National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for kaviany moo hwan

  1. Energy Conserving Routing in Wireless Ad-hoc Networks Jae-Hwan Chang and Leandros Tassiulas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Bing

    Energy Conserving Routing in Wireless Ad-hoc Networks Jae-Hwan Chang and Leandros Tassiulas-- energy-sensitive routing, wireless ad-hoc networks, sensor networks I. INTRODUCTION CONSIDER a group of wireless static nodes is considered as it arises in a rapidly deployed, sensor based, monitoring system

  2. Atomic and electronic structure of styrene on Ge(100) Do Hwan Kim a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    Atomic and electronic structure of styrene on Ge(100) Do Hwan Kim a , Yun Jeong Hwang b , Junga: Styrene Ge(100) Adsorption DFT calculations STM Coverage-dependent adsorption structures of styrene favorable configuration at room temperature is that the two styrene molecules are bound to two Ge dimers

  3. Atomic and electronic structure of acetic acid on Ge(100) Do Hwan Kim a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    Atomic and electronic structure of acetic acid on Ge(100) Do Hwan Kim a,b , Eunkyung Hwang to investigate the atomic and electronic structure of acetic acid adsorbed on Ge(100) surface. Due to its acidity, acetic acid dissociates and the resulting electron-rich acetate group reacts with the electron

  4. Automorphic correction of the hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebra E10 Henry H. Kim and Kyu-Hwan Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyu-Hwan J.

    Automorphic correction of the hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebra E10 Henry H. Kim and Kyu-Hwan Lee://jmp.aip.org/about/about_the_journal Top downloads: http://jmp.aip.org/features/most_downloaded Information for Authors: http-Moody algebra E10 Henry H. Kim1,a) and Kyu-Hwan Lee2,b) 1 Department of Mathematics, University of Toronto

  5. Modeling RF Passive Circuits using Coupled Lines and Scalable Models Sidharth Dalmia, Sung Hwan Min and Madhavan Swaminathan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Madhavan

    the building blocks for other passive structures such as spiral inductors, transformers and capacitors [1Modeling RF Passive Circuits using Coupled Lines and Scalable Models Sidharth Dalmia, Sung Hwan Min.swaminathan@ee.gatech.edu Abstract Coupled line sections are critical structures in distributed RF and microwave passive circuits

  6. Extending a MOOS-IvP Autonomy System and Users Guide to the IvPBuild Toolbox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Michael R.

    2009-08-20

    This document describes how to extend the suite of MOOS applications and IvP Helm behaviors distributed with the MOOS-IvP software bundle from www.moos-ivp.org. It covers (a) a straw-man repository with a place-holder MOOS ...

  7. MOOS-IvP Autonomy Tools Users Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Michael R.

    2008-11-11

    This document describes seven common MOOS-IvP autonomy tools. The uHelmScope application provides a run-time scoping window into the state of an active IvP Helm executing its mission. The pMarineViewer application is a ...

  8. Dissociative Chemisorption of Methanol on Ge(100) Sung-Soo Bae, Do Hwan Kim,, Ansoon Kim,, Soon Jung Jung, Suklyun Hong,*, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    Dissociative Chemisorption of Methanol on Ge(100) Sung-Soo Bae, Do Hwan Kim,, Ansoon Kim,,§ Soon of methanol (CH3OH) on Ge(100) surface has been studied using ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy-resolution experimental STM shows that methanol undergoes O-H bond dissociative adsorption on a single Ge-Ge dimer

  9. Felix Moos--Center for East Asian Studies Interview: An Anthropologist's Asian Journeys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moos, Felix; Greene, Megan

    2013-11-01

    This video interview of Dr. Felix Moos by Dr. Megan Greene is a part of the University of Kansas East Asian Studies Faculty Interview Series....

  10. High Pressure Transformation of La4Cu3MoO12 to a Layered Perovskite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    High Pressure Transformation of La4Cu3MoO12 to a Layered Perovskite Douglas A. Vander Griend it stabilizes the perovskite structure. In this paper, we describe the HP synthesis of a new copper-rich layered perovskite, La4Cu3MoO12, which is isotypic with La2- CuSnO6.1 When synthesized at ambient pressure (AP

  11. Origin of the high work function and high conductivity of MoO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2014-12-04

    ) and organic photovoltaics (OPVs) [6-12], and as an anode or hole transfer dopant for graphene and MoS2 devices [10-15]. Given its high work function, band gap and defect induced conductivity, it is important to understand how these properties arise... functional. The partial DOS in Fig 2(b) shows that CBM consists of Mo d orbitals while the VBM consists of O p orbitals. This is because MoO3 is a standard closed shell d0 system. The Mo-O bonds are polar, resulting in a large band gap. We now discuss...

  12. Stability of Graphene doping with MoO_3 and I_2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D’Arsié, Lorenzo; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Weatherup, Robert; Guo, Yuzheng; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; Cepek, Cinzia; Robertson, John

    2014-09-08

    We dope graphene by evaporation of MoO_3 or by solution-deposition of I_2 and assess the doping stability for its use as transparent electrodes. Electrical measurements show that both dopants increase the graphene sheet conductivity and find that Mo...

  13. Catalytic Properties of Supported MoO3 Catalysts for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Catalytic Properties of Supported MoO3 Catalysts for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane Kaidong The effects of MoOx structure on propane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) rates and selectivity were examined with those obtained on MoOx/ZrO2. On MoOx/Al2O3 catalysts, propane turnover rate increased with increasing Mo

  14. Ferromagnetic superexchange in insulating Cr2MoO6 by controlling orbital hybridization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, M.; Do, D.; Dela Cruz, Clarina R.; Dun, Zhiling; Cheng, J. -G.; Goto, H.; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Zou, T.; Zhou, Haidon D.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; et al

    2015-09-11

    We report the magnetic and electronic structures of the newly synthesized inverse-trirutile compound Cr2MoO6. Despite the same crystal symmetry and similar bond-lengths and bond-angles to Cr2TeO6, Cr2MoO6 possesses a magnetic structure of the Cr2MoO6 type, different from that seen in Cr2TeO6. Ab-initio electronic structure calculations show that the sign and strength of the Cr-O-Cr exchange coupling is strongly influenced by the hybridization between Mo 4d and O 2p orbitals. This result further substantiates our recently proposed mechanism for tuning the exchange interaction between two magnetic atoms by modifying the electronic states of the non-magnetic atoms in the exchange path throughmore »orbital hybridization. This approach is fundamentally different from the conventional methods of controlling the exchange interaction by either carrier injection or through structural distortions.« less

  15. Thin-film growth of the charge-density-wave oxide Rb0.30MoO3 H. S. J. van der Zant,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thin-film growth of the charge-density-wave oxide Rb0.30MoO3 H. S. J. van der Zant,a) O. C. Mantel 29 April 1996 We report on the thin-film fabrication of a charge-density wave CDW compound. Single-phase epitaxial films of the model CDW oxide Rb0.30MoO3 have been grown by pulsed-laser deposition. Detailed

  16. Mo-O bond doping and related-defect assisted enhancement of photoluminescence in monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Xiaoxu; Yu, Zhihao; Cheng, Ying; Yu, Linwei; Wang, Junzhuan Wang, Xinran; Shi, Yi; Hu, Fengrui; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min

    2014-12-15

    In this work, we report a strong photoluminescence (PL) enhancement of monolayer MoS{sub 2} under different treatments. We find that by simple ambient annealing treatment in the range of 200?°C to 400?°C, the PL emission can be greatly enhanced by a factor up to two orders of magnitude. This enhancement can be attributed to two factors: first, the formation of Mo-O bonds during ambient exposure introduces an effective p-doping in the MoS{sub 2} layer; second, localized electrons formed around Mo-O bonds related defective sites where the electrons can be effectively localized with higher binding energy resulting in efficient radiative excitons recombination. Time resolved PL decay measurement showed that longer lifetime of the treated sample consistent with the higher quantum efficiency in PL. These results give more insights to understand the luminescence properties of the MoS{sub 2}.

  17. Facile and Green Preparation for the Formation of MoO2GO Composites as Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, the MoO2-GO composites exhibited an improved storage capacity for lithium-ion batteries. 1. INTRODUCTION With the fast-growing demand on petroleum resources and gaseous cycling life, and environmental benignity, lithium- ion batteries (LIBs) have been regarded as one

  18. Aboveground test of an advanced Li$_2$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometer to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bekker, T B; Danevich, F A; Degoda, V Ya; Giuliani, A; Grigorieva, V D; Ivannikova, N V; Mancuso, M; de Marcillac, P; Moroz, I M; Nones, C; Olivieri, E; Pessina, G; Poda, D V; Shlegel, V N; Tretyak, V I; Velazquez, M

    2014-01-01

    Large lithium molybdate (Li$_2$MoO$_4$) crystal boules were produced by using the low thermal gradient Czochralski growth technique from deeply purified molybdenum. A small sample from one of the boules was preliminary characterized in terms of X-ray-induced and thermally-excited luminescence. A large cylindrical crystalline element (with a size of $\\oslash 40\\times40$ mm) was used to fabricate a scintillating bolometer, which was operated aboveground at $\\sim 15$ mK by using a pulse-tube cryostat housing a high-power dilution refrigerator. The excellent detector performance in terms of energy resolution and $\\alpha$ background suppression along with preliminary positive indications on the radiopurity of this material show the potentiality of Li$_2$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers for low-counting experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo.

  19. Biographical Sketch JungHwan Oh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, JungHwan

    Florida DBMS Programmer & Office of Research 1996 ­ 2000 Maintenance Specialist University of Central, Multimedia data mining. Multimedia Big Data. I have established a medical video research in 2003 mining. Pending Supports 1. SCH: INT: Collaborative Research: Intraoperative Generation of the 3D

  20. Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane over V2O5/MoO3/Al2O3 and V2O5/Cr2O3/Al2O3: Structural Characterization and Catalytic Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane over V2O5/MoO3/Al2O3 and V2O5/Cr2O3/Al2O3: Structural of stoichiometric reduction in H2, and the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane. VOx domains on Al2O3 modified The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane provides an attractive route for the synthesis of propene.1

  1. Jee-Hwan Ryu School of Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Jee-Hwan

    Elements of Electricity EFS161 Korea University of Technology and Education (a) : (b) : Protons: Neutrons: Electrons: , #12;Korea University of Technology and Education (Electrical Current University of Technology and Education Mechanical and Electrical Analogy #12;Korea University of Technology

  2. Jee-Hwan Ryu School of Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Jee-Hwan

    Elements of Electricity MEC240 IT Korea University of Technology and Education (a) : (b) : Protons: Neutrons: Electrons: , #12;Korea University of Technology and Education (Electrical Current University of Technology and Education Mechanical and Electrical Analogy #12;Korea University of Technology

  3. Impurities in a Homogeneous Electron Gas Jung-Hwan Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansen, Henri J. F.

    thankful to my friends and office-mates, especially Jae-Hyuk Lee, Porn- rat Wattanakasiwich, and David

  4. Resultatives as Causal Relations between Events Ik-Hwan Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . She washes them clean. (resultative) = She washes them and, because she washes them, they become clean painted the car a pale shade of red. (RP=Noun Phrase) [Object-predicated] c. The brook froze solid. (RP of red, is predicated of the direct object NP the car. In (3c) the RP solid is predicated of the surface

  5. Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Kaviany and B.P. Singh, “Radiative heat transfer in porousmedia”, Advances in Heat Transfer, vol. 23, no. 23, pp. 133–Thermal radiation heat transfer, Hemisphere Publishing Co. ,

  6. Quadratic Regularization Design for 3D Axial CT Jang Hwan Cho and Jeffrey A. Fessler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) re- construction [1]. Regularized image reconstruction methods, such as penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) method or a penalized-likelihood (PL) method, provide noise control Impulse Response Consider a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) objec- tive function of the form (x

  7. The Microevolution of V1r Vomeronasal Receptor Genes in Seong Hwan Park ,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    terrestrial vertebrates: the main olfac- tory system (MOS) and the vomeronasal system (VNS) (Dulac and Torello and have distinct signal transduction pathways (Dulac and Torello 2003; Grus and Zhang 2006). The VNS

  8. Atomic and Electronic Structure of Pyrrole on Ge(100) Do Hwan Kim,,, Dae Sik Choi, Suklyun Hong,*, and Sehun Kim*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    ,*, and Sehun Kim*, Department of Chemistry and School of Molecular Science (BK 21), Korea AdVanced Institute in this area, many different types of reactions have been found that are analogues to those found in solution rows as in pyrimidine on Ge.7 Further, the fate of the dissociated hydrogen atom in the N

  9. Hyung-Sin Kim, Jin-Seok Han and Yong-Hwan Lee School of Electrical Engineering and INMC, Seoul National University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    to construct a large scale wireless sensor network (WSN). For example, ZigBee can construct a cluster conventional ZigBee in a large scale WSN. 1 Index Terms--wireless sensor network, network connection not be applicable to large scale WSNs [8]. To minimize energy consumption, ZigBee employs distributed network

  10. Interference Mitigation in IEEE 802.15.4 Networks Jin-Seok Han, Hyung-Sin Kim, Jae-Seok Bang and Yong-Hwan Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    importance. To alleviate the interference problem, ZigBee alliance has proposed an interference avoidance scheme [10]. The coordi- nator of ZigBee network detects the presence of interference by measuring

  11. Distributed Scalable Network Association in Wireless Sensor Networks Hyung-Sin Kim, Jin-Seok Han, Jae-Seok Bang, and Yong-Hwan Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    to securely allocate address to all the nodes in an energy efficient manner. ZigBee has been considered as one problem [10, 11]. As a consequence, it may not be feasible to apply ZigBee to the construction of a large to alleviate the scalability problem of ZigBee [7]. The SAAM makes each router allocate its child node

  12. Distributed Multi-Hop Network Association in Large-Scale Wireless Sensor Hyung-Sin Kim, Jae-Seok Bang, and Yong-Hwan Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    (i.e., to minimize energy consumption), while providing networking expansion capability [4]. ZigBee addressing space increasing exponentially proportional to the network depth [7]. Moreover, ZigBee employs]. As a consequence, ZigBee may not be practical for the construction of a large scale network. A stochastic address

  13. Discrimination of Chiral Adsorption Configurations: Styrene on Germanium(100) Yun Jeong Hwang, Eunkyung Hwang, Do Hwan Kim,,, Ansoon Kim,,| Suklyun Hong,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    Discrimination of Chiral Adsorption Configurations: Styrene on Germanium(100) Yun Jeong Hwang and desorption temperatures of styrene on a Ge surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), temperature that styrene molecules attach via the vinyl group in two adsorption configurations: (i) on the top of single Ge

  14. Debonding and fracture of ceramic islands on polymer substrates Jeong-Yun Sun, Nanshu Lu, Juil Yoon, Kyu-Hwan Oh, Zhigang Suo et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    is smaller than the interfacial toughness, the critical substrate strains for island fracture and debondingDebonding and fracture of ceramic islands on polymer substrates Jeong-Yun Sun, Nanshu Lu, Juil Yoon, 244706 (2011) Temperature-induced anomalous brittle-to-ductile transition of bulk metallic glasses Appl

  15. Bidentate Structures of Acetic Acid on Ge(100): The Role of Carboxyl Oxygen Eunkyung Hwang,, Do Hwan Kim,,, Yun Jeong Hwang, Ansoon Kim,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    Bidentate Structures of Acetic Acid on Ge(100): The Role of Carboxyl Oxygen Eunkyung Hwang,,§ Do structures of acetic acid on the Ge(100) surface at room temperature have been investigated by using both of acetic acid to acetate on the Ge(100) surface occurs through dissociation of the O-H bond

  16. Materials Data on Tl3(MoO4)2 (SG:186) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. High Capacity MoO3 Nanoparticle Li-Ion Battery Anode | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Nanostructured Metal Oxide Anodes Nanostructured Metal Oxide Anodes Novel Lithium Ion Anode Structures: Overview of New DOE BATT Anode Projects...

  18. Density Log at Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:Delta

  19. Neutron Log At Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd JumpNesjavellir Geothermal Power

  20. Resistivity Log At Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy RFPsLtdEnergyResidentialAlum Area

  1. Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log At Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)|Alabama:Crofton, Maryland: EnergyCrosby

  2. Gamma Log At Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprintGEXA Corp. (Delaware)Galveston Test JumpGambia:Alum

  3. Acoustic Logs At Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)dataSuccessful SmartAcomita Lake, New Mexico: EnergyAlum

  4. Geophys. J. Int. (2006) 166, 227237 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2006.02920.x GJISeismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatzfeld, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Seismological evidence for crustal-scale thrusting in the Zagros mountain belt (Iran) Anne Paul,1 Ayoub Kaviani spatial resolution. From the coast of the Persian Gulf to 25 km southwest of the Main Zagros Thrust (MZT by assuming that the crust of Zagros underthrusts the crust of central Iran along the MZT considered

  5. Geophys. J. Int. (2007) doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2007.03535.x GJISeismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatzfeld, Denis

    2007-01-01

    velocity contrast in the shallow mantle across the Zagros collision zone (Iran) A. Kaviani1,2 , A. Paul1 temporary seismic profile across the Zagros to investigate its upper-mantle structure. The S-wave model determined from Rayleigh wave dispersion in the Zagros fold and thrust belt has high velocities from 4.5 ± 0

  6. Shear-wave splitting, lithospheric anisotropy, and mantle deformation beneath the ArabiaEurasia collision zone in Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatzfeld, Denis

    ­Eurasia collision zone in Iran Ayoub Kaviani a,b,c , Denis Hatzfeld c, , Anne Paul c , Mohammad Tatar b , Keith Priestley d a Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Zanjan, Iran b International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology, P.O. Box 19395-3913, Tehran, Iran c

  7. Lithographically patterned wires of the charge-density-wave conductor Rb0.30MoO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekker, Cees

    condensation of electron-hole pairs, similar to Cooper-pair formation in superconductors. Several CDW properties can be described with equations for superconductors, with the role of current and voltage reversed and commercial applications. Even for the more complex high-TC superconductors, a thin-film tech- nology has been

  8. MoO3 as combined hole injection layer and tapered spacer in combinatorial multicolor microcavity organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, R.; Xu, Chun; Biswas, Rana; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth

    2011-09-01

    Multicolor microcavity ({mu}C) organic light-emitting diode (OLED) arrays were fabricated simply by controlling the hole injection and spacer MoO{sub 3} layer thickness. The normal emission was tunable from {approx}490 to 640 nm and can be further expanded. A compact, integrated spectrometer with two-dimensional combinatorial arrays of {mu}C OLEDs was realized. The MoO{sub 3} yields more efficient and stable devices, revealing a new breakdown mechanism. The pixel current density reaches {approx}4 A/cm{sup 2} and a maximal normal brightness {approx}140 000 Cd/m{sup 2}, which improves photoluminescence-based sensing and absorption measurements.

  9. CRITICAL BEHAVIOR OF ACOUSTICAL WAVES IN FERROELECTRIC-FERROELASTIC PHASE OF Tb2(MoO4)3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . - Gadolinium molybdate Gd2(MO04). (GMO) and terbium molybdate Tb2(Mo04)3 (TMO) under- goes a ,structural phase]. Ultrasonic measurements [5, 6] and Brillouin diffusion experiments [7, 8] have been carried out on GMO with the Centre National de la Recherche Scienti- fique. for a and c directions in a GMO monodomain : a coupling

  10. ATTNUATION ULTRASONORE CRITIQUE DANS Gd2(MoO4)3 J. M. COURDILLE et J. DUMAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .8 1027 s-2. Introduction. - Le molybdate de gadolinium Gd2(Mo04)3 (GMO) subit vers 159 ~C une transition dans sa theorie phenomenologique du GMO [10, 11]. Resultats experimentaux. - Nous mesurons 1'atte axes orthorhombiques [100] et [001

  11. KIM, SANG-HWAN. Examining and Explaining the Effects of Non-Iconic Conformal Features in Advanced Head-up Displays on Pilot Performance. (Under the direction of Dr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    (HUD) during various phases of a landing approach under instrument meteorological conditions (IMCs presenting varied HUD configurations were pre-recorded using a high-fidelity flight simulator at NASA Langley and presented to eight pilots later in a lab environment. The HUD videos from the high- fidelity simulator were

  12. Comparison of near-threshold reactivity of ground-state and spin-orbit excited chlorine atoms with methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    with methane Zee Hwan Kim, Andrew J. Alexander,a) Hans A. Bechtel, and Richard N. Zareb) Department of methane with atomic chlorine is initiated by photolysis of BrCl. Near 420 nm, the resulting mixture

  13. Domain inversion in LiNbQ using direct electron-beam writing Alan C. G. Nutt, Venkatraman Gopalan,a)and Moo1C. Gupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Venkatraman

    Domain inversion in LiNbQ using direct electron-beam writing Alan C. G. Nutt, Venkatraman Gopalan- face of LiNbQs has been written using direct electron-beam writing for first-order gratings used of the domain and need for a conductor on the C+ face during the electron-beam writing process. The quasiphase

  14. Scintillating bolometers based on ZnMoO$_4$ and Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystals to search for 0$\

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poda, D V; Arnaud, Q; Augier, C; Benoît, A; Bergé, L; Boiko, R S; Bergmann, T; Blümer, J; Broniatowski, A; Brudanin, V; Camus, P; Cazes, A; Censier, B; Chapellier, M; Charlieux, F; Chernyak, D M; Coron, N; Coulter, P; Cox, G A; Danevich, F A; de Boissière, T; Decourt, R; De Jesus, M; Devoyon, L; Drillien, A -A; Dumoulin, L; Eitel, K; Enss, C; Filosofov, D; Fleischmann, A; Fourches, N; Gascon, J; Gastaldo, L; Gerbier, G; Giuliani, A; Gros, M; Hehn, L; Henry, S; Hervé, S; Heuermann, G; Humbert, V; Ivanov, I M; Juillard, A; Kéfélian, C; Kleifges, M; Kluck, H; Kobychev, V V; Koskas, F; Kozlov, V; Kraus, H; Kudryavtsev, V A; Sueur, H Le; Loidl, M; Magnier, P; Makarov, E P; Mancuso, M; de Marcillac, P; Marnieros, S; Marrache-Kikuchi, C; Menshikov, A; Nasonov, S G; Navick, X-F; Nones, C; Olivieri, E; Pari, P; Paul, B; Penichot, Y; Pessina, G; Piro, M C; Plantevin, O; Redon, T; Robinson, M; Rodrigues, M; Rozov, S; Sanglard, V; Schmidt, B; Shlegel, V N; Siebenborn, B; Strazzer, O; Tcherniakhovski, D; Tenconi, M; Torres, L; Tretyak, V I; Vagneron, L; Vasiliev, Ya V; Velazquez, M; Viraphong, O; Walker, R J; Weber, M; Yakushev, E; Zhang, X; Zhdankov, V N

    2015-01-01

    The technology of scintillating bolometers based on zinc molybdate (ZnMoO$_4$) crystals is under development within the LUMINEU project to search for 0$\

  15. First-principles determination of static potential energy surfaces for atomic friction in MoS2 and MoO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Wallace

    Received 1 October 2007; published 10 March 2008 Using first-principles electronic-structure calculations friction, sophisticated descriptions of atomic bonding and electron density can now be used to calculate by first-principles calculations,3­5 or using empirical poten- tials in molecular dynamics simulations.1

  16. Affinity Purification and Characterization of a Cutinase from the Fungal Plant Pathogen Monilinia fructicola (Wint.) Honey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    fructicola (Wint.) Honey Guang-Yi Wang,* Themis J. Michailides,* Bruce D. Hammock, Young-Moo Lee, and Richard

  17. Mesoscopic Charge Density Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.3.1 Thin lms of Rb0:30MoO3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 2 Thin Rb0:30MoO3 lms by pulsed-laser deposition 23 2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 3.2 Thin lms of Rb0:30MoO3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 3.3 Fabrication of Rb0

  18. Effect of proton exchange on the nonlinear optical properties of LiNb& Wei-Yung Hsu,~) Craig S. Willand, Venkatraman Gopalan,a) and Moo1 C. Gupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Venkatraman

    Effect of proton exchange on the nonlinear optical properties of LiNb& and LiTaO, Wei-Yung Hsu 1992) The effect of proton exchange carried out using benzoic and pyrophosphoric acid on the nonlinear of proton exchange with either benzoic or pyrophosphoric acid under the conditions studied. Some recovery

  19. Scintillating bolometers based on ZnMoO$_4$ and Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystals to search for 0$?$2$?$ decay of $^{100}$Mo (LUMINEU project): first tests at the Modane Underground Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Poda; E. Armengaud; Q. Arnaud; C. Augier; A. Benoît; A. Benoît; L. Bergé; R. S. Boiko; T. Bergmann; J. Blümer; A. Broniatowski; V. Brudanin; P. Camus; A. Cazes; B. Censier; M. Chapellier; F. Charlieux; D. M. Chernyak; N. Coron; P. Coulter; G. A. Cox; F. A. Danevich; T. de Boissière; R. Decourt; M. De Jesus; L. Devoyon; A. -A. Drillien; L. Dumoulin; K. Eitel; C. Enss; D. Filosofov; A. Fleischmann; N. Fourches; J. Gascon; L. Gastaldo; G. Gerbier; A. Giuliani; M. Gros; L. Hehn; S. Henry; S. Hervé; G. Heuermann; V. Humbert; I. M. Ivanov; A. Juillard; C. Kéfélian; M. Kleifges; H. Kluck; V. V. Kobychev; F. Koskas; V. Kozlov; H. Kraus; V. A. Kudryavtsev; H. Le Sueur; M. Loidl; P. Magnier; E. P. Makarov; M. Mancuso; P. de Marcillac; S. Marnieros; C. Marrache-Kikuchi; A. Menshikov; S. G. Nasonov; X-F. Navick; C. Nones; E. Olivieri; P. Pari; B. Paul; Y. Penichot; G. Pessina; M. C. Piro; O. Plantevin; T. Redon; M. Robinson; M. Rodrigues; S. Rozov; V. Sanglard; B. Schmidt; V. N. Shlegel; B. Siebenborn; O. Strazzer; D. Tcherniakhovski; M. Tenconi; L. Torres; V. I. Tretyak; L. Vagneron; Ya. V. Vasiliev; M. Velazquez; O. Viraphong; R. J. Walker; M. Weber; E. Yakushev; X. Zhang; V. N. Zhdankov

    2015-02-04

    The technology of scintillating bolometers based on zinc molybdate (ZnMoO$_4$) crystals is under development within the LUMINEU project to search for 0$\

  20. p s sreprints www.interscience.wiley.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    energy transfer directed from colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots to epitaxial InGaN/GaN quantum wells for solar cells Sedat Nizamoglu*, 1 , Emre Sari1 , Jong-Hyeob Baek2 , In-Hwan Lee3 , and Hilmi Volkan Demir1 transfer, nanoscale, quantum dots, semiconductors, solar cells * Corresponding author: e-mail sedatn

  1. Polymer International Polym Int 55:292298 (2006) DOI: 10.1002/pi.1951

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Siqun

    2006-01-01

    Polymer International Polym Int 55:292­298 (2006) DOI: 10.1002/pi.1951 Crystallization behaviour of cellulose acetate butylate/poly(butylene succinate)-co-(butylene carbonate) blends Seung-Hwan Lee and Siqun(butylene succinate)-co-(butylene carbonate) (PBS-co-BC) and its blends with cellulose acetate butylate (CAB) (10

  2. Channel-specific angular distributions of HCl and CH3 products from the reaction of atomic chlorine with stretch-excited methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    with stretch-excited methane Zee Hwan Kim, Hans A. Bechtel, and Richard N. Zarea) Department of Chemistry containing methane and molecular chlorine is expanded into a vacuum where the methane is excited with two to involve the nonadiabatic interaction involving the low frequency bending mode in methane that correlates

  3. RNA-Seq Approach for Genetic Improvement of Meat Quality in Pig and Evolutionary Insight into the Substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Keun Woo

    Chung1,2 , Young Min Song1,2 , Il Suk Kim1,2 , Sang Keun Jin1,2 , Doo Hwan Kim1,2 , Seung-Won Lee3 , Keun Woo Lee4,5 , Woo Young Bang2 *, Chul Wook Kim1,2 * 1 Department of Animal Resources Technology

  4. 2013. 5. 29 -5. 31 NUCLEAR SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., Ltd) Seong O Kim, Ji Young Jeong, and Tae Ho Lee(KAERI) 09:20 CFD Analysis of a Centrifugal Pump-Yong Sung, Min-Hwan Kim, and Yong-Wan Kim(KAERI) 12:00 Economic and Environmental Value of Advanced Fuel

  5. www.afm-journal.de Vol. 25 No. 32 August 26 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    , hardware-secure digital memories, and other applications that are not well served by conventional technolo for Programmed, Functional Transformation of Transient Electronic Devices Chi Hwan Lee, Seung-Kyun Kang, Giovanni that enable programmable transformation of functional behaviors by remote control or by autonomous responses

  6. Journal of Chromatography A, 1154 (2007) 444453 Characterization and performance of injection molded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    2007-01-01

    molded poly(methylmethacrylate) microchips for capillary electrophoresis Irena Nikcevica, Se Hwan Leeb March 2007; accepted 30 March 2007 Available online 6 April 2007 Abstract Injection molded poly measured parameters. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Injection molding; Poly

  7. RESEARCH ARTICLE Disentangling the Complexity of HGF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timmer, Jens

    and Quantitative Modeling Lorenza A. D'Alessandro1 , Regina Samaga2 , Tim Maiwald3,4 , Seong-Hwan Rho3,4¤ , Sandra, Goyang, Korea * jeti@fdm.uni-freiburg.de (JT); klamt@mpi-magdeburg.mpg.de (SK); u

  8. 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim 1 www.advmat.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    by Self-Heating Sung-Hwan Bae, Sangmin Lee, Hyun Koo, Long Lin, Bong Hyun Jo, Chan Park,* and Zhong Lin consumption but also high-speed operation and long retention based on simple structures.[1] Recently in 1791.[2] Since memristors can achieve both high integration density and low switching power consumption

  9. Performance Comparison of the Distributed Extended Kalman Filter and Markov Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Matthew

    Particle Filter (MCDPF) Sun Hwan Lee Matthew West Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Stanford accurate. Keywords: Target tracking filters, Estimation algorithm, Distributed estimation, Sensor network. Chen and Somani, 2006), target tracking (Sheng et al., 2005) and surveillance (Yan et al., 2003

  10. Pyroelectric energy conversion using PLZT ceramics and the ferroelectricergodic relaxor phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Pyroelectric energy conversion using PLZT ceramics and the ferroelectric­ergodic relaxor phase conversion using PLZT ceramics and the ferroelectric­ergodic relaxor phase transition Felix Y Lee, Hwan Ryul titanate (PLZT) ceramics undergoing a relaxor­ferroelectric phase transition. The Olsen cycle consists

  11. October 11, 2005 10:11 Proceedings Trim Size: 9.75in x 6.5in apbc ALIGNSCOPE : A VISUAL MINING TOOL FOR GENE TEAM FINDING WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Limsoon

    FOR GENE TEAM FINDING WITH WHOLE GENOME ALIGNMENT HEE-JEONG JIN,1 HYE-JUNG KIM,1 JEONG-HYEON CHOI2 AND HWAN@indiana.edu One of the main issues in comparative genomics is the study of chromosomal gene order in one or more related species. Recently identifying sets of orthologous genes in several genomes has become getting

  12. Groundwater Chemistry Changes as a Result of CO2 Injection at the ZERT Field Site in Bozeman, Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Co +2 Cu + Cd +2 PbSe CrO + AsSe(OH)(SeH) - FeSe MoO 4-2 UOCo +2 Cu + Cd +2 PbSe CrO + AsSe(OH)(SeH) - FeSe MoO 4-2 UO

  13. 91Fall 2008 Volume 42, Number 3 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiu, Peng

    ), GoMOOS has served as a proving ground for new technologies, operational procedures, protocolsMOOS) was established in the summer of 2001 as a prototype real-time observing system that now includes eleven solar pose severe chal- lenges, including high waves and the build-up of sea ice on buoy sensors

  14. Multiobjective Optimization and Phase Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seoane, Luís F

    2015-01-01

    Many complex systems obey to optimality conditions that are usually not simple. Conflicting traits often interact making a Multi Objective Optimization (MOO) approach necessary. Recent MOO research on complex systems report about the Pareto front (optimal designs implementing the best trade-off) in a qualitative manner. Meanwhile, research on traditional Simple Objective Optimization (SOO) often finds phase transitions and critical points. We summarize a robust framework that accounts for phase transitions located through SOO techniques and indicates what MOO features resolutely lead to phase transitions. These appear determined by the shape of the Pareto front, which at the same time is deeply related to the thermodynamic Gibbs surface. Indeed, thermodynamics can be written as an MOO from where its phase transitions can be parsimoniously derived; suggesting that the similarities between transitions in MOO-SOO and Statistical Mechanics go beyond mere coincidence.

  15. Adaptive Resource Management Schemes for Web Services 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Heung Ki

    2011-02-22

    MANAGEMENT SCHEMES FOR WEB SERVICES A Dissertation by HEUNG KI LEE Submitted to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulflllment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2009 Major Subject: Computer...: Chair of Committee, Eun Jung Kim Committee Members, Riccardo Bettati Rabi N. Mahapatra Deepa Kundur Ki Hwan Yum Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor December 2009 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Adaptive Resource Management Schemes for Web...

  16. Religion and Politics in Japan: The Case of the S?ka Gakkai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moos, Felix

    1963-01-01

    your stories about how Open Access to this article benefits you. This is the published version of the article, made available with the permission of the publisher. Moos, Felix. 1963. Religions and Politics in Japan: The Case of Soka Gakkai. Asian... Survey, Vol. 3, pp.136-142. Terms of Use: http://www2.ku.edu/~scholar/docs/license.shtml by Felix Moos RELIGION AND POLITICS IN JAPAN: THE CASE OF THE SOKA GAKKAI* FELIX MOOS Japan has never known the domination of any single religio...

  17. Unfinished Business Dennis E. White

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    Johannes C. C. Nitsche #12;Deans Steven Crouch Ted Davis Willard Miller Francis Kulacki Gordon Beavers Malcolm Moos #12;More Presidents Barack Obama G. W. Bush Bill Clinton G. H. W. Bush Ronald Reagan Jimmy

  18. Religion and Politics in Japan: The Case of the S?ka Gakkai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moos, Felix

    1963-03-01

    Extract from ASIAN SURVEY March, 190.5 Religion and Politics in Japan: The Case of the Soka Gakkai By Felix Moos East Asian Scries, Reprint No. (> INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CENTER FOR EAST ASIAN STUOIES THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS Lawrence... in the Philip pines, by Edgar Wickberg. 4. Some Aspects of Korean Acculturation and Value Orientation Since 1950, by Felix Moos. 5. The Philippine Political Party System, by Carl H. Lande. 6. Religion and Politics in Japan: The Case of the Soka Gakkai...

  19. Mechanism of Na2SO4-induced corrosion of molybdenum containing nickel-base superalloys at high temperatures. I. Corrosion in atmospheres containing O2 only. II. Corrosion in O2 + SO2 atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, A.K.

    1986-05-01

    Kinetics of the Na2SO4-induced corrosion of the molybdenum-containing nickel-base superalloys, B-1900 and Udimet 700, coated with Na2MoO4, has been studied in oxygen atmosphere at temperatures ranging from 750 to 950 C. Because the gas turbine atmosphere always contains some SO2 and SO3, the effect of atmospheric SO2 content on corrosion of Udimet-700 has also been studied. It was found that in the O2 atmosphere the melt in the catastrophic corrosion phase consists of Na2MoO4 plus MoO3, with the onset of the catastrophic corrosion coinciding with the appearance of MoO3. In the presence of low levels of atmospheric SO2 (below 0.24 percent), the melt during catastrophic corrosion contains, in addition to Na2MoO4 and MoO3, some quantities of Na2SO4. At the levels of SO2 above 1 percent, no catastrophic corrosion was observed. At these SO2 levels, internal sulfidation appears to be the primary mode of degradation. 40 references.

  20. Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms Inform Discovery: Identification and Characterization of a Novel Amycolatopsis Strain Producing Ristocetin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truman, Andrew W.; Kwun, Min Jung; Cheng, Jinhua; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won; Hong, Hee-Jeon

    2014-07-16

    1 1 2 Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms Inform Discovery: Identification and Characterization of a Novel 3 Amycolatopsis Strain Producing Ristocetin 4 5 6 Andrew W. Truman,a* Min Jung Kwun,b Jinhua Cheng,c Seung Hwan Yang,c Joo-Won Suh,d... glycopeptide antibiotics such as vancomycin. Vancomycin inhibits the completion of bacterial cell wall 71 peptidoglycan biosynthesis by non-covalently binding to the teminus of growing peptidoglycan, D-72 4 alanyl-D-alanine (D-Ala-D-Ala) (3). For more...

  1. Simulation of surface waves with porous boundaries in a 2-D numerical wave tank 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Weoncheol

    1999-01-01

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Moo-Hyu Kim (Chair of Committee) Hamn-Chi g Chen (Member) Robert O. Reid (Member) M. Nied e i ( ead of Departm nt) May 1999 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering ABSTRACT Simulation.... Moo-Hyun Kim for the guidance, assistance and supervision he has shown in completing this thesis. The patience and encouragement he has shown when various problems occurred are much appreciated. I also want to thank Dr. Hamn-Ching Chen...

  2. Methane Activation by Transition-Metal Oxides, MOx (M ) Cr, Mo, W; x ) 1, 2, 3) Xin Xu,# Francesco Faglioni, and William A. Goddard, III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Methane Activation by Transition-Metal Oxides, MOx (M ) Cr, Mo, W; x ) 1, 2, 3) Xin Xu,# Francesco, 2002 Recent experiments on the dehydrogenation-aromatization of methane (DHAM) to form benzene using a MoO3/HZSM-5 catalyst stimulated us to examine methane activation by the transition-metal oxide

  3. PROTON MOBILITY IN MOLYBDENUM BRONZES A. CIRILLO and J. J. FRIPIAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    microcrystalline MoO3, covered with small particles of Pt, to gaseous hydrogen. A pulsed proton magnetic resonance is very small due to the small electron density seen by the nucleus as a result of diffusion. LE JOURNAL of the hydro- gen species formed to the oxide - a process aided by a carrier ; and third, the invasion

  4. Advances in Whole Genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    Advances in Whole Genome Sequencing IMA Public Lecture: Tuesday, May 6, 2003, 7:30 p.m. Moos Tower sequenced genome, the virus Lambda at 50,000 nucleotides, was sequenced via the shotgun method by Sanger that this approach could not be applied to genomes over 100,000 nucleotides long, so a long period followed where

  5. Amsterdam Oxford Joint Rescue Forces Team Description Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Arnoud

    Simulation League RoboCup 2010 and Iran Open Arnoud Visser1 , Quang Nguyen1 , Bas Terwijn1 , Moos Hueting1 to be able to autonomously explore with the AirRobots. Robots equipped with both camera and laser-range scanners can learn a visual classifier of free space, which could be used by robots without laser

  6. Configurac~ao do Suporte de Comunicac~ao em Ambientes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigues, Luís E.T.

    ¸~ao de protocolos configur´avel, que fornece a comunicac¸~ao em grupo. Este artigo discute o papel do, mudanc¸as din^amicas e efici^encia deste tipo de sistemas, os ambientes MOO (multi-utilizador orientados

  7. Microstructured porous ZnO thin film for increased light scattering and improved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    (12), 3408­3418 (2011). 3. J. D. Servaites, M. A. Ratner, and T. J. Marks, "Organic solar cells: A new look, "Inverted tandem organic solar cells with a MoO3/Ag/Al/Ca intermediate layer," Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, D. W. Zhao, and D. L. Kwong, "An inverted organic solar cell employing a sol-gel derived Zn

  8. Third Annual Cyber Security and Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Axel W.

    Third Annual Cyber Security and Information Infrastructure Research Workshop May 14-15, 2007 TOWARDS COMPREHENSIVE STRATEGIES THAT MEET THE CYBER SECURITY CHALLENGES OF THE 21ST CENTURY Frederick Sheldon, Axel Krings, Seong-Moo Yoo, and Ali Mili (Editors) #12;CSIIRW07: Cyber Security and Information

  9. Analysis Report for the Shielded Container Performance Assessment Page 1 of 51

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (6710) Print Signature Date Management Review: Moo Y. Lee (6711) Print Signature Date WIPP:1.4.1.2:PA SUMMARY The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a deep geologic repository developed by the U at the WIPP is regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) according to the requirements set

  10. Surface Engineering Proceedings of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    oxides such as WO3, MoO3 and TiO2 were studied. In this paper, however, the results in the case of one for the nanotube/nanowire synthesis. Thus, they become model systems to study and correlate the theoretical

  11. E A S T C A R O L I N A U N I V E R S I T Y r e s e a r c h a n d c r e a t i v e a c t i v i t y SPRING 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigsby, Catherine A.

    the beauty of a deep blue sky reflected in the flowing water. Then a strong north wind brought the mooing students, faculty and staff · SPRING 2000 · 6 E EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA WAS STUNNED BY THE FLOOD OF '99. ECU to normal in eastern North Carolina.At the United Methodist Church in Grifton, where the School of Medicine

  12. Dipole moments of boroxazolidines in 1, 4-Dioxane 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Hwei Choung

    1961-01-01

    Soba44oa4 oo the thacaaoe sohool ot hho AIL4aLLtaxol ana Noojtaotoa1 Qolloao af %'aaao 1a faltlllaeat, ot ihe ooyc~moo fag oho doggie of SeSXR ts' IC 148? Aypaee4 ae ee etre sa4 ?elms bgt (dhainaa ef CoaaLt tea) cg c gee ot Qsyarhswi) Qeg...

  13. Electric field dependence of the effective dielectric constant in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    field Eext as in: 1.00 V/Å 0.10 V/Å #12;Graphene h-BN What about other 2D-materials? -MoO3 2D: not a metal, not a semiconductor Also apply for multilayer graphene #12;Polarization charge is field dependent The non-linear screening effect is the main reason behind of the electric tuning Other 2D-crystals, e

  14. The Chinese Mestizo in Philippine History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wickberg, Edgar

    1964-03-01

    Reprinted from THE JOURNAL SOUTHEAST ASIAN HISTORY (Vol. 5, No. 1) March 1964 (pp. 62-100) The Chinese Mestizo in Philippine History By E. Wickberg East Asian Series, Reprint No. 10 INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CENTER FOR EAST ASIAN STUDIES... Chinese Economic Influences in the Philip pines, by Edgar Wickberg. 4. Some Aspects of Korean Acculturation and Value Orientation Since 1950, by Felix Moos. 5. The Philippine Political Party System, by Carl H. Lande. 6. Religion and Politics in Japan...

  15. Morphological features of crinoid columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, R. C.; Jeffords, Russell M.; Miller, T. H.

    1968-01-26

    , but experience will be necessary in order to determine best methods of preparation and criteria that may be used most successfully for classification. Some hard sandstones, siltstones, and impure lime- stones which contain or once contained fragmentary re- mains... Oregon (Nehalem River region) which furnished excellent natural and artificial molds used in studies of the stem parts and other dissociated fragments (MooRE & \\JOKES, 1953). Mode of occurrence of these fossils and their association with leaves of land...

  16. In Situ Time-Resolved Characterization of Ni-MoO2 Catalysts for the Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen,W.; Calderon, J.; Brito, J.; Marinkovic, N.; Hanson, J.; Rodriquez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Active catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS, CO + H2O ? H2 + CO2) reaction were synthesized from nickel molybdates ({beta}-NiMoO4 and nH2O{center_dot}NiMoO4) as precursors, and their structural transformations were monitored using in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. In general, the nickel molybdates were not stable and underwent partial reduction in the presence of CO or CO/H2O mixtures at high temperatures. The interaction of {beta}-NiMoO4 with the WGS reactants at 500 C led to the formation of a mixture of Ni (24 nm particle size) and MoO2 (10 nm particle size). These Ni-MoO2 systems displayed good catalytic activity at 350, 400, and 500 C. At 350 and 400 C, catalytic tests revealed that the Ni-MoO2 system was much more active than isolated Ni (some activity) or isolated MoO2 (negligible activity). Thus, cooperative interactions between the admetal and oxide support were probably responsible for the high WGS activity of Ni-MoO2. In a second synthetic approach, the NiMoO4 hydrate was reduced to a mixture of metallic Ni, NiO, and amorphous molybdenum oxide by direct reaction with H2 gas at 350 C. In the first pass of the water-gas shift reaction, MoO2 appeared gradually at 500 C with a concurrent increase of the catalytic activity. For these catalysts, the particle size of Ni (4 nm) was much smaller than that of the MoO2 (13 nm). These systems were found to be much more active WGS catalysts than Cu-MoO2, which in turn is superior to commercial low-temperature Cu-ZnO catalysts.

  17. 12 2000 UT University of Tokyo Forum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    20 12 2000 UT University of Tokyo Forum 6 UT 19 2007 6 25 26 6 25 26 2 6 UT 2 2 UT 2 21 21 COE 6 UT-KU Forum:"University Education in the midst of Globalization" 2 150 #12;22 UT 2 6 26 #12;? 1 21 21 2,000 23-Moo 1944 67 72 81 88 99 2000 00 02 03 04 05 4 28 KOMIYAMA Hiroshi 19 6 26 #12;26 UT 2000 1 2 1 1 2 3 4 4 5

  18. Evaluation of a Direct Evaporative Roof-Spray Cooling System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrasco, A.; Pittard, R.; Kondepudi, S. N.; Somasundaram, S.

    1987-01-01

    of Evaporative Cooling of Roofs", Project Report, I (1986). JULY 29 * EXP-Wcr + EXP-DRY --- MOO-WET -- MOD-DRY TIME OF DAY IN DECIMAL HOURS Figure 3. Heat Flux Through the Roof - July 29 TIME OF DAY IN DECIMAL HOURS 150- v, W W 140- CC Z: P 130... gunny bags on the temperatures and heat flux at the ceiling surface of thick roofs. They concluded that, in the tropics, for the effect of reduced indoor temper- atures to be more effective, the roofs needed to be treated. They further confirmed...

  19. Development of cryogenic low background detector based on enriched zinc molybdate crystal scintillators to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Chernyak

    2015-07-16

    ZnMoO$_4$ scintillators with a mass of $\\sim$ 0.3 kg, as well as Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystals enriched in the isotope $^{100}$Mo were produced for the first time by using the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique. The optical and luminescent properties of the produced crystals were studied to estimate the progress in crystal growth quality. The low-temperature tests with a 313 g ZnMoO$_4$ and two enriched Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystals were performed aboveground in the Centre de Sciences Nucl\\'eaires et de Sciences de la Mati\\`ere. The low background measurements with a three ZnMoO$_4$ and two enriched detectors installed in the EDELWEISS set-up at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane were carried out. To optimize the light collection in ZnMoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers, we have simulated the collection of scintillation photons in a detector module for different geometries by Monte Carlo method using the GEANT4 package. Response to the 2$\

  20. Tuning charge–discharge induced unit cell breathing in layer-structured cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Yong-Ning; Ma, Jun; Hu, Enyuan; Yu, Xiqian; Gu, Lin; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Chen, Liquan; Wang, Zhaoxiang; Yang, Xiao -Qing

    2014-11-18

    Through a systematic study of lithium molybdenum trioxide (Li2MoO3), a new ‘unit cell breathing’ mechanism is introduced based on both crystal and electronic structural changes of transition metal oxide cathode materials during charge–discharge: For widely used LiMO2 (M = Co, Ni, Mn), lattice parameters, a and b, contracts during charge. However, for Li2MoO3, such changes are in opposite directions. Metal–metal bonding is used to explain such ‘abnormal’ behaviour and a generalized hypothesis is developed. The expansion of M–M bond becomes the controlling factor for a(b) evolution during charge, in contrast to the shrinking M–O as controlling factor in ‘normal’ materials.more »The cation mixing caused by migration of Mo ions at higher oxidation state provides the benefits of reducing the c expansion range in early stage of charging and suppressing the structure collapse at high voltage charge. These results open a new strategy for designing and engineering layered cathode materials for high energy density lithium-ion batteries.« less

  1. Development of cryogenic low background detector based on enriched zinc molybdate crystal scintillators to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chernyak, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    ZnMoO$_4$ scintillators with a mass of $\\sim$ 0.3 kg, as well as Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystals enriched in the isotope $^{100}$Mo were produced for the first time by using the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique. The optical and luminescent properties of the produced crystals were studied to estimate the progress in crystal growth quality. The low-temperature tests with a 313 g ZnMoO$_4$ and two enriched Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystals were performed aboveground in the Centre de Sciences Nucl\\'eaires et de Sciences de la Mati\\`ere. The low background measurements with a three ZnMoO$_4$ and two enriched detectors installed in the EDELWEISS set-up at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane were carried out. To optimize the light collection in ZnMoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers, we have simulated the collection of scintillation photons in a detector module for different geometries by Monte Carlo method using the GEANT4 package. Response to the 2$\

  2. Development of flexible, free-standing, thin films for additive manufacturing and localized energy generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clark, Billy; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    Film energetics are becoming increasingly popular because a variety of technologies are driving a need for localized energy generation in a stable, safe and flexible form. Aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO?) composites were mixed into a silicon binder and extruded using a blade casting technique to form flexible free-standing films ideal for localized energy generation. Since this material can be extruded onto a surface it is well suited to additive manufacturing applications. This study examines the influence of 0-35% by mass potassium perchlorate (KClO?) additive on the combustion behavior of these energetic films. Without KClO? the film exhibits thermalmore »instabilities that produce unsteady energy propagation upon reaction. All films were cast at a thickness of 1 mm with constant volume percent solids to ensure consistent rheological properties. The films were ignited and flame propagation was measured. The results show that as the mass percent KClO? increased, the flame speed increased and peaked at 0.43 cm/s and 30 wt% KClO?. Thermochemical equilibrium simulations show that the heat of combustion increases with increasing KClO? concentration up to a maximum at 20 wt% when the heat of combustion plateaus, indicating that the increased chemical energy liberated by the additional KClO? promotes stable energy propagation. Differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis show that the silicone binder participates as a fuel and reacts with KClO? adding energy to the reaction and promoting propagation.« less

  3. Design of a 465 MW Combined Cycle Cogeneration Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leffler, D. W.

    1986-01-01

    'PLy ~P5KJ~S?lritN/1-R(4.J'l4~ I I 80"121'1:' """ ~ '-..J o ~ o UV-HR fr/( IS) l!AS -nJR8f1f ~PS.C~~2;fc; .. CEH?RATORS ""~OO' laM' , ~.~ 1<0/']-1 1.2.'0 PSG I MOO kPo 1 m-F"15Ol-c1 lO.9,l4,oo::l lB/1-R ( 01'9 kOli \\ 11,0" 149 to~~~t5~'t'~~ I......K'4---'-~<:lG'N- S1't.Ml ~ ST[AI.f TO f'ROC(SS PlWl ustll5 \\050,000 LB/lfl (132.4 0/' I 1.,370,000 I..fl.Ilfl r In.7 klV11 Pl..NIT NET ~""T RAT? :1,:513 8T\\J/t(\\IIlH (L1?N I 1,..!)l)~rge:lOkPuI (5615 KJ/KWH! lHV I I HPfW 2S~ l tU?e) PLAN...

  4. Development of flexible, free-standing, thin films for additive manufacturing and localized energy generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Billy; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    Film energetics are becoming increasingly popular because a variety of technologies are driving a need for localized energy generation in a stable, safe and flexible form. Aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO?) composites were mixed into a silicon binder and extruded using a blade casting technique to form flexible free-standing films ideal for localized energy generation. Since this material can be extruded onto a surface it is well suited to additive manufacturing applications. This study examines the influence of 0-35% by mass potassium perchlorate (KClO?) additive on the combustion behavior of these energetic films. Without KClO? the film exhibits thermal instabilities that produce unsteady energy propagation upon reaction. All films were cast at a thickness of 1 mm with constant volume percent solids to ensure consistent rheological properties. The films were ignited and flame propagation was measured. The results show that as the mass percent KClO? increased, the flame speed increased and peaked at 0.43 cm/s and 30 wt% KClO?. Thermochemical equilibrium simulations show that the heat of combustion increases with increasing KClO? concentration up to a maximum at 20 wt% when the heat of combustion plateaus, indicating that the increased chemical energy liberated by the additional KClO? promotes stable energy propagation. Differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis show that the silicone binder participates as a fuel and reacts with KClO? adding energy to the reaction and promoting propagation.

  5. ZINC MITIGATION INTERIM REPORT - THERMODYNAMIC STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2010-12-17

    An experimental program was initiated in order to develop and validate conditions that will effectively trap Zn vapors that are released during extraction. The proposed work is broken down into three tasks. The first task is to determine the effectiveness of various pore sizes of filter elements. The second task is to determine the effect of filter temperature on zinc vapor deposition. The final task is to determine whether the zinc vapors can be chemically bound. The approach for chemically binding the zinc vapors has two subtasks, the first is a review of literature and thermodynamic calculations and the second is an experimental approach using the best candidates. This report details the results of the thermodynamic calculations to determine feasibility of chemically binding the zinc vapors within the furnace module, specifically the lithium trap (1). A review of phase diagrams, literature, and thermodynamic calculations was conducted to determine if there are suitable materials to capture zinc vapor within the lithium trap of the extraction basket. While numerous elements exist that form compounds with zinc, many of these also form compounds with hydrogen or the water that is present in the TPBARs. This relatively comprehensive review of available data indicates that elemental cobalt and copper and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) may have the requisite properties to capture zinc and yet not be adversely affected by the extraction gases and should be considered for testing.

  6. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  7. ALD of Al2O3 for Highly Improved Performance in Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, A.; Jung, Y. S.; Ban, C.; Riley, L.; Cavanagh, A.; Yan, Y.; George, S.; Lee, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances in energy density, rate capability and safety will be required for the implementation of Li-ion batteries in next generation electric vehicles. We have demonstrated atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a promising method to enable superior cycling performance for a vast variety of battery electrodes. The electrodes range from already demonstrated commercial technologies (cycled under extreme conditions) to new materials that could eventually lead to batteries with higher energy densities. For example, an Al2O3 ALD coating with a thickness of ~ 8 A was able to stabilize the cycling of unexplored MoO3 nanoparticle anodes with a high volume expansion. The ALD coating enabled stable cycling at C/2 with a capacity of ~ 900 mAh/g. Furthermore, rate capability studies showed the ALD-coated electrode maintained a capacity of 600 mAh/g at 5C. For uncoated electrodes it was only possible to observe stable cycling at C/10. Also, we recently reported that a thin ALD Al2O3 coating with a thickness of ~5 A can enable natural graphite (NG) electrodes to exhibit remarkably durable cycling at 50 degrees C. The ALD-coated NG electrodes displayed a 98% capacity retention after 200 charge-discharge cycles. In contrast, bare NG showed a rapid decay. Additionally, Al2O3 ALD films with a thickness of 2 to 4 A have been shown to allow LiCoO2 to exhibit 89% capacity retention after 120 charge-discharge cycles performed up to 4.5 V vs Li/Li+. Bare LiCoO2 rapidly deteriorated in the first few cycles. The capacity fade is likely caused by oxidative decomposition of the electrolyte at higher potentials or perhaps cobalt dissolution. Interestingly, we have recently fabricated full cells of NG and LiCoO2 where we coated both electrodes, one or the other electrode as well as neither electrode. In creating these full cells, we observed some surprising results that lead us to obtain a greater understanding of the ALD coatings. We have also recently coated a binder free LiNi0.04Mn0.04Co02O2 electrode containing 5 wt% single-walled carbon nanotubes as the conductive additive and demonstrated both high rate capability as well as the ability to cycle the cathode to 5 V vrs. Li/Li+. Finally, we coated a Celgard (TM) separator and enabled stable cycling in a high dielectric electrolyte. These results will be presented in detail.

  8. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Tuscarora geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Dering, 2013). The Tuscarora area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Tuscarora area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Tuscarora is defined by a left-step in a major north- to-north northeast striking, west-dipping range-bounding normal fault system. Faults within the broad step define an anticlinal accommodation zone...

  9. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Based on inversion of fault kinematic data, Edwards (2013) interpreted that two discrete stress orientations are preserved at Neal Hot Springs. An older episode of east-west directed extension and a younger episode of southwest-northeast directed sinistral, oblique -normal extension. This interpretation is consistent with the evolution of Cenozoic tectonics in the region (Edwards, 2013). As such we applied a southwest-northeast (060) directed normal faulting stress regime, consistent with the younger extensional episode, to the Neal Hot Springs faults. Under these stress conditions northeast striking steeply dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to dilate and northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Under these stress condition...

  10. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Patua Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency analysis for the Patua geothermal system was calculated based on faults mapped in the Hazen Quadrangle (Faulds et al., 2011). Patua lies near the margin between the Basin and Range province, which is characterized by west-northwest directed extension and the Walker Lane province, characterized by west-northwest directed dextral shear. As such, the Patua area likely has been affected by tectonic stress associated with either or both of stress regimes over geologic time. In order to characterize this stress variation we calculated slip tendency at Patua for both normal faulting and strike slip faulting stress regimes. Based on examination of regional and local stress data (as explained above) we applied at shmin direction of 105 to Patua. Whether the vertical stress (sv) magnitude is larger than ...

  11. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Salt Wells Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Salt Wells geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped in the Bunejug Mountains quadrangle (Hinz et al., 2011). The Salt Wells area lies in the Basin and Range Province (N. Hinz personal comm.) As such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Salt Wells area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 105, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Several such faults intersect in high density in the core of the accommodation zone in the Bunejug Mountains and local to the Salt Wells geothermal .

  12. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of McGinness Hills Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the McGinness Hills geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped McGinness Hills area (Siler 2012, unpublished). The McGinness Hills area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the McGinness area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. The McGinness Hills geothermal system is characterized by a left-step in a north-northeast striking west-dipping fault system wit...

  13. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the San Emidio Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the San Emidio geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Rhodes, 2011). The San Emidio area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the San Emidio area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. This is consistent with the shmin determined through inversion of fault data by Rhodes (2011). Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Interesting, the San Emidio geothermal field lies in an area of primarily north striking faults, which...

  14. Propane ammoxidation over the Mo-V-Te-Nb-O M1 phase: Reactivity of surface cations in hydrogen abstraction steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthukumar, Kaliappan; Yu, Junjun; Xu, Ye; Guliants, Vadim V.

    2011-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations (GGA-PBE) have been performed to investigate the adsorption of C3 (propane, isopropyl, propene, and allyl) and H species on the proposed active center present in the surface ab planes of the bulk Mo-V-Te-Nb-O M1 phase in order to better understand the roles of the different surface cations in propane ammoxidation. Modified cluster models were employed to isolate the closely spaced V=O and Te=O from each other and to vary the oxidation state of the V cation. While propane and propene adsorb with nearly zero adsorption energy, the isopropyl and allyl radicals bind strongly to V=O and Te=O with adsorption energies, {Delta}E, being {le} -1.75 eV, but appreciably more weakly on other sites, such as Mo=O, bridging oxygen (Mo-O-V and Mo-O-Mo), and empty metal apical sites ({Delta}E > -1 eV). Atomic H binds more strongly to Te = O ({Delta}E {le} -3 eV) than to all the other sites, including V = O ({Delta}E = -2.59 eV). The reduction of surface oxo groups by dissociated H and their removal as water are thermodynamically favorable except when both H atoms are bonded to the same Te=O. Consistent with the strong binding of H, Te=O is markedly more active at abstracting the methylene H from propane (E{sub a} {le} 1.01 eV) than V = O (E{sub a} = 1.70 eV on V{sup 5+} = O and 2.13 eV on V{sup 4+} = O). The higher-than-observed activity and the loose binding of Te = O moieties to the mixed metal oxide lattice of M1 raise the question of whether active Te = O groups are in fact present in the surface ab planes of the M1 phase under propane ammoxidation conditions.

  15. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Based on inversion of fault kinematic data, Edwards (2013) interpreted that two discrete stress orientations are preserved at Neal Hot Springs. An older episode of east-west directed extension and a younger episode of southwest-northeast directed sinistral, oblique -normal extension. This interpretation is consistent with the evolution of Cenozoic tectonics in the region (Edwards, 2013). As such we applied a southwest-northeast (060) directed normal faulting stress regime, consistent with the younger extensional episode, to the Neal Hot Springs faults. Under these stress conditions northeast striking steeply dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to dilate and northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Under these stress condition...

  16. Accident source terms for pressurized water reactors with high-burnup cores calculated using MELCOR 1.8.5.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Ashbaugh, Scott G.; Leonard, Mark Thomas; Longmire, Pamela

    2010-04-01

    In this study, risk-significant pressurized-water reactor severe accident sequences are examined using MELCOR 1.8.5 to explore the range of fission product releases to the reactor containment building. Advances in the understanding of fission product release and transport behavior and severe accident progression are used to render best estimate analyses of selected accident sequences. Particular emphasis is placed on estimating the effects of high fuel burnup in contrast with low burnup on fission product releases to the containment. Supporting this emphasis, recent data available on fission product release from high-burnup (HBU) fuel from the French VERCOR project are used in this study. The results of these analyses are treated as samples from a population of accident sequences in order to employ approximate order statistics characterization of the results. These trends and tendencies are then compared to the NUREG-1465 alternative source term prescription used today for regulatory applications. In general, greater differences are observed between the state-of-the-art calculations for either HBU or low-burnup (LBU) fuel and the NUREG-1465 containment release fractions than exist between HBU and LBU release fractions. Current analyses suggest that retention of fission products within the vessel and the reactor coolant system (RCS) are greater than contemplated in the NUREG-1465 prescription, and that, overall, release fractions to the containment are therefore lower across the board in the present analyses than suggested in NUREG-1465. The decreased volatility of Cs2MoO4 compared to CsI or CsOH increases the predicted RCS retention of cesium, and as a result, cesium and iodine do not follow identical behaviors with respect to distribution among vessel, RCS, and containment. With respect to the regulatory alternative source term, greater differences are observed between the NUREG-1465 prescription and both HBU and LBU predictions than exist between HBU and LBU analyses. Additionally, current analyses suggest that the NUREG-1465 release fractions are conservative by about a factor of 2 in terms of release fractions and that release durations for in-vessel and late in-vessel release periods are in fact longer than the NUREG-1465 durations. It is currently planned that a subsequent report will further characterize these results using more refined statistical methods, permitting a more precise reformulation of the NUREG-1465 alternative source term for both LBU and HBU fuels, with the most important finding being that the NUREG-1465 formula appears to embody significant conservatism compared to current best-estimate analyses.

  17. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  18. Preparation and structural study from neutron diffraction data of Pr{sub 5}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Lope, M.J.; Alonso, J.A.; Sheptyakov, D.; Pomjakushin, V.

    2010-12-15

    The title compound has been prepared as polycrystalline powder by thermal treatments of mixtures of Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11} and MoO{sub 2} in air. In the literature, an oxide with a composition Pr{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} has been formerly described to present interesting catalytic properties, but its true stoichiometry and crystal structure are reported here for the first time. It is cubic, isostructural with CdTm{sub 4}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 16} (space group Pn-3n, Z=8), with a=11.0897(1) A. The structure contains MoO{sub 4} tetrahedral units, with Mo-O distances of 1.788(2) A, fully long-range ordered with PrO{sub 8} polyhedra; in fact it can be considered as a superstructure of fluorite (M{sub 8}O{sub 16}), containing 32 MO{sub 2} fluorite formulae per unit cell, with a lattice parameter related to that of cubic fluorite (a{sub f}=5.5 A) as a{approx}2a{sub f}. A bond valence study indicates that Mo exhibits a mixed oxidation state between 5+ and 6+ (perhaps accounting for the excellent catalytic properties). One kind of Pr atoms is trivalent whereas the second presents a mixed Pr{sup 3+}-Pr{sup 4+} oxidation state. The similarity of the XRD pattern with that published for Ce{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} suggests that this compound also belongs to the same structural type, with an actual stoichiometry Ce{sub 5}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 16}. -- Graphical Abstract: Formerly formulated as Pr{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}, the title compound is a cubic superstructure of fluorite (a=11.0897(1) A, space group Pn-3n) due to the long-range ordering of PrO{sub 8} scalenohedra and MoO{sub 4} tetrahedral units, showing noticeable shifts of the oxygen positions in order to provide a tetrahedral coordination for Mo ions. A mixed valence Mo{sup 5+}-Mo{sup 6+} is identified, which could account for the excellent catalytic properties of this material. Display Omitted

  19. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the San Emidio Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the San Emidio geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Rhodes, 2011). The San Emidio area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the San Emidio area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. This is consistent with the shmin determined through inversion of fault data by Rhodes (2011). Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Interesting, the San Emidio geothermal field lies in an area of primarily north striking faults, which...

  20. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Salt Wells Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Salt Wells geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped in the Bunejug Mountains quadrangle (Hinz et al., 2011). The Salt Wells area lies in the Basin and Range Province (N. Hinz personal comm.) As such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Salt Wells area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 105, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Several such faults intersect in high density in the core of the accommodation zone in the Bunejug Mountains and local to the Salt Wells geothermal .

  1. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of McGinness Hills Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the McGinness Hills geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped McGinness Hills area (Siler 2012, unpublished). The McGinness Hills area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the McGinness area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. The McGinness Hills geothermal system is characterized by a left-step in a north-northeast striking west-dipping fault system wit...

  2. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Tuscarora geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Dering, 2013). The Tuscarora area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Tuscarora area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Tuscarora is defined by a left-step in a major north- to-north northeast striking, west-dipping range-bounding normal fault system. Faults within the broad step define an anticlinal accommodation zone...

  3. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Patua Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency analysis for the Patua geothermal system was calculated based on faults mapped in the Hazen Quadrangle (Faulds et al., 2011). Patua lies near the margin between the Basin and Range province, which is characterized by west-northwest directed extension and the Walker Lane province, characterized by west-northwest directed dextral shear. As such, the Patua area likely has been affected by tectonic stress associated with either or both of stress regimes over geologic time. In order to characterize this stress variation we calculated slip tendency at Patua for both normal faulting and strike slip faulting stress regimes. Based on examination of regional and local stress data (as explained above) we applied at shmin direction of 105 to Patua. Whether the vertical stress (sv) magnitude is larger than ...

  4. Thermal expansion of Cr{sub 2x}Fe{sub 2-2x}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12}, Al{sub 2x}Fe{sub 2-2x}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} and Al{sub 2x}Cr{sub 2-2x}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} solid solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ari, M.; Jardim, P.M.; Marinkovic, B.A. Rizzo, F.; Ferreira, F.F.

    2008-06-15

    The transition temperature from monoclinic to orthorhombic and the thermal expansion of the orthorhombic phase were investigated for three systems of the family A{sub 2}M{sub 3}O{sub 12}: Cr{sub 2x}Fe{sub 2-2x}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12}, Al{sub 2x}Fe{sub 2-2x}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} and Al{sub 2x}Cr{sub 2-2x}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12}. It was possible to obtain a single-phase solid solution in all studied samples (x=0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9 and 1). A linear relationship between the transition temperature and the fraction of A{sup 3+} cations (x) was observed for each system. In all orthorhombic solid solutions studied here the observed thermal expansion was anisotropic. These anisotropic thermal expansion properties of crystallographic axes a, b and c result in a low positive or near-zero overall linear coefficient of thermal expansion ({alpha}{sub l}={alpha}{sub V}/3). The relationship between the size of A{sup 3+} cations in A{sub 2}M{sub 3}O{sub 12} and the coefficient of thermal expansion is discussed. Near-zero thermal expansion of Cr{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} is explained by the behavior of Cr-O and Mo-O bond distances, Cr-Mo non-bond distances and Cr-O-Mo bond angles with increasing temperature, estimated by Rietveld analysis of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. - Graphical abstract: In this figure, all published overall linear coefficients of thermal expansion for orthorhombic A{sub 2}M{sub 3}O{sub 12} family obtained through diffraction methods as a function of A{sup 3+} cation radii size, together with dilatometric results, are plotted. Our results indicate that Cr{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} does not exactly follow the established relationship.