Sample records for kaviany moo hwan

  1. Introduction to Microprocessors Jee-Hwan Ryu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Jee-Hwan

    Introduction to Microprocessors MEC382 Jee-Hwan Ryu School of Mechanical Engineering Korea Unit; CPU) IC 1971 Intel (4004->8008->8080), MPU (MicroProcessor Unit) . =MPU of Technology and Education ( ) A status register is a collection of flag bits for a microprocessor

  2. Introduction to RoboticsIntroduction to Robotics Jee-Hwan Ryu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Jee-Hwan

    the robots of science fiction. HONDA ASIMO Application Areas of Robots 1970 1990 20102000 Automotive Field Service HospitalHospital Elder, DisabledElder, Disabled #12;Industrial Robots LCD Transfer WeldingIntroduction to RoboticsIntroduction to Robotics Jee-Hwan Ryu School of Mechanical Engineering

  3. MOOS-IvP Autonomy Tools Users Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Michael R.

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes seven common MOOS-IvP autonomy tools. The uHelmScope application provides a run-time scoping window into the state of an active IvP Helm executing its mission. The pMarineViewer application is a ...

  4. A MOOS MODULE FOR MONITORING ENERGY USAGE OF AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Idaho, University of

    A MOOS MODULE FOR MONITORING ENERGY USAGE OF AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES Anthony Kanago, Kevin Roos, James--Tracking the energy usage of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and making accurate data available provides is particularly relevant in the context of long, open-sea missions: energy consumption. A vehicle operating

  5. MOOS-IvP Autonomy Tools Users Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Michael R.

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes fifteen MOOS-IvP autonomy tools. uHelmScope provides a run-time scoping window into the state of an active IvP Helm executing its mission. pMarineViewer is a geo-based GUI tool for rendering marine ...

  6. Dissociative Chemisorption of Methanol on Ge(100) Sung-Soo Bae, Do Hwan Kim,, Ansoon Kim,, Soon Jung Jung, Suklyun Hong,*, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    Dissociative Chemisorption of Methanol on Ge(100) Sung-Soo Bae, Do Hwan Kim,, Ansoon Kim,,§ Soon of methanol (CH3OH) on Ge(100) surface has been studied using ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy-resolution experimental STM shows that methanol undergoes O-H bond dissociative adsorption on a single Ge-Ge dimer

  7. High Capacity MoO3 Nanoparticle Li-Ion Battery Anode

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy functional were employed.) 10 AccomplishmentStatus Theoretical changes in Li-ion intercalated -MoO 3 Mo Li O * Four Li inserted in a theoretical nanoparticle. * 9 ps...

  8. An investigation of learner interaction in a MOO-based virtual environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Mark

    This study investigated how EFL learners managed their real time interaction in a computer-mediated communication (CMC) environment called Schmooze University MOO. Fourteen undergraduates enrolled at two universities in ...

  9. Stability of Graphene doping with MoO_3 and I_2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D’Arsié, Lorenzo; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Weatherup, Robert; Guo, Yuzheng; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; Cepek, Cinzia; Robertson, John

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We dope graphene by evaporation of MoO_3 or by solution-deposition of I_2 and assess the doping stability for its use as transparent electrodes. Electrical measurements show that both dopants increase the graphene sheet conductivity and find that Mo...

  10. Catalytic Properties of Supported MoO3 Catalysts for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Catalytic Properties of Supported MoO3 Catalysts for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane Kaidong The effects of MoOx structure on propane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) rates and selectivity were examined with those obtained on MoOx/ZrO2. On MoOx/Al2O3 catalysts, propane turnover rate increased with increasing Mo

  11. MOOS-IvP Autonomy Tools Users Manual Release 4.2.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Michael R.

    2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes 19 MOOS-IvP autonomy tools. uHelmScope provides a run-time scoping window into the state of an active IvP Helm executing its mission. pMarineViewer is a geo-based GUI tool for rendering marine ...

  12. Scalable Brain Network Construction on White Matter Fibers Moo K. Chung1,3,6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Moo K.

    of white matter fibers are connected so we are actually dealing with paired point cloud data. SoScalable Brain Network Construction on White Matter Fibers Moo K. Chung1,3,6 , Nagesh Adluru3 to characterize the structural connectivity of the human brain non-invasively by tracing white matter fiber tracts

  13. Beta. -MoO sub 3 produced from a novel freeze drying route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parise, J.B. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (United States)); McCarron, E.M. III (E.I. Dupont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Wilmington, DE (United States)); Von Dreele, R.; Goldstone, J.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Powdered samples of {beta}-MoO{sub 3} have been produced by the gentle heat treatment of freeze-dried molybdic acid at 350{degree}C for 1 hr. The samples, yellow-green in appearance, contained varying amounts of the thermodynamically stable {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}, depending upon the time and temperature of heat treatment. Neutron diffraction data were collected at 300 K. all peaks, not attributable to {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}, were indexed on the basis of a monoclinic cell, P2{sub 1}/c, {alpha} = 7.1228(7), b = 5.3660(6), c = 5.5665(6), {beta} = 92.01(1){degree}, V = 212.62(6){angstrom}{sup 3}. The structure, which is related to ReO{sub 3}, contains two crystallographically independent octahedra. Both show evidence of disorder at the Mo and O sites. Two distinct orientations of a short mo-O distance, suggestive of the type of molybdenyl bond observed in both the {alpha} and {beta}{prime}-forms, are primarily responsible for the observed disordering.

  14. Aboveground test of an advanced Li$_2$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometer to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. B. Bekker; N. Coron; F. A. Danevich; V. Ya. Degoda; A. Giuliani; V. D. Grigorieva; N. V. Ivannikova; M. Mancuso; P. de Marcillac; I. M. Moroz; C. Nones; E. Olivieri; G. Pessina; D. V. Poda; V. N. Shlegel; V. I. Tretyak; M. Velazquez

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Large lithium molybdate (Li$_2$MoO$_4$) crystal boules were produced by using the low thermal gradient Czochralski growth technique from deeply purified molybdenum. A small sample from one of the boules was preliminary characterized in terms of X-ray-induced and thermally-excited luminescence. A large cylindrical crystalline element (with a size of $\\oslash 40\\times40$ mm) was used to fabricate a scintillating bolometer, which was operated aboveground at $\\sim 15$ mK by using a pulse-tube cryostat housing a high-power dilution refrigerator. The excellent detector performance in terms of energy resolution and $\\alpha$ background suppression along with preliminary positive indications on the radiopurity of this material show the potentiality of Li$_2$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers for low-counting experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo.

  15. Aboveground test of an advanced Li$_2$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometer to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bekker, T B; Danevich, F A; Degoda, V Ya; Giuliani, A; Grigorieva, V D; Ivannikova, N V; Mancuso, M; de Marcillac, P; Moroz, I M; Nones, C; Olivieri, E; Pessina, G; Poda, D V; Shlegel, V N; Tretyak, V I; Velazquez, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large lithium molybdate (Li$_2$MoO$_4$) crystal boules were produced by using the low thermal gradient Czochralski growth technique from deeply purified molybdenum. A small sample from one of the boules was preliminary characterized in terms of X-ray-induced and thermally-excited luminescence. A large cylindrical crystalline element (with a size of $\\oslash 40\\times40$ mm) was used to fabricate a scintillating bolometer, which was operated aboveground at $\\sim 15$ mK by using a pulse-tube cryostat housing a high-power dilution refrigerator. The excellent detector performance in terms of energy resolution and $\\alpha$ background suppression along with preliminary positive indications on the radiopurity of this material show the potentiality of Li$_2$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers for low-counting experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo.

  16. Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane over V2O5/MoO3/Al2O3 and V2O5/Cr2O3/Al2O3: Structural Characterization and Catalytic Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane over V2O5/MoO3/Al2O3 and V2O5/Cr2O3/Al2O3: Structural of stoichiometric reduction in H2, and the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane. VOx domains on Al2O3 modified The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane provides an attractive route for the synthesis of propene.1

  17. Jee-Hwan Ryu School of Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Jee-Hwan

    Elements of Electricity EFS161 Korea University of Technology and Education (a) : (b) : Protons: Neutrons: Electrons: , #12;Korea University of Technology and Education (Electrical Current University of Technology and Education Mechanical and Electrical Analogy #12;Korea University of Technology

  18. Jee-Hwan Ryu School of Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Jee-Hwan

    Elements of Electricity MEC240 IT Korea University of Technology and Education (a) : (b) : Protons: Neutrons: Electrons: , #12;Korea University of Technology and Education (Electrical Current University of Technology and Education Mechanical and Electrical Analogy #12;Korea University of Technology

  19. A/D Converter Jee-Hwan Ryu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Jee-Hwan

    A/D , MUX and REFS update #12;Korea University of Technology and Education ADSC=1 of Technology and Education Korea University of Technology and Education A/D converter #12;Korea University of Technology and Education () AD > -> X = 1 Korea University of Technology and Education AD #12;Korea

  20. Impurities in a Homogeneous Electron Gas Jung-Hwan Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansen, Henri J. F.

    thankful to my friends and office-mates, especially Jae-Hyuk Lee, Porn- rat Wattanakasiwich, and David

  1. Jee-Hwan Ryu School of Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Jee-Hwan

    between force and motion Important in Design of robots Simulation and animation of robot motion Design ME1035 ADVANCED ROBOTICS Korea University of Technology and Education Introduction Relationship and Education Two-links Cartesian Manipulators Korea University of Technology and Education Planar Elbow

  2. Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kaviany and B.P. Singh, “Radiative heat transfer in porousmedia”, Advances in Heat Transfer, vol. 23, no. 23, pp. 133–Thermal radiation heat transfer, Hemisphere Publishing Co. ,

  3. Fabrication of metal field emitter arrays on polycrystalline silicon II Hwan Kim and Chun Gyoo Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong Duk

    of the gate aperture which rendered a stable emission characteristic. © 1997 American Vacuum Society. S0734 a large FEA panel using this fabrication process since the size of the single-crystal silicon wafer and the undoped polysilicon is completely con- sumed in the oxidation to form a gate insulator. The diffu- sion

  4. NEURAL SIGNAL COMPRESSION BASED ON GAUSSIAN CURVE FITTING Hyun Jung Ko, Wonseok Song, Joon Hwan Choi, and Taejeong Kim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Taejeong

    coefficients Neural signal Fitted spike Noise region Spike region Fig. 1. Flow chart of the encoding process the multi-resolution Teager energy operator (MTEO) method. And then each spike is fitted by a multi

  5. Enriched Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers to search for $0 \

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barabash, A S; Danevich, F A; Giuliani, A; Ivanov, I M; Makarov, E P; Mancuso, M; Marnieros, S; Nasonov, S G; Nones, C; Olivieri, E; Pessina, G; Poda, D V; Shlegel, V N; Tenconi, M; Tretyak, V I; Vasiliev, Ya V; Velazquez, M; Zhdankov, V N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LUMINEU project aims at performing a demonstrator underground experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of the isotope $^{100}$Mo embedded in zinc molybdate (ZnMoO$_4$) scintillating bolometers. In this context, a zinc molybdate crystal boule enriched in $^{100}$Mo to 99.5\\% with a mass of 171 g was grown for the first time by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique. The production cycle provided a high yield (the crystal boule mass was 84\\% of initial charge) and an acceptable level -- around 4\\% -- of irrecoverable losses of the costy enriched material. Two crystals of 59 g and 63 g, obtained from the enriched boule, were tested aboveground at milli-Kelvin temperature as scintillating bolometers. They showed a high detection performance, equivalent to that of previously developed natural ZnMoO$_4$ detectors. These results pave the way to future sensitive searches based on the LUMINEU technology, capable to approach and explore the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass p...

  6. Methanol Partial Oxidation on MoO3/SiO2 Catalysts: Application...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is presented in this article. For the first time, this OHT reactor integrates Fourier Transformation infrared (FT-IR) imaging technique and Raman spectroscopy in operando...

  7. Gamma Log At Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, NewG22 Jump to: navigation,Log At Alum

  8. Origin of the high work function and high conductivity of MoO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulovic, J Kong, Nanoletts 12 133 (2012) 14. C. Battaglia, X Yin, M Zheng, I D Sharp, T Chen, S McDonnell, A Azcati, C Carraro, R M Wallace, A Javey, Nano Lett. 14, 967 (2014) 15. S. Chuang, C Battaglia, A Azcati, S McDonnell, J S Kang, X Yin, M Tosun...

  9. Acoustic Logs At Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind6:00-06:00AboutAchille,Acme, Washington:Alum

  10. Resistivity Log At Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | RoadmapRenewableGeothermal Field | OpenResistivity

  11. Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log At Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|CoreCp HoldingsCrofutt'sWyoming:Plains,

  12. Density Log at Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: Energy ResourcesDenair,Dennis Port,1987) |

  13. Neutron Log At Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergyPPCR) Jump to:Netherlands:Density, photo-electric

  14. High Capacity MoO3 Nanoparticle Li-Ion Battery Anode | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TOTechnology Validation » Hickam

  15. Creation and annihilation of single atom vacancy during subsurface diffusion Junghun Choi,1 Do Kyung Lim,1 Youngwoo Kim,1 Do Hwan Kim,2,*, and Sehun Kim1,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    to their importances in the development of contact materials and dilute magnetic semiconductors.1­8 Reactive 3d

  16. Distributed Scalable Network Association in Wireless Sensor Networks Hyung-Sin Kim, Jin-Seok Han, Jae-Seok Bang, and Yong-Hwan Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    @snu.ac.kr Abstract--Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) need to employ a network association mechanism that can securely centralized and broadcasting based network association mechanisms may consume large energy, and distributed of the proposed scheme is evaluated by computer simulation, showing remarkable performance improvement over

  17. Forced convection in a porous medium heated by a permeable wall perpendicular to ow direction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    transport, nuclear waste disposal, chemical reactors engineering, insulation of buildings and pipes. The state of art concerning porous media models has been summarized in the book by Nield and Bejan [2] as well as the book by Kaviany [3]. For the case of boundary layer ¯ow over a ¯at plate embedded

  18. Shear-wave splitting, lithospheric anisotropy, and mantle deformation beneath the ArabiaEurasia collision zone in Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatzfeld, Denis

    ­Eurasia collision zone in Iran Ayoub Kaviani a,b,c , Denis Hatzfeld c, , Anne Paul c , Mohammad Tatar b , Keith Priestley d a Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Zanjan, Iran b International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology, P.O. Box 19395-3913, Tehran, Iran c

  19. A strong seismic velocity contrast in the shallow mantle across the Zagros collision zone (Iran)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (Iran) A. Kaviani 1, 2 , A. Paul 1 , E. Bourova 1 , D. Hatzfeld 1 , H. Pedersen 1 , M. Mokhtari 2 1 19395/3913, Tehran, Iran Revised version, 8 June 2007 Keywords: Zagros collision belt, lithospheric residuals in the Zagros Simple Folded Belt and positive residuals in Central Iran. This difference

  20. MoO3 as combined hole injection layer and tapered spacer in combinatorial multicolor microcavity organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, R.; Xu, Chun; Biswas, Rana; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multicolor microcavity ({mu}C) organic light-emitting diode (OLED) arrays were fabricated simply by controlling the hole injection and spacer MoO{sub 3} layer thickness. The normal emission was tunable from {approx}490 to 640 nm and can be further expanded. A compact, integrated spectrometer with two-dimensional combinatorial arrays of {mu}C OLEDs was realized. The MoO{sub 3} yields more efficient and stable devices, revealing a new breakdown mechanism. The pixel current density reaches {approx}4 A/cm{sup 2} and a maximal normal brightness {approx}140 000 Cd/m{sup 2}, which improves photoluminescence-based sensing and absorption measurements.

  1. An experimental study of the solubility of MoO3 in aqueous vapour and low to intermediate density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Zajacz et al., 2008; Lerchbaumer and Audetat, 2012; Seo et al., 2012). In view of this, it is important., 1999; Audetat and Pettke, 2003; Rusk et al., 2004; Klemm et al., 2007, 2008; Zajacz et al., 2008; Seo et al., 2009; Audetat, 2010; Landtwing et al., 2010; Lerchbaumer and Audetat, 2012; Seo et al., 2012

  2. Solution-processed single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors and bootstrapped inverters for disintegratable, transient electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    , Dong Joon Lee, Chi Hwan Lee, Jong-Ho Lee, and John A. Rogers Citation: Applied Physics Letters 105 Jin,1,a,b) Jongmin Shin,1,a) In-Tak Cho,1 Sang Youn Han,2,3 Dong Joon Lee,2 Chi Hwan Lee,2 Jong-Ho Lee biodegradable implants to hardware-secure memory systems, vanishing environmental sensors, and consumer

  3. Copyright WILEYVCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, 69469 Weinheim, Germany, 2014. Supporting Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    By Kwi-Il Park, Jung Hwan Son, Geon-Tae Hwang, Chang Kyu Jeong, Jungho Ryu, Min Koo, Insung Choi, Seung Nanogenerator on Plastic Substrates Kwi-Il Park, Jung Hwan Son, Geon-Tae Hwang, Chang Kyu Jeong, Jungho Ryu, Min Koo, Insung Choi, Seung Hyun Lee, Myunghwan Byun, Zhong Lin Wang, and Keon Jae Lee* #12;1 Supporting

  4. First-principles determination of static potential energy surfaces for atomic friction in MoS2 and MoO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Wallace

    Received 1 October 2007; published 10 March 2008 Using first-principles electronic-structure calculations friction, sophisticated descriptions of atomic bonding and electron density can now be used to calculate by first-principles calculations,3­5 or using empirical poten- tials in molecular dynamics simulations.1

  5. ~~@~~@ ~MOO~~ ~WOO~~ ~~~~~0~~~~~ ~~~@~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Instantaneous''· p 2. Thermal support power - that power which must be provided upon dernand to an instrurnent, - the technique of thermal control~ e. g. , proportional, bang-bang, tirne-sha:r.e, etc. The 1naximum and minixnum full thermal support power is being used. The values listed represent the maximum instantaneous values

  6. Enriched Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers to search for $0 ? 2?$ decay of $^{100}$Mo with the LUMINEU experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash; D. M. Chernyak; F. A. Danevich; A. Giuliani; I. M. Ivanov; E. P. Makarov; M. Mancuso; S. Marnieros; S. G. Nasonov; C. Nones; E. Olivieri; G. Pessina; D. V. Poda; V. N. Shlegel; M. Tenconi; V. I. Tretyak; Ya. V. Vasiliev; M. Velazquez; V. N. Zhdankov

    2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The LUMINEU project aims at performing a demonstrator underground experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of the isotope $^{100}$Mo embedded in zinc molybdate (ZnMoO$_4$) scintillating bolometers. In this context, a zinc molybdate crystal boule enriched in $^{100}$Mo to 99.5\\% with a mass of 171 g was grown for the first time by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique. The production cycle provided a high yield (the crystal boule mass was 84\\% of initial charge) and an acceptable level -- around 4\\% -- of irrecoverable losses of the costy enriched material. Two crystals of 59 g and 63 g, obtained from the enriched boule, were tested aboveground at milli-Kelvin temperature as scintillating bolometers. They showed a high detection performance, equivalent to that of previously developed natural ZnMoO$_4$ detectors. These results pave the way to future sensitive searches based on the LUMINEU technology, capable to approach and explore the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass pattern.

  7. Sunday, June 13, 2010 Arrival and hotel check-in (Shilla Hotel and The Suites Hotel)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF A TAILOR-MADE CORYNEBACTERIUM GLUTAMICUM STRAIN FOR PRODUCTION OF DIAMINOPENTANE TOWARDS BIO PRODUCTION Jin Hwan Park (KAIST, Korea) 11:25 ­ 11:50 Lecture 4: SYSTEMS BIOLOGY OF AMINO ACID FERMENTATION

  8. 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim 1 www.advmat.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    by Self-Heating Sung-Hwan Bae, Sangmin Lee, Hyun Koo, Long Lin, Bong Hyun Jo, Chan Park,* and Zhong Lin)) and insulating monoclinic structure (VO2(M)), can lead to change in electrical resistance of about four orders

  9. Affinity Purification and Characterization of a Cutinase from the Fungal Plant Pathogen Monilinia fructicola (Wint.) Honey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    fructicola (Wint.) Honey Guang-Yi Wang,* Themis J. Michailides,* Bruce D. Hammock, Young-Moo Lee, and Richard

  10. Effect of proton exchange on the nonlinear optical properties of LiNb& Wei-Yung Hsu,~) Craig S. Willand, Venkatraman Gopalan,a) and Moo1 C. Gupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Venkatraman

    Effect of proton exchange on the nonlinear optical properties of LiNb& and LiTaO, Wei-Yung Hsu 1992) The effect of proton exchange carried out using benzoic and pyrophosphoric acid on the nonlinear of proton exchange with either benzoic or pyrophosphoric acid under the conditions studied. Some recovery

  11. adult epileptic patients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control Chung, Moo K. 91 Testing statistical significance of multivariate time series analysis techniques for epileptic seizure prediction Physics Websites Summary: Epilepsy...

  12. Rendering of Environmental Force Feedback in Mobile Robot Teleoperation based on Fuzzy Logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Jee-Hwan

    Rendering of Environmental Force Feedback in Mobile Robot Teleoperation based on Fuzzy Logic Ildar Farkhatdinov, Jee-Hwan Ryu and Jury Poduraev Abstract-- In this paper a study on rendering of environmen- tal to the distance between the obstacles and the mobile robot. In previous approaches force feedback was rendered

  13. Biotechnology Letters 22: 585588, 2000. 2000 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Jin Hwan Do, Sang Yup Lee & Ho Nam Chang Department of Chemical Engineering and Bio-batch cultures of Bacillus licheniformis produced poly- -glutamic acid (PGA), a water-soluble biodegradable biodegrad- able, water-soluble and non-toxic to the human body. A relatively high molecular mass (M = 100

  14. Evaluation of interphase properties in a cellulose fiber-reinforced polypropylene composite by nanoindentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Siqun

    by nanoindentation and finite element analysis Seung-Hwan Lee a,*, Siqun Wang a , George M. Pharr b,c , Haitao Xu b- ing and separation, and biodegradability. Furthermore, the use of natural resources reduces releases author. Tel.: +1 865 974 4965; fax: +1 865 946 1109. E-mail address: lshyhk@hotmail.com (S.-H. Lee). www

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPONENTS AND PACKAGING TECHNOLOGIES, VOL. 26, NO. 2, JUNE 2003 483 Characterization and Modeling of a New Via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Lynn

    , KiHyuk Kim, SeungChul Choi, JuHwan Lim, Jung-Ho Park, Lynn Choi, Member, IEEE, SungWoo Hwang, Member' com- ments. D. Kwon, J. Kim, K. Kim, S. Choi, J. Lim, J.-H. Park, L. Choi, and S. Hwang

  16. 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim 1 www.advmat.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Substrates Kwi-Il Park, Jung Hwan Son, Geon-Tae Hwang, Chang Kyu Jeong, Jungho Ryu, Min Koo, Insung Choi. K. Jeong, Dr. M. Koo, I. Choi, S. H. Lee, Dr. M. Byun, Prof. K. J. Lee Department of Materials

  17. K. -H. Seo J. -K. E. Schemm C. Jones S. Moorthi Forecast skill of the tropical intraseasonal oscillation in the NCEP GFS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Charles

    K. -H. Seo Æ J. -K. E. Schemm Æ C. Jones Æ S. Moorthi Forecast skill of the tropical intraseasonal, whereas it is more verti- cally aligned over the Indian Ocean (Sperber 2003). K. -H. Seo (&) Æ J. -K. E-mail: kyong-hwan.seo@noaa.gov Fax: +1-301-7638125 C. Jones Institute for Computational Earth System Science

  18. October 11, 2005 10:11 Proceedings Trim Size: 9.75in x 6.5in apbc ALIGNSCOPE : A VISUAL MINING TOOL FOR GENE TEAM FINDING WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Limsoon

    FOR GENE TEAM FINDING WITH WHOLE GENOME ALIGNMENT HEE-JEONG JIN,1 HYE-JUNG KIM,1 JEONG-HYEON CHOI2 AND HWAN@indiana.edu One of the main issues in comparative genomics is the study of chromosomal gene order in one or more related species. Recently identifying sets of orthologous genes in several genomes has become getting

  19. J. Microbiol. Biotechnol. (2006), 16(2), 232239 Bacterial Community Structure in Activated Sludge Reactors Treating Free

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    treatments. Lately, scientific investigation of the biological treatment of cyanide-containing wastewater as an alternative to chemical processes is being increasingly undertaken. Biological treatment of cyanide , JONG-HWAN BAEK1 , YONG-HA PARK2 , AND SUNG-TAIK LEE1 * 1 Department of Biological Sciences, Korea

  20. Author's personal copy Simulations of a prototypical device using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    for harvesting waste heat Damien Vanderpool, Jeong Hwan Yoon, Laurent Pilon * University of California, Los Keywords: Pyroelectric Direct energy conversion Waste heat Optimum efficiency Power density Numerical simulation a b s t r a c t This paper is concerned with directly converting waste heat into electricity using

  1. Groundwater Chemistry Changes as a Result of CO2 Injection at the ZERT Field Site in Bozeman, Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co +2 Cu + Cd +2 PbSe CrO + AsSe(OH)(SeH) - FeSe MoO 4-2 UOCo +2 Cu + Cd +2 PbSe CrO + AsSe(OH)(SeH) - FeSe MoO 4-2 UO

  2. al-2 o-3 surfaces: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MoO3, ZrMo2O8, and Al2(MoO4)3 suggests that the behavior Iglesia, Enrique 151 European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Valencia, Spain, 6-10 September 2010, 2AO.1.4...

  3. Direct Multisearch for Multiobjective Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 1, 2010 ... MOO and (ii) the extension of performance and data profiles to MOO, allowing a ... ‡Department of Systems and Production, University of Minho, ... Given a current iterate (a poll center), the poll step in single ...... temperature of 100, a final temperature of 2.5 × 10?6, and a cooling factor of 0.6, yielding a.

  4. The growth and characterization of LiGd?(Mo0?)? single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reimund, James Allyn

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' C/second 37 Pyroelectric Current vs. Temperature dT/dt = 30' C/second 180' Domains (Gd (MoO ) ) 37 39 INTRODUCTION This thesis discusses the growth and some single crystalline properties of lithium-gadolinium-molybdate of the type LiGd (Mo...O ) 3 45' This compound is one of the three thus far discovered compounds of the lithium ? gadolinium-molybdate (LGMO) system. In general, this system can be expressed as Li2Mo04. XGd2(Mo04)3, where LiGd3(MoO, )5 4 5 single crystals synthesize when X...

  5. International Oil and Gas Board International Oil and Gas Board...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ministry of Oil Kuwait City Kuwait http www moo gov kw Syrian Petroleum Company Syrian Petroleum Company Damascus Syria http www spc sy com en production activities1 en php...

  6. Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ag, Fe, Cr, Y - Metal oxides - ZrO 2 , MoO 3 - Zeolites - Mordenite, Ferrierite, - Y, Beta Pioneering Science and Technology Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Minimal...

  7. Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ag, Fe, Cr, Y - Metal oxides - ZrO 2 , MoO 3 - Zeolites - Mordenite, Ferrierite, - Y, Beta Pioneering Science and Technology Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Catalyst...

  8. An in situ x-ray spectroscopic study of Mo?{sup +} speciation in supercritical aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Hao [Missouri State University, Springfield, MO (United States); Mayanovic, Robert A. [Missouri State University, Springfield, MO (United States); Anderson, Alan J. [St. Francis Xavier Univ., Antigonish, NS (Canada); Meredith, Peter R. [St. Francis Xavier Univ., Antigonish, NS (Canada)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ XRF and Mo K-edge XAS measurements were made on the ID20-B beam line at the APS on MoO? in 1 M H?O? aqueous solution, at temperatures between 400 and 600 °C. The samples were analyzed using a modified Bassett-type hydrothermal diamond anvil cell. Our XRF measurements show that MoO? is highly soluble in the supercritical H?O? aqueous fluid. Analysis of XAS spectra shows that the Mo?{sup +} ion exhibits consistent speciation in the H?O? aqueous solution at temperatures ranging from 400 to 600 °C.

  9. Evaporation/ Solution Droplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    · Nano-Catalysts · Fine Powders · Spray Drying MoO3 As prepared initially. After thermal annealing at 350oC. Hollow Spheres and Crystals 1st Hollow Crystals! Cooling bath Titanium Horn Collar & O-Rings Gas Production of Nano-Materials microporous shell internal macropores Hierarchically Porous Carbons Brandon Ito

  10. Third Annual Cyber Security and Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Axel W.

    Third Annual Cyber Security and Information Infrastructure Research Workshop May 14-15, 2007 TOWARDS COMPREHENSIVE STRATEGIES THAT MEET THE CYBER SECURITY CHALLENGES OF THE 21ST CENTURY Frederick Sheldon, Axel Krings, Seong-Moo Yoo, and Ali Mili (Editors) #12;CSIIRW07: Cyber Security and Information

  11. CHEN ET AL. VOL. XXX ' NO. XX ' 000000 ' XXXX www.acsnano.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    beyond graphene have at- tracted huge amounts of attention especially for those transition metal dichal graphene coupled by weak van der Waals forces between adja- cent layers. But more than that, each TMDC and Kalantar-zadeh et al. have shown the preparation of thin MoS2 flakes by evaporation of sulfur and MoO3

  12. Comparative Studies on Micro Heat Exchanger Optimisation Tatsuya Okabe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    Olhofer , Yaochu Jin , and Bernhard Sendhoff Honda Research Institute Europe GmbH, Carl.sendhoff£ @honda-ri.de ¡ Honda Research Institute USA Co., 1381 Kinnear Road, suite 116, Columbus, OH 43212, USA kfoli@honda-ri.com Abstract- Although many methods for dealing with multi-objective optimisation (MOO

  13. Simultaneous Replacement in Normal Programs Annalisa Bossi 1 , Nicoletta Cocco 2 , Sandro Etalle 1;3 .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cocco, Nicoletta

    Simultaneous Replacement in Normal Programs Annalisa Bossi 1 , Nicoletta Cocco 2 , Sandro Etalle 1@zenone.math.unipd.it, cocco@moo.dsi.unive.it, etalle@cwi.nl October 13, 1994 Abstract The simultaneous replacement results for Fitting's and Kunen's semantics. We also show how simultaneous replacement can mimic other

  14. Japan, France Vying for Korea's Nuclear Project By Cho Jin-seo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Japan, France Vying for Korea's Nuclear Project By Cho Jin-seo Staff Reporter France and Japan with an estimated cost of $10 billion. France's Cadarache region and Japan's Rokkashomura region are two candidates Rho Moo- hyun. Japan deployed Science and Technology Minister Takeo Kawamura to Korea on Jan. 14

  15. U N I V E R S I T Y O F V E R M O N T C O L L E G E O F M E D I C I N E V E R M O N T S U M M E R 2 0 1 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    incorrectly in the 2013 Year-in-Review issue of Vermont Medicine. In March 2013, Dr. Abajian was givenXtras in this issue: · 2014 UVM Research Report · The Given Building 50 years ago · Full Match Day coverage Integrated Curriculum to "Dr. Moo," our rst-year medical students this fall will nd UVM to be the perfect

  16. THE SYNTHESIS OF AN INTERSTRATIFIED LAYERED OXIDE FROM EXFOLIATED PRECURSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    THE SYNTHESIS OF AN INTERSTRATIFIED LAYERED OXIDE FROM EXFOLIATED PRECURSORS RICHARD L. SMITH 15213 ABSTRACT Aqueous suspensions of exfoliated Li0 .25MoO 3 and Na-montmorillonite have been combined solids can be exfoliated and restacked to form new interstratified materials. INTRODUCTION A wide variety

  17. Nanomaterials DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105324

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frenkel, Anatoly

    of the vapor and its condensation into Re-doped MoO3�y nanoparticles. The resulting NP react with H2/H2S gas a long (25­35 h) annealing process at 8708C in the presence of H2S and forming gas (H2 10 wt%; N2

  18. Twin Cities Campus Dental Hygiene M.D.H.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    · · · · · · · - · - - - - · Twin Cities Campus Dental Hygiene M.D.H. Dentistry Primary Care of Dental Hygiene, 9-372 Moos Tower, 515 Delaware Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-625-9121; fax: 612 for timely completion. Degree: Master of Dental Hygiene Along with the program-specific requirements listed

  19. PROTON MOBILITY IN MOLYBDENUM BRONZES A. CIRILLO and J. J. FRIPIAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    microcrystalline MoO3, covered with small particles of Pt, to gaseous hydrogen. A pulsed proton magnetic resonance is very small due to the small electron density seen by the nucleus as a result of diffusion. LE JOURNAL of the hydro- gen species formed to the oxide - a process aided by a carrier ; and third, the invasion

  20. EUROSPF Conference Carcassonne, France from 3-5 September 2008 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL BY SUPERPLASTIC FREE BULGING TEST Jong-Hoon YOON 1 , Yeong-Moo YI 1 , Ho-Sung LEE. In the current study, the material characterization of duplex stainless steel, UNS S31803, has been carried out test can be enhanced. Keywords : Duplex stainless steel, Free bulging test, Strain rate sensitivity

  1. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of molybdenum and molybdenum monoxide anions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lineberger, W. Carl

    in environments as diverse as interstellar media,1 surface chemistry, and as superconducting materials and 22 000 cm 1 . Among the findings in this latest report is the identification of the ground state symmetry of MoO as 5 , with a positive spin­orbit coupling such that the 5 1 level lies at lowest energy

  2. 91Fall 2008 Volume 42, Number 3 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maine, University of

    , superstructure, and solar panels, and in summer its productive waters present severe biofouling problems that canMOOS) was established in the summer of 2001 as a prototype real-time observing system that now includes eleven solar been established in the United States to date. It has also been a very successful system, with data

  3. Growth of Large-Area Aligned Molybdenum Nanowires by High Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition: Synthesis, Growth Mechanism, and Device Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    , thermogravimetry, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis, as well as structure analysis by electron on the decomposition of MoO2 vapors through condensation of its vapor at high substrate temperatures. The aligned nanowires with H2 gas.6d-f However, the reduction process degrades the crystal- linity of the nanowires

  4. APOLLO OVER THE MOON A View From Orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    #12;s Near ride #12;APOLLO OVER THE MOON A View From Orbit #12;#12;NASA SP-362 APOLLO OVER THE MOO Catalogingin Publication Data Main entry under title: Apollo over the moon. (NASA SP ;362) Bibliography: p. 251. 1. Moon-Photographs from space. 2. Project Apollo. I. Masursky, Harold, 1922- 11. Colton, George

  5. Business Finder a tool for regional networking among organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are Silicon Valley for IT, Hollywood for movie production or the Ruhr Area in Germany for metal.reichling, benjamin.moos, volker.wulf}@uni-siegen.de Abstract Networks of organizations improve the competitiveness of its member companies. Computer applications can make the competencies of organizations more visible

  6. Time-resolved studies on the dynamics of photoinduced formation of M(CO)/sub 4/(polypyridyl) (M = Mo, Cr, and W) complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalyanasundaram, K.

    1988-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of photoinduced formation of M(CO)/sub 4/(LL) (M = Mo(O), Cr(O), and W(O) and LL = various polypyridyl ligands such as 5-chloro-1, 10-phen, 1,10-phen, 2,2'-bpy, and 4,4'-Me/sub 2/-2,2'-bpy) from M(CO)/sub 6/ and LL in benzene has been examined via pulsed laser photolysis techniques. The formation of the polypyridyl tetracarbonyl complex occurs in several steps, extending over a wide range of time scales (from a few nanoseconds to several milliseconds). Spectral evidence is presented for the formation of a pentacarbonyl monodentate polypyridine intermediate. The rate of formation of the complexes follows the order Mo(O) > Cr(O) > W(O). For a given metal carbonyl, the reactivity of various ligands follows the order 5-Clphen greater than or equal to phen > bpy greater than or equal to Me/sub 2/bpy.

  7. Under consideration for publication in J. Functional Programming 1 Types and Trace Effects of Higher Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skalka, Christian

    , if a program is sending and receiving data over an SSL socket, the relevant events are opening and closing be: ssl_open("snork.cs.jhu.edu",4434); ssl_hs_begin(4434); ssl_hs_success(4434); ssl_put(4434); ssl_get(4434); ssl_open("moo.cs.uvm.edu",4435); ssl_hs_begin(4434); ssl_put(4435); ssl_close(4434); ssl

  8. . S.-K. Chan & V. Heine, J. Phys. F: Met. Phys. 3, 795 (1973) TTF-TCNQ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    et al., PRL 75, 4540 (1995) E. Rotenberg et al., Prog. Surf Sci. 75, 237 (2004) : #12; , #12; S. V. Borisenko et al., PRL 102, 166402 (2009); S. V. Borisenko et al., PRL 100, 196402 #12; S. V. Borisenko et al., PRL 102, 166402 (2009); S. V. Borisenko et al., PRL 100, 196402 #12; K0.3MoO3 (« ») A. V

  9. Analysis of sub-surface towing of tendons and comparison of results using WINPOST and ORCAFLEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendon, Perdoor Mukthi

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dmpm or ~m Reheard tn Sbdh ~ Canvergenae: Mas Mht Msg. Or Mag. Of Neragarm Taienece Damphtg SRL Error SRL Change 30 0. 0001 1800 2000 tLOTO Speed (nua) Dhecthm (deg) 0. 00 0. 00 Stags DunNon Number (a) 0 9. 000 1 208dtO Tbne Slaps (s) hear... Outer 0. 00028 08100 Une Target Damping (% arhhmt): Axle( Sending Tomhn O. MOO 0. 0000 0. 0000 Nea Our(sac 2 (m): 0. 000 Water Densgy Varhdhrc Water Densh)r. Constant Density (isbn"3) 1. 02$ Seabed Type Flat Seabed Origin (m) Dhecgon Slaps...

  10. Quantification of model mismatch errors of the dynamic energy distribution in a stirred-tank reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmich, Mark Raymond

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments Moo- Young and Chan (1971) proposed a model which consisted of a dual series of well-mixed regions and dead space in series with a plug- flow region. The system studied consisted of a viscous fluid flowing in a cylindrical tank fitted with four...QUANTIFICATION OF MODEL MISMATCH ERRORS OF THE DYNAMIC ENERGY DISTRIBUTION IN A STIRRED- TANK REACTOR A Thesis by MARK RAYMOND KIMMICH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  11. The blackness of darkness: Burkean sublimity in the political and moral aesthetics of Herman Melville's Moby-Dick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovelace, Lisa Lynn

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the picturesque in England, see Boulton, xciv-xcvi; Hippie, 185-191. For the American picturesque, see Barbara Novak, Nature and Culture: American Landsca e and Paintin 1825-1875 (New York: Oxford OP, 3939) 34-44; Rtche d 3. Moore. Thet CD ~ inrh Al habet... stenrtental 9 ~ rterl 29 (peb. 1976): 30-33; Moo e, That C imh A~i habet 17-19. 23 12 In That Cunnin Al hah t Moore notes that "[a]t least ten American editions of the ~En uir appeared between 1800 and 1856" (19). A more specialized study by Janice G...

  12. Fertilizer Statistics for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1927-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    * : .COI??b .... .m-w .+M 1.mim . -. 0. .' - .C\\lvcO. .w bb" .... ..... : : :-"2 crj c1. : ...... ..,.. 3 .... ... .... 12 BULLETIN NO. 350, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION i . ... . . .v@J .am . .O .- .. .O) .LC),+@JWCOCO ... .--I.,+ .M .a... .LID) *ma- .t. .-CD~*W~ .. .OSW@J ... .-- -b~12o~nt.m* .-(3 .. .... .G F Cl In .@I .- [-@I ,350 -2 :z %GO T* .-?b . 01 : .. .-.a .... .3 3 c" .?I - .o -om.-, .a3 ... ..... ... ..... ... ..... .. .w*w .a .~,amb .CDO .moo- . .me .mnim-a .oa...

  13. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 34 (1999) 3853 3858 Physical and dielectric properties of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, David B.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Publishers 1. Introduction Transition metal oxides, such as V2O5, MoO3, CuO, and TiO2, when heated with glassCa3Cu2O10 glasses (x = 0.5 and R = Ag, Ni) A. MEMON, D. B. TANNER Department of Physics, UniversityO3, SrCO3, CaCO3, AgO, NiO2 and CuO were mixed in appropriate quan- tities and calcined at 800 C

  14. Development of cryogenic low background detector based on enriched zinc molybdate crystal scintillators to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chernyak, Dmitry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ZnMoO$_4$ scintillators with a mass of $\\sim$ 0.3 kg, as well as Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystals enriched in the isotope $^{100}$Mo were produced for the first time by using the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique. The optical and luminescent properties of the produced crystals were studied to estimate the progress in crystal growth quality. The low-temperature tests with a 313 g ZnMoO$_4$ and two enriched Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystals were performed aboveground in the Centre de Sciences Nucl\\'eaires et de Sciences de la Mati\\`ere. The low background measurements with a three ZnMoO$_4$ and two enriched detectors installed in the EDELWEISS set-up at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane were carried out. To optimize the light collection in ZnMoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers, we have simulated the collection of scintillation photons in a detector module for different geometries by Monte Carlo method using the GEANT4 package. Response to the 2$\

  15. Tuning charge–discharge induced unit cell breathing in layer-structured cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Yong-Ning [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Ma, Jun [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Beijing National Lab. for Condensed Matter Physics (BNLCP-CAS); Hu, Enyuan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Yu, Xiqian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Gu, Lin [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Beijing National Lab. for Condensed Matter Physics (BNLCP-CAS); Nam, Kyung -Wan [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chen, Liquan [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Beijing National Lab. for Condensed Matter Physics (BNLCP-CAS); Wang, Zhaoxiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Beijing National Lab. for Condensed Matter Physics (BNLCP-CAS); Yang, Xiao -Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Through a systematic study of lithium molybdenum trioxide (Li2MoO3), a new ‘unit cell breathing’ mechanism is introduced based on both crystal and electronic structural changes of transition metal oxide cathode materials during charge–discharge: For widely used LiMO2 (M = Co, Ni, Mn), lattice parameters, a and b, contracts during charge. However, for Li2MoO3, such changes are in opposite directions. Metal–metal bonding is used to explain such ‘abnormal’ behaviour and a generalized hypothesis is developed. The expansion of M–M bond becomes the controlling factor for a(b) evolution during charge, in contrast to the shrinking M–O as controlling factor in ‘normal’ materials. The cation mixing caused by migration of Mo ions at higher oxidation state provides the benefits of reducing the c expansion range in early stage of charging and suppressing the structure collapse at high voltage charge. These results open a new strategy for designing and engineering layered cathode materials for high energy density lithium-ion batteries.

  16. Tuning charge–discharge induced unit cell breathing in layer-structured cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Yong-Ning; Ma, Jun; Hu, Enyuan; Yu, Xiqian; Gu, Lin; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Chen, Liquan; Wang, Zhaoxiang; Yang, Xiao -Qing

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Through a systematic study of lithium molybdenum trioxide (Li2MoO3), a new ‘unit cell breathing’ mechanism is introduced based on both crystal and electronic structural changes of transition metal oxide cathode materials during charge–discharge: For widely used LiMO2 (M = Co, Ni, Mn), lattice parameters, a and b, contracts during charge. However, for Li2MoO3, such changes are in opposite directions. Metal–metal bonding is used to explain such ‘abnormal’ behaviour and a generalized hypothesis is developed. The expansion of M–M bond becomes the controlling factor for a(b) evolution during charge, in contrast to the shrinking M–O as controlling factor in ‘normal’ materials.more »The cation mixing caused by migration of Mo ions at higher oxidation state provides the benefits of reducing the c expansion range in early stage of charging and suppressing the structure collapse at high voltage charge. These results open a new strategy for designing and engineering layered cathode materials for high energy density lithium-ion batteries.« less

  17. The market for beef among commercial eating establishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larey, Claudie Eugene

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    then sh vn ths "ulcc?zuo ci 'uh"-' r. oEx run'8 . :Rjrek~x&'ui13ig difx . ::-&t Ue Gs beef Crades, ' The buyer was aoherl 'uo ri conc, the c?us they p ?;=' or d irc'~ thee lrioturea end giVC reaanna fOr hie ChaiCe. ESm -. ~ctnua Was laioaled with the as...;ni. , is -. rte SSle 0, renlo ie nst the Orirn~- Dusine 0, - 'r. ?:, 'ir. - =:;='5: ' i30:. Ri dining roonec is;. =rtnont onti vsriety store restsorsnts, ctxr, . t i 0 . t I-. teria lt. n-d, son. ttes sn well se ciioing oogz of "m'oos t q:" s 0~ olobn. Xrlitlr...

  18. A study of the plant composition and utilization by mixed classes of livestock and white-tailed deer on the Kerr Wildlife Management area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Morton

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ^ z*\\ ^ z * A A M CULlEGE OF TEXAS A STUDY OF THE PLOT COMPOSITION AND UTILIZATION BY MIXED CLASSES OF LIVESTOCK AND WHITE-TAILED DEER ON THE KERR WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA A MCUULlEGECOF TOlEOF TGX S18cCEEL- EO E2L (lG-1GEL So2OOp Oe E2L... AnlCo1pE1lGp GF- TLo2GFCoGp ;OppLnL Oe )LsGU CF hGlECGp e1peCppcLFE Oe E2L lLa1ClLcLFEU eOl E2L MLnlLL Oe MOoEOl Oe d2CpOUOh2X JGF1GlXP 1959. Major Subject; Range Management A STUDY OF THE PLANT COM?031 ?ION AND UTILIZATION BY MIXED CLASSES...

  19. ZINC MITIGATION INTERIM REPORT - THERMODYNAMIC STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental program was initiated in order to develop and validate conditions that will effectively trap Zn vapors that are released during extraction. The proposed work is broken down into three tasks. The first task is to determine the effectiveness of various pore sizes of filter elements. The second task is to determine the effect of filter temperature on zinc vapor deposition. The final task is to determine whether the zinc vapors can be chemically bound. The approach for chemically binding the zinc vapors has two subtasks, the first is a review of literature and thermodynamic calculations and the second is an experimental approach using the best candidates. This report details the results of the thermodynamic calculations to determine feasibility of chemically binding the zinc vapors within the furnace module, specifically the lithium trap (1). A review of phase diagrams, literature, and thermodynamic calculations was conducted to determine if there are suitable materials to capture zinc vapor within the lithium trap of the extraction basket. While numerous elements exist that form compounds with zinc, many of these also form compounds with hydrogen or the water that is present in the TPBARs. This relatively comprehensive review of available data indicates that elemental cobalt and copper and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) may have the requisite properties to capture zinc and yet not be adversely affected by the extraction gases and should be considered for testing.

  20. SU-E-T-91: Correction Method to Determine Surface Dose for OSL Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, T; Higgins, P [UniversityMinnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: OSL detectors are commonly used in clinic due to their numerous advantages, such as linear response, negligible energy, angle and temperature dependence in clinical range, for verification of the doses beyond the dmax. Although, due to the bulky shielding envelope, this type of detectors fails to measure skin dose, which is an important assessment of patient ability to finish the treatment on time and possibility of acute side effects. This study aims to optimize the methodology of determination of skin dose for conventional accelerators and a flattening filter free Tomotherapy. Methods: Measurements were done for x-ray beams: 6 MV (Varian Clinac 2300, 10×10 cm{sup 2} open field, SSD = 100 cm) and for 5.5 MV (Tomotherapy, 15×40 cm{sup 2} field, SAD = 85 cm). The detectors were placed at the surface of the solid water phantom and at the reference depth (dref=1.7cm (Varian 2300), dref =1.0 cm (Tomotherapy)). The measurements for OSLs were related to the externally exposed OSLs measurements, and further were corrected to surface dose using an extrapolation method indexed to the baseline Attix ion chamber measurements. A consistent use of the extrapolation method involved: 1) irradiation of three OSLs stacked on top of each other on the surface of the phantom; 2) measurement of the relative dose value for each layer; and, 3) extrapolation of these values to zero thickness. Results: OSL measurements showed an overestimation of surface doses by the factor 2.31 for Varian 2300 and 2.65 for Tomotherapy. The relationships: SD{sup 2300} = 0.68 × M{sup 2300}-12.7 and SD?o?o = 0.73 × M?o?o-13.1 were found to correct the single OSL measurements to surface doses in agreement with Attix measurements to within 0.1% for both machines. Conclusion: This work provides simple empirical relationships for surface dose measurements using single OSL detectors.

  1. Supercapacitor behavior of ?-MnMoO{sub 4} nanorods on different electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purushothaman, K.K., E-mail: purushoth_gri@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, TRP Engineering College (SRM Group), Irungalur, Trichy, Tamilnadu (India); Cuba, M. [Department of Physics, Gandhigram Rural Institute – Deemed University, Gandhigram, Tamilnadu (India)] [Department of Physics, Gandhigram Rural Institute – Deemed University, Gandhigram, Tamilnadu (India); Muralidharan, G., E-mail: muralg@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Gandhigram Rural Institute – Deemed University, Gandhigram, Tamilnadu (India)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: SEM image of ?-MnMoO{sub 4} nanorods on FTO substrate. Highlights: ? Synthesis of ?-MnMoO{sub 4} nanorods by spin coating method. ? First study on the effect of electrolyte on the pseudocapacitance behavior. ? ?-MnMoO{sub 4} nanorods exhibit maximum specific capacitance of 998 F/g. ? At higher scan rates p-TSA electrolyte exhibits superior capacitive behavior. -- Abstract: ?-MnMoO{sub 4} nanorods were prepared on conducting glass substrate via sol–gel spin coating method at the optimum doping level. The effect of electrolyte on the pseudocapacitance behavior of the ?-MnMoO{sub 4} nanorods was studied using para toluene sulfonic acid (p-TSA), sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) as electrolytes. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the formation of ?-MnMoO{sub 4} in monoclinic phase. FTIR spectra contain vibrational bands associated with Mo=O, M–O and Mo–O–Mo bonds. SEM image reveals the formation of nanorods. Supercapacitor behavior has been studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV) analysis. ?-MnMoO{sub 4} nanorods exhibit maximum specific capacitance of 998 F/g at a scan rate of 5 mV/s in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte while a specific capacitance of 784 F/g and 530 F/g have been obtained using p-TSA and HCl electrolytes, respectively. At higher scan rates p-TSA electrolyte exhibits superior capacitive behavior than H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}.

  2. High-pressure X-ray diffraction study of SrMoO{sub 4} and pressure-induced structural changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Errandonea, Daniel [MALTA Consolider Team-Departamento de Fisica Aplicada-ICMUV, Universitat de Valencia, Edificio de Investigacion, c/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: daniel.errandonea@uv.es; Kumar, Ravhi S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, University of Nevada, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4002 (United States); Ma Xinghua; Tu Chaoyang [Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Graduated School of Chinese Academy of Science, 100039 Beijing (China)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    SrMoO{sub 4} was studied under compression up to 25 GPa by angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction. A phase transition was observed from the scheelite-structured ambient phase (space group I4{sub 1}/a) to a monoclinic fergusonite phase (space group I2/a) at 12.2(9) GPa. The unit-cell parameters of the high-pressure phase are a=5.265(9) A, b=11.191(9) A, c=5.195 (5) A, and {beta}=90.9(1){sup o}, Z=4 at 13.1 GPa. There is no significant volume collapse at the phase transition. No additional phase transitions were observed and on release of pressure the initial phase is recovered, implying that the observed structural modifications are reversible. The reported transition appeared to be a ferroelastic second-order transformation producing a structure that is a monoclinic distortion of the low-pressure phase and was previously observed in compounds isostructural to SrMoO{sub 4}. A possible mechanism for the transition is proposed and its character is discussed in terms of the present data and the Landau theory. Finally, the room temperature equation of states is reported and the anisotropic compressibility of the studied crystal is discussed in terms of the compression of the Sr-O and Mo-O bonds. - Graphical abstract: The evolution of the structure of SrMoO{sub 4} upon compression was established using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and a diamond-anvil cell. A pressure-induced phase transition was found involving a symmetry decrease from tetragonal to monoclinic. A transition mechanism is proposed and its ferroelastic character is discussed in terms of the Landau theory.

  3. Final Report: Catalytic Hydrocarbon Reactions over Supported Metal Oxides, August 1, 1995 - July 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekerdt, John G.

    1999-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The research program focused on the catalysis of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) over molybdenum-based catalysts and how catalyst composition, redox ability, structure and neighboring sites control the catalytic properties of metal oxides. We sought to understand the catalytic features/sites that control hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis, and isomerization during HDS. Unprompted silica-supported molybdenum oxides and molybdenum sulfides were studied. Model catalyst systems were prepared from organometallic precursors or cluster compounds to generate supported structures that feature Mo(II) and Mo(IV) cations that are isolated or in ensembles and that have either Mo-O or Mo-S bonds. Conventional MOS{sub 2} catalysts, which contain both edge and rim sites, were be studied. Finally, single-layer MOS{sub 2} structures were also prepared from 2H-MoS{sub 2} powder so that the model systems could be compared against a disulfide catalyst that only involves rim sites. Catalytic reactions for thiophene and tetrahydrothione were studied over the various catalysts. Oxidation states were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray crystallography was used to characterize and follow changes in the MOS{sub 2} structures. The program on metal oxides prepared supported oxides that have a specific structure and oxidation state to serve as model templates for the more complex commercial catalysts and then employed these structures in reaction studies. This focus area examined the relationships between structure and cation redox characteristics in oxidation catalysis. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the cations and reaction intermediates.

  4. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  5. Accident source terms for pressurized water reactors with high-burnup cores calculated using MELCOR 1.8.5.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Ashbaugh, Scott G.; Leonard, Mark Thomas; Longmire, Pamela

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, risk-significant pressurized-water reactor severe accident sequences are examined using MELCOR 1.8.5 to explore the range of fission product releases to the reactor containment building. Advances in the understanding of fission product release and transport behavior and severe accident progression are used to render best estimate analyses of selected accident sequences. Particular emphasis is placed on estimating the effects of high fuel burnup in contrast with low burnup on fission product releases to the containment. Supporting this emphasis, recent data available on fission product release from high-burnup (HBU) fuel from the French VERCOR project are used in this study. The results of these analyses are treated as samples from a population of accident sequences in order to employ approximate order statistics characterization of the results. These trends and tendencies are then compared to the NUREG-1465 alternative source term prescription used today for regulatory applications. In general, greater differences are observed between the state-of-the-art calculations for either HBU or low-burnup (LBU) fuel and the NUREG-1465 containment release fractions than exist between HBU and LBU release fractions. Current analyses suggest that retention of fission products within the vessel and the reactor coolant system (RCS) are greater than contemplated in the NUREG-1465 prescription, and that, overall, release fractions to the containment are therefore lower across the board in the present analyses than suggested in NUREG-1465. The decreased volatility of Cs2MoO4 compared to CsI or CsOH increases the predicted RCS retention of cesium, and as a result, cesium and iodine do not follow identical behaviors with respect to distribution among vessel, RCS, and containment. With respect to the regulatory alternative source term, greater differences are observed between the NUREG-1465 prescription and both HBU and LBU predictions than exist between HBU and LBU analyses. Additionally, current analyses suggest that the NUREG-1465 release fractions are conservative by about a factor of 2 in terms of release fractions and that release durations for in-vessel and late in-vessel release periods are in fact longer than the NUREG-1465 durations. It is currently planned that a subsequent report will further characterize these results using more refined statistical methods, permitting a more precise reformulation of the NUREG-1465 alternative source term for both LBU and HBU fuels, with the most important finding being that the NUREG-1465 formula appears to embody significant conservatism compared to current best-estimate analyses.

  6. Propane ammoxidation over the Mo-V-Te-Nb-O M1 phase: Reactivity of surface cations in hydrogen abstraction steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthukumar, Kaliappan [University of Cincinnati; Yu, Junjun [University of Cincinnati; Xu, Ye [ORNL; Guliants, Vadim V. [University of Cincinnati

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Density functional theory calculations (GGA-PBE) have been performed to investigate the adsorption of C3 (propane, isopropyl, propene, and allyl) and H species on the proposed active center present in the surface ab planes of the bulk Mo-V-Te-Nb-O M1 phase in order to better understand the roles of the different surface cations in propane ammoxidation. Modified cluster models were employed to isolate the closely spaced V=O and Te=O from each other and to vary the oxidation state of the V cation. While propane and propene adsorb with nearly zero adsorption energy, the isopropyl and allyl radicals bind strongly to V=O and Te=O with adsorption energies, {Delta}E, being {le} -1.75 eV, but appreciably more weakly on other sites, such as Mo=O, bridging oxygen (Mo-O-V and Mo-O-Mo), and empty metal apical sites ({Delta}E > -1 eV). Atomic H binds more strongly to Te = O ({Delta}E {le} -3 eV) than to all the other sites, including V = O ({Delta}E = -2.59 eV). The reduction of surface oxo groups by dissociated H and their removal as water are thermodynamically favorable except when both H atoms are bonded to the same Te=O. Consistent with the strong binding of H, Te=O is markedly more active at abstracting the methylene H from propane (E{sub a} {le} 1.01 eV) than V = O (E{sub a} = 1.70 eV on V{sup 5+} = O and 2.13 eV on V{sup 4+} = O). The higher-than-observed activity and the loose binding of Te = O moieties to the mixed metal oxide lattice of M1 raise the question of whether active Te = O groups are in fact present in the surface ab planes of the M1 phase under propane ammoxidation conditions.

  7. Preparation and structural study from neutron diffraction data of Pr{sub 5}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Lope, M.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid, Spain. (Spain); Alonso, J.A., E-mail: ja.alonso@icmm.csic.e [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid, Spain. (Spain); Sheptyakov, D.; Pomjakushin, V. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The title compound has been prepared as polycrystalline powder by thermal treatments of mixtures of Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11} and MoO{sub 2} in air. In the literature, an oxide with a composition Pr{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} has been formerly described to present interesting catalytic properties, but its true stoichiometry and crystal structure are reported here for the first time. It is cubic, isostructural with CdTm{sub 4}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 16} (space group Pn-3n, Z=8), with a=11.0897(1) A. The structure contains MoO{sub 4} tetrahedral units, with Mo-O distances of 1.788(2) A, fully long-range ordered with PrO{sub 8} polyhedra; in fact it can be considered as a superstructure of fluorite (M{sub 8}O{sub 16}), containing 32 MO{sub 2} fluorite formulae per unit cell, with a lattice parameter related to that of cubic fluorite (a{sub f}=5.5 A) as a{approx}2a{sub f}. A bond valence study indicates that Mo exhibits a mixed oxidation state between 5+ and 6+ (perhaps accounting for the excellent catalytic properties). One kind of Pr atoms is trivalent whereas the second presents a mixed Pr{sup 3+}-Pr{sup 4+} oxidation state. The similarity of the XRD pattern with that published for Ce{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} suggests that this compound also belongs to the same structural type, with an actual stoichiometry Ce{sub 5}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 16}. -- Graphical Abstract: Formerly formulated as Pr{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}, the title compound is a cubic superstructure of fluorite (a=11.0897(1) A, space group Pn-3n) due to the long-range ordering of PrO{sub 8} scalenohedra and MoO{sub 4} tetrahedral units, showing noticeable shifts of the oxygen positions in order to provide a tetrahedral coordination for Mo ions. A mixed valence Mo{sup 5+}-Mo{sup 6+} is identified, which could account for the excellent catalytic properties of this material. Display Omitted

  8. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Tuscarora geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Dering, 2013). The Tuscarora area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Tuscarora area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Tuscarora is defined by a left-step in a major north- to-north northeast striking, west-dipping range-bounding normal fault system. Faults within the broad step define an anticlinal accommodation zone...

  9. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the San Emidio Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the San Emidio geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Rhodes, 2011). The San Emidio area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the San Emidio area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. This is consistent with the shmin determined through inversion of fault data by Rhodes (2011). Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Interesting, the San Emidio geothermal field lies in an area of primarily north striking faults, which...

  10. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Salt Wells Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Salt Wells geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped in the Bunejug Mountains quadrangle (Hinz et al., 2011). The Salt Wells area lies in the Basin and Range Province (N. Hinz personal comm.) As such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Salt Wells area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 105, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Several such faults intersect in high density in the core of the accommodation zone in the Bunejug Mountains and local to the Salt Wells geothermal .

  11. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Patua Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency analysis for the Patua geothermal system was calculated based on faults mapped in the Hazen Quadrangle (Faulds et al., 2011). Patua lies near the margin between the Basin and Range province, which is characterized by west-northwest directed extension and the Walker Lane province, characterized by west-northwest directed dextral shear. As such, the Patua area likely has been affected by tectonic stress associated with either or both of stress regimes over geologic time. In order to characterize this stress variation we calculated slip tendency at Patua for both normal faulting and strike slip faulting stress regimes. Based on examination of regional and local stress data (as explained above) we applied at shmin direction of 105 to Patua. Whether the vertical stress (sv) magnitude is larger than ...

  12. ALD of Al2O3 for Highly Improved Performance in Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, A.; Jung, Y. S.; Ban, C.; Riley, L.; Cavanagh, A.; Yan, Y.; George, S.; Lee, S. H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant advances in energy density, rate capability and safety will be required for the implementation of Li-ion batteries in next generation electric vehicles. We have demonstrated atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a promising method to enable superior cycling performance for a vast variety of battery electrodes. The electrodes range from already demonstrated commercial technologies (cycled under extreme conditions) to new materials that could eventually lead to batteries with higher energy densities. For example, an Al2O3 ALD coating with a thickness of ~ 8 A was able to stabilize the cycling of unexplored MoO3 nanoparticle anodes with a high volume expansion. The ALD coating enabled stable cycling at C/2 with a capacity of ~ 900 mAh/g. Furthermore, rate capability studies showed the ALD-coated electrode maintained a capacity of 600 mAh/g at 5C. For uncoated electrodes it was only possible to observe stable cycling at C/10. Also, we recently reported that a thin ALD Al2O3 coating with a thickness of ~5 A can enable natural graphite (NG) electrodes to exhibit remarkably durable cycling at 50 degrees C. The ALD-coated NG electrodes displayed a 98% capacity retention after 200 charge-discharge cycles. In contrast, bare NG showed a rapid decay. Additionally, Al2O3 ALD films with a thickness of 2 to 4 A have been shown to allow LiCoO2 to exhibit 89% capacity retention after 120 charge-discharge cycles performed up to 4.5 V vs Li/Li+. Bare LiCoO2 rapidly deteriorated in the first few cycles. The capacity fade is likely caused by oxidative decomposition of the electrolyte at higher potentials or perhaps cobalt dissolution. Interestingly, we have recently fabricated full cells of NG and LiCoO2 where we coated both electrodes, one or the other electrode as well as neither electrode. In creating these full cells, we observed some surprising results that lead us to obtain a greater understanding of the ALD coatings. We have also recently coated a binder free LiNi0.04Mn0.04Co02O2 electrode containing 5 wt% single-walled carbon nanotubes as the conductive additive and demonstrated both high rate capability as well as the ability to cycle the cathode to 5 V vrs. Li/Li+. Finally, we coated a Celgard (TM) separator and enabled stable cycling in a high dielectric electrolyte. These results will be presented in detail.

  13. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Based on inversion of fault kinematic data, Edwards (2013) interpreted that two discrete stress orientations are preserved at Neal Hot Springs. An older episode of east-west directed extension and a younger episode of southwest-northeast directed sinistral, oblique -normal extension. This interpretation is consistent with the evolution of Cenozoic tectonics in the region (Edwards, 2013). As such we applied a southwest-northeast (060) directed normal faulting stress regime, consistent with the younger extensional episode, to the Neal Hot Springs faults. Under these stress conditions northeast striking steeply dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to dilate and northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Under these stress condition...

  14. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of McGinness Hills Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the McGinness Hills geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped McGinness Hills area (Siler 2012, unpublished). The McGinness Hills area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the McGinness area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. The McGinness Hills geothermal system is characterized by a left-step in a north-northeast striking west-dipping fault system wit...

  15. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and Dilation Tendency in focus areas Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Based on inversion of fault kinematic data, Edwards (2013) interpreted that two discrete stress orientations are preserved at Neal Hot Springs. An older episode of east-west directed extension and a younger episode of southwest-northeast directed sinistral, oblique -normal extension. This interpretation is consistent with the evolution of Cenozoic tectonics in the region (Edwards, 2013). As such we applied a southwest-northeast (060) directed normal faulting stress regime, consistent with the younger extensional episode, to the Neal Hot Springs faults. Under these stress conditions northeast striking steeply dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to dilate and northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Under these stress condition...

  16. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  17. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Patua Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency analysis for the Patua geothermal system was calculated based on faults mapped in the Hazen Quadrangle (Faulds et al., 2011). Patua lies near the margin between the Basin and Range province, which is characterized by west-northwest directed extension and the Walker Lane province, characterized by west-northwest directed dextral shear. As such, the Patua area likely has been affected by tectonic stress associated with either or both of stress regimes over geologic time. In order to characterize this stress variation we calculated slip tendency at Patua for both normal faulting and strike slip faulting stress regimes. Based on examination of regional and local stress data (as explained above) we applied at shmin direction of 105 to Patua. Whether the vertical stress (sv) magnitude is larger than ...

  18. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Salt Wells Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Salt Wells geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped in the Bunejug Mountains quadrangle (Hinz et al., 2011). The Salt Wells area lies in the Basin and Range Province (N. Hinz personal comm.) As such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Salt Wells area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 105, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Several such faults intersect in high density in the core of the accommodation zone in the Bunejug Mountains and local to the Salt Wells geothermal .

  19. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the San Emidio Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the San Emidio geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Rhodes, 2011). The San Emidio area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the San Emidio area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. This is consistent with the shmin determined through inversion of fault data by Rhodes (2011). Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Interesting, the San Emidio geothermal field lies in an area of primarily north striking faults, which...

  20. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Tuscarora geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Dering, 2013). The Tuscarora area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Tuscarora area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Tuscarora is defined by a left-step in a major north- to-north northeast striking, west-dipping range-bounding normal fault system. Faults within the broad step define an anticlinal accommodation zone...

  1. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of McGinness Hills Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and Dilation Tendency in focus areas Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the McGinness Hills geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped McGinness Hills area (Siler 2012, unpublished). The McGinness Hills area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the McGinness area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. The McGinness Hills geothermal system is characterized by a left-step in a north-northeast striking west-dipping fault system wit...