AC-Current Distributions in Superconducting YBCO Thin Films and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Leah B.

    Time-Resolved Magnetic Flux and AC-Current Distributions in Superconducting YBCO Thin Films magnetic field. We study the interaction behavior of YBCO thin films in an ac transport current and a dc the calibrated field profiles. The current density evolution in YBCO thin films is studied by TRMOI as a function

  1. Theoretical studies of time-resolved spectroscopy of protein Jonathan D. Hirst,*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onufriev, Alexey

    Theoretical studies of time-resolved spectroscopy of protein folding Jonathan D. Hirst,*a Samita desirable as theoretical and experimental studies begin to probe protein folding events reliably on the nanosecond timescale. Introduction Protein folding is generally rapid and strongly co-operative.1,2 Knowledge

  2. ZERO ENERGY ASYMPTOTICS OF THE RESOLVENT IN THE LONG RANGE CASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skibsted, Erik

    ZERO ENERGY ASYMPTOTICS OF THE RESOLVENT IN THE LONG RANGE CASE S. FOURNAIS AND E. SKIBSTED at zero energy, for a much wider class of potentials. Our basic assumption is a sign condition at infinity at zero energy for a SchrË?odinger operator H = -# + V on H = L 2 (R d ) recalling the notation R(#) = (H

  3. Resolving unwanted couplings through interactive exploration of co-evolving software entities An experience report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Hans

    how interactive visualizations can support the process of analyzing the identified unwanted couplings of coupling between entities is then replaced by a more dynamic one. Entities that change together becauseResolving unwanted couplings through interactive exploration of co-evolving software entities

  4. Compact cryogenic Kerr microscope for time-resolved studies of electron spin transport in microstructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Wal, Caspar H.

    Compact cryogenic Kerr microscope for time-resolved studies of electron spin transport with 1 m spatial resolution. The microscope was designed to study spin transport, a critical issue-temperature optical microscope, elec- tromagnet and cryogenic cell with cold finger to measure continuous-wave cw

  5. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 139, 124113 (2013) Time-resolved broadband Raman spectroscopies: A unified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be defined as a change of the energy of the electromagnetic field S = - dt d dt a i (t)ai(t) = I 2 ¯ - dt and frequency resolved Raman techniques have been developed towards monitoring ex- cited and ground state the system with pulse Ej and deex- cites it with E i . We use complex pulse amplitudes. The elec- tronically

  6. Spatially resolved photoluminescence and Raman scattering experiments on the GaN/substrate interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Spatially resolved photoluminescence and Raman scattering experiments on the GaN experiments on the substrate interface region of wurtzite GaN layers. We show that the broad photoluminescence band with an intensity maximum at 2.4 eV is not an intrinsic property of GaN. We found

  7. Simulating the evolution of soot mixing state with a particle-resolved aerosol model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Matthew

    to simulate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types due to coagulation and condensation moreover depended on the amount of sulfur in the fuel, and the size distribution and composition typicallySimulating the evolution of soot mixing state with a particle-resolved aerosol model N. Riemer,1 M

  8. Understanding global secondary organic aerosol amount and size-resolved condensational behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding global secondary organic aerosol amount and size-resolved condensational behavior and Adams, 2009b) ·Condensation, coagulation, nucleation ·40 size bins (1 nm ­ 10 µm) ·Nucleation rates the aerosol mass distribution. However, recent closure studies with field measurements show that a significant

  9. Time-resolved dynamics in acetonitrile cluster anions CH3CN Ryan M. Young a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    Time-resolved dynamics in acetonitrile cluster anions ðCH3CN�� n Ryan M. Young a , Graham B December 2009 a b s t r a c t Excited state dynamics of acetonitrile cluster anions, ðCH3CN�� n , were, antiparallel solvent molecules [19,20]. Evidence for two electron solvation motifs in acetonitrile also comes

  10. Resolving Isomeric Peptide Mixtures: A Combined HPLC/Ion Mobility-TOFMS Analysis of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemmer, David E.

    of the relatively low density of the buffer gas (compared with condensed-phase separations), mobilities of ions to incorporate the gas-phase separation between condensed-phase separation methods and MS detectionResolving Isomeric Peptide Mixtures: A Combined HPLC/Ion Mobility-TOFMS Analysis of a 4000

  11. Meyers DR-1 GSA Data Repository Item for: "Resolving Milankovitchian Controversies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    Meyers DR-1 GSA Data Repository Item for: "Resolving Milankovitchian Controversies: The Triassic Latemar Limestone and the Eocene Green River Formation" Stephen R. Meyers Department of Geological" (Meyers, 2008). Topics addressed here include: (1) an introduction to the ASM methodology, (2) specific

  12. Spectroscopic Properties of a Self-Assembled Zinc Porphyrin Tetramer II. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    Spectroscopic Properties of a Self-Assembled Zinc Porphyrin Tetramer II. Time-Resolved Fluorescence tetramer [Part I], with a 1 ns rotational correlation time at 10 °C. The initial fluorescence anisotropy of the monomer is found to be 0.1. In the tetramer an additional depolarization process occurs with a correlation

  13. Active Power Control from Wind Power (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Brooks, D.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

  14. High power fast ramping power supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marneris,I.; Bajon, E.; Bonati, R.; Sandberg, J.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Hundred megawatt level fast ramping power converters to drive proton and heavy ion machines are under research and development at accelerator facilities in the world. This is a leading edge technology. There are several topologies to achieve this power level. Their advantages and related issues will be discussed.

  15. Laser wavelength effects on the charge state resolved ion energy distributions from laser-produced Sn plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    Laser wavelength effects on the charge state resolved ion energy distributions from laser of laser wavelength on the charge state resolved ion energy distributions from laser-produced Sn plasma freely expanding into vacuum are investigated. Planar Sn targets are irradiated at laser wavelengths

  16. Excited electron dynamics in bulk ytterbium: Time-resolved two-photon photoemission and GW+T ab initio calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschlimann, Martin

    relaxation dynamics is played by the electronic structure of the system close to the Fermi level. For exampleExcited electron dynamics in bulk ytterbium: Time-resolved two-photon photoemission and GW+T ab November 2007 The excited electron dynamics in ytterbium is investigated by means of the time-resolved two

  17. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechOH:OH_Gell-Mann_M Photo ID RFB70.2-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dervan, Peter B.

    http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechOH:OH_Gell-Mann_M Photo ID RFB70.2-4 MURRAY GELL-MANN (b. 1929, with Murray Gell-Mann, Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Theoretical Physics, emeritus. Dr. Gell Wasserburg; works on dispersion relations and pseudoscalar meson theory #12;http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechOH:OH_Gell

  18. Development Of a Spatially Resolving X-ray Crystal Spectrometer For Measurement Of Ion-temperature (Ti) And Rotation-velocity (v) Profiles in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K W; Delgado-Aparico, L; Johnson, David; Feder, R; Beiersdorfer, P; Dunn, James; Morris, K; Wang, E; Reinke, M; Podpaly, Y; Rice, J E; Barnsley, R; O'Mullane, M

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer #2;XCS#3; arrays are being developed as a US-ITER activity for Doppler measurement of Ti and v profiles of impurities #2;(W, Kr, and Fe)#3; with ~#4;7 cm (a/30)#3; and 10-100 ms resolution in ITER. The imaging XCS, modeled after a prototype instrument on Alcator C-Mod, uses a spherically bent crystal and 2D x-ray detectors to achieve high spectral resolving power (E / dE >#2;6000)#3; horizontally and spatial imaging vertically. Two arrays will measure Ti and both poloidal and toroidal rotation velocity profiles. The measurement of many spatial chords permits tomographic inversion for the inference of local parameters. The instrument design, predictions of performance, and results from C-Mod are presented.

  19. Development of a Spatially Resolving X-Ray Crystal Spectrometer (XCS) for Measurement of Ion-Temperature (Ti) and Rotation-Velocity (v) Profiles in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K W; Delgado-Aprico, L; Johnson, D; Feder, R; Beiersdorfer,; Dunn, J; Morris, K; Wang, E; Reinke, M; Podpaly, Y; Rice, J E; Barnsley, R; O'Mullane, M; Lee, S G

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging XCS arrays are being developed as a US-ITER activity for Doppler measurement of Ti and v profiles of impurities (W, Kr, Fe) with ~7 cm (a/30) and 10-100 ms resolution in ITER. The imaging XCS, modeled after a PPPL-MIT instrument on Alcator C-Mod, uses a spherically bent crystal and 2d x-ray detectors to achieve high spectral resolving power (E/dE>6000) horizontally and spatial imaging vertically. Two arrays will measure Ti and both poloidal and toroidal rotation velocity profiles. Measurement of many spatial chords permits tomographic inversion for inference of local parameters. The instrument design, predictions of performance, and results from C-Mod will be presented.

  20. Evaluation of station blackout accidents at nuclear power plants: Technical findings related to unresolved safety issue A-44: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Station Blackout,'' which is the complete loss of alternating current (AC) electrical power in a nuclear power plant, has been designated as Unresolved Safety Issue A-44. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on AC power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. This report documents the findings of technical studies performed as part of the program to resolve this issue. The important factors analyzed include: the fequency of loss of offsite power; the probability that emergency or onsite AC power supplies would be unavailable; the capability and reliability of decay heat removal systems independent of AC power; and the likelihood that offsite power would be restored before systems that cannot operate for extended periods without AC power fail, thus resulting in core damage. This report also addresses effects of different designs, locations, and operational features on the estimated frequency of core damage resulting from station blackout events.

  1. Biomass plants face wood supply risks Report warns giant new biomass power plants will be hugely reliant on wood chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass plants face wood supply risks Report warns giant new biomass power plants will be hugely's biomass energy sector could be undermined unless businesses move to resolve the supply chain issues-scale biomass plants will leave generators largely reliant on biomass from overseas such as wood chips, elephant

  2. UGP Power Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wildlife and power generation on the Missouri River. Seven dams and powerplants have the installed capacity of 2,610 MW. That hydroelectric power is delivered across about 7,919...

  3. Residential Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Gary

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study will explore the use of residential wind power and associated engineering and environmental issues. There is various wind power generating devices available to the consumer. The study will discuss the dependencies of human...

  4. Power production and ADS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the power production process in Accelerator Driven Sub-critical systems employing Thorium-232 and Uranium-238 as fuel and examine the demands on the power of the accelerator required.

  5. Power Factor Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

  6. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Research Center Blvd. Fayetteville, AR 72701 Phone: (479)-443-5759 Email: marcelo@apei.net Website: www.apei.net High Temperature and High Power Density SiC Power Electronic...

  7. Idaho Power- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

  8. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Research Center Blvd. Fayetteville, AR 72701 Phone: (479)-443-5759 Email: mschupb@apei.net Website: www.apei.net High Power Density Silicon Carbide Power Electronic Converters...

  9. Space Solar Power Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arif, H.; Barbosa, H.; Bardet, C.; Baroud, M.; Behar, A.; Berrier, K.; Berthe, P.; Bertrand, R.; Bibyk, I.; Bisson, J.; Bloch, L.; Bobadilla, G.; Bourque, D.; Bush, L.; Carandang, R.; Chiku, T.; Crosby, N.; De Seixas, M.; De Vries, J.; Doll, S.; Dufour, F.; Eckart, P.; Fahey, M.; Fenot, F.; Foeckersperger, S.; Fontaine, J.E.; Fowler, R.; Frey, H.; Fujio, H.; Gasa, J.M.; Gleave, J.; Godoe, J.; Green, I.; Haeberli, R.; Hanada, T.; Ha

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information pertaining to the Space Solar Power Program is presented on energy analysis; markets; overall development plan; organizational plan; environmental and safety issues; power systems; space transportation; space manufacturing, construction, operations; design examples; and finance.

  10. Green Power Purchase Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Class I renewable energy resources include solar, wind, new sustainable biomass, landfill gas, fuel cells (using renewable or non-renewable fuels), ocean thermal power, wave or tidal power, low...

  11. Body powered thermoelectric systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settaluri, Krishna Tej

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Great interest exists for and progress has be made in the effective utilization of the human body as a possible power supply in hopes of powering such applications as sensors and continuously monitoring medical devices ...

  12. Soldier power. Battery charging.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    hours runtime at full load 50 W #12; (%) (kW) 300 1-5 Siemens-Power 30 (hr) 10,000 Siemens 300 Acumentrics 80 (mW/cm2) 600 400 Siemens-Power 85 (hr) 70,000 3,000 Siemens-Power 15 () 500 25 Siemens-Power 60 >2013 - , Bloom, MHI, Rolls Royce 6 #12; SOFCSOFC * (LSCF ) ( Ag

  13. Concentrating Solar Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its concentrating solar power subprogram.

  14. Power Prepayment Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics Power Electronics PowerPower

  15. Power/Privilege Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Major; People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, New Orleans 2. Power is the ability to define reality and to convince other people that it is their definition. ~ Dr. Wade Nobles 3. Power is the capacity to act. 4 different cultures. [JL] RACISM Racism is race prejudice plus power [See Racist]. People's Institute calls

  16. EXTERIOR POWERS KEITH CONRAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    form on a manifold is related to exterior powers of the dual space of the tangent space of a manifoldEXTERIOR POWERS KEITH CONRAD 1. Introduction Let R be a commutative ring. Unless indicated the alternating multilinear functions on Mk: the exterior power k(M). It is a certain quotient module of Mk

  17. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  18. Power Dancers Audition Packet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Power Dancers Dance Team Audition Packet September 8-10, 2014 #12;Power Dancers Dance Team Dear service to their school with the support of the faculty, administration, and other groups on campus, but they also provide a source of great school spirit to UT Dallas. Power Dancers provides a real opportunity

  19. Power Dancers Audition Packet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Power Dancers Dance Team Audition Packet September 9-11, 2013 #12;Power Dancers Dance Team Dear service to their school with the support of the faculty, administration, and other groups on campus, but they also provide a source of great school spirit to UT Dallas. Power Dancers provides a real opportunity

  20. Power Dancers Audition Packet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Power Dancers Dance Team Audition Packet September 10 & 12, 2012 #12;Power Dancers Dance Team Dear service to their school with the support of the faculty, administration, and other groups on campus, but they also provide a source of great school spirit to UT Dallas. Power Dancers provides a real opportunity

  1. Green Power Inverter Prvningsrapport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green Power Inverter Prøvningsrapport SolenergiCentret Søren Poulsen Ivan Katic Oktober 2004 #12;Green Power Inverter målerapport.doc SolenergiCentret - 04-03-2005 2 Forord Nærværende rapport indeholder Teknologisk Instituts bidrag til målinger i forbindelse med PSO projektet "Green Power Inverter

  2. Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Place: India...

  3. How Power is Lost: Illusions of Alliance Among the Powerful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brion, Sebastien

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    while most accounts of power loss focus on ethical breachesPower Loss .1. Proposed Model of Power Loss Figure 2. Social Monitoring

  4. High Power Laser Innovation Sparks Geothermal Power Potential...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    power source among renewables, is poised to emerge also as a flexible power source, balancing intermittent wind and solar power production and reducing variability in energy...

  5. Using government purchasing power to reduce equipment standby power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Jeffrey; Meier, Alan; Bartholomew, Emily; Thomas, Alison; Glickman, Joan; Ware, Michelle

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or external power supply, other specifications, and purchasethe consumer to purchase extra power strips and extensionan internal standby power function, shall purchase Although

  6. Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations The 2008 Peer Review Meeting for the...

  7. Revealing Carrier-Envelope Phase through Frequency Mixing and Interference in Frequency Resolved Optical Gating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snedden, Edward W; Jamison, Steven P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that full temporal characterisation of few-cycle electromagnetic pulses, including retrieval of the carrier envelope phase (CEP), can be directly obtained from Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) techniques in which the interference between non-linear frequency mixing processes is resolved. We derive a framework for this scheme, defined Real Domain-FROG (ReD-FROG), as applied to the cases of interference between sum and difference frequency components and between fundamental and sum/difference frequency components. A successful numerical demonstration of ReD-FROG as applied to the case of a self-referenced measurement is provided. A proof-of-principle experiment is performed in which the CEP of a single-cycle THz pulse is accurately obtained and demonstrates the possibility for THz detection beyond the bandwidth limitations of electro-optic sampling.

  8. Time-resolved fuel injector flow characterisation based on 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crua, Cyril

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to enable investigations of the fuel flow inside unmodified injectors, we have developed a new experimental approach to measure time-resolved vibration spectra of diesel nozzles using a three dimensional laser vibrometer. The technique we propose is based on the triangulation of the vibrometer and fuel pressure transducer signals, and enables the quantitative characterisation of quasi-cyclic internal flows without requiring modifications to the injector, the working fluid, or limiting the fuel injection pressure. The vibrometer, which uses the Doppler effect to measure the velocity of a vibrating object, was used to scan injector nozzle tips during the injection event. The data were processed using a discrete Fourier transform to provide time-resolved spectra for valve-closed-orifice, minisac and microsac nozzle geometries, and injection pressures ranging from 60 to 160MPa, hence offering unprecedented insight into cyclic cavitation and internal mechanical dynamic processes. A peak was consistently f...

  9. A new method for deriving the stellar birth function of resolved stellar populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gennaro, Mario; Brown, Tom; Gordon, Karl

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new method for deriving the stellar birth function (SBF) of resolved stellar populations. The SBF (stars born per unit mass, time, and metallicity) is the combination of the initial mass function (IMF), the star-formation history (SFH), and the metallicity distribution function (MDF). The framework of our analysis is that of Poisson Point Processes (PPPs), a class of statistical models suitable when dealing with points (stars) in a multidimensional space (the measurement space of multiple photometric bands). The theory of PPPs easily accommodates the modeling of measurement errors as well as that of incompleteness. Compared to most of the tools used to study resolved stellar populations, our method avoids binning stars in the color-magnitude diagram and uses the entirety of the information (i.e., the whole likelihood function) for each data point; the proper combination of the individual likelihoods allows the computation of the posterior probability for the global population parameters. This inc...

  10. ADEPT: Efficient Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADEPT Project: In today’s increasingly electrified world, power conversion—the process of converting electricity between different currents, voltage levels, and frequencies—forms a vital link between the electronic devices we use every day and the sources of power required to run them. The 14 projects that make up ARPA-E’s ADEPT Project, short for “Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,” are paving the way for more energy efficient power conversion and advancing the basic building blocks of power conversion: circuits, transistors, inductors, transformers, and capacitors.

  11. Multimegawatt space power reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dearien, J.A.; Whitbeck, J.F.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the need of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and long range space exploration and extra-terrestrial basing by the National Air and Space Administration (NASA), concepts for nuclear power systems in the multi-megawatt levels are being designed and evaluated. The requirements for these power systems are being driven primarily by the need to minimize weight and maximize safety and reliability. This paper will discuss the present requirements for space based advanced power systems, technological issues associated with the development of these advanced nuclear power systems, and some of the concepts proposed for generating large amounts of power in space. 31 figs.

  12. Angle-resolved scattering spectroscopy of explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation of angle-resolved scattering from solid explosives residues on a car door for non-contact sensing geometries. Illumination with a mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser tuning between 7 and 8 microns was detected both with a sensitive single point detector and a hyperspectral imaging camera. Spectral scattering phenomena were discussed and possibilities for hyperspectral imaging at large scattering angles were outlined.

  13. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved; Quarterly progress report, October--December 1993: Volume 12, No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  14. FROM RESOLVENT ESTIMATES TO DAMPED WAVES HANS CHRISTIANSON, EMMANUEL SCHENCK, ANDRAS VASY, AND JARED WUNSCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasy, András

    On a compact, connected Riemannian manifold without boundary (X, g), we consider the non-selfadjoint Schr of the resolvent of P(h), Rz(h) := (P(h) - z)-1 for z in a complex h-dependent neighborhood of 1. For non with the rate of the energy decay of the solution of the damped wave equation on X : (1.2) 2 t + g + a(x)t u

  15. Frequency Resolved Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of 4,4'-Dimercaptostilbene on Silver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Ueltschi, Tyler W.; Mifflin, Amanda L.; Hu, Dehong; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-resonant tip-enhanced Raman images of 4,4'-dimercaptostilbene on silver reveal that different vibrational resonances of the reporter are selectively enhanced at different sites on the metal substrate. Sequentially recorded images track molecular diffusion within the diffraction-limited laser spot which illuminates the substrate. In effect, the recorded time resolved (?t = 10 s) pixelated images (25 nm x 8 cm-1) broadcast molecule-local field interactions which take place on much finer scales.

  16. High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dakovski, Georgi L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Yinwan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durakiewicz, Tomasz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a laser-based apparatus for visible pump/XUV probe time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TRARPES) utilizing high-harmonic generation from a noble gas. Femtosecond temporal resolution for each selected harmonic is achieved by using a time-delay-compensated monochromator (TCM). The source has been used to obtain photoemission spectra from insulators (UO{sub 2}) and ultrafast pump/probe processes in semiconductors (GaAs).

  17. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pe?ina, Jan, E-mail: jan.perina.jr@upol.cz [RCPTM, Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Haderka, Ond?ej [Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Allevi, Alessia [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, Università degli Studi dell'Insubria, I-22100 Como (Italy); Bondani, Maria [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR-IFN, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  18. Resolving the ambiguities: An industrial hygiene Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gammage, R.B.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resolving the Ambiguities: An Industrial Hygiene (IAQ) Symposium was a one-day event designed to inform practicing industrial hygienists about highlight presentations made at Indoor Air `93. A broad range of topics was presented by invited speakers. Topics included were attempts to deal with guidelines and standards, questionnaires, odors and sensory irritation, respiratory allergies, neuroses, sick building syndrome (SBS), and multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS).

  19. ZERO ENERGY ASYMPTOTICS OF THE RESOLVENT FOR A CLASS OF SLOWLY DECAYING POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ZERO ENERGY ASYMPTOTICS OF THE RESOLVENT FOR A CLASS OF SLOWLY DECAYING POTENTIALS S. FOURNAIS and on the possible existence of zero­energy eigenstates and/or a re­ sonance state. For the `long­range' case, V (x AND E. SKIBSTED Abstract. We prove a limiting absorption principle at zero en­ ergy for two­body Schr

  20. Multimode power processor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, George A. (Pottersville, NJ); O'Sullivan, Joseph A. (St. Louis, MO)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In one embodiment, a power processor which operates in three modes: an inverter mode wherein power is delivered from a battery to an AC power grid or load; a battery charger mode wherein the battery is charged by a generator; and a parallel mode wherein the generator supplies power to the AC power grid or load in parallel with the battery. In the parallel mode, the system adapts to arbitrary non-linear loads. The power processor may operate on a per-phase basis wherein the load may be synthetically transferred from one phase to another by way of a bumpless transfer which causes no interruption of power to the load when transferring energy sources. Voltage transients and frequency transients delivered to the load when switching between the generator and battery sources are minimized, thereby providing an uninterruptible power supply. The power processor may be used as part of a hybrid electrical power source system which may contain, in one embodiment, a photovoltaic array, diesel engine, and battery power sources.

  1. Multimode power processor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, G.A.; O'Sullivan, J.A.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In one embodiment, a power processor which operates in three modes: an inverter mode wherein power is delivered from a battery to an AC power grid or load; a battery charger mode wherein the battery is charged by a generator; and a parallel mode wherein the generator supplies power to the AC power grid or load in parallel with the battery. In the parallel mode, the system adapts to arbitrary non-linear loads. The power processor may operate on a per-phase basis wherein the load may be synthetically transferred from one phase to another by way of a bumpless transfer which causes no interruption of power to the load when transferring energy sources. Voltage transients and frequency transients delivered to the load when switching between the generator and battery sources are minimized, thereby providing an uninterruptible power supply. The power processor may be used as part of a hybrid electrical power source system which may contain, in one embodiment, a photovoltaic array, diesel engine, and battery power sources. 31 figs.

  2. Space-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy free of high-energy neutral particle noise in wavelength range of 10–130 Å on the large helical device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xianli, E-mail: huang.xianli@nifs.ac.jp [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan)] [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan); Morita, Shigeru; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Goto, Motoshi [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan) [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan); Dong, Chunfeng [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)] [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer system working in wavelength range of 10–130 Å has been constructed in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for profile measurements of bremsstrahlung continuum and line emissions of heavy impurities in the central column of plasmas, which are aimed at studies on Z{sub eff} and impurity transport, respectively. Until now, a large amount of spike noise caused by neutral particles with high energies (?180 keV) originating in neutral beam injection has been observed in EUV spectroscopy on LHD. The new system has been developed with an aim to delete such a spike noise from the signal by installing a thin filter which can block the high-energy neutral particles entering the EUV spectrometer. Three filters of 11 ?m thick beryllium (Be), 3.3 ?m thick polypropylene (PP), and 0.5 ?m thick polyethylene terephthalate (PET: polyester) have been examined to eliminate the spike noise. Although the 11 ?m Be and 3.3 ?m PP filters can fully delete the spike noise in wavelength range of ? ? 20 Å, the signal intensity is also reduced. The 0.5 ?m PET filter, on the other hand, can maintain sufficient signal intensity for the measurement and the spike noise remained in the signal is acceptable. As a result, the bremsstrahlung profile is successfully measured without noise at 20 Å even in low-density discharges, e.g., 2.9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup ?3}, when the 0.5 ?m PET filter is used. The iron n = 3–2 L? transition array consisting of FeXVII to FeXXIV is also excellently observed with their radial profiles in wavelength range of 10–18 Å. Each transition in the L? array can be accurately identified with its radial profile. As a typical example of the method a spectral line at 17.62 Å is identified as FeXVIII transition. Results on absolute intensity calibration of the spectrometer system, pulse height and noise count analyses of the spike noise between holographic and ruled gratings and wavelength response of the used filters are also presented with performance of the present spectrometer system.

  3. Power Quality Aspects in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Chacon, J.; Romanowitz, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although many operational aspects affect wind power plant operation, this paper focuses on power quality. Because a wind power plant is connected to the grid, it is very important to understand the sources of disturbances that affect the power quality.

  4. EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI May 3, 2010 EA-1726: Final...

  5. Dynamic Reactive Power Control of Isolated Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falahi, Milad

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents dynamic reactive power control of isolated power systems. Isolated systems include MicroGrids in islanded mode, shipboard power systems operating offshore, or any other power system operating in islanded mode intentionally...

  6. Phase-resolved HST/STIS spectroscopy of the exposed white dwarf in the high-field polar AR UMa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Gaensicke; G. D. Schmidt; S. Jordan; P. Szkody

    2001-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase-resolved HST/STIS ultraviolet spectroscopy of the high-field polar AR UMa confirms that the WD photospheric Ly alpha Zeeman features are formed in a magnetic field of ~200 MG. In addition to the Ly alpha pi and sigma+ components, we detect the forbidden hydrogen 1s0->2s0 transition, which becomes ``enabled'' in the presence of both strong magnetic and electric fields. Our attempt in fitting the overall optical+UV low state spectrum with single temperature magnetic WD models remains rather unsatisfactory, indicating either a shortcoming in the present models or a new physical process acting in AR UMa. As a result, our estimate of the WD temperature remains somewhat uncertain, Twd=20000+-5000K. We detect a broad emission bump centered at ~1445A and present throughout the entire binary orbit, and a second bump near ~1650A, which appears only near the inferior conjunction of the secondary star. These are suggestive of low harmonic cyclotron emission produced by low-level (M-dot~1e-13 Msun/yr) accretion onto both magnetic poles. However, there is no evidence in the power spectrum of light variations for accretion in gas blobs. The observed Ly alpha emission line shows a strong phase dependence with maximum flux and redshift near orbital phase phi~0.3, strongly indicating an origin on the trailing hemisphere of the secondary star. An additional Ly alpha absorption feature with similar phasing as the Ly alpha emission, but a \\~700km/s blueshift could tentatively be ascribed to absorption of WD emission in a moderately fast wind. We derive a column density of neutral hydrogen of NH=(1.1+-1.0)1e18 cm**-2, the lowest of any known polar.

  7. Time-resolved analysis of Fermi gamma-ray bursts with fast- and slow-cooled synchrotron photon models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, J. M.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Xiong, S. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Kienlin, A.; Rau, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); McGlynn, S. [Exzellence Cluster "Universe," Technische Universitt Mnchen, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Meegan, C. A. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Axelsson, M. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Dermer, C. D. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Iyyani, S. [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kocevski, D., E-mail: james.m.burgess@nasa.gov, E-mail: Rob.Preece@nasa.gov, E-mail: shabuiyyani@gmail.com, E-mail: baring@rice.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); and others

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved spectroscopy is performed on eight bright, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) dominated by single emission pulses that were observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Fitting the prompt radiation of GRBs by empirical spectral forms such as the Band function leads to ambiguous conclusions about the physical model for the prompt radiation. Moreover, the Band function is often inadequate to fit the data. The GRB spectrum is therefore modeled with two emission components consisting of optically thin non-thermal synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons and, when significant, thermal emission from a jet photosphere, which is represented by a blackbody spectrum. To produce an acceptable fit, the addition of a blackbody component is required in five out of the eight cases. We also find that the low-energy spectral index ? is consistent with a synchrotron component with ? = –0.81 ± 0.1. This value lies between the limiting values of ? = –2/3 and ? = –3/2 for electrons in the slow- and fast-cooling regimes, respectively, suggesting ongoing acceleration at the emission site. The blackbody component can be more significant when using a physical synchrotron model instead of the Band function, illustrating that the Band function does not serve as a good proxy for a non-thermal synchrotron emission component. The temperature and characteristic emission-region size of the blackbody component are found to, respectively, decrease and increase as power laws with time during the prompt phase. In addition, we find that the blackbody and non-thermal components have separate temporal behaviors as far as their respective flux and spectral evolutions.

  8. The Extended Power Law as Intrinsic Signature For a Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lev Titarchuk; Thomas Zannias

    1997-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the exact general relativistic exact integro-differential equation of radiative transfer describing the interaction of low energy photons with a Maxwellian distribution of hot electrons in gravitational field of a Schwarzschild black hole. We prove that due to Comptonization an initial arbitrary spectrum of low energy photons unavoidably results in spectra characterized by an extended power-law feature. We examine the spectral index by using both analytical and numerical methods for a variety of physical parameters as such the plasma temperature and the mass accretion rate. The presence of the event horizon as well as the behaviour of the null geodesics in its vicinity largely determine the dependence of the spectral index on the flow parameters. We come to the conclusion that the bulk motion of a converging flow is more efficient in upscattering photons than thermal Comptonization provided that the electron temperature in the flow is of order of a few keV or less. In this case, the spectrum observed at infinity consists of a soft component produced by those input photons that escape after a few scatterings without any significant energy change and of hard component (described by a power law) produced by the photons that underwent significant upscattering. The luminosity of the power-law component is relatively small compared to that of the soft component. For accretion into black hole the spectral energy index of the power-law is always higher than one for plasma temperature of order of a few keV. This result suggests that the bulk motion Comptonization might be responsible for the power-law spectra seen in the black-hole X-ray sources.

  9. PASSIVE CONTROL OF FLUID POWERED HUMAN POWER AMPLIFIERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    PASSIVE CONTROL OF FLUID POWERED HUMAN POWER AMPLIFIERS Perry Y. Li and Venkat Durbha Center is proposed for the control of fluid powered human power amplifiers. Human power amplifiers are mechanical as a torque/force source. The control objective is to amplify the power that the human exerts on the machine

  10. Alternative Energy Technologies Solar Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    #12;Alternative Energy Technologies Solar Power Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Power;Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Reflector material is Aluminum or Silver Tube material ..... Several possible ............... Mexico, Canada, Peru Alumina ............Guinea, Brazil, Australia, Jamaica Manganese ....... S. Africa

  11. Entangling Power of Permutations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieven Clarisse; Sibasish Ghosh; Simone Severini; Anthony Sudbery

    2005-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion of entangling power of unitary matrices was introduced by Zanardi, Zalka and Faoro [PRA, 62, 030301]. We study the entangling power of permutations, given in terms of a combinatorial formula. We show that the permutation matrices with zero entangling power are, up to local unitaries, the identity and the swap. We construct the permutations with the minimum nonzero entangling power for every dimension. With the use of orthogonal latin squares, we construct the permutations with the maximum entangling power for every dimension. Moreover, we show that the value obtained is maximum over all unitaries of the same dimension, with possible exception for 36. Our result enables us to construct generic examples of 4-qudits maximally entangled states for all dimensions except for 2 and 6. We numerically classify, according to their entangling power, the permutation matrices of dimension 4 and 9, and we give some estimates for higher dimensions.

  12. Power densities for two-step gamma-ray transitions from isomeric states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silviu Olariu; Agata Olariu

    1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have calculated the incident photon power density P_2 for which the two-step induced emission rate from an isomeric nucleus becomes equal to the natural isomeric decay rate. We have analyzed two-step transitions for isomeric nuclei with a half-life greater than 10 min, for which there is an intermediate state of known energy, spin and half-life, for which the intermediate state is connected by a known gamma-ray transition to the isomeric state and to at least another intermediate state, and for which the relative intensities of the transitions to lower states are known. For the isomeric nucleus 166m-Ho, which has a 1200 y isomeric state at 5.98 keV, we have found a value of P_2=6.3 x 10^7 W cm^{-2}, the intermediate state being the 263.8 keV level. We have found power densities P_2 of the order of 10^{10} W cm^{-2} for several other isomeric nuclei.

  13. Interleaved power converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Lizhi (Canton, MI)

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A power converter architecture interleaves full bridge converters to alleviate thermal management problems in high current applications, and may, for example, double the output power capability while reducing parts count and costs. For example, one phase of a three phase inverter is shared between two transformers, which provide power to a rectifier such as a current doubler rectifier to provide two full bridge DC/DC converters with three rather than four high voltage inverter legs.

  14. Electric power annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and state levels: generating capability and additions, net generation, fossil-fuel statistics, retail sales and revenue, finanical statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, demand side management, nonutility power producers. Purpose is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets.

  15. Power System load management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, Yu.N.; Semenov, V.A.; Sovalov, S.A.; Syutkin, B.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The variation in demand nonuniformity is analyzed for the Unified Electric Power System of the USSR and certain interconnected power systems; the conditions for handling such nonuniformity with utilization of generating equipment having differing flexibility capabilities are also considered. On this basis approaches and techniques for acting on user loads, load management, in order to assure a balance between generated and consumed power are considered.

  16. Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development...

  17. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Characterization (SciChar) Workshop Characterization Capabilities Battery Questions Neutron Advantages * Scattering Power unrelated to Z - Many low Z elements have high cross...

  18. 2025 Power Marketing Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the LAP FES contracts and has developed a plan for marketing and allocating LAP hydroelectric power after the current FES contracts expire. We call this plan our 2025...

  19. Power Supply Negotiations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Southeastern Federal Power Alliance Incremental Decay in Energy March 11, 2014 2 Incremental Decay in Energy Hydropower customers observations from our review of the Buford...

  20. Power Purchase Agreements Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers an update on power purchase agreements and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

  1. Green Power Offer (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter establishes requirements, standards and procedures and a competitive bidding process to implement the green power offer program. The program is designed to make renewable energy...

  2. Municipal Electric Power (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section describes energy procurement for local utilities operating in Minnesota and provides a means for Minnesota cities to construct and operate hydroelectric power plants. The statute gives...

  3. Alabama Power- UESC Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses Alabama Power and its utility energy service contract (UESC) projects and activities.

  4. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  5. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    including natural gas, and competing renewable power resources such as solar photovoltaics. Figure 4-3. Wind turbine hub height trends in Germany from 2007 to 2014 Source:...

  6. Critical pulse power components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarjeant, W.J.; Rohwein, G.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical components for pulsed power conditioning systems will be reviewed. Particular emphasis will be placed on those components requiring significant development efforts. Capacitors, for example, are one of the weakest elements in high-power pulsed systems, especially when operation at high-repetition frequencies for extended periods of time are necessary. Switches are by far the weakest active components of pulse power systems. In particular, opening switches are essentially nonexistent for most applications. Insulaton in all systems and components requires development and improvement. Efforts under way in technology base development of pulse power components will be discussed.

  7. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Systems Program 1 DOE Energy Storage & Power Electronics Research Programs October 8, 2009 Marcelo Schupbach, Ph.D. Chief Technology Officer APEI, Inc. 535 Research Center Blvd....

  8. Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Learn how hydroelectric power, or hydropower, captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it into electricity for our homes and businesses.

  9. Southwestern Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    POTC Home Courses Instructors NERC Continuing Education Power Operations Training Center Instructors All instructors at Southwestern's POTC are NERC-approved continuing education...

  10. Combined Heat & Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & Power (CHP) Michael Ellis Director AGL Energy Services Federal Utility Partnership Working Group May 7 - 8, 2014 Virginia Beach, VA "CHP is the most efficient way of generating...

  11. European Space Power Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bents, D.J.; Kohout, L.L.; Mckissock, B.I.; Rodriguez, C.D.; Withrow, C.A.; Colozza, A.; Hanlon, J.C.; Schmitz, P.C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To support the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), a study was performed to investigate power system alternatives for the rover vehicles and servicers that were subsequently generated for each of these rovers and servicers, candidate power sources incorporating various power generation and energy storage technologies were identified. The technologies were those believed most appropriate to the SEI missions, and included solar, electrochemical, and isotope systems. The candidates were characterized with respect to system mass, deployed area, and volume. For each of the missions a preliminary selection was made. Results of this study depict the available power sources in light of mission requirements as they are currently defined.

  12. Green Power Purchasing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eligible resources include tidal and wave power, fuel cells using renewable fuels, hydropower facilities less than 60 megawatts (MW), solar thermal-electric systems, photovoltaics (PV), wind,...

  13. Application Power Signature Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Chung-Hsing [ORNL] [ORNL; Combs, Jacob [Sonoma State University] [Sonoma State University; Nazor, Jolie [Sonoma State University] [Sonoma State University; Santiago, Fabian [Sonoma State University] [Sonoma State University; Thysell, Rachelle [Sonoma State University] [Sonoma State University; Rivoire, Suzanne [Sonoma State University] [Sonoma State University; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-performance computing (HPC) community has been greatly concerned about energy efficiency. To address this concern, it is essential to understand and characterize the electrical loads of HPC applications. In this work, we study whether HPC applications can be distinguished by their power-consumption patterns using quantitative measures in an automatic manner. Using a collection of 88 power traces from 4 different systems, we find that basic statistical measures do a surprisingly good job of summarizing applications' distinctive power behavior. Moreover, this study opens up a new area of research in power-aware HPC that has a multitude of potential applications.

  14. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTRIBUTORS Developed by Rob Carmichael, Cadeo Group, Mark Bielecki and Amy Meyer, Navigant Consulting and Kristin Salvador, Artisan. Developed for the Bonneville Power...

  15. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in SAM Photovoltaics Concentrating PV Solar Water Heating Geothermal Dish-Stirling Linear Fresnel Power Tower Parabolic Trough Small Wind Utility-scale Wind Biomass...

  16. Concentrated Thermoelectric Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    electricity. Representing about 15% of the total system cost, power blocks include the steam turbine, generator, and associated equipment such as condensers and water treatment...

  17. Time-resolved spectroscopy on epitaxial graphene in the infrared spectral range: relaxation dynamics and saturation behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Time-resolved spectroscopy on epitaxial graphene in the infrared spectral range: relaxation graphene samples performed in a wide spectral range, namely from the near signatures of the highly doped graphene layers at the interface to Si

  18. Flammable Gas Refined Safety Analysis Tool Software Verification and Validation Report for Resolve Version 2.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRATZEL, D.R.

    2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document all software verification and validation activities, results, and findings related to the development of Resolve Version 2.5 for the analysis of flammable gas accidents in Hanford Site waste tanks.

  19. Pixel Array Detector for Time-Resolved X-ray Science, September 1, 1997 - September 14, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruner, Sol M.

    2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress on the design, fabrication, testing and assembly of two-layer Pixel Array Detectors (PADs) is described. The PADs are developed for challenging time-resolved X-ray imaging applications at synchrotron radiation X-ray sources.

  20. Measurement of the 238U neutron-capture cross section and gamma-emission spectra from 10 eV to 100 keV using the DANCE detector at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullmann, John L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, A J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keksis, A L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vieira, D J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Donnell, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jandel, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haight, R C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rundberg, R S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kawano, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chyzh, A [NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV; Baramsai, B [NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV; Wu, C Y [LLNL; Mitchell, G E [NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV; Becker, J A [LLNL; Krticka, M [CHARLES UNIV

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A careful new measurement of the {sup 238}U(n,{gamma}) cross section from 10 eV to 100 keV has been made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE. DANCE is a 4{pi} calorimetric scintillator array consisting of 160 BaF{sub 2} crystals. Measurements were made on a 48 mg/cm{sup 2} depleted uranium target. The cross sections are in general good agreement with previous measurements. The gamma-ray emission spectra, as a function of gamma multiplicity, were also measured and compared to model calculations.

  1. Absolute spin calibration of an electron spin polarimeter by spin-resolved photoemission from the Au(111) surface states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cacho, Cephise M. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Photon Science Department, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Vlaic, Sergio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Malvestuto, Marco; Ressel, Barbara [Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Seddon, Elaine A. [Photon Science Department, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Parmigiani, Fulvio [Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we report the absolute characterization of a spin polarimeter by measuring the Sherman function with high precision. These results have been obtained from the analysis of the spin and angle-resolved photoemission spectra of Au(111) surface states. The measurements have been performed with a 250 kHz repetition rate Ti:sapphire amplified laser system combined with a high energy-, angle-, and spin-resolving time-of-flight electron spectrometer.

  2. Power balance and characterization of impurities in the Maryland Spheromak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cote, C.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maryland Spheromak is a medium size magnetically confined plasma of toroidal shape. Low T{sub e} and higher n{sub e} than expected contribute to produce a radiation dominated short-lived spheromak configuration. A pyroelectric radiation detector and a VUV spectrometer have been used for space and time-resolved measurements of radiated power and impurity line emission. Results from the bolometry and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics have been combined to give the absolute concentrations of the major impurity species together with the electron temperature. The large amount of oxygen and nitrogen ions in the plasma very early in the discharge is seen to be directly responsible for the abnormally high electron density. The dominant power loss mechanisms are found to be radiation (from impurity line emission) and electron convection to the end walls during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration, and radiation only during the decay phase.

  3. Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the main project is to identify the current developmental status of MCFC systems and address those technical issues that need to be resolved to move the technology from its current status to the demonstration stage in the shortest possible time. The specific objectives are separated into five major tasks as follows: Stack research; Power plant development; Test facilities development; Manufacturing facilities development; and Commercialization. This Final Report discusses the M-C power Corporation effort which is part of a general program for the development of commercial MCFC systems. This final report covers the entire subject of the Unocal 250-cell stack. Certain project activities have been funded by organizations other than DOE and are included in this report to provide a comprehensive overview of the work accomplished.

  4. Role of electron-electron interference in ultrafast time-resolved imaging of electronic wavepackets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixit, Gopal [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Santra, Robin [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Hamburg, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast time-resolved x-ray scattering is an emerging approach to image the dynamical evolution of the electronic charge distribution during complex chemical and biological processes in real-space and real-time. Recently, the differences between semiclassical and quantum-electrodynamical (QED) theory of light-matter interaction for scattering of ultrashort x-ray pulses from the electronic wavepacket were formally demonstrated and visually illustrated by scattering patterns calculated for an electronic wavepacket in atomic hydrogen [G. Dixit, O. Vendrell, and R. Santra, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, 11636 (2012)]. In this work, we present a detailed analysis of time-resolved x-ray scattering from a sample containing a mixture of non-stationary and stationary electrons within both the theories. In a many-electron system, the role of scattering interference between a non-stationary and several stationary electrons to the total scattering signal is investigated. In general, QED and semiclassical theory provide different results for the contribution from the scattering interference, which depends on the energy resolution of the detector and the x-ray pulse duration. The present findings are demonstrated by means of a numerical example of x-ray time-resolved imaging for an electronic wavepacket in helium. It is shown that the time-dependent scattering interference vanishes within semiclassical theory and the corresponding patterns are dominated by the scattering contribution from the time-independent interference, whereas the time-dependent scattering interference contribution do not vanish in the QED theory and the patterns are dominated by the scattering contribution from the non-stationary electron scattering.

  5. Power, Media & Montesquieu. New forms of public power and the balance of power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Brink, Jeroen

    SUMMARY Power, Media & Montesquieu. New forms of public power and the balance of power are organized it is crucial to restrain the power that the state exerts on its citizens. The state has three functions, commonly known as powers: the legislative, executive and judicial powers. This three

  6. Theoretical studies on the stopping power of deuterium-tritium mixed with uranium plasmas for ? particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhigang [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Fu, Zhen-Guo [Research Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China); Zhang, Ping, E-mail: zhang-ping@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Research Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The stopping power of a compressed and highly ionized deuterium-tritium (DT) and uranium (U) plasma for ? particles at very high temperatures (T?=?5?keV) is examined theoretically with the dimensional continuation method. We show that with increasing density of U, both the magnitude and width of the resonance peak in the stopping power (as a function of the ? particle energy), increases because of the ions, while the penetration distance of the ? particles decreases. A simple relation of decreasing penetration distance as a function of plasma density is observed, which may be useful for inertial confinement fusion experiments. Moreover, by comparing the results with the case of a DT plasma mixed with beryllium, we find that the effect of a higher Z plasma is stronger, with regard to energy loss as well as the penetration distance of ? particles, than that of a lower Z plasma.

  7. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved material licensees. Quarterly progress report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April-June 1995) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to material licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  8. Time-resolved measurements of double layer evolution in expanding plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scime, E. E.; Biloiu, I. A.; Carr, J. Jr.; Thakur, S. Chakraborty; Galante, M.; Hansen, A.; Houshmandyar, S.; Keesee, A. M.; McCarren, D.; Sears, S. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Biloiu, C. [Varian Associates, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States); Sun, X. [Tri-Alpha Corporation, Foothill Ranch, California 92610 (United States)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations in steady-state plasmas confirm predictions that formation of a current-free double layer in a plasma expanding into a chamber of larger diameter is accompanied by an increase in ionization upstream of the double layer. The upstream plasma density increases sharply at the same driving frequency at which a double layer appears. For driving frequencies at which no double layer appears, large electrostatic instabilities are observed. Time-resolved measurements in pulsed discharges indicate that the double layer initially forms for all driving frequencies. However, for particularly strong double layers, instabilities appear early in the discharge and the double layer collapses.

  9. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved reactor licensees. Semiannual progress report, July 1996--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July-December 1996) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  10. Time-Resolved Imaging and Manipulation of H{sub 2} Fragmentation in Intense Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ergler, Th.; Rudenko, A.; Feuerstein, B.; Zrost, K.; Schroeter, C.D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the experimental realization of time-resolved coincident Coulomb explosion imaging of H{sub 2} fragmentation in 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} laser fields. Combining a high-resolution 'reaction microscope' and a fs pump-probe setup, we map the motion of wave packets dissociating via one- or two-photon channels, respectively, and observe a new region of enhanced ionization. The long-term interferometric stability of our system allows us to extend pump-probe experiments into the region of overlapping pulses, which offers new possibilities for the manipulation of ultrafast molecular fragmentation dynamics.

  11. Direct Surface Analysis of Time-Resolved Aerosol Impactor Samples with Ultrahigh-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Stephen J.; Zhao, Yongjing; Cliff, Steven S.; Wexler, Anthony S.; Kalberer, Markus

    2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    was assumed to be correct. Unfortunately due to the generally low peak intensities of the identified species MS-MS analysis for further structural identification was not possible. Only about 10-15% of the peaks contain a sulfur atom and are not further... 1 Direct surface analysis of time-resolved aerosol impactor samples with ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry Stephen J. Fuller 1, Yongjing Zhao2, Steven S. Cliff2, Anthony S. Wexler2, Markus Kalberer 1* 1 University of Cambridge, Department...

  12. Spatially resolvable optical emission spectrometer for analyzing density uniformity of semiconductor process plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, Changhoon; Ryoo, Hoonchul; Lee, Hyungwoo; Hahn, Jae W. [Nano Photonics Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se-Yeon; Yi, Hun-Jung [Manufacturing Technology Team, Memory Division, Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-do 445-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We proposed a spatially resolved optical emission spectrometer (SROES) for analyzing the uniformity of plasma density for semiconductor processes. To enhance the spatial resolution of the SROES, we constructed a SROES system using a series of lenses, apertures, and pinholes. We calculated the spatial resolution of the SROES for the variation of pinhole size, and our calculated results were in good agreement with the measured spatial variation of the constructed SROES. The performance of the SROES was also verified by detecting the correlation between the distribution of a fluorine radical in inductively coupled plasma etch process and the etch rate of a SiO{sub 2} film on a silicon wafer.

  13. Time-resolved energy transfer from single chloride-terminated nanocrystals to graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajayi, O. A., E-mail: oaa2114@columbia.edu, E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu; Wong, C. W., E-mail: oaa2114@columbia.edu, E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu [Optical Nanostructures Laboratory, Center for Integrated Science and Engineering, Solid-State Science and Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Anderson, N. C.; Wolcott, A.; Owen, J. S. [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Cotlet, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, New York 11973 (United States); Petrone, N.; Hone, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Gu, T.; Gesuele, F. [Optical Nanostructures Laboratory, Center for Integrated Science and Engineering, Solid-State Science and Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the time-resolved resonance energy transfer of excitons from single n-butyl amine-bound, chloride-terminated nanocrystals to two-dimensional graphene through time-correlated single photon counting. The radiative biexponential lifetime kinetics and blinking statistics of the individual surface-modified nanocrystal elucidate the non-radiative decay channels. Blinking modification as well as a 4× reduction in spontaneous emission were observed with the short chloride and n-butylamine ligands, probing the energy transfer pathways for the development of graphene-nanocrystal nanophotonic devices.

  14. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993: Volume 12, No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  15. On the spectrum of non-selfadjoint Schrödinger operators with compact resolvent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaniv Almog; Bernard Helffer

    2014-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the Schatten class for the compact resolvent of Dirichlet realizations, in unbounded domains, of a class of non-selfadjoint differential operators. This class consists of operators that can be obtained via analytic dilation from a Schr\\"odinger operator with magnetic field and a complex electric potential. As an application, we prove, in a variety of examples motivated by Physics, that the system of generalized eigenfunctions associated with the operator is complete, or at least the existence of an infinite discrete spectrum.

  16. Space- and Time-Resolved Mapping of Ionic Dynamic and Electroresistive Phenomena in Lateral Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strelcov, Evgheni [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Yen-Lin, Huang [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Yung-Chun, Teng [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Ying-Hao, Chu [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel scanning probe microscopy (SPM) based technique for probing local ionic and electronic transport and their dynamic behavior on the 10 ms 10 s scale is presented. The time-resolved Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (tr-KPFM) allows mapping surface potential in both space and time domains, visualizing electronic and ionic charge dynamics and separating underlying processes based on their time responses. Here, tr-KPFM is employed to explore the interplay of the adsorbed surface ions and bulk oxygen vacancies and their role in the resistive switching in the Ca-substituted bismuth ferrite thin film.

  17. Time Resolved Collapse of a Folding Protein Observed with Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollack, L.; Tate, M. W.; Finnefrock, A. C.; Kalidas, C.; Trotter, S.; Darnton, N. C.; Lurio, L.; Austin, R. H.; Batt, C. A.; Gruner, S. M. (and others)

    2001-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High-intensity, ''pink'' beam from an undulator was used in conjunction with microfabricated rapid-fluid mixing devices to monitor the early events in protein folding with time resolved small angle x-ray scattering. This Letter describes recent work on the protein bovine {beta} -lactoglobulin where collapse from an expanded to a compact set of states was directly observed on the millisecond time scale. The role of chain collapse, one of the initial stages of protein folding, is not currently understood. The characterization of transient, compact states is vital in assessing the validity of theories and models of the folding process.

  18. Resolve to Save Energy in the New Year | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepository | Department of Energy RequestGasResidentialResolve

  19. NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA: 2007 STATUS REPORT CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION October 2007 CEC-100, California Contract No. 700-05-002 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Barbara Byron, Senior Nuclear public workshops on nuclear power. The Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee, led by Commissioners

  20. Purchasing Renewable Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal agencies can purchase renewable power or renewable energy certificates (RECs) from a utility or other organization to meet Federal renewable energy requirements. Renewable power and RECs are good choices for facilities where on-site projects may be difficult or capital budgets are limited.

  1. Fusion Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Schmidt; J.M. Ogden

    2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment.

  2. Electrically powered hand tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Kurt S.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically powered hand tool is described and which includes a three phase electrical motor having a plurality of poles; an electrical motor drive electrically coupled with the three phase electrical motor; and a source of electrical power which is converted to greater than about 208 volts three-phase and which is electrically coupled with the electrical motor drive.

  3. The Icelandic Power Situation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    energy attracts power intensive industry to Iceland Households use only 5% 90% of district heating ensured · Feasible to sell excess energy · Takes advantage of the flexiblity of hydropower · Energy with low cost geothermal energy 80% 5% 15% Households Other users Power intensive industries #12;Future

  4. Application of External-Cavity Quantum Cascade Infrared Lasers to Nanosecond Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Condensed-Phase Samples Following Pulse Radiolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grills, D.C.; Cook, A.R.; Fujita, E.; George, M.W.; Miller, J.R.; Preses, J.M.; Wishart, J.F.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse radiolysis, utilizing short pulses of high-energy electrons from accelerators, is a powerful method for rapidly generating reduced or oxidized species and other free radicals in solution. Combined with fast time-resolved spectroscopic detection (typically in the ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared), it is invaluable for monitoring the reactivity of species subjected to radiolysis on timescales ranging from picoseconds to seconds. However, it is often difficult to identify the transient intermediates definitively due to a lack of structural information in the spectral bands. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy offers the structural specificity necessary for mechanistic investigations but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis experiments. For example, time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy has only been applied to a handful of gas-phase studies, limited mainly by several technical challenges. We have exploited recent developments in commercial external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) technology to construct a nanosecond TRIR apparatus that has allowed, for the first time, TRIR spectra to be recorded following pulse radiolysis of condensed-phase samples. Near single-shot sensitivity of DeltaOD <1 x 10(-3) has been achieved, with a response time of <20 ns. Using two continuous-wave EC-QCLs, the current apparatus covers a probe region from 1890-2084 cm(-1), and TRIR spectra are acquired on a point-by-point basis by recording transient absorption decay traces at specific IR wavelengths and combining these to generate spectral time slices. The utility of the apparatus has been demonstrated by monitoring the formation and decay of the one-electron reduced form of the CO(2) reduction catalyst, [Re(I)(bpy)(CO)(3)(CH(3)CN)](+), in acetonitrile with nanosecond time resolution following pulse radiolysis. Characteristic red-shifting of the nu(CO) IR bands confirmed that one-electron reduction of the complex took place. The availability of TRIR detection with high sensitivity opens up a wide range of mechanistic pulse radiolysis investigations that were previously difficult or impossible to perform with transient UV/visible detection.

  5. Power module assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Jeremy B. (Torrance, CA); Newson, Steve (Redondo Beach, CA)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A power module assembly of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicular power inverter, wherein the power inverter has a grounded chassis, is provided. The power module assembly comprises a conductive base layer electrically coupled to the chassis, an insulating layer disposed on the conductive base layer, a first conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, a second conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, wherein the first and second conductive nodes are electrically isolated from each other. The power module assembly also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the first conductive node, and further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the second conductive node.

  6. Multiwavelength Observations of the Powerful Gamma-ray Quasar PKS 1510-089: Clues on the Jet Composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kataoka, J.; Madejski, G.; Sikora, M.; Roming, P.; Chester, M.M.; Grupe, D.; Tsubuku, Y.; Sato, R.; Kawai, N.; Tosti, G.; Impiombato, D.; Kovalev, Y.Y.; Kovalev, Y.A.; Edwards, Philip G.; Wagner, S.J.; Moderski, R.; Stawarz, L.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results from a multiwavelength campaign conducted in August 2006 of the powerful {gamma}-ray quasar PKS 1510--089 (z = 0.361). This campaign commenced with a deep Suzaku observation lasting three days for a total exposure time of 120 ks, and continued with Swift monitoring over 18 days. Besides Swift observations, which sampled the optical/UV flux in all 6 UVOT filters as well as the X-ray spectrum in the 0.3--10 keV energy range, the campaign included ground-based optical and radio data, and yielded a quasi-simultaneous broad-band spectral energy distribution from 109 Hz to 1019 Hz. Thanks to its low instrumental background, the Suzaku observation provided a high S/N X-ray spectrum, which is well represented by an extremely hard power-law with photon index {Gamma}{approx_equal}1.2, augmented by a soft component apparent below 1 keV, which is well described by a black-body model with temperature kT {approx_equal}0.2 keV. Monitoring by Suzaku revealed temporal variability which is different between the low and high energy bands, again suggesting the presence of a second, variable component in addition to the primary power-law emission. We model the broadband spectrum of PKS 1510--089 assuming that the high energy spectral component results from Comptonization of infrared radiation produced by hot dust located in the surrounding molecular torus. In the adopted internal shock scenario, the derived model parameters imply that the power of the jet is dominated by protons but with a number of electrons/positrons exceeding a number of protons by a factor {approx} 10. We also find that inhomogeneities responsible for the shock formation, prior to the collision may produce bulk-Compton radiation which can explain the observed soft X-ray excess and possible excess at {approx} 18 keV. We note, however, that the bulk-Compton interpretation is not unique, and the observed soft excess could arise as well via some other processes discussed briefly in the text.

  7. Conditions for reliable time-resolved dosimetry of electronic portal imaging devices for fixed-gantry IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeo, Inhwan Jason; Patyal, Baldev; Mandapaka, Anant [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States); Jung, Jae Won [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858 (United States); Yi, Byong Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States); Kim, Jong Oh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The continuous scanning mode of electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) that offers time-resolved information has been newly explored for verifying dynamic radiation deliveries. This study seeks to determine operating conditions (dose rate stability and time resolution) under which that mode can be used accurately for the time-resolved dosimetry of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams.Methods: The authors have designed the following test beams with variable beam holdoffs and dose rate regulations: a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm open beam to serve as a reference beam; a sliding window (SW) beam utilizing the motion of a pair of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves outside the 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm jaw; a step and shoot (SS) beam to move the pair in step; a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) beam. The beams were designed in such a way that they all produce the same open beam output of 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm. Time-resolved ion chamber measurements at isocenter and time-resolved and integrating EPID measurements were performed for all beams. The time-resolved EPID measurements were evaluated through comparison with the ion chamber and integrating EPID measurements, as the latter are accepted procedures. For two-dimensional, time-resolved evaluation, a VMAT beam with an infield MLC travel was designed. Time-resolved EPID measurements and Monte Carlo calculations of such EPID dose images for this beam were performed and intercompared.Results: For IMRT beams (SW and SS), the authors found disagreement greater than 2%, caused by frame missing of the time-resolved mode. However, frame missing disappeared, yielding agreement better than 2%, when the dose rate of irradiation (and thus the frame acquisition rates) reached a stable and planned rate as the dose of irradiation was raised past certain thresholds (a minimum 12 s of irradiation per shoot used for SS IMRT). For VMAT, the authors found that dose rate does not affect the frame acquisition rate, thereby causing no frame missing. However, serious inplanar nonuniformities were found. This could be overcome by sacrificing temporal resolution (10 frames or 0.95 s/image): the continuous images agreed with ion chamber responses at the center of EPID and the calculation two-dimensionally in a time-resolved manner.Conclusions: The authors have determined conditions under which the continuous mode can be used for time-resolved dosimetry of fixed-gantry IMRT and VMAT and demonstrated it for VMAT.

  8. Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response andits Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response (DR) is an effective tool which resolves inconsistencies between electric power supply and demand. It further provides a reliable and credible resource that ensures stable and economical operation of the power grid. This paper introduces systematic definitions for DR and demand side management, along with operational differences between these two methods. A classification is provided for DR programs, and various DR strategies are provided for application in air conditioning and refrigerating systems. The reliability of DR is demonstrated through discussion of successful overseas examples. Finally, suggestions as to the implementation of demand response in China are provided.

  9. SMITH AND BARGHNONCONSCIOUS EFFECTS OF POWER NONCONSCIOUS EFFECTS OF POWER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bargh, John A.

    SMITH AND BARGHNONCONSCIOUS EFFECTS OF POWER NONCONSCIOUS EFFECTS OF POWER ON BASIC APPROACH to the approach/inhibition theory of power (Keltner, Gruenfeld, & Anderson, 2003), having power should be associated with the approach system, and lacking power with the avoidance system. However

  10. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fifth Northwest Power Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fifth Northwest Power Plan Statement of Basis and Purpose for the Fifth Power Plan and Response to Comments on the Draft Fifth Power Plan February 2005 #12;I. Background.........................................................................................................................................3 B. Developing the Fifth Power Plan

  11. The Power of Non-Uniform Wireless Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Power of Non-Uniform Wireless Power ETH Zurich ­ Distributed Computing Group Magnus M-To-Interference-Plus-Noise Ratio (SINR) Formula Minimum signal- to-interference ratio Power level of sender u Path-loss exponent Noise Distance between two nodes Received signal power from sender Received signal power from all other

  12. Trees and Power Lines: Minimizing Conflicts between Electric Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Trees and Power Lines: Minimizing Conflicts between Electric Power Infrastructure and the Urban: Minimizing Conflicts between Electric Power Infrastructure and the Urban Forest ISSUE BRIEF | March 2012 1: Minimizing Conflicts between Electric Power Infrastructure and the Urban Forest 1 Trees and overhead power

  13. Distributed Power Delivery for Energy Efficient and Low Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    Distributed Power Delivery for Energy Efficient and Low Power Systems Selc¸uk K¨ose Department throughout a power distribution system. Due to the parasitic impedances of the power distribution networks current to the load circuits [3]. The complexity of the high performance power delivery systems has

  14. TEP Power Partners Project [Tucson Electric Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arizona Governor’s Office of Energy Policy, in partnership with Tucson Electric Power (TEP), Tendril, and Next Phase Energy (NPE), formed the TEP Power Partners pilot project to demonstrate how residential customers could access their energy usage data and third party applications using data obtained from an Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) network. The project applied for and was awarded a Smart Grid Data Access grant through the U.S. Department of Energy. The project participants’ goal for Phase I is to actively engage 1,700 residential customers to demonstrate sustained participation, reduction in energy usage (kWh) and cost ($), and measure related aspects of customer satisfaction. This Demonstration report presents a summary of the findings, effectiveness, and customer satisfaction with the 15-month TEP Power Partners pilot project. The objective of the program is to provide residential customers with energy consumption data from AMR metering and empower these participants to better manage their electricity use. The pilot recruitment goals included migrating 700 existing customers from the completed Power Partners Demand Response Load Control Project (DRLC), and enrolling 1,000 new participants. Upon conclusion of the project on November 19, 2013: ? 1,390 Home Area Networks (HANs) were registered. ? 797 new participants installed a HAN. ? Survey respondents’ are satisfied with the program and found value with a variety of specific program components. ? Survey respondents report feeling greater control over their energy usage and report taking energy savings actions in their homes after participating in the program. ? On average, 43 % of the participants returned to the web portal monthly and 15% returned weekly. ? An impact evaluation was completed by Opinion Dynamics and found average participant savings for the treatment period1 to be 2.3% of their household use during this period.2 In total, the program saved 163 MWh in the treatment period of 2013.

  15. Technical Note: Influence of the phantom material on the absorbed-dose energy dependence of the EBT3 radiochromic film for photons in the energy range 3 keV–18 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermida-López, M., E-mail: mhermida@vhebron.net [NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstraße 55, Essen D-45122, Germany and Servei de Física i Protecció Radiològica, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Pg. Vall d’Hebron 119-129, Barcelona 08035 (Spain); Lüdemann, L.; Flühs, A. [Medical Physics, Strahlenklinik, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstraße 55, Essen D-45122 (Germany); Brualla, L. [NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstraße 55, Essen D-45122 (Germany)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Water is the reference medium for radiation therapy dosimetry, but for film dosimetry it is more practical to use a solid phantom. As the composition of solid phantoms differs from that of water, the energy dependence of film exposed within solid phantoms may also differ. The energy dependence of a radiochromic film for a given beam quality Q (energy for monoenergetic beams) has two components: the intrinsic energy dependence and the absorbed-dose energy dependence f(Q), the latter of which can be calculated through a Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport. The authors used Monte Carlo simulations to study the influence of the phantom material on the f(Q) of the EBT3 radiochromic film (Ashland Specialty Ingredients, Wayne, NJ) for photon beams with energies between 3 keV and 18 MeV. Methods: All simulations were carried out with the general-purpose Monte Carlo code PENELOPE 2011. The geometrical model consisted of a cylindrical phantom, with the film positioned at different depths depending on the initial photon energy. The authors simulated monoenergetic parallel photon beams and x-ray beams from a superficial therapy system. To validate their choice of simulation parameters, they also calculated f(Q) for older film models, EBT and EBT2, comparing with published results. In addition to water, they calculated f(Q) of the EBT3 film for solid phantom materials commonly used for film dosimetry: RW1 and RW3 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany), Solid Water (Gammex-RMI, Madison, WI), and PMMA. Finally, they combined their calculated f(Q) with published overall energy response data to obtain the intrinsic energy dependence of the EBT3 film in water. Results: The calculated f(Q) for EBT and EBT2 films was statistically compatible with previously published data. Between 10 keV and 18 MeV, the variation found in f(Q) of the EBT3 film for water was within 2.3%, with a standard statistical uncertainty less than 1%. If the quantity dose-to-water in the phantom is considered, which is the common practice in radiation dosimetry, the maximum difference of energy dependence for the solid phantoms with respect to water is about 6%, at an energy of 50 keV. Conclusions: The EBT3 film shows a reasonably constant absorbed-dose energy dependence when irradiated in water. If the dose-to-water in the phantom is considered, the maximum difference of EBT3 film energy dependence with the solid phantoms studied with respect to water is about 6% (at an energy of 50 keV). The reported overall energy dependence of the EBT3 film in water at energies below 100 keV is mainly due to the intrinsic energy dependence.

  16. Progress in resolving Hanford Site high-level waste tank safety issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babad, H.; Eberlein, S.J.; Johnson, G.D.; Meacham, J.E.; Osborne, J.W.; Payne, M.A.; Turner, D.A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim storage of alkaline, high-level radioactive waste, from two generations of spent fuel reprocessing and waste management activities, has resulted in the accumulation of 238 million liters of waste in Hanford Site single and double-shell tanks. Before the 1990`s, the stored waste was believed to be: (1) chemically unreactive under its existing storage conditions and plausible accident scenarios; and (2) chemically stable. This paradigm was proven incorrect when detailed evaluation of tank contents and behavior revealed a number of safety issues and that the waste was generating flammable and noxious gases. In 1990, the Waste Tank Safety Program was formed to focus on identifying safety issues and resolving the ferrocyanide, flammable gas, organic, high heat, noxious vapor, and criticality issues. The tanks of concern were placed on Watch Lists by safety issue. This paper summarizes recent progress toward resolving Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tank safety issues, including modeling, and analyses, laboratory experiments, monitoring upgrades, mitigation equipment, and developing a strategy to screen tanks for safety issues.

  17. Time-resolved particle velocity measurements at impact velocities of 10 km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Reinhart, W.D.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypervelocity launch capabilities (9--16 km/s) with macroscopic plates have become available in recent years. It is now feasible to conduct instrumented plane-wave tests using this capability. Successfully conducting such tests requires a planar launch and impact at hypervelocities, appropriate triggering for recording systems, and time-resolved measurements of motion or stress at a particular point or set of points within the target or projectile during impact. The authors have conducted the first time-resolved wave-profile experiments using velocity interferometric techniques at impact velocities of 10 km/s. These measurements show that aluminum continues to exhibit normal release behavior to 161 GPa shock pressure, with complete loss of strength of the shocked state. These experiments have allowed a determination of shock-wave window transparency in conditions produced by a hypervelocity impact. In particular, lithium fluoride appears to lose transparency at a shock stress of 200 GPa; this appears to be the upper limit for conventional wave profile measurements using velocity interferometric techniques.

  18. Size-resolved parameterization of primary organic carbon in fresh marine aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Michael S [ORNL; Keene, William C [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine aerosols produced by the bursting of artificially generated bubbles in natural seawater are highly enriched (2 to 3 orders of magnitude based on bulk composition) in marine-derived organic carbon (OC). Production of size-resolved particulate OC was parameterized based on a Langmuir kinetics-type association of OC to bubble plumes in seawater and resulting aerosol as constrained by measurements of aerosol produced from highly productive and oligotrophic seawater. This novel approach is the first to account for the influence of adsorption on the size-resolved association between marine aerosols and OC. Production fluxes were simulated globally with an eight aerosol-size-bin version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.5.07). Simulated number and inorganic sea-salt mass production fell within the range of published estimates based on observationally constrained parameterizations. Because the parameterization does not consider contributions from spume drops, the simulated global mass flux (1.5 x 10{sup 3} Tg y{sup -1}) is near the lower limit of published estimates. The simulated production of aerosol number (2.1 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and OC (49 Tg C y{sup -1}) fall near the upper limits of published estimates and suggest that primary marine aerosols may have greater influences on the physiochemical evolution of the troposphere, radiative transfer and climate, and associated feedbacks on the surface ocean than suggested by previous model studies.

  19. Resolving the vacuum fluctuations of an optomechanical system using an artificial atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Lecocq; J. D. Teufel; J. Aumentado; R. W. Simmonds

    2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Heisenberg's uncertainty principle results in one of the strangest quantum behaviors: an oscillator can never truly be at rest. Even in its lowest energy state, at a temperature of absolute zero, its position and momentum are still subject to quantum fluctuations. Resolving these fluctuations using linear position measurements is complicated by the fact that classical noise can masquerade as quantum noise. On the other hand, direct energy detection of the oscillator in its ground state makes it appear motionless. So how can we resolve quantum fluctuations? Here, we parametrically couple a micromechanical oscillator to a microwave cavity to prepare the system in its quantum ground state and then amplify the remaining vacuum fluctuations into real energy quanta. Exploiting a superconducting qubit as an artificial atom, we measure the photon/phonon-number distributions during these optomechanical interactions. This provides an essential non-linear resource to, first, verify the ground state preparation and second, reveal the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the macroscopic oscillator's motion. Our results further demonstrate the ability to control a long-lived mechanical oscillator using a non-Gaussian resource, directly enabling applications in quantum information processing and enhanced detection of displacement and forces.

  20. Resolving Spacecraft Earth-Flyby Anomalies with Measured Light Speed Anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T. Cahill

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Doppler shift observations of spacecraft, such as Galileo, NEAR, Cassini, Rosetta and MESSENGER in earth flybys, have all revealed unexplained speed `anomalies' - that the doppler-shift determined speeds are inconsistent with expected speeds. Here it is shown that these speed anomalies are not real and are actually the result of using an incorrect relationship between the observed doppler shift and the speed of the spacecraft - a relationship based on the assumption that the speed of light is isotropic in all frames, i.e. invariant. Taking account of the repeatedly measured light-speed anisotropy the anomalies are resolved. The Pioneer 10/11 anomalies are discussed, but not resolved. The spacecraft observations demonstrate again that the speed of light is not invariant, and is isotropic only with respect to a dynamical 3-space. The existing doppler shift data also offers a resource to characterise a new form of gravitational waves, the dynamical 3-space turbulence, that has also been detected by other techniques.

  1. Millifluidics for time-resolved mapping of the growth of gold nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sai Krishna, Katla; Navin, Chelliah; Biswas, Sanchita; Singh, Varshni; Ham, Kyungmin; Bovencamp, L. S.; Theegala, Chandra; Miller, Jeffrey T; Spivey, James J.; Kumar, Challa S.S.R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative in situ characterization tools are essential for understanding the reaction mechanisms leading to the growth of nanoscale materials. Though techniques, such as in situ transmission X-ray microscopy, fast single-particle spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, etc., are currently being developed, these tools are complex, not easily accessible, and do not necessarily provide the temporal resolution required to follow the formation of nanomaterials in real time. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the utility of a simple millifluidic chip for an in situ real time analysis of morphology and dimension-controlled growth of gold nano- and microstructures with a time resolution of 5 ms. The structures formed were characterized using synchrotron radiation-based in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, 3-D X-ray tomography, and high-resolution electron microscopy. These gold nanostructures were found to be catalytically active for conversion of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, providing an example of the potential opportunities for time-resolved analysis of catalytic reactions. While the investigations reported here are focused on gold nanostructures, the technique can be applied to analyze the time-resolved growth of other types of nanostructured metals and metal oxides. With the ability to probe at least a 10-fold higher concentrations, in comparison with traditional microfluidics, the tool has potential to revolutionize a broad range of fields from catalysis, molecular analysis, biodefense, and molecular biology.

  2. Electric power annual 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  3. Computational power of correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janet Anders; Dan E. Browne

    2009-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the intrinsic computational power of correlations exploited in measurement-based quantum computation. By defining a general framework the meaning of the computational power of correlations is made precise. This leads to a notion of resource states for measurement-based \\textit{classical} computation. Surprisingly, the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt problems emerge as optimal examples. Our work exposes an intriguing relationship between the violation of local realistic models and the computational power of entangled resource states.

  4. Foucault's Ethics of Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Kirk

    ­ cally remarks , there is no 'headquarters that presides over the rationality" of power (HSl 125). Rather, strategies of power are nonsubjective insofar as they arc anonymous and operate indepen­ dent ly of the part icular people who wil l ingly or unwi...Foucault's Ethics of Power Kirk Wolf Delia College 1. I n t r o d u c t i o n Since Foucaull 's death in 19K4, his interpreters have generally located his importance in his genealogical critiques and in his phi­ losophy ofpower. On the one hand...

  5. Nuclear power attitude trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nealey, S.M.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing vulnerability of nuclear power to political pressures fueled by public concerns, particularly about nuclear plant safety and radioactive waste disposal, has become obvious. Since Eisenhower's Atoms-for-Peace program, utility and government plans have centered on expansion of nuclear power generating capability. While supporters have outnumbered opponents of nuclear power expansion for many years, in the wake of the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident the margin of support has narrowed. The purpose of this paper is to report and put in perspective these long-term attitude trends.

  6. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1Department of60Power Purchase Agreements PowerPowerCentsDC

  7. Power control system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steigerwald, Robert Louis; Anderson, Todd Alan

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system includes an energy harvesting device, a battery coupled to the energy harvesting device, and a circuit coupled to the energy harvesting device and the battery. The circuit is adapted to deliver power to a load by providing power generated by the energy harvesting device to the load without delivering excess power to the battery and to supplement the power generated by the energy harvesting device with power from the battery if the power generated by the energy harvesting device is insufficient to fully power the load. A method of operating the power system is also provided.

  8. Power control system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steigerwald, Robert Louis (Burnt Hills, NY) [Burnt Hills, NY; Anderson, Todd Alan (Niskayuna, NY) [Niskayuna, NY

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system includes an energy harvesting device, a battery coupled to the energy harvesting device, and a circuit coupled to the energy harvesting device and the battery. The circuit is adapted to deliver power to a load by providing power generated by the energy harvesting device to the load without delivering excess power to the battery and to supplement the power generated by the energy harvesting device with power from the battery if the power generated by the energy harvesting device is insufficient to fully power the load. A method of operating the power system is also provided.

  9. ICPIG, July 15-20, 2007, Prague, Czech Republic C9 Heavy particle impact excitation of atomic oxygen in front of the powered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehske, Holger

    was assumed. Collision between O2 + and the background gas O2 generate electronically excited atomic oxygen oxygen in front of the powered electrode of oxygen rf plasmas ­ Experiment and PIC-Simulation K. Dittmann) resolved plasma induced optical emission of the atomic oxygen in an asymmetrical oxygen rf plasma (CCP

  10. POWER CENTRALIZED SEMIGROUPS PRIMOZ MORAVEC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POWER CENTRALIZED SEMIGROUPS PRIMOZ MORAVEC Abstract. A semigroup is said to be power centralized if for every pair of elements x and y there exists a power of x commuting with y. The structure of power centralized groups and semigroups is investigated. In particular, we characterize 0-simple power centralized

  11. Efficient Power System State Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavaei, Javad

    monitoring of power systems. 2. Background Power systems have four main components: transmission, sub-transmissionEfficient Power System State Estimation Zafirah Baksh Expected BS, Department of Electrical Engineering May 2013 ELEN E4511 Power Systems Analysis Professor Javad Lavaeiyanesi #12;1. Introduction Power

  12. High Power, Linear CMOS Power Amplifier for WLAN Applications /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afsahi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracking OFDM Power Amplier,” IEEE Journal of Solid-StateGSM/GPRS CMOS Power Ampli?er,” IEEE Journal of Solid-StateEnded Switching Power Ampli?es,” IEEE Journal of Solid-State

  13. Transportation and Stationary Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) is small. Previous feedback from industry has indicated that existing transportation fuel providers (oil for multiple fuel cell applications, including material handling equipment, backup power, and light- or heavy

  14. DSW Power Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Hoover Powerplant produce about 2,074 MW--enough electricity for nearly 8 million people. Western markets this power to public utilities in Arizona, California and Nevada...

  15. Power System Operator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At Southeastern, you can make a direct impact by helping us deliver low-cost hydroelectric power to over one hundred electric cooperatives and municipal utilities, and over eight million end-use...

  16. CRSP Power Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    expenses of the project each year, and receive all of the energy it produces. Salt Lake City AreaIntegrated Projects: Power from the Colorado River Storage Project plants was...

  17. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cable & conductor into 2,000 ft coiled tubing World first high power laser hardware (optics package & fiber connector) tested to >5,000 psi Achieving target requires "world...

  18. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Symposium on Power Systems for Electric Vehicles, Columbiaelectric vehicle must be considered as a total system which includes the primary energy source, electric powerpower for urban driving (32 W/kg), (130, Flow schematic for an electric vehicle battery system.

  19. in Idaho's Power County

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Located in Power County on the Fort Hall Reservation, the land is bisected by Bannock Creek, a perennial stream which flows from the east side of the Deep Creek Mountains and...

  20. Renewable Power Procurement Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York Governor George Pataki signed Executive Order No. 111 to promote "Green and Clean" State Buildings and Vehicles on June 10, 2001. The renewable-power procurement component of this order...

  1. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  2. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  3. Pig Poop Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: What could be more fitting in the Year of the Pig than to turn to the pig for power? And that's what is happening here in South Korea. In an effort to develop environmentally friendly, renewable energy ...

  4. Bonneville Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management BC Hydro and Power Authority 691 1 Southpoint Drive, El5 Burnaby, B.C., Canada V3N 4 x 8 Dear Ms. Kurschner: This letter Agreement (09NTSSA) between our...

  5. Bonneville Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vintage Rate (as made available by BPA) o All Non-Federal Resources (elect to not purchase power at Tier 2 rates) o Combination of BPA Tier 2 and Non-Federal Resources *...

  6. Mesofluidic magnetohydrodynamic power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fucetola, Jay J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the previous research into magnetohydrodynamics has involved large-scale systems. This thesis explores the miniaturization and use of devices to convert the power dissipated within an expanding gas flow into ...

  7. GMP Solar Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Green Mountain Power, an investor-owned electric utility operating in Vermont, offers a credit to customers with net-metered photovoltaic (PV) systems. In addition to the benefits of net metering,...

  8. Glucose-powered neuroelectronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapoport, Benjamin Isaac

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A holy grail of bioelectronics is to engineer biologically implantable systems that can be embedded without disturbing their local environments, while harvesting from their surroundings all of the power they require. As ...

  9. Power Quality Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilson, D.

    Electric utilities in the United States spend in excess of one billion dollars annually to maintain or improve the quality of electric power supplied to their customers. Yet, an increasing and alarming number of complaints are being voiced...

  10. Structural power flow measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  11. Bonneville Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    http:www.bpa.gov PR 02 14 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 CONTACT: Kevin Wingert, 503-230-4140971-207-8390 or 503-230-5131 BPA...

  12. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * No cold or centrifugation steps * Power draw is minimal RNA Prep Module: Digital Microfluidics (DMF) with Macro-to-Micro Fluidic Interface Jebrail MJ et al., Anal Chem 86:3856...

  13. Linear Motor Powered Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Richard D.

    This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

  14. Crowd-powered systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Michael Scott

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crowd-powered systems combine computation with human intelligence, drawn from large groups of people connecting and coordinating online. These hybrid systems enable applications and experiences that neither crowds nor ...

  15. Power Plant Dams (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states the provisions for erection and maintenance of dams. When any person, corporation or city may be desirous of erecting and maintaining a milldam or dam for generating power across...

  16. Green Power Purchasing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2003, Maine's governor established a goal for the state government to buy at least 50% of its electricity from "reasonably priced" renewable-power sources, paid for by energy conservation...

  17. Bonneville Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation Resource Management, BC Hydro and Power Authority 6911 Southpoint Drive, Tower 15 Burnaby, BC V3N 4X8 Dear Ms. Kurshner: This letter agreement (Agreement) between...

  18. The power tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAYFIELD, J.P.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POWER Tool--Planning, Optimization, Waste Estimating and Resourcing tool, a hand-held field estimating unit and relational database software tool for optimizing disassembly and final waste form of contaminated systems and equipment.

  19. Power conversion technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, M. A.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Power Conversion Technologies thrust area identifies and sponsors development activities that enhance the capabilities of engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the area of solid- state power electronics. Our primary objective is to be a resource to existing and emerging LLNL programs that require advanced solid-state power electronic technologies.. Our focus is on developing and integrating technologies that will significantly impact the capability, size, cost, and reliability of future power electronic systems. During FY-96, we concentrated our research efforts on the areas of (1) Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR); (2) novel solid-state opening switches; (3) advanced modulator technology for accelerators; (4) compact accelerators; and (5) compact pulse generators.

  20. Reactive Power Compensator.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

    1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

  1. Reactive power compensator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  2. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics Power

  3. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics PowerSigurd Hofmann GSI

  4. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics PowerSigurd Hofmann

  5. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics PowerSigurd

  6. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics PowerSigurdTechnologies October

  7. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics PowerSigurdTechnologies

  8. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics PowerSigurdTechnologiesBrainstorm:

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - Vicksburg District Federal Power Projects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Federal Power Projects Vicksburg District Federal Power Projects Blakely Mountain Hydro DeGray Hydro DeGray Hydro Narrows Hydro Blakely Mountain Rewind Unit 1 ll Rotor...

  10. Lease of Power Privilege Flowchart: Lease of Power Privilege...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Power Privilege Flowchart: Lease of Power Privilege Contract through End of Construction Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  11. RESOLVING THE OPTICAL EMISSION LINES OF Ly{alpha} BLOB ''B1'' AT z = 2.38: ANOTHER HIDDEN QUASAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overzier, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Nesvadba, N. P. H. [Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Dijkstra, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Hatch, N. A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Lehnert, M. D. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8111, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Villar-Martin, M. [Centro de Astrobioloia (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Wilman, R. J. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH13LE (United Kingdom); Zirm, A. W., E-mail: overzier@astro.as.utexas.edu [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the SINFONI near-infrared integral field unit on the Very Large Telescope to resolve the optical emission line structure of one of the brightest (L{sub Ly{alpha}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) and nearest (z Almost-Equal-To 2.38) of all Ly{alpha} blobs (LABs). The target, known in the literature as object {sup B}1{sup ,} lies at a redshift where the main optical emission lines are accessible in the observed near-infrared. We detect luminous [O III] {lambda}{lambda}4959, 5007 and H{alpha} emission with a spatial extent of at least 32 Multiplication-Sign 40 kpc (4'' Multiplication-Sign 5''). The dominant optical emission line component shows relatively broad lines (600-800 km s{sup -1}, FWHM) and line ratios consistent with active galactic nucleus (AGN) photoionization. The new evidence for AGN photoionization, combined with previously detected C IV and luminous, warm infrared emission, suggest that B1 is the site of a hidden quasar. This is confirmed by the fact that [O II] is relatively weak compared with [O III] (extinction-corrected [O III]/[O II] of about 3.8), which is indicative of a high, Seyfert-like ionization parameter. From the extinction-corrected [O III] luminosity we infer a bolometric AGN luminosity of {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, and further conclude that the obscured AGN may be Compton-thick given existing X-ray limits. The large line widths observed are consistent with clouds moving within the narrow-line region of a luminous QSO. The AGN scenario is capable of producing sufficient ionizing photons to power the Ly{alpha}, even in the presence of dust. By performing a census of similar objects in the literature, we find that virtually all luminous LABs harbor obscured quasars. Based on simple duty-cycle arguments, we conclude that AGNs are the main drivers of the Ly{alpha} in LABs rather than the gravitational heating and subsequent cooling suggested by cold stream models. We also conclude that the empirical relation between LABs and overdense environments at high redshift must be due to a more fundamental correlation between AGNs (or massive galaxies) and environment.

  12. Superconducting electric power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaugher, R.D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of superconductors to electric power systems has been actively pursued over the past 30 years. Following the realization of high-field, high-current superconductors in 1961, researchers applied these type II materials, such as Nb-Ti and Nb{sub 3}Sn, to laboratory magnets, followed by generators, motors, and transmission cables. Successful prototypes for the latter were constructed and tested by the mid-1980s. It is fair to assume that widespread utility acceptance of these low-temperature superconducting (LTS) power applications was compromised by the necessity for liquid helium cooling. The discovery of the high-temperature superconductors (HTS) in 1986, which offered the prospect for liquid nitrogen cooling, provided renewed interest and impetus and spurred the development of HTS power components. The expectations for HTS power components are, in fact, near realization, as a result of the rapid worldwide progress in HTS wire and tape development. This paper will review the history and present status of superconducting power-system-related applications. The major problems facing this technology and the prospects for commercialization and eventual integration into the utility sector will be discussed. General acceptance for superconducting power equipment by the electric utilities and other end-users will ultimately be based on the respective system performance, efficiency, reliability and maintenance, operational lifetime, and installed cost compared to conventional technologies.

  13. Execution Version POWER PURCHASE AGREEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    ") and BLUEWATER WIND DELAWARE LLC ("Seller") June 23, 2008 #12;Execution Version POWER PURCHASE AGREEMENT TableExecution Version POWER PURCHASE AGREEMENT between DELMARVA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY ("Buyer 3.5 Energy Forecasts, Scheduling and Balancing.......................................... 40 3

  14. GaN power electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin

    Between 5 and 10% of the world's electricity is wasted as dissipated heat in the power electronic circuits needed, for example, in computer power supplies, motor drives or the power inverters of photovoltaic systems. This ...

  15. Solar Power Tower Design Basis Document, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZAVOICO,ALEXIS B.

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the design basis for a generic molten-salt solar power tower. A solar power tower uses a field of tracking mirrors (heliostats) that redirect sunlight on to a centrally located receiver mounted on top a tower, which absorbs the concentrated sunlight. Molten nitrate salt, pumped from a tank at ground level, absorbs the sunlight, heating it up to 565 C. The heated salt flows back to ground level into another tank where it is stored, then pumped through a steam generator to produce steam and make electricity. This report establishes a set of criteria upon which the next generation of solar power towers will be designed. The report contains detailed criteria for each of the major systems: Collector System, Receiver System, Thermal Storage System, Steam Generator System, Master Control System, and Electric Heat Tracing System. The Electric Power Generation System and Balance of Plant discussions are limited to interface requirements. This design basis builds on the extensive experience gained from the Solar Two project and includes potential design innovations that will improve reliability and lower technical risk. This design basis document is a living document and contains several areas that require trade-studies and design analysis to fully complete the design basis. Project- and site-specific conditions and requirements will also resolve open To Be Determined issues.

  16. Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in...

  17. Power System Dispatcher (Technical Writer)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Power System Operations Transmission Switching, (J4100) 5555...

  18. Power network analysis and optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wanping

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chip power supply network optimization using multigrid-basedchip decoupling capacitor optimization for high- performanceSapatnekar, “Analysis and optimization of structured power/

  19. A high-order harmonic generation apparatus for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frietsch, B.; Gahl, C.; Teichmann, M.; Weinelt, M. [Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)] [Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Carley, R. [Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany) [Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Döbrich, K. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schwarzkopf, O.; Wernet, Ph. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a table top setup for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate band structure dynamics of correlated materials driven far from equilibrium by femtosecond laser pulse excitation. With the electron-phonon equilibration time being in the order of 1–2 ps it is necessary to achieve sub-picosecond time resolution. Few techniques provide both the necessary time and energy resolution to map non-equilibrium states of the band structure. Laser-driven high-order harmonic generation is such a technique. In our experiment, a grating monochromator delivers tunable photon energies up to 40 eV. A photon energy bandwidth of 150 meV and a pulse duration of 100 fs FWHM allow us to cover the k-space necessary to map valence bands at different k{sub z} and detect outer core states.

  20. Time-resolved temperature measurement and numerical simulation of millisecond laser irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zewen; Zhang Hongchao; Shen Zhonghua; Ni Xiaowu [School of Science, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2013-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal process of 1064 nm millisecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiated silicon was time-resolved temperature measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer, temperature evolutions of the spot center for wide range of laser energy densities were presented. The waveforms of temperature evolution curves contained much information about phase change, melting, solidification and vaporization. An axisymmetric numerical model was established for millisecond laser heating silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained by using the finite element method. The numerical results of temperature evolutions of the spot center are in good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, the axial temperature distributions of the numerical results give a better understanding of the waveforms in the experimental results. The melting threshold, vaporizing threshold, melting duration, and melting depth were better identified by analyzing two kinds of results.

  1. Time resolved magneto-optical studies of ferromagnetic InMnSb films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, M.; Kini, R. N.; Nontapot, K.; Khodaparast, G. A. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Wojtowicz, T. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Liu, X.; Furdyna, J. K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report time resolved magneto-optical measurements in InMnSb ferromagnetic films with 2% and 2.8% Mn contents grown by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy. In order to probe a possible interaction between the spins of photoexcited carriers and the Mn ions, we measured spin dynamics before and after aligning the Mn ions by applying an external magnetic field at temperatures above and below the samples' Curie temperatures. We observed no significant temperature or magnetic field dependence in the relaxation times and attribute the observed dynamics entirely to the relaxation of photoexcited electrons in the conduction band where the s-d coupling with the localized Mn ions is significantly weaker compared to the p-d exchange coupling. We observed several differences in the optical response of our InMnSb samples which could have been influenced mainly by the samples' growth conditions.

  2. Study of nanosecond laser-produced plasmas in atmosphere by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Wenfu; Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 XianNing West Road, Xi'an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 XianNing West Road, Xi'an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China)

    2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the evolution of the species from both the target and the air, and the plasma parameter distribution of the nanosecond laser-produced plasmas in atmospheric air. The technique used is spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. It is argued that the N II from the air, which is distributed over a wider region than the target species in the early stages of the discharge, is primarily formed by the shock wave. The ionized species have a larger expansion velocity than the excited atoms in the first ?100 ns, providing direct evidence for space-charge effects. The electron density decreases with the distance from the target surface in the early stages of the discharge, and both the electron density and the excited temperature variation in the axial direction are found to become insignificant at later stages.

  3. Time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters by means of triple probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qayyum, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.; Deeba, Farah; Ali, Rafaqat; Hussain, S. [National Tokamak Fusion Program, 3329 Islamabad (Pakistan)] [National Tokamak Fusion Program, 3329 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Triple Langmuir probe (TLP) diagnostic system with its necessary driving circuit is developed and successfully applies for time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters in the negative glow region of pulsating-dc discharge. This technique allows the instantaneous measurement of electron temperature [T{sub ?}], electron number density [n{sub ?}] as well as plasma fluctuations without any voltage or frequency sweep. In TLP configuration two probes are differentially biased and serve as a floating symmetric double probe whereas the third probe is simply floating into plasma to measure floating potential as a function of time and thus incorporates the effect of plasma fluctuations. As an example of the application to time-dependent plasmas, basic plasma parameters such as floating potential, electron temperature, and electron number density in low pressure air discharge are determined as a function of time for different fill pressure. The results demonstrate temporal evolution of plasma parameters and thus plasma generation progression for different fill pressures.

  4. An ultrafast angle-resolved photoemission apparatus for measuring complex materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smallwood, Christopher L.; Lanzara, Alessandra [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Jozwiak, Christopher [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Zhang Wentao [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present technical specifications for a high resolution time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy setup based on a hemispherical electron analyzer and cavity-dumped solid state Ti:sapphire laser used to generate pump and probe beams, respectively, at 1.48 and 5.93 eV. The pulse repetition rate can be tuned from 209 Hz to 54.3 MHz. Under typical operating settings the system has an overall energy resolution of 23 meV, an overall momentum resolution of 0.003 A{sup -1}, and an overall time resolution of 310 fs. We illustrate the system capabilities with representative data on the cuprate superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}. The descriptions and analyses presented here will inform new developments in ultrafast electron spectroscopy.

  5. Introduction to theory and analysis of resolved (and unresolved) neutron resonances via SAMMY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, N.M.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron cross-section data are important for two distinct purposes: first, they provide insight into the nature of matter, thus assisting in the understanding of fundamental physics; second, they are needed for practical applications (e.g., for calculating when and how a reactor will become critical, or how much shielding is needed for storage of nuclear materials, and for medical applications). Neutron cross section data in the resolved-resonance region are generally obtained by time-of-flight experiments, which must be carefully analyzed if they are to be properly understood and utilized. In this paper, important features of the analysis process are discussed, with emphasis on the particular technique used in the analysis code SAMMY. Other features of the code are also described; these include such topics as calculation of group cross sections (including covariance matrices), generation and fitting of integral quantities, and extensions into the unresolved-resonance region and higher-energy regions.

  6. MONSTIR II: A 32-channel, multispectral, time-resolved optical tomography system for neonatal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Robert J., E-mail: robert.cooper@ucl.ac.uk; Magee, Elliott; Everdell, Nick; Magazov, Salavat; Varela, Marta; Airantzis, Dimitrios; Gibson, Adam P.; Hebden, Jeremy C. [Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We detail the design, construction and performance of the second generation UCL time-resolved optical tomography system, known as MONSTIR II. Intended primarily for the study of the newborn brain, the system employs 32 source fibres that sequentially transmit picosecond pulses of light at any four wavelengths between 650 and 900 nm. The 32 detector channels each contain an independent photo-multiplier tube and temporally correlated photon-counting electronics that allow the photon transit time between each source and each detector position to be measured with high temporal resolution. The system's response time, temporal stability, cross-talk, and spectral characteristics are reported. The efficacy of MONSTIR II is demonstrated by performing multi-spectral imaging of a simple phantom.

  7. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS?: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jin, Wencan; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Yeh, Po-Chun; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Liou, Jonathan T.; Dadap, Jerry I.; Herman, Irving P.; Osgood, Jr., Richard M.; Sutter, Peter; et al

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS?) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer MoS? elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. A suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer MoS? crystals. For suspended MoS?, a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at ? and ? of 2.00m? and 0.43m?, respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of ?? to the vicinity of ? and briefly discuss itsmore »possible origin.« less

  8. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Rob [University of Colorado] [University of Colorado

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Rob Knight of the University of Colorado gives a presentation on "Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  9. Time-resolved soft x-ray spectra from laser-produced Cu plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cone, K V; Dunn, J; Baldis, H A; May, M J; Purvis, M A; Scott, H A; Schneider, M B

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The volumetric heating of a thin copper target has been studied with time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. The copper target was heated from a plasma produced using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Compact Multipulse Terrawatt (COMET) laser. A variable spaced grating spectrometer coupled to an x-ray streak camera measured soft x-ray emission (800-1550 eV) from the back of the copper target to characterize the bulk heating of the target. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations were modeled in 2-dimensions using the HYDRA code. The target conditions calculated by HYDRA were post-processed with the atomic kinetics code CRETIN to generate synthetic emission spectra. A comparison between the experimental and simulated spectra indicates the presence of specific ionization states of copper and the corresponding electron temperatures and ion densities throughout the laser-heated copper target.

  10. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS?: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jin, Wencan [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sadowski, Jerzy T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yeh, Po-Chun [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Zaki, Nader [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Zhang, Datong [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Liou, Jonathan T. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Dadap, Jerry I. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Herman, Irving P. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Osgood, Jr., Richard M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sutter, Peter [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Barinov, Alexey [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Yablonskikh, Mikhail [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS?) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer MoS? elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. A suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer MoS? crystals. For suspended MoS?, a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at ? and ? of 2.00m? and 0.43m?, respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of ?? to the vicinity of ? and briefly discuss its possible origin.

  11. Time- and spectrally resolved measurements of laser-driven hohlraum radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hessling, T.; Blazevic, A.; Stoehlker, T. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Frank, A.; Kraus, D.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Hoffmann, D. H. H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At the GSI Helmholtz center for heavy-ion research combined experiments with heavy ions and laser-produced plasmas are investigated. As a preparation to utilize indirectly heated targets, where a converter hohlraum provides thermal radiation to create a more homogeneous plasma, this converter target has to be characterized. In this paper the latest results of these measurements are presented. Small spherical cavities with diameters between 600 and 750 {mu}m were heated with laser energies up to 30 J at 532-nm wavelength. Radiation temperatures could be determined by time-resolved as well as time-integrated diagnostics, and maximum values of up to 35 eV were achieved.

  12. Time-resolved photoelectrochemical measurements on surface-modified n- and p-InP electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, R.L.; Dempsey, P.F.; Sammells, A.F.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved photoelectrochemical measurements following illumination with a pulsed laser source have been performed on surface-modified n- and p-InP photoelectrodes. The rate of the initial fast transient photopotential decay was shown to be sensitive to the nature of the surface modification used. The chemisorption of Ru ions onto the n-InP surface reduced the rapid initial decay of the transient photopotential response observed on the unmodified n-InP surface. It is proposed that Ru/sup 3+/ chemisorption may effectively reduce surface trap density at the interface region. For p-InP either unmodified or modified by Co, Rh, Pt, Pb, Rh/Pt, or Co/Pt, the transient photopotential decay exhibited a two segment response. The fast initial decay was found dependent on the previous surface treatment of the p-InP electrode. The second slower decay, however, was found independent of previous surface treatments.

  13. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Resolving waterinflux and reservoir permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.; Keers, Henk

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for geophysical model assessment, in particuale thecomputation of model parameter resolution, indicate the value and thelimitations of time-lapse data in estimating reservoir flow properties. Atrajectory-based method for computing sensitivities provides an effectivemeans to compute model parameter resolutions. We examine the commonsituation in which water encroaches into a resrvoir from below, as due tothe upward movement of an oil-water contact. Using straight-forwardtechniques we find that, by inclusing reflections off the top and bottomof a reservoir tens of meters thick, we can infer reservoir permeabilitybased upon time-lapse data. We find that, for the caseof water influxfrom below, using multiple time-lapse 'snapshots' does not necessarilyimprove the resolution of reservoir permeability. An application totime-lapse data from the Norne field illustrates that we can resolve thepermeability near a producing well using reflections from threeinterfaces associated with the reservoir.

  14. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Knight, Rob [University of Colorado

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Rob Knight of the University of Colorado gives a presentation on "Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  15. Site-resolved Imaging of Fermionic Lithium-6 in an Optical Lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, Maxwell F; Mazurenko, Anton; Chiu, Christie S; Setiawan, Widagdo; Wooley-Brown, Katherine; Blatt, Sebastian; Greiner, Markus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate site-resolved imaging of individual fermionic lithium-6 atoms in a 2D optical lattice. To preserve the density distribution during fluorescence imaging, we simultaneously cool the atoms with 3D Raman sideband cooling. This laser cooling technique, demonstrated here for the first time for lithium-6 atoms, also provides a pathway to rapid low-entropy filling of an optical lattice. We are able to determine the occupation of individual lattice sites with a fidelity >95%, enabling direct, local measurement of particle correlations in Fermi lattice systems. This ability will be instrumental for creating and investigating low-temperature phases of the Fermi-Hubbard model, including antiferromagnets and d-wave superfluidity.

  16. Comparison of spatially resolved carrier lifetimes in mc-Si with solar cell and material characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glunz, S.W.; Hebling, C.; Warta, W.; Wettling, W. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Solare Energiesysteme, Freiburg (Germany)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors introduce a novel application of modulated free carrier absorption (MFCA) for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in multicrystalline silicon with high spatial resolution. The improved lateral resolution compared to other contactless techniques allows the correlation between these lifetime maps and solar cell characteristics as well as microscopic properties, like dislocations, precipitates, oxygen concentration, etc. Comparisons of the lifetime maps measured on the starting material and light beam induced current (LBIC) maps exhibit a very good qualitative correlation of the structures observed in both cases. In addition, correlations to microscopic characteristics like high dislocation density in regions with low lifetimes are investigated and a comparison with spatially resolved FT-IR measurements of the interstitial oxygen concentration is performed.

  17. Phase-resolved optical emission of dusty rf discharges: Experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melzer, Andre; Huebner, Simon; Lewerentz, Lars; Schneider, Ralf [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universiaet, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Matyash, Konstantin [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Ikkurthi, Ramana [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Ghandinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral emission of atoms in a dusty radio frequence (rf) discharge plasma in argon and helium has been measured with a gated ICCD camera. The spatially and temporally resolved emission/excitation of the argon and helium atoms during the rf cycle in the dusty discharge was compared to the dust-free case. In the bulk plasma above the dust cloud, the emission is clearly enhanced in the dusty discharge with respect to the pure discharge, whereas in the sheath the emission is reduced. In addition, the emission of a dusty argon plasma is studied via particle-particle particle-mesh (P{sup 3}M) simulations. The rf dynamics with a single dust particle trapped in the sheath was calculated. Like in the experiment the dust modifies the atomic emission. The spatiotemporal excitation pattern of the experiment is reproduced and a detailed understanding of the difference in excitation of the discharge with and without dust is presented.

  18. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Feng [Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei, E-mail: weicai@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Duan, Qianqian [College of Information Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, Zhiguo, E-mail: zhangzhiguo@hit.edu.cn [Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Laboratory of Sono- and Photo-Theranostic Technologies, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Cao, Wenwu, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu [Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Laboratory of Sono- and Photo-Theranostic Technologies, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 ?s. CW Nd{sup 3+} lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho{sup 3+} was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb{sup 3+} to Yb{sup 3+} was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar{sup +} laser, Kr{sup +} laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc.

  19. Time-, frequency-, and wavevector-resolved x-ray diffraction from single molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, Kochise, E-mail: kcbennet@uci.edu; Biggs, Jason D.; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul, E-mail: smukamel@uci.edu [University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broadband X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and proteins.

  20. Temperature Profiles and the Effect of AGN on Submillimeter Emission from BLAST Observations of Resolved Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiebe, Donald V; Bock, James J; Chapin, Edward L; Devlin, Mark J; Dicker, Simon; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C; Hughes, David H; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Martin, Peter G; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin B; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S; Viero, Marco P

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of two flights, the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) made resolved maps of seven nearby (BLAST05), BLAST observed a single nearby galaxy, NGC 4565. During the December 2006 flight from Antarctica (BLAST06), BLAST observed the nearby galaxies NGC 1097, NGC 1291, NGC 1365, NGC 1512, NGC 1566, and NGC 1808. We fit physical dust models to a combination of BLAST observations and other available data for the the galaxies with Spitzer data. We fit a modified blackbody to the remaining galaxies to obtain total dust mass and mean dust temperature. For the four galaxies with Spitzer data, we also produce maps and radial profiles of dust column density and temperature. We measure the fraction of BLAST detected flux originating from the central cores of these galaxies and use this to calculate a "core fraction", an upper limit on the "AGN fraction" of submillimeter detected galaxies. Fin...