Sample records for junction greenfield grundy

  1. 1 CONFIDENTIAL1 CONFIDENTIAL GreenField Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    1 CONFIDENTIAL1 CONFIDENTIAL GreenField Solar: Testing and Reliability needs of CPV Systems Dr-south movements only required once a day West East #12;CONFIDENTIAL 7 Industry-wide issues - Solar Issues from ­ Encapsulation failures ­ Inverter reliability Solder fatigue Encapsulant browning Junction box failures

  2. Grundy Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoods |Grundy Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation,

  3. Brownfields vs greenfields -- Considerations for facility siting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, D.W.; Kaiding, D.C.; DeMaria, M.J. [Blasland, Bouck and Lee, Inc., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the promulgation of the ``Superfund`` component of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) in 1980, the sale and acquisition of industrial properties (brownfields) have been sluggish at best or non-existent where significant environmental contamination has been detected. As a result, many urban areas contain numerous brownfield sites that lie vacant due to the presence or the potential existence of contaminants. Wary of the potential remedial costs associated with brownfield sites, industry has focused its development on greenfield areas -- undeveloped areas where the potential for previous environmental contamination is remote. This paper evaluates the impact of the development of these brownfield areas from both an environmental and economic perspective. Critical to this evaluation is the impact of brownfield development as it relates to urban areas. Mature, heavily developed urban areas are usually unable to offer substantial greenfield areas, and as a result, have suffered a declining tax base, as employment opportunities are shifted beyond city limits. This paper also explores the advantages and disadvantages of developing brownfield versus greenfield areas, including issues such as: infrastructure, proximity to public transportation, public acceptance, and zoning and permitting. Furthermore, this paper provides an overview of current and pending legislation from both the federal government and various state agencies with regard to incentives being offered for the development of brownfield sites.

  4. Grundy Electric Coop, Inc (Iowa) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergy Information GroundwaterGrovers HotGrundy

  5. Grundy County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open Energy Information 2000)2004) |1978)NewGrundy County, Iowa:

  6. Grundy County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open Energy Information 2000)2004) |1978)NewGrundy County,

  7. Grundy County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open Energy Information 2000)2004) |1978)NewGrundy

  8. Grundy Center Mun Light & Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoods | OpenInformationMagneticsFeaturedGrundy

  9. Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Division of URS

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the initial “first look” of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

  10. "Diffusion of Innovation: Solar Oven Use in Lesotho (Africa)." Grundy, William and Roy Grundy. Advances in Solar Cooking: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Solar Cooker Use and Technology. Shyam S. Nandwani, ed. July 12-15, 1994.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, William Stafford

    "Diffusion of Innovation: Solar Oven Use in Lesotho (Africa)." Grundy, William and Roy Grundy. Advances in Solar Cooking: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Solar Cooker Use and Technology. Shyam S. Nandwani, ed. July 12-15, 1994. pp. 240-247. 1 DIFFUSION OF INNOVATION: SOLAR OVEN USE

  11. Greenfield, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrder JumpIowa: Energy Resources Jump to:Greenfield,

  12. Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems: Greenfield assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the KRW fluidized-bed gasifier and the transport gasifier case studies were used for this assessment. The transport technology is a high-velocity circulating fluidized-bed reactor currently under development by The M.W. Kellogg Company. In the earlier assessment, seven design concepts or cases were identified; a process design was developed; major equipment items were identified; estimates of capital cost, operation and maintenance cost, and cost of electricity were developed; reliability was predicted; and development issues were identified for six studies. Three of the most probable cases were further evaluated for a Greenfield assessment in this report to adequately determine all costs independent of facilities at Plant Wansley.

  13. Josephson junction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  14. SVSM/Combinatorics Assignment 11 More Composite Games 1. The table below gives the Grundy values for all pairs of pile sizes from up to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    for all pairs of pile sizes from up to 10 per pile for Whytoff's game. For example, the Grundy value of counters from one pile or the same number of counters from two piles. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 0 0 1 2 3 4 of the four one pile nim games N(3), N(5), N(7) and N(9). That is, N(3, 5, 7, 9) = N(3)N(5)N(7)N(9

  15. PRB coal safety design considerations for new greenfield plants: an EPCC's perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, J.H. [Fluor Power (United States)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The article reviews the design and safety aspects to consider in a new greenfield Powder River Basin (PRB) coal-fired power plant such as the 200 MW TS Power Plant (TSPP) in Nevada that Fluor is working on as an engineering, procurement and construction contractor (EPCC). PRB coals can become fragmented and form coal dust that is highly volatile and easily self-ignited. Coal handling systems incorporate features to minimise dust, such as totally enclosed chute works, 'spoon drops' to reduce impact turbulence, and overflow hoods. Conveyors have extended skirtboards and tight clearances between the wear plates and the belts. Storage piles are designed to have high compaction to deprive oxygen and dust suppression monitor hydrants to minimise dust and assist in compaction. The coal silo filling bay is designed to minimise dust once the coal is crushed, and attention is paid to cleaning and lighting. The silos are designed to ensure mass flow to the feeder and incorporate a carbon monoxide monitor and an F-500 fire suppressant. 3 photos.

  16. Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems: Greenfield assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the KRW fluidized-bed gasifier and the transport gasifier case studies were used for this assessment. The transport technology is a high-velocity circulating fluidized-bed reactor currently under development by The M.W. Kellogg Company. In the earlier assessment, seven design concepts or cases were identified; a process design was developed; major equipment items were identified; estimates of capital cost, operation and maintenance cost, and cost of electricity were developed; reliability was predicted; and development issues were identified for six studies. Three of the most probable cases were further evaluated for a Greenfield assessment in this report to adequately determine all costs independent of facilities at Plant Wansley.

  17. THERMAL EVALUATION OF THE CONCEPTUAL DHLW DISPOSAL CONTAINER LOADED WITH PU/CS GREENFIELD GLASS (SCPB: N/A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.L. Lotz

    1995-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) as specified in the Waste Package Implementation Plan (pp. 4-8,4-11,4-24,5-1, and 5-13; Ref. 5.10) and Waste Package Plan (pp. 3-15,3-17, and 3-24; Ref. 5.9). The design data request addressed herein is: Characterize the conceptual Defense High Level Waste (DHLW) Disposal Container design to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment when loaded with a plutonium/cesium greenfield glass waste form. The purpose of this analysis is to respond to a concern that the long-term disposal thermal issues for the conceptual DHLW disposal container design do not preclude compatibility with the MGDS if it is loaded with alternate waste forms. The objective of this analysis is to provide thermal parameter information for the conceptual DHLW disposal container design loaded with an alternative waste form containing a plutonium/cesium mixture under nominal MGDS repository conditions. The results are intended to show that the design loaded with this alternative waste form has a reasonable chance to meet the MGDS design requirements for normal MGDS operation and to provide the required guidance to determining the major design issues for future design efforts. Future design efforts will focus on specific DHLW vendor designs and improved waste form data when they become available.

  18. Three-junction solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludowise, Michael J. (Cupertino, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic solar cell is formed in a monolithic semiconductor. The cell contains three junctions. In sequence from the light-entering face, the junctions have a high, a medium, and a low energy gap. The lower junctions are connected in series by one or more metallic members connecting the top of the lower junction through apertures to the bottom of the middle junction. The upper junction is connected in voltage opposition to the lower and middle junctions by second metallic electrodes deposited in holes 60 through the upper junction. The second electrodes are connected to an external terminal.

  19. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation. Abstract: Time and frequency dependent intensity variations in sequences of...

  20. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  1. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); Hilbert, Claude (Austin, TX); Hahn, Erwin L. (Berkeley, CA); Sleator, Tycho (Berkeley, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  2. Greenfield FELs John Galayda, SLAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coverage (fundamental) 3 (5)1 (8)# FEL undulators 2012 (?)2009 (2013)Operation start TESLA (upgrade) LCLS (upgrade) X-ray FEL Projects in Preconstruction #12;Status of X-ray FELs in 2015 · LCLS and TESLA FEL ­ Self-seeding ­ Ultrashort pulse · HGHG scheme #12;SASE FEL for 30 keV · LCLS reference parameters: =

  3. Greenfield Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,IISrl

  4. Greenfield Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrder Jump

  5. Role of magnetic anisotropy in spin-filter junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chopdekar, R.V.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and azimuthal angle for a 2 nm MCO based junction. Figure 1.4 (CCO) or MnCr 2 O 4 (MCO)- both of which are isostructuralin CCO junctions compared to MCO junctions. Detailed studies

  6. Superconducting Tunnel Junctions as Direct Detectors for Submillimeter Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconducting Tunnel Junctions as Direct Detectors for Submillimeter Astronomy A Dissertation 2008 by John Daniel Teufel. All rights reserved. #12;Abstract Superconducting Tunnel Junctions on the of performance of superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) as direct detectors for submillimeter radiation. Over

  7. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  8. Phonon Bottleneck in Graphene-Based Josephson Junctions at Millikelvin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Phonon Bottleneck in Graphene-Based Josephson Junctions at Millikelvin Temperatures Citation Details Title: Phonon Bottleneck in Graphene-Based Josephson Junctions at Millikelvin...

  9. adherens junction formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aluminum tunnel junctions Our recent work has involved fabrication of superconducting aluminum tunnel junctions for use; W. Barber et al. 2. PROCEDURE Our tunnel...

  10. Quantum Junction Solar Cells Jiang Tang,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantum Junction Solar Cells Jiang Tang,, Huan Liu,, David Zhitomirsky,§ Sjoerd Hoogland,§ Xihua, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074, China § Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family

  11. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  12. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  13. Thermoelectric efficiency of critical quantum junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihail Mintchev; Luca Santoni; Paul Sorba

    2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the efficiency at maximal power of a scale-invariant (critical) quantum junction in exact form. Both Fermi and Bose statistics are considered. We show that time-reversal invariance is spontaneously broken. For fermions we implement a new mechanism for efficiency enhancement above the Curzon-Ahlborn bound, based on a shift of the particle energy in each heat reservoir, proportional to its temperature. In this setting fermionic junctions can even reach at maximal power the Carnot efficiency. The bosonic junctions at maximal power turn out to be less efficient then the fermionic ones.

  14. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedman, Daniel J. (Lakewood, CO); Geisz, John F. (Wheat Ridge, CO)

    2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  15. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  16. Theory of Proximity Effect in Junctions with Unconventional Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    )Singlet superconductor junctions ()Triplet superconductor junctions [PRB 70, 012507 (2004), PRB71 024506(2005) PRB 72,R140503 (2005), PRL 96 (2006) ] [PRB 69 144519 (2004), PRL 90 167003(2003)] #12;Tunneling

  17. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Drummond, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Robertson, Perry J. (Albuquerque, NM); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits.

  18. Axion physics in a Josephson junction environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Beck

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that recent experiments based on Josephson junctions, SQUIDS, and coupled Josephson qubits have a cosmological interpretation in terms of axionic dark matter physics, in the sense that they allow for analogue simulation of early-universe axion physics. We propose new experimental setups in which SQUID-like axionic interactions in a resonant Josephson junction environment can be tested, similar in nature to recent experiments that test for quantum entanglement of two coupled Josephson qubits. We point out that the parameter values relevant for early-universe axion cosmology are accessible with present day's achievements in nanotechnology.

  19. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baca, A.G.; Drummond, T.J.; Robertson, P.J.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits. 10 figs.

  20. EA-0930: Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to expand and upgrade the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Projects Office facilities and operations in Grand Junction, Colorado.

  1. Dynamic simulations of arrays of Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eikmans, H.; van Himbergen, J.E. (Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Utrecht, P.O. Box 80.006, 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlands (NL))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First we introduce a very efficient algorithm for dynamic simulations of a wide class of arrays of Josephson junctions with realistic boundaries. With this algorithm one can also represent current-biased arrays with periodic boundaries. Next we present results of extensive simulations of ladder arrays. We evaluate the resistance as a function of magnetic field and find striking differences between different geometries.

  2. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zolper, John C. (Albuquerque, NM); Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  3. Axion mass estimates from resonant Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Beck

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently it has been proposed that dark matter axions from the galactic halo can produce a small Shapiro step-like signal in Josephson junctions whose Josephson frequency resonates with the axion mass [C. Beck, PRL 111, 231801 (2013)]. Here we show that the axion field equations in a voltage-driven Josephson junction environment allow for a nontrivial solution where the axion-induced electric current manifests itself as an oscillating supercurrent. The linear change of phase associated with this nontrivial solution implies the formal existence of a large magnetic field in a tiny surface area of the weak link region of the junction which makes incoming axions decay into microwave photons. We derive a condition for the design of Josephson junction experiments so that they can act as optimum axion detectors. Four independent recent experiments are discussed in this context. The observed Shapiro step anomalies of all four experiments consistently point towards an axion mass of $(110 \\pm 2)\\mu $eV. This mass value is compatible with the recent BICEP2 results and implies that Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking was taking place after inflation.

  4. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  5. QER- Comment of Solar Store of Greenfield

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I speak for many millions of Americans who are ready and able to more the USA towards that goal of 100% renewables by 2050. WE are ready to START TODAY. And in fact we have started already. Thank you for your time and consideration. Claire Chang

  6. Greenfield, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,IISrlMassachusetts: Energy Resources

  7. Greenfield, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrder JumpIowa: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,

  8. Greenfield, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrder JumpIowa: Energy Resources Jump to:

  9. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with epitaxial and textured ferromagnetic layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Y. Austin (Middleton, WI); Yang, Jianhua Joshua (Madison, WI)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to magnetic tunnel junctions and methods for making the magnetic tunnel junctions. The magnetic tunnel junctions include a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers both of which are epitaxial or textured with respect to the underlying substrate upon which the magnetic tunnel junctions are grown. The magnetic tunnel junctions provide improved magnetic properties, sharper interfaces and few defects.

  10. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Ager, III, Joel W. (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  11. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Ager, III, Joel W. (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  12. Investigation of the Wall Effect in the long Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nevirkovets, I.P.; Rudenko, E.M. (Inst. of Metal Physics of the Ukrainian Academy of Science, Kiev 252142 (SU))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the long Josephson junctions with edge current injection and shortened control line studied experimentally. It is found that the wall effect is connected with the blockade of vortices entry into the junction by control current, as well as with the existence of the energy barrier for the vortices at the boundary between a projection region and the remainder part of the junction. The significant enhancement of supercurrent due to the blockade was found.

  13. Raman Scattering at Plasmonic Junctions Shorted by Conductive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between line spectra and band spectra, can be assigned to shorting the junction plasmon through molecular conductive bridges. This is demonstrated through Raman trajectories...

  14. Quantum manipulation and simulation using Josephson junction arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xingxiang Zhou; Ari Mizel

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the prospect of using quantum properties of large scale Josephson junction arrays for quantum manipulation and simulation. We study the collective vibrational quantum modes of a Josephson junction array and show that they provide a natural and practical method for realizing a high quality cavity for superconducting qubit based QED. We further demonstrate that by using Josephson junction arrays we can simulate a family of problems concerning spinless electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions. These protocols require no or few controls over the Josephson junction array and are thus relatively easy to realize given currently available technology.

  15. Phonon interference effects in molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markussen, Troels, E-mail: troels.markussen@gmail.com [Center for Atomic-scale Materials Design (CAMD), Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)] [Center for Atomic-scale Materials Design (CAMD), Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study coherent phonon transport through organic, ?-conjugated molecules. Using first principles calculations and Green's function methods, we find that the phonon transmission function in cross-conjugated molecules, like meta-connected benzene, exhibits destructive quantum interference features very analogous to those observed theoretically and experimentally for electron transport in similar molecules. The destructive interference features observed in four different cross-conjugated molecules significantly reduce the thermal conductance with respect to linear conjugated analogues. Such control of the thermal conductance by chemical modifications could be important for thermoelectric applications of molecular junctions.

  16. Junction Hilltop Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | WindInformationJosephine,Junction Hilltop

  17. Limiting and realistic efficiencies of multi-junction solar Photonic Materials Group, FOM institute AMOLF, Amsterdam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    analysis of the single junction c-Si cell and the 5-junction Ge-(c-Si)-CZTS-(a-SiC)-GaP cell is performed

  18. Nonvolatile memory disturbs due to gate and junction leakage currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroder, Dieter K.

    ) from traps within the gate oxides. Such low gate leakage currents can lead to sufficient charge; accepted 10 September 2002 Abstract We address disturbs due to gate oxide and junction leakage currents in floating gate nonvolatile memories (NVM). The junction leakage is important, because the gate oxide current

  19. Profiling the Thermoelectric Power of Semiconductor Junctions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Profiling the Thermoelectric Power of Semiconductor Junctions with Nanometer Resolution Ho-Ki Lyeo,3 * We have probed the local thermoelectric power of semiconductor nanostruc- tures with the use of ultrahigh-vacuum scanning thermoelectric microscopy. When applied to a p-n junction, this method reveals

  20. Mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes in crossed junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yadong; Chen, Xiaoming; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Park, Cheol [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Fay, Catharine C. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Stupkiewicz, Stanislaw [Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in crossed junctions. The structure and deformation of the crossed tubes in the junction are characterized by using atomic force microscopy. Our results show that the total tube heights are reduced by 20%–33% at the crossed junctions formed by double-walled BNNTs with outer diameters in the range of 2.21–4.67?nm. The measured tube height reduction is found to be in a nearly linear relationship with the summation of the outer diameters of the two tubes forming the junction. The contact force between the two tubes in the junction is estimated based on contact mechanics theories and found to be within the range of 4.2–7.6 nN. The Young's modulus of BNNTs and their binding strengths with the substrate are quantified, based on the deformation profile of the upper tube in the junction, and are found to be 1.07?±?0.11 TPa and 0.18–0.29 nJ/m, respectively. Finally, we perform finite element simulations on the mechanical deformations of the crossed BNNT junctions. The numerical simulation results are consistent with both the experimental measurements and the analytical analysis. The results reported in this paper contribute to a better understanding of the structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and to the pursuit of their applications.

  1. Power dissipation in a single molecule junction: Tracking energy levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghoob Naimi; Javad Vahedi

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by recent work [Lee et al. Nature {\\bf 489}, 209 (2013)], on asymmetry features of heat dissipation in the electrodes of molecular junctions, we put forward an idea as a result of heat dissipation in the electrodes. Based on tight-binding model and a generalized Green's function formalism, we describe the conditions under which heat dissipation shows symmetry characteristic and does not depend on the bias polarity. We also show the power dissipated in the junction can be used to detect which energy levels of molecule junction play more or less role in the transmission process. We present this idea by studying a simple toy model and Au-$C_{60}$-Au junction.

  2. EA-1037: Uranium Lease Management Program, Grand Junction, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Projects Office's proposal to maintain and preserve the nation's immediately accessible supply of...

  3. apical cell junctions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Viciana; Dora E. Vega-salas; Hans-peter Hauri; M. Brignoni 1997-01-01 3 Quantum Junction Solar Cells Jiang Tang,, Engineering Websites Summary: tuned primarily via control over...

  4. adhering junctions connecting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of such experiments the number of magnetic flux quanta spontaneously trapped in a superconducting loop was measured by means of a long Josephson tunnel junction built on top of...

  5. adherens junctions connect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of such experiments the number of magnetic flux quanta spontaneously trapped in a superconducting loop was measured by means of a long Josephson tunnel junction built on top of...

  6. Josephson Junctions and Devices fabricated by Focused Electron Beam Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booij, Wilfred Edwin

    Josephson Junctions and Devices fabricated by Focused Electron Beam Irradiation Wilfred Edwin Booij Gonville and Caius College Cambridge A dissertation submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge December 1997... Summary Josephson Junctions and Devices fabricated by Focused Electron Beam Irradiation The irradiation of high Tc superconducting thin films with a focused electron beam, such as that obtained in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), can...

  7. EA-1338: Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office to Non-DOE Ownership, Grand Junction, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed transfer of real and personal property at the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Office to non-DOE ownership.

  8. A Three-Isocenter Jagged-Junction IMRT Approach for Craniospinal Irradiation Without Beam Edge Matching for Field Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Fred, E-mail: fcao@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada)] [Department of Medical Physics, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Ramaseshan, Ramani; Corns, Robert; Harrop, Sheryl [Department of Medical Physics, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada)] [Department of Medical Physics, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Nuraney, Nimet; Steiner, Peter; Aldridge, Stephanie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Liu, Mitchell; Carolan, Hannah [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Agranovich, Alex; Karvat, Anand [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Traditionally craniospinal irradiation treats the central nervous system using two or three adjacent field sets. We propose a technique using a three-isocenter intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan (jagged-junction IMRT) which overcomes problems associated with field junctions and beam edge matching and improves planning and treatment setup efficiencies with homogenous target dose distribution. Methods and Materials: Treatments for 3 patients with a prescription of 36 Gy in 20 fractions were retrospectively planned with jagged-junction IMRT and compared to conventional treatment plans. Planning target volume (PTV) included the whole brain and spinal canal to the S3 vertebral level. The plan used three field sets, each with a unique isocenter. One field set with seven fields treated the cranium. Two field sets treated the spine, each set using three fields. Fields from adjacent sets were overlapped, and the optimization process smoothly integrated the dose inside the overlapped junction. Results: For jagged-junction IMRT plans vs. conventional technique, the average homogeneity index equaled 0.08 {+-} 0.01 vs. 0.12 {+-} 0.02, respectively, and conformity number equaled 0.79 {+-} 0.01 vs. 0.47 {+-} 0.12, respectively. The 95% isodose surface covered (99.5 {+-} 0.3)% of the PTV vs. (98.1 {+-} 2.0)%, respectively. Both jagged-junction IMRT plans and the conventional plans had good sparing of organs at risk. Conclusions: Jagged-junction IMRT planning provided good dose homogeneity and conformity to the target while maintaining a low dose to organs at risk. Results from jagged-junction IMRT plans were better than or equivalent to those from the conventional technique. Jagged-junction IMRT optimization smoothly distributed dose in the junction between field sets. Because there was no beam matching, this treatment technique is less likely to produce hot or cold spots at the junction, in contrast to conventional techniques. The planning process is also simplified as only one IMRT plan is required for the entire target volume.

  9. Grundy County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open Energy Information 2000)2004) |1978)New

  10. Grundy County Rural Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoods |

  11. Measure Guideline: Optimizing the Configuration of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beach, R.; Burdick, A.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This measure guideline offers additional recommendations to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system designers for optimizing flexible duct, constant-volume HVAC systems using junction boxes within Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) Manual D guidance (Rutkowski, H. Manual D -- Residential Duct Systems, 3rd edition, Version 1.00. Arlington, VA: Air Conditioning Contractors of America, 2009.). IBACOS used computational fluid dynamics software to explore and develop guidance to better control the airflow effects of factors that may impact pressure losses within junction boxes among various design configurations (Beach, R., Prahl, D., and Lange, R. CFD Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, submitted for publication 2013). These recommendations can help to ensure that a system aligns more closely with the design and the occupants' comfort expectations. Specifically, the recommendations described herein show how to configure a rectangular box with four outlets, a triangular box with three outlets, metal wyes with two outlets, and multiple configurations for more than four outlets. Designers of HVAC systems, contractors who are fabricating junction boxes on site, and anyone using the ACCA Manual D process for sizing duct runs will find this measure guideline invaluable for more accurately minimizing pressure losses when using junction boxes with flexible ducts.

  12. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  13. Estimating commuter rail demand to Kendall Square along the Grand Junction Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockelie, Adam

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since acquiring the Grand Junction Railroad in June 2010 from CSX, the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA) has explored the possibility of using the line for commuter rail service. In addition the Grand Junction ...

  14. Annexin A2 is Required for Endothelial Cell Junctional Response to S1P 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Rebecca

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Endothelial cell (EC) junctions are critical for angiogenesis, the sprouting and growth of new blood vessels from existing vessels. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a proangiogenic factor that potently stimulates sprouting, fortifies EC junctions...

  15. Environmental Audit of the Grand Junction Projects Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) is located in Mesa County, Colorado, immediately south and west of the Grand Junction city limits. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Colorado Raw Materials Office at the present-day Grand Junction Projects Office in 1947, to aid in the development of a viable domestic uranium industry. Activities at the site included sampling uranium concentrate; pilot-plant milling research, including testing and processing of uranium ores; and operation of a uranium mill pilot plant from 1954 to 1958. The last shipment of uranium concentrate was sent from GJPO in January, 1975. Since that time the site has been utilized to support various DOE programs, such as the former National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), and the Technical Measurements Center (TMC). All known contamination at GJPO is believed to be the result of the past uranium milling, analyses, and storage activities. Hazards associated with the wastes impounded at GJPO include surface and ground-water contamination and potential radon and gamma-radiation exposure. This report documents the results of the Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) located in Grand Junction, Colorado. The Grand Junction Baseline Environmental Audit was conducted from May 28 to June 12, 1991, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). This Audit evaluated environmental programs and activities at GJPO, as well as GJPO activities at the State-Owned Temporary Repository. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Free electron gas primary thermometer: The bipolar junction transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mimila-Arroyo, J., E-mail: jmimila@cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Dpto. de Ing. Eléctrica-SEES, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional No 2508, México D.F. CP 07360 (Mexico)

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature of a bipolar transistor is extracted probing its carrier energy distribution through its collector current, obtained under appropriate polarization conditions, following a rigorous mathematical method. The obtained temperature is independent of the transistor physical properties as current gain, structure (Homo-junction or hetero-junction), and geometrical parameters, resulting to be a primary thermometer. This proposition has been tested using off the shelf silicon transistors at thermal equilibrium with water at its triple point, the transistor temperature values obtained involve an uncertainty of a few milli-Kelvin. This proposition has been successfully tested in the temperature range of 77–450?K.

  17. Visible Y -junction diode laser with mixed coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Poel, C.J.; Opschoor, J.; Valster, A.; Drenten, R.R. (Philips Research Laboratories, P. O. Box 80 000, 5600 JA Eindhoven (The Netherlands)); Andre, J.P. (Laboratoires d'Electronique et de Physique Applique, 3 Avenue Descartes, 94450 Limeil-Brevannes (France))

    1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study and theoretical analysis of a phase-locked, visible, {lambda}=670 nm, 2-3 {ital Y}-junction semiconductor laser array are presented. In a ridgetype 2-3 {ital Y}-junction, AlInGaP/InGaP array, both in-phase and anti-phase array modes are observed to lase simultaneously. The experimental results are discussed in the framework of a model based on the beam propagation method. The influence of the presence of both interferometric and evanescent coupling on the array modes is analyzed.

  18. Optimized Triple-Junction Solar Cells Using Inverted Metamorphic Approach (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J. F.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Record efficiencies with triple-junction inverted metamorphic designs, modeling useful to optimize, and consider operating conditions before choosing design.

  19. TM-mode coupling to a Josephson junction S. J. Lewandowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of the junction electrodes. to the j unction was provided by two leads immersed in superconducting solder, which

  20. Nanowire-Based Molecular Monolayer Junctions: Synthesis, Assembly, and Electrical Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (phenylene vinylene) (OPV) were prepared by replicating the pores of sub-40 nm diameter polycarbonate track etched that the conductance of junctions formed with -conjugated oligomers are several orders of magnitude larger than the saturated alkanes, with the OPV junctions having the highest conductance. The molecular wire junction

  1. DESIGN APPROACHES AND MATERIALS PROCESSES FOR ULTRAHIGH EFFICIENCY LATTICE MISMATCHED MULTI-JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    -JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS Melissa J. Griggs 1 , Daniel C. Law 2 , Richard R. King 2 , Arthur C. Ackerman 3 , James M heterostructures grown in a multi-junction solar cell-like structure by MOCVD. Initial solar cell data are also of the minority carrier lifetime. INTRODUCTION High efficiency triple junction solar cells have recently been

  2. Novel InGaAsN pn Junction for High-Efficiency Multiple-Junction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allerman, A.A.; Chang, P.C.; Gee, J.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Hou, H.Q.; Jones, E.D.; Kurtz, S.R.; Reinhardt, K.C.

    1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the application of a novel material, InGaAsN, with bandgap energy of 1.05 eV as a junction in an InGaP/GaAs/InGaAsN/Ge 4-junction design. Results of the growth and structural, optical, and electrical properties were demonstrated, showing the promising perspective of this material for ultra high efficiency solar cells. Photovoltaic properties of an as-grown pn diode structure and improvement through post growth annealing were also discussed.

  3. Photo-Thermoelectric Effect at a Graphene Interface Junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEuen, Paul L.

    Photo-Thermoelectric Effect at a Graphene Interface Junction Xiaodong Xu, Nathaniel M. Gabor increase at the cryogenic temperature as compared to room temperature. Assuming the thermoelectric power predictions. KEYWORDS Graphene, photocurrent, photo-thermoelectric effect D evices that convert photons

  4. Modeling Social Network Relationships via t-Cherry Junction Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    Modeling Social Network Relationships via t-Cherry Junction Trees Brian Proulx and Junshan Zhang Abstract--The massive scale of online social networks makes it very challenging to characterize intractable model for users' relationships in a social network. There are a number of advantages

  5. PARAMETRIC EXCITATION OF PLASMA OSCILLATIONS IN JOSEPHSON JUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    b. ' FIG. 3. - (a) 03B1c tan çoo vs. 2/Q at co = 2 cop. Straight line : theory. Circles : analog harmonic generation with big amplitude may be understood from a discussion of the stability properties frequency FIG. 1. - The junction model. For the analog R = 500 il, Io = 1 mA, C = 100 nF, and k = « 2 e

  6. Mutual synchronization of two stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions in cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors, which naturally realize a stack of Josephson junctions, thus can be used to generate electromagnetic waves in the terahertz region. A plate-like single crystal with 10{sup 4} junctions without cavity resonance was proposed to achieve strong radiation. For this purpose, it is required to synchronize the Josephson plasma oscillation in all junctions. In this work, we propose to use two stacks of junctions shunted in parallel to achieve synchronization. The two stacks are mutually synchronized in the whole IV curve, and there is a phase shift between the plasma oscillation in the two stacks. The phase shift is nonzero when the number of junctions in different stacks is the same, while it can be arbitrary when the number of junctions is different. This phase shift can be tuned continuously by applying a magnetic field when all the junctions are connected by superconducting wires.

  7. Topological p-n junctions in helical edge states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disha Wadhawan; Poonam Mehta; Sourin Das

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum spin Hall effect is endowed with topologically protected edge modes with gapless Dirac spectrum. Applying a magnetic field locally along the edge leads to a gapped edge spectrum with opposite parity for winding of spin texture for conduction and valence band. Using Pancharatnam's prescription for geometric phase it is shown that mismatch of this parity across a p-n junction, which could be engineered into the edge by electrical gate induced doping, leads to a phase dependence in the two-terminal conductance which is purely topological (0 or $\\pi$). This fact results in a ${\\mathbb{Z}}_2$ classification of such junctions with an associated duality. Current asymmetry measurements which are shown to be robust against electron-electron interactions are proposed to infer this topology.

  8. Transient Dynamics in Molecular Junctions: Coherent Bichromophoric Molecular Electron Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roie Volkovich; Uri Peskin

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of using single molecule junctions as electron pumps for energy conversion and storage is considered. It is argued that the small dimensions of these systems enable to make use of unique intra-molecular quantum coherences in order to pump electrons between two leads and to overcome relaxation processes which tend to suppress the pumping efficiency. In particular, we demonstrate that a selective transient excitation of one chromophore in a bi-chromophoric donor-bridge-acceptor molecular junction model yields currents which transfer charge (electron and holes) unevenly to the two leads in the absence of a bias potential. The utility of this mechanism for charge pumping in steady state conditions is proposed.

  9. Electron transport in normal-metal/superconductor junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, XZ; Zhao, HW; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    junction, the electron PRB 610163-1829/2000/61~21!/14759~6!/$15.00 l?superconductor junctions g Yan , College Station, Texas 77843-4242 , P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100080, China d Chia-Ren Hu , College Station, Texas 77843-4242 y 2000! systems, we...tanh@~v1eVs3!/2kBT#~L10 2L20 !, PRB 61ZHAO, AND CHIA-REN HU R f5tanh~v/2kBT !~R10 2R20 !, L1 0 5L 2 0? 5L0~k ,v1eVs31i0 !, R1 0 5R 2 0? 5R0~k ,v1i0 !. Here L1 0 and R1 0 (L 2 0 and R 2 0 ) are the retarded ~advanced! Green...

  10. Epithelial cell polarity and cell junctions in drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tepass, Ulrich; Tanentzapf­ , Guy; Ward, Robert; Fehon, Richard

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18 Oct 2001 10:14 AR AR144-24.tex AR144-24.sgm ARv2(2001/05/10) P1: GJB Annu. Rev. Genet. 2001. 35:747?84 Copyright c 2001 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved EPITHELIAL CELL POLARITY AND CELL JUNCTIONS IN DROSOPHILA Ulrich Tepass and Guy....35:747-784. Downloaded from arjournals.annualreviews.org by University of Kanas-Lawrence & Edwards on 09/26/05. For personal use only. 18 Oct 2001 10:14 AR AR144-24.tex AR144-24.sgm ARv2(2001/05/10) P1: GJB 748 TEPASS ET AL. THE SEPTATE JUNCTION...

  11. Instability of superconducting state in Josephson tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nevirkovets, I.P.; Rudenko, =.M.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments on low-resistance Josephson Sn--I--Sn tunnel junctions have shown the superconductor to exhibit an instability that manifests itself on the current--voltage characteristic (IVC) in the form of a jumplike decrease of the voltage when it reaches a value 2..delta../e. When a weak magnetic field H is applied parallel to the junction plane and suppresses the nonstationary Josephson effect, the negative-slope IVC section vanishes. The H-dependent instability-current component, as well as the dc component of the Josephson current near 2..delta../e, can be approximated by a function of H/sup -2/. The singularity observed is attributed to the presence of a maximum of the superconducting component, due to the Riedel singularity, at V = 2..delta../e.

  12. Strain designed Josephson $?$ junction qubits with topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin Benjamin

    2015-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A Josephson qubit is designed via the application of a tensile strain to a topological insulator surface sandwiched between two s-wave superconductors. The strain applied leads to a shift in the Dirac point without changing the pre-existing conducting states, on the surface of a topological insulator. Strain applied can be tuned to form a $\\pi$ junction in such a structure. Combining two such junctions in a ring architecture leads to the ground state of the ring being in doubly degenerate state- the "0" and "1" states of a qubit. A qubit designed this way is quite easily controlled via the tunable strain applied. We report on the conditions necessary to design such a qubit. Finally the operating time of a single qubit phase gate is derived.

  13. Nonlinear thermal control in an N-terminal junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvira Segal

    2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate control over heat flow in an N-terminal molecular junction. Using simple model Hamiltonians we show that the heat current through two terminals can be tuned, switched, and amplified, by the temperature and coupling parameters of external gating reservoirs. We discuss two models: A fully harmonic system, and a model incorporating anharmonic interactions. For both models the control reservoirs induce thermal fluctuations of the transition elements between molecular vibrational states. We find that a fully harmonic model does not show any controllability, while for an anharmonic system the conduction properties of the junction strongly depend on the parameters of the gates. Realizations of the model system within nanodevices and macromolecules are discussed.

  14. Towards understanding junction degradation in cadmium telluride solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nardone, Marco, E-mail: marcon@bgsu.edu [Department of Environment and Sustainability, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403 (United States)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A degradation mechanism in cadmium telluride (CdTe/CdS) solar cells is investigated using time-dependent numerical modeling to simulate various temperature, bias, and illumination stress conditions. The physical mechanism is based on defect generation rates that are proportional to nonequilibrium charge carrier concentrations. It is found that a commonly observed degradation mode for CdTe/CdS solar cells can be reproduced only if defects are allowed to form in a narrow region of the absorber layer close to the CdTe/CdS junction. A key aspect of this junction degradation is that both mid-gap donor and shallow acceptor-type defects must be generated simultaneously in response to photo-excitation or applied bias. The numerical approach employed here can be extended to study other mechanisms for any photovoltaic technology.

  15. Nanopillar Spin Filter Tunnel Junctions with Manganite Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Bhagwati; Egilmez, Mehmet; Schoofs, Frank; Fix, Thomas; Vickers, Mary E; Zhang, Wenrui; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Blamire, Mark G

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge, CB3 0FS, UK ‡ Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 77843-3128, USA KEYWORDS: Spin filter, Nano... magnetic memories, reprogrammable logic and quantum computers.1,2 These devices rely on the generation of highly spin-polarized currents. Spin filter tunnel junction (SFTJ) has emerged as a promising alternative for this purpose. A possible way...

  16. United States Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grand Junction Office (GJO), US Department of Energy (DOE), develops and administers programs for evaluating domestic uranium resources and the production capability of industry; for developing resource planning information for DOE; and for advancing geologic and geophysical exploration concepts and techniques. In addition, GJO administers the leasing of mineral lands under DOE control, and carries out activities relating to the environmental aspects of uranium mining and milling, including remedial programs. The Office is staffed by administrative and technical program-management personnel. Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (Bendix) is the DOE operating contractor at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Government-owned/contractor-operated (GOCO) facility. The technical staffs of both GJO and Bendix are primarily geoscience-oriented. Specifically during 1980, uranium resource assessment on 135 National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangles was completed, along with other specific studies, to yield October 1980 national resource estimates. In addition, updated uranium supply analysis and production capability projections were completed. Another key aspect of this successful program was the development of improved geophysical and geochemical equipment and techniques in support of uranium resource assessment. Much of the hardware and know-how developed was turned over to the public and to the uranium industry at large for application to uranium exploration and the assessment of uranium company resources. The Grand Junction Office also participated actively during 1980 in international cooperative research on uranium exploration techniques and on the geology of uranium deposits.

  17. Environmental assessment of facility operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Because DOE-GJPO regularly proposes and conducts many different on-site activities, DOE decided to evaluate these activities in one sitewide EA rather than in multiple, activity-specific documents. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for facility operations, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  18. Shunt-capacitor-assisted synchronization of oscillations in intrinsic Josephson junctions stack.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, I.; Halasz, G. B.; Bulaevskii, L. N.; Koshelev, A. E.; Materials Science Division; LANL

    2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a shunt capacitor, by coupling each Josephson junction to all the other junctions, stabilizes synchronized oscillations in an intrinsic Josephson junction stack biased by a dc current. This synchronization mechanism is similar to the previously discussed radiative coupling between junctions, however, it is not defined by the geometry of the stack. It is particularly important in crystals with smaller numbers of junctions (where the radiation coupling is weak), and is comparable with the effect of strong super-radiation in crystals with many junctions. The shunt also helps to enter the phase-locked regime in the beginning of the oscillations, after switching on the bias current. Furthermore, it may be used to tune radiation power, which drops as the shunt capacitance increases.

  19. Process For Direct Integration Of A Thin-Film Silicon P-N Junction Diode With A Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toet, Daniel (Mountain View, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  20. Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toet, Daniel (Mountain View, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  1. Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toet, Daniel; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  2. Mode stabilization mechanism of buried waveguide lasers with lateral diffused junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, K.L.; Chen, T.R.; Koren, U.; Lau, K.Y.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mode stabilization behavior of the buried active waveguide with lateral diffused junction is theoretically investigated. The study shows that for an active waveguide of width around 5 ..mu..m with a lateral diffused junction in the middle, the single fundamental transverse mode is preferred as the injection level is raised. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental results observed in the groove transverse junction InGaAsP/InP laser.

  3. Enhancement of tunnel magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junction by a superlattice barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C. H.; Hsueh, W. J., E-mail: hsuehwj@ntu.edu.tw [Nanomagnetism Group, Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10660, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Tunnel magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junction improved by a superlattice barrier composed of alternate layers of a nonmagnetic metal and an insulator is proposed. The forbidden band of the superlattice is used to predict the low transmission range in the superlattice barrier. By forbidding electron transport in the anti-parallel configuration, the tunnel magnetoresistance is enhanced in the superlattice junction. The results show that the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio for a superlattice magnetic tunnel junction is greater than that for traditional single or double barrier junctions.

  4. Superconducting qubit without Josephson junctions manipulated by orbital angular momentum of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Jae Yun

    2015-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous superconducting qubits have used Josephson junctions as an essential part which gives anharmonicity to make well-separated energy-level spacings. However, since a superconductor ring without Josephson junctions has intrinsically well-separated energy-level spacings, Josephson junctions are not necessary as long as one can achieve single-qubit operations. We show that orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light can be adopted as a qubit-control means and can eliminate the need of Josephson junctions. We provide theoretical analysis for the interaction between a superconducting ring and OAM of light. Feasibility study reveals that the proposed qubit has many advantages over the previous ones.

  5. Comment on "Analysis of quantum coherent semiconductor quantum dot p-i-n junction photovoltaic cells"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scully, Marlan O

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a comment on PRL paper by A.P. Kirk "Analysis of quantum coherent semiconductor quantum dot p-i-n junction photovoltaic cells"

  6. Iron Junction, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar Energy JumpIrem Geothermal Power PlantUtah:Junction,

  7. Monmouth Junction, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana:Northeast Asia | Open EnergyMongoliaJunction, New

  8. Designing a supply chain for a foreign Greenfield facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anstey, Brian (Brian Mark), II

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABB Schweiz AG has experienced substantial growth in demand for the innovative energy management and conversion products designed and assembled by the Medium Voltage Automation Products Division. This demand has fully ...

  9. A brownfield to greenfield success story: Denver Radium Superfund Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baracani, E. [Sverdrup Environmental, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Bruskin, L.J. [Colorado Dept. of Public Health and the Environment, Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Denver Radium Site consists of forty-nine separate sites divided into 11 operable units throughout the city of Denver, Colorado. The sites contained radioactive soils and residues (310,000 tons) from processing of radium in the early 1900s. The majority of the radioactive material was removed, transported by rail, and disposed offsite in Utah. During radiologic cleanup at the former Robinson Brick Company Site (ROBCO), (OU No. 4/5), metal contaminated soils from previous smelting operations were encountered. The Denver Radium Site was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), and through cooperation of private parties, the state and federal governments, the land was cleaned up and restored to productive use.

  10. City of Greenfield, Indiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity ofCity ofCityCity ofGrandCityCity

  11. City of Greenfield, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity ofCity ofCityCity ofGrandCityCityCity

  12. Inverted GaInP/(In)GaAs/InGaAs Triple-Junction Solar Cells with Low-Stress Metamorphic Bottom Junctions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J. F.; Kurtz, S. R.; Wanlass, M. W.; Ward, J. S.; Duda, A.; Friedman, D. J.; Olson, J. M.; McMahon, W. E.; Moriarty, T. E.; Kiehl, J. T.; Romero, M. J.; Norman, A. G.; Jones, K. M.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate high efficiency performance in two ultra-thin, Ge-free III-V semiconductor triple-junction solar cell device designs grown in an inverted configuration. Low-stress metamorphic junctions were engineered to achieve excellent photovoltaic performance with less than 3 x 106 cm-2 threading dislocations. The first design with band gaps of 1.83/1.40/1.00 eV, containing a single metamorphic junction, achieved 33.8% and 39.2% efficiencies under the standard one-sun global spectrum and concentrated direct spectrum at 131 suns, respectively. The second design with band gaps of 1.83/1.34/0.89 eV, containing two metamorphic junctions achieved 33.2% and 40.1% efficiencies under the standard one-sun global spectrum and concentrated direct spectrum at 143 suns, respectively.

  13. Photovoltaic nanopillar radial junction diode architecture enhanced by integrating semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals as light harvesters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Photovoltaic nanopillar radial junction diode architecture enhanced by integrating semiconductor hybridized, radial p-n junction based, nanopillar solar cells with photovoltaic performance enhanced. By furnishing Si based nanopillar photovoltaic diodes with CdSe quantum dots, we experimentally showed up

  14. Reliability of normal-state currentvoltage characteristics as an indicator of tunnel-junction barrier quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabson, David A.

    Department of Physics, PHY 114, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 Received 21 April 2000 conductance below Tc , we divide samples into junctions with an integral barrier and junctions having metallic pinholes in the barrier. © 2000 American Institute of Physics. S0003-6951 00 01138-4 Ferromagnet

  15. Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

  16. C-V Profiling of Ultrashallow Junctions using a Step-Like Background Doping Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technische Universiteit Delft

    C-V Profiling of Ultrashallow Junctions using a Step-Like Background Doping Profile Milos Popadi, Delft, The Netherlands m.popadic@tudelft.nl Abstract--A novel C-V profiling method that enables profiling of ultrashallow and ultra-abrupt junctions is described. The method takes advantage of a peculiar

  17. Tight JunctionAssociated Signaling Pathways Modulate Cell Proliferation in Uveal Melanoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tight Junction­Associated Signaling Pathways Modulate Cell Proliferation in Uveal Melanoma Ashwath the role of tight junction (TJ)­associ- ated signaling pathways in the proliferation of uveal melanoma. METHODS. Human uveal melanoma cell lines overexpressing the TJ molecule blood vessel epicardial substance

  18. A new junction termination technique: the Deep Trench Termination (DT2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A new junction termination technique: the Deep Trench Termination (DT2 ) L. Théolier1,2 , H. Mahfoz. In this work, a new concept of low cost, low surface and high efficiency junction termination for power devices is presented and experimentally validated. This termination is based on a large and deep trench filled by BCB

  19. Efficient broadband energy transfer via momentum matching at hybrid junctions of guided-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficient broadband energy transfer via momentum matching at hybrid junctions of guided://apl.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Efficient broadband energy transfer via momentum matching at hybrid junctions of guided, The American University in Cairo, New Cairo 11835, Egypt (Received 2 August 2012; accepted 5 September 2012

  20. OPTIMIZATION OF a-SiGe BASED TRIPLE, TANDEM AND SINGLE-JUNCTION SOLAR Xunming Deng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    OPTIMIZATION OF a-SiGe BASED TRIPLE, TANDEM AND SINGLE-JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS Xunming Deng Department cells, all employing high- quality a-SiGe cells, are reviewed in this paper. Incorporating various improvements in device fabrication, the UT group fabricated 1) triple-junction a-Si/a-SiGe/a- SiGe solar cells

  1. Gallium phosphide high-temperature bipolar junction transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipperian, T.E.; Dawson, L.R.; Caffin, R.J.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results are reported on the development of a high-temperature (> 350/sup 0/C) gallium phosphide bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for goethermal and other energy applications. This four-layer p/sup +/n/sup -/pp/sup +/ structure was fromed by liquid phase epitaxy using a supercooling technique to insure uniform nucleation of the thin layers. Magnesium was used as the p-type dopant to avoid excessive out-diffusion into the lightly doped base. By appropriate choice of electrodes, the device may also be driven as an n-channel junction field-effect transistor. The gallium phosphide BJT is observed to have a common-emitter current gain peaking in the range of 6 to 10 (for temperatures from 20/sup 0/C to 400/sup 0/C) and a room-temperature, punchthrough-limited, collector-emitter breakdown voltage of approximately -6V. Other parameters of interest include an f/sub/ = 400 KHz (at 20/sup 0/C) and a collector base leakage current = 200 ..mu..A (at 350/sup 0/C).

  2. Josephson junction of non-Abelian superconductors and non-Abelian Josephson vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitta, Muneto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Josephson junction is made of two superconductors sandwiching an insulator, and a Josephson vortex is a magnetic vortex absorbed into the Josephson junction, whose dynamics can be described by the sine-Gordon equation. In a field theory framework, a flexible Josephson junction was proposed, in which the Josephson junction is represented by a domain wall separating two condensations and a Josephson vortex is a sine-Gordon soliton in the domain wall effective theory. In this paper, we propose a Josephson junction of non-Abelian color superconductors, that is described by a non-Abelian domain wall, and show that a non-Abelian vortex (color magnetic flux tube) absorbed into it is a non-Abelian Josephson vortex represented as a non-Abelian sine-Gordon soliton in the domain wall effective theory.

  3. Measurement of Component Cell Current-Voltage Characteristics in a Tandem-JunctionTwo-Terminal Solar Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    Measurement of Component Cell Current-Voltage Characteristics in a Tandem- JunctionTwo-Terminal-V) characteristics in a tandem-junction two-terminal solar cell is described. The measurements are performed with (a, solar cells Introduction In the course of fabricating and optimizing multiple-junction, two-terminal

  4. Contactless electronic transport in a bio-molecular junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, Faruque M., E-mail: fhossain@unimelb.edu.au; Al-Dirini, Feras; Skafidas, Efstratios [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Center for Neural Engineering (CfNE), The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular electronics hold promise for next generation ultra-low power, nano-scale integrated electronics. The main challenge in molecular electronics is to make a reliable interface between molecules and metal electrodes. Interfacing metals and molecules detrimentally affects the characteristics of nano-scale molecular electronic devices. It is therefore essential to investigate alternative arrangements such as contact-less tunneling gaps wherever such configurations are feasible. We conduct ab initio density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions calculations to investigate the transport properties of a biocompatible glycine molecular junction. By analyzing the localized molecular orbital energy distributions and transmission probabilities in the transport-gap, we find a glycine molecule confined between two gold electrodes, without making a contact, is energetically stable and possesses high tunneling current resembling an excellent ohmic-like interface.

  5. Linear nanometric tunnel junction sensors with exchange pinned sensing layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitao, D. C., E-mail: dleitao@inesc-mn.pt; Silva, A. V.; Cardoso, S. [INESC-MN and IN, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Superior Técnico (IST), Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1000-029 Lisboa (Portugal); Ferreira, R.; Paz, E.; Deepack, F. L. [INL, Av. Mestre Jose Veiga, 4715-31 Braga (Portugal); Freitas, P. P. [INESC-MN and IN, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisboa (Portugal); INL, Av. Mestre Jose Veiga, 4715-31 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly sensitive nanosensors with high spatial resolution provide the necessary features for high accuracy imaging of isolated magnetic nanoparticles. In this work, we report the fabrication and characterization of MgO-barrier magnetic tunnel junction nanosensors, with two exchange-pinned electrodes. The perpendicular magnetization configuration for field sensing is set using a two-step annealing process, where the second annealing temperature was optimized to yield patterned sensors responses with improved linearity. The optimized circular nanosensors show sensitivities up to 0.1%/Oe, larger than previously reported for nanometric sensors and comparable to micrometric spin-valves. Our strategy avoids the use of external permanent biasing or demagnetizing fields (large for smaller structures) to achieve a linear response, enabling the control of the linear operation range using only the stack and thus providing a small footprint device.

  6. Stability of winding cosmic wall lattices with X type junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandon Carter

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work confirms the stability of a class of domain wall lattice models that can produce accelerated cosmological expansion, with pressure to density ratio $w=-1/3$ at early times, and with $w=-2/3$ at late times when the lattice scale becomes large compared to the wall thickness. For walls of tension $T_{I}$, the relevant X type junctions could be unstable (for a sufficiently acute intersection angle $\\alpha$) against separation into a pair of Y type junctions joined by a compound wall, only if the tension $T_{II}$ of the latter were less than $2T_{I}$ (and for an approximately right-angled intersection if it were less that $\\sqrt{2} T_{I}$) which can not occur in the class considered here. In an extensive category of multicomponent scalar field models of forced harmonic (linear or non-linear) type it is shown how the relevant tension -- which is the same as the surface energy density $U$ of the wall -- can be calculated as the minimum (geodesic) distance between the relevant vacuum states as measured on the space of field values $\\Phi^i$ using a positive definite (Riemannian) energy metric $dU^2=\\tilde G_{ij} d\\Phi^i d\\Phi^j$ that is obtained from the usual kinetic metric (which is flat for a model with ordinary linear kinetic part) by application of a conformal factor proportional to the relevant potential function $V$. For suitably periodic potential functions there will be corresponding periodic configurations -- with parallel walls characterised by incrementation of a winding number -- in which the condition for stability of large scale bunching modes is shown to be satisfied automatically. It is suggested that such a configuration -- with a lattice lengthscale comparable to intergalactic separation distances -- might have been produced by a late stage of cosmological inflation.

  7. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy analyses of GaAs/Si interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    -bonded multi-junction solar cells Dietrich Häussler a , Lothar Houben b , Stephanie Essig c , Mert Kurttepeli online 20 July 2013 Keywords: Multi-junction solar cell Wafer bonding Interfaces Aberration corrected and composition fluctuations near interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells. Multi-junction solar

  8. Improved method of preparing p-i-n junctions in amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madan, A.

    1984-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of preparing p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junctions for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes depositing amorphous silicon on a thin layer of trivalent material, such as aluminum, indium, or gallium at a temperature in the range of 200/sup 0/C to 250/sup 0/C. At this temperature, the layer of trivalent material diffuses into the amorphous silicon to form a graded p/sup +/-i junction. A layer of n-type doped material is then deposited onto the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer in a conventional manner to finish forming the p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junction.

  9. Reduced low frequency noise in electron beam evaporated MgO magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diao, Z.; Feng, J. F.; Kurt, H.; Feng, G.; Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare low frequency noise in magnetic tunnel junctions with MgO barriers prepared by electron-beam evaporation with those prepared by radiofrequency sputtering, both showing a high tunneling magnetoresistance. The normalized noise parameter in the parallel state of junctions with evaporated barriers is at least one order of magnitude lower than that in junctions with sputtered barriers, and exhibits a weaker bias dependence. The lowest normalized noise is in the 10{sup -11} mum{sup 2} range. A lower density of oxygen vacancies acting as charge trap states in the evaporated MgO is responsible for the lower noise.

  10. Performance of single-junction and dual-junction InGaP/GaAs solar cells under low concentration ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Aurangzeb; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Takamoto, Tatsuya [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama 36688 (United States); Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Sharp Corporation, 282-1 Hajikami, Shinjo, Nara 639-2198 (Japan)

    2004-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the performance of single-junction InGaP/GaAs and dual-junction InGaP/GaAs tandem cells under low concentration ratios (up to 15 suns), before and after 1 MeV electron irradiation is presented. Analysis of the tunnel junction parameters under different concentrated light illuminations reveals that the peak current (J{sub P}) and valley current (J{sub V}) densities should be greater than the short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) for better performance. The tunnel junction behavior against light intensity improved after irradiation. This led to the suggestion that the peak current density (J{sub P}) and valley current density (J{sub V}) of the tunnel junction were enhanced after irradiation or the peak current was shifted to higher concentration. The recovery of the radiation damage under concentrated light illumination conditions suggests that the performance of the InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cell can be enhanced even under low concentration ratios.

  11. 0.7-eV GaInAs Junction for a GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs(1eV)/GaInAs(0.7eV) Four-Junction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Geisz, J. F.; Norman, A. G.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction solar cells, focusing on adding a fourth junction to the Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5} P/GaAs/Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As inverted three-junction cell. This cell, grown inverted on GaAs so that the lattice-mismatched Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As third junction is the last one grown, has demonstrated 38% efficiency, and 40% is likely in the near future. To achieve still further gains, a lower-bandgap Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction could be added to the three-junction structure for a four-junction cell whose efficiency could exceed 45% under concentration. Here, we present the initial development of the Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction. Junctions of various bandgaps ranging from 0.88 to 0.73 eV were grown, in order to study the effect of the different amounts of lattice mismatch. At a bandgap of 0.88 eV, junctions were obtained with very encouraging {approx}80% quantum efficiency, 57% fill factor, and 0.36 eV open-circuit voltage. The device performance degrades with decreasing bandgap (i.e., increasing lattice mismatch). We model the four-junction device efficiency vs. fourth junction bandgap to show that an 0.7-eV fourth-junction bandgap, while optimal if it could be achieved in practice, is not necessary; an 0.9-eV bandgap would still permit significant gains in multijunction cell efficiency while being easier to achieve than the lower-bandgap junction.

  12. Spin-polarized tunneling in MgO-based tunnel junctions with superconducting electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schebaum, Oliver

    We prepared magnetic tunnel junctions with one ferromagnetic and one superconducting Al–Si electrode. Pure cobalt electrodes were compared with a Co–Fe–B alloy and the Heusler compound Co[subscript 2]FeAl. The polarization ...

  13. Superconducting qubit without Josephson junctions manipulated by the orbital angular momentum of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Jae Yun

    2015-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional superconducting qubits have used Josephson junctions as an essential part to provide anharmonicity for well-separated energy-level spacings. However, because a superconducting ring without Josephson junctions has intrinsically well-separated energy-level spacings, Josephson junctions are not necessary as long as one can achieve single-qubit operations. We show that the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light can be adopted as a qubit-control means and can eliminate the need for Josephson junctions. We provide theoretical analysis for the interaction between a superconducting ring and the OAM of light. The feasibility study reveals that the proposed qubit has many advantages over the previous ones. Moreover, because the qubits are controlled optically, no-circuit architecture would be possible if two-qubit gates were achieved by moving the rings.

  14. Motion of fluxons in distributed two-dimensional Josephson tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nevirkovets, I.P.; Rudenko, E.M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A strong asymmetry is observed in the current--voltage characteristics of distributed two-dimensional Sn--I--Sn, Sn--I--Pb tunnel junctions with dimensions L>>lambda/sub J/ when an external magnetic field is applied in the plane of the junction perpendicular to the L dimension for different orientations of the field. A resistive section in the form of an almost vertical step appears in the IVC in one orientation of the field and is absent in the opposite orientation. It is shown that the appearance of the steps is related to the conditions of motion of Josephson vortices in tunnel junctions under the action of the Lorentz force in the presence of a current domain at the edge of the distributed junction.

  15. EFFECT OF PREPARATION PARAMETERS ON LIGHT SENSITIVITY IN SUPERCONDUCTIVE TUNNEL JUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Italy Résumé. 2014 Des jonctions « tunnel » supraconductrices utilisant du sulfure de cadmium et du al. [17] have considered semiconductor barriers for low capacitance tunnel junctions. Light can be depo- sited in ultra high vacuum systems without fear of contamination. Work

  16. A market analysis for high efficiency multi-junction solar cells grown on SiGe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judkins, Zachara Steele

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications, markets and a cost model are presented for III-V multi-junction solar cells built on compositionally graded SiGe buffer layers currently being developed by professors Steven Ringell of Ohio State University ...

  17. Gap junction intercellular communication: a microinjection investigation of fibroblast and epithelial cell lines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pahlka, Raymond Benton

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters as well as optimal cell conditions for effective, repeatable studies using the microinjection protocol. The second objective was to determine whether or not the AG1522 cell line exhibited gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) through...

  18. Back to the crossroads of Flatbush--the junction--student housing for Brooklyn College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Keith A. (Keith Anthony)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The crossroads of Flatbush (often called The Junction) is a five point intersection of vehicular and pedestrian traffic. A crossroad where ethnic groups step beyond subtle neighborhood boundaries and merge to use public ...

  19. Device characterization for design optimization of 4 junction inverted metamorphic concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, John F.; France, Ryan M.; Steiner, Myles A.; Friedman, Daniel J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); García, Iván [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401 USA and Instituto de Energía Solar, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Avda Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative electroluminescence (EL) and luminescent coupling (LC) analysis, along with more conventional characterization techniques, are combined to completely characterize the subcell JV curves within a fourjunction (4J) inverted metamorphic solar cell (IMM). The 4J performance under arbitrary spectral conditions can be predicted from these subcell JV curves. The internal radiative efficiency (IRE) of each junction has been determined as a function of current density from the external radiative efficiency using optical modeling, but this required the accurate determination of the individual junction current densities during the EL measurement as affected by LC. These measurement and analysis techniques can be applied to any multijunction solar cell. The 4J IMM solar cell used to illustrate these techniques showed excellent junction quality as exhibited by high IRE and a one-sun AM1.5D efficiency of 36.3%. This device operates up to 1000 suns without limitations due to any of the three tunnel junctions.

  20. Thermally activated switching in spin-flop tunnel junctions V. Korenivskia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    -closed multilayers, consisting of two ferromagnetic layers separated by a thin nonmagnetic spacer, have been proposed of similar lateral dimensions. Spin-flop junctions with writing circuits have been fab- ricated by methods

  1. Grain boundary and triple junction constraints during martensitic transformation in shape memory alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueland, Stian Melhus

    We investigate the role of grain constraint upon martensitic transformation through in situ scanning electron microscope tensile experiments on shape memory microwires with a small number of grains and grain junctions. The ...

  2. Transverse-modal behavior of a transverse junction stripe laser excited by a short electrical pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, K.Y.; Yariv, A.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transverse-modal behavior of a lateral injection gain-guided laser (the transverse junction strip (TJS) laser) excited by a short (70 ps) electrical pulse is investigated experimentally and theoretically. It is predicted theoretically and observed experimentally that the transverse mode strongly depends on the excitation pulse amplitude and the dc bias current (which is set below threshold). This dependence is found to be due to transient lateral carrier diffusion at the lasing junction.

  3. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

  4. High temperature superconductor step-edge Josephson junctions using Ti-Ca-Ba-Cu-O

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.; Martens, J.S.; Plut, T.A.; Tigges, C.P.; Vawter, G.A.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for formulating non-hysteretic and hysteretic Josephson junctions using HTS materials which results in junctions having the ability to operate at high temperatures while maintaining high uniformity and quality. The non-hysteretic Josephson junction is formed by step-etching a LaAlO[sub 3] crystal substrate and then depositing a thin film of TlCaBaCuO on the substrate, covering the step, and forming a grain boundary at the step and a subsequent Josephson junction. Once the non-hysteretic junction is formed the next step to form the hysteretic Josephson junction is to add capacitance to the system. In the current embodiment, this is accomplished by adding a thin dielectric layer, LaA1O[sub 3], followed by a cap layer of a normal metal where the cap layer is formed by first depositing a thin layer of titanium (Ti) followed by a layer of gold (Au). The dielectric layer and the normal metal cap are patterned to the desired geometry. 8 figs.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beach, R.; Prahl, D.; Lange, R.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  6. Spin Josephson effect in topological superconductor-ferromagnet junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, C. D.; Wang, J., E-mail: jwang@seu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The composite topological superconductor (TS), made of one-dimensional spin-orbit coupled nanowire with proximity-induced s-wave superconductivity, is not a pure p-wave superconductor but still has a suppressed s-wave pairing. We propose to probe the spin texture of the p-wave pairing in this composite TS by examining possible spin supercurrents in an unbiased TS/ferromagnet junction. It is found that both the exchange-coupling induced and spin-flip reflection induced spin currents exist in the setup and survive even in the topological phase. We showed that besides the nontrivial p-wave pairing state accounting for Majorana Fermions, there shall be a trivial p-wave pairing state that contributes to spin supercurrent. The trivial p-wave pairing state is diagnosed from the mixing effect between the suppressed s-wave pairing and the topologically nontrivial p-wave pairing. The d vector of the TS is proved not to be rigorously perpendicular to the spin projection of p-wave pairings. Our findings are also confirmed by the Kitaev's p-wave model with a nonzero s-wave pairing.

  7. Quantum interference in thermoelectric molecular junctions: A toy model perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nozaki, Daijiro, E-mail: daijiro.nozaki@gmail.com, E-mail: research@nano.tu-dresden.de [Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Avdoshenko, Stas M. [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, 100 E. 24th St. A1590, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Sevinçli, Hâldun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, Gulbahce Kampusu 35430 Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Cuniberti, Gianaurelio [Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Dresden Center for Computational Materials Science (DCCMS), TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfAED), TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum interference (QI) phenomena between electronic states in molecular circuits offer a new opportunity to design new types of molecular devices such as molecular sensors, interferometers, and thermoelectric devices. Controlling the QI effect is a key challenge for such applications. For the development of single molecular devices employing QI effects, a systematic study of the relationship between electronic structure and the quantum interference is needed. In order to uncover the essential topological requirements for the appearance of QI effects and the relationship between the QI-affected line shape of the transmission spectra and the electronic structures, we consider a homogeneous toy model where all on-site energies are identical and model four types of molecular junctions due to their topological connectivities. We systematically analyze their transmission spectra, density of states, and thermoelectric properties. Even without the degree of freedom for on-site energies an asymmetric Fano peak could be realized in the homogeneous systems with the cyclic configuration. We also calculate the thermoelectric properties of the model systems with and without fluctuation of on-site energies. Even under the fluctuation of the on-site energies, the finite thermoelectrics are preserved for the Fano resonance, thus cyclic configuration is promising for thermoelectric applications. This result also suggests the possibility to detect the cyclic configuration in the homogeneous systems and the presence of the QI features from thermoelectric measurements.

  8. Investigation of redox processes at semiconductor electrode liquid junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koval, C.A.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in fundamental aspects of photoelectrochemical cells has been in the following areas: chemical probes for hot carrier processes, electrostatic theory for describing electrical interactions at interfaces, and kinetics of electron transfer at ideal semiconductor solution interfaces. Our goal is to achieve a better understanding of dark and photo-induced current flow at the semiconductor electrode/redox electrolyte interface (SEI) so that devices and processes utilizing this interface for solar energy conversion can be developed or improved. Our most important accomplishment has been the development of a redox system capable of detecting hot electrons at the p-InP/acetonitrile interface. Also, we have examined electrostatic theory for the image potential of an ion as a function of distance from the SEI. Finally, our group was one of the first to realize that the 2-dimensional metal chalcogenides (MC) are excellent materials for fundamental studies of electron transfer at the SEI. One of the chief potential advantages for use of MC's is the formation of semiconductor/liquid junctions with nearly ideal electrochemical properties. 27 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Transition voltages of vacuum-spaced and molecular junctions with Ag and Pt electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kunlin; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin, E-mail: smhou@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition voltage of vacuum-spaced and molecular junctions constructed with Ag and Pt electrodes is investigated by non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that, similarly to the case of Au-vacuum-Au previously studied, the transition voltages of Ag and Pt metal-vacuum-metal junctions with atomic protrusions on the electrode surface are determined by the local density of states of the p-type atomic orbitals of the protrusion. Since the energy position of the Pt 6p atomic orbitals is higher than that of the 5p/6p of Ag and Au, the transition voltage of Pt-vacuum-Pt junctions is larger than that of both Ag-vacuum-Ag and Au-vacuum-Au junctions. When one moves to analyzing asymmetric molecular junctions constructed with biphenyl thiol as central molecule, then the transition voltage is found to depend on the specific bonding site for the sulfur atom in the thiol group. In particular agreement with experiments, where the largest transition voltage is found for Ag and the smallest for Pt, is obtained when one assumes S binding at the hollow-bridge site on the Ag/Au(111) surface and at the adatom site on the Pt(111) one. This demonstrates the critical role played by the linker-electrode binding geometry in determining the transition voltage of devices made of conjugated thiol molecules.

  10. Nonequilibrium transport through quantum-wire junctions and boundary defects for free massless bosonic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaw?dzki, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a model of quantum-wire junctions where the latter are described by conformal-invariant boundary conditions of the simplest type in the multicomponent compactified massless scalar free field theory representing the bosonized Luttinger liquids in the bulk of wires. The boundary conditions result in the scattering of charges across the junction with nontrivial reflection and transmission amplitudes. The equilibrium state of such a system, corresponding to inverse temperature $\\beta$ and electric potential $V$, is explicitly constructed both for finite and for semi-infinite wires. In the latter case, a stationary nonequilibrium state describing the wires kept at different temperatures and potentials may be also constructed. The main result of the present paper is the calculation of the full counting statistics (FCS) of the charge and energy transfers through the junction in a nonequilibrium situation. Explicit expressions are worked out for the generating function of FCS and its large-deviations asym...

  11. Delocalised oxygen as the origin of two-level defects in Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy C. DuBois; Manolo C. Per; Salvy P. Russo; Jared H. Cole

    2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key problems facing superconducting qubits and other Josephson junction devices is the decohering effects of bi-stable material defects. Although a variety of phenomenological models exist, the true microscopic origin of these defects remains elusive. For the first time we show that these defects may arise from delocalisation of the atomic position of the oxygen in the oxide forming the Josephson junction barrier. Using a microscopic model, we compute experimentally observable parameters for phase qubits. Such defects are charge neutral but have non-zero response to both applied electric field and strain. This may explain the observed long coherence time of two-level defects in the presence of charge noise, while still coupling to the junction electric field and substrate phonons.

  12. Formation of Porous Layers by Electrochemical Etching of Germanium and Gallium Arsenide for Cleave Engineered Layer Transfer (CELT) Application in High Efficiency Multi-Junction Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fong, David Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III! V Multijunction Solar Cells,” (2003). J. F. Geisz, etEfficiency Multi-Junction Solar Cells A thesis submitted inEfficiency Multi-Junction Solar Cells By David Michael Fong

  13. arXiv:cond-mat/0301467v219Mar2003 Quantum effects in small-capacitance single Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    is that the effective impedance of an array can be varied in situ by applying an external magnetic field perpen- dicular measured the current-voltage (I-V ) characteristics of small-capacitance single Josephson junctions at low devices (SQUIDs). The single-junction I-V curve is sensitive to the impedance of the environment, which

  14. FILM ADHESION IN TRIPLE JUNCTION a-Si SOLAR CELLS ON POLYIMIDE and X. Deng1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    FILM ADHESION IN TRIPLE JUNCTION a-Si SOLAR CELLS ON POLYIMIDE SUBSTRATES A. Vijh1,2 , X. Yang1 , W encountered during fabrication of triple junction a-Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex

  15. MODELING OF TRIPLE JUNCTION A-SI SOLAR CELLS USING ASA: ANALYSIS OF DEVICE PERFORMANCE UNDER VARIOUS FAILURE SCENARIOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    have experienced a significant increase in the recent years. Solar panels with triple- junction found. To assist the optimization of solar cell fabrication and cost-effective industrial photovoltaicMODELING OF TRIPLE JUNCTION A-SI SOLAR CELLS USING ASA: ANALYSIS OF DEVICE PERFORMANCE UNDER

  16. Measurements and Predictions of the Heat Transfer at the Tube-Fin Junction for Louvered Fin Heat Exchangers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thole, Karen A.

    Measurements and Predictions of the Heat Transfer at the Tube-Fin Junction for Louvered Fin Heat Transfer at the Tube-Fin Junction for Louvered Fin Heat Exchangers Abstract The dominant thermal resistance used to increase heat transfer by initiating new boundary layer growth and increasing surface area

  17. Effect of Front-Side Silver Metallization on Underlying n+-p Junction in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. S.; Li, Z. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; Liang, L.; Ionkin, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the effect of front-side Ag metallization on the underlying n+-p junction of multicrystalline Si solar cells. The junction quality beneath the contacts was investigated by characterizing the uniformities of the electrostatic potential and doping concentration across the junction, using scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. We investigated cells with a commercial Ag paste (DuPont PV159) and fired at furnace setting temperatures of 800 degrees, 840 degrees, and 930 degrees C, which results in actual cell temperatures ~100 degrees C lower than the setting temperature and the three cells being under-, optimal-, and over-fired. We found that the uniformity of the junction beneath the Ag contact was significantly degraded by the over-firing, whereas the junction retained good uniformity with the optimal- and under-fire temperatures. Further, Ag crystallites with widely distributed sizes from <100 nm to several ?m were found at the Ag/Si interface of the over-fired cell. Large crystallites were imaged as protrusions into Si deeper than the junction depth. However, the junction was not broken down; instead, it was reformed on the entire front of the crystallite/Si interface. We propose a mechanism of the junction-quality degradation, based on emitter Si melting at the temperature around the Ag-Si eutectic point during firing, and subsequent recrystallization with incorporation of impurities in the Ag paste and with formation of crystallographic defects during quenching.

  18. HIGH-EFFICIENCY BACK-JUNCTION SILICON SOLAR CELL WITH AN IN-LINE EVAPORATED ALUMINUM FRONT GRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HIGH-EFFICIENCY BACK-JUNCTION SILICON SOLAR CELL WITH AN IN-LINE EVAPORATED ALUMINUM FRONT GRID M-diffused back-junction emitter. The aluminum front side grid is evaporated in an industrial-type in-thick silicon shadow masks for the in-line evaporation of the aluminum front grid. The masks are fabricated

  19. Monolithic interconnected module with a tunnel junction for enhanced electrical and optical performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, Christopher S. (Bethel Park, PA); Wilt, David M. (Bay Village, OH)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved thermophotovoltaic (TPV) n/p/n device is provided. Monolithic Interconnected Modules (MIMS), semiconductor devices converting infrared radiation to electricity, have been developed with improved electrical and optical performance. The structure is an n-type emitter on a p-type base with an n-type lateral conduction layer. The incorporation of a tunnel junction and the reduction in the amount of p-type material used results in negligible parasitic absorption, decreased series resistance, increased voltage and increased active area. The novel use of a tunnel junction results in the potential for a TPV device with efficiency greater than 24%.

  20. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell is described having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of ''pinning'' the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14[+-]0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap. 7 figures.

  1. Semiconductor device PN junction fabrication using optical processing of amorphous semiconductor material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan; Rangappan, Anikara

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for semiconductor device PN junction fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating an electrical device having a P-N junction comprises: depositing a layer of amorphous semiconductor material onto a crystalline semiconductor base, wherein the crystalline semiconductor base comprises a crystalline phase of a same semiconductor as the amorphous layer; and growing the layer of amorphous semiconductor material into a layer of crystalline semiconductor material that is epitaxially matched to the lattice structure of the crystalline semiconductor base by applying an optical energy that penetrates at least the amorphous semiconductor material.

  2. Hetero-junctions of Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis and Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yap, Yoke Khin

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Hetero-junctions of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are expected to have appealing new properties that are not available from pure BNNTs and CNTs. Theoretical studies indicate that BNNT/CNT junctions could be multifunctional and applicable as memory, spintronic, electronic, and photonics devices with tunable band structures. This will lead to energy and material efficient multifunctional devices that will be beneficial to the society. However, experimental realization of BNNT/CNT junctions was hindered by the absent of a common growth technique for BNNTs and CNTs. In fact, the synthesis of BNNTs was very challenging and may involve high temperatures (up to 3000 degree Celsius by laser ablation) and explosive chemicals. During the award period, we have successfully developed a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique to grow BNNTs at 1100-1200 degree Celsius without using dangerous chemicals. A series of common catalyst have then been identified for the synthesis of BNNTs and CNTs. Both of these breakthroughs have led to our preliminary success in growing two types of BNNT/CNT junctions and two additional new nanostructures: 1) branching BNNT/CNT junctions and 2) co-axial BNNT/CNT junctions, 3) quantum dots functionalized BNNTs (QDs-BNNTs), 4) BNNT/graphene junctions. We have started to understand their structural, compositional, and electronic properties. Latest results indicate that the branching BNNT/CNT junctions and QDs-BNNTs are functional as room-temperature tunneling devices. We have submitted the application of a renewal grant to continue the study of these new energy efficient materials. Finally, this project has also strengthened our collaborations with multiple Department of Energy�s Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), including the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINTs) at Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results obtained during the current funding period have led to the publication of twelve peer reviewed articles, three review papers, two book and one encyclopedia chapters, and thirty eight conference/seminar presentation. One US provisional patent and one international patent have also been filed.

  3. Nonequilibrium transport through quantum-wire junctions and boundary defects for free massless bosonic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzysztof Gaw?dzki; Clément Tauber

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a model of quantum-wire junctions where the latter are described by conformal-invariant boundary conditions of the simplest type in the multicomponent compactified massless scalar free field theory representing the bosonized Luttinger liquids in the bulk of wires. The boundary conditions result in the scattering of charges across the junction with nontrivial reflection and transmission amplitudes. The equilibrium state of such a system, corresponding to inverse temperature $\\beta$ and electric potential $V$, is explicitly constructed both for finite and for semi-infinite wires. In the latter case, a stationary nonequilibrium state describing the wires kept at different temperatures and potentials may be also constructed. The main result of the present paper is the calculation of the full counting statistics (FCS) of the charge and energy transfers through the junction in a nonequilibrium situation. Explicit expressions are worked out for the generating function of FCS and its large-deviations asymptotics. For the purely transmitting case they coincide with those obtained in the litterature, but numerous cases of junctions with transmission and reflection are also covered. The large deviations rate function of FCS for charge and energy transfers is shown to satisfy the fluctuation relations and the expressions for FCS obtained here are compared with the Levitov-Lesovic formulae.

  4. Chemical Doping and Enhanced Solar Energy Conversion of Graphene/Silicon Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinming; Wang, Kunlin; Wei, Jinquan; Fan, Guifeng; Li, Xiao; Wu, Dehai

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of chemical doping of graphene films on the photovoltaic properties of the graphene/silicon Schottky junction solar cells was investigated. Thionyl chloride modification greatly enhanced the conductivity of graphene film, resulting in a significant improvement in cell performance with a 3-fold increase in conversion efficiency (up to 3.9%) and good short-term stability.

  5. Kinked p-n Junction Nanowire Probes for High Spatial Resolution Sensing and Intracellular Recording

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, David R.

    - conducting nanoscale materials configured as field-effect transistors have been studied extensively localized near the junction, and while nanowire p-n diodes have been widely studied as photovoltaic devices studies have shown that nanoscale field- effect transistors (nanoFETs) can be synthetically encoded

  6. Tuning electron transport through a single molecular junction by bridge modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiao-Fei, E-mail: xf.li@uestc.edu.cn; Qiu, Qi [School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Luo, Yi [Division of Theoretical Chemistry and Biology, School of Biotechnology, KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of controlling electron transport in a single molecular junction represents the ultimate goal of molecular electronics. Here, we report that the modification of bridging group makes it possible to improve the performance and obtain new functions in a single cross-conjugated molecular junction, designed from a recently synthesized bipolar molecule bithiophene naphthalene diimide. Our first principles results show that the bipolar characteristic remains after the molecule was modified and sandwiched between two metal electrodes. Rectifying is the intrinsic characteristic of the molecular junction and its performance can be enhanced by replacing the saturated bridging group with an unsaturated group. A further improvement of the rectifying and a robust negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior can be achieved by the modification of unsaturated bridge. It is revealed that the modification can induce a deviation angle about 4° between the donor and the acceptor ?-conjugations, making it possible to enhance the communication between the two ? systems. Meanwhile, the low energy frontier orbitals of the junction can move close to the Fermi level and encounter in energy at certain biases, thus a transport channel with a considerable transmission can be formed near the Fermi level only at a narrow bias regime, resulting in the improvement of rectifying and the robust NDR behavior. This finding could be useful for the design of single molecular devices.

  7. Title of Dissertation: MASKLESS FABRICATION OF JUNCTION FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTORS VIA FOCUSED ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: MASKLESS FABRICATION OF JUNCTION FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTORS VIA FOCUSED ION BEAMS Anthony John De Marco, Doctor of Philosophy, 2004 Dissertation directed by: Professor Dissertation submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Maryland, College Park

  8. 1364 Brief Communication Gap junction protein connexin-43 interacts directly with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullen, Sean P.

    Increasing evidence indicates that gap-junctional Cx43 ismediate intercellular communication-terminal tail of connexin-43 (Cx43), the phorylate the Cx43 C-terminal tail (CT) via SH2 and SH3 domain in the regulation of Cx43 channel C-terminal residues of Cx43 interact with the second PDZ domain of the Zona

  9. N-PERT BACK JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS: AN OPTION FOR THE NEXT INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY GENERATION?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are introducing a new solar cell design: the Passivated Emitter and Rear Cell (PERC), which features a full-PERT (Passivated Emitter, Rear Totally Diffused) solar cells with a processing sequence based on an industrialN-PERT BACK JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS: AN OPTION FOR THE NEXT INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY GENERATION? Bianca

  10. CMOS Interface Circuits for Spin Tunneling Junction Based Magnetic Random Access Memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh Saripalli

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Magneto resistive memories (MRAM) are non-volatile memories which use magnetic instead of electrical structures to store data. These memories, apart from being non-volatile, offer a possibility to achieve densities better than DRAMs and speeds faster than SRAMs. MRAMs could potentially replace all computer memory RAM technologies in use today, leading to future applications like instan-on computers and longer battery life for pervasive devices. Such rapid development was made possible due to the recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in Spin tunneling junction devices. Spin tunneling junctions (STJ) are composite structures consisting of a thin insulating layer sandwiched between two magnetic layers. This thesis research is targeted towards these spin tunneling junction based Magnetic memories. In any memory, some kind of an interface circuit is needed to read the logic states. In this thesis, four such circuits are proposed and designed for Magnetic memories (MRAM). These circuits interface to the Spin tunneling junctions and act as sense amplifiers to read their magnetic states. The physical structure and functional characteristics of these circuits are discussed in this thesis. Mismatch effects on the circuits and proper design techniques are also presented. To demonstrate the functionality of these interface structures, test circuits were designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35{micro} CMOS process. Also circuits to characterize the process mismatches were fabricated and tested. These results were then used in Matlab programs to aid in design process and to predict interface circuit's yields.

  11. Control of the electromagnetic environment for single Josephson junctions using arrays of dc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    ;ective impedance of the array can be varied in situ by applying an external magnetic #12;eld and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA Abstract. We have measured the current-pair tunneling is induced in the single junction. The measured blockade voltage agrees with the theoretical

  12. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 1 DECEMBER 2013 | DOI: 10.1038/NMAT3811 Adaptive semiconductor/electrocatalyst junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    as an EC. Impedance and current­voltage measurements have been used to show that Co­Pi collects and stores in situ using two working electrodes to independently monitor and control the potential and current `adaptive' SC/EC junctions where the effective Schottky barrier height changes in situ with the oxidation

  13. Control of the Electromagnetic Environment for Single Josephson Junctions Using Arrays of dc SQUIDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    is that the effective impedance of the SQUID array can be varied in situ by applying an external magnetic field Postdoctoral Researcher), E-mail: michio@postman.riken.go.jp. Abstract--We have measured the current. This environmental effect on nano-scale junctions can be studied by measuring the current- voltage (IV

  14. Alloyed junction Ge Esaki diodes on Si substrates realised by aspect ratio trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rommel, Sean

    Alloyed junction Ge Esaki diodes on Si substrates realised by aspect ratio trapping technique D. Pawlik, S. Sieg, S.K. Kurinec, S.L. Rommel, Z. Cheng, J.-S. Park, J. Hydrick and A. Lochtefeld A Ge Esaki diode is demonstrated on Si atop a coalesced epitaxial layer of Ge grown through narrow openings in SiO2

  15. NREL scientists develop near-field optical microscopy techniques for imaging solar cell junctions and identify

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar cell producers are facing urgent pressures to lower module production cost.This achievementNREL scientists develop near-field optical microscopy techniques for imaging solar cell junctions is an increasingly important issue for silicon solar cells. The issue has taken center stage now that the solar

  16. Thermal conductance of the junction between single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    conductances of the carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions that would be found in a CNT aerogel are predicted using of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (e.g., aligned films, mats, and aerogels) are candidates for use in electronic issue in all of these applications. Our focus here is related to single-walled CNT aerogels, which

  17. Andreev-level spectroscopy and Josephson-current switching in a three-terminal Josephson junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Andreev-level spectroscopy and Josephson-current switching in a three-terminal Josephson junction H. The voltage V applied to the normal-metal terminal controls the occupation of Andreev energy levels En the Andreev level. The differential conductance along the normal-metal terminal permits spectroscopy

  18. Etching suspended superconducting hybrid junctions from a multilayer H. Q. Nguyen,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by an insulating oxide bar- rier (I) are a central component to mesoscopic electronic devices. The isothermal multilayer. The process involves few fabrication steps, is reliable and produces extremely high-quality tunnel junctions. Under an appropriate voltage bias, a significant electronic cooling is demonstrated

  19. A solvable model for scattering on a junction and a modified analytic perturbation procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Pavlov

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a one-body spin-less electron spectral problem for a resonance scattering system constructed of a quantum well weakly connected to a noncompact exterior reservoir, where the electron is free. The simplest kind of the resonance scattering system is a quantum network, with the reservoir composed of few disjoint cylindrical quantum wires, and the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation on the network, with the real bounded potential on the wells and constant potential on the wires. We propose a Dirichlet-to-Neumann - based analysis to reveal the resonance nature of conductance across the star-shaped element of the network (a junction), derive an approximate formula for the scattering matrix of the junction, construct a fitted zero-range solvable model of the junction and interpret a phenomenological parameter arising in Datta-Das Sarma boundary condition, see {\\cite{DattaAPL}, for T-junctions. We also propose using of the fitted zero-range solvable model as the first step in a modified analytic perturbation procedure of calculation of the corresponding scattering matrix.

  20. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this initial site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Grand Junction, Colorado. This SOWP is one of the first UMTRA Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards (40 CFR Part 192, as amended by 60 FR 2854) for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The DOE goal is to use the observational method to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation based on the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards.

  1. Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene hexagonal boron nitride graphene junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene ­ hexagonal boron nitride ­ graphene junctions T. Roy1 , L. Liu2 , S. de la Barrera,3 B. Chakrabarti1,4 , Z. R. Hesabi1 , C. A. Joiner1 Abstract: Large area chemical vapor deposited graphene and hexagonal boron nitride was used to fabricate

  2. In situ Formation of Highly Conducting Covalent Au-C Contacts for Single-Molecule Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Z.L.; Hybertsen, M.; Skouta, R.; Vazquez, H.; Widawsky, J.R.; Schneebeli, S.; Chen, W.; Breslow, R.; Venkataraman, L.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charge transport across metal-molecule interfaces has an important role in organic electronics. Typically, chemical link groups such as thiols or amines are used to bind organic molecules to metal electrodes in single-molecule circuits, with these groups controlling both the physical structure and the electronic coupling at the interface. Direct metal-carbon coupling has been shown through C60, benzene and {pi}-stacked benzene but ideally the carbon backbone of the molecule should be covalently bonded to the electrode without intervening link groups. Here, we demonstrate a method to create junctions with such contacts. Trimethyl tin (SnMe{sub 3})-terminated polymethylene chains are used to form single-molecule junctions with a break-junction technique. Gold atoms at the electrode displace the SnMe{sub 3} linkers, leading to the formation of direct Au-C bonded single-molecule junctions with a conductance that is {approx}100 times larger than analogous alkanes with most other terminations. The conductance of these Au-C bonded alkanes decreases exponentially with molecular length, with a decay constant of 0.97 per methylene, consistent with a non-resonant transport mechanism. Control experiments and ab initio calculations show that high conductances are achieved because a covalent Au-C sigma ({sigma}) bond is formed. This offers a new method for making reproducible and highly conducting metal-organic contacts.

  3. Microsimulation analysis of a hybrid system model of multiple merge junction highway and semiautomatic vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girault, Alain

    , it receives its exit number, which of course has to be after the entry junction. Of course, all these figures Exit 3 9600 m Exit 1 960 m Exit 2 8640 m Entry 3 7680 m Entry 2 2640 m 10320 m Figure 1: Highwa section, which includes three merge junc­ tion and three exit ramps. We show through micro­ simulation

  4. FRONTIERS ARTICLE Efficiency enhancement of copper contaminated radial pn junction solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    energy represents one of the most important sustainable and renewable energy sources. The most common power from solar cells [1]. The reason is that crystalline silicon solar cell manufacturingFRONTIERS ARTICLE Efficiency enhancement of copper contaminated radial p­n junction solar cells

  5. SUPERCONDUCTING TUNNEL JUNCTION BOLOMETERS J. CLARKE, G. I. HOFFER and P. L. RICHARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    69 SUPERCONDUCTING TUNNEL JUNCTION BOLOMETERS J. CLARKE, G. I. HOFFER and P. L. RICHARDS DepartmentIioration possible de ces performances. Abstract. 2014 Two new types of superconducting infrared bolometer doped germanium, are widely used as sensitive broadband infrared detectors. Superconducting bolometers

  6. TRIPLE-JUNCTION A-SI SOLAR CELLS WITH HEAVILY DOPED THIN INTERFACE LAYERS AT THE TUNNEL W. Wang, H. Povolny, W. Du, X.B. Liao and X. Deng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    TRIPLE-JUNCTION A-SI SOLAR CELLS WITH HEAVILY DOPED THIN INTERFACE LAYERS AT THE TUNNEL JUNCTIONS W of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 USA ABSTRACT Triple-junction a-Si based solar cells, having a structure of SS cells and between the middle and bottom component cells on the efficiency of triple- junction solar

  7. Radiation response of single and dual junction p{sup +}n InGaP/GaAs space solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, R.J.; Xapsos, M.A.; Summers, G.P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Cotal, H.L.; Messenger, S.R. [SFA, Inc., Largo, MD (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation response of single and dual-junction p{sup +}n InGaP/GaAs solar cells is studied. The degradation mechanisms of single-junction InGaP cells are identified, and characteristic degradation curves in terms of displacement damage dose are calculated. The response of dual-junction cells is presented, and the response of each sub-cell is discussed. The cell response is compared with those of other technologies. The effect of current injection on irradiated InGaP cell is presented.

  8. Distinct regions of right temporo-parietal junction are selective for theory of mind and exogenous attention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triantafyllou, Christina

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, a cortical region in the right temporo-parietal junction (RTPJ) is recruited when participants read stories about people's thoughts (‘Theory of Mind’). Both fMRI and ...

  9. Investigation of Band-Offsets at Monolayer-Multilayer MoS2 Junctions by Scanning Photocurrent Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, Sarah L; Wu, Chung-Chiang; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Sangwan, Vinod K; Kang, Junmo; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C; Lauhon, Lincoln J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thickness-dependent band structure of MoS2 implies that discontinuities in energy bands exist at the interface of monolayer (1L) and multilayer (ML) thin films. The characteristics of such heterojunctions are analyzed here using current versus voltage measurements, scanning photocurrent microscopy, and finite element simulations of charge carrier transport. Rectifying I-V curves are consistently observed between contacts on opposite sides of 1L-ML junctions, and a strong bias-dependent photocurrent is observed at the junction. Finite element device simulations with varying carrier concentrations and electron affinities show that a type II band alignment at single layer/multi-layer junctions reproduces both the rectifying electrical characteristics and the photocurrent response under bias. However, the zero-bias junction photocurrent and its energy dependence are not explained by conventional photovoltaic and photothermoelectric mechanisms, indicating the contributions of hot carriers.

  10. InGaP/GaAs and InGaAs mechanically-stacked triple-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takamoto, T.; Ikeda, E.; Agui, T. [Japan Energy Corp., Toda, Saitama (Japan)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Triple-junction cells with AM1.5 efficiencies of over 33% have been demonstrated. A planar type InGaP/GaAs monolithic dual-junction cell was fabricated on a semi-insulating FaAs substrate, which has high infra-red transparency. Then a dual-junction cell, with efficiency of 27--28%, was mechanically stacked on an InGaAs cell fabricated on an InP substrate. The bottom InGaAs cell showed an efficiency of 6.2% under the InGaP/GaAs cell, and a total efficiency of 33--34% was achieved for the four-terminal triple-junction cell.

  11. EIS-0126: Remedial Actions at the Former Climax Uranium Company Uranium Mill Site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assess the environmental impacts of remediating the residual radioactive materials left from the inactive uranium processing site and associated properties located in Grand Junction, Colorado.

  12. Influence of uniaxial pressure on the critical temperature for long delays in GaAs junction lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morosini, M.B.Z.; Patel, N.B.; Nunes, F.D.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we report on the influence of uniaxial pressure applied perpendicularly to junction laser on the behavior of the critical temperature for the onset of long delays in GaAs junction lasers. Experimental data showing this influence for lasers operating in a TE or TM polarization are presented and explained on the basis of a thermal theory of long delays and related phenomena.

  13. Antenna-coupled Photon Emission from hexagonal Boron Nitride Tunnel Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parzefall, Markus; Jain, Achint; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Novotny, Lukas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultrafast conversion of electrical to optical signals at the nanoscale is of fundamental interest for data processing, telecommunication and optical interconnects. However, the modulation bandwidths of semiconductor LEDs are limited by the spontaneous recombination rate of electron-hole pairs and the footprint of electrically-driven ultrafast lasers is too large for practical on-chip integration. A metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junction approaches the ultimate size limit of electronic devices and its operating speed is fundamentally limited only by the tunneling time. Here we study the conversion of electron energy - localized in vertical gold-h-BN-gold tunnel junctions - into free space photons, mediated by resonant slot antennas. Optical antennas efficiently bridge the size-mismatch between nanoscale volumes and far-field radiation and strongly enhance the electron-photon conversion efficiency. We achieve polarized, directional and resonantly enhanced light emission from inelastic electron tunnelin...

  14. Theory of microwave spectroscopy of Andreev bound states with a Josephson junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Bretheau; Ç. Girit; M. Houzet; H. Pothier; D. Esteve; C. Urbina

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a microscopic theory for the current through a tunnel Josephson junction coupled to a non-linear environment, which consists of an Andreev two-level system coupled to a harmonic oscillator. It models a recent experiment [Bretheau, Girit, Pothier, Esteve, and Urbina, Nature (London) 499, 312 (2013)] on photon spectroscopy of Andreev bound states in a superconducting atomic-size contact. We find the eigenenergies and eigenstates of the environment and derive the current through the junction due to inelastic Cooper pair tunneling. The current-voltage characteristic reveals the transitions between the Andreev bound states, the excitation of the harmonic mode that hybridizes with the Andreev bound states, as well as multi-photon processes. The calculated spectra are in fair agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Electrical characteristics and interface structure of magnetic tunnel junctions with hafnium oxyfluoride barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y.Y.; Kim, D.S.; Char, K. [Center for Strongly Correlated Materials Research and School of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the effects of fluorine inclusion on the electrical transport characteristics and interface structure of the hafnium oxide barrier in a magnetic tunnel junction. The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and resistance-area (RA) as a function of oxidation time show that the TMR ratio of the hafnium oxyfluoride barrier is higher (8.3%) than that of the hafnium oxide barrier (5.7%) at their optimum conditions, and the oxyfluoride barrier junctions maintain a high TMR ratio even when the RA product increases by three orders of magnitude. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that the fluorine atoms in the oxyfluoride barrier play an important role in the formation of a barrier with uniform composition. We believe that the initial fluoride layer is causing the subsequent oxygen diffusion to slow down, resulting in the formation of a defect-free hafnium oxide layer. These results are consistent with what we have found for aluminum oxyfluoride barriers.

  16. Giant amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance in a molecular junction: Molecular spin-valve transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhungana, Kamal B.; Pati, Ranjit, E-mail: patir@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance by gate field in a molecular junction is the most important requirement for the development of a molecular spin valve transistor. Herein, we predict a giant amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance in a single molecular spin valve junction, which consists of Ru-bis-terpyridine molecule as a spacer between two ferromagnetic nickel contacts. Based on the first-principles quantum transport approach, we show that a modest change in the gate field that is experimentally accessible can lead to a substantial amplification (320%) of tunnel magnetoresistance. The origin of such large amplification is attributed to the spin dependent modification of orbitals at the molecule-lead interface and the resultant Stark effect induced shift in channel position with respect to the Fermi energy.

  17. Bedrock acquifer geometry in the Panther Junction area of Big Bend National Park, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, Caroline Lownes

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    areas where an igneous intrusive i. s known to exist as indicated by well data and geologic maps . The location of these impermeable igneous intrusions and their relationship to the water bearing sediments is important as a trapping mechanism. , espec.... Bouguer gravity map of the Big Bend region by Metcalfe and Clarke with the location of the gravity study in the Panther Juncti. on area. Generalised stratigraphic nomenclature and correlation, Panther Junction Area, Big Bend National Park...

  18. Conductance states of molecular junctions for encoding binary information: a computational approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agapito, Luis Alberto

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    CONDUCTANCE STATES OF MOLECULAR JUNCTIONS FOR ENCODING BINARY INFORMATION: A COMPUTATIONAL APPROACH A Dissertation by LUIS ALBERTO AGAPITO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... Dissertation by LUIS ALBERTO AGAPITO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Jorge M...

  19. Physical model of the contact resistivity of metal-graphene junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaves, Ferney A., E-mail: ferneyalveiro.chaves@uab.cat; Jiménez, David [Departament d'Enginyeria Electrònica, Escola d'Enginyeria, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Cummings, Aron W. [ICN2–Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Roche, Stephan [ICN2–Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, 08070 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    While graphene-based technology shows great promise for a variety of electronic applications, including radio-frequency devices, the resistance of the metal-graphene contact is a technological bottleneck for the realization of viable graphene electronics. One of the most important factors in determining the resistance of a metal-graphene junction is the contact resistivity. Despite the large number of experimental works that exist in the literature measuring the contact resistivity, a simple model of it is still lacking. In this paper, we present a comprehensive physical model for the contact resistivity of these junctions, based on the Bardeen Transfer Hamiltonian method. This model unveils the role played by different electrical and physical parameters in determining the specific contact resistivity, such as the chemical potential of interaction, the work metal-graphene function difference, and the insulator thickness between the metal and graphene. In addition, our model reveals that the contact resistivity is strongly dependent on the bias voltage across the metal-graphene junction. This model is applicable to a wide variety of graphene-based electronic devices and thus is useful for understanding how to optimize the contact resistance in these systems.

  20. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This site observational work plan (SOWP) is one of the first Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement. This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The US Department of Energy (DOE) goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards. The conceptual model demonstrates that the uranium processing-related contamination at the site has affected the unconfined alluvial aquifer, but not the deeper confined aquifer.

  1. National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Bibliographic index of Grand Junction office uranium reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.B.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 1978, Mesa College entered into subcontract with Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) to prepare a bibliographic index of the uranium raw materials reports issued by the Grand Junction Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Bendix, prime contractor to the Grand Junction Office, operates the Technical Library at the DOE facility. Since the early 1950s, approximately 2700 reports have been issued by the Grand Junction Office. These reports were the results of uranium investigations conducted by federal agencies and their subcontractors. The majority of the reports cover geology, mineralogy, and metallurgy of uranium and/or thorium. No single, complete list of these reports existed. The purpose of this subcontract was to compile a comprehensive index to these reports. The Mesa College geology faculty worked with the BFEC and DOE staffs to develop the format for the index. Undergraduate geology students from Mesa compiled a master record sheet for each report. All reports issued up to January 1, 1979 were included in the bibliography. The bibliography is in preliminary, unedited form. It is being open-filed at this time, on microfiche, to make the information available to the public on a timely basis. The bibliography is divided into a master record list arranged in alpha-numeric order by report identification number, with separate indices arranged by title, author, state and county, 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangle, key words, and exploration area.

  2. Transport in arrays of submicron Josephson junctions over a ground plane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Teressa Rae [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) arrays of Al islands linked by submicron Al/Al{sub x}O{sub y}/Al tunnel junctions were fabricated on an insulating layer grown on a ground plane. The arrays were cooled to temperatures as low as 20 mK where the Josephson coupling energy E{sub J} of each junction and the charging energy E{sub C} of each island were much greater than the thermal energy k{sub B}T. The capacitance C{sub g} between each island and the ground plane was much greater than the junction capacitance C. Two classes of arrays were studied. In the first class, the normal state tunneling resistance of the junctions was much larger than the resistance quantum for single electrons, R{sub N}{much_gt} R{sub Q{sub e}}{identical_to} h/e{sup 2} {approx} 25.8 k{Omega}, and the islands were driven normal by an applied magnetic field such that E{sub J} = 0 and the array was in the Coulomb blockade regime. The arrays were made on degenerately-doped Si, thermally oxidized to a thickness of approximately 100 nm. The current-voltage (I - V) characteristics of a 1D and a 2D array were measured and found to display a threshold voltage V{sub T} below which little current flows. In the second class of arrays, the normal state tunneling resistance of the junctions was close to the resistance quantum for Cooper pairs, R{sub N}{approx}R{sub Q}{equivalent_to}h/4e{sup 4}{approx}6.45k{Omega}, such that E{sub J}/E{sub C}{approx}1. The arrays were made on GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As heterostructures with a two-dimensional electron gas approximately 100 nm below the surface. One array displayed superconducting behavior at low temperature. Two arrays displayed insulating behavior at low temperature, and the size of the Coulomb gap increased with increasing R{sub g}.

  3. Two-Dimensional Measurement of n+-p Asymmetrical Junctions in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Using AFM-Based Electrical Techniques with Nanometer Resolution: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Li, J. V.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Heath, J. T.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lateral inhomogeneities of modern solar cells demand direct electrical imaging with nanometer resolution. We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based electrical techniques provide unique junction characterizations, giving a two-dimensional determination of junction locations. Two AFM-based techniques, scanning capacitance microscopy/spectroscopy (SCM/SCS) and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), were significantly improved and applied to the junction characterizations of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells. The SCS spectra were taken pixel by pixel by precisely controlling the tip positions in the junction area. The spectra reveal distinctive features that depend closely on the position relative to the electrical junction, which allows us to indentify the electrical junction location. In addition, SKPFM directly probes the built-in potential over the junction area modified by the surface band bending, which allows us to deduce the metallurgical junction location by identifying a peak of the electric field. Our results demonstrate resolutions of 10-40 nm, depending on the techniques (SCS or SKPFM). These direct electrical measurements with nanometer resolution and intrinsic two-dimensional capability are well suited for investigating the junction distribution of solar cells with lateral inhomogeneities.

  4. InGaN/GaN tunnel junctions for hole injection in GaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram, E-mail: krishnamoorthy.13@osu.edu, E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu; Akyol, Fatih [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth, E-mail: krishnamoorthy.13@osu.edu, E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaN/GaN tunnel junction contacts were grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on top of a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown InGaN/GaN blue (450?nm) light emitting diode. A voltage drop of 5.3?V at 100?mA, forward resistance of 2 × 10{sup ?2} ? cm{sup 2}, and a higher light output power compared to the reference light emitting diodes (LED) with semi-transparent p-contacts were measured in the tunnel junction LED (TJLED). A forward resistance of 5?×?10{sup ?4} ? cm{sup 2} was measured in a GaN PN junction with the identical tunnel junction contact as the TJLED, grown completely by MBE. The depletion region due to the impurities at the regrowth interface between the MBE tunnel junction and the MOCVD-grown LED was hence found to limit the forward resistance measured in the TJLED.

  5. Electron microscopic single particle analysis of a tetrameric RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayanagi, Kouta [Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura-cho, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); Takara-Bio Endowed Division, Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 6-2-3 Furuedai, Suita, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); BIRD, JST (Japan)], E-mail: maya@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp; Fujiwara, Yoshie [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Miyata, Tomoko [Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 1-3 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Morikawa, Kosuke [The Takara-Bio Endowed Division, Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 6-2-3 Furuedai, Suita, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); CREST, JST (Japan)], E-mail: morikako@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    During the late stage of homologous recombination in prokaryotes, RuvA binds to the Holliday junction intermediate and executes branch migration in association with RuvB. The RuvA subunits form two distinct complexes with the Holliday junction: complex I with the single RuvA tetramer on one side of the four way junction DNA, and complex II with two tetramers on both sides. To investigate the functional roles of complexes I and II, we mutated two residues of RuvA (L125D and E126K) to prevent octamer formation. An electron microscopic analysis indicated that the mutant RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex formed the characteristic tripartite structure, with only one RuvA tetramer bound to one side of the Holliday junction, demonstrating the unexpected stability of this complex. The novel bent images of the complex revealed an intriguing morphological similarity to the structure of SV40 large T antigen, which belongs to the same AAA+ family as RuvB.

  6. 0.7-eV GaInAs Junction for a GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs(1-eV)/GaInAs(0.7-eV) Four-Junction Solar Cell: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Geisz, J. F.; Norman, A. G.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction solar cells, focusing on adding a fourth junction to the Ga0.5In0.5P/GaAs/Ga0.75In0.25As inverted three-junction cell. This cell, grown inverted on GaAs so that the lattice-mismatched Ga0.75In0.25As third junction is the last one grown, has demonstrated 38% efficiency, and 40% is likely in the near future. To achieve still further gains, a lower-bandgap GaxIn1-xAs fourth junction could be added to the three-junction structure for a four-junction cell whose efficiency could exceed 45% under concentration. Here, we present the initial development of the GaxIn1-xAs fourth junction. Junctions of various bandgaps ranging from 0.88 to 0.73 eV were grown, in order to study the effect of the different amounts of lattice mismatch. At a bandgap of 0.88 eV, junctions were obtained with very encouraging {approx}80% quantum efficiency, 57% fill factor, and 0.36 eV open-circuit voltage. The device performance degrades with decreasing bandgap (i.e., increasing lattice mismatch). We model the four-junction device efficiency vs. fourth junction bandgap to show that an 0.7-eV fourth-junction bandgap, while optimal if it could be achieved in practice, is not necessary; an 0.9-eV bandgap would still permit significant gains in multijunction cell efficiency while being easier to achieve than the lower-bandgap junction.

  7. Regulation of gap junction function and Connexin 43 expression by cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polusani, Srikanth R.; Kar, Rekha; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Masters, Bettie Sue [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Biochemistry, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)] [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Biochemistry, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Panda, Satya P., E-mail: panda@uthscsa.edu [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Biochemistry, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} Humans with severe forms of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) mutations show bone defects as observed in Antley-Bixler Syndrome. {yields} First report showing knockdown of CYPOR in osteoblasts decreased Connexin 43 (Cx43) protein levels. Cx43 is known to play an important role in bone modeling. {yields} Knockdown of CYPOR decreased Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and hemichannel activity. {yields} Knockdown of CYPOR decreased Cx43 in mouse primary calvarial osteoblasts. {yields} Decreased Cx43 expression was observed at the transcriptional level. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) is a microsomal electron-transferring enzyme containing both FAD and FMN as co-factors, which provides the reducing equivalents to various redox partners, such as cytochromes P450 (CYPs), heme oxygenase (HO), cytochrome b{sub 5} and squalene monooxygenase. Human patients with severe forms of CYPOR mutation show bone defects such as cranio- and humeroradial synostoses and long bone fractures, known as Antley-Bixler-like Syndrome (ABS). To elucidate the role of CYPOR in bone, we knocked-down CYPOR in multiple osteoblast cell lines using RNAi technology. In this study, knock-down of CYPOR decreased the expression of Connexin 43 (Cx43), known to play a critical role in bone formation, modeling, and remodeling. Knock-down of CYPOR also decreased Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) and hemichannel activity. Promoter luciferase assays revealed that the decrease in expression of Cx43 in CYPOR knock-down cells was due to transcriptional repression. Primary osteoblasts isolated from bone specific Por knock-down mice calvariae confirmed the findings in the cell lines. Taken together, our study provides novel insights into the regulation of gap junction function by CYPOR and suggests that Cx43 may play an important role(s) in CYPOR-mediated bone defects seen in patients.

  8. Temperature study of Zero Bias Features using self-assembling tunnel junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savitski, Stephen Ronald

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 04 1. 02 0. 90 -100 -20 20 60 100 Bias Voltage (mV) FIG. 3. Conductance vs. voltage, highlighting the Zero-Bias Feature (ZBF). Data curves are shown for a 100'70 neon junction at 1. 5 K, with some curves appropriately shifted in 6r so as to fit... of currents of 11-30 A corresponding to 1. 0-3. 2 Tesla were used, although for test purposes the magnet was periodically cycled to its full capability. 17 7 6 Fe n tX 3 '4 n II ee 1 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Supply Current (A) FIG. 7...

  9. Dynamical properties of three terminal magnetic tunnel junctions: Spintronics meets spin-orbitronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasello, R. [Department of Computer Science, Modeling, Electronics and System Science, University of Calabria, Rende (CS) (Italy)] [Department of Computer Science, Modeling, Electronics and System Science, University of Calabria, Rende (CS) (Italy); Carpentieri, M., E-mail: m.carpentieri@poliba.it [Department of Electrical and Information Engineering, Politecnico of Bari, via E. Orabona 4, I-70125 Bari (Italy); Finocchio, G. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Engineering, University of Messina, C.da di Dio, I-98166 Messina (Italy)] [Department of Electronic Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Engineering, University of Messina, C.da di Dio, I-98166 Messina (Italy)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter introduces a micromagnetic model able to characterize the magnetization dynamics in three terminal magnetic tunnel junctions, where the effects of spin-transfer torque and spin-orbit torque are taken into account. Our results predict that the possibility to separate electrically those two torque sources is very promising from a technological point of view for both next generation of nanoscale spintronic oscillators and microwave detectors. A scalable synchronization scheme based on the parallel connection of those three terminal devices is also proposed.

  10. Asymmetric current-phase relation due to spin-orbit interaction in semiconductor nanowire Josephson junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokoyama, Tomohiro; Eto, Mikio [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Nazarov, Yuli V. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft, The Netherlands (Netherlands)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study the current-phase relation in semiconductor nanowire Josephson junction in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. In the nanowire, the impurity scattering with strong SO interaction is taken into account using the random matrix theory. In the absence of magnetic field, the Josephson current I and phase difference ? between the superconductors satisfy the relation of I(?) = –I(–?). In the presence of magnetic field along the nanowire, the interplay between the SO interaction and Zeeman effect breaks the current-phase relation of I(?) = –I(–?). In this case, we show that the critical current depends on the current direction, which qualitatively agrees with recent experimental findings.

  11. Parametric excitation in a magnetic tunnel junction-based spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Åkerman, J. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Materials Physics, School of ICT, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Muduli, P. K. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, 110016 New Delhi (India)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Using microwave current injection at room temperature, we demonstrate parametric excitation of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ)-based spin-torque oscillator (STO). Parametric excitation is observed for currents below the auto-oscillation threshold, when the microwave current frequency f{sub e} is twice the STO free-running frequency f{sub 0}. Above threshold, the MTJ becomes parametrically synchronized. In the synchronized state, the STO exhibits an integrated power up to 5 times higher and a linewidth reduction of two orders of magnitude, compared to free-running conditions. We also show that the parametric synchronization favors single mode oscillations in the case of multimode excitation.

  12. The effect of environmental coupling on tunneling of quasiparticles in Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad H. Ansari; Frank K. Wilhelm; Urbasi Sinha; Aninda Sinha

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study quasiparticle tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions embedded in an electromagnetic environment. We identify tunneling processes that transfer electrical charge and couple to the environment in a way similar to that of normal electrons, and processes that mix electrons and holes and are thus creating charge superpositions. The latter are sensitive to the phase difference between the superconductor and are thus limited by phase diffusion even at zero temperature. We show that the environmental coupling is suppressed in many environments, thus leading to lower quasiparticle decay rates and thus better superconductor qubit coherence than previously expected. Our approach is nonperturbative in the environmental coupling strength.

  13. Enhanced efficiency of graphene-silicon Schottky junction solar cells by doping with Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, X. W., E-mail: xwzhang@semi.ac.cn; Yin, Z. G.; Meng, J. H.; Gao, H. L.; Zhang, L. Q.; Zhao, Y. J.; Wang, H. L. [Key Lab of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, CAS, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have reported a method to enhance the performance of graphene-Si (Gr/Si) Schottky junction solar cells by introducing Au nanoparticles (NPs) onto the monolayer graphene and few-layer graphene. The electron transfer between Au NPs and graphene leads to the increased work function and enhanced electrical conductivity of graphene, resulting in a remarkable improvement of device efficiency. By optimizing the initial thickness of Au layers, the power conversion efficiency of Gr/Si solar cells can be increased by more than three times, with a maximum value of 7.34%. These results show a route for fabricating efficient and stable Gr/Si solar cells.

  14. Ground-water hydrology of the Panther Junction area of Big Bend National Park, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, John Lawrence

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -made discharge in the Panther Junction area is 52 acre-ft/yr. The possible ground-water deficit from total discharge is calculated at nine acre-ft/ yr. Therefore, recharge and discharge may be in balance. Transmissivity coefficients for six wells penetrating... the Aguja aquifer are 600 gpd/ft or less. The transmissi- vity at well 47-201, which also penetrates the Aguja aqui- fer, is 30, 000 gpd/ft. The transmissivity is 5500 gpd/ft at one of two production wells penetrating the Chisos aquifer in the K-Bar area...

  15. Electron transport in graphene/graphene side-contact junction by plane-wave multiple scattering method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang-Guo; Zhang, X -G; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron transport in graphene is along the sheet but junction devices are often made by stacking different sheets together in a "side-contact" geometry which causes the current to flow perpendicular to the sheets within the device. Such geometry presents a challenge to first-principles transport methods. We solve this problem by implementing a plane-wave based multiple scattering theory for electron transport. This implementation improves the computational efficiency over the existing plane-wave transport code, scales better for parallelization over large number of nodes, and does not require the current direction to be along a lattice axis. As a first application, we calculate the tunneling current through a side-contact graphene junction formed by two separate graphene sheets with the edges overlapping each other. We find that transport properties of this junction depend strongly on the AA or AB stacking within the overlapping region as well as the vacuum gap between two graphene sheets. Such transport beh...

  16. Nonlinear thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions with vibrational coupling M. Leijnse,1 M. R. Wegewijs,2,3,4 and K. Flensberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonlinear thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions with vibrational coupling M. Leijnse,1 M 17 June 2010; published 13 July 2010 We present a detailed study of the nonlinear thermoelectric of molecular junctions for thermoelectric applications. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.045412 PACS number s : 84

  17. Three-dimensional analysis of the rectifying properties of geometrically asymmetric metal-vacuum-metal junctions treated as an oscillating barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Alexandre

    -vacuum-metal junctions treated as an oscillating barrier A. Mayer,1,* M. S. Chung,2 B. L. Weiss,3 N. M. Miskovsky,4 and P-vacuum-metal junctions treated as an oscillating barrier. In particular, we focus on systems in which an oscillating bias on these approximations but rather treat these aspects exactly by taking account of three-dimensional aspects

  18. Four-Junction Solar Cell with 40% Target Efficiency Fabricated by Wafer Bonding and Layer Transfer: Final Technical Report, 1 January 2005 - 31 December 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, H. A.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We realized high-quality InGaP/GaAs 2-junction top cells on Ge/Si, InGaAs/InP bottom cells, direct-bond series interconnection of tandem cells, and modeling of bonded 3- and 4-junction device performance.

  19. The effects of laser scanning on the characteristics of a p-n junction diode in dislocated silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael, Mark Wayne

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF LASER SCANNING ON THE CHARACTERISTICS OF A p-n JUNCTION DIODE IN DISLOCATED SILICON A Thesis by NARK WAYNE MICHAEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December l9SQ Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THE EPFECTS OP LASER SCANNING ON THE CHARACTERISTICS 07 A p-n JUNCTION DIODE IN DISLOCATED SILICON A Thesis NARK WAYNE NICHAEL Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee...

  20. GaN-based vertical-cavity laser performance improvements using tunnel-junction-cascaded active regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piprek, Joachim, E-mail: piprek@nusod.org [NUSOD Institute LLC, P.O. Box 7204, Newark, Delaware 19714 (United States)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter investigates the output power enhancement achieved by tunnel junction insertion into the InGaN multi-quantum well (MQW) active region of a 410?nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser which enables the repeated use of carriers for light generation (carrier recycling). While the number of quantum wells remains unchanged, the tunnel junction eliminates absorption caused by the non-uniform MQW carrier distribution. The thermal resistance drops and the excess bias lead to a surprisingly small rise in self-heating.

  1. VOLUME 77, NUMBER 20 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 11 NOVEMBER 1996 One-Dimensional Localization of Quantum Vortices in Disordered Josephson Junction Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    of a square network of Josephson junctions in which each superconducting island is coupled to four nearest

  2. Grand Junction Projects Office site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1992 at the US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO) facility in Colorado. Environmental activities conducted at the GJPO facility during 1992 included those associated with environmental compliance, site remediation, off-site dose modeling, and radiological and nonradiological monitoring. Four phases of the on-site Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project were completed in 1992. Remediation activities, which included the removal of 161,589 tons of uranium-mill-tailings-contaminated material from the facility, were conducted in compliance with all applicable permits. Off-site dose modeling for the GJPO was conducted to determine compliance with current National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, and applicable DOE Orders (5400.1 and 5400.5). The total off-site EDE to the public from all sources of radiation emanating from the facility (radon, air particulates, gamma) was calculated as 9 mrem/yr, which is well below the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr above background. The radiological and nonradiological monitoring program at the GJPO facility included monitoring of activities that generate potentially hazardous or toxic wastes and monitoring of ambient air, surface water, and ground water.

  3. Design, fabrication, and analysis of p-channel arsenide/antimonide hetero-junction tunnel transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajamohanan, Bijesh, E-mail: bor5067@psu.edu; Mohata, Dheeraj; Hollander, Matthew; Datta, Suman [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Zhu, Yan; Hudait, Mantu [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Jiang, Zhengping; Klimeck, Gerhard [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we demonstrate InAs/GaSb hetero-junction (hetJ) and GaSb homo-junction (homJ) p-channel tunneling field effect transistors (pTFET) employing a low temperature atomic layer deposited high-? gate dielectric. HetJ pTFET exhibited drive current of 35 ?A/?m in comparison to homJ pTFET, which exhibited drive current of 0.3 ?A/?m at V{sub DS}?=??0.5?V under DC biasing conditions. Additionally, with pulsing of 1 ?s gate voltage, hetJ pTFET exhibited enhanced drive current of 85 ?A/?m at V{sub DS}?=??0.5?V, which is the highest reported in the category of III-V pTFET. Detailed device characterization was performed through analysis of the capacitance-voltage characteristics, pulsed current-voltage characteristics, and x-ray diffraction studies.

  4. Hetero-junction photovoltaic device and method of fabricating the device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aytug, Tolga; Christen, David K; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Polat, Ozgur

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A hetero-junction device and fabrication method in which phase-separated n-type and p-type semiconductor pillars define vertically-oriented p-n junctions extending above a substrate. Semiconductor materials are selected for the p-type and n-type pillars that are thermodynamically stable and substantially insoluble in one another. An epitaxial deposition process is employed to form the pillars on a nucleation layer and the mutual insolubility drives phase separation of the materials. During the epitaxial deposition process, the orientation is such that the nucleation layer initiates propagation of vertical columns resulting in a substantially ordered, three-dimensional structure throughout the deposited material. An oxidation state of at least a portion of one of the p-type or the n-type semiconductor materials is altered relative to the other, such that the band-gap energy of the semiconductor materials differ with respect to stoichiometric compositions and the device preferentially absorbs particular selected bands of radiation.

  5. Thermal influence on charge carrier transport in solar cells based on GaAs PN junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osses-Márquez, Juan; Calderón-Muñoz, Williams R., E-mail: wicalder@ing.uchile.cl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Chile, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron and hole one-dimensional transport in a solar cell based on a Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) PN junction and its dependency with electron and lattice temperatures are studied here. Electrons and heat transport are treated on an equal footing, and a cell operating at high temperatures using concentrators is considered. The equations of a two-temperature hydrodynamic model are written in terms of asymptotic expansions for the dependent variables with the electron Reynolds number as a perturbation parameter. The dependency of the electron and hole densities through the junction with the temperature is analyzed solving the steady-state model at low Reynolds numbers. Lattice temperature distribution throughout the device is obtained considering the change of kinetic energy of electrons due to interactions with the lattice and heat absorbed from sunlight. In terms of performance, higher values of power output are obtained with low lattice temperature and hot energy carriers. This modeling contributes to improve the design of heat exchange devices and thermal management strategies in photovoltaic technologies.

  6. Lessons Learned: The Grand Junction Office Site Transfer to Private Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office (DOE?GJO) in Grand Junction, Colorado, has played an integral role within the DOE complex for many years. GJO has a reputation for outstanding quality in the performance of complex environmental restoration projects, utilizing state-of-the-art technology. Many of the GJO missions have been completed in recent years. In 1998, DOE Headquarters directed GJO to reduce its mortgage costs by transferring ownership of the site and to lease space at a reasonable rate for its ongoing work. A local community group and GJO have entered into a sales contract; signing of the Quitclaim Deed is planned for February 16, 2001. Site transfer tasks were organized as a project with a critical-path schedule to track activities and a Site Transition Decision Plan was prepared that included a decision process flow chart, key tasks, and responsibilities. Specifically, GJO identified the end state with affected parties early on, successfully dealt with site contamination issues, and negotiated a lease-back arrangement, resulting in an estimated savings of more than 60 percent of facility maintenance costs annually. Lessons learned regarding these transition activities could be beneficial to many other sites.

  7. Quantitative interpretation of the transition voltages in gold-poly(phenylene) thiol-gold molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kunlin; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin, E-mail: smhou@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)] [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition voltage of three different asymmetric Au/poly(phenylene) thiol/Au molecular junctions in which the central molecule is either benzene thiol, biphenyl thiol, or terphenyl thiol is investigated by first-principles quantum transport simulations. For all the junctions, the calculated transition voltage at positive polarity is in quantitative agreement with the experimental values and shows weak dependence on alterations of the Au-phenyl contact. When compared to the strong coupling at the Au-S contact, which dominates the alignment of various molecular orbitals with respect to the electrode Fermi level, the coupling at the Au-phenyl contact produces only a weak perturbation. Therefore, variations of the Au-phenyl contact can only have a minor influence on the transition voltage. These findings not only provide an explanation to the uniformity in the transition voltages found for ?-conjugated molecules measured with different experimental methods, but also demonstrate the advantage of transition voltage spectroscopy as a tool for determining the positions of molecular levels in molecular devices.

  8. ZnO PN Junctions for Highly-Efficient, Low-Cost Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David P. Norton; Stephen Pearton; Fan Ren

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    By 2015, the US Department of Energy has set as a goal the development of advanced solid state lighting technologies that are more energy efficient, longer lasting, and more cost-effective than current technology. One approach that is most attractive is to utilize light-emitting diode technologies. Although III-V compound semiconductors have been the primary focus in pursuing this objective, ZnO-based materials present some distinct advantages that could yield success in meeting this objective. As with the nitrides, ZnO is a direct bandgap semiconductor whose gap energy (3.2 eV) can be tuned from 3.0 to 4 eV with substitution of Mg for higher bandgap, Cd for lower bandgap. ZnO has an exciton binding energy of 60 meV, which is larger than that for the nitrides, indicating that it should be a superior light emitting semiconductor. Furthermore, ZnO thin films can be deposited at temperatures on the order of 400-600 C, which is significantly lower than that for the nitrides and should lead to lower manufacturing costs. It has also been demonstrated that functional ZnO electronic devices can be fabricated on inexpensive substrates, such as glass. Therefore, for the large-area photonic application of solid state lighting, ZnO holds unique potential. A significant impediment to exploiting ZnO in light-emitting applications has been the absence of effective p-type carrier doping. However, the recent realization of acceptor-doped ZnO material overcomes this impediment, opening the door to ZnO light emitting diode development In this project, the synthesis and properties of ZnO-based pn junctions for light emitting diodes was investigated. The focus was on three issues most pertinent to realizing a ZnO-based solid state lighting technology, namely (1) achieving high p-type carrier concentrations in epitaxial and polycrystalline films, (2) realizing band edge emission from pn homojunctions, and (3) investigating pn heterojunction constructs that should yield efficient light emission. The project engaged established expertise at the University of Florida in ZnO film growth (D. Norton), device fabrication (F. Ren) and wide bandgap photonics (S. Pearton). It addressed p-type doping and junction formation in (Zn,Mg)O alloy thin films. The project employed pulsed laser deposition for film growth. The p-type dopant of interest was primarily phosphorus, given the recent results in our laboratory and elsewhere that this anions can yield p-type ZnO-based materials. The role of Zn interstitials, oxygen vacancies, and/or hydrogen complexes in forming compensating shallow donor levels imposes the need to simultaneously consider the role of in situ and post-growth processing conditions. Temperature-dependent Hall, Seebeck, C-V, and resistivity measurements was used to determine conduction mechanisms, carrier type, and doping. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence was used to determine the location of the acceptor level, injection efficiency, and optical properties of the structures. X-ray diffraction will used to characterize film crystallinity. Using these materials, the fabrication and characterization of (Zn,Mg)O pn homojunction and heterojunction devices was pursued. Electrical characterization of the junction capacitance and I-V behavior was used to extract junction profile and minority carrier lifetime. Electroluminescence from biased junctions was the primary property of interest.

  9. GaAs Nanowire Array Solar Cells with Axial p-i-n Junctions Maoqing Yao, Ningfeng Huang, Sen Cong, Chun-Yung Chi, M. Ashkan Seyedi, Yen-Ting Lin, Yu Cao,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    for future low-cost, high-efficiency photovoltaics. KEYWORDS: Nanowires, solar cells, gallium arsenide, axial.58% efficiency. Simulations show that axial junctions are more tolerant to doping variation than radial junctions and shallow junctions are essential for a high extraction efficiency. Our approach opens up great opportunity

  10. Short-time OD matrix estimation for a complex junction using Fuzzy-Timed High-Level Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Short-time OD matrix estimation for a complex junction using Fuzzy-Timed High-Level Petri Nets cedex, France, E-mail: krystyna.biletska@utc.fr (corresponding author) Abstract--The OD matrix systems. A new dynamic two-steps method is proposed to estimate such an OD matrix. First, a vehicle

  11. Rapid and reversible reduction of junctional permeability in cells infected with a temperature-sensitive mutant of avian sarcoma virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael M. Atkinson; A. S. Menko; Ross G. Johnson; J R Sheppard; Judson D. Sheridan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT The transformed or normal phenotype of cultured normal rat kidney cells infected with a temperature-sensitive mutant of avian sarcoma virus is conditional on the temperature at which the cells are grown. Using dye injection techniques, we show that junction-mediated dye transfer is also temperature-sensitive. The extent and rate of transfer between infected cells grown at the transformation-permissive temperature (35 ° C) is significantly reduced when compared to infected cells grown at the nonpermissive temperature (40.5 ° C) or uninfected cells grown at either temperature. Infected cells subjected to reciprocal temperature shifts express rapid and reversible alterations of dye transfer capacities, with responses evident by 15 min and completed by 60 min for temperature shifts in either direction. These results suggest that altered junctional capacities may be fundamental to the expression of the ASV-induced, transformed phenotype. Most cells possess permeable junctions which connect the interiors of adjacent cells and allow the direct exchange oflow molecular weight substances (for review, see references 1-3). When present, such junctions provide the capacity for direct electrical communication between electrically excitable cells

  12. Junction temperature, spectral shift, and efficiency in GaInN-based blue and green light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    Keywords: GaInN/GaN Light emitting diode temperature Micro-Raman Photoluminescence Electroluminescence well light emitting diode (LED) dies is analyzed by micro-Raman, photoluminescence, cathodoluminescenceJunction temperature, spectral shift, and efficiency in GaInN-based blue and green light emitting

  13. High efficiency single Ag nanowire/p-GaN substrate Schottky junction-based ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.; Hasan, T.; Li, X.; Xu, P.; Wang, Y.; Shen, X.; Liu, X.; Yang, Q.

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a high efficiency single Ag nanowire (NW)/p-GaN substrate Schottky junction-based ultraviolet light emitting diode (UV-LED). The device demonstrates deep UV free exciton electroluminescence at 362.5?nm. The dominant emission, detectable...

  14. Calcium niobate nanosheets as a novel electron transport material for solution-processed multi-junction polymer solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterloh, Frank

    from a common solvent. Nanoscale interpenetrating networks are formed as the donor and acceptor phase-junction polymer solar cells Lilian Chang,a Michael A. Holmes,b Mollie Waller,b Frank E. Osterlohb and Adam J-processed tandem polymer solar cells are demonstrated using stacked perovskite, (TBA,H) Ca2Nb3O10 (CNO

  15. The lid wiper and muco-cutaneous junction anatomy of the human eyelid margins: an in vivo confocal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Ron

    The lid wiper and muco-cutaneous junction anatomy of the human eyelid margins: an in vivo confocal thickness (lid wiper). This continued for 0.3­1.5 mm and formed a slope. The MCJ and lid wiper extended all border has distinct zones. Due to its location and morphology, the epithelial lip of the lid wiper

  16. Simulation assisted design of a gallium phosphide np photovoltaic junction Charles R. Allen, Jong-Hyeok Jeon , Jerry M. Woodall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    University, 1205 W State Street, West Lafayette, IN, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 27 February 2010 Keywords: Gallium phosphide Solar cell Multi-junction CPV Simulation a b s t r a c with measurements of the dark and light response. The light current was measured under an illumination of air mass

  17. Survey of Seeps and Springs within the Bureau of Land Management's Grand Junction Field Office Management Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Seeps and Springs within the Bureau of Land Management's Grand Junction Field Office Management Area (Mesa County, CO) Colorado Natural Heritage Program Colorado State University 8002 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-8002 #12;Survey of Seeps and Springs within the Bureau of Land

  18. Survey of Seeps and Springs within the Bureau of Land Management's Grand Junction Field Office Management Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Seeps and Springs within the Bureau of Land Management's Grand Junction Field Office Management Area (Garfield County, CO) Colorado Natural Heritage Program College of Natural Resources, 254 General Services Building Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 #12;Survey of Seeps

  19. The benzene metabolite trans,trans-muconaldehyde blocks gap junction intercellular communication by cross-linking connexin43

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivedal, Edgar [Department of Cancer Prevention, Institute for Cancer Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: edgarr@rr-research.no; Leithe, Edward [Department of Cancer Prevention, Institute for Cancer Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway)

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Benzene is used at large volumes in many different human activities. Hematotoxicity and cancer-causation as a result of benzene exposure was recognized many years ago, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Aberrant regulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) has been linked to both cancer induction and interference with normal hematopoietic development. We have previously suggested that inhibition of GJIC may play a role in benzene toxicity since benzene metabolites were found to block GJIC, the ring-opened trans,trans-muconaldehyde (MUC) being the most potent metabolite. In the present work we have studied the molecular mechanisms underlying the MUC-induced inhibition of gap junctional communication. We show that MUC induces cross-linking of the gap junction protein connexin43 and that this is likely to be responsible for the induced inhibition of GJIC, as well as the loss of connexin43 observed in Western blots. We also show that glutaraldehyde possesses similar effects as MUC, and we compare the effects to that of formaldehyde. The fact that glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde have been associated with induction of leukemia as well as disturbance of hematopoiesis, strengthens the possible link between the effect of MUC on gap junctions, and the toxic effects of benzene.

  20. Influence of magnetic electrodes thicknesses on the transport properties of magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuchet, Léa; Rodmacq, Bernard; Auffret, Stéphane; Sousa, Ricardo C.; Dieny, Bernard [SPINTEC, UMR 8191, CEA-INAC/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1/Grenoble-INP, 38054 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the bottom and top magnetic electrodes thicknesses on both perpendicular anisotropy and transport properties is studied in (Co/Pt)/Ta/CoFeB/MgO/FeCoB/Ta magnetic tunnel junctions. By carefully investigating the relative magnetic moment of the two electrodes as a function of their thicknesses, we identify and quantify the presence of magnetically dead layers, likely localized at the interfaces with Ta, that is, 0.33?nm for the bottom electrode and 0.60?nm for the top one. Critical thicknesses (spin-reorientation transitions) are determined as 1.60 and 1.65?nm for bottom and top electrodes, respectively. The tunnel magnetoresistance ratio reaches its maximum value, as soon as both effective (corrected from dead layer) electrode thicknesses exceed 0.6?nm.

  1. Three-terminal magnetic tunneling junction device with perpendicular anisotropy CoFeB sensing layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honjo, H., E-mail: hr-honjou@aist.go.jp; Nebashi, R.; Tokutome, K.; Miura, S.; Sakimura, N.; Sugibayashi, T. [Green Platform Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, Tsukuba (Japan); Fukami, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Murahata, M.; Kasai, N. [Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ishihara, K. [Smart Energy Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, Tsukuba (Japan); Ohno, H. [Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Laboratory for Nanoelectronics and Spintronics, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrated read and write characteristics of a three terminal memory device with a perpendicular anisotropy-free layer of a strip of [Co/Ni] and a low-switching perpendicular-anisotropy CoFeB/MgO sensing layer. This new design of the cell results in a small cell area. The switching magnetic field of the sensing layer can be decreased by changing sputtering gas for the Ta-cap from Ar to Kr. An electron energy-loss spectroscopy analysis of the cross-section of the magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) revealed that the boron content in CoFeB with a Kr-sputtered Ta-cap was smaller than that with an Ar-sputtered one. A change in resistance for the MTJ was observed that corresponded to the magnetic switching of the Co/Ni wire and its magnetoresistance ratio and critical current were 90% and 0.8?mA, respectively.

  2. Spin-orbit torque magnetization switching of a three-terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cubukcu, Murat; Boulle, Olivier; Drouard, Marc; Mihai Miron, Ioan; Gaudin, Gilles [SPINTEC, UMR 8191, CEA/CNRS/UJF/GINP, INAC, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Garello, Kevin; Onur Avci, Can; Gambardella, Pietro [Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Hönggerbergring 64, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Langer, Juergen; Ocker, Berthold [Singulus Technologies, Hanauer Landstr, 103, 63796 Kahl am Main (Germany)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the current-induced magnetization switching of a three-terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction by spin-orbit torque and its read-out using the tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. The device is composed of a perpendicular Ta/FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB stack on top of a Ta current line. The magnetization of the bottom FeCoB layer can be switched reproducibly by the injection of current pulses with density 5?×?10{sup 11}?A/m{sup 2} in the Ta layer in the presence of an in-plane bias magnetic field, leading to the full-scale change of the TMR signal. Our work demonstrates the proof of concept of a perpendicular spin-orbit torque magnetic memory cell.

  3. Controllable 0 ? ? transition in iron pnictide superconductor junctions with a spacer of strong ferromagnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S. Y.; Tao, Y. C., E-mail: yctao88@163.com; Ji, T. T.; Di, Y. S. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Hu, J. G. [Department of Physics, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China)

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the control of 0?? transition in Josephson junctions consisting of a highly spin-polarized ferromagnet coupled to two iron pnictide superconductors (SCs). It is shown that, a 0?? transition as a function of interband coupling strength is always exhibited, which can be experimentally used to discriminate the s{sub ±}-wave pairing symmetry in the iron pnictide SCs from the s{sub ++}-wave one in MgB{sub 2}. By tuning the doping level in the s{sub ±}-wave SCs, one can vary the interband coupling strength so as to obtain the controllable 0?? transition. This device may be realized with current technologies and has practical use in Cooper pair spintronics and quantum information.

  4. Investigation of photoelectrode redox polymer junctions. Technical report, 16 November-15 January 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, R.L.; Sammells, A.F.

    1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The n-CdS flatband potential in the solid-state cell n-CdS/Nafion 117 + redox species/Au was shifted progressively in a cathode directed upon the introduction of FeCp2, FeCp2 + Ru(bpy)3(2+) into the SPE. This cathodic shift was consistent with that for the oxidation potentials seen for Ru(bpy)3(2+) (E1/2 = 1.25V vs SCE) and FeCp2 (0.285V vs SCE) in acetonitrile. Such perturbations of semiconductor properties can be expected to form the basis of a detector technology when the semiconductor/SPE junction is exposed to selected chemical species.

  5. Tuning the thickness of electrochemically grafted layers in large area molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluteau, T.; Bessis, C.; Barraud, C., E-mail: clement.barraud@univ-paris-diderot.fr; Della Rocca, M. L.; Lafarge, P. [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, MPQ, UMR 7162, CNRS, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Martin, P.; Lacroix, J.-C. [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS, UMR 7086, CNRS, 15 rue J.-A. de Baïf, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the thickness, the surface roughness, and the transport properties of oligo(1-(2-bisthienyl)benzene) (BTB) thin films grafted on evaporated Au electrodes, thanks to a diazonium-based electro-reduction process. The thickness of the organic film is tuned by varying the number of electrochemical cycles during the growth process. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal the evolution of the thickness in the range of 2–27 nm. Its variation displays a linear dependence with the number of cycles followed by a saturation attributed to the insulating behavior of the organic films. Both ultrathin (2 nm) and thin (12 and 27 nm) large area BTB-based junctions have then been fabricated using standard CMOS processes and finally electrically characterized. The electronic responses are fully consistent with a tunneling barrier in case of ultrathin BTB film whereas a pronounced rectifying behavior is reported for thicker molecular films.

  6. Surface tension of multi-phase flow with multiple junctions governed by the variational principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shigeki Matsutani; Kota Nakano; Katsuhiko Shinjo

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore a computational model of an incompressible fluid with a multi-phase field in three-dimensional Euclidean space. By investigating an incompressible fluid with a two-phase field geometrically, we reformulate the expression of the surface tension for the two-phase field found by Lafaurie, Nardone, Scardovelli, Zaleski and Zanetti (J. Comp. Phys. \\vol{113} \\yr{1994} \\pages{134-147}) as a variational problem related to an infinite dimensional Lie group, the volume-preserving diffeomorphism. The variational principle to the action integral with the surface energy reproduces their Euler equation of the two-phase field with the surface tension. Since the surface energy of multiple interfaces even with singularities is not difficult to be evaluated in general and the variational formulation works for every action integral, the new formulation enables us to extend their expression to that of a multi-phase ($N$-phase, $N\\ge2$) flow and to obtain a novel Euler equation with the surface tension of the multi-phase field. The obtained Euler equation governs the equation of motion of the multi-phase field with different surface tension coefficients without any difficulties for the singularities at multiple junctions. In other words, we unify the theory of multi-phase fields which express low dimensional interface geometry and the theory of the incompressible fluid dynamics on the infinite dimensional geometry as a variational problem. We apply the equation to the contact angle problems at triple junctions. We computed the fluid dynamics for a two-phase field with a wall numerically and show the numerical computational results that for given surface tension coefficients, the contact angles are generated by the surface tension as results of balances of the kinematic energy and the surface energy.

  7. InGaP/GaAs Inverted Dual Junction Solar Cells For CPV Applications Using Metal-Backed Epitaxial Lift-Off

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauhuis, Gerard J.; Mulder, Peter; Haverkamp, Erik J.; Schermer, John J. [Applied Materials Science, IMM, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 625 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nash, Lee J.; Fulgoni, Dominic J. F.; Ballard, Ian M.; Duggan, Geoffrey [Circadian Solar Ltd, One Sovereign Court, Sir William Lyons Road, Coventry, CV4 7EZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The epitaxial lift-off (ELO) technique has been combined with inverted III-V PV cell epitaxial growth with the aim of employing thin film PV cells in HCPV systems. In a stepwise approach to the realization of an inverted triple junction on a MELO platform we have first grown a GaAs single junction PV cell to establish the basic layer release process and cell processing steps followed by the growth, fabrication and test of an inverted InGaP/GaAs dual junction structure.

  8. The U.S. Burning Plasma Program C.M. Greenfield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for burning plasma research ­ US Burning Plasma Organization (created 2005): currently 283 registered members

  9. Hawaii energy strategy project 2: Fossil energy review. Task 3 -- Greenfield options: Prospects for LNG use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breazeale, K. [ed.; Fesharaki, F.; Fridley, D.; Pezeshki, S.; Wu, K.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper begins with an overview of the Asia-Pacific LNG market, its major players, and the likely availability of LNG supplies in the region. The discussion then examines the possibilities for the economic supply of LNG to Hawaii, the potential Hawaiian market, and the viability of an LNG project on Oahu. This survey is far from a complete technical assessment or an actual engineering/feasibility study. The economics alone cannot justify LNG`s introduction. The debate may continue as to whether fuel diversification and environmental reasons can outweigh the higher costs. Several points are made. LNG is not a spot commodity. Switching to LNG in Hawaii would require a massive, long-term commitment and substantial investments. LNG supplies are growing very tight in the Asia-Pacific region. Some of the environmental benefits of LNG are not entirely relevant in Hawaii because Hawaii`s air quality is generally excellent. Any air quality benefits may be more than counterbalanced by the environmental hazards connected with large-scale coastal zone construction, and by the safety hazards of LNG carriers, pipelines, etc. Lastly, LNG is not suitable for all energy uses, and is likely to be entirely unsuitable for neighbor island energy needs.

  10. Building America Case Study: Conway Street Apartments, Greenfield, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While single-family, detached homes account for 63% of households (EIA 2009); multi-family homes account for a very large portion of that remaining housing stock, and this fraction is growing. Through recent research efforts, CARB has been evaluating strategies and technologies that can make dramatic improvements in energy performance in multi-family buildings

  11. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Rural Development Inc., Wisdom Way Solar Village, Greenfield, MA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEngines |New TechnologyNelsonWith design assistance

  12. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: New Insights for Improving the Designs of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance.

  13. Tip-contact related low-bias negative differential resistance and rectifying effects in benzene–porphyrin–benzene molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Jue-Fei [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Suzhou Vocational University, Suzhou 215104 (China); Zhou, Liping, E-mail: zhoulp@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: leigao@suda.edu.cn; Liu, Man; Yan, Qiang; Han, Qin; Gao, Lei, E-mail: zhoulp@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: leigao@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic transport properties of benzene–porphyrin–benzene (BPB) molecules coupled to gold (Au) electrodes were investigated. By successively removing the front-end Au atoms, several BPB junctions with different molecule-electrode contact symmetries were constructed. The calculated current–voltage (I–V) curves depended strongly on the contact configurations between the BPB molecules and the Au electrodes. In particular, a significant low-voltage negative differential resistance effect appeared at ?0.3 V in the junctions with pyramidal electrodes on both sides. Along with the breaking of this tip-contact symmetry, the low-bias negative differential resistance effect gradually disappeared. This tip-contact may be ideal for use in the design of future molecular devices because of its similarity with experimental processes.

  14. Multi-junction, monolithic solar cell using low-band-gap materials lattice matched to GaAs or Ge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO); Friedman, Daniel J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-junction, monolithic, photovoltaic solar cell device is provided for converting solar radiation to photocurrent and photovoltage with improved efficiency. The solar cell device comprises a plurality of semiconductor cells, i.e., active p/n junctions, connected in tandem and deposited on a substrate fabricated from GaAs or Ge. To increase efficiency, each semiconductor cell is fabricated from a crystalline material with a lattice constant substantially equivalent to the lattice constant of the substrate material. Additionally, the semiconductor cells are selected with appropriate band gaps to efficiently create photovoltage from a larger portion of the solar spectrum. In this regard, one semiconductor cell in each embodiment of the solar cell device has a band gap between that of Ge and GaAs. To achieve desired band gaps and lattice constants, the semiconductor cells may be fabricated from a number of materials including Ge, GaInP, GaAs, GaInAsP, GaInAsN, GaAsGe, BGaInAs, (GaAs)Ge, CuInSSe, CuAsSSe, and GaInAsNP. To further increase efficiency, the thickness of each semiconductor cell is controlled to match the photocurrent generated in each cell. To facilitate photocurrent flow, a plurality of tunnel junctions of low-resistivity material are included between each adjacent semiconductor cell. The conductivity or direction of photocurrent in the solar cell device may be selected by controlling the specific p-type or n-type characteristics for each active junction.

  15. Study of a-SiGe:H films and nip devices used in high efficiency triple junction solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    Study of a-SiGe:H films and n­i­p devices used in high efficiency triple junction solar cells and n­i­p solar cells for GeH4=Si2H6 ratio varying from 1.43 to 0. This results in a variation of band measurements on n­i­p solar cells with i-layer having different Ge content show that as Ge content increase

  16. Reconfigurable p-n junction diodes and the photovoltaic effect in exfoliated MoS{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutar, Surajit; Agnihotri, Pratik; Comfort, Everett; Ung Lee, Ji, E-mail: jlee1@albany.edu [The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE), SUNY at Albany, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K. [National Institute of Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba-city, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Realizing basic semiconductor devices such as p-n junctions are necessary for developing thin-film and optoelectronic technologies in emerging planar materials such as MoS{sub 2}. In this work, electrostatic doping by buried gates is used to study the electronic and optoelectronic properties of p-n junctions in exfoliated MoS{sub 2} flakes. Creating a controllable doping gradient across the device leads to the observation of the photovoltaic effect in monolayer and bilayer MoS{sub 2} flakes. For thicker flakes, strong ambipolar conduction enables realization of fully reconfigurable p-n junction diodes with rectifying current-voltage characteristics, and diode ideality factors as low as 1.6. The spectral response of the photovoltaic effect shows signatures of the predicted band gap transitions. For the first excitonic transition, a shift of >4{sub kB}T is observed between monolayer and bulk devices, indicating a thickness-dependence of the excitonic coulomb interaction.

  17. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the exterior land areas at the Grand Junction Projects Office facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility occupies approximately 56.4 acres (22.8 hectares) along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. The site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium-refining activities conducted by the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot-milling experiments conducted for the US Atomic Energy Commission`s (AEC`s) domestic uranium procurement program. The GJPO facility was the collection and assay point for AEC uranium and vanadium oxide purchases until the early 1970s. The DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program sponsored the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to remediate the facility lands, site improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor, Rust Geotech, was the Remedial Action Contractor for GJPORAP. The exterior land areas of the facility assessed as contaminated have been remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unrestricted use. Restoration of the aquifer will be accomplished through the natural flushing action of the aquifer during the next 50 to 80 years. The remediation of the DOE-GJPO facility buildings is ongoing and will be described in a separate report.

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1995 at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Environmental activities conducted at the GJPO facility during 1995 were associated with mixed-waste treatment, site remediation, off-site dose modeling, and radiological and nonradiological monitoring. As part of the GJPO Mixed-Waste Treatment Program, on-site treatability studies were conducted in 1995 that made use of pilot-scale evaporative-oxidation and thermal-desorption units and bench-scale stabilization. DOE-GJPO used some of its own mixed-waste as well as samples received from other DOE sites for these treatability studies. These studies are expected to conclude in 1996. Removal of radiologically contaminated materials from GJPO facility buildings was conducted under the provisions of the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Remediation activities included the removal of 394 metric tons of contaminated material from Buildings 18 and 28 and revegetation activities on the GJPO site; remediation was conducted in compliance with applicable permits.

  19. Lattice-Mismatched GaAs/InGaAs Two-Junction Solar Cells by Direct Wafer Bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanabe, K.; Aiken, D. J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Morral, A. F.; Atwater, H. A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct bonded interconnect between subcells of a lattice-mismatched III-V compound multijunction cell would enable dislocation-free active regions by confining the defect network needed for lattice mismatch accommodation to tunnel junction interfaces, while metamorphic growth inevitably results in less design flexibility and lower material quality than is desirable. The first direct-bond interconnected multijunction solar cell, a two-terminal monolithic GaAs/InGaAs two-junction solar cell, is reported and demonstrates viability of direct wafer bonding for solar cell applications. The tandem cell open-circuit voltage was approximately the sum of the subcell open-circuit voltages. This achievement shows direct bonding enables us to construct lattice-mismatched III-V multijunction solar cells and is extensible to an ultrahigh efficiency InGaP/GaAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs four-junction cell by bonding a GaAs-based lattice-matched InGaP/GaAs subcell and an InP-based lattice-matched InGaAsP/InGaAs subcell. The interfacial resistance experimentally obtained for bonded GaAs/InP smaller than 0.10 Ohm-cm{sup 2} would result in a negligible decrease in overall cell efficiency of {approx}0.02%, under 1-sun illumination.

  20. High-field electroluminescence in semiconductor tunnel junctions with a Mn-doped GaAs layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hai, Pham Nam [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-0033 (Japan); Yatsui, Takashi; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Tanaka, Masaaki [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nanophotonics Research Center, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated high-field electroluminescence (EL) in semiconductor tunnel junctions with a Mn-doped GaAs layer (here, referred to as GaAs:Mn). Besides the band-gap emission of GaAs, the EL spectra show visible light emissions with two peaks at 1.94?eV and 2.19?eV, which are caused by d-d transitions of the Mn atoms excited by hot electrons. The threshold voltages for band-gap and visible light EL in the tunnel junctions with a GaAs:Mn electrode are 1.3?V higher than those of GaAs:Mn excited by hot holes in reserve biased p{sup +}-n junctions, which is consistent with the hot carrier transport in the band profiles of these structures. Our EL results at room temperature show that the electron temperature in GaAs:Mn can be as high as ?700?K for a low input electrical power density of 0.4?W/cm{sup 2}, while the lattice temperature of the GaAs:Mn layer can be kept at 340?K.

  1. Simulation of neutron displacement damage in bipolar junction transistors using high-energy heavy ion beams.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Buller, Daniel L.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Fleming, Robert M; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic components such as bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) are damaged when they are exposed to radiation and, as a result, their performance can significantly degrade. In certain environments the radiation consists of short, high flux pulses of neutrons. Electronics components have traditionally been tested against short neutron pulses in pulsed nuclear reactors. These reactors are becoming less and less available; many of them were shut down permanently in the past few years. Therefore, new methods using radiation sources other than pulsed nuclear reactors needed to be developed. Neutrons affect semiconductors such as Si by causing atomic displacements of Si atoms. The recoiled Si atom creates a collision cascade which leads to displacements in Si. Since heavy ions create similar cascades in Si we can use them to create similar damage to what neutrons create. This LDRD successfully developed a new technique using easily available particle accelerators to provide an alternative to pulsed nuclear reactors to study the displacement damage and subsequent transient annealing that occurs in various transistor devices and potentially qualify them against radiation effects caused by pulsed neutrons.

  2. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  3. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  4. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, Alex Blair (San Jose, CA); Ballas, Gary J. (San Jose, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

  5. Plasma Separation Process: Betacell (BCELL) code: User's manual. [Bipolar barrier junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1987-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of clearly defined applications for (small or large) amounts of long-life and reliable power sources has given the design and production of betavoltaic systems a new life. Moreover, because of the availability of the plasma separation program, (PSP) at TRW, it is now possible to separate the most desirable radioisotopes for betacell power generating devices. A computer code, named BCELL, has been developed to model the betavoltaic concept by utilizing the available up-to-date source/cell parameters. In this program, attempts have been made to determine the betacell energy device maximum efficiency, degradation due to the emitting source radiation and source/cell lifetime power reduction processes. Additionally, comparison is made between the Schottky and PN junction devices for betacell battery design purposes. Certain computer code runs have been made to determine the JV distribution function and the upper limit of the betacell generated power for specified energy sources. A Ni beta emitting radioisotope was used for the energy source and certain semiconductors were used for the converter subsystem of the betacell system. Some results for a Promethium source are also given here for comparison. 16 refs.

  6. Nonlinear vs. bolometric radiation response and phonon thermal conductance in graphene-superconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vora, Heli; Nielsen, Bent; Du, Xu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene is a promising candidate for building fast and ultra-sensitive bolometric detectors due to its weak electron-phonon coupling and low heat capacity. In order to realize a practical graphene-based bolometer, several important issues, including the nature of radiation response, coupling efficiency to the radiation and the thermal conductance need to be carefully studied. Addressing these issues, we present graphene-superconductor junctions as a viable option to achieve efficient and sensitive bolometers, with the superconductor contacts serving as hot electron barriers. For a graphene-superconductor device with highly transparent interfaces, the resistance readout in the presence of radio frequency radiation is dominated by non-linear response. On the other hand, a graphene-superconductor tunnel device shows dominantly bolometric response to radiation. For graphene devices fabricated on SiO{sub 2} substrates, we confirm recent theoretical predictions of T{sup 2} temperature dependence of phonon thermal conductance in the presence of disorder in the graphene channel at low temperatures.

  7. Local dissipation effects in two-dimensional quantum Josephson junction arrays with a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polak, T.P.; Kopec, T.K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Institute for Low Temperatures and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, POB 1410, 50-950 Wroclaw 2 (Poland)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the quantum phase transitions in two-dimensional arrays of Josephson-couples junctions with short range Josephson couplings (given by the Josephson energy E{sub J}) and the charging energy E{sub C}. We map the problem onto the solvable quantum generalization of the spherical model that improves over the mean-field theory method. The arrays are placed on the top of a two-dimensional electron gas separated by an insulator. We include effects of the local dissipation in the presence of an external magnetic flux f={phi}/{phi}{sub 0} in square lattice for several rational fluxes f=0,(1/2),(1/3),(1/4), and (1/6). We also have examined the T=0 superconducting-insulator phase boundary as a function of a dissipation {alpha}{sub 0} for two different geometry of the lattice: square and triangular. We have found a critical value of the dissipation parameter independent on geometry of the lattice and presence magnetic field.

  8. Trial Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Deibert, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires), caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat', 'thermal-cycle', or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine 4 moisture-cured silicones, 4 foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 deg C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden, Miami, and Phoenix for 1 year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  9. Interplay between interband coupling and ferromagnetism in iron pnictide superconductor/ferromagnet/iron pnictide superconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S. Y.; Tao, Y. C., E-mail: yctao88@163.com [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Hu, J. G. [Department of Physics, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An extended eight-component Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation is applied to study the Josephson effect between iron-based superconductors (SCs) with s{sub ±}-wave pairing symmetry, separated by an ferromagnet (FM). The feature of damped oscillations of critical Josephson current as a function of FM thickness, the split of the peaks induced by the interband coupling is much different from that for the junction with the s{sub ±}-wave SCs replaced by s{sub ++}-wave ones. In particular, a 0?? transition as a function of interband coupling strength ? is found to always exhibit with the corresponding dip shifting toward the larger ? due to enhancing the spin polarization in the FM, while there exits no 0?? transition for the SC with s{sub ++}-wave pairing symmetry. The two features can be used to identify the pairing symmetry in the iron pnictide SC different from the s{sub ++}-wave one in MgB{sub 2}. Experimentally, by adjusting the doping level in the s{sub ±}-wave SCs, one can vary ?.

  10. GaSb based ternary and quaternary diffused junction devices for TPV applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaram, V.S.; Saban, S.B.; Morgan, M.D.; Horne, W.E.; Evans, B.D.; Ketterl, J.R. [EDTEK Inc. 7082 S. 220th Street Kent, Washington 98032 (United States); Morosini, M.B.; Patel, N.B. [Instituto de Fisica, UNICAMP, Campinas, Brasil (Brazil); Field, H. [NREL, Golden, Colorado (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we report the characteristics of ternary, GaInSb (Eg=0.70eV) and quarternary, GaInAsSb (Eg=0.5eV) diffused junction photovoltaic devices. The unique feature of the quarternary device is the extended long-wavelength response to 2.1 microns enabling the efficient use of the blackbody-like thermal sources operating at 1373 K in thermophotovoltaic energy conversion systems. The ternary device was fabricated by diffusing zinc into a n-type (100) oriented GaInSb substrate. For the quarternary, a four micron thick Te doped GaInAsSb layer grown by LPE on a n-type GaSb(100) wafer was used as the starting substrate for zinc diffusion. The ternary device exhibits an open circuit voltage of 0.38 V, Fill Factor of 0.63 and a short circuit current of 0.8A/cm{sup 2}, while the corresponding values for the quarternary device are 0.25 V, 0.58 and 0.8A/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The peak internal quantum efficiency for the ternary is over 90{percent} and that of the quarternary is above 75{percent}. Process optimization should improve the performance charcateristics of the quarternary. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. New Insights for Improving the Designs of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  12. Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney disposal site. The site is in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site may be licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Cheney disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete and the NRC formally accepts this plan. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure that the Cheney disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify potential threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

  13. InGaAsN/GaAs heterojunction for multi-junction solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Klem, John F. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Eric D. (Edgewood, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An InGaAsN/GaAs semiconductor p-n heterojunction is disclosed for use in forming a 0.95-1.2 eV bandgap photodetector with application for use in high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction is formed by epitaxially growing on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) or germanium (Ge) substrate an n-type indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN) layer having a semiconductor alloy composition In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As.sub.1-y N.sub.y with 070%.

  14. Magnetotransport in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrieu, S., E-mail: stephane.andrieu@univ-lorraine.fr; Bonell, F.; Hauet, T.; Montaigne, F. [Institut Jean Lamour, Nancy University/CNRS, Bd des Aiguillettes, BP239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Calmels, L.; Snoeck, E. [CEMES, CNRS and Toulouse University, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Lefevre, P.; Bertran, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL-CNRS, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong impact of molecular beam epitaxy growth and Synchrotron Radiation characterization tools in the understanding of fundamental issues in nanomagnetism and spintronics is illustrated through the example of fully epitaxial MgO-based Magnetic Tunnel Junctions (MTJs). If ab initio calculations predict very high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in such devices, some discrepancy between theory and experiments still exists. The influence of imperfections in real systems has thus to be considered like surface contaminations, structural defects, unexpected electronic states, etc. The influence of possible oxygen contamination at the Fe/MgO(001) interface is thus studied, and is shown to be not so detrimental to TMR as predicted by ab initio calculations. On the contrary, the decrease of dislocations density in the MgO barrier of MTJs using Fe{sub 1?x}V{sub x} electrodes is shown to significantly increase TMR. Finally, unexpected transport properties in Fe{sub 1?X}Co{sub x}/MgO/Fe{sub 1?X}Co{sub x} (001) are presented. With the help of spin and symmetry resolved photoemission and ab initio calculation, the TMR decrease for Co content higher than 25% is shown to come from the existence of an interface state and the shift of the empty ?1 minority spin state towards the Fermi level.

  15. Influence of hydrogen patterning gas on electric and magnetic properties of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, J. H., E-mail: juno@fris.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Semiconductor R and D Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Hwasung (Korea, Republic of); Endoh, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Center for Innovative Integrated Electronic Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Kim, Y.; Kim, W. K.; Park, S. O. [Semiconductor R and D Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Hwasung (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    To identify the degradation mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using hydrogen, the properties of the MTJs were measured by applying an additional hydrogen etch process and a hydrogen plasma process to the patterned MTJs. In these studies, an additional 50?s hydrogen etch process caused the magnetoresistance (MR) to decrease from 103% to 14.7% and the resistance (R) to increase from 6.5?k? to 39?k?. Moreover, an additional 500?s hydrogen plasma process decreased the MR from 103% to 74% and increased R from 6.5?k? to 13.9?k?. These results show that MTJs can be damaged by the hydrogen plasma process as well as by the hydrogen etch process, as the atomic bonds in MgO may break and react with the exposed hydrogen gas. Compounds such as MgO hydrate very easily. We also calculated the damaged layer width (DLW) of the patterned MTJs after the hydrogen etching and plasma processes, to evaluate the downscaling limitations of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random-access memory (STT-MRAM) devices. With these calculations, the maximum DLWs at each side of the MTJ, generated by the etching and plasma processes, were 23.8?nm and 12.8?nm, respectively. This result validates that the hydrogen-based MTJ patterning processes cannot be used exclusively in STT-MRAMs beyond 20?nm.

  16. Forest transitions and ecosystem services in Zimbabwe Supervisors: Dr Casey Ryan (UoE), Dr Isla Grundy (University of Zimbabwe)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest transitions and ecosystem services in Zimbabwe Supervisors: Dr Casey Ryan (UoE), Dr Isla and a variety of other ecosystem services. However the expansion of agricultural land and the curing of tobacco is accelerating deforestation and forest degradation rates. These structural changes to the ecosystem threaten

  17. Effect of CoFe insertion in Co{sub 2}MnSi/CoFe/n-GaAs junctions on spin injection properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebina, Yuya; Akiho, Takafumi; Liu, Hong-xi; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya, E-mail: uemura@ist.hokudai.ac.jp [Division of Electronics for Informatics, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0814 (Japan)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The CoFe thickness (t{sub CoFe}) dependence of spin injection efficiency was investigated for Co{sub 2}MnSi/CoFe/n-GaAs junctions. The ?V{sub NL}/I value, which is a measure of spin injection efficiency, strongly depended on t{sub CoFe}, where ?V{sub NL} is the amplitude of a nonlocal spin-valve signal, and I is an injection current. Importantly, the maximum value of ?V{sub NL}/I for a Co{sub 2}MnSi/CoFe/n-GaAs junction was one order of magnitude higher than that for a CoFe/n-GaAs junction, indicating that a Co{sub 2}MnSi electrode works as a highly polarized spin source. No clear spin signal, on the other hand, was observed for a Co{sub 2}MnSi/n-GaAs junction due to diffusion of Mn atoms into the GaAs channel. Secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the CoFe insertion effectively suppressed the diffusion of Mn into GaAs, resulting in improved spin injection properties compared with those for a Co{sub 2}MnSi/n-GaAs junction.

  18. Anomalous junctions characterized by Raman spectroscopy in Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1?x} nanowires with axially degraded components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Minggang, E-mail: xiamg@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Nanostructure and Physics Properties, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Han, Jinyun; Cheng, Zhaofang; Liang, Chunping; Zhang, Shengli [Laboratory of Nanostructure and Physics Properties, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization of junctions in nanowires by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with spherical aberration correction is tricky and tedious. Many disadvantages also exist, including rigorous sample preparation and structural damage inflicted by high-energy electrons. In this work, we present a simple, low-cost, and non-destructive Raman spectroscopy method of characterizing anomalous junctions in nanowires with axially degraded components. The Raman spectra of Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1?x} nanowires with axially degraded components are studied in detail using a confocal micro-Raman spectrometer. Three Raman peaks (?{sub Si–Si}?=?490?cm{sup ?1}, ?{sub Si–Ge}?=?400?cm{sup ?1}, and ?{sub Ge–Ge}?=?284?cm{sup ?1}) up-shift with increased Si content. This up-shift originates in the bond compression induced by a confined effect on the radial direction of nanowire. The anomalous junctions in Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1?x} nanowires with axially degraded components are then observed by Raman spectroscopy and verified by transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The anomalous junctions of Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1?x} nanowires with axially degraded components are due to the vortex flow of inlet SiH{sub 4} and GeH{sub 4} gas in their synthesis. The anomalous junctions can be used as raw materials for fabricating devices with special functions.

  19. Proposed Junction-Box Stress Test (Using an Added Weight) for Use During the Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. Furthermore, there are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the j-box adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to the preliminary results conducted using representative materials and components.

  20. Low-temperature magnetic characterization of optimum and etch-damaged in-plane magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kan, Jimmy J.; Gottwald, Matthias; Fullerton, Eric E. [Center for Magnetic Recording Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Center for Magnetic Recording Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Lee, Kangho; Kang, Seung H. [Advanced Technology, Qualcomm, Inc., San Diego, California 92121 (United States)] [Advanced Technology, Qualcomm, Inc., San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe low-temperature characterization of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) patterned by reactive ion etching for spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory. Magnetotransport measurements of typical MTJs show increasing tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and larger coercive fields as temperature is decreased down to 10 K. However, MTJs selected from the high-resistance population of an MTJ array exhibit stable intermediate magnetic states when measured at low temperature and show TMR roll-off below 100 K. These non-ideal low-temperature behaviors arise from edge damage during the etch process and can have negative impacts on thermal stability of the MTJs.

  1. Analysis of different tunneling mechanisms of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/AlGaAs tunnel junction light-emitting transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Cheng-Han [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chao-Hsin, E-mail: chaohsinwu@ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrical and optical characteristics of tunnel junction light-emitting transistors (TJLETs) with different indium mole fractions (x?=?5% and 2.5%) of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As base-collector tunnel junctions have been investigated. Two electron tunneling mechanisms (photon-assisted or direct tunneling) provide additional currents to electrical output and resupply holes back to the base region, resulting in the upward slope of I-V curves and enhanced optical output under forward-active operation. The larger direct tunneling probability and stronger Franz-Keldysh absorption for 5% TJLET lead to higher collector current slope and less optical intensity enhancement when base-collector junction is under reverse-biased.

  2. Heterocellular interaction enhances recruitment of {alpha} and {beta}-catenins and ZO-2 into functional gap-junction complexes and induces gap junction-dependant differentiation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talhouk, Rabih S. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, American University of Beirut, Beirut (Lebanon)], E-mail: rtalhouk@aub.edu.lb; Mroue, Rana; Mokalled, Mayssa; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Nehme, Ralda; Ismail, Ayman; Khalil, Antoine [Department of Biology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, American University of Beirut, Beirut (Lebanon); Zaatari, Mira [Department of Human Morphology, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut (Lebanon); El-Sabban, Marwan E. [Department of Human Morphology, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut (Lebanon)], E-mail: me00@aub.edu.lb

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gap junctions (GJ) are required for mammary epithelial differentiation. Using epithelial (SCp2) and myoepithelial-like (SCg6) mouse-derived mammary cells, the role of heterocellular interaction in assembly of GJ complexes and functional differentiation ({beta}-casein expression) was evaluated. Heterocellular interaction is critical for {beta}-casein expression, independent of exogenous basement membrane or cell anchoring substrata. Functional differentiation of SCp2, co-cultured with SCg6, is more sensitive to GJ inhibition relative to homocellular SCp2 cultures differentiated by exogenous basement membrane. Connexin (Cx)32 and Cx43 levels were not regulated across culture conditions; however, GJ functionality was enhanced under differentiation-permissive conditions. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated association of junctional complex components ({alpha}-catenin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-2) with Cx32 and Cx43, in differentiation conditions, and additionally with Cx30 in heterocellular cultures. Although {beta}-catenin did not shuttle between cadherin and GJ complexes, increased association between connexins and {beta}-catenin in heterocellular cultures was observed. This was concomitant with reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin, suggesting that differentiation in heterocellular cultures involves sequestration of {beta}-catenin in GJ complexes.

  3. Statistics and fluctuation theorem for boson and fermion transport through mesoscopic junctions Upendra Harbola,1 Massimiliano Esposito,1,2 and Shaul Mukamel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    Statistics and fluctuation theorem for boson and fermion transport through mesoscopic junctions; published 8 August 2007 The statistical properties of quantum particles moving between two heat reservoirs correction. Non-Poissonian transfer statistics bunching for bosons and antibunching for fermions are examined

  4. Heating-compensated constant-temperature tunneling measurements on stacks of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x intrinsic junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hu-Jong

    measurements on a stack of intrinsic junctions IJs in a high-bias range are often susceptible to self-heating one to get rid of spurious tunneling effects arising from the self-heating. © 2005 American Institute. The poor thermal conductivity of the Bi-2212 IJs, how- ever, is known to cause serious local self-heating

  5. Magnetic-field-induced control of breather dynamics in a single plaquette of Josephson junctions M. V. Fistul, S. Flach, and A. Benabdallah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flach, Sergej

    with electromagnetic oscillations manifest themselves by resonant current steps and voltage jumps in the current-voltage the Josephson current oscillations of two resistive junctions. By making use of the rotation wave approximation the voltage jumps in the current-voltage characteristics. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.65.046616 PACS number s : 74

  6. Comparison of junction temperature evaluations in a power IGBT module using an IR camera and three thermo-sensitive electrical parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and electrical methods. The main optical methods are local infrared sensors [3,4], optical fibers [5], infraredComparison of junction temperature evaluations in a power IGBT module using an IR camera and three information of the actual chip temperature distribution. In this paper, we propose to use infrared (IR

  7. The thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions can now be investigated with scanning tunnelling microscopy. Such experiments provide insights into charge transport in single

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    The thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions can now be investigated with scanning . They used a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to investigate thermoelectricity -- the voltage generated that thermoelectric measurements by STM provide a solution to this problem MOLECULAR ELECTRONICS Charges feel the heat

  8. Thin-film silicon triple-junction solar cell with 12.5% stable efficiency on innovative flat light-scattering substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psaltis, Demetri

    solar cells Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 221110 (2012) Error analysis for concentrated solar collectors JThin-film silicon triple-junction solar cell with 12.5% stable efficiency on innovative flat light of organic solar cells APL: Org. Electron. Photonics 5, 251 (2012) Effects of the Al cathode evaporation rate

  9. Surface photovoltage analyses of Cu(In,Ga)S2/CdS and Cu(In,Ga)S2/In2S3 photovoltaic junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterloh, Frank

    film photovoltaics. While the highest efficiency was achieved for low band-gap absorbers,1 wide bandSurface photovoltage analyses of Cu(In,Ga)S2/CdS and Cu(In,Ga)S2/In2S3 photovoltaic junctions S-Film and Nanotechnology for Photovoltaics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Schwarzschildstr. 3, D12489 Berlin-Adlershof, Germany

  10. Superconductlng InGaAs junction field...effect transistors with Nb electrodes A. W. Kleinsasser, T. N. Jackson, D. Mcinturff, F. Rammo, G. D. Pettit,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    is set by the normal coherence length ofthe semiconductor, and (2) the superconductor-semicon- ductorSuperconductlng InGaAs junction field...effect transistors with Nb electrodes A. W. Kleinsasser, T for publication 21 August 1989) We describe the design, fabrication, and characterization of superconducting 1n0

  11. Proposal for a second-generation, lattice matched, multiple junction Ga{sub 2}AsSb TPV converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, G.S. [Keithley Instruments, Solon Ohio (United States); Coutts, T.J.; Wanlass, M.W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado (United States)

    1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    First order device modeling is used to show that spontaneously ordered Ga{sub 2}AsSb may prove useful in the newly-active field of thermophotovoltaic power generation. Optimal band gaps for single-, double- and triple-junction III-V devices are presented for a range of blackbody emitter temperatures (1000--2000 K), and it is shown that monolithic, current-matched devices may be constructed that are lattice-matched throughout the stack to an underlying InP substrate. Device efficiency, short-circuit current, fill factor, and open-circuit voltage calculations are presented. The power generation capabilities are expected to be substantial due to the proximity of the devices to the thermal radiators. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  12. Modeling of droplet breakup in a microfluidic T--shaped junction with a phase--field model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario De Menech

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A phase--field method is applied to the modeling of flow and breakup of droplets in a T--shaped junction in the hydrodynamic regime where capillary and viscous stresses dominate over inertial forces, which is characteristic of microfluidic devices. The transport equations are solved numerically in the three--dimensional geometry, and the dependence of the droplet breakup on the flow rates, surface tension and viscosities of the two components is investigated in detail. The model reproduces quite accurately the phase diagram observed in experiments performed with immiscible fluids. The critical capillary number for droplet breakup depends on the viscosity contrast, with a trend which is analogous to that observed for free isolated droplets in hyperbolic flow.

  13. Electronic transport transition at graphene/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??} junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Q. J.; Wang, H. S. [School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China) [School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Wang, H. M., E-mail: hmwang@mail.sim.ac.cn; Gao, B.; Li, Q.; Xie, X. M. [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Deng, L. W.; Hu, Z. W. [School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)] [School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the fabrication of graphene/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??} contacts and their superconducting proximity effect. Both the temperature dependence of resistance and the current bias dependence of resistance for the contacts are investigated, respectively. The results are compared with that of pure YBCO Hall bar. It is found that the differential resistance transits from a non-zero value to zero at high bias across graphene/YBCO junction below the transition temperature of YBCO, the phenomena indicate the tunneling of Cooper pairs from YBCO to graphene. As the YBCO film deposited by pulsed laser deposition has a rough surface, the graphene layer can contact with the edge of CuO{sub 2} planes. It allows that Cooper pairs could leak into graphene along the CuO{sub 2} planes.

  14. Boron diffusion in magnetic tunnel junctions with MgO (001) barriers and CoFeB electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt, H.; Rode, K.; Oguz, K.; Coey, J. M. D. [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Boese, M.; Faulkner, C. C. [Advanced Microscopy Laboratory, CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Boron diffusion out of the CoFeB layers in model systems with thick CoFeB and MgO layers grown by radiofrequency sputtering or electron-beam evaporation and in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is probed after annealing by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Successive interfaces are exposed by ion milling the stacks, layer by layer, in the XPS system. Despite the presence of thick CoFeB and a high annealing temperature of 400 deg. C, we found no boron in the MgO or at the MgO/CoFe interfaces. Similar results are also obtained in the MTJs.

  15. Tunneling processes in asymmetric double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with a thin top MgO layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, D. L.; Feng, J. F. [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Yu, G. Q.; Guo, P.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F., E-mail: xfhan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Chen, J. Y.; Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic conductance dI/dV and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) d{sup 2}I/dV{sup 2} have been measured at different temperatures for double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with a thin top MgO layer. The resistance in the antiparallel state exhibits a normal tunnel-like behavior, while the resistance in the parallel state shows metallic-like transport, indicating the presence of pinholes in the thin top MgO layer. Three IETS peaks are the zero-bias anomaly, interface magnons, and barrier phonons in both the parallel and antiparallel states. The zero-bias anomaly is the strongest peak in the parallel state and its intensity decreases with temperature. The magnon has the largest intensity in the antiparallel state and its intensity also decreases with temperature. The origins of the dips and peaks in the dI/dV-V curve are also discussed.

  16. Very low 1/f barrier noise in sputtered MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with high tunneling magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, J. F.; Chen, J. Y.; Kurt, H.; Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Low frequency 1/f barrier noise has been investigated in sputtered MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a tunneling magnetoresistance ratio of up to 330% at room temperature. The lowest normalized noise parameter {alpha} of the tunnel barrier reaches 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12}-2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} {mu}m{sup 2}, which is comparable to that found in MTJs with the MgO barrier grown by MBE or electron-beam evaporation. This normalized barrier noise is almost bias independent in the voltage range of up to {+-}1.2 V. The low noise level and high voltage stability may reflect the high quality of the sputtered MgO with a uniform distribution of defects in the MgO layer.

  17. Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Using Intrafractional Junction Shifts and Field-in-Field Dose Shaping: Early Experience at Methodist Hospital

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: msouth@tmhs.org; Chiu, J. Kam; Teh, Bin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Bloch, Charles [Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Schroeder, Thomas M. [Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Paulino, Arnold C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To describe our preliminary experience with supine craniospinal irradiation. The advantages of the supine position for craniospinal irradiation include patient comfort, easier access to maintain an airway for anesthesia, and reduced variability of the head tilt in the face mask. Methods and Materials: The cranial fields were treated with near lateral fields and a table angle to match their divergence to the superior edge of the spinal field. The collimator was rotated to match the divergence from the superior spinal field. The spinal fields were treated using a source to surface distance (SSD) technique with the couch top at 100 cm. When a second spinal field was required, the table and collimator were rotated 90{sup o} to allow for the use of the multileaf collimator and so the gantry could be rotated to match the divergence of the superior spinal field. The multileaf collimator was used for daily dynamic featherings and field-in-field dose control. Results: With a median follow-up of 20.2 months, five documented failures and no cases of radiation myelitis occurred in 23 consecutive patients. No failures occurred in the junctions of the spine-spine or brain-spine fields. Two failures occurred in the primary site alone, two in the spinal axis alone, and one primary site failure plus distant metastasis. The median time to recurrence was 17 months. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that supine approach for delivering craniospinal irradiation is not associated with increased relapses at the field junctions. To date, no cases of radiation myelitis have developed.

  18. Infrared detection with high-{Tc} bolometers and response of Nb tunnel junctions to picosecond voltage pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verghese, S.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxide superconductors with high critical temperature {Tc} make sensitive thermometers for several types of infrared bolometers. The authors built composite bolometers with YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} thermometers on sapphire substrates which have higher sensitivity than competing thermal detectors which operate at temperatures above 77 K. A 1 x 1 mm bolometer with gold black serving as the radiation absorber has useful sensitivity for wavelengths 20--100 {mu}m. A 3 x 3 mm bolometer with a bismuth film as the absorber operates from 20--100 {mu}m. High-{Tc} bolometers which are fabricated with micromachining techniques on membranes of Si or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} have potential application to large-format arrays which are used for infrared imaging. A nonisothermal high-{Tc} bolometer can be fabricated on a membrane of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) which is in thermal contact with the heat sink along the perimeter of the membrane. A thermal analysis indicates that the YSZ membrane bolometer can have improved sensitivity compared to the sapphire bolometer for spectrometer applications. The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) junction is highly nonlinear in the applied voltage. The authors have made the first measurement of the linear response of the quasiparticle current in a Nb/AlO{sub x}/Nb junction over a broad bandwidth from 75--200 GHz. Nonlinear measurements made with these pulses may provide information about the quasiparticle lifetime. Preliminary data from such measurements are presented.

  19. Room temperature magnetoresistance in CoFeB/SrTiO{sub 3}/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions deposited by ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassen, E. M. J. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, Grenoble (France); SPINTEC (UMR 8191 CEA-CNRS-UJF), CEA-INAC, 38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Viala, B.; Cyrille, M. C.; Cartier, M.; Redon, O. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, Grenoble (France); Lima, P. [SPTS, Process Technology Systems, Ringland Way, Newport (United Kingdom); Belhadji, B.; Yang, H. X.; Chshiev, M. [SPINTEC (UMR 8191 CEA-CNRS-UJF), CEA-INAC, 38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Velev, J. [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan 00931 (Puerto Rico)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Room temperature transport properties are reported in polycrystalline SrTiO{sub 3}-based magnetic tunnel junctions deposited by ion beam sputtering. The junctions comprise CoFeB electrodes and the SrTiO{sub 3} barrier with thickness varied between 0.9 and 1.9 nm. Resistance area product values between 3 {Omega}.{mu}m{sup 2} and 22 k{Omega}.{mu}m{sup 2} have been measured with a tunnel magnetoresistance ratio ranging from 3.1 to 13% at room temperature. At low barrier thickness (1.2 nm), ferromagnetic coupling between electrodes is observed, indicating the presence of defects in the structure. A post-oxidation step was found to improve transport properties at lower barrier thickness.

  20. Novel signal inversion of laser beam induced current for femtosecond-laser-drilling-induced junction on vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, W. C.; Wang, R.; Xu, Z. J.; Jiang, T. [College of Photoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China); Cheng, X. A., E-mail: xiang-ai-cheng@126.com [College of Photoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Computing, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China); Science and Technology on Electro-Optical Information Security Control Laboratory, Hebei 065201 (China)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, experimental results of temperature-dependent signal inversion of laser beam induced current (LBIC) for femtosecond-laser-drilling-induced junction on vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe are reported. LBIC characterization shows that the traps induced by femtosecond laser drilling are sensitive to temperature. Theoretical models for trap-related p-n junction transformation are proposed and demonstrated using numerical simulations. The simulations are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effects of traps and mixed conduction are possibly the main reasons that result in the novel signal inversion of LBIC microscope at room temperature. The research results provide a theoretical guide for practical applications of large-scale array HgCdTe infrared photovoltaic detectors formed by femtosecond laser drilling, which may act as a potential new method for fabricating HgCdTe photodiodes.

  1. Conductance enhancement due to interface magnons in electron-beam evaporated MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with CoFeB free layer deposited at different pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, P.; Yu, G. Q.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F., E-mail: jiafengfeng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: xfhan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, D. L.; Feng, J. F., E-mail: jiafengfeng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: xfhan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Kurt, H. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Department of Engineering Physics, Istanbul Medeniyet University, 34720 Istanbul (Turkey); Chen, J. Y.; Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-beam evaporated MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions have been fabricated with the CoFeB free layer deposited at Ar pressure from 1 to 4 mTorr, and their tunneling process has been studied as a function of temperature and bias voltage. By changing the growth pressure, the junction dynamic conductance dI/dV, inelastic electron tunneling spectrum d²I/dV², and tunneling magnetoresistance vary with temperature. Moreover, the low-energy magnon cutoff energy E{sub C} derived from the conductance versus temperature curve agrees with interface magnon energy obtained directly from the inelastic electron tunneling spectrum, which demonstrates that interface magnons are involved in the electron tunneling process, opening an additional conductance channel and thus enhancing the total conductance.

  2. Influence of growth and annealing conditions on low-frequency magnetic 1/f noise in MgO magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng Jiafeng; Diao Zhu; Kurt, Huseyin; Singh, A.; Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Stearrett, Ryan; Nowak, Edmund R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic 1/f noise is compared in magnetic tunnel junctions with electron-beam evaporated and sputtered MgO tunnel barriers in the annealing temperature range 350 - 425 Degree-Sign C. The variation of the magnetic noise parameter ({alpha}{sub mag}) of the reference layer with annealing temperature mainly reflects the variation of the pinning effect of the exchange-bias layer. A reduction in {alpha}{sub mag} with bias is associated with the bias dependence of the tunneling magnetoresistance. The related magnetic losses are parameterized by a phase lag {epsilon}, which is nearly independent of bias especially below 100 mV. The similar changes in magnetic noise with annealing temperature and barrier thickness for two types of MgO magnetic tunnel junctions indicate that the barrier layer quality does not affect the magnetic losses in the reference layer.

  3. Cubic AlGaN/GaN Hetero-Junction Field-Effect Transistors with Normally-on and Normally-off

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    Cubic AlGaN/GaN Hetero-Junction Field-Effect Transistors with Normally-on and Normally-effect transistors (HFETs) in GaN technology. HFET structures were fabricated of non-polar cubic AlGaN/GaN hetero insulation of 3C-SiC was realized by Ar+ implantation before c-AlGaN/GaN growth. HFETs with normally

  4. Edge electroluminescence of the effective silicon point-junction light-emitting diode in the temperature range 80-300 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emel'yanov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)], E-mail: Emelyanov@mail.ioffe.ru

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The edge electroluminescence spectra of silicon point-junction light-emitting diodes with a p-n junction area of 0.008 mm{sup 2} are studied at temperatures ranging from 80 to 300 K. Unprecedentedly high stability of the position of the spectral peak is observed at temperatures in the range between 130 and 300 K. The spectral characteristics of the light emitting diodes are studied at 80 K at different current densities up to 25 kA/cm{sup 2}. In contrast to the earlier reported data obtained at 300 K, the data obtained at 80 K do not show any noticeable Augerrecombination-related decrease in the quantum efficiency. From an analysis of the electroluminescence spectra at 80 K in a wide range of currents, it follows that radiative annihilation of free excitons is not a governing mechanism of electroluminescence in the entire emitting region in the base of the point-junction light-emitting diode at all currents used in the experiment.

  5. Temperature dependent junction capacitance-voltage characteristics of Ni embedded TiN/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si metal–insulator–semiconductor structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panda, J.; Nath, T. K., E-mail: tnath@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Chattopadhyay, S. [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Amity Institute of Nano Technology, Amity University, Sector-125, Noida, Uttar Pradesh 201313 (India)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents the junction capacitance–voltage characteristics of highly textured/epitaxial Ni nanoparticle embedded in TiN matrix (TiN(Ni)) metal-insulator-semiconductor TiN(Ni)/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si (100) heterojunction in the temperature range of 10–300?K. This heterojunction behaves as metal-semiconductor junction with unavoidable leakage through native oxide SiO{sub 2} layer. The clockwise hysteresis loop has been observed in the capacitance-voltage characteristics measured at various frequencies mainly due to presence of trap centers at the TiN(Ni)/SiO{sub 2} interface and these are temperature dependent. The spin-dependent trap charge effect at the interface influences the quadratic nature of the capacitance with magnetic field. The junction magnetocapacitance (JMC) is observed to be dependent on both temperature and frequency. The highest JMC of this heterojunction has been observed at 200?K at higher frequencies (100?kHz–1?MHz). It is found that there is not much effect of band structure modification under magnetic field causing the JMC.

  6. High Efficiency Narrow Gap and Tandem Junction Devices: Final Technical Report, 1 May 2002--31 October 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madan, A

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report uses a modified pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique that has been successfully developed to fabricate state-of-the-art nc-Si materials and devices. Specifically, we have achieved the following benchmarks: nc SiH device with an efficiency of 8% achieved at a deposition rate of {approx}1 A/s; nc SiH device with an efficiency of 7% achieved at a deposition rate of {approx}5 A/s; large-area technology developed using pulsed PECVD with uniformity of +/-5% over 25 cm x 35 cm; devices have been fabricated in the large-area system (part of Phase 3); an innovative stable four-terminal (4-T) tandem-junction device of h> 9% fabricated. (Note that the 4-T device was fabricated with existing technology base and with further development can reach stabilized h of 12%); and with improvement in Voc {approx} 650 mV, from the current value of 480 mV can lead to stable 4-T device with h>16%. Toward this objective, modified pulsed PECVD was developed where layer- by-layer modification of nc-SiH has been achieved. (Note that due to budget cuts at NREL, this project was curtailed by about one year.)

  7. Confirmatory radiological survey of the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project exterior portions, 1989-1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forbes, G.H.; Egidi, P.V.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this independent assessment was to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with an independent verification (IV) that the soil at the Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) complies with applicable DOE guidelines. Oak Ridge National Laboratory/ Environmental Technology Section (ORNL/ETS) which is also located at the GJPO, was assigned by DOE as the Independent Verification Contractor (IVC). The assessment included reviews of the decontamination and decommissioning plan, annual environmental monitoring reports, data in the pre- and post-remedial action reports, reassessment reports and IV surveys. Procedures and field methods used during the remediation were reviewed, commented on, and amended as needed. The IV surveys included beta-gamma and gamma radiation scans, soil sampling and analyses. Based on the data presented in the post-remedial action report and the results of the IV surveys, the remediation of the outdoor portions of the GJPO has achieved the objectives. Residual deposits of uranium contamination may exist under asphalt because the original characterization was not designed to identify uranium and subsequent investigations were limited. The IVC recommends that this be addressed with the additional remediation. The IVC is working with the remedial action contractor (RAC) to assure that final documentation WM be sufficient for certification. The IVC will address additional remediation of buildings, associated utilities, and groundwater in separate reports. Therefore, this is considered a partial verification.

  8. Work plan for phase 1A paleochannel studies at the Cheney disposal cell, Grand Junction, Colorado: Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document will serve as a Work Plan for continuing paleochannel characterization activities at the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado. Elevated levels of nitrate were encountered in ground water from two monitor wells installed in alluvial paleochannels near the Cheney disposal cell in 1994. This triggered a series of investigations (Phase 1) designed to determine the source of nitrate and other chemical constituents in ground water at the site. A comprehensive summary of the Phase 1 field investigations (limited to passive monitoring and modeling studies) conducted by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) and Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to date is provided in Section 2.0 of this document. Results of Phase 1 were inconclusive regarding the potential interaction between the disposal cell and the paleochannels, so additional Phase 1A investigations are planned. Recommendations for Phase 1A tasks and possible future activities are discussed in Section 3.0. Detailed information on the implementation of the proposed Phase 1A tasks appears in Section 4.0 and will provide the basis for Statements of Work (SOW) for each of these tasks. A detailed sampling plan is provided to ensure quality and a consistency with previous data collection efforts.

  9. Cadmium-free junction fabrication process for CuInSe.sub.2 thin film solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramanathan, Kannan V. (Lakewood, CA); Contreras, Miguel A. (Golden, CA); Bhattacharya, Raghu N. (Littleton, CA); Keane, James (Lakewood, CA); Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an economical, simple, dry and controllable semiconductor layer junction forming process to make cadmium free high efficiency photovoltaic cells having a first layer comprised primarily of copper indium diselenide having a thin doped copper indium diselenide n-type region, generated by thermal diffusion with a group II(b) element such as zinc, and a halide, such as chlorine, and a second layer comprised of a conventional zinc oxide bilayer. A photovoltaic device according the present invention includes a first thin film layer of semiconductor material formed primarily from copper indium diselenide. Doping of the copper indium diselenide with zinc chloride is accomplished using either a zinc chloride solution or a solid zinc chloride material. Thermal diffusion of zinc chloride into the copper indium diselenide upper region creates the thin n-type copper indium diselenide surface. A second thin film layer of semiconductor material comprising zinc oxide is then applied in two layers. The first layer comprises a thin layer of high resistivity zinc oxide. The second relatively thick layer of zinc oxide is doped to exhibit low resistivity.

  10. Trial-Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Deibert, S. L.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat,' 'thermal-cycle,' or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial-run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine four moisture-cured silicones, four foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 degrees C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden (CO), Miami (FL), and Phoenix (AZ) for one year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site.

  12. Comparative life-cycle energy payback analysis of multi-junction a-SiGe and nanocrystalline/a-Si modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, V.; Kim, H.

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the publicity of nanotechnologies in high tech industries including the photovoltaic sector, their life-cycle energy use and related environmental impacts are understood only to a limited degree as their production is mostly immature. We investigated the life-cycle energy implications of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV designs using a nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) bottom layer in the context of a comparative, prospective life-cycle analysis framework. Three R and D options using nc-Si bottom layer were evaluated and compared to the current triple-junction a-Si design, i.e., a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe. The life-cycle energy demand to deposit nc-Si was estimated from parametric analyses of film thickness, deposition rate, precursor gas usage, and power for generating gas plasma. We found that extended deposition time and increased gas usages associated to the relatively high thickness of nc-Si lead to a larger primary energy demand for the nc-Si bottom layer designs, than the current triple-junction a-Si. Assuming an 8% conversion efficiency, the energy payback time of those R and D designs will be 0.7-0.9 years, close to that of currently commercial triple-junction a-Si design, 0.8 years. Future scenario analyses show that if nc-Si film is deposited at a higher rate (i.e., 2-3 nm/s), and at the same time the conversion efficiency reaches 10%, the energy-payback time could drop by 30%.

  13. Global Structure of a Three-Way Junction in a Phi29 Packaging RNA Dimer Determined Using Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Tung, Chang-Shung; Sowa, Glenna; Hatmal, Ma'mon M.; Haworth, Ian S.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The condensation of bacteriophage phi29 genomic DNA into its preformed procapsid requires the DNA packaging motor, which is the strongest known biological motor. The packaging motor is an intricate ring-shaped protein/RNA complex, and its function requires an RNA component called packaging RNA (pRNA). Current structural information on pRNA is limited, which hinders studies of motor function. Here, we used site-directed spin labeling to map the conformation of a pRNA three-way junction that bridges binding sites for the motor ATPase and the procapsid. The studies were carried out on a pRNA dimer, which is the simplest ring-shaped pRNA complex and serves as a functional intermediate during motor assembly. Using a nucleotide-independent labeling scheme, stable nitroxide radicals were attached to eight specific pRNA sites without perturbing RNA folding and dimer formation, and a total of 17 internitroxide distances spanning the three-way junction were measured using Double Electron-Electron Resonance spectroscopy. The measured distances, together with steric chemical constraints, were used to select 3662 viable three-way junction models from a pool of 65 billion. The results reveal a similar conformation among the viable models, with two of the helices (HT and HL) adopting an acute bend. This is in contrast to a recently reported pRNA tetramer crystal structure, in which HT and HL stack onto each other linearly. The studies establish a new method for mapping global structures of complex RNA molecules, and provide information on pRNA conformation that aids investigations of phi29 packaging motor and developments of pRNA-based nanomedicine and nanomaterial.

  14. Origin of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode efficiency improvements using tunnel-junction-cascaded active regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piprek, Joachim, E-mail: piprek@nusod.org [NUSOD Institute LLC, P.O. Box 7204, Newark, Delaware 19714 (United States)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter investigates the efficiency enhancement achieved by tunnel junction insertion into the InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW) active region of blue light emitting diodes (LEDs). The peak quantum efficiency of such LED exceeds 100%, but the maximum wall-plug efficiency (WPE) hardly changes. However, due to the increased bias, the WPE peaks at much higher input power, i.e., the WPE droop is significantly delayed, and the output power is strongly enhanced. The main physical reason for this improvement lies in the non-uniform vertical carrier distribution typically observed within InGaN MQWs.

  15. Computed tomography image using sub-terahertz waves generated from a high-T{sub c} superconducting intrinsic Josephson junction oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwagi, T., E-mail: kashiwagi@ims.tsukuba.ac.jp; Minami, H.; Kadowaki, K. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba (Japan); Division of Materials Science, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Nakade, K.; Saiwai, Y.; Kitamura, T.; Watanabe, C.; Ishida, K.; Sekimoto, S.; Asanuma, K.; Yasui, T.; Shibano, Y. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba (Japan); Tsujimoto, M. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Wide Bandgap Materials Group, Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, Environment and Energy Materials Division, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Markovi?, B. [Faculty of Sciences, University of Montenegro, George Washington Str., 81000 Podgorica (Montenegro); Mirkovi?, J. [Faculty of Science, University of Montenegro, and CETI, Put Radomira Ivanovica, 81000 Podgorica (Montenegro); Klemm, R. A. [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816-2385 (United States)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A computed tomography (CT) imaging system using monochromatic sub-terahertz coherent electromagnetic waves generated from a device constructed from the intrinsic Josephson junctions in a single crystalline mesa structure of the high-T{sub c} superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+?} was developed and tested on three samples: Standing metallic rods supported by styrofoam, a dried plant (heart pea) containing seeds, and a plastic doll inside an egg shell. The images obtained strongly suggest that this CT imaging system may be useful for a variety of practical applications.

  16. Fermi-level depinning and contact resistance reduction in metal/n-Ge junctions by insertion of W-encapsulating Si cluster films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okada, Naoya [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Uchida, Noriyuki [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Kanayama, Toshihiko [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate Fermi-level depinning in metal/Ge junctions and a significant reduction of specific contact resistivity of n-Ge by inserting an ultra-thin semiconducting Si-rich W silicide film (WSi{sub n}, n?=?12–14) composed of W-encapsulating Si clusters. Dependence of the specific contact resistivity on the electron Schottky barrier height followed the ideal exponential relation for various contact metal species. This result indicates that the insertion of the WSi{sub n} film provides a negligible contribution to contact resistivity because its tunneling resistance is very low owing to the low offset of the conduction band edge of Ge.

  17. Photointercalating-semiconductor/solid-electrolyte junctions for storage and chemical detection. Phase 2. Final report, 1 October 1986-31 May 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1988-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this Phase II effort was to perform a scientific and technical characterization of photointercalating-semiconductor/solid-electrolyte junctions for photoelectrochemical energy storage, with emphasis being placed upon the Group IV dichalcogenides n-HfS/sub 2/ and n-ZrS/sub 2/ and their interface with solid polymer electrolytes. Also incorporated within the scope of this program was the application of insights gained towards novel approaches for chemical detection. Here, emphasis was placed upon surface acoustic wave (SAW) and multiple-reflecting optical-waveguide sensors for the reversible detection of SO/sub 2/.

  18. The gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Xie, Yuchao [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Farhood, Anwar [Department of Pathology, St. David's North Austin Medical Center, Austin, TX 78756 (United States); Vinken, Mathieu [Department of Toxicology, Center for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. Although many aspects of the mechanism are known, recent publications suggest that gap junctions composed of connexin32 function as critical intercellular communication channels which transfer cytotoxic mediators into neighboring hepatocytes and aggravate liver injury. However, these studies did not consider off-target effects of reagents used in these experiments, especially the gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate (2-APB). In order to assess the mechanisms of protection of 2-APB in vivo, male C56Bl/6 mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP to cause extensive liver injury. This injury was prevented when animals were co-treated with 20 mg/kg 2-APB and was attenuated when 2-APB was administered 1.5 h after APAP. However, the protection was completely lost when 2-APB was given 4–6 h after APAP. Measurement of protein adducts and c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation indicated that 2-APB reduced both protein binding and JNK activation, which correlated with hepatoprotection. Although some of the protection was due to the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that 2-APB directly inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. In addition, JNK activation induced by phorone and tert-butylhydroperoxide in vivo was inhibited by 2-APB. The effects against APAP toxicity in vivo were reproduced in primary cultured hepatocytes without use of DMSO and in the absence of functional gap junctions. We conclude that the protective effect of 2-APB was caused by inhibition of metabolic activation of APAP and inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway and not by blocking connexin32-based gap junctions. - Highlights: • 2-APB protected against APAP-induced liver injury in mice in vivo and in vitro • 2-APB protected by inhibiting APAP metabolic activation and JNK signaling pathway • DMSO inhibited APAP metabolic activation as the solvent of 2-APB • Off-target effects of connexin32 gene knock-out mice need to be considered.

  19. A study of the influence of boron diffusion sources on the material and electrical characteristics of silicon p-n junctions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Kuan-Chun Andrew

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is . he sheet resistance x. is the junc. ion dep. h. This average ccnductivity is then applied to Irvin's cu ve cr a p-+yoe Gaussian layer in silicon to obtain the surface concentration. Impurity Profile Incremental etching is a technique... for removing thin sections of silicon by a timed etch in a PNO -HF mixture (23). It is a relatively rough but quick technique to determine the impurity profile of a deep junction. A volume mixture of 2$ HF, 98fo HNO is experimentally determined to be best...

  20. On the effect of N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN built-in junctions in the n-GaN layer for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    On the effect of N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN/P-GaN/N- GaN built-in junctions in the n-GaN layer for InGaN/GaN: N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN (NPNPN-GaN) junctions embedded between the n-GaN region and multiple the performance of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) in this work. In the proposed architecture, each thin P-GaN

  1. Carbachol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage by down-regulating NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ying [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People's Republic of China (China)] [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People's Republic of China (China); Li, Jianguo, E-mail: 2010lijianguo@sina.cn [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People's Republic of China (China)] [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People's Republic of China (China)

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol ameliorated the lipopolysaccharide-induced ileal tight junction damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol prevented the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol exerted its beneficial effects in an {alpha}7 nicotinic receptor-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist that protects the intestines after trauma or burn injury. The present study determines the beneficial effects of carbachol and the mechanisms by which it ameliorates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg LPS. Results showed that the gut barrier permeability was reduced, the ultrastructural disruption of tight junctions (TJs) was prevented, the redistribution of zonula occludens-1 and claudin-2 proteins was partially reversed, and the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-{kappa}{beta}) and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) activation in the intestinal epithelium were suppressed after carbachol administration in LPS-exposed rats. Pretreatment with the {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7nAchR) antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin blocked the protective action of carbachol. These results suggested that carbachol treatment can protect LPS-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Carbachol exerts its beneficial effect on the amelioration of the TJ damage by inhibiting the NF-{kappa}{beta} and MLCK pathways in an {alpha}7nAchR-dependent manner.

  2. Structural and optical studies of GaN pn-junction with AlN buffer layer grown on Si (111) by RF plasma enhanced MBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusoff, Mohd Zaki Mohd; Hassan, Zainuriah; Woei, Chin Che; Hassan, Haslan Abu; Abdullah, Mat Johar [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang, Malaysia and Department of Applied Sciences Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) 13500 Permatang Pauh, Penang (Malaysia); Department of Applied Sciences Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) 13500 Permatang Pauh, Penang (Malaysia)

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN pn-junction grown on silicon substrates have been the focus in a number of recent reports and further effort is still necessary to improve its crystalline quality for practical applications. GaN has the high n-type background carrier concentration resulting from native defects commonly thought to be nitrogen vacancies. In this work, we present the growth of pn-junction of GaN on Si (111) substrate using RF plasma-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Both of the layers show uniformity with an average thickness of 0.709 {mu}m and 0.095 {mu}m for GaN and AlN layers, respectively. The XRD spectra indicate that no sign of cubic phase of GaN are found, so it is confirmed that the sample possessed hexagonal structure. It was found that all the allowed Raman optical phonon modes of GaN, i.e. the E2 (low), E1 (high) and A1 (LO) are clearly visible.

  3. [3] E. Harabetian and S. Osher, Stabilizing illposed problems vis the level set approach, preprint. [4] B. Merriman, J. Bence, and S. Osher, Motion of multiple junctions : A level set approach,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Tony F.

    . [4] B. Merriman, J. Bence, and S. Osher, Motion of multiple junctions : A level set approach, J. Comp of essentially nonoscillatory schemes i, J. Comp.Phys., 83 (1989), pp. 32--78. [10] M. Sussman, Ph.d thesis, UCLA of multiple junc­ tions and interfaces in 3­d and application to domain decomposition, Preprint. 32 #12; Let F

  4. 820 mV open-circuit voltages from Cu2O/CH3CN junctions Chengxiang Xiang, Gregory M. Kimball, Ronald L. Grimm, Bruce S. Brunschwig, Harry A. Atwater*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimball, Gregory

    couple, cuprous oxide yielded open- circuit voltage, Voc, values of 820 mV and short-circuit current-conversion efficiency of 1.5% was limited by solution absorption and optical reflection losses that reduced the short-circuit820 mV open-circuit voltages from Cu2O/CH3CN junctions Chengxiang Xiang, Gregory M. Kimball, Ronald

  5. 2. HIGH-LOv~ JUNCTION FORY_,\\'UO AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF AL-ALLOYED:'p+ JUNCT;[ONS FOR SSF SOLAR CELT.S As temperature rises en..!."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    . Luque formed. The deposited Al diss Instituto de Energia Solar {E.T,S,I.T,} phase composition given2. HIGH-LOv~ JUNCTION FORY_,\\'UO AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF AL-ALLOYED:§'p+ JUNCT;[ONS FOR SSF SOLAR+pp+ bifacial SSF solar cells are used to experimentally analyse the interphase in a similar way a 5i layer

  6. Modeling of electronic transport in GaN n-i-p junctions Laboratoire de Physique du Solide, Facults Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, Rue de Bruxelles 61,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Alexandre

    Modeling of electronic transport in GaN n-i-p junctions A. Mayera) Laboratoire de Physique du) We propose a model and an algorithm for computing the transport properties of GaN n-i-p devices as cold cathodes2,3 or thermoelectric coolers.4­8 For applications as electronic emitters, the idea

  7. Hexavalent chromium at low concentration alters Sertoli cell barrier and connexin 43 gap junction but not claudin-11 and N-cadherin in the rat seminiferous tubule culture model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carette, Diane [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Perrard, Marie-Hélène, E-mail: marie-helene.durand@ens-lyon.fr [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Prisant, Nadia [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Gilleron, Jérome; Pointis, Georges [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Segretain, Dominique [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Durand, Philippe [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Kallistem SAS Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to toxic metals, specifically those belonging to the nonessential group leads to human health defects and among them reprotoxic effects. The mechanisms by which these metals produce their negative effects on spermatogenesis have not been fully elucidated. By using the Durand's validated seminiferous tubule culture model, which mimics the in vivo situation, we recently reported that concentrations of hexavalent chromium, reported in the literature to be closed to that found in the blood circulation of men, increase the number of germ cell cytogenetic abnormalities. Since this metal is also known to affect cellular junctions, we investigated, in the present study, its potential influence on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins present at this level such as connexin 43, claudin-11 and N-cadherin. Cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers expressed the three junctional proteins and ZO-1 for at least 12 days. Exposure to low concentrations of chromium (10 ?g/l) increased the trans-epithelial resistance without major changes of claudin-11 and N-cadherin expressions but strongly delocalized the gap junction protein connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells. The possibility that the hexavalent chromium-induced alteration of connexin 43 indirectly mediates the effect of the toxic metal on the blood–testis barrier dynamic is postulated. - Highlights: ? Influence of Cr(VI) on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins ? Use of cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers ? Low concentrations of Cr(VI) (10 ?g/l) altered the trans-epithelial resistance. ? Cr(VI) did not alter claudin-11 and N-cadherin. ? Cr(VI) delocalized connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells.

  8. Magnetic tunnel junctions for magnetic field sensor by using CoFeB sensing layer capped with MgO film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takenaga, Takashi, E-mail: takenaga@leap.or.jp; Tsuzaki, Yosuke; Yoshida, Chikako; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Hatada, Akiyoshi; Nakabayashi, Masaaki; Iba, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Atsushi; Noshiro, Hideyuki; Tsunoda, Koji; Aoki, Masaki; Furukawa, Taisuke; Fukumoto, Hiroshi; Sugii, Toshihiro [Low-power Electronics Association and Project (LEAP), Tsukuba 305-8569 (Japan)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluated MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) for magnetic field sensors with spin-valve-type structures in the CoFeB sensing layer capped by an MgO film in order to obtain both top and bottom interfaces of MgO/CoFeB exhibiting interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Hysteresis of the CoFeB sensing layer in these MTJs annealed at 275?°C was suppressed at a thickness of the sensing layer below 1.2?nm by interfacial PMA. We confirmed that the CoFeB sensing layers capped with MgO suppress the thickness dependences of both the magnetoresistance ratio and the magnetic behaviors of the CoFeB sensing layer more than that of the MTJ with a Ta capping layer. MgO-based MTJs with MgO capping layers can improve the controllability of the characteristics for magnetic field sensors.

  9. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office to Non-DOE Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this environmental assessment (EA) is to analyze the potential consequences of the Proposed Action on human health and the environment. Accordingly, this EA contains an introduction to the site and the history of the Grand Junction Office (Chapter One), a description of the Purpose and Need for Agency Action (Chapter Two), a description of the Proposed Action and Alternatives (Chapter Three), and the description of the Affected Environment and the Environmental Consequences (Chapter Four). Resource categories addressed in this EA include geology, soils and topography, groundwater and surface water, floodplains and wetlands, land use and infrastructure, human health, ecological resources, cultural resources, air quality, noise, visual resources, solid and hazardous waste management, transportation, and socioeconomic and environmental justice.

  10. Site-specific analysis of the cobbly soils at the Grand Junction processing site. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a recent site-specific analysis to evaluate the necessity of a recommendation to install a slurry trench around the Grand Junction processing site. The following analysis addresses the cobbly nature of the site's radiologically contaminated foundation soil, reassesses the excavation depths based on bulk radionuclide concentrations, and presents data-based arguments that support the elimination of the initially proposed slurry trench. The slurry trench around the processing site was proposed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) to minimize the amount of water encountered during excavation. The initial depths of excavation developed during conceptual design, which indicated the need for a slurry wall, were reexamined as part of this analysis. This reanalysis, based on bulk concentrations of a cobbly subsoil, supports decreasing the original excavation depth, limiting the dewatering quantities to those which can be dissipated by normal construction activities. This eliminates the need for a slurry trench andseparate water treatment prior to permitted discharge.

  11. Commercialization of New Lattice-Matched Multi-Junction Solar Cells Based on Dilute Nitrides: July 8, 2010 - March 7, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herb, J.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Technical Progress Report for PV Incubator subcontract NAT-0-99013-03. The overall objective of this Incubator subcontract was to complete the work necessary to make commercial ready solar cells using the dilute nitride technology. The specific objectives of this program were aimed at completing the development of a triple-junction solar cell that incorporates a GaInNAs {approx}1eV subcell to the point of commercial readiness, and determining the cell reliability and, if necessary, identifying and eliminating process or material related issues that lead to early-life cell failures. There were three major objectives for Phase 1, each of which focuses on a key element of the solar cell that determines its performance in a commercial CPV system. One objective was to optimize the quality and performance of the key individual components making up the solar cell structure and then to optimize the integration of these components into a complete triple-junction cell. A second objective was to design and test anti-reflective coating that maximizes the light coupled into a 3J cell with a {approx}1 eV bottom cell bandgap. The third objective was to develop Highly Accelerated Life Tests (HALT) protocols and tools for identifying and correcting potential reliability problems. The Phase 2 objectives were a continuation of the work begun in Phase 1 but aimed at optimizing cell performance for commercial requirements. Phase 2 had four primary objectives: (1) develop a glass-matched anti-reflective coating (ARC) and optimize the cell/ARC to give good performance at 60C operating temperature, (2) optimize the cell for good operation at 60C and high concentration, and (3) complete the light biased HALT system and use it to determine what, if any, failures are observed, and (4) determine the reliability limits of the optimized cell.

  12. Remedial actions at the former Climax Uranium Company, Uranium Mill site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. Volume 1, Text: Final environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This statement evaluates and compares the environmental impacts associated with the remedial actions of the residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site and associated vicinity properties at Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. This statement is also intended to aid the BLM in amending their management framework plans and final resource management plan, as well as assisting in compliance with the withdrawal application as appropriate. The site is a 114-acre tract of private and state owned land which contains approximately 3.1 million cubic yards of tailings and associated contaminated soils. The vicinity properties are homes, businesses, public buildings, and vacant lots which may have been contaminated during construction by the use of tailings as building material. An estimated 3465 vicinity properties would be cleaned up during remedial action of the tailings pile. The tailings were produced by the former Climax Uranium Company which processed uranium ore, which it sold to the US Atomic Energy Commission from 1951 to 1966 and to private sources from 1966 to 1970. This statement evaluates six alternatives for stabilization and disposal of the tailings and other contaminated materials: (1) No action. (2) Stabilization at the Grand Junction site. (3) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with truck transport. (4) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with train and truck transport. (5) Disposal at the Two Road site with truck transport. (6) Disposal at the Two Road site with train and truck transport. All of the alternatives except no action include remedial action at an estimated 3465 vicinity properties. Alternative 3 is DOE`s preferred alternative.

  13. Special Publication 800-72 Sponsored by the Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grance from NIST, Karen Kent from Booz-Allen-Hamilton, Barry Grundy from NASA ­ Office of Inspector

  14. InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode with a polarization tunnel junction Zi-Hui Zhang, Swee Tiam Tan, Zabu Kyaw, Yun Ji, Wei Liu et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode with a polarization tunnel junction Zi-Hui Zhang, Swee Tiam Tan of AIP content is subject to the terms at: http://apl.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;InGaN/GaN; accepted 29 April 2013; published online 15 May 2013) We report InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LED

  15. Back-junction back-contact n-type silicon solar cell with diffused boron emitter locally blocked by implanted phosphorus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Müller, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.mueller@ise.fraunhofer.de; Schrof, Julian; Reichel, Christian; Benick, Jan; Hermle, Martin [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstrasse 2, Freiburg D-79110 (Germany)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The highest energy conversion efficiencies in the field of silicon-based photovoltaics have been achieved with back-junction back-contact (BJBC) silicon solar cells by several companies and research groups. One of the most complex parts of this cell structure is the fabrication of the locally doped p- and n-type regions, both on the back side of the solar cell. In this work, we introduce a process sequence based on a synergistic use of ion implantation and furnace diffusion. This sequence enables the formation of all doped regions for a BJBC silicon solar cell in only three processing steps. We observed that implanted phosphorus can block the diffusion of boron atoms into the silicon substrate by nearly three orders of magnitude. Thus, locally implanted phosphorus can be used as an in-situ mask for a subsequent boron diffusion which simultaneously anneals the implanted phosphorus and forms the boron emitter. BJBC silicon solar cells produced with such an easy-to-fabricate process achieved conversion efficiencies of up to 21.7%. An open-circuit voltage of 674?mV and a fill factor of 80.6% prove that there is no significant recombination at the sharp transition between the highly doped emitter and the highly doped back surface field at the device level.

  16. Testing epitaxial Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Ge(001) electrodes in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neggache, A. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS 7198, Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre lès Nancy (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL-CNRS, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hauet, T.; Petit-Watelot, S.; Boulet, P.; Andrieu, S., E-mail: stephane.andrieu@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS 7198, Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre lès Nancy (France); Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Ohresser, P. [Synchrotron SOLEIL-CNRS, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Devolder, T. [Institut d'Electronique Fondamentale, CNRS, UMR 8622, 91405 Orsay (France); Mewes, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy/Center for Materials for Information Technology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Maat, S.; Childress, J. R. [San Jose Research Center, HGST, a Western Digital company, San Jose, California 95135 (United States)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of the full Heusler alloy Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Ge(001) (CFG) to be a Half-Metallic Magnetic (HMM) material is investigated. Epitaxial CFG(001) layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The results obtained using electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism are consistent with the full Heusler structure. The pseudo-gap in the minority spin density of state typical in HMM is examined using spin-resolved photoemission. Interestingly, the spin polarization found to be negative at E{sub F} in equimolar CoFe(001) is observed to shift to positive values when inserting Ge in CoFe. However, no pseudo-gap is found at the Fermi level, even if moderate magnetization and low Gilbert damping are observed as expected in HMM materials. Magneto-transport properties in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions using CFG electrodes are investigated via spin and symmetry resolved photoemission.

  17. Spin dependent transport properties of Mn-Ga/MgO/Mn-Ga magnetic tunnel junctions with metal(Mg, Co, Cr) insertion layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, S. H.; Tao, L. L.; Liu, D. P., E-mail: dpliu@iphy.ac.cn; Han, X. F., E-mail: xfhan@iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Lu, Y. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Nancy Université, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a first principles theoretical investigation of spin polarized quantum transport in Mn{sub 2}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 2}Ga and Mn{sub 3}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 3}Ga magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) with the consideration of metal(Mg, Co, Cr) insertion layer effect. By changing the concentration of Mn, our calculation shows a considerable disparity in transport properties: A tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of 852% was obtained for Mn{sub 2}Ga-based MTJs, however, only a 5% TMR ratio for Mn{sub 3}Ga-based MTJs. In addition, the influence of insertion layer has been considered in our calculation. We found the Co insertion layer can increase the TMR of Mn{sub 2}Ga-based MTJ to 904%; however, the Cr insertion layer can decrease the TMR by 668%; A negative TMR ratio can be obtained with Mg insertion layer. Our work gives a comprehensive understanding of the influence of different insertion layer in Mn-Ga based MTJs. It is proved that, due to the transmission can be modulated by the interfacial electronic structure of insertion, the magnetoresistance ratio of Mn{sub 2}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 2}Ga MTJ can be improved by inserting Co layer.

  18. Advanced natural gas-fired turbine system utilizing thermochemical recuperation and/or partial oxidation for electricity generation, greenfield and repowering applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance, economics and technical feasibility of heavy duty combustion turbine power systems incorporating two advanced power generation schemes have been estimated to assess the potential merits of these advanced technologies. The advanced technologies considered were: Thermochemical Recuperation (TCR), and Partial Oxidation (PO). The performance and economics of these advanced cycles are compared to conventional combustion turbine Simple-Cycles and Combined-Cycles. The objectives of the Westinghouse evaluation were to: (1) simulate TCR and PO power plant cycles, (2) evaluate TCR and PO cycle options and assess their performance potential and cost potential compared to conventional technologies, (3) identify the required modifications to the combustion turbine and the conventional power cycle components to utilize the TCR and PO technologies, (4) assess the technical feasibility of the TCR and PO cycles, (5) identify what development activities are required to bring the TCR and PO technologies to commercial readiness. Both advanced technologies involve the preprocessing of the turbine fuel to generate a low-thermal-value fuel gas, and neither technology requires advances in basic turbine technologies (e.g., combustion, airfoil materials, airfoil cooling). In TCR, the turbine fuel is reformed to a hydrogen-rich fuel gas by catalytic contact with steam, or with flue gas (steam and carbon dioxide), and the turbine exhaust gas provides the indirect energy required to conduct the endothermic reforming reactions. This reforming process improves the recuperative energy recovery of the cycle, and the delivery of the low-thermal-value fuel gas to the combustors potentially reduces the NO{sub x} emission and increases the combustor stability.

  19. Building America Case Study: Conway Street Apartments, Greenfield, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet), Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Future of CSP:Brookhaven TeachingCommunity-Scale Energy

  20. SMALLCAPACITANCE JOSEPHSON JUNCTIONS: ONEDIMENSIONAL ARRAYS AND SINGLE JUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    because a high­ impedance environment is necessary, and special care should be taken with the measurement be measured. Furthermore, one can design a JJ array in such a way that one of the important parameter in the theory, the Josephson coupling energy E J between adjacent islands can be tuned in situ [23, 24

  1. Interface magnetism of Co{sub 2}FeGe Heusler alloy layers and magnetoresistance of Co{sub 2}FeGe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, M. A., E-mail: mtanaka@nitech.ac.jp; Maezaki, D.; Ishii, T.; Okubo, A.; Mibu, K. [Department of Engineering Physics, Electronics and Mechanics, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8555 (Japan); Hiramatsu, R.; Ono, T. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The interface magnetism between Co{sub 2}FeGe Heusler alloy layers and MgO layers was investigated using {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Interface-sensitive samples, where the {sup 57}Fe isotope was used only for the interfacial atomic layer of the Co{sub 2}FeGe layer on the MgO layer, were prepared using atomically controlled alternate deposition. The {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra of the interface-sensitive samples at room temperature were found similar to those of the bulk-sensitive Co{sub 2}FeGe films in which the {sup 57}Fe isotope was distributed throughout the films. On the other hand, the tunnel magnetoresistance effect of magnetic tunnel junctions with Co{sub 2}FeGe layers as the ferromagnetic electrodes showed strong reduction at room temperature. These results indicate that the strong temperature dependence of the tunneling magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junctions using Heusler alloy electrodes cannot be attributed simply to the reduction of the magnetization at the interfaces between the Heusler alloy and insulator layers.

  2. Anisotropic elastic scattering of stripe/line-shaped scatters to two-dimensional electron gas: Model and illustrations in a nonpolar AlGaN/GaN hetero-junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinfeng, E-mail: jfzhang@xidian.edu.cn; Li, Yao; Yan, Ran; Nie, Yuhu; Zhang, Jincheng; Hao, Yue, E-mail: yhao@xidian.edu.cn [State Key Discipline Laboratory of Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Technologies, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi'an 710071 (China); Liu, Guipeng [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In a semiconductor hetero-junction, the stripe/line-shaped scatters located at the hetero-interface lead to the anisotropic transport of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The elastic scattering of infinitely long and uniform stripe/line-shaped scatters to 2DEG is theoretically investigated based on a general theory of anisotropic 2DEG transport [J. Schliemann and D. Loss, Phys. Rev. B 68(16), 165311 (2003)], and the resulting 2DEG mobility along the applied electrical field is modeled to be a function of the angle between the field and the scatters. The anisotropy of the scattering and the mobility originate in essence from that the stripe/line-shaped scatters act upon the injecting two-dimensional wave vector by changing only its component perpendicular to the scatters. Three related scattering mechanisms in a nonpolar AlGaN/GaN hetero-junction are discussed as illustrations, including the striated morphology caused interface roughness scattering, and the polarization induced line charge dipole scattering and the misfit dislocation scattering at the AlGaN/GaN interface. Different anisotropic behaviors of the mobility limited by these scattering mechanisms are demonstrated, but analysis shows that all of them are determined by the combined effects of the anisotropic bare scattering potential and the anisotropic dielectric response of the 2DEG.

  3. Cryogenic characterization of Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Keith Andrew

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryogenic characterization is a crucial part of understanding the behavior of low-temperature quantum electronics. Reliable device testing provides the feedback to fabrication process development, facilitating the rapid ...

  4. Solar Junction | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingapore Jump to: navigation, search Name:SGTJunction Jump

  5. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 Topological Insulators on GaAs (111) Substrates: A Potential Route to Fabricate Topological Insulator p-n Junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhaoquan Zeng; Timothy A. Morgan; Dongsheng Fan; Chen Li; Yusuke Hirono; Xian Hu; Yanfei Zhao; Joon Sue Lee; Zhiming M. Wang; Jian Wang; Shuiqing Yu; Michael E. Hawkridge; Mourad Benamara; Gregory J. Salamo

    2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    High quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 topological insulators films were epitaxially grown on GaAs (111) substrate using solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Their growth and behavior on both vicinal and non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrates were investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrate is better than a vicinal substrate to provide high quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 films. Hall and magnetoresistance measurements indicate that p type Sb2Te3 and n type Bi2Te3 topological insulator films can be directly grown on a GaAs (111) substrate, which may pave a way to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction on the same substrate, compatible with the fabrication process of present semiconductor optoelectronic devices.

  6. Software Engineering Craig A. Damon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damon, Craig A.

    ) greenfield vs. brownfield project features #12;Software EngineeringCIS4150-1 20 many roles contribute to s

  7. Trac ow modelling with junctions. Magali Mercier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Magali

    by the modelling of a roundabout, we are led to study the trac on a road with points of entry and exit rather to consider a roundabout as an innite road with points of entry and exit periodically distributed is such that between two points of entry and exit the trac is governed by the LWR model, so that the total density

  8. Analysis of Holliday junction-binding compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rideout, Marc Christoffer

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the effective isotope enrichment of several peptides usingconditions for the isotope enrichment can be found in theal. 2011)) and the C, N isotope enrichment strategy would be

  9. Josephson Junctions Fabricated by Focussed Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadfield, Robert Hugh

    ): Phil McBrien, James Ransley, David Moore, Ben Simons, Sam Benz, Paul Dresselhaus, Sasha Klushin, Alexey Ustinov, Simon Bending, Mac Beasley and John Martinis. The U.K. Engineering and Physical Sciences and Research Council (EPSRC) provided financial... not exceed 60,000 words. Robert Hadfield 21st October 2002 ii Foreword This thesis gives an account of work I have carried out since October 1999 as a Ph.D. student in the Device Materials group at the Department of Materials Science...

  10. Analysis of Holliday junction-binding compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rideout, Marc Christoffer

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. aureus G565 resistant (MRSA) a The Segall lab strainB. subtillis G565 S. aureus MRSA G748 G762 The Segall labresistant S. aureus ( MRSA). As seen in Table 2-5, the four

  11. Tandem junction amorphous semiconductor photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dalal, V.L.

    1983-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic stack comprising at least two p[sup +]i n[sup +] cells in optical series, said cells separated by a transparent ohmic contact layer(s), provides a long optical path for the absorption of photons while preserving the advantageous field-enhanced minority carrier collection arrangement characteristic of p[sup +]i n[sup +] cells. 3 figs.

  12. i/to Aberystwyth Spaghetti Junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chaniatâd Arolwg Ordnans ar ran Rheolwr Llyfrfa Ei Mawrhydi © Y Goron. Mae atgynhyrchu heb ganiatâd yn torri. This is a demanding route with some technical singletrack descents and long climbs. Parts are open and exposed, watch'n addas i'w ddefnyddio mewn unrhyw dywydd. Mae'n gwau ei ffordd drwy goedwigoedd coniffer, i lawr llethrau

  13. Measurement of Tunnel Junction Resistance during Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bland, Roger

    and wire­bonding of the device. Under the assumption that oxygen was diffusing through the electrodes, we, pumped with an oil diffusion pump. Throughout fabrication of the device, liquid nitrogen is circulated

  14. Grand Junction Office Founder Honored at the

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneral Guidance onGlennNEPAofUpdate Workshop4 Grand

  15. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office Edgemont LTSP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNew 1325.8. (8-89) EFO IO?-90) United

  16. Grand Junction, Colorado, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN551 - g 7 s %GrandD D&D

  17. Delta Junction Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05b NoCounty,Delaware: EnergyDelta

  18. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulators on GaAs (111) substrates: a potential route to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Zhaoquan; Morgan, Timothy A.; Li, Chen; Hirono, Yusuke; Hu, Xian; Hawkridge, Michael E.; Benamara, Mourad; Salamo, Gregory J. [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Material Sciences and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)] [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Material Sciences and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Fan, Dongsheng; Yu, Shuiqing [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Material Sciences and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States) [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Material Sciences and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Zhao, Yanfei [International Center for Quantum Materials, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China)] [International Center for Quantum Materials, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); Lee, Joon Sue [The Center for Nanoscale Science and Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)] [The Center for Nanoscale Science and Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wang, Jian [International Center for Quantum Materials, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China) [International Center for Quantum Materials, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); The Center for Nanoscale Science and Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wang, Zhiming M. [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Material Sciences and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States) [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Material Sciences and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Engineering Research Center for Semiconductor Integrated Technology, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High quality Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulators films were epitaxially grown on GaAs (111) substrate using solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Their growth and behavior on both vicinal and non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrates were investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrate is better than a vicinal substrate to provide high quality Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films. Hall and magnetoresistance measurements indicate that p type Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and n type Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulator films can be directly grown on a GaAs (111) substrate, which may pave a way to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction on the same substrate, compatible with the fabrication process of present semiconductor optoelectronic devices.

  19. The origins and limits of metalgraphene junction resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perebeinos, Vasili

    with a drain bias of 1 mV. The source­drain resistance (Rtotal) is plotted in Fig. 1a as a function of back resistance (Rtotal) between the source and drain in a graphene transistor is regarded as the combination and drain contacts are made from palladium/gold (25/25 nm). We first performed measurements at 300 K

  20. Method of junction formation for CIGS photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delahoy, Alan E. (Rocky Hill, NJ)

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur is used to improve the performance of CIGS devices prepared by the evaporation of a single source ZIS type compound to form a buffer layer on the CIGS. The sulfur may be evaporated, or contained in the ZIS type material, or both. Vacuum evaporation apparatus of many types useful in the practice of the invention are known in the art. Other methods of delivery, such as sputtering, or application of a thiourea solution, may be substituted for evaporation.

  1. Method of junction formation for CIGS photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delahoy, Alan E.

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur is used to improve the performance of CIGS devices prepared by the evaporation of a single source ZIS type compound to form a buffer layer on the CIGS. The sulfur may be evaporated, or contained in the ZIS type material, or both. Vacuum evaporation apparatus of many types useful in the practice of the invention are known in the art. Other methods of delivery, such as sputtering, or application of a thiourea solution, may be substituted for evaporation.

  2. Template Synthesis of Metal Nanowires Containing Monolayer Molecular Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -mercaptohexanoic acid were made by replication of the pores of 70 nm diameter polycarbonate track etch membranes such as molecular conduction, rectification, negative differential resistance, and configurable switching.4

  3. Josephson junctions defined by a nanoplough B. Irmer,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    of thin-film superconductors on semiconductor samples with nanometer resolution. In the more common atomic Dayem bridge or variable thickness with almost ideal Jo- sephson behavior.4,5 The main advantage

  4. High Current Analog Bipolar Junction Transistor Amplifier Integrated Circuit Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    . Thermal Modeling of Devices A. Determination of intrinsic device self-heating and thermal model algebra self-heating model development for discrete square and stripe devices d. Transition of thermal determination of thermal capacitance of discrete square and stripe devices c. Time dependent self-heating model

  5. Inelastic transport In molecular junctions from first principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sejoong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is dedicated to development of a first-principle approach to study electron-vibration interactions on quantum transport properties. In the first part we discuss a general implementation for inelastic transport ...

  6. Gap Junctions and Connexon Hemichannels in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huettner, James E.

    cells main- tained in vitro expressed RNA for 18 of the 20 known connexins; only connexin 40.1 (Cx40.1) and Cx50 were not detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reac- tion. Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45 communication that is observed in early embryos [3, 4]. More than 20 different connexin (Cx) subunits

  7. INTRODUCTION Gap junctions are intercellular protein channels formed by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Scott A.

    expressed in both HeLa transfectants (rat Cx26, rat Cx32 and mouse Cx45) and Xenopus oocytes (rat Cx26 and rat Cx32). In HeLa cells, we examined permeability to two fluorescent molecules: Lucifer Yellow (LY of the kinetics of fluorescent dye transfer showed Cx32, Cx26 and Cx45 to have progressively decreasing

  8. Amorphous silicon passivated contacts for diffused junction silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, J., E-mail: james.bullock@anu.edu.au; Yan, D.; Wan, Y.; Cuevas, A. [Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Demaurex, B.; Hessler-Wyser, A.; De Wolf, S. [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of micro engineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronic Laboratory, Maladière 71, CH-200 Neuchâtel (Switzerland)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Carrier recombination at the metal contacts is a major obstacle in the development of high-performance crystalline silicon homojunction solar cells. To address this issue, we insert thin intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon [a-Si:H(i)] passivating films between the dopant-diffused silicon surface and aluminum contacts. We find that with increasing a-Si:H(i) interlayer thickness (from 0 to 16?nm) the recombination loss at metal-contacted phosphorus (n{sup +}) and boron (p{sup +}) diffused surfaces decreases by factors of ?25 and ?10, respectively. Conversely, the contact resistivity increases in both cases before saturating to still acceptable values of ? 50 m? cm{sup 2} for n{sup +} and ?100 m? cm{sup 2} for p{sup +} surfaces. Carrier transport towards the contacts likely occurs by a combination of carrier tunneling and aluminum spiking through the a-Si:H(i) layer, as supported by scanning transmission electron microscopy–energy dispersive x-ray maps. We explain the superior contact selectivity obtained on n{sup +} surfaces by more favorable band offsets and capture cross section ratios of recombination centers at the c-Si/a-Si:H(i) interface.

  9. alter tight junction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extracts prepared under conditions which preserve protein associations Lylme A. Jesaitis; Daniel A. Goodenough 1994-01-01 25 ISCHEMIAREPERFUSION IMPAIRS BLOODBRAIN BARRIER FUNCTION...

  10. altered tight junction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extracts prepared under conditions which preserve protein associations Lylme A. Jesaitis; Daniel A. Goodenough 1994-01-01 25 ISCHEMIAREPERFUSION IMPAIRS BLOODBRAIN BARRIER FUNCTION...

  11. Noise-assisted Thouless pump in elastically deformable molecular junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. Perroni; F. Romeo; A. Nocera; V. Marigliano Ramaglia; R. Citro; V. Cataudella

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a Thouless pump realized with an elastically \\textit{deformable quantum dot} whose center of mass follows a non-linear stochastic dynamics. The interplay of noise, non-linear effects, dissipation and interaction with an external time-dependent driving on the pumped charge is fully analyzed. The results show that the quantum pumping mechanism not only is not destroyed by the force fluctuations, but it becomes stronger when the forcing signal frequency is tuned close to the resonance of the vibrational mode. The robustness of the quantum pump with temperature is also investigated and an exponential decay of the pumped charge is found when the coupling to the vibrational mode is present. Implications of our results for nano-electromechanical systems are also discussed.

  12. Spin Torques in Magnetic and Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Silas Eli

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insets show oscillations of voltage and phase as a functionInsets show oscillations of voltage and phase as a function

  13. Minigap in superconductor-ferromagnet junctions with inhomogeneous magnetization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    , Bruder, Schön: #12;Measuring the minigap Gupta, Crétinon, Moussy, Pannetier, Courtois, PRB 69, 104514: Champel, Eschrig, PRB 71, 220506(R) (2005): short-range triplet component M(r) is parallel to h ferromagnet Eg sf0 Crouzy, Bascones, Ivanov, PRB 72, 092501 (2005): #12;S 2L S F HS L F H 1) 2) Examples

  14. Experimental Studies of Oxide Magnetic Tunnel Junctions and Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xinfei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electron interaction in graphene. The central Nernst peak83, 6694 (1998). Chapter IV Introduction to Graphene IV-1Discovery of Graphene Carbon-based electronic materials have

  15. The planar X-junction flow: stability analysis and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lashgari, Iman; Tammisola, Outi; Citro, Vincenzo; Juniper, Matthew P.; Brandt, Luca

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    symmetric state to a steady asymmetric state via a pitchfork bifurcation. The core of this instability, whether defined by the structural sensitivity or the disturbance energy production, is at the edges of the recirculation bubbles, which are located... . The spatial map of this term is depicted in figure 5(c), and can be compared to the map of total energy production in 5(b). We observe that total energy production and energy production by the term uvdU/dy are almost identical in amplitude and shape, from...

  16. Geometric Phase in a Bose-Einstein Josephson Junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radha Balakrishnan; Mitaxi Mehta

    2003-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the geometric phase associated with the time evolution of the wave function of a Bose-Einstein condensate system in a double-well trap by using a model for tunneling between the wells. For a cyclic evolution, this phase is shown to be half the solid angle subtended by the evolution of a unit vector whose z component and azimuthal angle are given by the population difference and phase difference between the two condensates. For a non-cyclic evolution an additional phase term arises. We show that the geometric phase can also be obtained by mapping the tunneling equations onto the equations os a space curve. The importance of a geometric phase in the context of some recent experiments is pointed out.

  17. Microsoft Word - Wireless - Eagle Junction CX.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    B1.19 Siting, construction, and operation of microwave and radio communication towers and associated facilities... Location: Polk County, Oregon (Township 7 South, Range...

  18. Tuning the Thermal Properties of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, Vivek Pravin

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    magnetic field. This phenomenon potentially enables the controlled manipulation of temperature gradients, the recycling of wasted heat, and thermal spin-logic. Our calculations employ the Landauer-Buttiker scattering formalism, in conjunction...

  19. Solar Junction Develops World Record Setting Concentrated Photovoltaic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    equity investments. The Incubator program provides early-stage assistance to help startup companies cross technological barriers to commercialization while encouraging private...

  20. COULOMB BLOCKADED JOSEPHSON JUNCTION AS A NOISE DETECTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    : Theory: Levitov & Reznikov, cond-mat/011057 Beenakker et al., PRL 90, 1766802 (2003) Gutman & Gefen, PRB 68, 035302 (2003) Experiment: Reulet et al., PRL 91, 196001 (2003). Bomze et al. PRL 95, 176601 (2005

  1. Frustrated polyelectrolyte bundles and T=0 Josephson-junction arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grason, Gregory M; Bruinsma, R F

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRL 97, 027802 (2006) PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS week ending 14The American Physical Society PRL 97, 027802 (2006) PHYSICALup to a pure rotation). PRL 97, 027802 (2006) PHYSICAL

  2. Microwave-induced phase escape in a Josephson tunnel junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guozhu, Sun; Yiwen, Wang; Junyu, Cao; Jian, Chen; Zhengming, Ji; Lin, Kang; Weiwei, Xu; Yang, Yu; Han, Siyuan; Peiheng, Wu

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    capacitance and resistance, respectively. Ib is the bias current and I0 is the critical current. For Ib, slightly smaller than I0, the potential has a series of metastable wells with barrier height given by #5;U=2EJ(#5;1? #1;idc#2;2 ? idc cos?1#1;idc#2;). Here... decrease Ip, which can be written as4 ip = 1 ? #12;#15;ip#1;T#2; ? icrmw 2 #1;#8;r#2;/2 #1; #5;1 ? ip 2 ? #8;r 2 #2; 2 + #12;2#8;r 2 , #1;8#2; where #12;#15;ip#1;T#2; = #3;#1;kBT /2EJ#2;ln#1;#8;0I0 /2#7;I?b#2;#4;2/3 / I0 is the shift of ip due to thermal...

  3. Targeting the tight junction : immunotherapy of colon cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Margaret E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A33 is a cell surface glycoprotein of colon epithelium with a long clinical history as a target in antibody-based cancer therapy. Despite being present in normal colon, radio-labeled antibodies against A33 are selectively ...

  4. amplifies gap junction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    frequencies has become increasingly important for the research related to superconducting qubits and nanoelectromechanical systems. The fundamental limit of added noise by...

  5. atomic gold junction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atoms with opposite persistent currents. This system is closely analogous to the superconducting flux qubit. Single qubit quantum logic gates are performed by modulating the...

  6. Mapping Electrostatic Profiles Across Axial p-n Junctions in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about the electrically active dopant distributions in nanowire structures. Citation: Gan Z, DE Perea, J Yoo, ST Picraux, DJ Smith, and MR Mccartney.2013."Mapping Electrostatic...

  7. annular josephson junctions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of magnitude and the corresponding lifetime of about seven decades. R. Yamapi; G. Filatrella 2014-06-24 193 Observation of Josephson-vortex-flow submodes in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x...

  8. adherens junctions caused: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of an order of magnitude and the corresponding lifetime of about seven decades. R. Yamapi; G. Filatrella 2014-06-24 497 Deaths: Leading causes for 2001 CiteSeer Summary:...

  9. Controlling two-phase flow through pipe junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thonsgaard, Jonathan Eric

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industry with a study of gas networks that contain liquid condensate. His study was based on horizontal tees and gas flows with only a small liquid flow, which is considered a high quality mixture. He showed that when only a small fraction of gas enters... consisted of the same size pipe, so a direct comparison of this study's results to those of Hong was possible. Since the tee shown in Figure 6 was not constructed with a perfect fit, the three-way valve, shown in Figure 10, was used for some...

  10. DNA Gridiron Nanostructures Based on Four-Arm Junctions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTION ADMSE Electron Beam

  11. Essex Junction, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to:Escondido,Esopus,Fells,

  12. Solar Junction Develops World Record Setting Concentrated Photovoltaic

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepositoryManagement |Solar Energy Development inSolar FlareSolar

  13. LM Completes the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site Historical Wall Display |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732on ArmedManufacturingJune 17, 2015

  14. Phonon Bottleneck in Graphene-Based Josephson Junctions at Millikelvin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum Reserves Vision, Missionthe

  15. Phonon Bottleneck in Graphene-Based Josephson Junctions at Millikelvin

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than histone30518the dirty limit

  16. Lessons Learned: The Grand Junction Office Site Transfer to Private

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »of EnergyLearningMarch 2015 LessonsLearned:

  17. Pacific Junction, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York:Ozark,Pacific Gas & Electric

  18. Princeton Junction, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:Precourt Institute for EnergyWister AreaPrimePrince William

  19. NREL: Awards and Honors - Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNREL NREL RefinesAnalysis Software(PPS)Cell

  20. City of Grand Junction, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity ofCity ofCityCity ofGrand

  1. Grand Junction, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County, Kansas:GrahamBlanc,GrandIsland,

  2. Design of Flexible-Duct Junction Boxes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H I E L D *DepartmentTSDepartment3, 2015

  3. Apache Junction, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources JumpAnaconda,Anza Electric Coop Inc Jump

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Grand Junction Sites

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -Elk RiverFrederickAZ 03

  5. Coso Junction, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis AtSystems | OpenCorvallis,Coskata

  6. Heterojunction for Multi-Junction Solar Cells - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeatHenry Hurwitz,HermannPhotovoltaic

  7. High Efficiency Multiple-Junction Solar Cells - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartmentInnovation Portal 130221326|

  8. Biggs Junction, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark, Arizona: Energy ResourcesStoneinkBiggs

  9. White River Junction, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) ContributorRiver

  10. Grand Junction, Colorado, Processing Site and Disposal Sites Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN551 - g 7 s %Grand

  11. Phonon Bottleneck in Graphene-Based Josephson Junctions at Millikelvin

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,Speeding access to scienceSpeedingSpeedingOpticallyPhase

  12. VEE-0035- In the Matter of Rice Oil Company, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 22, 1996, Rice Oil Company, Inc. (Rice) of Greenfield, Massachusetts filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE)....

  13. Ac#vi#es of the US Burning Plasma Organiza#on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    =ons · USBPO ­ Coordinates US burning plasma research, to advance scien=fic understanding USBPO organizes the US Fusion Energy Science community to support burning plasma research 5 Charles Greenfield (Director) Amanda Hubbard (Deputy Director) Nermin

  14. CX-003711: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal ProjectCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 09/15/2010Location(s): Greenfield, MassachusettsOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  15. Experimental Design for Human-Robot Interaction with Assistive Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanco, Holly A.

    Experimental Design for Human-Robot Interaction with Assistive Technology Katherine M. Tsui Rehabilitation Center Assistive Technology Unit One Verney Drive Greenfield, NH 03047 david technology (AT), and human- robot interaction with assisitve technology (HRI-AT). To illustrate complexities

  16. Nutrient composition and sensory properties of prepared ground beef 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bravo-Gutierrez, Maria Leticia

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    content. . . . . . 39 Caloric content. 42 Lipid oxidation, Sensory evaluation. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION. Summary. Conclusion. . . REFERENCES. APPENDICES. . . . . APPENDIX 1. FLAVOR PROFILE PANEL - BEEF DESCRIPTORS, . APPENDIX 2. FLAVOR PROFILE...). Since dietary fat, especially saturated fat, and its caloric contribution to the diet seem to have a greater effect than dietary cholesterol on serum cholesterol and the risk for cardiovascular disease (Grundy, 1986), researchers have strived...

  17. In Proceedings of APSEC 2010 Cloud Workshop, Sydney, Australia, 30th An Analysis of The Cloud Computing Security Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grundy, John

    of The Cloud Computing Security Problem Mohamed Al Morsy, John Grundy and Ingo Müller Computer Science to adopt IT without upfront investment. Despite the potential gains achieved from the cloud computing solution. Keywords: cloud computing; cloud computing security; cloud computing security management. I

  18. GaAs, AlGaAs and InGaP Tunnel Junctions for Multi-Junction Solar Cells Under Concentration: Resistance Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeldon, Jeffrey F.; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Walker, Alex; Kolhatkar, Gitanja; Hall, Trevor J.; Hinzer, Karin [Centre for Research in Photonics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Masson, Denis; Riel, Bruno; Fafard, Simon [Cyrium Technologies Inc., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Jaouad, Abdelatif; Turala, Artur; Ares, Richard; Aimez, Vincent [Centre de Recherche en Nanofabrication et en Nanocaracterisation CRN2, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada)

    2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The following four TJ designs, AlGaAs/AlGaAs, GaAs/GaAs, AlGaAs/InGaP and AlGaAs/GaAs are studied to determine minimum doping concentration to achieve a resistance of <10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} and a peak tunneling current suitable for MJ solar cells up to 1500-suns concentration (operating current of 21 A/cm{sup 2}). Experimentally calibrated numerical models are used to determine how the resistance changes as a function of doping concentration. The AlGaAs/GaAs TJ design is determined to require the least doping concentration to achieve the specified resistance and peak tunneling current, followed by the GaAs/GaAs, and AlGaAs/AlGaAs TJ designs. The AlGaAs/InGaP TJ design can only achieve resistances >5x10{sup -4} {omega}cm{sup 2}.

  19. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 87, 144301 (2013) Parametric amplification in Josephson junction embedded transmission lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedland, Lazar

    transmission lines O. Yaakobi,1,* L. Friedland,2 C. Macklin,3 and I. Siddiqi3 1 INRS-EMT, 1650 Boul. Lionel; published 1 April 2013) An electronic transmission line that contains an array of nonlinear elements of the node flux along the transmission line is derived. It is shown that due to the nonlinearity

  20. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 219904(E) (2013) Erratum: Parametric amplification in Josephson junction embedded transmission lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedland, Lazar

    embedded transmission lines [Phys. Rev. B 87, 144301 (2013)] Oded Yaakobi, Lazar Friedland, Chris Macklin

  1. Improved One-dimensional Analysis of CMOS Photodiode Including Epitaxial-Substrate Junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornsey, Richard

    -dimensional analysis of CMOS photodiode has been derived in which the effect of the substrate, which forms a high, following the classical one- dimensional analyses of photodiodes and other photovoltaic devices [1-3], subsequent efforts focused on the effects of lateral diffusion in linear and two-dimensional arrays

  2. Nanopillar Photovoltaics: Photon Management and Junction Engineering for Next-Generation Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariani, Giacomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of interfaces in high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. , MRS24,25 Nonetheless, a high-efficiency photovoltaic device ishigh-efficiency photovoltaics”, 39th IEEE Photovoltaic

  3. Cooperative Contractility: the Role of Stress Fibres in the Regulation of Cell-Cell Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronan, William; McMeeking, Robert M.; Chen, Christopher S.; McGarry, J. Patrick; Deshpande, Vikram S.

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    = 0.003 s -1; 𝜃 = 70 s; 𝑘𝑓?? ? = 10; 𝑘𝑏?? ? = 1. Moreover, for all cell types, the Young’s modulus 𝐸𝑐𝑒𝑙𝑙 and Poisson’s ratio 𝜈𝑐𝑒𝑙𝑙 of the cell, which represent the passive components of the cytoplasm and nucleus, were fixed at 0... is unaffected by 𝐴𝐽). To better understand this, consider the single cell (Figure 5A) and cell pair (Figure 5B) on a bed of 3.2 nN/µm micro-posts. The average traction force 𝐹𝑎𝑣𝑔 in both cases are nearly identical (Figure 4D). However, in the cell pairs...

  4. Rotated Wedge Averaging Method for Junction Characterization \\Lambda Weichuan Yu, Kostas Daniilidis, Gerald Sommer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Weichuan

    , Gerald Sommer Institute of Computer Science Christian Albrechts University Preusserstrasse 1­9, D­24105. Michaelis and Sommer [7] proposed a method for junc­ tion characterization based on SVD. The steered filter was

  5. Annexin A2 is Required for Endothelial Cell Junctional Response to S1P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Rebecca

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    culture flasks (Corning; Corning, NY) in growth medium containing Medium 199 (M199; Gibco; Carlsbad, CA), heparin (100µg/mL; Sigma-Aldrich; St. Louis, MO), 0.034% lyophilized endothelial growth supplement (Pel- Freeze Biologicals; Rogers, AR) prepared...×105 cells in 1mL of growth medium (to yield a confluency of 25-30%), 2mL viral supernatant, 2mL endothelial growth medium, and 12?g/mL Polybrene (Sigma-Aldrich; St. Louis, MO) were added to a gelatin coated T25 flask and allowed to incubate. Viral...

  6. Controllable p-n Junction Formation in Monolayer Graphene Using Electrostatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perebeinos, Vasili

    ,24-26 as is currently the case. To explore high bias regime, we fabricated four-terminal, back in Figure 1b, the graphene channel is 1 µm wide and 6 µm long and contacted by titanium source (S) and drain) transport in the channel by choosing negative drain (VD

  7. Line junctions in the quantum Hall effect Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Charles

    is varied, the degree of back- scattering between the two counterpropagating modes can be varied. For strong depletion under the gate, all backscattering can be effectively eliminated, and the source to drain con- ductance vanishes. In the opposite limit, the gate potential can be turned off, and the two-terminal source-to-drain

  8. Photophysics and Charge Separation Dynamics in Two-Dimensional Semiconductor Nanoparticle Junctions and Heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, David F.

    2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The work on this grant can be divided into two categories: spectroscopy and dynamics of GaSe nanoparticles, and synthesis and exciton dynamics of II-VI nanoparticles and nanostructures.

  9. Nanopillar Photovoltaics: Photon Management and Junction Engineering for Next-Generation Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariani, Giacomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Heterojunction photovoltaics using GaAs nanowires andC. M. Single nanowire photovoltaics, Chem. Soc. Rev. 38, 16-nanopillar-array photovoltaics on low-cost and flexible

  10. Migration of seismicity and earthquake interactions monitored by GPS in SE Asia triple junction: Sulawesi, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigny, Christophe

    : Sulawesi, Indonesia Christophe Vigny,1 Hugo Perfettini,1,2 Andrea Walpersdorf,1,2 Anne Lemoine,1 Wim Simons] Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements made in Sulawesi, Indonesia, from 1992 to 1999 detected, fault, fluids, seismotectonics, earthquake, Indonesia 1. Introduction [2] The Eurasian, Philippine Sea

  11. Migration of seismicity and earthquake interactions monitored by GPS in SE Asia triple junction: Sulawesi, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaffrey, Robert

    : Sulawesi, Indonesia Christophe Vigny,1 Hugo Perfettini,1,2 Andrea Walpersdorf,1,2 Anne Lemoine1 Wim Simons] Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements made in Sulawesi, Indonesia, from 1992 to 1999 detected, fault, fluids, seismotectonics, earthquake, Indonesia Citation: Vigny, C., et al., Migration

  12. Nanopillar Photovoltaics: Photon Management and Junction Engineering for Next-Generation Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariani, Giacomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plasmon-enhanced dye- sensitized solar cells through metalnanostructure- based or dye-sensitized solar cells represent

  13. Depletion region - spatial variation with reverse bias voltage of typical diffused p-n junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swasdee, Manot

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' t I k ) 2N22(SA' IN2122A 2N2218AI 2N2219AI 2N2221AI 2N2222A &curUnuud) SMALL SIGNAL FORWARO CIIRRENT CAIN TunrM, Mrme ANO VOLTAGE FEEOeACK RATIO versus COLLECTOR CURRENT Vca f0v Q I KC 2N221M. 1A22220 Io N 10 ID Is 100 60? la VI al al DS... used to store the potential V(I) - Node potentials - Dummy variables used to store the value of (I-1. 5) H and (I - 0. 5) e H, respectively B. Computer Program Figure II-1 is a flow chart of the numerical techniques used for determining...

  14. Conductance of a Molecular Junction M. A. Reed,* C. Zhou, C. J. Muller, T. P. Burgin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    ­9), with the potential bar- riers of the semiconductor system being re- placed by any existing contact barrier the displacement of thi- ols has been shown (10) and the formation of a disulfide bridge would require oxygen (21

  15. Nano-elastohydrodynamics: Structure, dynamics, and flow in nonuniform lubricated junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, J.; Luedtke, W.D.; Landman, U. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Structure, flow, and response characteristics of molecularly thin films of hexadecane, sheared by topographically nonuniform solid gold surfaces sliding at a relative velocity of 10 meters per second, were investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations reveal three characteristics: spatial and temporal variations in the density and pressure of the lubricant in the region confined by the approaching asperities, accompanied by asperity-induced molecular layering transitions that are reflected in oscillatory patterns in the friction force; asperity deformations and microstructural transformations mediated by the lubricant; and an onset of cavitated zones in the lubricant after the asperity-asperity collision process. The simulations extend micrometer-scale elastohydrodynamic investigations into the nanometer-scale regime and provide molecular-scale insights into the fundamental mechanisms of ultrathin film lubrication phenomena under extreme conditions. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Update on connexins and gap junctions in neurons and glia in the mammalian nervous system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rash, John E.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 3.1. Cx32 in Schwann cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 3.2. Cx29 in peripheral myelin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 4. Cx26, Cx30 and Cx43 in astrocytes

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF CONNEXIN36 IN GAP JUNCTIONS BETWEEN NEURONS IN RODENT LOCUS COERULEUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rash, John E.

    consisting of connexin32 (Cx32) and con- nexin26 (Cx26), and that those same connexins abundantly link. In early postnatal development, connexin36 (Cx36) and connexin43 (Cx43) immunofluorescent puncta were densely distributed in the locus coeruleus, whereas Cx32 and Cx26 were not detected. By freeze

  18. Defining a Link between Gap Junction Communication, Proteolysis, and Cataract Formation*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogyo, Matthew

    Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037 Disruption of the connexin 3 (Cx46) gene ( 3 ( / )) in mice express 1 (Cx43)1 connexin; fiber cells express 3 (Cx46) and 8 (Cx50) connexin (5, 6). In order). Dis- ruption of the 3 (Cx46) or 8 (Cx50) genes gives rise to distinct phenotypes; 8 ablation in mice

  19. Transport, Aharonov-Bohm, and Topological Effects in Graphene Molecular Junctions and Graphene Nanorings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yannouleas, Constantine; Landman, Uzi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unique ultra-relativistic, massless, nature of electron states in two-dimensional extended graphene sheets, brought about by the honeycomb lattice arrangement of carbon atoms in two-dimensions, provides ingress to explorations of fundamental physical phenomena in graphene nanostructures. Here we explore the emergence of new behavior of electrons in atomically precise segmented graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) and graphene rings with the use of tight-binding calculations, non-equilibrium Green's function transport theory, and a newly developed Dirac continuum model that absorbs the valence-to-conductance energy gaps as position-dependent masses, including topological-in-origin mass-barriers at the contacts between segments. Through transport investigations in variable-width segmented GNRs with armchair, zigzag, and mixed edge terminations we uncover development of new Fabry-Perot-like interference patterns in segmented GNRs, a crossover from the ultra-relativistic massless regime, characteristic of extended gra...

  20. Optimization of a plasma immersion ion implantation process for shallow junctions in silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Ashok; Nori, Rajashree; Bhatt, Piyush; Lodha, Saurabh; Pinto, Richard, E-mail: rpinto@ee.iitb.ac.in; Rao, Valipe Ramgopal [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Jomard, François; Neumann-Spallart, Michael [Groupe d'Étude de la Matière Condensée, C.N.R.S./Université de Versailles-St.Quentin, 45, Avenue des États-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process has been developed for realizing shallow doping profiles of phosphorus and boron in silicon using an in-house built dual chamber cluster tool. High Si etch rates observed in a 5% PH{sub 3} in H{sub 2} plasma have been ascribed to high concentration of H(?) radicals. Therefore, subsequent work was carried out with 5% PH{sub 3} in He, leading to much smaller etch rates. By optical emission spectroscopy, the radical species H(?), PH*{sub 2}, and PH* have been identified. The concentration of all three species increased with pressure. Also, ion concentrations increased with pressure as evidenced by Langmuir data, with a maximum occurring at 0.12 mbar. The duty cycle of pulsed DC bias has a significant bearing on both the implantation and the etching process as it controls the leakage of positive charge collected at the surface of the silicon wafer during pulse on-time generated primarily due to secondary electron emission. The P implant process was optimized for a duty cycle of 10% or less at a pressure of 0.12 mbar with implant times as low as 30?s. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy showed a P dopant depth of 145?nm after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 950?°C for 5?s, resulting in a sheet resistance of 77 ?/?. Si n{sup +}/p diodes fabricated with phosphorus implantation using optimized PIII and RTA conditions exhibit J{sub on}/J{sub off}?>?10{sup 6} with an ideality factor of nearly 1.2. Using similar conditions, shallow doping profiles of B in silicon have also been realized.

  1. Diagnosis and location of pinhole defects in tunnel junctions using only electrical measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabson, David A.

    Zhongsheng Zhang and David A. Rabsona) Department of Physics, PHY 114, University of South Florida, Tampa the presence of a pinhole and estimate its position and resistance. © 2004 American Institute of Physics. DOI the use of an integrated superconduct- ing electrode,20 the temperature dependence of device resistance,20

  2. of the measured nonlinearity of the current in the junction to adjust the theoretical noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirak, Fehmi

    thermometers. References and Notes 1. R. L. Rusby et al., Metrologia 33, 409 (1996). 2. M. R. Moldover et al. Witt, Metrologia 26, 47 (1989). 5. J. P. Pekola, K. P. Hirvi, J. P. Kauppinen, M. A. Paalanen, Phys. White et al., Metrologia 33, 325 (1996). 11. J. B. Johnson, Nature 119, 50 (1927). 12. J. B. Johnson

  3. Silicon-Based Thermoelectrics: Harvesting Low Quality Heat Using Economically Printed Flexible Nanostructured Stacked Thermoelectric Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: UIUC is experimenting with silicon-based materials to develop flexible thermoelectric devices—which convert heat into energy—that can be mass-produced at low cost. A thermoelectric device, which resembles a computer chip, creates electricity when a different temperature is applied to each of its sides. Existing commercial thermoelectric devices contain the element tellurium, which limits production levels because tellurium has become increasingly rare. UIUC is replacing this material with microscopic silicon wires that are considerably cheaper and could be equally effective. Improvements in thermoelectric device production could return enough wasted heat to add up to 23% to our current annual electricity production.

  4. Mechanisms leading to erratic snapback behavior in bipolar junction transistors with base emitter shorted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of avalanche injection in p/n- /n+ structures show that two very close breakdown states coexist. The mechanisms to an avalanche breakdown and a delay time before the initiation of the breakdown.2­14 Typically, shorter delays Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 Sameer Pendharkar Texas Instruments Inc., 13560

  5. Compound Josephson-junction coupler for flux qubits with minimal crosstalk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, R.; Lanting, T.; Berkley, A. J.; Johansson, J.; Johnson, M. W.; Bunyk, P.; Ladizinsky, E.; Oh, T.; Han, Siyuan

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    shifted by #11;act 0 . Let the device described by Eq. #1;3#2; be connected to two qubits via mutual inductances Mco,1 and Mco,2. The mutual inductance between the qubits will be Meff = Mco,1Mco,2#16;#1;1#2;, #1;4#2; where #16;#1;1#2;#6;#1;Iact p /#1... mutual inductances Mco and Mact, respectively. These give rise to the fluxes #5;co x and #5;actx . The qubits are controlled via fluxes #5;cjj#20; x and #5;q#20; x #1;#20;=1,2#2; as described in Ref. 13. The qubits interact with the coupler via mutual...

  6. Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, T.; Hesabi, Z. R.; Joiner, C. A.; Vogel, E. M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Liu, L.; Gu, G. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Tennessee, 1520 Middle Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Barrera, S. de la; Feenstra, R. M. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Chakrabarti, B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 West Campbell Rd., Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Large area chemical vapor deposited graphene and hexagonal boron nitride was used to fabricate graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene symmetric field effect transistors. Gate control of the tunneling characteristics is observed similar to previously reported results for exfoliated graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene devices. Density-of-states features are observed in the tunneling characteristics of the devices, although without large resonant peaks that would arise from lateral momentum conservation. The lack of distinct resonant behavior is attributed to disorder in the devices, and a possible source of the disorder is discussed.

  7. Transport, Aharonov-Bohm, and Topological Effects in Graphene Molecular Junctions and Graphene Nanorings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constantine Yannouleas; Igor Romanovsky; Uzi Landman

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The unique ultra-relativistic, massless, nature of electron states in two-dimensional extended graphene sheets, brought about by the honeycomb lattice arrangement of carbon atoms in two-dimensions, provides ingress to explorations of fundamental physical phenomena in graphene nanostructures. Here we explore the emergence of new behavior of electrons in atomically precise segmented graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) and graphene rings with the use of tight-binding calculations, non-equilibrium Green's function transport theory, and a newly developed Dirac continuum model that absorbs the valence-to-conductance energy gaps as position-dependent masses, including topological-in-origin mass-barriers at the contacts between segments. Through transport investigations in variable-width segmented GNRs with armchair, zigzag, and mixed edge terminations we uncover development of new Fabry-Perot-like interference patterns in segmented GNRs, a crossover from the ultra-relativistic massless regime, characteristic of extended graphene systems, to a massive relativistic behavior in narrow armchair GNRs, and the emergence of nonrelativistic behavior in zigzag-terminated GNRs. Evaluation of the electronic states in a polygonal graphene nanoring under the influence of an applied magnetic field in the Aharonov-Bohm regime, and their analysis with the use of a relativistic quantum-field theoretical model, unveils development of a topological-in-origin zero-energy soliton state and charge fractionization. These results provide a unifying framework for analysis of electronic states, coherent transport phenomena, and the interpretation of forthcoming experiments in segmented graphene nanoribbons and polygonal rings.

  8. Towards the fabrication of suspended superconductor-graphene-superconductor Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Haofei

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene, a newly discovered material. has been the subject of much experimental and theoretical study due to its unique electronic behavior. In this thesis, I present, my work with graduate student Joel Wang to design and ...

  9. Common-path interference and oscillatory Zener tunneling in bilayer graphene p-n junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nandkishore, Rahul Mahajan

    Interference and tunneling are two signature quantum effects that are often perceived as the yin and yang of quantum mechanics: a particle simultaneously propagating along several distinct classical paths versus a particle ...

  10. Experimental detection of stimulation of superconductivity by a current in ''long'' tunnel Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, =.M.; Nevirkovets, I.P.; Shaternik, V.E.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    External agencies can stimulate superconductivity in suitable materials with nonequilibrium population of the levels. An investigation of this effect is reported. (AIP)

  11. Design of Novel Electron-Rich Organometallic Frameworks Involving Metal-Isocyanide Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maher, Tiffany Rene

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic diisocyanides are extensively employed as building blocks in coordination and surface chemistry as charge transport mediators for nanotechnology applications. The first diisocyanoarene-bridged bimetallate system, [{(CO)5V}2(?-CNC6Me4NC)]2...

  12. Nanopillar Photovoltaics: Photon Management and Junction Engineering for Next-Generation Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariani, Giacomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    silicon nanowires as solar cells and nanoelectronic powerTowards efficient hybrid solar cells based on fully polymerSariciftci, N. S. Hybrid solar cells, Inorg. Chim. Acta 361,

  13. Nanopillar Photovoltaics: Photon Management and Junction Engineering for Next-Generation Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariani, Giacomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for ultrahigh-efficiency photovoltaics, Nat. Mater. 11, 174-devices towards high-efficiency photovoltaics”, 39th IEEEto ensure high-efficiency nanostructured photovoltaics: each

  14. Understanding and engineering of NiGe/Ge junction formed by phosphorus ion implantation after germanidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oka, Hiroshi, E-mail: oka@asf.mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji [Department of Material and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Modulation of the effective electron Schottky barrier height (eSBH) of NiGe/Ge contacts induced by phosphorus ion implantation after germanide formation was investigated by considering local inhomogeneity in the eSBH. Systematic studies of NiGe/Ge contact devices having various germanide thicknesses and ion implantation areas indicated the threshold dopant concentration at the NiGe/Ge interface required for eSBH modulation and negligible dopant diffusion even at NiGe/Ge interface during drive-in annealing, leading to variation in the eSBH between the bottom and sidewall portions of the NiGe regions. Consequently, this method makes it possible to design source/drain contacts with low-resistivity Ohmic and ideal rectifying characteristics for future Ge-based transistors.

  15. Development status of triple-junction solar cells optimized for low intensity low temperature applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- III-V semiconductor materials, Jupiter, photovoltaic cells, temperature dependence, radiation effects the limit of the feasibility of photovoltaics due to the very low solar intensities (45-50W/m2 compared on the degradation behavior of the solar cells due to particle irradiation under LILT conditions which basically

  16. Carbon-doped GaAs single junction solar microcells grown in multilayer epitaxial assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiuling

    for the degraded contact properties and photovoltaic performance, resulting from prolonged thermal treatmentsAs solar cells,6 however, the photovoltaic performance showed a systematic degradation betwe of photovoltaic performance compared to zinc-doped systems due to the lack of mobile dopants while a slight

  17. Carbon-doped GaAs single junction solar microcells grown in multilayer epitaxial assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    responsible for the degraded contact properties and photovoltaic performance, resulting from prolonged thermalAs solar cells,6 however, the photovoltaic performance showed a systematic degradation between device uniformity of photovoltaic performance compared to zinc-doped systems due to the lack of mobile dopants while

  18. Characterizing Ion Profiles in Dynamic Junction Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoji, Tyko D.; Zhu, Zihua; Leger, Janelle M.

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic semiconductors have the unique ability to conduct both ionic and electronic charge carriers in thin films, an emerging advantage in applications such as light-emitting devices, transistors, and electrochromic devices, among others. Evidence suggests that the profiles of ions and electrochemical doping in the polymer film during operation significantly impact the performance and stability of the device. However, few studies have directly characterized ion profiles within LECs. Here, we present profiles of ion distributions in LECs following application of voltage, via time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Ion distributions were characterized with regard to film thickness, salt concentration, applied voltage, and relaxation over time. Results provide insight into the correlation between ion profiles and device performance, as well as potential approaches to tuning electrochemical doping processes in LECs.

  19. Etching suspended superconducting tunnel junctions from a multilayer H. Q. Nguyen,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by an insulating oxide barrier (I) are a central component to mesoscopic electronic de- vices. In SINIS structures of a superconductor - insulator - normal metal multilayer. The process involves few fabrication steps, is reliable electronic cooling is demonstrated. We analyze semi-quantitatively the thermal behavior of a typical device

  20. Nanopillar Photovoltaics: Photon Management and Junction Engineering for Next-Generation Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariani, Giacomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for efficient photovoltaic cells, Nat. Nanotechnol. 6, 568-for efficient photovoltaic cells, Nat. Nanotechnol. 6, 568-trapping in thin-film photovoltaic cells, Opt. Express 8,

  1. Reversible control of spin-polarised supercurrents in ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, N.; Robinson, J. W. A.; Blamire, M. G.

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    by the linear current-voltage characteristic recorded at -40 mT (Fig. 3(a) inset)); the small rise seen at high fields is associated with thermal effects arising from the magnet coil. On reducing the central Co layer thickness to 3 nm which enables a singlet... with increasing F thickness24,25, but to provide an estimate of the upper limit of the singlet current we just consider the envelope of the maxima – in other words assuming that the net exchange energy of the barrier is such that singlet pair dephasing...

  2. Nanopillar Photovoltaics: Photon Management and Junction Engineering for Next-Generation Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariani, Giacomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for ultrahigh-efficiency photovoltaics, Nat. Mater. 11, 174-devices towards high-efficiency photovoltaics”, 39th IEEEfor high efficiency hybrid photovoltaics”, 37th IEEE

  3. Nanopillar Photovoltaics: Photon Management and Junction Engineering for Next-Generation Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariani, Giacomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coating J SC Short-circuit current density VLS Vapor-liquid-conducting oxide I SC Short-circuit current ITO Indium tinV OC ) of 0.2 V, a short circuit current density (J SC ) of

  4. Physical model of back line-contact front-junction solar cells Andres Cuevas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the device, including not only the open-circuit voltage but also the short-circuit current and the maxi the semiconductor, pro- viding an exit path for the electric current generated in it. In the common industrial losses due to lateral currents while suppressing recombination. A possible approach is to use one

  5. Toward Scalable and Parallel Inductive Learning: A Case Study in Splice Junction Prediction \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    algorithms like ID3 rely on a monolithic memory to fit all of its training data. However, it is clear

  6. arsenide junction-field-effect transistors: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 201 Proposal and design of a new SiC-emitter lateral NPM Schottky collector bipolar transistor on Engineering Websites Summary: for VLSI...

  7. System vendor Contents Type Location Removal of Misc Cable, Conduit and Junction Boxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    NCSX Autoclave Lift Procedure Procedure Procedure Files L-NCSX-982 Coils Wound Modular Coil Lift Procedure Procedure Files L-NCSX-984 Coils, Modular Modular Coil Winding Form Lift Procedure Procedure Procedure Files L-NCSX-983 Coils, Modular Finished Modular Coil Winding Form Lift Procedure Procedure

  8. Effects of Angiopoietin-2-Blocking Antibody on Endothelial Cell–Cell Junctions and Lung Metastasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tammela, Tuomas

    Background: Angiopoietin-2 (Ang2), a ligand for endothelial TEK (Tie2) tyrosine kinase receptor, is induced in hypoxic endothelial cells of tumors, where it promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth. However, the effects of ...

  9. Nanopillar Photovoltaics: Photon Management and Junction Engineering for Next-Generation Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariani, Giacomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3D inorganic structures. In particular, common processing methods including spin-coating, inkjet printing,

  10. Gap junction intercellular communication: a microinjection investigation of fibroblast and epithelial cell lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pahlka, Raymond Benton

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this research were threefold. The first objective was to develop a protocol for unbiased microinjection of the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow to normal fibroblast and epithelial cell lines. I determined the optimal equipment...

  11. Boron-enhanced-diffusion of boron: The limiting factor for ultra-shallow junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, A. [Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, NJ (United States). Bell Labs.]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.; Eaglesham, D.J.; Gossmann, H.J.; Pelaz, L.; Herner, S.B.; Jacobson, D.C. [Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, NJ (United States). Bell Labs.; Haynes, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Erokhin, Y.; Simonton, R. [Eaton Corp., Beverly, MA (United States). Semiconductor Equipment Operations

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing implant energy is an effective way to eliminate transient enhanced diffusion (TED) due to excess interstitials from the implant. It is shown that TED from a fixed Si dose implanted at energies from 0.5 to 20 keV into boron doping-superlattices decreases linearly with decreasing Si ion range, virtually disappearing at sub-keV energies. However, for sub-keV B implants diffusion remains enhanced and x{sub j} is limited to {ge} 100 nm at 1,050 C. The authors term this enhancement, which arises in the presence of B atomic concentrations at the surface of {approx} 6%, Boron-Enhanced-Diffusion (BED).

  12. Measurements of possible type inversion in silicon junction detectors by fast neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.; Kraner, H.W.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful application of silicon position sensitive detectors in experiments at the SSC or LHC depends on an accurate assessment of the radiation tolerance of this detector species. In particular, fast neutrons (E{sub av} = 1 MeV) produce bulk displacement damage that is projected, from estimated fluences, to cause increased generation (leakage) current, charge collection deficiencies, resistivity changes and possibly semiconductor type change or inversion. Whereas the leakage current increase was believed to be the major concern for estimated fluences of 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} experiment year at the initial SSC luminosity of 10{sup 33}/cm{sup 2}-sec, increased luminosity and exposure time has raised the possible exposure to 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}, which opens the door for the several other radiation effects suggested above to play observable and significant roles in detector degradation or change. 17 refs., 19 figs.

  13. Microwave Characterization of Josephson Junction Arrays: Implementing a Low Loss Superinductance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devoret, Michel H.

    the simplest case of a dissipationless LC oscillator, where the charge Q on the capacitor plates and the gener and capacitors, the characteristic impedance of the oscillator Z0 cannot exceed the vacuum impedance Zvac at DC, and extremely low dissipation. These attributes define the so-called ``super- inductance'' [4

  14. Fabrication of Microfibre-nanowire Junction Arrays of ZnO/SnO2 Composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglic, Ales

    nanocomposite sensitized with a D35-cpdt dye was investigated. A dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) with a Zn discussed. Keywords ZnO/SnO2 Nanocomposite, Dye-sensitized Solar Cell, Nanostructured Surfaces 1O/SnO2 nanocomposite photoanode based on a cobalt electrolyte achieved a solar-to-electricity conversion

  15. Crescent Junction Disposal Site Diversion Channel Design, North Side Disposal Cell Sources of Data:

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Checked b"t me-Kao a MName A e4719 lProblem Statement: " Design erosion protection for the north slope of the disposal cell to prevent detrimental erosion from surface water flows from upland area, consistent with the requirements of 40 CFR Part 192 and NRC guidance in NUREG 1623.

  16. Photo of the Week: An Express Train to Crescent Junction | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. was found near Moab, Utah. The Department of Energy began cleaning up the uranium mill tailings from the Moab Site in April 2009, using steel containers to transport more...

  17. Structure and tectonics of the Sumatra Fault Zone-Sundra Trench junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handayani, Lina

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    been compiled. These data consist of topography, free-air gravity, seismic refection profiles, and seismicity. Gravity analysis and modeling reveals that the Sunda Strait forearm region lacks accretionary prism development and instead consists of lower...

  18. INVESTIGATION OF THE ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL/PYRITE (FeS2) JUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    cost was a factor and the unconventional solar cell candidates included: FeS2, CuO, and Zn3P2 (Wadia et al 2009:2702). For high volume production of solar panels, cheaper material for commercial use The nontoxic semiconductor pyrite FeS2 appeals to us as a good candidate for solar cells because it has a small

  19. Epitaxial lift-off of quantum dot enhanced GaAs single junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, Mitchell F.; Bittner, Zachary S.; Forbes, David V.; Hubbard, Seth M., E-mail: smhsps@rit.edu [Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Rao Tatavarti, Sudersena; Wibowo, Andree; Pan, Noren; Chern, Kevin [MicroLink Devices, Inc., Niles, Illinois 60714 (United States)] [MicroLink Devices, Inc., Niles, Illinois 60714 (United States); Phillip Ahrenkiel, S. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, South Dakota 57701 (United States)] [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, South Dakota 57701 (United States)

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    InAs/GaAs strain-balanced quantum dot (QD) n-i-p solar cells were fabricated by epitaxial lift-off (ELO), creating thin and flexible devices that exhibit an enhanced sub-GaAs bandgap current collection extending into the near infrared. Materials and optical analysis indicates that QD quality after ELO processing is preserved, which is supported by transmission electron microscopy images of the QD superlattice post-ELO. Spectral responsivity measurements depict a broadband resonant cavity enhancement past the GaAs bandedge, which is due to the thinning of the device. Integrated external quantum efficiency shows a QD contribution to the short circuit current density of 0.23?mA/cm{sup 2}.

  20. over many micrometers. Inorganic ZnS nano-crystals were confined at junction areas where

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . A. P. Alivisatos et al., Nature 381, 56 (1996). 9. C. A. Mirkin, R. L. Letsinger, R. C. Mucic, J. J

  1. A 2-terminal perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell enabled by a silicon tunnel junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailoa, Jonathan P.

    With the advent of efficient high-bandgap metal-halide perovskite photovoltaics, an opportunity exists to make perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells. We fabricate a monolithic tandem by developing a silicon-based interband ...

  2. THE MOTION OF MULTIPLE-PHASE JUNCTIONS UNDER PRESCRIBED PHASE-BOUNDARY VELOCITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jean

    interface configuration* *s consisting of three half-lines in the plane meeting at a point, or six planar and proved to be complete for which configurations of three half-lines in the 2* *-dimensional plane can between these regions move so that the normal velocity is the mobility times the force * *driving them

  3. Ground-water hydrology of the Panther Junction area of Big Bend National Park, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, John Lawrence

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Hydrogeologic investigation of the study area included eval- uation of precipitation, recharge, discharge, aquifer geometry, storage reserve, and hydraulic properties of the aquifer. Accumulated departure from mean annual orecipitation at. the Panther... the surface. The effective uniform depth of precipitation on the mountain slopes is 15. 86 in/yr. Green Gulch is believed to be the primary recharge zone for the Aguja aquifer, and the eastern slope of the Chisos Mountains is the major recharge zone...

  4. Nanopillar Photovoltaics: Photon Management and Junction Engineering for Next-Generation Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariani, Giacomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Towards efficient hybrid solar cells based on fully polymerSariciftci, N. S. Hybrid solar cells, Inorg. Chim. Acta 361,Y. , Warta, W. , Dunlop, E.D. Solar cell efficiency table (

  5. Organic photovoltaics without p-n junctions: Computational study of ferroelectric columnar molecular clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobolewski, Andrzej L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural and electronic properties of ferroelectric columnar clusters constructed from benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid, (B3CA)n, were investigated at the Hartree-Fock level. It is shown that B3CA stacks form helix-shaped molecular tubes which are stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonds. It is furthermore shown that the strong electric field generated by the uniaxial alignment of the carboxyl groups can split an optically prepared exciton into an electron-hole pair and can drive the charge carriers to the opposite ends of the tube. Some consequences of the phenomenon for photovoltaic applications are discussed.

  6. Superconductors with Topological Order and their Realization in Josephson Junction Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Diamantini; P. Sodano; C. A. Trugenberger

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We will describe a new superconductivity mechanism, proposed by the authors in [1], which is based on a topologically ordered ground state rather than on the usual Landau mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. Contrary to anyon superconductivity it works in any dimension and it preserves P-and T-invariance. In particular we will discuss the low-energy effective field theory, what would be the Landau-Ginzburg formulation for conventional superconductors.

  7. Broadband and omnidirectional anti-reflection layer for III/V multi-junction solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diedenhofen, Silke L; Haverkamp, Erik; Bauhuis, Gerard; Schermer, John; Rivas, Jaime Gómez; 10.1016/j.solmat.2012.02.022

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a novel graded refractive index antireflection coating for III/V quadruple solar cells based on bottom-up grown tapered GaP nanowires. We have calculated the photocurrent density of an InGaP-GaAs-InGaAsP-InGaAs solar cell with a MgF2/ZnS double layer antireflection coating and with a graded refractive index coating. The photocurrent density can be increased by 5.9 % when the solar cell is coated with a graded refractive index layer with a thickness of 1\\mu m. We propose to realize such a graded refractive index layer by growing tapered GaP nanowires on III/V solar cells. For a first demonstration of the feasibility of the growth of tapered nanowires on III/V solar cells, we have grown tapered GaP nanowires on AlInP/GaAs substrates. We show experimentally that the reflection from the nanowire coated substrate is reduced and that the transmission into the substrate is increased for a broad spectral and angular range.

  8. Y-Junction based addressing in Optical Symmetric Multiprocessor Networks Avinash Karanth Kodi and Ahmed Louri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kodi, Avinash

    and Ahmed Louri Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Arizona Tucson - 85721, USA processor has its own cache, and all the processors and memory modules are connected to the central interconnect, which is usually a shared bus. As the processors become faster, the central interconnect

  9. Giant higher harmonic generation in mesoscopic metal wires and rings interrupted by tunnel junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    Giant higher harmonic generation in mesoscopic metal wires and rings interrupted by tunnel 5046, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands Received 19 December 1997 Higher harmonic generation in mesoscopic is biased with a sinusoidal varying current, we observe giant higher harmon- ics in the conductance

  10. Nanopillar Photovoltaics: Photon Management and Junction Engineering for Next-Generation Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariani, Giacomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F. The influence of the InGaP window of GaAs solar cells,F. The influence of the InGaP window layer on the opticalEnhanced PCE using InGaP passivation…………………. ……..…. …………

  11. Electrical Characterization of Layer-Exchange Solid-Phase Epitaxy Si Diode Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technische Universiteit Delft

    . The controllability of the growth location and dimensions, practically unchanged when the downscale is reduced nitride (SiNx) spacer technology [14], mature in our research laboratory, has L 408 #12;been used: a 300

  12. Grand Junction Office Founder Honored at the Philip C. Leahy Memorial Park

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P. D'Agostino,Glen Wattman - Director,Dedication and Open House

  13. Materials en Multi-junction Solar Cells to Push CPV Efficiencies Beyond 50%

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenter (LMI-EFRC) -PublicationsMaterialsceem.ucsb.edu/rss

  14. JOURNAL OF COMPOSITES FOR CONSTRUCTION / NOVEMBER 1999 / 177 FAILURE OF WEB-FLANGE JUNCTION IN POSTBUCKLED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bank, Lawrence C.

    buckling of the flange. A node-separation technique is used to simulate the progressive failure of com- mercially produced pultruded wide-flange profiles. Local buckling of beams has been investigated by Barbero and Raf- toyiannis (1993) and Bank et al. (1995); lateral torsional buck- ling of beams by Mottram

  15. Sustained signalling by PTH modulates IP3 accumulation and IP3 receptors via cyclic AMP junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meena, Abha; Tovey, Stephen C.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    -Aldrich 433 (Gillingham, UK). Ionomycin was from Apollo Scientific (Stockport, UK). Cell culture 434 media, G-418, fluo 4AM and fura 2AM were from Life Technologies (Paisley, UK). 3-[5-435 (tert-butyl)isoxazol-3-yl]-2-[2-(3-chlorophenyl)hydrazono]-3...

  16. DOE/Grand Junction Office Bluewater LTSP July 1997 Doc. No. S00012AA, Page iii

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111A LithologicProcessing SiteSurface1 Rev.I

  17. In the OSTI Collections: Josephson Junctions | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » ImportantOffice ofOffice

  18. Arsen Sukiasyan > MBE Scientist - Solar Junction > Center Alumni > The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational Management »Energy Poneman |

  19. Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the NationalPennsylvania | Department of EnergyColorado,

  20. Data Compendium for the Logging Test Pits at the ERDA Grand Junction

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPMMilestone | DepartmentEACompound (December 1975) |