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1

Africa gaining importance in world LPG trade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Major LPG projects planned or under way in Africa will increase the importance of that region`s presence in world LPG trade. Supplies will nearly double between 1995 and 2005, at which time they will remain steady for at least 10 years. At the same time that exports are leveling, however, increasing domestic demand for PG is likely to reduce export-market participation by Algeria, Nigeria, Egypt, and Libya. The growth of Africa`s participation in world LPG supply is reflected in comparisons for the next 15--20 years. Total world supply of LPG in 1995 was about 165 million metric tons (tonnes), of which Africans share was 7.8 million tonnes. By 2000, world supply will grow to slightly more than 200 million tonnes, with Africa`s share expected to increase to 13.2 million tonnes (6.6%). And by 2005, world LPG supply will reach nearly 230 million tonnes; Africa`s overall supply volumes by that year will be nearly 16.2 million tonnes (7%). World LPG supply for export in 1995 was on order of 44 million tonnes with Africa supply about 4 million tonnes (9%). By 2005, world export volumes of LPG will reach nearly 70 million tonnes; Africa`s share will have grown by nearly 10 million tonnes (14.3%).

Haun, R.R. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Dallas, TX (United States); Otto, K.W.; Whitley, S.C. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

2

LPG Electrical, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 ThrottledInformationparticipants < LEDSGP‎Hoying, LLC Jump to:LPG

3

2000-32 V'B SAFETY PROVISIONS AND LPG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a single site). Four operators account for 54 of these sites ; chemical firms and refineries operate 15 Author manuscript, published in "15. Hazards Symposium "The Process its Safety and the Environment UTILISING LPG The French sites utilising LPG can be subdivided into 7 main categories : · Refineries

Boyer, Edmond

4

Assessment of research and development (R and D) needs in LPG safety and environmental control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report characterizes the LPG industry covering all operations from production to end use, reviews current knowledge of LPG release phenomenology, summarizes the status of current LPG release prevention and control methodology, and identifies any remaining safety and environmental problems and recommends R and D strategies that may mitigate these problems. (ACR)

DeSteese, J.G.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To secure a stable supply of petroleum gas, underground storage caverns for liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are commonly used in many countries worldwide. Storing LPG in underground caverns requires that the surrounding rock mass remain saturated with groundwater and that the water pressure be higher than the liquid pressure inside the cavern. In previous studies, gas containment criteria for underground gas storage based on hydraulic gradient and pressure have been discussed, but these studies do not consider the physicochemical characteristics and behavior of LPG such as vaporization and dissolution in groundwater. Therefore, while these studies are very useful for designing storage caverns, they do not provide better understanding of the either the environmental effects of gas contamination or the behavior of vaporized LPG. In this study, we have performed three-phase fluid flow simulations of gas leakage from underground LPG storage caverns, using the multiphase multicomponent nonisothermal simulator TMVOC (Pruess and Battistelli, 2002), which is capable of solving the three-phase nonisothermal flow of water, gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. A two-dimensional cross-sectional model resembling an actual underground LPG facility in Japan was developed, and gas leakage phenomena were simulated for three different permeability models: (1) a homogeneous model, (2) a single-fault model, and (3) a heterogeneous model. In addition, the behavior of stored LPG was studied for the special case of a water curtain suddenly losing its function because of operational problems, or because of long-term effects such as clogging of boreholes. The results of the study indicate the following: (1) The water curtain system is a very powerful means for preventing gas leakage from underground storage facilities. By operating with appropriate pressure and layout, gas containment can be ensured. (2) However , in highly heterogeneous media such as fractured rock and fault zones, local flow paths within which the gas containment criterion is not satisfied could be formed. To eliminate such zones, treatments such as pre/post grouting or an additional installment of water-curtain boreholes are essential. (3) Along highly conductive features such as faults, even partially saturated zones possess certain effects that can retard or prevent gas leakage, while a fully unsaturated fault connected to the storage cavern can quickly cause a gas blowout. This possibility strongly suggests that ensuring water saturation of the rock surrounding the cavern is a very important requirement. (4) Even if an accident should suddenly impair the water curtain, the gas plume does not quickly penetrate the ground surface. In these simulations, the plume takes several months to reach the ground surface.

Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Carbon footprints of heating oil and LPG heating systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For European homes without access to the natural gas grid, the main fuels-of-choice for heating are heating oil and LPG. How do the carbon footprints of these compare? Existing literature does not clearly answer this, so the current study was undertaken to fill this gap. Footprints were estimated in seven countries that are representative of the EU and constitute two-thirds of the EU-27 population: Belgium, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Poland and the UK. Novelties of the assessment were: systems were defined using the EcoBoiler model; well-to-tank data were updated according to most-recent research; and combustion emission factors were used that were derived from a survey conducted for this study. The key finding is that new residential heating systems fuelled by LPG are 20% lower carbon and 15% lower overall-environmental-impact than those fuelled by heating oil. An unexpected finding was that an LPG system's environmental impact is about the same as that of a bio heating oil system fuelled by 100% rapeseed methyl ester, Europe's predominant biofuel. Moreover, a 20/80 blend (by energy content) with conventional heating oil, a bio-heating-oil system generates a footprint about 15% higher than an LPG system's. The final finding is that fuel switching can pay off in carbon terms. If a new LPG heating system replaces an ageing oil-fired one for the final five years of its service life, the carbon footprint of the system's final five years is reduced by more than 50%.

Johnson, Eric P., E-mail: ejohnson@ecosite.co.uk

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Fuel switching from wood to LPG can benefit the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Himalaya in India is one of the world's biodiversity hotspots. Various scientific studies have reported and proven that many factors are responsible for the tremendous decline of the Himalayan forests. Extraction of wood biomass from the forests for fuel is one of the factors, as rural households rely entirely on this for their domestic energy. Efforts continue for both conservation and development of the Himalayan forests and landscape. It has been reported that people are still looking for more viable solutions that could help them to improve their lifestyle as well as facilitate ecosystem conservation and preservation of existing biodiversity. In this direction, we have documented the potential of the introduction of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), which is one of the solutions that have been offered to the local people as a substitute for woodfuel to help meet their domestic energy demand. The results of the current study found dramatic change in per capita woodfuel consumption in the last two decades in the villages where people are using LPG. The outcome showed that woodfuel consumption had been about 475 kg per capita per year in the region, but after introduction of LPG, this was reduced to 285 kg per capita per year in 1990-1995, and was further reduced to 46 kg per capita per year in 2000-2005. Besides improving the living conditions of the local people, this transformation has had great environmental consequences. Empirical evidence shows that this new paradigm shift is having positive external effects on the surrounding forests. Consequently, we have observed a high density of tree saplings and seedlings in adjacent forests, which serves as an assessment indicator of forest health. With the help of the current study, we propose that when thinking about a top-down approach to conservation, better solutions, which are often ignored, should be offered to local people.

Nautiyal, Sunil [Leibniz-Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Institute of Socioeconomics, Eberswalder Str. 84, 15374 Muencheberg (Germany)], E-mail: sunil.nautiyal@zalf.de; Kaechele, Harald [Leibniz-Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Institute of Socioeconomics, Eberswalder Str. 84, 15374 Muencheberg (Germany)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Evaluation of aftermarket LPG conversion kits in light-duty vehicle applications. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SwRI was contracted by NREL to evaluate three LPG conversion kits on a Chevrolet Lumina. The objective of the project was to measure the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions and fuel economy of these kits, and compare their performance to gasoline-fueled operation and to each other. Varying LPG fuel blends allowed a preliminary look at the potential for fuel system disturbance. The project required kit installation and adjustment according to manufacturer`s instructions. A limited amount of trouble diagnosis was also performed on the fuel systems. A simultaneous contract from the Texas Railroad Commission, in cooperation with NREL, provided funds for additional testing with market fuels (HD5 propane and industry average gasoline) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions speciation to determine the ozone-forming potential of LPG HC emissions. This report documents the procurement, installation, and testing of these LPG conversion kits.

Bass, E.A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (US)] [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

An analysis of weep holes as a product detection device for underground compensated LPG storage systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Weep holes have been used widely to detect the presence of Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG) in brine for underground compensated storage systems. When the brine level drops below the weep hole, LPG product enters the brine production system causing an increase in both tubing head pressure and flow rate. To prevent cavern overfill, a cavern shutdown is initiated upon detection of LPG in the surface brine system by pressure or flow instruments at the tubing head. In this study, we have investigated the multiphase flow characteristics of weep hole LPG detection systems to correctly estimate the operating limits. A simple and easy to use model has been developed to predict the tubing head pressure and flow rate increases. The model can be used to implement safer and more efficient operation procedures for underground compensated LPG storage systems. The model predictions for a typical field case are presented. An analysis of weep holes as product detection devices for LPG storage reservoirs has been carried out. It was found that the increases in pressure and flow rates at the tubing head change as a function of injection flow rate of the product. Therefore, a thorough consideration of cavern operating parameters is necessary to evaluate the use constant pressure and flow rate values to initiate emergency shut down of the cavern.

Sarica, C.; Demir, H.M.; Brill, J.P.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

LIQUID PROPANE GAS (LPG) STORAGE AREA BOILING LIQUID EXPANDING VAPOR EXPLOSION (BLEVE) ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PHA and the FHAs for the SWOC MDSA (HNF-14741) identified multiple accident scenarios in which vehicles powered by flammable gases (e.g., propane), or combustible or flammable liquids (e.g., gasoline, LPG) are involved in accidents that result in an unconfined vapor cloud explosion (UVCE) or in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), respectively. These accident scenarios are binned in the Bridge document as FIR-9 scenarios. They are postulated to occur in any of the MDSA facilities. The LPG storage area will be in the southeast corner of CWC that is relatively remote from store distaged MAR. The location is approximately 30 feet south of MO-289 and 250 feet east of 2401-W by CWC Gate 10 in a large staging area for unused pallets and equipment.

PACE, M.E.

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

11

Converting LPG caverns to natural-gas storage permits fast response to market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deregulation of Canada`s natural-gas industry in the late 1980s led to a very competitive North American natural-gas storage market. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., began looking for method for developing cost-effective storage while at the same time responding to new market-development opportunities and incentives. Conversion of existing LPG-storage salt caverns to natural-gas storage is one method of providing new storage. To supply SaskEnergy Inc., the province`s local distribution company, and Saskatchewan customers, TransGas previously had developed solution-mined salt storage caverns from start to finish. Two Regina North case histories illustrate TransGas` experiences with conversion of LPG salt caverns to gas storage. This paper provides the testing procedures for the various caverns, cross-sectional diagrams of each cavern, and outlines for cavern conversion. It also lists storage capacities of these caverns.

Crossley, N.G. [TransGas Ltd., Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

1996-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

12

Pressurized release of liquefied fuel gases (LNG and LPG). Topical report, May 1993-February 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an important contribution to the behavior of pressurized liquefied gases when accidentally released into the atmosphere. LNG vehicle fueling stations and LPG storage facilities operate at elevated pressures. Accidental releases could result in rainout and the formation of an aerosol in the vapor cloud. These factors must be considered when estimating the extent of the hazard zone of the vapor cloud using a heavier-than-air gas dispersion model such as DEGADIS (or its Windows equivalent DEGATEC). The DOS program PREL has been incorporated in the Windows program LFGRISK.

Atallah, S.; Janardhan, A.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Investigation on effects of surface morphologies on response of LPG sensor based on nanostructured copper ferrite system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Figure shows the variations in resistance with time for copper ferrite system synthesized in various molar ratio. A maximum variation in resistance was observed for copper ferrite prepared in 1:1 molar ratio. Highlights: ? Evaluation of structural, optical and surface morphologies. ? Significant variation in LPG sensing properties. ? Surface modification of ferric oxide pellet by copper ferrite. ? CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} pellets for LPG sensing at room temperature. -- Abstract: Synthesis of a copper ferrite system (CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) via chemical co-precipitation method is characterized by X-ray diffraction, surface morphology (scanning electron microscope) and optical absorption spectroscopy. These characteristics show their dependence on the relative compositions of the two subsystems. They are further confirmed by the variation in the band gap. A study of gas sensing properties shows the spinel CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} synthesized in 1:1 molar ratio exhibit best response to LPG adsorption/resistance measurement. Thus resistance based LPG sensor is found robust, cheap and may be applied for kitchens and industrial applications.

Singh, Satyendra [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India)] [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India); Yadav, B.C., E-mail: balchandra_yadav@rediffmail.com [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India); Department of Applied Physics, School for Physical Sciences, Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University, Lucknow 226025, U.P. (India); Gupta, V.D. [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India)] [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India); Dwivedi, Prabhat K. [DST Unit on Nanosciences, Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, U.P. (India)] [DST Unit on Nanosciences, Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, U.P. (India)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Testimony on Impacts of Proposed LPG Tank Development in Searsport, Maine on Property Values and Tourism-based Economic Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testimony on Impacts of Proposed LPG Tank Development in Searsport, Maine on Property Values and Tourism-based Economic Activity Prepared for Thanks But No Tank (TBNT) for Presentation to the Searsport At the request of Counsel for Thanks But No Tanks (TBNT) and the Islesboro Island Trust (IIT), I have reviewed

Thomas, Andrew

15

The San Jose Scale.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for controlling the scale. The most important spray mixtures in use are lime-sulphur salt, lime-sulphur, whale oil soap, kero? sene, crude petroleum, Kero-water, and kerosene or crude oil emulsions. All these preparations are mainly winter sprays, being applied... applied while cold, however, it clogs the apparatus and causes considerable inconven? ience in getting it on the tree. It is more expensive than the Lime- Sulphur wash. i I o . B I 3 I 2 In some States coal oil or kerosene has been experimented...

Conradi, Albert F.

1906-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

LPG recovery from refinery flare by waste heat powered absorption refrigeration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A waste heat powered ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit (ARU) has commenced operation at the Colorado Refining Company in Commerce City, Colorado. The ARU provides 85 tons of refrigeration at 30 F to refrigerate the net gas/treat gas stream, thereby recovering 65,000 barrels per year of LPG which formerly was flared or burned as fuel. The ARU is powered by the 290 F waste heat content of the reform reactor effluent. An additional 180 tons of refrigeration is available at the ARU to debottleneck the FCC plant wet gas compressors by cooling their inlet vapor. The ARU is directly integrated into the refinery processes, and uses enhanced, highly compact heat and mass exchange components. The refinery's investment will pay back in less than two years from increased recovery of salable product, and CO{sub 2} emissions are decreased by 10,000 tons per year in the Denver area.

Erickson, D.C.; Kelly, F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

Patinkin, L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

E-Print Network 3.0 - acutifolia delile sene Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

'Pendulifolia' Weeping Willow 2 T10 2009071 Scutellaria resinosa 'Smoky Hills' 'Smoky Hills Source: O'Laughlin, Jay - Department of Forest Resources, University of Idaho...

19

Aerosol Releases from the ICPP July 2005 FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. 102 Donner Drive Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 Authors: Robert P. Wichner, SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. John-Paul Renier, SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. A. Iulian Apostoaei, SENES Oak Ridge

20

TEXAS LPG FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT Full-Text - Submission contains both citation data and full-text of the journal article. Full-text can be either a pre-print or post-print, but not the copyrighted article.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Conservation Office has executed its first Fuel Cell Project which was awarded under a Department of Energy competitive grant process. The Texas LPG Fuel Processor Development and Fuel Cell Demonstration Program is a broad-based public/private partnership led by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO). Partners include the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division (AFRED) of the Railroad Commission of Texas; Plug Power, Inc., Latham, NY, UOP/HyRadix, Des Plaines, IL; Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), San Antonio, TX; the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), and the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). The team proposes to mount a development and demonstration program to field-test and evaluate markets for HyRadix?s LPG fuel processor system integrated into Plug Power?s residential-scale GenSys? 5C (5 kW) PEM fuel cell system in a variety of building types and conditions of service. The program?s primary goal is to develop, test, and install a prototype propane-fueled residential fuel cell power system supplied by Plug Power and HyRadix in Texas. The propane industry is currently funding development of an optimized propane fuel processor by project partner UOP/HyRadix through its national checkoff program, the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC). Following integration and independent verification of performance by Southwest Research Institute, Plug Power and HyRadix will produce a production-ready prototype unit for use in a field demonstration. The demonstration unit produced during this task will be delivered and installed at the Texas Department of Transportation?s TransGuide headquarters in San Antonio, Texas. Simultaneously, the team will undertake a market study aimed at identifying and quantifying early-entry customers, technical and regulatory requirements, and other challenges and opportunities that need to be addressed in planning commercialization of the units. For further information please contact Mary-Jo Rowan at mary-jo.rowan@cpa.state.tx.us

SOUTHWEST RESEARCH LABORATORY SUBMITTED BY SUBCONTRACTOR, RAILROAD COMMISSION OF TEXAS

2004-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kero sene lpg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model contains three propane storage caverns, 10 m wide and3.2.9. The loss of propane from storage is not significant,liquefied propane) was placed in the storage caverns, and

Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Application of Energy Saving Concepts to LPG Recovery Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inefficient compared to current standards. This paper deals with energy savings that may be effected for one such plant. Three basic ideas are evaluated:- o Use of Multi-Component Chilling (MCC). o Addition of an Expander. o Heat Recovery from Gas Turbine...

Carpenter, M. J.; Barnwell, J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Waste Heat Powered Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit for LPG Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An emerging DOE-sponsored technology has been deployed. The technology recovers light ends from a catalytic reformer plant using waste heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration. It is deployed at the 17,000 bpd Bloomfield, New Mexico refinery of Western Refining Company. The technology recovers approximately 50,000 barrels per year of liquefied petroleum gas that was formerly being flared. The elimination of the flare also reduces CO2 emissions by 17,000 tons per year, plus tons per year reductions in NOx, CO, and VOCs. The waste heat is supplied directly to the absorption unit from the Unifiner effluent. The added cooling of that stream relieves a bottleneck formerly present due to restricted availability of cooling water. The 350oF Unifiner effluent is cooled to 260oF. The catalytic reformer vent gas is directly chilled to minus 25oF, and the FCC column overhead reflux is chilled by 25oF glycol. Notwithstanding a substantial cost overrun and schedule slippage, this project can now be considered a success: it is both profitable and highly beneficial to the environment. The capabilities of directly-integrated waste-heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration and their benefits to the refining industry have been demonstrated.

Donald C, Energy Concepts Co.; Lauber, Eric, Western Refining Co.

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

Microsoft Word - 0615DOE-LPG-wd6.doc  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOE Tribal Leader ForumStatus ofStephenEnergy SectorMay

25

FINAL REPORT DOSES TO THE PUBLIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oak Ridge, Inc. 102 Donner Drive Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 Authors: A. Iulian Apostoaei / SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. Brian A. Thomas / SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. David C. Kocher / SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. F. Owen Hoffman / SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. July 2005 #12;Doses to the Public from Atmospheric

26

ATMOSPHERIC SOURCE TERMS FOR THE IDAHO CHEMICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Georgia 30335 SC&A, Inc. 6858 Old Dominion Drive, Suite 301 McLean, Virginia 22101 SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. 102 Donner Drive Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 Authors: Robert P. Wichner, SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. John-Paul Renier, SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. A. Iulian Apostoaei, SENES Oak Ridge, Inc. July

27

Public Health in East and Southeast Asia: Challenges and Opportunities in the Twenty-First Century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

major industries, waste incineration, and the combustion oftotal suspended PM) Waste incineration Sulfur dioxide (SO )industries; waste incineration; combustion of coal, kero-

Detels, Roger; Sullivan, Sheena G.; Tan, Chorh Chuan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The effect of asphalt deposition on permeability in miscible flooding with liquified petroleum gas (LPG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'teen milliliters of oil was mixed thoroughly with 85 milliliters of petroleum ether and centrifuged at 1750 rpm for 450 seconds. The results of the precipitation tests are shown in Table III. The petroleum ether used was 67. )fo N-Pentane and. $2. 7%%d Di.... 48 0. 114 21 ' 8 24. 7 36 ' 6 41. 4 39. 0 37. 7 37-3 ?Hawkins and Talco at 80'F, others at 74 F TABLE III PRECIPITATION BEHAVIOR OP OILS MIXED WITH PETROLEUM ETHER OILS Denton 75%%d Denton/25% "Heavy" 50% Denton/50%%d "Heavy" 25...

Pinson, Arthur Edward, Jr

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

An investigation of oil recovery by injection of CO? and LPG mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in light hydrocarbons, due to a selective extraction by the CO2 was believed to be responsible for the attractively high oil recoveries. Holm ' further re- ported additional oil recoveries of 6 to 15 per cent of the original oil in place by blowing down... the pressure in the reservoir. The blow down recovery was found to be a function of the oil left after flooding. Further work on CO2 flooding revealed that carbon 16 dioxide is not completely miscible with most reservoir oils at reservoir pressures...

Kumar, Naresh

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Factors affecting the recovery of petroleum in projects involving the injection of liquefied petroleum gases (LPG)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- and ? water saturated uncon- solidated sand packs ranging from l. 9 to 22, 8 feet in length. The different series were run at rates varying from 3 to 120 feet per day. A commercial butane - propane mixture and natural gas were used as the solvent... properties are listed in Table I. The cores were packed under water in a vertical position by applying continuous percussion blows along the entire length of the pipe as the sand was added. A filter of glass wool and a fine brass screen were used...

Graham, Gerry A

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fuel Displacement & Cost Potential of CNG, LNG, and LPG Vehicles |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy FrozenNovember 10, 2014EnergyNEAC

32

Table A58. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy Sources by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative FuelsTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History71.7 588.51 " " (Estimates in7.8.

33

ASE Certification for Light/Medium Duty CNG/LPG Training Programs  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DiggFederalNationalandElectric-driveMobile*Drivers of

34

amino acid insertion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

their distribution in known structures with experimental data such as amino acid transfer free energy scales (water to membrane center and water Senes, Alessandro 2 Amino Acid...

35

acid energy percentage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

their distribution in known structures with experimental data such as amino acid transfer free energy scales (water to membrane center and water Senes, Alessandro 8 Evaluation of...

36

E-Print Network 3.0 - av langtransporterte luftforurensninger...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

14: 234-244. Copenhagen 1991 Changes in forest soils and vegetation in Sene, southern Norway, Summary: . Overvlkning av langtransportert forurenset luft og nedbor (Monitoring of...

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - av langtransporterte forsuringer Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

14: 234-244. Copenhagen 1991 Changes in forest soils and vegetation in Sene, southern Norway, Summary: . Overvlkning av langtransportert forurenset luft og nedbor (Monitoring of...

38

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

per Day Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Residual Fuel Oil Figure 5. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Volumes Propane 7.1% Kero-jet 2.9% Residual Fuel Oil 2.1% Other...

39

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

per Day Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Residual Fuel Oil Figure 5. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Volumes Propane 7.3% Kero-jet 2.4% Residual Fuel Oil 1.3% Other...

40

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

per Day Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Residual Fuel Oil Figure 5. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Volumes Propane 6.7% Kero-jet 2.4% Residual Fuel Oil 1.8% Other...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kero sene lpg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A first-of-its-kind Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) was installed by Planetec Utility Services Co., Inc. in partnership with Energy Concepts Co. at Ultramar Diamond Shamrock's 30,000 barrel per day refinery in Denver...

Brant, B.; Brueske, S.; Erickson, D.; Papar, R.

42

Model curriculum outline for Alternatively Fueled Vehicle (AFV) automotive technician training in light and medium duty CNG and LPG  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This model curriculum outline was developed using a turbo-DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process which utilizes practicing experts to undertake a comprehensive job and task analysis. The job and task analysis serves to establish current baseline data accurately and to improve both the process and the product of the job through constant and continuous improvement of training. The DACUM process is based on the following assumptions: (1) Expert workers are the best source for task analysis. (2) Any occupation can be described effectively in terms of tasks. (3) All tasks imply knowledge, skills, and attitudes/values. A DACUM panel, comprised of six experienced and knowledgeable technicians who are presently working in the field, was given an orientation to the DACUM process. The panel then identified, verified, and sequenced all the necessary job duty areas and tasks. The broad duty categories were rated according to relative importance and assigned percentage ratings in priority order. The panel then rated every task for each of the duties on a scale of 1 to 3. A rating of 3 indicates an {open_quotes}essential{close_quotes} task, a rating of 2 indicates an {open_quotes}important{close_quotes} task, and a rating of 1 indicates a {open_quotes}desirable{close_quotes} task.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

"Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 103. Relative Standard Errors for Table N8.3;"0. Total

44

"Table A2. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 103. Relative Standard Errors for Table N8.3;"0. Total1.6.7..

45

Advancing New Mexico's Alternative Fuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

gas (CNG) and propane (LPG) station infrastructure * Lack of funding for incremental cost of CNG and LPG vehicles * Reluctance to purchase new technologies * Shortage of...

46

Subpart W Stakeholders Conference Call July 11, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Angelique Diaz Environmental Groups: Sharyn Cunningham, CCAT; Sarah Fields, Uranium Watch; Jennifer Thurston, INFORM Uranium Industry/Other: Oscar Paulson, Kennecott; Mike Griffin, Strata; Dawn Coleman, Uranerz; Josh Leftwich, Cameco; Katie Sweeney, National Mining Association; Darryl Liles, SENES UPDATE Reid

47

Ecole Doctorale IAEM Lorraine Etude de modles de transmission de la  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3. Abdou SENE, examinateur, Professeur université Gaston Berger 4. Bedr'Edine AINSEBA, rapporteur´erique et d'Informatique) parti- culi`erement Mamadou Abdoul Diop, Khalifa Bodian, Abdou S`ene et Mamadou Sy ferons l'effort d'^etre plus pr´esent d´esormais. Je n'oublie pas le Duo Di`ene Ngom- Abdou Guiro mais

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

48

The Bumpy Road to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gases (LPG) and compressed natural gas (CNG) have persistedbenefits from compressed natural gas, ethanol, methanol,

Sperling, Dan; Ogden, Joan M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Dating Carbonaceous Matter in Archean Cherts by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rocks. This is particularly the case for Archean siliceous sedimentary rocks (cherts), which record. As thermal treatments impact organic matter maturity, the effect of temperature on this syngeneity proxy samples (from Mars for example). Key Words: Kero- gen--Sedimentary rocks

50

http://jer.sagepub.com/ International Journal of Engine Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

single-cylinder research engine to spark-assisted HCCI An experimental investigation of the sensitivity and combustion properties of a single-cylinder research engine to spark-assisted HCCI B T Zigler1,2 , P E Keros1 ignition (HCCI) combustion may be a method to improve the operation of HCCI engines. In the current study

Wooldridge, Margaret S.

51

Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Prices Figure J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1996 Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes Kero-jet Propane No. 1 Distillate No....

52

Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Prices Figure J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1995 Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes Kero-jet Propane No. 1 Distillate No....

53

Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

4. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Prices Figure J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1997 Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes Kero-jet Propane No. 1 Distillate No....

54

Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a LPG storage cavern. The algorithm captures the complex behavior of the resulting flow. We, in modeling the leakage of gas from a LPG storage cavern, the density of the gaseous phase decreases rapidly

Bell, John B.

55

Development of a robot localization and environment mapping system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The intent of this research is to develop a robust, efficient, self-contained localization module for use in a robotic liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) tank inspection system. Inspecting large LPG tanks for defects is difficult, ...

Panas, Cynthia Dawn Walker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rural, k=Kerosene m=rural, k=biogas m =urban, k=LPG m=urban,k=LPG k=wood k=kerosene k=biogas k=electricity k=electricity

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Triangle Alternative Transportation Fuels First Responder Training Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fueling sites. Vehicles deployed include compressed natural gas (CNG), propane (LPG), hybrid electric: Natural Gas and Propane--Rich Cregar, Automotive Technology Expert What is a Gaseous Fuel? Propane (LPG

58

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHG fuels such as compressed natural gas, low-GHG ethanol,LPG) Methane Compressed natural gas (CNG) Ethanol production

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Documentation of Calculation Methodology, Input data, and Infrastructure for the Home Energy Saver Web Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Propane Gas (LPG) code) Fuel Oil Separate from heating Separate system Combined boiler, tankless Combined boiler, storage

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasoline Ethanol Electric Diesel CNG Gasoline HybridEthanol Diesel CNG Gasoline Hybrid LPG Electric Figure 23

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kero sene lpg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SOFC Technology R& D Needs Steven Shaffer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cell Market Opportunity US Stationary ­ APU & CHP Natural Gas, LPG European micro ­CHP & CHCP Natural

62

Advanced Engine Trends, Challenges and Opportunities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Petroleum (Conventional and Alternative Sources) Alternative Fuels (Ethanol, Biodiesel, CNG, LPG) Electricity (Conv. and Alternative Sources) Hydrogen Time ADVANCED...

63

Titania Prepared by Ball Milling: Its Characterization and Application as Liquefied Petroleum Gas Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Present paper reports the LPG sensing of TiO2 obtained through ball milling. The milled powder was characterized by XRD, TEM and UV-visible spectroscopy. Further the ball milled powder was compressed in to pellet using hydraulic press. This pellet was investigated with the exposure of LPG. Variations in resistance with exposure of LPG to the sensing pellet were recorded. The sensitivity of the sensor was ~ 11 for 5 vol.% of LPG. Response and recovery times of the sensor were ~ 100 and 250 sec. The sensor was quite sensitive to LPG and results were found reproducible within 91%.

Yadav, B C; Singh, Satyendra; Yadav, T P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

SOLAR DESALINATION John H. Lienhard,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 9 SOLAR DESALINATION John H. Lienhard,1, Mohamed A. Antar,2 Amy Bilton,1 Julian Blanco,3, Saudi Arabia 3 Plataforma Solar de Almeria, Carretera de Senes s/n, 04200 Tabernas (Almeria), Spain 4 supply infrastructure are inadequate, fossil energy costs may be high whereas solar energy is abundant

Lienhard V, John H.

65

Page 1 of 3 DRAFT Minutes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this rulemaking. Sarah ­ in Paradox valley we have a proposed uranium mill with a surface mining operation that in Subpart W should take into consideration the radon from uranium mines in the vicinity of the uranium mill (Strathmore) Sarah Fields (Uranium Watch) Steve Brown (SENES) Jan Johnson (Tetratech) Travis Stills, Energy

66

tel-00857686,version1-3Sep2013 tel-00857686,version1-3Sep2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'amiti´e, ainsi que le Pr Abdou Sene pour son soutien moral p´edagogique et logistique (covoiturage Dakar Kane, Abdou Mbodj, Youssou Ndao ("guedj"), Alpha Ba, Sow, Coumba Guedj Kane et les r´esidents du bloc 2

Boyer, Edmond

67

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biogas, LPG, ethanol, bio-diesel, DME, CH2/LH2 Gasoline,Gasoline, bio-fuel, H2, electricity Gasoline, diesel, CNG,

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cities, December 1994 6. Ex-Refinery Oil Products Prices,and residential sectors. Includes refinery gas, LPG, variousOil Field Petroleum Refinery Output Natural Gas Production

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel Oil Fuel Oil LPG Refinery Gas Other PetroleumPipelines. All still gas/refinery gas in China is reportedlubricants petroleum coke refinery feedstock still gas/

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity gas exchange Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Leading edge packaging High... Cell Market Opportunity US Stationary - APU & CHP Natural Gas, LPG ... Source: DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,...

71

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparative analysis of biodiesel and FT diesel. Energy and5.9 Schematic flow diagram for biodiesel production fromGas (LPG), ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, Dimethyl Ether (

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Shell Gas to Liquids in the context of a Future Fuel Strategy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* Bulky on-board storage * Shell companies assess locally whether to supply (eg. Argentina) LPG * Lower sulphur, PM, NOx and SOx * Overall emissions similar to CNG *...

73

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kW LBNL LPG Mcf MECS MMBtu Mt MTBE MVSTAFF MW Average Annualof ethanol, as opposed to MTBE, as a blending component of

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Series 50 propane-fueled Nova bus: Engine development, installation, and field trials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report describes a project to develop the Detroit Diesel series 50 liquefied propane gas (LPG) heavy-duty engine and to conduct demonstrations of LPG-fuelled buses at selected sites (Halifax Regional Municipality and three sites in the United States). The project included five main elements: Engine development and certification, chassis re-engineering and engine installation, field demonstration, LPG fuel testing, and LPG fuel variability testing. Lessons learned with regard to engine design and other issues are discussed, and recommendations are made for further development and testing.

Smith, B.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Fact #634: August 2, 2010 Off-highway Transportation-related...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

graph showing the 2008 off-highway transportation-related fuel consumption including gasoline, diesel, CNG, and LPG for the following areas: railroad maintenance; airport ground;...

76

DOE/EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oi, and LPG. Report the shell capacity (that is, the design capacity of the storage :: tanks) in the units of measure specified. Inclutte: ' jzir: ' > Onsite capacity of all...

77

X1/EIA-0512(88)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil, and LPG. Report the shell capacity that is, the design capacity of the storage tanks) in the units of measure specified. Include: * Onsite capacity of all storage...

78

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

other cleaner burning fuels (biogas or LPG) for cooking andstove with improved stove or biogas can be suggested, if thegaseous-burning-fuel stove (biogas, liquefied petroleum gas,

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning (Performance Analysis. Grossmann #12;2 Motivation · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies HF REFINERY FUEL RG LPG LN HN KN GO1 GO2 VGO VR1 VR2 C1 LPG LIGHT NAPHTHA PMS 98 MOGAS 95 JET FUEL

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

80

The upgrading of Fischer-Tropsch liquids over ZSM-5 using model compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Using the synthetic oxygenate mixture the selectivity of aromatics and LPG increasec with temperature at the expense of lower olerins and C5+ oils. The methane selectivity was very low. At a temperature of 573 K the aromatic yield was 5. s weight.... 1 percent LPG. The remainder was ethylene, propylene, and a small amount of 23 methane. The 1-butane however yielcea 30. 1 precent aromatics, 27. 3 percent oils ana 32. 3 percent LPG. The increase in aromatic yiela from 1-butene when compared...

Smith, David Duane

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kero sene lpg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fall in China's coal use and energy intensity after 1995 wasLPG is a major energy source, while coal and electricity arewas the dominance of coal in the energy structure. From 51%

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LPG is a major energy source, while coal and electricity areoil coal Figure 14 Residential Primary Energy Consumption bytotal primary energy supply in 2000, coal will drop to about

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LPG is a major energy source, while coal and electricity arethe total residential energy and coal is the dominant fuel.1 Residential Energy consumption by End-use Coal Renewables

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasoline. CNG is compressed natural gas. BTL is biomass-gasoline. CNG is compressed natural gas. BTL is biomass-Petroleum Gas (LPG) Compressed Natural Gas(CNG) Liquefied

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasoline. CNG is compressed natural gas. BTL is biomass-gasoline. CNG is compressed natural gas. BTL is biomass-Petroleum Gas (LPG) Compressed Natural Gas(CNG) Liquefied

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LPG Furnace Oil Furnace Electric Heat Pump Gas BoilerOil Boiler Electric Room Heater Gas Room Heater Wood Stove (Electric Heat Pump Gas Boiler Oil Boiler Electric Room Gas

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Journal of Catalysis 252 (2007) 4956 www.elsevier.com/locate/jcat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel in power generation, food preparation, and space * Corresponding author. E-mail address: iglesia as a replace- ment for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and diesel fuel in de- veloping countries [1,2]. Several

Iglesia, Enrique

88

New energy carriers in vehicles and their impact on confined infrastructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and LPG, but also CNG, Hydrogen, ethanol, DME and other bio-fuels, as well as batteries and fuel cells securityare analysed separately. Therefore, a combined risk analysis can contribute to find more cost

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

89

Kylteknik ("KYL")Kylteknik ("KYL") RefrigerationRefrigerationRefrigerationRefrigeration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Gas processing (O2, H2, CO2, LPG, LNG...) (3) Air conditioning, cooling towers, rg/pages/zon Air conditioning, cooling towers, food cooling and freezing (4) Heat pumps, heat pipes, special ww.sgisland.o p p

Zevenhoven, Ron

90

Petroleum Displacement Program Annual Report FY 2010-2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency 0.2% of displacement was lost through decreased use of CNG (natural gas) and LPG (propane..................................................................... 12 General Trends in FY10-11 PDP .............................................. 15 Fuel Pricing, Trends, and Cost Savings

91

Metallic Pressure Vessels Failures M. Mosnier, B. Daudonnet, J. Renard and G. Mavrothalassitis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to store or to transport gas or pressurized liquid (such as LPG or LNG), to dry, or as steam boiler... etc of thé vessel is usually achieved with thé help of handbooks, that sometimes overestimate effects

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

92

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drinking Water: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE).http://www.epa.gov/mtbe/water.htm (11/30/10), Chiu, Y. W. ;LCFS LCI LP LPG MED MRO MSF MTBE MWD MWDOC NAICS NERC NETL

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

C:\\...\\mailquestionnaire. [PFP#1121010499  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

FULL NAME OF BOTTLED GAS COMPANY BOTTLED GAS LOCATION OF COMPANY (IF KNOWN): STREET, CITY, STATE, AND ZIP CODE (LPG or Propane) ACCOUNT NUMBER (IF KNOWN) TELEPHONE NUMBER (IF...

94

Clean Fuel Advanced Technology Public Education Campaign: Billboards According to the U.S. Department of Energy's July 2013 alternative fuel price report, the price of propane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Department of Energy's July 2013 alternative fuel price report, the price of propane (LPG) in North Carolina at least $1,000 in yearly fuel costs by driving on natural gas or propane. · According to the U

95

GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning Department of Chemical · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies on the accuracy of the CDU REFINERY FUEL RG LPG LN HN KN GO1 GO2 VGO VR1 VR2 C1 LPG LIGHT NAPHTHA PMS 98 MOGAS 95 JET FUEL AGO HGO HFO

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

96

Resource Areas of Texas: Land.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prairie (Coastal ~~~(l), soils are less acid and some are calcareous. Main series: lrictoria, Orelia, Clareville. ~ight, acid sands and darker, loamy to clayey soils-some $;dine and sodic-lie in a narrow band along the coast. Main aeries: Harris...). Mai series: Truce, Waurika, Brown, moderately deep 11 shallow, calcareous, clay1 a1 oils are alg common. Main series: (: 1 to alk nts; somt Bonti. ey soils >wens. over sh Bottomlands-minor areas or brown to clam gray, loam1 1 Main senes 3...

Godfrey, Curtis L.; Carter, Clarence R.; McKee, Gordon S.

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Gas sensing properties of magnesium doped SnO{sub 2} thin films in relation to AC conduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conducting magnesium doped (0 to 1.5 wt %) tin oxide thin films prepared by Spray Pyrolysis technique achieved detection of 1000 ppm of LPG. The films deposited at 304 C exhibit an enhanced response at an operating temperature of 350 C. The microstructural properties are studied by means of X-ray diffraction. AC conductivity measurements are carried out using precision LCR meter to analyze the parameters that affect the variation in sensing. The results are correlated with compositional parameters and the subsequent modification in the charge transport mechanism facilitating an enhanced LPG sensing action.

Deepa, S.; Skariah, Benoy, E-mail: dr.boben1@gmail.com; Thomas, Boben, E-mail: dr.boben1@gmail.com [Research Centre in Physics, Mar Athanasius College, Kothamangalam P.O., Kerala 686 666 (India); Joseph, Anisha [Dept.of Physics, Holy Grace Academy of Engineering for Women, Mala, Kerala 683 102 (India)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

98

Life Cycle Inventory of CO2 in a EOR System Supporting Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/MJ) Combustion (g CO2e/MJ) Coal [1] 4.99 88 LPG-NGL [2, 3] 17.5 58.4 Pet-Coke [2, 3] 17.5 95.9 Other Pet Natural Gas (m3/bbl) 7.08 Coal (metric ton/bbl) 6.3-06 Electricity (kWh/bbl) 7.6 LPG (bbl/bbl) 4.8E-04-04 Petroleum Coke (bbl/bbl) 1.6E-02 Results Figure S1 shows the sources of these emissions

Jaramillo, Paulina

99

Storage opportunities in Arizona bedded evaporites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arizona is endowed with incredibly diverse natural beauty, and has also been blessed with at least seven discrete deposits of bedded salt. These deposits are dispersed around the state and cover some 2, 500 square miles; they currently contain 14 LPG storage caverns, with preliminary plans for more in the future. The areal extent and thickness of the deposits creates the opportunity for greatly expanded storage of LPG, natural gas, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). The location of salt deposits near Tucson and Phoenix may make CAES an attractive prospect in the future. The diversity of both locations and evaporate characteristics allows for much tailoring of individual operations to meet specific requirements.

Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rauzi, S.L. [Arizona Geological Survey, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

An investigation of the displacement of oil by a miscible slug followed by water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of this sand is represented in Table I. For the sake of uniformity in packing and the assurance of a water-wet matrix the sand was packed under water with continuous percussion blows applied along the lengths of the cores. By knowing the core... (46' SPI) commercial grade hav4ng a viscosity of i. 27 cp. at a temperature of 78'F. The water was ordinary tap ~ster. The LPG was a 60-40 mixture of butane and propane having a vapor pressure of 83 psi. The LPG was contained in a five gallon...

Startzman, Richard Albert

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kero sene lpg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-513-7831 | www.cleantransportation.org 9/17/12 Advancing Clean Energy for a Sustainable Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.cleantransportation.org 9/17/12 Advancing Clean Energy for a Sustainable Economy Clean Transportation | Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-513-7831 | www.cleantransportation.org Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) 2010-2012: Iredell County Sheriff Propane (LPG) Vehicle Summary Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) Project 2006

102

North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-513-7831 | www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu 9/17/12 Advancing Clean Energy for a Sustainable Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.nccleantech.ncsu.edu 9/17/12 Advancing Clean Energy for a Sustainable Economy Clean Transportation | www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) 2010-2012: Iredell County Sheriff Propane (LPG) Vehicle Summary Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) Project 2006-2012: Administered by the NC Solar Center at NC State

103

Clean Transportation | Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-513-7831 | www.cleantransportation.org North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-513-7831 | www.cleantransportation.org 9/17/12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in an liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) sub-award with the Iredell Advancing Clean Energy for a Sustainable EconomyClean Transportation | Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-513-7831 | www.cleantransportation.org 9/17/12 Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) Project 2006-20012: Administered by the NC Solar

104

NORTH CAROLINA 2013-2014 CLEAN TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY DIRECTORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Propane (CNG/LPG) Heavy Duty Vehicles Diesel Retrofit Technologies Idle Reduction Technologies Motor Spark EV Fiat 500e Ford Focus Electric Honda Fit EV Nissan LEAF Tesla Model S Smart Fortwo Electric Drive Toyota RAV4 EV Via Motors VTRUX Note: some models are currently only available in certain markets

105

Htfiffi m'* Effects of Alternative Fuels on Vehicle Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: gasoline, gasoline-ethanol l'rlends, diesel, biodiesel blends, LPG lquefied petroleurn gas) ancl CNG operating on gasoline arrd a similar non-FF\\-. llir:s rs a in-al ethanol composition blend requires vehicle in the atmosphere. For many r.ears, the primary vehicie fuels used have been gasoline and diesel fuels. These iuels

106

Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Others Share Source: Murthy, 2007 3.3.3 Energy data The productionthe World Bank. 4.2.2 Industrial Production Intensity EnergyEnergy) Production Of crude steel Mt SEC GJ/t cs Coal Elect FO LPG Gas SEC World

Sathaye, Jayant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Jeudi 3 octobre 2013 Renewable energies in the service of humanity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biofuels : BioTFuel #12;Laboratoire Physiologie et Biotechnologie des AlguesJean-Paul CADORET Microalgaes,3% 3,1% 39,2% 55,1% 1,3% Gasoline Diesel Biofuel LPG VNG #12;Mt Biofuels : worldwide consumption and CO2 balance CO2 balance of 1st generation biofuels ? Change in land use ? 2nd generation #12;Lignin

Canet, Lonie

108

Ris Energy Report 3 Safety issues of hydrogen as an energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(liquefied petroleum gas) and natural gas. Hydrogen's lower flammability limit in air is higher than with hydrogen, as there have been with other hazardous materials including gasoline, LPG and natural gas and as hydrides ­ all technologies that are likely to be required in a hydrogen economy. Most importantly

109

State Laboratory Program -Calibration Scope Summary Certificate Date Comments Mass I Mass II Mass III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 3000 lb 500 gal to 1 gal 500 gal to 20 gal LPG Corn 21 % to 14 % Wheat 18 % to 13 % Soy Bean 17 % to 12 gal Los Angeles County 2014 10 kg to 100 g 5000 lb to 1 lb 8 oz to 4 oz 5 gal to 1 gal Louisiana 2014

110

6th International Symposium on Multiphase Flow, Heat Mass Transfer and Energy Conversion Xi'an, China, 11-15 July 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a variety of sources including fossil fuels (coal, natural gas, LPG, gasoline, diesel, methane in the process. Use of natural gas or naphtha as a raw material is an industrial process. Typical reactions'an, China, 11-15 July 2009 Paper No. RE-10 - 1 - Producing Hydrogen from Ethanol in a Microfuel Processor

Khandekar, Sameer

111

Dimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be made from any carbonaceous feedstock, including natural gas, coal, or biomass, using establishedDimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China Eric D. Larson Princeton gas (LPG) as a household cooking fuel. As such, DME is an attractive fuel for clean cooking. DME can

112

DOE Fuel Cell Subprogram Nancy Garland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen fuel cell power system at a cost of $45/kW with 5000 hours of durability (80°C); by 2015, a cost a distributed generation PEM fuel cell system operating on natural gas or LPG that achieves 40% electricalDOE Fuel Cell Subprogram Nancy Garland Acting Fuel Cell Team Leader Pre-Solicitation Meeting Golden

113

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide from transit buses and heavy-duty vehicles when they are tested on simulated · CO2, CO, HC, NOx, and particulates · Fuels: Diesel, gasoline, CNG, propane, LNG, LPG, ethanol · 30-ton axle capacity · 80 mph speed · Simulated road load curve · Test cycle simulation with driver

Lee, Dongwon

114

Liquid Resin Infusion process monitoring with superimposed Fibre Bragg Grating sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Liquid Resin Infusion process monitoring with superimposed Fibre Bragg Grating sensor Emmanuel Resin Infusion (LRI) , with the FBG/LPG sensor embedded in a composite part. Dielectric analysis the material and the structure. Among the various composite manufacturing processes, Liquid Resin Infusion (LRI

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

115

Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/09)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

placed into service to keep the threads clean. Storage in a well ventilated area above ground of this SOP is to provide safe practices for use and storage of portable LPG cylinders. This SOP is based on NFPA requirements, as administered by the State Fire Marshal's Office. Storage Requirements Inside

Farritor, Shane

116

North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-515-3480 | www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu | 7/29/13 Advancing Clean Energy for a Sustainable Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.cleantransportation.org PROPANE A clean choice for your vehicle Propane, or Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), is a simple hydrocarbon grade of propane for automotive use is known as HD-5 in North America and is also called Autogas cleaner than gasoline. Reduced Costs- Engines running on HD- 5 propane often require less engine

117

Petroleum: An energy profile, 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report prepared by the Energy Information Administration covers the following topics: petroleum production and end-use sectors; resources and reserves; exploration and production; LPG sources and processing; motor gasoline octane enhancement; constructing pipelines; the strategic petroleum reserve; imports and exports; marketing; district descriptions and maps; and refinery processes and facilities. 33 figs., 7 tabs.

NONE

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Published: April 28, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 629 dx.doi.org/10.1021/cs200092c |ACS Catal. 2011, 1, 629635  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catal. 2011, 1, 629­635 RESEARCH ARTICLE pubs.acs.org/acscatalysis Propane Oxidation over Pt/SrTiO3 compared to gasoline, pro- vided the vehicle is retrofitted for LPG use.1,2 However, tailpipe emissionsfrom catalysts in an effort to reduce tailpipe HC emissions. The study focuses on propane oxida- tion since

Marks, Laurence D.

119

Rutgers Fire Safety Precautions December 11, 2001 1.1 KETTLE/TANKER FIRE SAFETY PRECAUTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tance away from any structure or combustible material. G. Where liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) cylinders heating apparatus is used, it should be kept in constant motion while operating. To prevent smoldering contact with the flame of the torch. Small torches should be used to heat the underside of the membrane

120

Worldwide construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tables list major construction projects for refineries, petrochemical plants, sulfur plants, natural gas processing plants, and gas and oil pipelines. Data are compiled by country, company name, project type, added capacity, status of the project, expected completion date, contractor and contract type. Gas processes include LPG recovery, cryogenic separation, turboexpanders, LNG, liquefaction, desulfurization, NGL recovery, dehydration, hydrogen plants, and fractionators.

Radler, M.

1998-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kero sene lpg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Beechenhurst visitor centre A new environmentally-friendly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiently. The rest of the building has under floor heating which runs on LPG. Solar Four solar thermal, is the sole source of heating for the shop. It operates using clean-burn technology which produces heat more panels mounted on the roof provide hot water to the hand basins in the toilets and kitchen. Water

122

Safe Use of Flammable and Explosive Substances: A Guide to DSEAR in the University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

common organic solvents o Benzoyl peroxide o Ammonia gas o Oxygen gas o Petrol o Varnishes o LPG o Methyl of waste dusts in woodworking shops; · Handling and storage of flammable wastes including fuel oils; · Hot work on tanks or drums that have contained flammable material; · Work activities that could release

Glasgow, University of

123

Self-traveling robotic system for autonomous abrasive blast cleaning in double-hulled structures of ships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oil tankers carrying crude oil, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), lead, vessels such as very large crude oil carriers (VLCCs), bulk carriers (B/C), and liquefied natural gas after midnight on March 24, 1989, the 987-foot tank vessel Exxon Valdez, of the Exxon shipping company

Kim, Jongwon

124

Alternative Fuel Tool Kit How to Implement: Propane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, colorless gas that is a byproduct of natural gas production and crude oil refining. Propane autogas What is Liquefied Petroleum Gas? Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is commonly referred to as propane energy storage, propane is stored as a liquid in a pressurized tank onboard the vehicle, typically at 100

125

Water Heating Requirements Overview Page 5-1 5 Water Heating Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

units with tank volumes of 40 to 50 gallons. Standby loss associated with the center flue gas storage energy use. Whereas natural gas, (liquefied petroleum gas), LPG or oil can be burned directly to heat code from 2008 are listed below: Instantaneous (or tankless) water heaters including gas, oil, small

126

Underground caverns for hydrocarbon storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large, international gas processing projects and growing LPG imports in developing countries are driving the need to store large quantities of hydrocarbon liquids. Even though underground storage is common in the US, many people outside the domestic industry are not familiar with the technology and the benefits underground storage can offer. The latter include lower construction and operating costs than surface storage, added safety, security and greater environmental acceptance.

Barron, T.F. [Exeter Energy Services, Houston, TX (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

The effect of the volume of liquid injected on recovery in solvent slug flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effect of slug size on oil recovered. A series of verti. cal displacements was performed on a kerosene- and-water saturated core 10 feet in length, using butane as the solvent and methane as the inert dksplacing medium. Breakthrough recovery was fo... storage problem, it mrght be ea, sily possible to solve two difficultres 11 simultaneously, as suggested by Kennedy. The LPG is easily recovered following the displacement by the srmple expedient of blowing down the reservoir, Much interest has...

Bowman, Charles Hay

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Cummins Engine Company B5.9 Propane Engine Development, Certification, and Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to successfuly develop and certify an LPG-dedicated medium-duty original equipment manufacturer (OEM) engine that could be put into production. The engine was launched into production in 1994, and more than 800 B5.9G engines are now in service in the United States and abroad. This engine is now offered by more than 30 bus and truck OEMs.

The ADEPT Group, Inc. (Los Angeles, California)

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

129

Associations of health, physical activity and weight status with motorised travel and transport carbon dioxide emissions: a cross-sectional, observational study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(petrol ICE, diesel ICE, LPG ICE, petrol HEV), engine size (2 litres) and vehicle age. The most used vehicle reported by the participants was taken as the reference vehicle for the emissions analysis. Where one or more... fleet average of petrol and diesel car emissions factors. Multiplying total distance travelled by these speed-emissions factors gave us an estimate of the total hot emissions for each vehicle when the engine was warmed up. As a final adjustment...

Goodman, Anna; Brand, Christian; Ogilvie, David; on behalf of the iConnect consortium

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

130

Efficient gas sensitivity in mixed bismuth ferrite micro (cubes) and nano (plates) structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Micro (cubes) structure embedded in nano (plates) of bismuth ferrite was prepared by a chemical method. ? These structures were characterized by XRD and SEM. ? LPG, CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 4} gases were exposed. ? Properties related to gas sensors were measured and reported. -- Abstract: Mixed micro (cubes) and nano (plates) structures of bismuth ferrite (BFO) have been synthesized by a simple and cost-effective wet-chemical method. Structural, morphological and phase confirmation characteristics are measured using X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis techniques. The digital FE-SEM photo-images of BFO sample confirmed an incubation of discrete micro-cubes into thin and regularly placed large number of nano-plates. The bismuth ferrite, with mixed structures, films show considerable performance when used in liquefied petroleum (LPG), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and ammonium (NH{sub 3}) gas sensors application. Different chemical entities in LPG have made it more efficient with higher sensitivity, recovery and response times compared to CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} gases. Furthermore, effect of palladium surface treatment on the gas sensitivity and the charge transfer resistances of BFO mixed structures is investigated and reported.

Waghmare, Shivaji D.; Jadhav, Vijaykumar V.; Gore, Shaym K. [Center for Nanomaterials and Energy Devices, School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, Maharashtra (India)] [Center for Nanomaterials and Energy Devices, School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, Maharashtra (India); Yoon, Seog-Joon; Ambade, Swapnil B. [Inorganic Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-1791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Inorganic Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-1791 (Korea, Republic of); Lokhande, B.J. [Department of Physics, Solapur University, Solapur (India)] [Department of Physics, Solapur University, Solapur (India); Mane, Rajaram S., E-mail: rsmane_2000@yahoo.com [Center for Nanomaterials and Energy Devices, School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, Maharashtra (India); Han, Sung-Hwan, E-mail: shhan@hanyang.ac.kr [Inorganic Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-1791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Inorganic Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-1791 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Guidelines for Company Reporting on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Annexes updated July 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0.32 LPG kWh x 0.214 therms x 6.27 litres x 1.49 Coking Coal tonnes x 2736 kWh x 0.331 Aviation.63 Petrol tonnes x 3135 kWh x 0.24 litres x 2.30 Fuel Oil tonnes x 3223 kWh x 0.27 Coal2 tonnes x 2548 kWh xWh x 0.25 Petroleum Coke tonnes x 3410 kWh x 0.34 Refinery Miscellaneous kWh x 0.24 therms x 7

132

Hydrocarbon Processing`s HPI construction boxscore update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are compiled for oil and gas industry construction projects worldwide, listing country (and state or province, when appropriate), company, location of the project, purpose, plant capacity, estimated cost, current status, licensor, engineering firm, and construction company. Projects include carbon monoxide, urea, ammonia, isomerizer, hydrogen, alkylation, TAME, desalter, hydrotreating, sulfur, waste gas cleanup, catalytic reformer, ethylene recovery, natural gas helium, nitrogen removal, NGL recovery, cumene, dewaxer, polystyrene, vinyl chloride, synthesis gas, formaldehyde, FCC cracker, isobutylene, H{sub 2}S removal, cogeneration, methanol, delayed coker, gas oil treater, NGL fractionation, BTX, information systems, control systems, waste water cleanup, glycol treater, acid gas removal, LPG, MTBE, caustic cleanup, visbreaker, naphtha treater, and others.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Industries of the Future: Creating a Sustainable Technology Edge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDUSTRIES OF THE FUTURE: Creating A Sustainable Technology Edge Sandra L. Glatt Office of Industrial Technologies Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U. S. Department of Energy 55 ESL-IE-00-04-10 Proceedings from the Twenty... and Renewable Energy U.S, Department of Energy Industries of the Future: Creating a Sustainable Technology Edge . cUn' OFwlOd CCooI .. LPG .Eleclric~ CNI!hnIG. AgriclAtll'e Mining A1uminu",J Totll1* kldutb't.1 Conllomption: :W, 111 TrtIlion 8tus...

Glatt, S. L.

134

Source profiles for nonmethane organic compounds in the atmosphere of Cairo, Egypt.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Profiles of the sources of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) were developed for emissions from vehicles, petroleum fuels (gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and natural gas), a petroleum refinery, a smelter, and a cast iron factory in Cairo, Egypt. More than 100 hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons were tentatively identified and quantified. Gasoline-vapor and whole-gasoline profiles could be distinguished from the other profiles by high concentrations of the C{sub 5} and C{sub 6} saturated hydrocarbons. The vehicle emission profile was similar to the whole-gasoline profile, with the exception of the unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, which were present at higher concentrations in the vehicle emission profile. High levels of the C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} saturated hydrocarbons, particularly n-butane, were characteristic features of the petroleum refinery emissions. The smelter and cast iron factory emissions were similar to the refinery emissions; however, the levels of benzene and toluene were greater in the former two sources. The LPG and natural gas emissions contained high concentrations of n-butane and ethane, respectively. The NMOC source profiles for Cairo were distinctly different from profiles for U.S. sources, indicating that NMOC source profiles are sensitive to the particular composition of petroleum fuels that are used in a location.

Doskey, P. V.; Fukui, Y.; Sultan, M.; Maghraby, A. A.; Taher, A.; Environmental Research; Cairo Univ.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Gasoline from Wood via Integrated Gasification, Synthesis, and Methanol-to-Gasoline Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) assessment of the feasibility of making gasoline via the methanol-to-gasoline route using syngas from a 2,000 dry metric tonne/day (2,205 U.S. ton/day) biomass-fed facility. A new technoeconomic model was developed in Aspen Plus for this study, based on the model developed for NREL's thermochemical ethanol design report (Phillips et al. 2007). The necessary process changes were incorporated into a biomass-to-gasoline model using a methanol synthesis operation followed by conversion, upgrading, and finishing to gasoline. Using a methodology similar to that used in previous NREL design reports and a feedstock cost of $50.70/dry ton ($55.89/dry metric tonne), the estimated plant gate price is $16.60/MMBtu ($15.73/GJ) (U.S. $2007) for gasoline and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) produced from biomass via gasification of wood, methanol synthesis, and the methanol-to-gasoline process. The corresponding unit prices for gasoline and LPG are $1.95/gallon ($0.52/liter) and $1.53/gallon ($0.40/liter) with yields of 55.1 and 9.3 gallons per U.S. ton of dry biomass (229.9 and 38.8 liters per metric tonne of dry biomass), respectively.

Phillips, S. D.; Tarud, J. K.; Biddy, M. J.; Dutta, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

1982 worldwide pipeline construction will top 21,900 miles, $9. 5 billion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports that pipeline construction slowed slightly in 1982 because of lowered economic activity worldwide, with an upturn forecast for 1983. Explains that need for new pipelines to transport increasing amounts of oil and gas energy now being discovered, plus use of pipelines to transport other commodities in increasing amounts, has created a backlog of demand for facilities. Indicates that commodities suited for pipeline transport and getting consideration include crude oil; refined products; natural gas liquids; LPG; coal slurries; carbon dioxide (used for enhanced oil recovery); chemicals such as ammonia, ethane, ethylene, and similar petrochemical feedstocks; industrial gases such as oxygen, nitrogen; and solids slurries such as ores, wood chips, and other non-soluble minerals, even items such as wood chips and wood pulp for paper-making. Reveals that there are 10,396 miles of coal slurry pipeline planned for the US and 500 miles in Canada. Major US projects underway in the gas pipeline field include the 797-mile, 36-in. Trailblazer system in Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah. Products/ LPG/NGL pipelines underway include 105 miles of dual 4 and 6-in. line in Kansas. Crude pipeline activity includes 100 miles of 12-in. in California and 80 miles of 4 thru 40-in. in Alaska on the North Slope. Updates plans in Canada, Scotland, Denmark, Ireland, France, the Middle East, Australia, Southeast Asia, Mexico, South America and the USSR.

Hall, D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

New waste-heat refrigeration unit cuts flaring, reduces pollution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Planetec Utility Services Co. Inc. and Energy Concepts Co. (ECC), with the help of the US Department of Energy (DOE), developed and commissioned a unique waste-heat powered LPG recovery plant in August 1997 at the 30,000 b/d Denver refinery, operated by Ultramar Diamond Shamrock (UDS). This new environmentally friendly technology reduces flare emissions and the loss of salable liquid-petroleum products to the fuel-gas system. The waste heat ammonia absorption refrigeration plant (Whaarp) is the first technology of its kind to use low-temperature waste heat (295 F) to achieve sub-zero refrigeration temperatures ({minus}40 F) with the capability of dual temperature loads in a refinery setting. The ammonia absorption refrigeration is applied to the refinery`s fuel-gas makeup streams to condense over 180 b/d of salable liquid hydrocarbon products. The recovered liquid, about 64,000 bbl/year of LPG and gasoline, increases annual refinery profits by nearly $1 million, while substantially reducing air pollution emissions from the refinery`s flare.

Brant, B.; Brueske, S. [Planetec Utility Services Co., Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States); Erickson, D.; Papar, R. [Energy Concepts Co., Annapolis, MD (United States)

1998-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

138

Intergovernmental Advanced Stationary PEM Fuel Cell System Demonstration Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program to complete the design, construction and demonstration of a PEMFC system fuelled by Ethanol, LPG or NG for telecom applications was initiated in October 2007. Early in the program the economics for Ethanol were shown to be unfeasible and permission was given by DOE to focus on LPG only. The design and construction of a prototype unit was completed in Jun 2009 using commercially available PEM FC stack from Ballard Power Systems. During the course of testing, the high pressure drop of the stack was shown to be problematic in terms of control and stability of the reformer. Also, due to the power requirements for air compression the overall efficiency of the system was shown to be lower than a similar system using internally developed low pressure drop FC stack. In Q3 2009, the decision was made to change to the Plug power stack and a second prototype was built and tested. Overall net efficiency was shown to be 31.5% at 3 kW output. Total output of the system is 6 kW. Using the new stack hardware, material cost reduction of 63% was achieved over the previous Alpha design. During a November 2009 review meeting Plug Power proposed and was granted permission, to demonstrate the new, commercial version of Plug Power's telecom system at CERL. As this product was also being tested as part of a DOE Topic 7A program, this part of the program was transferred to the Topic 7A program. In Q32008, the scope of work of this program was expanded to include a National Grid demonstration project of a micro-CHP system using hightemperature PEM technology. The Gensys Blue system was cleared for unattended operation, grid connection, and power generation in Aug 2009 at Union College in NY state. The system continues to operate providing power and heat to Beuth House. The system is being continually evaluated and improvements to hardware and controls will be implemented as more is learned about the system's operation. The program is instrumental in improving the efficiency and reducing costs of PEMFC based power systems using LPG fuel and continues to makes steps towards meeting DOE's targets. Plug Power would like to thank DOE for their support of this program.

Rich Chartrand

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the U.S. transportation sector. Technical report fourteen: Market potential and impacts of alternative fuel use in light-duty vehicles -- A 2000/2010 analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, estimates are provided of the potential, by 2010, to displace conventional light-duty vehicle motor fuels with alternative fuels--compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), methanol from natural gas, ethanol from grain and from cellulosic feedstocks, and electricity--and with replacement fuels such as oxygenates added to gasoline. The 2010 estimates include the motor fuel displacement resulting both from government programs (including the Clean Air Act and EPACT) and from potential market forces. This report also provides an estimate of motor fuel displacement by replacement and alterative fuels in the year 2000. However, in contrast to the 2010 estimates, the year 2000 estimate is restricted to an accounting of the effects of existing programs and regulations. 27 figs., 108 tabs.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Coal-oil slurry preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pumpable slurry of pulverized coal in a coal-derived hydrocarbon oil carrier which slurry is useful as a low-ash, low-sulfur clean fuel, is produced from a high sulfur-containing coal. The initial pulverized coal is separated by gravity differentiation into (1) a high density refuse fraction containing the major portion of non-coal mineral products and sulfur, (2) a lowest density fraction of low sulfur content and (3) a middlings fraction of intermediate sulfur and ash content. The refuse fraction (1) is gasified by partial combustion producing a crude gas product from which a hydrogen stream is separated for use in hydrogenative liquefaction of the middlings fraction (3). The lowest density fraction (2) is mixed with the liquefied coal product to provide the desired fuel slurry. Preferably there is also separately recovered from the coal liquefaction LPG and pipeline gas.

Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kero sene lpg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

FBIS report. Science and technology: Japan, December 10, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents (partial): Japan: Fabrication of Diamond Single Crystal Thin Film by Ion Beam Deposition; Japan: Hitachi Metal Develops New Semi Solid Metal Processing Technology; Japan: NTT Develops Fuel Cell System That Uses Both City Gas, LPG; Japan: Daihatsu Motor Completes Prototype EV; Japan: NIRIM Announces Success With Synthetic Bone Development; Japan: Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Plans Clinical Trials of Gene Therapy to Cerebral Tumor in Japan; Japan: MITI To Provide Aid for Residential Solar Power Generation Systems; Japan: MELCO To Provide Satellite Solar Cell Panel for SSL, USA; Japan: Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Leads Nuclear Research; Japan: Kobe Steel`s Superconducting Magnet Ready to Go Fast; Japan: MPT To Begin Validation Test for Electric Money Implementation; and Japan: Defense Agency to Send ASDF`s Pilots to Russia for Training.

NONE

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

142

Natural gas cavern storage regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigation of an incident at an LPG storage facility in Texas by U.S. Department of Transportation resulted in recommendation that state regulation of natural gas cavern storage might be improved. Interstate Oil & Gas Compact Commission has established a subcommittee to analyze the benefits and risks associated with natural gas cavern storage, and to draft a regulation model which will suggest engineering and performance specifications. The resulting analysis and regulatory language will be reviewed by I.O.G.C.C., and if approved, distributed to member states (including New York) for consideration. Should the states desire assistance in modifying the language to reflect local variables, such as policy and geology, I.O.G.C.C. may offer assistance. The proposed presentation will review the I.O.G.C.C. product (if published at that date), and discuss implications of its application in New York.

Heneman, H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Regulatory, technical pressures prompt more U. S. salt-cavern gas storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural-gas storage in US salt caverns is meeting the need for flexible, high delivery and injection storage following implementation Nov. 1, 1993, of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Order 636. This ruling has opened the US underground natural-gas storage market to more participants and created a demand for a variety of storage previously provided by pipelines as part of their bundled sales services. Many of these new services such as no-notice and supply balancing center on use of high-delivery natural gas storage from salt caverns. Unlike reservoir storage, nothing restricts flow in a cavern. The paper discusses the unique properties of salt that make it ideal for gas storage, choosing a location for the storage facility, cavern depth and shape, cavern size, spacing, pressures, construction, conversion or brine or LPG storage caverns to natural gas, and operation.

Barron, T.F. (PB-KBB Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Trends in hydrogen plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding important design considerations for H{sub 2} production via steam reforming require detailed attention to the many elements that make up the process. This paper discusses design trends focus on improvements to the plant's three principal unit operations: Generation of H{sub 2}/CO syngas, Conversion of CO in the syngas and Separation/purification of H{sub 2} from syngas. Natural gas, LPG, oil, coal and coke are all potential raw materials for H{sub 2} production. For the first step in the process, generation of H{sub 2} syngas, the processes available are: Reforming the steam; Autothermal reforming with oxygen and steam; and Partial oxidation with oxygen (POX). Most syngas is presently produced by steam reforming of natural gas or light hydrocarbons up to naphtha.

Johansen, T.; Raghuraman, K.S.; Hackett, L.A. (KTI, Zoetermeer (NL))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ethylene plant commissioned at Corpus Christi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethylene Plant Commissioned at Corpus Christi. Corpus Christi Petrochemical Co. has commissioned its $600 million ethylene plant at Corpus Christi, Tex. Plant capacities include 1.2 billion lb/yr of ethylene, 560 million lb/yr of propylene, 400 million lb/yr of crude butadiene mixture, 60 million gal of benzene, 45 million gal of gasoline blending components, and 50 million gal of fuel oils. The ethylene and propylene will be transported by pipeline to Houston for further processing. At the Corpus Christi facilities, process pressures range from full vacuum to 1800 psig, and process temperatures range from -260/sup 0/ to +1600/sup 0/F. The plant uses gas oil and naphtha as feedstock, but also has some flexibility to use ethane or LPG as feedstock. Stone and Webster Engineering Corp. engineered and Brown and Root Inc. built the plant.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Asia/Pacific ethylene capacity to more than double by 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tremendous growth of Asia`s petrochemical industry is expected to continue into the next century. This rapid expansion has redirected many Asian nations` energy resources to the petrochemical industry, according to an advisory report by Ronald E. Hagen of the East-West Center, Honolulu. Petrochemical producers throughout the region are planning to build a number of new, world-scale ethylene plants, and expand and upgrade existing facilities. Feedstocks used to produce ethylene include: ethane, LPG, naphtha, kerosene, gas oil, and ethanol. Traditionally, usage of ethanol and kerosene in the region has been small, and gas oil usage is centered mainly in China. Information is listed and discussed for ethylene capacity through 2000 on a country-by-country basis, along with the feedstocks used by each plant.

NONE

1995-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

147

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health and safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) 1980 annual report to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1980. Part 5 includes technology assessments for natural gas, enhanced oil recovery, oil shale, uranium mining, magnetic fusion energy, solar energy, uranium enrichment and industrial energy utilization; regional analysis studies of environmental transport and community impacts; environmental and safety engineering for LNG, oil spills, LPG, shale oil waste waters, geothermal liquid waste disposal, compressed air energy storage, and nuclear/fusion fuel cycles; operational and environmental safety studies of decommissioning, environmental monitoring, personnel dosimetry, and analysis of criticality safety; health physics studies; and epidemiological studies. Also included are an author index, organization of PNL charts and distribution lists of the annual report, along with lists of presentations and publications. (DLS)

Baalman, R.W.; Hays, I.D. (eds.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Allocation of Energy Use LCA Case Studies LCA Case Studies Allocation of Energy Use in Petroleum Refineries to Petroleum Products Implications for Life-Cycle Energy Use and Emission Inventory of Petroleum Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aim, Scope, and Background. Studies to evaluate the energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems have to address allocation of the energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products because refineries produce multiple products. The allocation is needed in evaluating energy and emission effects of individual transportation fuels. Allocation methods used so far for petroleum-based fuels (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and liquefied petroleum gas [LPG]) are based primarily on mass, energy content, or market value shares of individual fuels from a given refinery. The aggregate approach at the refinery level is unable to account for the energy use and emission differences associated with producing individual fuels at the next sub-level: individual refining processes within a refinery. The approach ignores the fact that different refinery products

Michael Wang; Hanjie Lee; John Molburg

149

Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar magnitude.

Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

150

Cryofuels, now and in the future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our desire to use domestically available, cleaner, and less expensive vehicular fuels is creating a market demand for new business related to the supply of the alterative fuels, propane (LPG), natural gas (CNG/LNG), and hydrogen (CH{sub 2}/LH{sub 2}). These three fuels have the common attribute of equilibrium boiling points that are less than ambient temperature. Each of these fuels is either readily or potentially readily available in North America and many other countries of the world. Although properly designed engines that combust these fuels with substantially less harmful emissions than from gasoline and diesel are being integrated into several sizes of vehicles, the present use of cryofuels in the transportation sector is negligible. To change this situation and enable incremental conversion to gaseous cryofuels, a distribution of fleet-size refueling systems that provide LPG, CNG, LNG, hythane, CH2, and LH{sub 2} in an integrated operation with the existing supply network are required. The author`s analysis shows that the creation of improved conversion economics is essential to initiate rapid fleet conversion. The price of the liquid or compressed form of cryofuels to fleet owners/operators or individuals depends on several factors including the capital cost and operating cost of the refueling stations. With existing stable natural gas feedstock prices, inexpensive dedicated alternate fuel engines/vehicles, and less expensive refueling stations, dispensed cryofuels are or can be significantly less expensive than gasoline and diesel for fleet owners/operators. Such price differentials will pay for fleet conversion, staff retraining, refueling systems, etc., and provide substantial returns on fuel conversion investments. This paper will summarize the present status of the transition to cryofuels, identify the technical and market barriers, and discuss some business opportunities for new cryogenic materials, equipment, and systems.

Barclay, J.A. [Univ. of Victoria (Canada)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts: Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage, Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past 40 years, cavern storage of LPG's, petrochemicals, such as ethylene and propylene, and other petroleum products has increased dramatically. In 1991, the Gas Processors Association (GPA) lists the total U.S. underground storage capacity for LPG's and related products of approximately 519 million barrels (82.5 million cubic meters) in 1,122 separate caverns. Of this total, 70 are hard rock caverns and the remaining 1,052 are caverns in salt deposits. However, along the eastern seaboard of the U.S. and the Pacific northwest, salt deposits are not available and therefore, storage in hard rocks is required. Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. Competing methods include LNG facilities and remote underground storage combined with pipeline transportation to the area. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. DOE has identified five regions, that have not had favorable geological conditions for underground storage development: New England, Mid-Atlantic (NY/NJ), South Atlantic (DL/MD/VA), South Atlantic (NC/SC/GA), and the Pacific Northwest (WA/OR). PB-KBB reviewed published literature and in-house databases of the geology of these regions to determine suitability of hard rock formations for siting storage caverns, and gas market area storage needs of these regions.

none

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Activation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and risk of lung cancer among rural women in India who cook with biomass fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of indoor air pollution (IAP) from biomass fuel burning on the risk of carcinogenesis in the airways has been investigated in 187 pre-menopausal women (median age 34 years) from eastern India who cooked exclusively with biomass and 155 age-matched control women from same locality who cooked with cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas. Compared with control, Papanicolau-stained sputum samples showed 3-times higher prevalence of metaplasia and 7-times higher prevalence of dysplasia in airway epithelial cell (AEC) of biomass users. Immunocytochemistry showed up-regulation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt{sup ser473} and p-Akt{sup thr308}) proteins in AEC of biomass users, especially in metaplastic and dysplastic cells. Compared with LPG users, biomass-using women showed marked rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and depletion of antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD) indicating oxidative stress. There were 25 times more particulate pollutants (PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}), 72% more nitrogen dioxide and 4-times more particulate-laden benzo(a)pyrene, but no change in sulfur dioxide in indoor air of biomass-using households, and high performance liquid chromatography estimated 6-fold rise in the concentration of benzene metabolite trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in urine of biomass users. Metaplasia and dysplasia, p-Akt expression and ROS generation were positively associated with PM and t,t-MA levels. It appears that cumulative exposure to biomass smoke increases the risk of lung carcinogenesis via oxidative stress-mediated activation of Akt signal transduction pathway. -- Highlights: ? Carcinogenesis in airway cells was examined in biomass and LPG using women. ? Metaplasia and dysplasia of epithelial cells were more prevalent in biomass users. ? Change in airway cytology was associated with oxidative stress and Akt activation. ? Biomass users had greater exposure to respirable PM, B(a)P and benzene. ? Cooking with biomass increases cancer risk in the airways via Akt activation.

Roychoudhury, Sanghita; Mondal, Nandan Kumar; Mukherjee, Sayali; Dutta, Anindita; Siddique, Shabana; Ray, Manas Ranjan, E-mail: manasrray@rediffmail.com

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Assessment of institutional barriers to the use of natural gas in automotive vehicle fleets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Institutional barriers to the use of natural gas as a fuel for motor vehicle fleets were identified and assessed. Recommendations for barrier removal were then developed. The research technique was a combination of literature review and interviews of knowledgeable persons in government and industry, including fleet operators and marketers of natural gas vehicles and systems. Eight types of institutional barriers were identified and assessed. The most important were two safety-related barriers: (1) lack of a national standard for the safety design and certification of natural gas vehicles and refueling stations; and (2) excessively conservative or misapplied state and local regulations, including bridge and tunnel restrictions, restrictions on types of vehicles that may be fueled by natural gas, zoning regulations that prohibit operation of refueling stations, parking restrictions, application of LPG standards to LNG vehicles, and unintentionally unsafe vehicle or refueling station requirements. Other barriers addressed include: (3) need for clarification of EPA's tampering enforcement policy; (4) the US hydrocarbon standard; (5) uncertainty concerning state utility commission jurisdiction; (6) sale-for-resale prohibitions imposed by natural gas utility companies or state utility commissions; (7) uncertainty of the effects of conversions to natural gas on vehicle manufacturers warranties; and (8) need for a natural gas to gasoline-equivalent-units conversion factor for use in calculation of state road use taxes. Insurance on natural gas vehicles, and state emissions and anti-tampering regulations were also investigated as part of the research but were not found to be barriers.

Jablonski, J.; Lent, L.; Lawrence, M.; White, L.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

A comparative analysis of accident risks in fossil, hydro, and nuclear energy chains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents a comparative assessment of severe accident risks in the energy sector, based on the historical experience of fossil (coal, oil, natural gas, and LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas)) and hydro chains contained in the comprehensive Energy-related Severe Accident Database (ENSAD), as well as Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for the nuclear chain. Full energy chains were considered because accidents can take place at every stage of the chain. Comparative analyses for the years 1969-2000 included a total of 1870 severe ({>=} 5 fatalities) accidents, amounting to 81,258 fatalities. Although 79.1% of all accidents and 88.9% of associated fatalities occurred in less developed, non-OECD countries, industrialized OECD countries dominated insured losses (78.0%), reflecting their substantially higher insurance density and stricter safety regulations. Aggregated indicators and frequency-consequence (F-N) curves showed that energy-related accident risks in non-OECD countries are distinctly higher than in OECD countries. Hydropower in non-OECD countries and upstream stages within fossil energy chains are most accident-prone. Expected fatality rates are lowest for Western hydropower and nuclear power plants; however, the maximum credible consequences can be very large. Total economic damages due to severe accidents are substantial, but small when compared with natural disasters. Similarly, external costs associated with severe accidents are generally much smaller than monetized damages caused by air pollution.

Burgherr, P.; Hirschberg, S. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Portable thermo-photovoltaic power source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A miniature thermo-photovoltaic (TPV) device for generation of electrical power for use in portable electronic devices. A TPV power source is constructed to provide a heat source chemical reactor capable of using various fuels, such as liquid hydrocarbons, including but not limited to propane, LPG, butane, alcohols, oils and diesel fuels to generate a source of photons. A reflector dish guides misdirected photon energy from the photon source toward a photovoltaic array. A thin transparent protector sheet is disposed between the photon source and the array to reflect back thermal energy that cannot be converted to electricity, and protect the array from thermal damage. A microlens disposed between the protector sheet and the array further focuses the tailored band of photon energy from the photon source onto an array of photovoltaic cells, whereby the photon energy is converted to electrical power. A heat recuperator removes thermal energy from reactor chamber exhaust gases, preferably using mini- or micro-bellows to force air and fuel past the exhaust gases, and uses the energy to preheat the fuel and oxidant before it reaches the reactor, increasing system efficiency. Mini- or micro-bellows force ambient air through the system both to supply oxidant and to provide cooling. Finally, an insulator, which is preferably a super insulator, is disposed around the TPV power source to reduce fuel consumption, and to keep the TPV power source cool to the touch so it can be used in hand-held devices.

Zuppero, Anthony C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Krawetz, Barton (Idaho Falls, ID); Barklund, C. Rodger (Idaho Falls, ID); Seifert, Gary D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office`s program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

Yurconic, M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office's program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

Yurconic, M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Cummins Power Generation SECA Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report documents the progress of the Cummins Power Generation (CPG) SECA Phase 1 SOFC development and final testing under the U.S. Department of Energy Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) contract DE-FC26-01NT41244. This report overviews and summarizes CPG and partner research development leading to successful demonstration of the SECA Phase 1 objectives and significant progress towards SOFC commercialization. Significant Phase 1 Milestones: (1) Demonstrated: (a) Operation meeting Phase 1 requirements on commercial natural gas. (b) LPG and Natural Gas CPOX fuel reformers. (c) SOFC systems on dry CPOX reformate. (c) Steam reformed Natural Gas operation. (d) Successful start-up and shut-down of SOFC system without inert gas purge. (e) Utility of stack simulators as a tool for developing balance of plant systems. (2) Developed: (a) Low cost balance of plant concepts and compatible systems designs. (b) Identified low cost, high volume components for balance of plant systems. (c) Demonstrated high efficiency SOFC output power conditioning. (d) Demonstrated SOFC control strategies and tuning methods. The Phase 1 performance test was carried out at the Cummins Power Generation facility in Minneapolis, Minnesota starting on October 2, 2006. Performance testing was successfully completed on January 4, 2007 including the necessary steady-state, transient, efficiency, and peak power operation tests.

Charles Vesely

2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

159

Sedimentology and diagenesis of misoa C-2 reservoir, VLE-305/326 area, block V, Lamar Field, Maracaibe Lake, Venezuela  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main purpose of this study was to characterize the Upper Eocene C-2 reservoir using sedimentological, petrophysical and biostratigraphic parameters. The reservoir quality was evaluated by defining its physical attributes, geometry, areal distribution and orientation, from facies analysis of sedimentary units identified in core samples. In evaluating the sedimentary features of the Misoa C-2 reservoir in VLE 305/326 area, Block V, Lamar Field, Maracaibo Lake, 2,000' of cores from five wells (named VLe-339, VLE-720, VLE -723, VLe-754, LPG-1211) were analyzed. The sedimentary sequence studied represents upper-middle deltaic plain deposits with no marine influence. These deposits were identified as interdistributary channels, crevasse splays and interdistributary bays deposited in a northward prograding system. Seven sedimentary facies were defined from the physical, chemical and biological features observed in all cores. These facies were petrophysically and petrographically characterized then grouped in six sedimentary units which were then correlated over the entire area. One hundred well logs were correlated using sedimentological criteria. Finally, four flow units were identified in the reservoir using the sedimentological parameters, petrophysical data and production behavior. A surface trend analysis program utilizing thickness values resulted in contours, trends, residuals and isometry maps of each unit with a generalized southwest-northeast trend orientation. It was determined that facies distribution in the units controls the reservoir quality. These results are the main input into reservoir simulation. An accurate reservoir modeling is needed to prepare for optimizing secondary oil recovery.

Cabrera de Casas, L.; Chacartegui, F. (Maraven S.A., Caracas (Venezuela))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Effect of fuel rate and annealing process of LiFePO{sub 4} cathode material for Li-ion batteries synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study the effect of fuel rate and annealing on particle formation of LiFePO{sub 4} as battery cathode using flame spray pyrolysis method was investigated numerically and experimentally. Numerical study was done using ANSYS FLUENT program. In experimentally, LiFePO{sub 4} was synthesized from inorganic aqueous solution followed by annealing. LPG was used as fuel and air was used as oxidizer and carrier gas. Annealing process attempted in inert atmosphere at 700C for 240 min. Numerical result showed that the increase of fuel rate caused the increase of flame temperature. Microscopic observation using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) revealed that all particles have sphere and polydisperse. Increasing fuel rate caused decreasing particle size and increasing particles crystallinity. This phenomenon attributed to the flame temperature. However, all produced particles still have more amorphous phase. Therefore, annealing needed to increase particles crystallinity. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis showed that all particles have PO4 function group. Increasing fuel rate led to the increase of infrared spectrum absorption corresponding to the increase of particles crystallinity. This result indicated that phosphate group vibrated easily in crystalline phase. From Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) analysis, annealing can cause the increase of Li{sup +} diffusivity. The diffusivity coefficient of without and with annealing particles were 6.8439910{sup ?10} and 8.5988810{sup ?10} cm{sup 2} s{sup ?1}, respectively.

Halim, Abdul; Setyawan, Heru; Machmudah, Siti; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng [Chemical Engineering, Sepuluh Nopember Institute of Technology, Kampus Sukolilo Surabaya Indonesia 60111 (Indonesia)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

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161

The processing of alcohols, hydrocarbons and ethers to produce hydrogen for a PEMFC for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wellman CJB Limited is involved in a number of projects to develop fuel processors to provide a hydrogen-rich fuel in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) systems for transportation applications. This work started in 1990 which resulted in the demonstration of 10kW PEMFC system incorporating a methanol reformer and catalytic gas clean-up system. Current projects include: The development of a compact fast response methanol reformer and gas clean-up system for a motor vehicle; Reforming of infrastructure fuels including gasoline, diesel, reformulated fuel gas and LPG to produce a hydrogen rich gas for PEMFC; Investigating the potential of dimethylether (DME) as source of hydrogen rich gas for PEMFCs; The use of thin film palladium diffusers to produce a pure hydrogen stream from the hydrogen rich gas from a reformer; and Processing of naval logistic fuels to produce a hydrogen rich gas stream for PEMFC power system to replace diesel generators in surface ships. This paper outlines the background to these projects and reports their current status.

Dams, R.A.J.; Hayter, P.R.; Moore, S.C. [Wellman CJB Limited, Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for Environment has responsibility for identifying, characterizing, and ameliorating the environmental, health, and safety issues and public concerns associated with commercial operation of specific energy systems. The need for developing a safety and environmental control assessment for liquefied gaseous fuels was identified by the Environmental and Safety Engineering Division as a result of discussions with various governmental, industry, and academic persons having expertise with respect to the particular materials involved: liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, and anhydrous ammonia. This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in Fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 1 (Executive Summary) describes the background, purpose and organization of the LGF Program and contains summaries of the 25 reports presented in Volumes 2 and 3. Annotated bibliographies on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety and Environmental Control Research and on Fire Safety and Hazards of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) are included in Volume 1.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Validating the role of AFVs in voluntary mobile source emission reduction programs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Late in 1997, EPA announced new allowances for voluntary emission control programs. As a result, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Cities and other metro areas that have made an ongoing commitment to increasing participation by alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) in local fleets have the opportunity to estimate the magnitude and obtain emission reduction credit for following through on that commitment. Unexpectedly large reductions in key ozone precursor emissions in key locations and times of the day can be achieved per vehicle-mile by selecting specific light duty AFV offerings from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in lieu of their gasoline-fueled counterparts. Additional benefit accrues from the fact that evaporative emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (generated in the case of CNG, LNG, and LPG by closed fuel-system AFV technology) can be essentially negligible. Upstream emissions from fuel storage and distribution with the airshed of interest are also reduced. This paper provides a justification and outlines a method for including AFVs in the mix of strategies to achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality, and for quantifying emission reduction credits. At the time of submission of this paper, the method was still under review by the US EPA Office of Mobile Sources, pending mutually satisfactory resolution of several of its key points. Some of these issues are discussed in the paper.

Santini, D. J.; Saricks, C. L.

1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

164

OXY (Occidental Petroleum Corp. ) units plan U. K. work worth $1. 5 billion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Occidental Refineries Ltd., an Occidental Petroleum Corp. subsidiary, plans to spend about $500,000 to build a 60,000 bbl/day hydrocracker on Canvey Island near London to produce aviation fuel, naphtha, and gasoline. Occidental hopes to deflect criticism by environmentalists, concerned about the concentration of petroleum facilities in the area, by installing a minimum amount of LPG storage and not using hydrogen sulfide on the site. During the 1970's, Occidental had prepared the site for the construction of a 125,000 bbl/day refinery, plans for which were scrapped after the demand for product compounds decreased. Occidental Chemical Co., another Occidental Petroleum subsidiary, plans to spend about $500,000 to build a 300,000 ton/yr ethylene plant at Peterhead, Scotl. The cracker would take part of the output from the de-ethanizer at the St. Fergus terminal for the proposed U.K. gas-gathering pipeline. Both projects would require about 3-4 yr to complete. Esso Chemical Ltd. will build a 550,000 ton/yr ethylene plant near the Mossmoran gas liquids plant in Fife, Scotl.

Not Available

1980-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Real-time optimization boosts capacity of Korean olefins plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Real-time optimization (RTO) of Hyundai Petrochemical Co. Ltd.`s olefins complex at Daesan, South Korea, increased ethylene capacity 4% and revenues 12%, and decreased feedstock and energy usage 2.5%, with no changes in operating conditions. The project comprised RTO and advanced process control (APC) systems for the 350,000 metric ton/year (mty) ethylene plant. A similar system was implemented in the hydrotreating and benzene recovery sections of the plant`s pyrolysis-gasoline treating unit. Hyundai Petrochemical started up its olefins complex on Korea`s western seaboard in late 1991. The Daesan complex comprises 10 plants, including naphtha cracking, monomer, and polymer units. Additional support facilities include: industrial water treatment plants; electric generators; automatic storage systems; a jetty with capacity to berth 100,000 dwt and 10,000 dwt ships simultaneously; a research and development center. The plant`s capacity is 350,000 mty ethylene and 175,000 mty propylene, based on 7,200 operating hr/year. Since start-up, naphtha has been the primary feed, but the plant was designed with flexibility to process C{sub 3}/C{sub 4} (LPG) and gas oil feeds. This paper reviews the project management and decision making process along with the computerized control system design.

Yoon, S. [Hyundai Petrochemical Co. Ltd., Daesan (Korea, Republic of); Dasgupta, S.; Mijares, G. [M.W. Kellogg Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

Co-firing coal and municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to experimentally investigate how different the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) or municipal solid waste (MSW) utilizing strategies affects the gas emission in simple fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of biomass. In this study, ground OFMSW and pulverized coal (PC) were used for co-firing tests. The tests were carried out in a bench-scale bubbling FBC. Coal and bio-waste fuels are quite different in composition. Ash composition of the bio-waste fuels is fundamentally different from ash composition of the coal. Chlorine (Cl) in the MSW may affect operation by corrosion. Ash deposits reduce heat transfer and also may result in severe corrosion at high temperatures. Nitrogen (N) and carbon ) assessments can play an important role in a strategy to control carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions while raising revenue. Regulations such as subsidies for oil, liquid petroleum gas (LPG) for natural gas powered vehicles, and renewables, especially biomass lines, to reduce emissions may be more cost-effective than assessments. Research and development (RD) resources are driven by energy policy goals and can change the competitiveness of renewables, especially solid waste. The future supply of co-firing depends on energy prices and technical progress, both of which are driven by energy policy priorities.

Demirbas, A. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Capital requirements for the transportation of energy materials: 1979 arc estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summaries of transportation investment requirements through 1990 are given for the low, medium and high scenarios. Total investment requirements for the three modes and the three energy commodities can accumulate to a $46.3 to $47.0 billion range depending on the scenario. The high price of oil, following the evidence of the last year, is projected to hold demand for oil below the recent past. Despite the overall decrease in traffic some investment in crude oil and LPG pipelines is necessary to reach new sources of supply. Although natural gas production and consumption is projected to decline through 1990, new investments in carrying capacity also are required due to locational shifts in supply. The Alaska Natural Gas Transportation System is the dominant investment for energy transportation in the next ten years. This year's report focuses attention on waterborne coal transportation to the northeast states in keeping with a return to significant coal consumption projected for this area. A resumption of such shipments will require a completely new fleet. The investment estimates given in this report identify capital required to transport projected energy supplies to market. The requirement is strategic in the sense that other reasonable alternatives do not exist or that a shared load of new growth can be expected. Not analyzed or forecasted are investments in transportation facilities made in response to local conditions. The total investment figures, therefore, represent a minimum necessary capital improvement to respond to changes in interregional supply conditions.

Not Available

1980-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

168

AET's new energy-efficient facility gears up for production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

American Energy Technologies, Inc. (AET), a company based just north of Green Cove Springs, Florida, has become the largest manufacturer of solar thermal products in the U.S. Phase 1 of the construction of AET's new manufacturing facility, which commenced in October 1992, was completed in April 1993. It houses high-output tooling designed by AET to ensure affordable, high-quality solar thermal hardware which is rated among the most efficient in the world today. The AET facility has integrated a number of energy-efficient design considerations and conservation measures. The passive-solar design of the building minimizes direct solar gain in the summer and maximizes tropical winds for passive cooling. Strategically placed native landscaping requires minimal maintenance, thus reducing water consumption, and provides natural shading for the offices. The exterior walls are constructed of Poly Steel hollow-core styrofoam forms filled with pumped concrete. This design provides an insulation rate of R-22, a wind load of 160 mph, and a two-hour fire rating. The light-colored office and the plant's exterior skin assist in reducing the cooling load with the protection of Lomit, a spray-applied radiant barrier manufactured by SOLEC Corporation, which coats the office roof decks. Climate control for the manufacturing area is provided by an AET solar heating system which works in tandem with two LPG Amana Command Aire 80s for back up. Office space heating is supplied by a warm forced-air system by US Solar Corporation which utilizes a 320-square-foot solar array with a 1,000-gallon storage tank. Circulation is powered by a Siemens Solar Pro photovoltaic array and the thermal system also provides solar hot water for the manufacturing process.

Pucci, A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

New Design Methods And Algorithms For High Energy-Efficient And Low-cost Distillation Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project sought and successfully answered two big challenges facing the creation of low-energy, cost-effective, zeotropic multi-component distillation processes: first, identification of an efficient search space that includes all the useful distillation configurations and no undesired configurations; second, development of an algorithm to search the space efficiently and generate an array of low-energy options for industrial multi-component mixtures. Such mixtures are found in large-scale chemical and petroleum plants. Commercialization of our results was addressed by building a user interface allowing practical application of our methods for industrial problems by anyone with basic knowledge of distillation for a given problem. We also provided our algorithm to a major U.S. Chemical Company for use by the practitioners. The successful execution of this program has provided methods and algorithms at the disposal of process engineers to readily generate low-energy solutions for a large class of multicomponent distillation problems in a typical chemical and petrochemical plant. In a petrochemical complex, the distillation trains within crude oil processing, hydrotreating units containing alkylation, isomerization, reformer, LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) and NGL (natural gas liquids) processing units can benefit from our results. Effluents from naphtha crackers and ethane-propane crackers typically contain mixtures of methane, ethylene, ethane, propylene, propane, butane and heavier hydrocarbons. We have shown that our systematic search method with a more complete search space, along with the optimization algorithm, has a potential to yield low-energy distillation configurations for all such applications with energy savings up to 50%.

Agrawal, Rakesh

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

170

Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: Measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios were measured with two different instruments at the T1 ground site in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March of 2006. A gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) quantified 18 light alkanes, alkenes and acetylene while a proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) quantified 12 VOC species including oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and aromatics. A GC separation system was used in conjunction with the PIT-MS (GC-PIT-MS) to evaluate PIT-MS measurements and to aid in the identification of unknown VOCs. The VOC measurements are also compared to simultaneous canister samples and to two independent proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) deployed on a mobile and an airborne platform during MILAGRO. VOC diurnal cycles demonstrate the large influence of vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissions during the night and photochemical processing during the afternoon. Emission ratios for VOCs and OVOCs relative to CO are derived from early-morning measurements. Average emission ratios for non-oxygenated species relative to CO are on average a factor of {approx}2 higher than measured for US cities. Emission ratios for OVOCs are estimated and compared to literature values the northeastern US and to tunnel studies in California. Positive matrix factorization analysis (PMF) is used to provide insight into VOC sources and processing. Three PMF factors were distinguished by the analysis including the emissions from vehicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of secondary VOCs + long-lived species. Emission ratios to CO calculated from the results of PMF analysis are compared to emission ratios calculated directly from measurements. The total PIT-MS signal is summed to estimate the fraction of identified versus unidentified VOC species.

Bon, D.M.; Springston, S.; M.Ulbrich, I.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D.; Fall, R.; Jimenez, J. L., Herndon, S. C.; Huey, L. G.; Knighton, W. B.; Ortega, J.; Vargas, O.

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

171

Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was undertaken in response to the Department of Energy's call to research and develop technologies 'that will reduce energy consumption, enhance economic competitiveness, and reduce environmental impacts of the domestic chemical industry.' The current technology at the time for producing 140 billion pounds per year of propylene from naphtha and Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) relied on energy- and capital-intensive steam crackers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) units. The propylene is isolated from the product stream in a costly separation step and subsequently converted to acrylic acid and other derivatives in separate production facilities. This project proposed a Short Contact Time Reactor (SCTR)-based catalytic oxydehydrogenation process that could convert propane to propylene and acrylic acid in a cost-effective and energy-efficient fashion. Full implementation of this technology could lead to sizeable energy, economic and environmental benefits for the U. S. chemical industry by providing up to 45 trillion BTUs/year, cost savings of $1.8 billion/year and a combined 35 million pounds/year reduction in environmental pollutants such as COx, NOx, and SOx. Midway through the project term, the program directive changed, which approval from the DOE and its review panel, from direct propane oxidation to acrylic acid at millisecond contact times to a two-step process for making acrylic acid from propane. The first step was the primary focus, namely the conversion of propane to propylene in high yields assisted by the presence of CO2. The product stream from step one was then to be fed directly into a commercially practiced propylene-to-acrylic acid tandem reactor system.

Scott Han

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Development and Testing of a 6-Cylinder HCCI Engine for Distributed Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the technical approach for converting a Caterpillar 3406 natural gas spark ignited engine into HCCI mode. The paper describes all stages of the process, starting with a preliminary analysis that determined that the engine can be operated by preheating the intake air with a heat exchanger that recovers energy from the exhaust gases. This heat exchanger plays a dual role, since it is also used for starting the engine. For start-up, the heat exchanger is preheated with a natural gas burner. The engine is therefore started in HCCI mode, avoiding the need to handle the potentially difficult transition from SI or diesel mode to HCCI. The fueling system was modified by replacing the natural gas carburetor with a liquid petroleum gas (LPG) carburetor. This modification sets an upper limit for the equivalence ratio at {phi} {approx} 0.4, which is ideal for HCCI operation and guarantees that the engine will not fail due to knock. Equivalence ratio can be reduced below 0.4 for low load operation with an electronic control valve. Intake boosting has been a challenge, as commercially available turbochargers are not a good match for the engine, due to the low HCCI exhaust temperature. Commercial introduction of HCCI engines for stationary power will therefore require the development of turbochargers designed specifically for this mode of operation. Considering that no appropriate off-the-shelf turbocharger for HCCI engines exists at this time, we are investigating mechanical supercharging options, which will deliver the required boost pressure (3 bar absolute intake) at the expense of some reduction in the output power and efficiency. An appropriate turbocharger can later be installed for improved performance when it becomes available or when a custom turbocharger is developed. The engine is now running in HCCI mode and producing power in an essentially naturally aspirated mode. Current work focuses on developing an automatic controller for obtaining consistent combustion in the 6 cylinders. The engine will then be tested for 1000 hours to demonstrate durability. This paper presents intermediate progress towards development of an HCCI engine for stationary power generation and next steps towards achieving the project goals.

Flowers, D L; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Killingsworth, N; Aceves, S M; Dibble, R; Kristic, M; Bining, A

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

HTGR-INTEGRATED COAL TO LIQUIDS PRODUCTION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the DOEs Idaho National Laboratory (INL) nuclear energy development mission, the INL is leading a program to develop and design a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which has been selected as the base design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Because an HTGR operates at a higher temperature, it can provide higher temperature process heat, more closely matched to chemical process temperatures, than a conventional light water reactor. Integrating HTGRs into conventional industrial processes would increase U.S. energy security and potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), particularly CO2. This paper focuses on the integration of HTGRs into a coal to liquids (CTL) process, for the production of synthetic diesel fuel, naphtha, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The plant models for the CTL processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The models were constructed with plant production capacity set at 50,000 barrels per day of liquid products. Analysis of the conventional CTL case indicated a potential need for hydrogen supplementation from high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), with heat and power supplied by the HTGR. By supplementing the process with an external hydrogen source, the need to shift the syngas using conventional water-gas shift reactors was eliminated. HTGR electrical power generation efficiency was set at 40%, a reactor size of 600 MWth was specified, and it was assumed that heat in the form of hot helium could be delivered at a maximum temperature of 700C to the processes. Results from the Aspen Plus model were used to perform a preliminary economic analysis and a life cycle emissions assessment. The following conclusions were drawn when evaluating the nuclear assisted CTL process against the conventional process: 11 HTGRs (600 MWth each) are required to support production of a 50,000 barrel per day CTL facility. When compared to conventional CTL production, nuclear integration decreases coal consumption by 66% using electrolysis and nuclear power as the hydrogen source. In addition, nuclear integration decreases CO2 emissions by 84% if sequestration is assumed and 96% without sequestration, when compared to conventional CTL. The preliminary economic assessment indicates that the incorporation of 11 HTGRs and the associated HTSEs impacts the expected return on investment, when compared to conventional CTL with or without sequestration. However, in a carbon constrained scenario, where CO2 emissions are taxed and sequestration is not an option, a reasonable CO2 tax would equate the economics of the nuclear assisted CTL case with the conventional CTL case. The economic results are preliminary, as they do not include economies of scale for multiple HTGRs and are based on an uncertain reactor cost estimate. Refinement of the HTGR cost estimate is currently underway. To reduce well to wheel (WTW) GHG emissions below baseline (U.S. crude mix) or imported crude derived diesel, integration of an HTGR is necessary. WTW GHG emissions decrease 8% below baseline crude with nuclear assisted CTL. Even with CO2 sequestration, conventional CTL WTW GHG emissions are 24% higher than baseline crude emissions. Current efforts are underway to investigate the incorporation of nuclear integrated steam methane reforming for the production of hydrogen, in place of HTSE. This will likely reduce the number of HTGRs required for the process.

Anastasia M Gandrik; Rick A Wood

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Cost-Benefit Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining in the Kraft Pulp and Paper Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production of liquid fuels and chemicals via gasification of kraft black liquor and woody residues (''biorefining'') has the potential to provide significant economic returns for kraft pulp and paper mills replacing Tomlinson boilers beginning in the 2010-2015 timeframe. Commercialization of gasification technologies is anticipated in this period, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are in most cases already commercially established today in the ''gas-to-liquids'' industry. These conclusions are supported by detailed analysis carried out in a two-year project co-funded by the American Forest and Paper Association and the Biomass Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. This work assessed the energy, environment, and economic costs and benefits of biorefineries at kraft pulp and paper mills in the United States. Seven detailed biorefinery process designs were developed for a reference freesheet pulp/paper mill in the Southeastern U.S., together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. Commercial (''Nth'') plant levels of technology performance and cost were assumed. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which would be refined to vehicle fuels at existing petroleum refineries), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or LPG substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. Compared to installing a new Tomlinson power/recovery system, a biorefinery would require larger capital investment. However, because the biorefinery would have higher energy efficiencies, lower air emissions, and a more diverse product slate (including transportation fuel), the internal rates of return (IRR) on the incremental capital investments would be attractive under many circumstances. For nearly all of the cases examined in the study, the IRR lies between 14% and 18%, assuming a 25-year levelized world oil price of $50/bbl--the US Department of Energy's 2006 reference oil price projection. The IRRs would rise to as high as 35% if positive incremental environmental benefits associated with biorefinery products are monetized (e.g., if an excise tax credit for the liquid fuel is available comparable to the one that exists for ethanol in the United States today). Moreover, if future crude oil prices are higher ($78/bbl levelized price, the US Department of Energy's 2006 high oil price scenario projection, representing an extrapolation of mid-2006 price levels), the calculated IRR exceeds 45% in some cases when environmental attributes are also monetized. In addition to the economic benefits to kraft pulp/paper producers, biorefineries widely implemented at pulp mills in the U.S. would result in nationally-significant liquid fuel production levels, petroleum savings, greenhouse gas emissions reductions, and criteria-pollutant reductions. These are quantified in this study. A fully-developed pulpmill biorefinery industry could be double or more the size of the current corn-ethanol industry in the United States in terms of annual liquid fuel production. Forest biomass resources are sufficient in the United States to sustainably support such a scale of forest biorefining in addition to the projected growth in pulp and paper production.

Eric D. Larson; Stefano Consonni; Ryan E. Katofsky; Kristiina Iisa; W. James Frederick

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z