Sample records for junction adjacent layers

  1. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with epitaxial and textured ferromagnetic layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Y. Austin (Middleton, WI); Yang, Jianhua Joshua (Madison, WI)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to magnetic tunnel junctions and methods for making the magnetic tunnel junctions. The magnetic tunnel junctions include a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers both of which are epitaxial or textured with respect to the underlying substrate upon which the magnetic tunnel junctions are grown. The magnetic tunnel junctions provide improved magnetic properties, sharper interfaces and few defects.

  2. Linear nanometric tunnel junction sensors with exchange pinned sensing layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitao, D. C., E-mail: dleitao@inesc-mn.pt; Silva, A. V.; Cardoso, S. [INESC-MN and IN, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Superior Técnico (IST), Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1000-029 Lisboa (Portugal); Ferreira, R.; Paz, E.; Deepack, F. L. [INL, Av. Mestre Jose Veiga, 4715-31 Braga (Portugal); Freitas, P. P. [INESC-MN and IN, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisboa (Portugal); INL, Av. Mestre Jose Veiga, 4715-31 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly sensitive nanosensors with high spatial resolution provide the necessary features for high accuracy imaging of isolated magnetic nanoparticles. In this work, we report the fabrication and characterization of MgO-barrier magnetic tunnel junction nanosensors, with two exchange-pinned electrodes. The perpendicular magnetization configuration for field sensing is set using a two-step annealing process, where the second annealing temperature was optimized to yield patterned sensors responses with improved linearity. The optimized circular nanosensors show sensitivities up to 0.1%/Oe, larger than previously reported for nanometric sensors and comparable to micrometric spin-valves. Our strategy avoids the use of external permanent biasing or demagnetizing fields (large for smaller structures) to achieve a linear response, enabling the control of the linear operation range using only the stack and thus providing a small footprint device.

  3. Three-terminal magnetic tunneling junction device with perpendicular anisotropy CoFeB sensing layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honjo, H., E-mail: hr-honjou@aist.go.jp; Nebashi, R.; Tokutome, K.; Miura, S.; Sakimura, N.; Sugibayashi, T. [Green Platform Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, Tsukuba (Japan); Fukami, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Murahata, M.; Kasai, N. [Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ishihara, K. [Smart Energy Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, Tsukuba (Japan); Ohno, H. [Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Laboratory for Nanoelectronics and Spintronics, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrated read and write characteristics of a three terminal memory device with a perpendicular anisotropy-free layer of a strip of [Co/Ni] and a low-switching perpendicular-anisotropy CoFeB/MgO sensing layer. This new design of the cell results in a small cell area. The switching magnetic field of the sensing layer can be decreased by changing sputtering gas for the Ta-cap from Ar to Kr. An electron energy-loss spectroscopy analysis of the cross-section of the magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) revealed that the boron content in CoFeB with a Kr-sputtered Ta-cap was smaller than that with an Ar-sputtered one. A change in resistance for the MTJ was observed that corresponded to the magnetic switching of the Co/Ni wire and its magnetoresistance ratio and critical current were 90% and 0.8?mA, respectively.

  4. TRIPLE-JUNCTION A-SI SOLAR CELLS WITH HEAVILY DOPED THIN INTERFACE LAYERS AT THE TUNNEL W. Wang, H. Povolny, W. Du, X.B. Liao and X. Deng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    TRIPLE-JUNCTION A-SI SOLAR CELLS WITH HEAVILY DOPED THIN INTERFACE LAYERS AT THE TUNNEL JUNCTIONS W of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 USA ABSTRACT Triple-junction a-Si based solar cells, having a structure of SS cells and between the middle and bottom component cells on the efficiency of triple- junction solar

  5. High-field electroluminescence in semiconductor tunnel junctions with a Mn-doped GaAs layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hai, Pham Nam [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-0033 (Japan); Yatsui, Takashi; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Tanaka, Masaaki [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nanophotonics Research Center, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated high-field electroluminescence (EL) in semiconductor tunnel junctions with a Mn-doped GaAs layer (here, referred to as GaAs:Mn). Besides the band-gap emission of GaAs, the EL spectra show visible light emissions with two peaks at 1.94?eV and 2.19?eV, which are caused by d-d transitions of the Mn atoms excited by hot electrons. The threshold voltages for band-gap and visible light EL in the tunnel junctions with a GaAs:Mn electrode are 1.3?V higher than those of GaAs:Mn excited by hot holes in reserve biased p{sup +}-n junctions, which is consistent with the hot carrier transport in the band profiles of these structures. Our EL results at room temperature show that the electron temperature in GaAs:Mn can be as high as ?700?K for a low input electrical power density of 0.4?W/cm{sup 2}, while the lattice temperature of the GaAs:Mn layer can be kept at 340?K.

  6. Tunneling processes in asymmetric double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with a thin top MgO layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, D. L.; Feng, J. F. [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Yu, G. Q.; Guo, P.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F., E-mail: xfhan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Chen, J. Y.; Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic conductance dI/dV and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) d{sup 2}I/dV{sup 2} have been measured at different temperatures for double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with a thin top MgO layer. The resistance in the antiparallel state exhibits a normal tunnel-like behavior, while the resistance in the parallel state shows metallic-like transport, indicating the presence of pinholes in the thin top MgO layer. Three IETS peaks are the zero-bias anomaly, interface magnons, and barrier phonons in both the parallel and antiparallel states. The zero-bias anomaly is the strongest peak in the parallel state and its intensity decreases with temperature. The magnon has the largest intensity in the antiparallel state and its intensity also decreases with temperature. The origins of the dips and peaks in the dI/dV-V curve are also discussed.

  7. Tuning the thickness of electrochemically grafted layers in large area molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluteau, T.; Bessis, C.; Barraud, C., E-mail: clement.barraud@univ-paris-diderot.fr; Della Rocca, M. L.; Lafarge, P. [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, MPQ, UMR 7162, CNRS, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Martin, P.; Lacroix, J.-C. [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS, UMR 7086, CNRS, 15 rue J.-A. de Baïf, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the thickness, the surface roughness, and the transport properties of oligo(1-(2-bisthienyl)benzene) (BTB) thin films grafted on evaporated Au electrodes, thanks to a diazonium-based electro-reduction process. The thickness of the organic film is tuned by varying the number of electrochemical cycles during the growth process. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal the evolution of the thickness in the range of 2–27 nm. Its variation displays a linear dependence with the number of cycles followed by a saturation attributed to the insulating behavior of the organic films. Both ultrathin (2 nm) and thin (12 and 27 nm) large area BTB-based junctions have then been fabricated using standard CMOS processes and finally electrically characterized. The electronic responses are fully consistent with a tunneling barrier in case of ultrathin BTB film whereas a pronounced rectifying behavior is reported for thicker molecular films.

  8. Formation of Porous Layers by Electrochemical Etching of Germanium and Gallium Arsenide for Cleave Engineered Layer Transfer (CELT) Application in High Efficiency Multi-Junction Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fong, David Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III! V Multijunction Solar Cells,” (2003). J. F. Geisz, etEfficiency Multi-Junction Solar Cells A thesis submitted inEfficiency Multi-Junction Solar Cells By David Michael Fong

  9. Magnetic tunnel junctions for magnetic field sensor by using CoFeB sensing layer capped with MgO film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takenaga, Takashi, E-mail: takenaga@leap.or.jp; Tsuzaki, Yosuke; Yoshida, Chikako; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Hatada, Akiyoshi; Nakabayashi, Masaaki; Iba, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Atsushi; Noshiro, Hideyuki; Tsunoda, Koji; Aoki, Masaki; Furukawa, Taisuke; Fukumoto, Hiroshi; Sugii, Toshihiro [Low-power Electronics Association and Project (LEAP), Tsukuba 305-8569 (Japan)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluated MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) for magnetic field sensors with spin-valve-type structures in the CoFeB sensing layer capped by an MgO film in order to obtain both top and bottom interfaces of MgO/CoFeB exhibiting interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Hysteresis of the CoFeB sensing layer in these MTJs annealed at 275?°C was suppressed at a thickness of the sensing layer below 1.2?nm by interfacial PMA. We confirmed that the CoFeB sensing layers capped with MgO suppress the thickness dependences of both the magnetoresistance ratio and the magnetic behaviors of the CoFeB sensing layer more than that of the MTJ with a Ta capping layer. MgO-based MTJs with MgO capping layers can improve the controllability of the characteristics for magnetic field sensors.

  10. Broadband and omnidirectional anti-reflection layer for III/V multi-junction solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diedenhofen, Silke L; Haverkamp, Erik; Bauhuis, Gerard; Schermer, John; Rivas, Jaime Gómez; 10.1016/j.solmat.2012.02.022

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a novel graded refractive index antireflection coating for III/V quadruple solar cells based on bottom-up grown tapered GaP nanowires. We have calculated the photocurrent density of an InGaP-GaAs-InGaAsP-InGaAs solar cell with a MgF2/ZnS double layer antireflection coating and with a graded refractive index coating. The photocurrent density can be increased by 5.9 % when the solar cell is coated with a graded refractive index layer with a thickness of 1\\mu m. We propose to realize such a graded refractive index layer by growing tapered GaP nanowires on III/V solar cells. For a first demonstration of the feasibility of the growth of tapered nanowires on III/V solar cells, we have grown tapered GaP nanowires on AlInP/GaAs substrates. We show experimentally that the reflection from the nanowire coated substrate is reduced and that the transmission into the substrate is increased for a broad spectral and angular range.

  11. Conductance enhancement due to interface magnons in electron-beam evaporated MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with CoFeB free layer deposited at different pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, P.; Yu, G. Q.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F., E-mail: jiafengfeng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: xfhan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, D. L.; Feng, J. F., E-mail: jiafengfeng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: xfhan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Kurt, H. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Department of Engineering Physics, Istanbul Medeniyet University, 34720 Istanbul (Turkey); Chen, J. Y.; Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-beam evaporated MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions have been fabricated with the CoFeB free layer deposited at Ar pressure from 1 to 4 mTorr, and their tunneling process has been studied as a function of temperature and bias voltage. By changing the growth pressure, the junction dynamic conductance dI/dV, inelastic electron tunneling spectrum d²I/dV², and tunneling magnetoresistance vary with temperature. Moreover, the low-energy magnon cutoff energy E{sub C} derived from the conductance versus temperature curve agrees with interface magnon energy obtained directly from the inelastic electron tunneling spectrum, which demonstrates that interface magnons are involved in the electron tunneling process, opening an additional conductance channel and thus enhancing the total conductance.

  12. Spin dependent transport properties of Mn-Ga/MgO/Mn-Ga magnetic tunnel junctions with metal(Mg, Co, Cr) insertion layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, S. H.; Tao, L. L.; Liu, D. P., E-mail: dpliu@iphy.ac.cn; Han, X. F., E-mail: xfhan@iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Lu, Y. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Nancy Université, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a first principles theoretical investigation of spin polarized quantum transport in Mn{sub 2}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 2}Ga and Mn{sub 3}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 3}Ga magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) with the consideration of metal(Mg, Co, Cr) insertion layer effect. By changing the concentration of Mn, our calculation shows a considerable disparity in transport properties: A tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of 852% was obtained for Mn{sub 2}Ga-based MTJs, however, only a 5% TMR ratio for Mn{sub 3}Ga-based MTJs. In addition, the influence of insertion layer has been considered in our calculation. We found the Co insertion layer can increase the TMR of Mn{sub 2}Ga-based MTJ to 904%; however, the Cr insertion layer can decrease the TMR by 668%; A negative TMR ratio can be obtained with Mg insertion layer. Our work gives a comprehensive understanding of the influence of different insertion layer in Mn-Ga based MTJs. It is proved that, due to the transmission can be modulated by the interfacial electronic structure of insertion, the magnetoresistance ratio of Mn{sub 2}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 2}Ga MTJ can be improved by inserting Co layer.

  13. Structural and optical studies of GaN pn-junction with AlN buffer layer grown on Si (111) by RF plasma enhanced MBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusoff, Mohd Zaki Mohd; Hassan, Zainuriah; Woei, Chin Che; Hassan, Haslan Abu; Abdullah, Mat Johar [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang, Malaysia and Department of Applied Sciences Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) 13500 Permatang Pauh, Penang (Malaysia); Department of Applied Sciences Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) 13500 Permatang Pauh, Penang (Malaysia)

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN pn-junction grown on silicon substrates have been the focus in a number of recent reports and further effort is still necessary to improve its crystalline quality for practical applications. GaN has the high n-type background carrier concentration resulting from native defects commonly thought to be nitrogen vacancies. In this work, we present the growth of pn-junction of GaN on Si (111) substrate using RF plasma-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Both of the layers show uniformity with an average thickness of 0.709 {mu}m and 0.095 {mu}m for GaN and AlN layers, respectively. The XRD spectra indicate that no sign of cubic phase of GaN are found, so it is confirmed that the sample possessed hexagonal structure. It was found that all the allowed Raman optical phonon modes of GaN, i.e. the E2 (low), E1 (high) and A1 (LO) are clearly visible.

  14. On the effect of N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN built-in junctions in the n-GaN layer for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    On the effect of N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN/P-GaN/N- GaN built-in junctions in the n-GaN layer for InGaN/GaN: N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN (NPNPN-GaN) junctions embedded between the n-GaN region and multiple the performance of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) in this work. In the proposed architecture, each thin P-GaN

  15. Formation of Porous Layers by Electrochemical Etching of Germanium and Gallium Arsenide for Cleave Engineered Layer Transfer (CELT) Application in High Efficiency Multi-Junction Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fong, David Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    matched materials of Ge/GaInAs/InGaP commonly used in triplesee that Ge, GaInAs, and InGaP all have a similar latticeinitial substrate to grow an InGaP top layer followed by a

  16. Interface magnetism of Co{sub 2}FeGe Heusler alloy layers and magnetoresistance of Co{sub 2}FeGe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, M. A., E-mail: mtanaka@nitech.ac.jp; Maezaki, D.; Ishii, T.; Okubo, A.; Mibu, K. [Department of Engineering Physics, Electronics and Mechanics, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8555 (Japan); Hiramatsu, R.; Ono, T. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The interface magnetism between Co{sub 2}FeGe Heusler alloy layers and MgO layers was investigated using {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Interface-sensitive samples, where the {sup 57}Fe isotope was used only for the interfacial atomic layer of the Co{sub 2}FeGe layer on the MgO layer, were prepared using atomically controlled alternate deposition. The {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra of the interface-sensitive samples at room temperature were found similar to those of the bulk-sensitive Co{sub 2}FeGe films in which the {sup 57}Fe isotope was distributed throughout the films. On the other hand, the tunnel magnetoresistance effect of magnetic tunnel junctions with Co{sub 2}FeGe layers as the ferromagnetic electrodes showed strong reduction at room temperature. These results indicate that the strong temperature dependence of the tunneling magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junctions using Heusler alloy electrodes cannot be attributed simply to the reduction of the magnetization at the interfaces between the Heusler alloy and insulator layers.

  17. Josephson junction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  18. Four-Junction Solar Cell with 40% Target Efficiency Fabricated by Wafer Bonding and Layer Transfer: Final Technical Report, 1 January 2005 - 31 December 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, H. A.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We realized high-quality InGaP/GaAs 2-junction top cells on Ge/Si, InGaAs/InP bottom cells, direct-bond series interconnection of tandem cells, and modeling of bonded 3- and 4-junction device performance.

  19. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedman, Daniel J. (Lakewood, CO); Geisz, John F. (Wheat Ridge, CO)

    2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  20. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Drummond, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Robertson, Perry J. (Albuquerque, NM); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits.

  1. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baca, A.G.; Drummond, T.J.; Robertson, P.J.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits. 10 figs.

  2. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  3. Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

  4. Three-junction solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludowise, Michael J. (Cupertino, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic solar cell is formed in a monolithic semiconductor. The cell contains three junctions. In sequence from the light-entering face, the junctions have a high, a medium, and a low energy gap. The lower junctions are connected in series by one or more metallic members connecting the top of the lower junction through apertures to the bottom of the middle junction. The upper junction is connected in voltage opposition to the lower and middle junctions by second metallic electrodes deposited in holes 60 through the upper junction. The second electrodes are connected to an external terminal.

  5. A Three-Isocenter Jagged-Junction IMRT Approach for Craniospinal Irradiation Without Beam Edge Matching for Field Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Fred, E-mail: fcao@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada)] [Department of Medical Physics, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Ramaseshan, Ramani; Corns, Robert; Harrop, Sheryl [Department of Medical Physics, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada)] [Department of Medical Physics, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Nuraney, Nimet; Steiner, Peter; Aldridge, Stephanie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Liu, Mitchell; Carolan, Hannah [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Agranovich, Alex; Karvat, Anand [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Traditionally craniospinal irradiation treats the central nervous system using two or three adjacent field sets. We propose a technique using a three-isocenter intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan (jagged-junction IMRT) which overcomes problems associated with field junctions and beam edge matching and improves planning and treatment setup efficiencies with homogenous target dose distribution. Methods and Materials: Treatments for 3 patients with a prescription of 36 Gy in 20 fractions were retrospectively planned with jagged-junction IMRT and compared to conventional treatment plans. Planning target volume (PTV) included the whole brain and spinal canal to the S3 vertebral level. The plan used three field sets, each with a unique isocenter. One field set with seven fields treated the cranium. Two field sets treated the spine, each set using three fields. Fields from adjacent sets were overlapped, and the optimization process smoothly integrated the dose inside the overlapped junction. Results: For jagged-junction IMRT plans vs. conventional technique, the average homogeneity index equaled 0.08 {+-} 0.01 vs. 0.12 {+-} 0.02, respectively, and conformity number equaled 0.79 {+-} 0.01 vs. 0.47 {+-} 0.12, respectively. The 95% isodose surface covered (99.5 {+-} 0.3)% of the PTV vs. (98.1 {+-} 2.0)%, respectively. Both jagged-junction IMRT plans and the conventional plans had good sparing of organs at risk. Conclusions: Jagged-junction IMRT planning provided good dose homogeneity and conformity to the target while maintaining a low dose to organs at risk. Results from jagged-junction IMRT plans were better than or equivalent to those from the conventional technique. Jagged-junction IMRT optimization smoothly distributed dose in the junction between field sets. Because there was no beam matching, this treatment technique is less likely to produce hot or cold spots at the junction, in contrast to conventional techniques. The planning process is also simplified as only one IMRT plan is required for the entire target volume.

  6. Improved method of preparing p-i-n junctions in amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madan, A.

    1984-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of preparing p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junctions for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes depositing amorphous silicon on a thin layer of trivalent material, such as aluminum, indium, or gallium at a temperature in the range of 200/sup 0/C to 250/sup 0/C. At this temperature, the layer of trivalent material diffuses into the amorphous silicon to form a graded p/sup +/-i junction. A layer of n-type doped material is then deposited onto the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer in a conventional manner to finish forming the p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junction.

  7. Enhancement of tunnel magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junction by a superlattice barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C. H.; Hsueh, W. J., E-mail: hsuehwj@ntu.edu.tw [Nanomagnetism Group, Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10660, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Tunnel magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junction improved by a superlattice barrier composed of alternate layers of a nonmagnetic metal and an insulator is proposed. The forbidden band of the superlattice is used to predict the low transmission range in the superlattice barrier. By forbidding electron transport in the anti-parallel configuration, the tunnel magnetoresistance is enhanced in the superlattice junction. The results show that the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio for a superlattice magnetic tunnel junction is greater than that for traditional single or double barrier junctions.

  8. A market analysis for high efficiency multi-junction solar cells grown on SiGe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judkins, Zachara Steele

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications, markets and a cost model are presented for III-V multi-junction solar cells built on compositionally graded SiGe buffer layers currently being developed by professors Steven Ringell of Ohio State University ...

  9. Thermally activated switching in spin-flop tunnel junctions V. Korenivskia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    -closed multilayers, consisting of two ferromagnetic layers separated by a thin nonmagnetic spacer, have been proposed of similar lateral dimensions. Spin-flop junctions with writing circuits have been fab- ricated by methods

  10. High temperature superconductor step-edge Josephson junctions using Ti-Ca-Ba-Cu-O

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.; Martens, J.S.; Plut, T.A.; Tigges, C.P.; Vawter, G.A.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for formulating non-hysteretic and hysteretic Josephson junctions using HTS materials which results in junctions having the ability to operate at high temperatures while maintaining high uniformity and quality. The non-hysteretic Josephson junction is formed by step-etching a LaAlO[sub 3] crystal substrate and then depositing a thin film of TlCaBaCuO on the substrate, covering the step, and forming a grain boundary at the step and a subsequent Josephson junction. Once the non-hysteretic junction is formed the next step to form the hysteretic Josephson junction is to add capacitance to the system. In the current embodiment, this is accomplished by adding a thin dielectric layer, LaA1O[sub 3], followed by a cap layer of a normal metal where the cap layer is formed by first depositing a thin layer of titanium (Ti) followed by a layer of gold (Au). The dielectric layer and the normal metal cap are patterned to the desired geometry. 8 figs.

  11. Semiconductor device PN junction fabrication using optical processing of amorphous semiconductor material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan; Rangappan, Anikara

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for semiconductor device PN junction fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating an electrical device having a P-N junction comprises: depositing a layer of amorphous semiconductor material onto a crystalline semiconductor base, wherein the crystalline semiconductor base comprises a crystalline phase of a same semiconductor as the amorphous layer; and growing the layer of amorphous semiconductor material into a layer of crystalline semiconductor material that is epitaxially matched to the lattice structure of the crystalline semiconductor base by applying an optical energy that penetrates at least the amorphous semiconductor material.

  12. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation. Abstract: Time and frequency dependent intensity variations in sequences of...

  13. Understanding Complex Network Attack Graphs through Clustered Adjacency Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, Steven

    Understanding Complex Network Attack Graphs through Clustered Adjacency Matrices Steven Noel}@gmu.edu Abstract We apply adjacency matrix clustering to network attack graphs for attack correlation, prediction, and hypothesizing. We self-multiply the clustered adjacency matrices to show attacker reachability across

  14. Measurements and Predictions of the Heat Transfer at the Tube-Fin Junction for Louvered Fin Heat Exchangers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thole, Karen A.

    Measurements and Predictions of the Heat Transfer at the Tube-Fin Junction for Louvered Fin Heat Transfer at the Tube-Fin Junction for Louvered Fin Heat Exchangers Abstract The dominant thermal resistance used to increase heat transfer by initiating new boundary layer growth and increasing surface area

  15. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming (Syvania, OH)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  16. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming (Syvania, OH); Liao, Xianbo (Toledo, OH); Du, Wenhui (Toledo, OH)

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  17. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming (Sylvania, OH); Liao, Xianbo (Toledo, OH); Du, Wenhui (Toledo, OH)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  18. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  19. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); Hilbert, Claude (Austin, TX); Hahn, Erwin L. (Berkeley, CA); Sleator, Tycho (Berkeley, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  20. adjacent marine waters: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between phytoplankton (more) Krupke, Andreas 2013-01-01 48 LBACORE TUNA EXPLORATION IN ALASKAN AND ADJACENT Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

  1. Irreversible Electroporation Adjacent to the Rectum: Evaluation of Pathological Effects in a Pig Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoellnast, Helmut [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Monette, Sebastien [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, Rockefeller University, Laboratory of Comparative Pathology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, Rockefeller University, Laboratory of Comparative Pathology (United States); Ezell, Paula C. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, Rockefeller University, Research Animal Resource Center (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, Rockefeller University, Research Animal Resource Center (United States); Single, Gordon [AngioDynamics Inc. (United States)] [AngioDynamics Inc. (United States); Maybody, Majid [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Weiser, Martin R.; Fong Yuman [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery (United States); Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the effects of irreversible electroporation (IRE) on the rectum wall after IRE applied adjacent to the rectum. CT-guided IRE adjacent to the rectum wall was performed in 11 pigs; a total of 44 lesions were created. In five pigs, ablations were performed without a water-filled endorectal coil (group A); in six pigs, ablation was performed with the coil to avoid displacement of the rectum wall (group B). The pigs were killed after 7-15 days and the rectums were harvested for pathological evaluation. There was no evidence of perforation on gross postmortem examination. Perirectal muscle lesions were observed in 18 of 20 ablations in group A and in 21 of 24 ablations in group B. Inflammation and fibrosis of the muscularis propria was observed in ten of 18 lesions in group A and in ten of 21 lesions in group B. In group A, findings were limited to the external layer of the muscularis propria except for one lesion; in group B, findings were transmural in all cases. Transmural necrosis with marked suppurative mucosal inflammation was observed in seven of 21 lesions in group B and in no lesion in group A. IRE-ablation adjacent to the rectum may be uneventful if the rectum wall is mobile and able to contract. IRE-ablation of the rectum may be harmful if the rectum wall is fixed adjacent to the IRE-probe.

  2. Photovoltaic devices comprising zinc stannate buffer layer and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xuanzhi (Golden, CO); Sheldon, Peter (Lakewood, CO); Coutts, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic device has a buffer layer zinc stannate Zn.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 disposed between the semiconductor junction structure and the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer to prevent formation of localized junctions with the TCO through a thin window semiconductor layer, to prevent shunting through etched grain boundaries of semiconductors, and to relieve stresses and improve adhesion between these layers.

  3. algaassb epitaxial layers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daniel 3 van der Waals Epitaxy of InAs Nanowires Vertically Aligned on Single-Layer Graphene Engineering Websites Summary: -organic vapor-phase epitaxy Hybrid junctions composed...

  4. Photovoltaic Cell Having A P-Type Polycrystalline Layer With Large Crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albright, Scot P. (Lakewood, CO); Chamberlin, Rhodes R. (El Paso, TX)

    1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic cell has an n-type polycrystalline layer and a p-type polycrystalline layer adjoining the n-type polycrystalline layer to form a photovoltaic junction. The p-type polycrystalline layer comprises a substantially planar layer portion having relatively large crystals adjoining the n-type polycrystalline layer. The planar layer portion includes oxidized impurities which contribute to obtainment of p-type electrical properties in the planar layer portion.

  5. High thermal conductivity lossy dielectric using a multi layer configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for loss dielectrics. A loss dielectric includes at least one high dielectric loss layer and at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. A method of manufacturing a loss dielectric includes providing at least one high dielectric loss layer and providing at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. The systems and methods provide advantages because the loss dielectrics are less costly and more environmentally friendly than the available alternatives.

  6. Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  7. Organic light emitting device having multiple separate emissive layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An organic light emitting device having multiple separate emissive layers is provided. Each emissive layer may define an exciton formation region, allowing exciton formation to occur across the entire emissive region. By aligning the energy levels of each emissive layer with the adjacent emissive layers, exciton formation in each layer may be improved. Devices incorporating multiple emissive layers with multiple exciton formation regions may exhibit improved performance, including internal quantum efficiencies of up to 100%.

  8. Process For Direct Integration Of A Thin-Film Silicon P-N Junction Diode With A Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toet, Daniel (Mountain View, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  9. Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toet, Daniel (Mountain View, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  10. Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toet, Daniel; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  11. Towards understanding junction degradation in cadmium telluride solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nardone, Marco, E-mail: marcon@bgsu.edu [Department of Environment and Sustainability, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403 (United States)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A degradation mechanism in cadmium telluride (CdTe/CdS) solar cells is investigated using time-dependent numerical modeling to simulate various temperature, bias, and illumination stress conditions. The physical mechanism is based on defect generation rates that are proportional to nonequilibrium charge carrier concentrations. It is found that a commonly observed degradation mode for CdTe/CdS solar cells can be reproduced only if defects are allowed to form in a narrow region of the absorber layer close to the CdTe/CdS junction. A key aspect of this junction degradation is that both mid-gap donor and shallow acceptor-type defects must be generated simultaneously in response to photo-excitation or applied bias. The numerical approach employed here can be extended to study other mechanisms for any photovoltaic technology.

  12. adjacent continental margin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    day. Here we review the two most important ideas of the MARS system: 1) how it addresses fire-induced changes in value and 2) how it uses 143 Analysis of Non-adjacent Forms in...

  13. adjacent pericarcinomatous foci: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    many nets, those using them were doingwell. The schooner Sarah 350 Geological Setting, Mineral Resources and ancient works of Samos and adjacent islands of the Aegean Sea, 26-30...

  14. A Tight Lower Bound for the Adjacent Quadratic Assignment Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borzou Rostami

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 23, 2014 ... A Tight Lower Bound for the Adjacent Quadratic Assignment Problem ... The first is based on a ``flow'' formulation whose linear relaxation can be solved very efficiently ... Category 2: Integer Programming (0-1 Programming ).

  15. Bazaar [+] : addressing critical adjacencies in Mumbai's urban farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, Arjun (Arjun Devadas)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the city of Mumbai, and evolves the notion of how "critical adjacency" has been instrumental in guiding the city's urban transformations into modernity. Presently, Mumbai experiences some of the ...

  16. SMALLCAPACITANCE JOSEPHSON JUNCTIONS: ONEDIMENSIONAL ARRAYS AND SINGLE JUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    because a high­ impedance environment is necessary, and special care should be taken with the measurement be measured. Furthermore, one can design a JJ array in such a way that one of the important parameter in the theory, the Josephson coupling energy E J between adjacent islands can be tuned in situ [23, 24

  17. Investigation of Band-Offsets at Monolayer-Multilayer MoS2 Junctions by Scanning Photocurrent Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, Sarah L; Wu, Chung-Chiang; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Sangwan, Vinod K; Kang, Junmo; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C; Lauhon, Lincoln J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thickness-dependent band structure of MoS2 implies that discontinuities in energy bands exist at the interface of monolayer (1L) and multilayer (ML) thin films. The characteristics of such heterojunctions are analyzed here using current versus voltage measurements, scanning photocurrent microscopy, and finite element simulations of charge carrier transport. Rectifying I-V curves are consistently observed between contacts on opposite sides of 1L-ML junctions, and a strong bias-dependent photocurrent is observed at the junction. Finite element device simulations with varying carrier concentrations and electron affinities show that a type II band alignment at single layer/multi-layer junctions reproduces both the rectifying electrical characteristics and the photocurrent response under bias. However, the zero-bias junction photocurrent and its energy dependence are not explained by conventional photovoltaic and photothermoelectric mechanisms, indicating the contributions of hot carriers.

  18. Alloyed junction Ge Esaki diodes on Si substrates realised by aspect ratio trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rommel, Sean

    Alloyed junction Ge Esaki diodes on Si substrates realised by aspect ratio trapping technique D. Pawlik, S. Sieg, S.K. Kurinec, S.L. Rommel, Z. Cheng, J.-S. Park, J. Hydrick and A. Lochtefeld A Ge Esaki diode is demonstrated on Si atop a coalesced epitaxial layer of Ge grown through narrow openings in SiO2

  19. Role of magnetic anisotropy in spin-filter junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chopdekar, R.V.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and azimuthal angle for a 2 nm MCO based junction. Figure 1.4 (CCO) or MnCr 2 O 4 (MCO)- both of which are isostructuralin CCO junctions compared to MCO junctions. Detailed studies

  20. Superconducting Tunnel Junctions as Direct Detectors for Submillimeter Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconducting Tunnel Junctions as Direct Detectors for Submillimeter Astronomy A Dissertation 2008 by John Daniel Teufel. All rights reserved. #12;Abstract Superconducting Tunnel Junctions on the of performance of superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) as direct detectors for submillimeter radiation. Over

  1. Monolithic interconnected module with a tunnel junction for enhanced electrical and optical performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, Christopher S. (Bethel Park, PA); Wilt, David M. (Bay Village, OH)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved thermophotovoltaic (TPV) n/p/n device is provided. Monolithic Interconnected Modules (MIMS), semiconductor devices converting infrared radiation to electricity, have been developed with improved electrical and optical performance. The structure is an n-type emitter on a p-type base with an n-type lateral conduction layer. The incorporation of a tunnel junction and the reduction in the amount of p-type material used results in negligible parasitic absorption, decreased series resistance, increased voltage and increased active area. The novel use of a tunnel junction results in the potential for a TPV device with efficiency greater than 24%.

  2. PERSISTENCE MODELING FOR THE POTOMAC AND ADJACENT RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    alternatives. The analysis is conducted on a case study basis on data pertaining to: 1. The Patuxent River near#12;PERSISTENCE MODELING FOR THE POTOMAC AND ADJACENT RIVERS By G.K. Young 1 and R.U. Jettmar2 and Recommendations 20 References 22 Acknowledgements 24 LIST OF FIGURES 1. Analysis Flow 9 2. Critical Patuxent Flows

  3. OPTIMAL ALGORITHM FOR FINDING DNA MOTIFS WITH NUCLEOTIDE ADJACENT DEPENDENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Francis Y.L.

    OPTIMAL ALGORITHM FOR FINDING DNA MOTIFS WITH NUCLEOTIDE ADJACENT DEPENDENCY FRANCIS Y.L. CHIN that the occurrence of a nucleotide in a binding site is independent of other nucleotides. More complicated representations, such as HMM or regular expression, exist that can capture the nucleotide dependency

  4. The effect of adjacent layers like biofilms on mass transport through nanofiltration membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bothe, Dieter

    , which is always present on the membrane surface in crossflow filtration processes, as well as a feed to high tangential flow velocities in crossflow filtrations, the size of this biofilm is limited to values

  5. Phonon Bottleneck in Graphene-Based Josephson Junctions at Millikelvin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Phonon Bottleneck in Graphene-Based Josephson Junctions at Millikelvin Temperatures Citation Details Title: Phonon Bottleneck in Graphene-Based Josephson Junctions at Millikelvin...

  6. adherens junction formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aluminum tunnel junctions Our recent work has involved fabrication of superconducting aluminum tunnel junctions for use; W. Barber et al. 2. PROCEDURE Our tunnel...

  7. Quantum Junction Solar Cells Jiang Tang,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantum Junction Solar Cells Jiang Tang,, Huan Liu,, David Zhitomirsky,§ Sjoerd Hoogland,§ Xihua, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074, China § Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family

  8. Gallium phosphide high-temperature bipolar junction transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipperian, T.E.; Dawson, L.R.; Caffin, R.J.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results are reported on the development of a high-temperature (> 350/sup 0/C) gallium phosphide bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for goethermal and other energy applications. This four-layer p/sup +/n/sup -/pp/sup +/ structure was fromed by liquid phase epitaxy using a supercooling technique to insure uniform nucleation of the thin layers. Magnesium was used as the p-type dopant to avoid excessive out-diffusion into the lightly doped base. By appropriate choice of electrodes, the device may also be driven as an n-channel junction field-effect transistor. The gallium phosphide BJT is observed to have a common-emitter current gain peaking in the range of 6 to 10 (for temperatures from 20/sup 0/C to 400/sup 0/C) and a room-temperature, punchthrough-limited, collector-emitter breakdown voltage of approximately -6V. Other parameters of interest include an f/sub/ = 400 KHz (at 20/sup 0/C) and a collector base leakage current = 200 ..mu..A (at 350/sup 0/C).

  9. Shapiro steps and stimulated radiation of electromagnetic waves due to Josephson oscillations in layered superconductors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulaevskii, L. N.; Kosehlev, A. E.; Tachiki, M.; Materials Science Division; LANL; Univ. of Tokyo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystals of layered high-temperature superconductors intrinsically behave as stacks of Josephson junctions. We analyze response of current-biased stack of intrinsic junctions to irradiation by the external electromagnetic (em) wave. In addition to well-known Shapiro steps in the current-voltage characteristics, irradiation promotes stimulated radiation which adds with spontaneous Josephson radiation from the crystal. Such enhancement of radiation from current-biased crystal may be used for amplification of em waves. Irradiation also facilitates synchronization of Josephson oscillations in all intrinsic Josephson junctions of a single crystal as well as oscillations in intrinsic junctions of different crystals.

  10. Method for closing a drift between adjacent in situ oil shale retorts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hines, Alex E. (Grand Junction, CO)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

  11. Method for closing a drift between adjacent in-situ oil shale retorts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, A.E.

    1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

  12. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  13. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  14. CMOS Interface Circuits for Spin Tunneling Junction Based Magnetic Random Access Memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh Saripalli

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Magneto resistive memories (MRAM) are non-volatile memories which use magnetic instead of electrical structures to store data. These memories, apart from being non-volatile, offer a possibility to achieve densities better than DRAMs and speeds faster than SRAMs. MRAMs could potentially replace all computer memory RAM technologies in use today, leading to future applications like instan-on computers and longer battery life for pervasive devices. Such rapid development was made possible due to the recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in Spin tunneling junction devices. Spin tunneling junctions (STJ) are composite structures consisting of a thin insulating layer sandwiched between two magnetic layers. This thesis research is targeted towards these spin tunneling junction based Magnetic memories. In any memory, some kind of an interface circuit is needed to read the logic states. In this thesis, four such circuits are proposed and designed for Magnetic memories (MRAM). These circuits interface to the Spin tunneling junctions and act as sense amplifiers to read their magnetic states. The physical structure and functional characteristics of these circuits are discussed in this thesis. Mismatch effects on the circuits and proper design techniques are also presented. To demonstrate the functionality of these interface structures, test circuits were designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35{micro} CMOS process. Also circuits to characterize the process mismatches were fabricated and tested. These results were then used in Matlab programs to aid in design process and to predict interface circuit's yields.

  15. Thermoelectric efficiency of critical quantum junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihail Mintchev; Luca Santoni; Paul Sorba

    2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the efficiency at maximal power of a scale-invariant (critical) quantum junction in exact form. Both Fermi and Bose statistics are considered. We show that time-reversal invariance is spontaneously broken. For fermions we implement a new mechanism for efficiency enhancement above the Curzon-Ahlborn bound, based on a shift of the particle energy in each heat reservoir, proportional to its temperature. In this setting fermionic junctions can even reach at maximal power the Carnot efficiency. The bosonic junctions at maximal power turn out to be less efficient then the fermionic ones.

  16. InGaP/GaAs Inverted Dual Junction Solar Cells For CPV Applications Using Metal-Backed Epitaxial Lift-Off

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauhuis, Gerard J.; Mulder, Peter; Haverkamp, Erik J.; Schermer, John J. [Applied Materials Science, IMM, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 625 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nash, Lee J.; Fulgoni, Dominic J. F.; Ballard, Ian M.; Duggan, Geoffrey [Circadian Solar Ltd, One Sovereign Court, Sir William Lyons Road, Coventry, CV4 7EZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The epitaxial lift-off (ELO) technique has been combined with inverted III-V PV cell epitaxial growth with the aim of employing thin film PV cells in HCPV systems. In a stepwise approach to the realization of an inverted triple junction on a MELO platform we have first grown a GaAs single junction PV cell to establish the basic layer release process and cell processing steps followed by the growth, fabrication and test of an inverted InGaP/GaAs dual junction structure.

  17. Electrical characteristics and interface structure of magnetic tunnel junctions with hafnium oxyfluoride barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y.Y.; Kim, D.S.; Char, K. [Center for Strongly Correlated Materials Research and School of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the effects of fluorine inclusion on the electrical transport characteristics and interface structure of the hafnium oxide barrier in a magnetic tunnel junction. The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and resistance-area (RA) as a function of oxidation time show that the TMR ratio of the hafnium oxyfluoride barrier is higher (8.3%) than that of the hafnium oxide barrier (5.7%) at their optimum conditions, and the oxyfluoride barrier junctions maintain a high TMR ratio even when the RA product increases by three orders of magnitude. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that the fluorine atoms in the oxyfluoride barrier play an important role in the formation of a barrier with uniform composition. We believe that the initial fluoride layer is causing the subsequent oxygen diffusion to slow down, resulting in the formation of a defect-free hafnium oxide layer. These results are consistent with what we have found for aluminum oxyfluoride barriers.

  18. Distribution of the spacing between two adjacent avoided crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manabu Machida; Keiji Saito

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the frequency at which avoided crossings appear in an energy level structure when an external field is applied to a quantum chaotic system. The distribution of the spacing in the parameter between two adjacent avoided crossings is investigated. Using a random matrix model, we find that the distribution of these spacings is well fitted by a power-law distribution for small spacings. The powers are 2 and 3 for the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble and Gaussian unitary ensemble, respectively. We also find that the distributions decay exponentially for large spacings. The distributions in concrete quantum chaotic systems agree with those of the random matrix model.

  19. Rapid and reversible reduction of junctional permeability in cells infected with a temperature-sensitive mutant of avian sarcoma virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael M. Atkinson; A. S. Menko; Ross G. Johnson; J R Sheppard; Judson D. Sheridan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT The transformed or normal phenotype of cultured normal rat kidney cells infected with a temperature-sensitive mutant of avian sarcoma virus is conditional on the temperature at which the cells are grown. Using dye injection techniques, we show that junction-mediated dye transfer is also temperature-sensitive. The extent and rate of transfer between infected cells grown at the transformation-permissive temperature (35 ° C) is significantly reduced when compared to infected cells grown at the nonpermissive temperature (40.5 ° C) or uninfected cells grown at either temperature. Infected cells subjected to reciprocal temperature shifts express rapid and reversible alterations of dye transfer capacities, with responses evident by 15 min and completed by 60 min for temperature shifts in either direction. These results suggest that altered junctional capacities may be fundamental to the expression of the ASV-induced, transformed phenotype. Most cells possess permeable junctions which connect the interiors of adjacent cells and allow the direct exchange oflow molecular weight substances (for review, see references 1-3). When present, such junctions provide the capacity for direct electrical communication between electrically excitable cells

  20. Enhanced efficiency of graphene-silicon Schottky junction solar cells by doping with Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, X. W., E-mail: xwzhang@semi.ac.cn; Yin, Z. G.; Meng, J. H.; Gao, H. L.; Zhang, L. Q.; Zhao, Y. J.; Wang, H. L. [Key Lab of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, CAS, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have reported a method to enhance the performance of graphene-Si (Gr/Si) Schottky junction solar cells by introducing Au nanoparticles (NPs) onto the monolayer graphene and few-layer graphene. The electron transfer between Au NPs and graphene leads to the increased work function and enhanced electrical conductivity of graphene, resulting in a remarkable improvement of device efficiency. By optimizing the initial thickness of Au layers, the power conversion efficiency of Gr/Si solar cells can be increased by more than three times, with a maximum value of 7.34%. These results show a route for fabricating efficient and stable Gr/Si solar cells.

  1. Si/SiGe modulation-doped structures with thin buffer layers: Effect of substrate orientation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Leslie H.

    Si/SiGe modulation-doped structures with thin buffer layers: Effect of substrate orientation G. L and Nomarski microscopy. In n-type modulation-doped Si-SiGe structures, the band structure is type II where SiGe layer, generally on top of the strained Si, is intentionally doped leaving the adjacent Si layer

  2. Analysis and interpretation of tidal currents in the coastal boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Paul Wesley, 1950-

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concern with the impact of human activities on the coastal region of the world's oceans has elicited interest in the so-called "coastal boundary layer"-that band of water adjacent to the coast where ocean currents adjust ...

  3. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  4. Theory of Proximity Effect in Junctions with Unconventional Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    )Singlet superconductor junctions ()Triplet superconductor junctions [PRB 70, 012507 (2004), PRB71 024506(2005) PRB 72,R140503 (2005), PRL 96 (2006) ] [PRB 69 144519 (2004), PRL 90 167003(2003)] #12;Tunneling

  5. Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sullivan, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); Friedmann, Thomas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials.

  6. Axion physics in a Josephson junction environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Beck

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that recent experiments based on Josephson junctions, SQUIDS, and coupled Josephson qubits have a cosmological interpretation in terms of axionic dark matter physics, in the sense that they allow for analogue simulation of early-universe axion physics. We propose new experimental setups in which SQUID-like axionic interactions in a resonant Josephson junction environment can be tested, similar in nature to recent experiments that test for quantum entanglement of two coupled Josephson qubits. We point out that the parameter values relevant for early-universe axion cosmology are accessible with present day's achievements in nanotechnology.

  7. Organic photosensitive cells having a reciprocal-carrier exciton blocking layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry P. (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Princeton, NJ); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A photosensitive cell includes an anode and a cathode; a donor-type organic material and an acceptor-type organic material forming a donor-acceptor junction connected between the anode and the cathode; and an exciton blocking layer connected between the acceptor-type organic material of the donor-acceptor junction and the cathode, the blocking layer consisting essentially of a material that has a hole mobility of at least 10.sup.-7 cm.sup.2/V-sec or higher, where a HOMO of the blocking layer is higher than or equal to a HOMO of the acceptor-type material.

  8. EA-0930: Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to expand and upgrade the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Projects Office facilities and operations in Grand Junction, Colorado.

  9. Hydrocarbon provinces and productive trends in Libya and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Missallati, A.A. (Agip (N.A.M.E.)Ltd., Tripoli (Libya))

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the age of major reservoirs, hydrocarbon occurrences in Libya and adjacent areas can be grouped into six major systems which, according to their geographic locations, can be classified into two major hydrocarbon provinces: (1) Sirte-Pelagian basins province, with major reservoirs ranging from middle-late Mesozoic to early Tertiary, and (2) Murzog-Ghadames basins province, with major reservoirs ranging from early Paleozoic to early Mesozoic. In the Sirte-Pelagian basins province, hydrocarbons have been trapped in structural highs or in stratigraphic wedge-out against structural highs and in carbonate buildups. Here, hydrocarbon generation is characterized by the combined effect of abundant structural relief and reservoir development in the same hydrocarbon systems of the same age, providing an excellent example of hydrocarbon traps in sedimentary basins that have undergone extensive tensional fracturing in a shallow marine environment. In the Murzog-Ghadames basins province, hydrocarbons have been trapped mainly in structural highs controlled by paleostructural trends as basement arches which acted as focal points for oil migration and accumulation.

  10. Dynamic simulations of arrays of Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eikmans, H.; van Himbergen, J.E. (Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Utrecht, P.O. Box 80.006, 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlands (NL))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First we introduce a very efficient algorithm for dynamic simulations of a wide class of arrays of Josephson junctions with realistic boundaries. With this algorithm one can also represent current-biased arrays with periodic boundaries. Next we present results of extensive simulations of ladder arrays. We evaluate the resistance as a function of magnetic field and find striking differences between different geometries.

  11. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zolper, John C. (Albuquerque, NM); Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  12. Axion mass estimates from resonant Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Beck

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently it has been proposed that dark matter axions from the galactic halo can produce a small Shapiro step-like signal in Josephson junctions whose Josephson frequency resonates with the axion mass [C. Beck, PRL 111, 231801 (2013)]. Here we show that the axion field equations in a voltage-driven Josephson junction environment allow for a nontrivial solution where the axion-induced electric current manifests itself as an oscillating supercurrent. The linear change of phase associated with this nontrivial solution implies the formal existence of a large magnetic field in a tiny surface area of the weak link region of the junction which makes incoming axions decay into microwave photons. We derive a condition for the design of Josephson junction experiments so that they can act as optimum axion detectors. Four independent recent experiments are discussed in this context. The observed Shapiro step anomalies of all four experiments consistently point towards an axion mass of $(110 \\pm 2)\\mu $eV. This mass value is compatible with the recent BICEP2 results and implies that Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking was taking place after inflation.

  13. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  14. Radiation due to Josephson oscillations in layered superconductors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulaevskii, L. N.; Koshelev, A. E.; Materials Science Division; LANL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the power of direct radiation into free space induced by Josephson oscillations in intrinsic Josephson junctions of layered superconductors. We consider the superradiation regime for a crystal cut in the form of a thin slice parallel to the c axis. We find that the radiation correction to the current-voltage characteristic in this regime depends only on crystal shape. We show that at a large number of junctions oscillations are synchronized providing high radiation power and efficiency in the terahertz frequency range. We discuss the crystal parameters and bias current optimal for radiation power and crystal cooling.

  15. Photovoltaic Device Including A Boron Doping Profile In An I-Type Layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Liyou (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic cell for use in a single junction or multijunction photovoltaic device, which includes a p-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon, an i-type layer of an amorphous semiconductor compound including silicon, and an n-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon formed on the i-type layer. The i-type layer including an undoped first sublayer formed on the p-type layer, and a boron-doped second sublayer formed on the first sublayer.

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent countries species Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: listed over a dozen Pyramica species, and even more of Strumigenys, from Suriname and its adjacent... ) and all other countries that surround it. Recently, this...

  17. Influence of growth and annealing conditions on low-frequency magnetic 1/f noise in MgO magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng Jiafeng; Diao Zhu; Kurt, Huseyin; Singh, A.; Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Stearrett, Ryan; Nowak, Edmund R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic 1/f noise is compared in magnetic tunnel junctions with electron-beam evaporated and sputtered MgO tunnel barriers in the annealing temperature range 350 - 425 Degree-Sign C. The variation of the magnetic noise parameter ({alpha}{sub mag}) of the reference layer with annealing temperature mainly reflects the variation of the pinning effect of the exchange-bias layer. A reduction in {alpha}{sub mag} with bias is associated with the bias dependence of the tunneling magnetoresistance. The related magnetic losses are parameterized by a phase lag {epsilon}, which is nearly independent of bias especially below 100 mV. The similar changes in magnetic noise with annealing temperature and barrier thickness for two types of MgO magnetic tunnel junctions indicate that the barrier layer quality does not affect the magnetic losses in the reference layer.

  18. Study of a-SiGe:H films and nip devices used in high efficiency triple junction solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    Study of a-SiGe:H films and n­i­p devices used in high efficiency triple junction solar cells and n­i­p solar cells for GeH4=Si2H6 ratio varying from 1.43 to 0. This results in a variation of band measurements on n­i­p solar cells with i-layer having different Ge content show that as Ge content increase

  19. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Ager, III, Joel W. (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  20. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Ager, III, Joel W. (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  1. Investigation of the Wall Effect in the long Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nevirkovets, I.P.; Rudenko, E.M. (Inst. of Metal Physics of the Ukrainian Academy of Science, Kiev 252142 (SU))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the long Josephson junctions with edge current injection and shortened control line studied experimentally. It is found that the wall effect is connected with the blockade of vortices entry into the junction by control current, as well as with the existence of the energy barrier for the vortices at the boundary between a projection region and the remainder part of the junction. The significant enhancement of supercurrent due to the blockade was found.

  2. FINE-GRAINED NANOCRYSTALLINE SILICON P-LAYER FOR HIGH OPEN CIRCUIT VOLTAGE A-SI:H SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    FINE-GRAINED NANOCRYSTALLINE SILICON P-LAYER FOR HIGH OPEN CIRCUIT VOLTAGE A-SI:H SOLAR CELLS of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA ABSTRACT Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) single- junction solar). It is found that the p-layer that leads to high Voc a-Si:H solar cells is a mixed-phase material that contains

  3. Raman Scattering at Plasmonic Junctions Shorted by Conductive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between line spectra and band spectra, can be assigned to shorting the junction plasmon through molecular conductive bridges. This is demonstrated through Raman trajectories...

  4. Quantum manipulation and simulation using Josephson junction arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xingxiang Zhou; Ari Mizel

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the prospect of using quantum properties of large scale Josephson junction arrays for quantum manipulation and simulation. We study the collective vibrational quantum modes of a Josephson junction array and show that they provide a natural and practical method for realizing a high quality cavity for superconducting qubit based QED. We further demonstrate that by using Josephson junction arrays we can simulate a family of problems concerning spinless electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions. These protocols require no or few controls over the Josephson junction array and are thus relatively easy to realize given currently available technology.

  5. Multi-junction, monolithic solar cell using low-band-gap materials lattice matched to GaAs or Ge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO); Friedman, Daniel J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-junction, monolithic, photovoltaic solar cell device is provided for converting solar radiation to photocurrent and photovoltage with improved efficiency. The solar cell device comprises a plurality of semiconductor cells, i.e., active p/n junctions, connected in tandem and deposited on a substrate fabricated from GaAs or Ge. To increase efficiency, each semiconductor cell is fabricated from a crystalline material with a lattice constant substantially equivalent to the lattice constant of the substrate material. Additionally, the semiconductor cells are selected with appropriate band gaps to efficiently create photovoltage from a larger portion of the solar spectrum. In this regard, one semiconductor cell in each embodiment of the solar cell device has a band gap between that of Ge and GaAs. To achieve desired band gaps and lattice constants, the semiconductor cells may be fabricated from a number of materials including Ge, GaInP, GaAs, GaInAsP, GaInAsN, GaAsGe, BGaInAs, (GaAs)Ge, CuInSSe, CuAsSSe, and GaInAsNP. To further increase efficiency, the thickness of each semiconductor cell is controlled to match the photocurrent generated in each cell. To facilitate photocurrent flow, a plurality of tunnel junctions of low-resistivity material are included between each adjacent semiconductor cell. The conductivity or direction of photocurrent in the solar cell device may be selected by controlling the specific p-type or n-type characteristics for each active junction.

  6. Phonon interference effects in molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markussen, Troels, E-mail: troels.markussen@gmail.com [Center for Atomic-scale Materials Design (CAMD), Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)] [Center for Atomic-scale Materials Design (CAMD), Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study coherent phonon transport through organic, ?-conjugated molecules. Using first principles calculations and Green's function methods, we find that the phonon transmission function in cross-conjugated molecules, like meta-connected benzene, exhibits destructive quantum interference features very analogous to those observed theoretically and experimentally for electron transport in similar molecules. The destructive interference features observed in four different cross-conjugated molecules significantly reduce the thermal conductance with respect to linear conjugated analogues. Such control of the thermal conductance by chemical modifications could be important for thermoelectric applications of molecular junctions.

  7. Junction Hilltop Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | WindInformationJosephine,Junction Hilltop

  8. Buffer layers for narrow bandgap a-SiGe solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, X.B.; Walker, J.; Deng, X.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In high efficiency narrow bandgap (NBG) a-SiGe solar cells, thin buffer layers of unalloyed hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si) are usually used at the interfaces between the a-SiGe intrinsic layer and the doped layers. They investigated the effect of inserting additional a-SiGe interface layers between these a-Si buffer layers and the a-SiGe absorber layer. They found that such additional interface layers increase solar cell V{sub oc} and FF sizably, most likely due to the reduction or elimination of the abrupt bandgap discontinuity between the a-SiGe absorber layer and the a-Si buffer layers. With these improved narrow bandgap solar cells incorporated into the fabrication of triple-junction a-Si based solar cells, they obtained triple cells with initial efficiency of 10.6%.

  9. Boron diffusion in magnetic tunnel junctions with MgO (001) barriers and CoFeB electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt, H.; Rode, K.; Oguz, K.; Coey, J. M. D. [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Boese, M.; Faulkner, C. C. [Advanced Microscopy Laboratory, CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Boron diffusion out of the CoFeB layers in model systems with thick CoFeB and MgO layers grown by radiofrequency sputtering or electron-beam evaporation and in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is probed after annealing by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Successive interfaces are exposed by ion milling the stacks, layer by layer, in the XPS system. Despite the presence of thick CoFeB and a high annealing temperature of 400 deg. C, we found no boron in the MgO or at the MgO/CoFe interfaces. Similar results are also obtained in the MTJs.

  10. Cadmium-free junction fabrication process for CuInSe.sub.2 thin film solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramanathan, Kannan V. (Lakewood, CA); Contreras, Miguel A. (Golden, CA); Bhattacharya, Raghu N. (Littleton, CA); Keane, James (Lakewood, CA); Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an economical, simple, dry and controllable semiconductor layer junction forming process to make cadmium free high efficiency photovoltaic cells having a first layer comprised primarily of copper indium diselenide having a thin doped copper indium diselenide n-type region, generated by thermal diffusion with a group II(b) element such as zinc, and a halide, such as chlorine, and a second layer comprised of a conventional zinc oxide bilayer. A photovoltaic device according the present invention includes a first thin film layer of semiconductor material formed primarily from copper indium diselenide. Doping of the copper indium diselenide with zinc chloride is accomplished using either a zinc chloride solution or a solid zinc chloride material. Thermal diffusion of zinc chloride into the copper indium diselenide upper region creates the thin n-type copper indium diselenide surface. A second thin film layer of semiconductor material comprising zinc oxide is then applied in two layers. The first layer comprises a thin layer of high resistivity zinc oxide. The second relatively thick layer of zinc oxide is doped to exhibit low resistivity.

  11. Limiting and realistic efficiencies of multi-junction solar Photonic Materials Group, FOM institute AMOLF, Amsterdam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    analysis of the single junction c-Si cell and the 5-junction Ge-(c-Si)-CZTS-(a-SiC)-GaP cell is performed

  12. A climatology of springtime convection systems over the Northwest Gulf of Mexico and adjacent coasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashem, Magda Sami

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Springtime (March 15-June 15) climatology of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) has been established on the basis of satellite imagery and radar reflectivities over the Northwest Gulf of Mexico and adjacent coastal areas during 1985...

  13. adjacent non-cancerous ductal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    many nets, those using them were doingwell. The schooner Sarah 312 Geological Setting, Mineral Resources and ancient works of Samos and adjacent islands of the Aegean Sea, 26-30...

  14. Influence of magnetic electrodes thicknesses on the transport properties of magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuchet, Léa; Rodmacq, Bernard; Auffret, Stéphane; Sousa, Ricardo C.; Dieny, Bernard [SPINTEC, UMR 8191, CEA-INAC/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1/Grenoble-INP, 38054 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the bottom and top magnetic electrodes thicknesses on both perpendicular anisotropy and transport properties is studied in (Co/Pt)/Ta/CoFeB/MgO/FeCoB/Ta magnetic tunnel junctions. By carefully investigating the relative magnetic moment of the two electrodes as a function of their thicknesses, we identify and quantify the presence of magnetically dead layers, likely localized at the interfaces with Ta, that is, 0.33?nm for the bottom electrode and 0.60?nm for the top one. Critical thicknesses (spin-reorientation transitions) are determined as 1.60 and 1.65?nm for bottom and top electrodes, respectively. The tunnel magnetoresistance ratio reaches its maximum value, as soon as both effective (corrected from dead layer) electrode thicknesses exceed 0.6?nm.

  15. Spin-orbit torque magnetization switching of a three-terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cubukcu, Murat; Boulle, Olivier; Drouard, Marc; Mihai Miron, Ioan; Gaudin, Gilles [SPINTEC, UMR 8191, CEA/CNRS/UJF/GINP, INAC, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Garello, Kevin; Onur Avci, Can; Gambardella, Pietro [Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Hönggerbergring 64, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Langer, Juergen; Ocker, Berthold [Singulus Technologies, Hanauer Landstr, 103, 63796 Kahl am Main (Germany)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the current-induced magnetization switching of a three-terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction by spin-orbit torque and its read-out using the tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. The device is composed of a perpendicular Ta/FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB stack on top of a Ta current line. The magnetization of the bottom FeCoB layer can be switched reproducibly by the injection of current pulses with density 5?×?10{sup 11}?A/m{sup 2} in the Ta layer in the presence of an in-plane bias magnetic field, leading to the full-scale change of the TMR signal. Our work demonstrates the proof of concept of a perpendicular spin-orbit torque magnetic memory cell.

  16. Nonvolatile memory disturbs due to gate and junction leakage currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroder, Dieter K.

    ) from traps within the gate oxides. Such low gate leakage currents can lead to sufficient charge; accepted 10 September 2002 Abstract We address disturbs due to gate oxide and junction leakage currents in floating gate nonvolatile memories (NVM). The junction leakage is important, because the gate oxide current

  17. Profiling the Thermoelectric Power of Semiconductor Junctions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Profiling the Thermoelectric Power of Semiconductor Junctions with Nanometer Resolution Ho-Ki Lyeo,3 * We have probed the local thermoelectric power of semiconductor nanostruc- tures with the use of ultrahigh-vacuum scanning thermoelectric microscopy. When applied to a p-n junction, this method reveals

  18. Hetero-junction photovoltaic device and method of fabricating the device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aytug, Tolga; Christen, David K; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Polat, Ozgur

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A hetero-junction device and fabrication method in which phase-separated n-type and p-type semiconductor pillars define vertically-oriented p-n junctions extending above a substrate. Semiconductor materials are selected for the p-type and n-type pillars that are thermodynamically stable and substantially insoluble in one another. An epitaxial deposition process is employed to form the pillars on a nucleation layer and the mutual insolubility drives phase separation of the materials. During the epitaxial deposition process, the orientation is such that the nucleation layer initiates propagation of vertical columns resulting in a substantially ordered, three-dimensional structure throughout the deposited material. An oxidation state of at least a portion of one of the p-type or the n-type semiconductor materials is altered relative to the other, such that the band-gap energy of the semiconductor materials differ with respect to stoichiometric compositions and the device preferentially absorbs particular selected bands of radiation.

  19. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

  20. Tandem junction amorphous semiconductor photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dalal, V.L.

    1983-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic stack comprising at least two p[sup +]i n[sup +] cells in optical series, said cells separated by a transparent ohmic contact layer(s), provides a long optical path for the absorption of photons while preserving the advantageous field-enhanced minority carrier collection arrangement characteristic of p[sup +]i n[sup +] cells. 3 figs.

  1. Transport in arrays of submicron Josephson junctions over a ground plane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Teressa Rae [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) arrays of Al islands linked by submicron Al/Al{sub x}O{sub y}/Al tunnel junctions were fabricated on an insulating layer grown on a ground plane. The arrays were cooled to temperatures as low as 20 mK where the Josephson coupling energy E{sub J} of each junction and the charging energy E{sub C} of each island were much greater than the thermal energy k{sub B}T. The capacitance C{sub g} between each island and the ground plane was much greater than the junction capacitance C. Two classes of arrays were studied. In the first class, the normal state tunneling resistance of the junctions was much larger than the resistance quantum for single electrons, R{sub N}{much_gt} R{sub Q{sub e}}{identical_to} h/e{sup 2} {approx} 25.8 k{Omega}, and the islands were driven normal by an applied magnetic field such that E{sub J} = 0 and the array was in the Coulomb blockade regime. The arrays were made on degenerately-doped Si, thermally oxidized to a thickness of approximately 100 nm. The current-voltage (I - V) characteristics of a 1D and a 2D array were measured and found to display a threshold voltage V{sub T} below which little current flows. In the second class of arrays, the normal state tunneling resistance of the junctions was close to the resistance quantum for Cooper pairs, R{sub N}{approx}R{sub Q}{equivalent_to}h/4e{sup 4}{approx}6.45k{Omega}, such that E{sub J}/E{sub C}{approx}1. The arrays were made on GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As heterostructures with a two-dimensional electron gas approximately 100 nm below the surface. One array displayed superconducting behavior at low temperature. Two arrays displayed insulating behavior at low temperature, and the size of the Coulomb gap increased with increasing R{sub g}.

  2. Mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes in crossed junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yadong; Chen, Xiaoming; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Park, Cheol [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Fay, Catharine C. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Stupkiewicz, Stanislaw [Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in crossed junctions. The structure and deformation of the crossed tubes in the junction are characterized by using atomic force microscopy. Our results show that the total tube heights are reduced by 20%–33% at the crossed junctions formed by double-walled BNNTs with outer diameters in the range of 2.21–4.67?nm. The measured tube height reduction is found to be in a nearly linear relationship with the summation of the outer diameters of the two tubes forming the junction. The contact force between the two tubes in the junction is estimated based on contact mechanics theories and found to be within the range of 4.2–7.6 nN. The Young's modulus of BNNTs and their binding strengths with the substrate are quantified, based on the deformation profile of the upper tube in the junction, and are found to be 1.07?±?0.11 TPa and 0.18–0.29 nJ/m, respectively. Finally, we perform finite element simulations on the mechanical deformations of the crossed BNNT junctions. The numerical simulation results are consistent with both the experimental measurements and the analytical analysis. The results reported in this paper contribute to a better understanding of the structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and to the pursuit of their applications.

  3. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murduck, James M. (Lisle, IL); Lepetre, Yves J. (Lauris, FR); Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources.

  4. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

  5. Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 609 2000 Materials Research Society Preparation of Microcrystalline Silicon Based Solar Cells at High i-layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    of Microcrystalline Silicon Based Solar Cells at High i-layer Deposition Rates Using a Gas Jet Technique S.J. Jones-layers for nip single-junction solar cells. The high deposition rates allow for fabrication of the required plays in determining the device performance. INTRODUCTION µc-Si-based solar cells are an intriguing

  6. Discharge waters from a power plant as an influent of phytoplankton in adjacent estuarine waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Clyde B

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DISCHARGE WATERS FROM A POWER PLANT AS AN 1NFLUENT OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN ADJACENT ESTUARINE WATERS A Thesis 'by CLYDE B. STRONG, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Su'bject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences DISCHARGE WATERS FROM A POWER PLANT AS AN INFLUEN'I' OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN ADJACENT ESTUARINE WATERS A Thesis by CLYDE B. STRONG, JR. Approved as to sty...

  7. Nutrient and dissolved-oxygen distributions in the Gulf of Mexico and adjacent regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, John Miller

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    renuirezent . d'or the u. =. p 'e= o 1 LA S 1" R G P S C I '"'11 C Z y Iis (h l1ajor Sub?-'er c: Ge, . anoSraoh; NUTRIENT AND DISSOLVED-OXYGE11 DISTRIBUTIONS XN THE GULF OF MEXICO AND ADJACENT REGIONS A Thesis by JOHN MILLER MORRXSON Approved... as to style and content by: (Chairman of Co ittee) (Head Department) (Member) (Me er) May &9yi) ABSTRACT Nutrient and. Dissolved-oxygen Distributions in the Gulf of Nexico and Adjacent Regions. (Nay 1974) John Miller Morrison~ B. A. , College...

  8. Power dissipation in a single molecule junction: Tracking energy levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghoob Naimi; Javad Vahedi

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by recent work [Lee et al. Nature {\\bf 489}, 209 (2013)], on asymmetry features of heat dissipation in the electrodes of molecular junctions, we put forward an idea as a result of heat dissipation in the electrodes. Based on tight-binding model and a generalized Green's function formalism, we describe the conditions under which heat dissipation shows symmetry characteristic and does not depend on the bias polarity. We also show the power dissipated in the junction can be used to detect which energy levels of molecule junction play more or less role in the transmission process. We present this idea by studying a simple toy model and Au-$C_{60}$-Au junction.

  9. EA-1037: Uranium Lease Management Program, Grand Junction, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Projects Office's proposal to maintain and preserve the nation's immediately accessible supply of...

  10. apical cell junctions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Viciana; Dora E. Vega-salas; Hans-peter Hauri; M. Brignoni 1997-01-01 3 Quantum Junction Solar Cells Jiang Tang,, Engineering Websites Summary: tuned primarily via control over...

  11. adhering junctions connecting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of such experiments the number of magnetic flux quanta spontaneously trapped in a superconducting loop was measured by means of a long Josephson tunnel junction built on top of...

  12. adherens junctions connect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of such experiments the number of magnetic flux quanta spontaneously trapped in a superconducting loop was measured by means of a long Josephson tunnel junction built on top of...

  13. 2. HIGH-LOv~ JUNCTION FORY_,\\'UO AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF AL-ALLOYED:'p+ JUNCT;[ONS FOR SSF SOLAR CELT.S As temperature rises en..!."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    . Luque formed. The deposited Al diss Instituto de Energia Solar {E.T,S,I.T,} phase composition given2. HIGH-LOv~ JUNCTION FORY_,\\'UO AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF AL-ALLOYED:§'p+ JUNCT;[ONS FOR SSF SOLAR+pp+ bifacial SSF solar cells are used to experimentally analyse the interphase in a similar way a 5i layer

  14. Josephson Junctions and Devices fabricated by Focused Electron Beam Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booij, Wilfred Edwin

    Josephson Junctions and Devices fabricated by Focused Electron Beam Irradiation Wilfred Edwin Booij Gonville and Caius College Cambridge A dissertation submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge December 1997... Summary Josephson Junctions and Devices fabricated by Focused Electron Beam Irradiation The irradiation of high Tc superconducting thin films with a focused electron beam, such as that obtained in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), can...

  15. EA-1338: Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office to Non-DOE Ownership, Grand Junction, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed transfer of real and personal property at the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Office to non-DOE ownership.

  16. Design, fabrication, and analysis of p-channel arsenide/antimonide hetero-junction tunnel transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajamohanan, Bijesh, E-mail: bor5067@psu.edu; Mohata, Dheeraj; Hollander, Matthew; Datta, Suman [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Zhu, Yan; Hudait, Mantu [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Jiang, Zhengping; Klimeck, Gerhard [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we demonstrate InAs/GaSb hetero-junction (hetJ) and GaSb homo-junction (homJ) p-channel tunneling field effect transistors (pTFET) employing a low temperature atomic layer deposited high-? gate dielectric. HetJ pTFET exhibited drive current of 35 ?A/?m in comparison to homJ pTFET, which exhibited drive current of 0.3 ?A/?m at V{sub DS}?=??0.5?V under DC biasing conditions. Additionally, with pulsing of 1 ?s gate voltage, hetJ pTFET exhibited enhanced drive current of 85 ?A/?m at V{sub DS}?=??0.5?V, which is the highest reported in the category of III-V pTFET. Detailed device characterization was performed through analysis of the capacitance-voltage characteristics, pulsed current-voltage characteristics, and x-ray diffraction studies.

  17. Differences in potassium forms between cutans and adjacent soil matrix in a Grey Clay Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Differences in potassium forms between cutans and adjacent soil matrix in a Grey Clay Soil Fan Liu1 of cutans on potassium forms and their transformations were investigated for a Western Australian grey clay soil. Cutans and matrix soil had similar clay mineral associations with kaolinite, smectite and illite

  18. 2D and 3D mesh graphs, 39 adjacency matrix, 5, 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kepner, Jeremy

    maximal independent set, 35 memory hierarchy, 290 minimum paths, 26 minimum spanning tree, 55 monotype deterministic, 161 fast generation, 157 generation, 143 interpretation, 155 real, 161 stochastic, 152, 161 multiplication, 31 sparse reference, 291 sparsity, 220, 226 spherical projection, 246 stochastic adjacency matrix

  19. COASTAL ENGINEERING 2012 DREDGING OPTIMIZATION OF AN INLET SYSTEM FOR ADJACENT SHORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    COASTAL ENGINEERING 2012 1 DREDGING OPTIMIZATION OF AN INLET SYSTEM FOR ADJACENT SHORE PROTECTION of this study is to investigate optimal dredging volumes and intervals, and to determine the beach placement mining at St. Augustine Inlet over 1.4-year simulations. Results determined that dredging scenarios under

  20. Successes, Challenges, Lessons Learned in Land Use Planning Efforts Adjacent to an LRT Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Successes, Challenges, Lessons Learned in Land Use Planning Efforts Adjacent to an LRT Station interest in "new outreach methods" ·!Demonstrated value added in more collaborative process #12;Lessons Learned 1.! Begin internal & external outreach earlier 2.! Our "good ideas" were not necessarily good

  1. The Film and Video Collection Department, located adjacent to the Student Multimedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cakoni, Fioralba

    The Film and Video Collection Department, located adjacent to the Student Multimedia Design Center," at [www.lib.udel.edu/filmandvideo/ Videographies.html]. · Come to the Student Multimedia Design Center Service Desk. · Visit the web page at [www.lib.udel.edu/multimedia]. · Submit a question from the web page

  2. BRYOPHYTES OF ADJACENT SERPENTINE AND GRANITE OUTCROPS ON THE DEER ISLES, MAINE, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    BRYOPHYTES OF ADJACENT SERPENTINE AND GRANITE OUTCROPS ON THE DEER ISLES, MAINE, U.S.A. LAURA R. E ultramafic rocks. This paper compares the bryophyte floras of both a peridotite and a granite outcrop from both sites. Fifty-five species were found, 43 on serpentine, 26 on granite. Fourteen species were

  3. 1 Copyright 2014 by ASME SEMI-QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT OF ADJACENT TRACK ACCIDENTS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    1 Copyright © 2014 by ASME SEMI-QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT OF ADJACENT TRACK ACCIDENTS ON SHARED risk analysis is developed to investigate various factors affecting train accident rate, intrusion rate and provides a basis for future quantitative risk analyses and risk mitigation implementations. NOMENCLATURE

  4. Distorted benzene bearing two bulky substituents on adjacent positions: structure of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaszynski, Piotr

    Distorted benzene bearing two bulky substituents on adjacent positions: structure of 1,2-bis(1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaboran-1-yl)benzene Yasuyuki Endo,a,* Chalermkiat Songkram,b Kiminori Ohta,a Piotr analysis of 1,2-bis(o-carboranyl)benzene were performed to examine the steric effects of the two extremely

  5. The hydraulics of exchange flow between adjacent confined building zones Saleh Nabi*, M.R. Flynn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Morris R.

    2012 Keywords: Buoyancy-driven exchange flow Boussinesq flow Natural ventilation Plumes Gravity with an adjacent volume of ambient fluid is a common problem in fluid mechanics with numerous examples in natural for the design of HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) systems or for increasing the efficiency

  6. InGaAsN/GaAs heterojunction for multi-junction solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Klem, John F. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Eric D. (Edgewood, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An InGaAsN/GaAs semiconductor p-n heterojunction is disclosed for use in forming a 0.95-1.2 eV bandgap photodetector with application for use in high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction is formed by epitaxially growing on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) or germanium (Ge) substrate an n-type indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN) layer having a semiconductor alloy composition In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As.sub.1-y N.sub.y with 0layer, with the InGaAsN and GaAs layers being lattice-matched to the substrate. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction can be epitaxially grown by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction provides a high open-circuit voltage of up to 0.62 volts and an internal quantum efficiency of >70%.

  7. Electrical Characterization of Layer-Exchange Solid-Phase Epitaxy Si Diode Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technische Universiteit Delft

    . The controllability of the growth location and dimensions, practically unchanged when the downscale is reduced nitride (SiNx) spacer technology [14], mature in our research laboratory, has L 408 #12;been used: a 300

  8. Measure Guideline: Optimizing the Configuration of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beach, R.; Burdick, A.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This measure guideline offers additional recommendations to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system designers for optimizing flexible duct, constant-volume HVAC systems using junction boxes within Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) Manual D guidance (Rutkowski, H. Manual D -- Residential Duct Systems, 3rd edition, Version 1.00. Arlington, VA: Air Conditioning Contractors of America, 2009.). IBACOS used computational fluid dynamics software to explore and develop guidance to better control the airflow effects of factors that may impact pressure losses within junction boxes among various design configurations (Beach, R., Prahl, D., and Lange, R. CFD Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, submitted for publication 2013). These recommendations can help to ensure that a system aligns more closely with the design and the occupants' comfort expectations. Specifically, the recommendations described herein show how to configure a rectangular box with four outlets, a triangular box with three outlets, metal wyes with two outlets, and multiple configurations for more than four outlets. Designers of HVAC systems, contractors who are fabricating junction boxes on site, and anyone using the ACCA Manual D process for sizing duct runs will find this measure guideline invaluable for more accurately minimizing pressure losses when using junction boxes with flexible ducts.

  9. Conformation of Adjacent Self-expanding Stents: A Cross-Sectional In Vitro Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Marion; Forauer, Andrew R. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)], E-mail: andrew.r.forauer@hitchcock.org; Lindh, Mats [University Hospital MAS, Radiology Department (Sweden); Cwikiel, Wojciech [University of Michigan Medical Center, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined the proximal conformation of three commonly used self-expanding stents when the stents were deployed adjacent to one another in a tubular model, simulating a 'kissing' stent technique. The stent pairs were evaluated by computed tomogrphy to determine the cross-sectional area excluded by the stents within the model. The mean areas associated with each stent pair were compared and significance evaluated by a t-test. A statistically significant difference was found when the area excluded by adjacent Wallstents was compared with both the Luminexx and SMART stents (p < 0.001 and p < 0.002, respectively). The difference in the area excluded and differences in conformation might play a role in the lower patencies that have been observed in 'kissing' stent series.

  10. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  11. Estimating commuter rail demand to Kendall Square along the Grand Junction Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockelie, Adam

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since acquiring the Grand Junction Railroad in June 2010 from CSX, the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA) has explored the possibility of using the line for commuter rail service. In addition the Grand Junction ...

  12. Annexin A2 is Required for Endothelial Cell Junctional Response to S1P 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Rebecca

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Endothelial cell (EC) junctions are critical for angiogenesis, the sprouting and growth of new blood vessels from existing vessels. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a proangiogenic factor that potently stimulates sprouting, fortifies EC junctions...

  13. Environmental Audit of the Grand Junction Projects Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) is located in Mesa County, Colorado, immediately south and west of the Grand Junction city limits. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Colorado Raw Materials Office at the present-day Grand Junction Projects Office in 1947, to aid in the development of a viable domestic uranium industry. Activities at the site included sampling uranium concentrate; pilot-plant milling research, including testing and processing of uranium ores; and operation of a uranium mill pilot plant from 1954 to 1958. The last shipment of uranium concentrate was sent from GJPO in January, 1975. Since that time the site has been utilized to support various DOE programs, such as the former National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), and the Technical Measurements Center (TMC). All known contamination at GJPO is believed to be the result of the past uranium milling, analyses, and storage activities. Hazards associated with the wastes impounded at GJPO include surface and ground-water contamination and potential radon and gamma-radiation exposure. This report documents the results of the Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) located in Grand Junction, Colorado. The Grand Junction Baseline Environmental Audit was conducted from May 28 to June 12, 1991, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). This Audit evaluated environmental programs and activities at GJPO, as well as GJPO activities at the State-Owned Temporary Repository. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Free electron gas primary thermometer: The bipolar junction transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mimila-Arroyo, J., E-mail: jmimila@cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Dpto. de Ing. Eléctrica-SEES, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional No 2508, México D.F. CP 07360 (Mexico)

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature of a bipolar transistor is extracted probing its carrier energy distribution through its collector current, obtained under appropriate polarization conditions, following a rigorous mathematical method. The obtained temperature is independent of the transistor physical properties as current gain, structure (Homo-junction or hetero-junction), and geometrical parameters, resulting to be a primary thermometer. This proposition has been tested using off the shelf silicon transistors at thermal equilibrium with water at its triple point, the transistor temperature values obtained involve an uncertainty of a few milli-Kelvin. This proposition has been successfully tested in the temperature range of 77–450?K.

  15. Visible Y -junction diode laser with mixed coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Poel, C.J.; Opschoor, J.; Valster, A.; Drenten, R.R. (Philips Research Laboratories, P. O. Box 80 000, 5600 JA Eindhoven (The Netherlands)); Andre, J.P. (Laboratoires d'Electronique et de Physique Applique, 3 Avenue Descartes, 94450 Limeil-Brevannes (France))

    1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study and theoretical analysis of a phase-locked, visible, {lambda}=670 nm, 2-3 {ital Y}-junction semiconductor laser array are presented. In a ridgetype 2-3 {ital Y}-junction, AlInGaP/InGaP array, both in-phase and anti-phase array modes are observed to lase simultaneously. The experimental results are discussed in the framework of a model based on the beam propagation method. The influence of the presence of both interferometric and evanescent coupling on the array modes is analyzed.

  16. Optimized Triple-Junction Solar Cells Using Inverted Metamorphic Approach (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J. F.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Record efficiencies with triple-junction inverted metamorphic designs, modeling useful to optimize, and consider operating conditions before choosing design.

  17. TM-mode coupling to a Josephson junction S. J. Lewandowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of the junction electrodes. to the j unction was provided by two leads immersed in superconducting solder, which

  18. Nanowire-Based Molecular Monolayer Junctions: Synthesis, Assembly, and Electrical Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (phenylene vinylene) (OPV) were prepared by replicating the pores of sub-40 nm diameter polycarbonate track etched that the conductance of junctions formed with -conjugated oligomers are several orders of magnitude larger than the saturated alkanes, with the OPV junctions having the highest conductance. The molecular wire junction

  19. DESIGN APPROACHES AND MATERIALS PROCESSES FOR ULTRAHIGH EFFICIENCY LATTICE MISMATCHED MULTI-JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    -JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS Melissa J. Griggs 1 , Daniel C. Law 2 , Richard R. King 2 , Arthur C. Ackerman 3 , James M heterostructures grown in a multi-junction solar cell-like structure by MOCVD. Initial solar cell data are also of the minority carrier lifetime. INTRODUCTION High efficiency triple junction solar cells have recently been

  20. Photonic layered media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  1. Novel InGaAsN pn Junction for High-Efficiency Multiple-Junction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allerman, A.A.; Chang, P.C.; Gee, J.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Hou, H.Q.; Jones, E.D.; Kurtz, S.R.; Reinhardt, K.C.

    1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the application of a novel material, InGaAsN, with bandgap energy of 1.05 eV as a junction in an InGaP/GaAs/InGaAsN/Ge 4-junction design. Results of the growth and structural, optical, and electrical properties were demonstrated, showing the promising perspective of this material for ultra high efficiency solar cells. Photovoltaic properties of an as-grown pn diode structure and improvement through post growth annealing were also discussed.

  2. Photo-Thermoelectric Effect at a Graphene Interface Junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEuen, Paul L.

    Photo-Thermoelectric Effect at a Graphene Interface Junction Xiaodong Xu, Nathaniel M. Gabor increase at the cryogenic temperature as compared to room temperature. Assuming the thermoelectric power predictions. KEYWORDS Graphene, photocurrent, photo-thermoelectric effect D evices that convert photons

  3. Modeling Social Network Relationships via t-Cherry Junction Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    Modeling Social Network Relationships via t-Cherry Junction Trees Brian Proulx and Junshan Zhang Abstract--The massive scale of online social networks makes it very challenging to characterize intractable model for users' relationships in a social network. There are a number of advantages

  4. PARAMETRIC EXCITATION OF PLASMA OSCILLATIONS IN JOSEPHSON JUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    b. ' FIG. 3. - (a) 03B1c tan çoo vs. 2/Q at co = 2 cop. Straight line : theory. Circles : analog harmonic generation with big amplitude may be understood from a discussion of the stability properties frequency FIG. 1. - The junction model. For the analog R = 500 il, Io = 1 mA, C = 100 nF, and k = « 2 e

  5. The economic effects of elevated and depressed freeways on adjacent property owners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scurry, Floyd David

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT The Economic EfFects of Elevated and Depressed Freeways on The Adjacent Property Owners. (May 1995) Floyd David Sentry, B. S. , Texas AkM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Daniel B. Fambro An econonuc assessment of a comnunity... 322, 095 283, 680 283, 680 260, 040 3, 327, 330 $5, 005, 770 Net Effect of Highway on Property Values $4, 275 139, 635 185, 310 262, 145 254, 800 271, 680 257, 840 3, 327, 330 $4, 703, 095 23 The resale of homes at all levels showed...

  6. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  7. Surface plasmon dispersion engineering via double-metallic AU/AG layers for nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tansu, Nelson; Zhao, Hongping; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Guangyu

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A double-metallic deposition process is used whereby adjacent layers of different metals are deposited on a substrate. The surface plasmon frequency of a base layer of a first metal is tuned by the surface plasmon frequency of a second layer of a second metal formed thereon. The amount of tuning is dependent upon the thickness of the metallic layers, and thus tuning can be achieved by varying the thicknesses of one or both of the metallic layers. In a preferred embodiment directed to enhanced LED technology in the green spectrum regime, a double-metallic Au/Ag layer comprising a base layer of gold (Au) followed by a second layer of silver (Ag) formed thereon is deposited on top of InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) on a sapphire/GaN substrate.

  8. Caged Layer Management.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cawley, W. O.; Quisenberry, J. H.; Allen, W. S.

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    so flies and odors will not annoy them. 5. Allow adjacent acreage for future expansion. Kind of Bird In egg production, the most important capital investment is the bird. For maximum return, she must meet exacting specifications. The most im.... But without ra si: ~perlative management and careful attention to etails, these lowered costs will be more than offset y increased mortality, reduced production, more irty and broken eggs and a greater fly problem. .esearch at Texas A&M University has...

  9. Mutual synchronization of two stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions in cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors, which naturally realize a stack of Josephson junctions, thus can be used to generate electromagnetic waves in the terahertz region. A plate-like single crystal with 10{sup 4} junctions without cavity resonance was proposed to achieve strong radiation. For this purpose, it is required to synchronize the Josephson plasma oscillation in all junctions. In this work, we propose to use two stacks of junctions shunted in parallel to achieve synchronization. The two stacks are mutually synchronized in the whole IV curve, and there is a phase shift between the plasma oscillation in the two stacks. The phase shift is nonzero when the number of junctions in different stacks is the same, while it can be arbitrary when the number of junctions is different. This phase shift can be tuned continuously by applying a magnetic field when all the junctions are connected by superconducting wires.

  10. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babcock, W.C.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

  11. Cover: PNNL's Photovoltaic array produces electricity for our super-computing facility and adjacent car charging stations. IN THIS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Cover: PNNL's Photovoltaic array produces electricity for our super-computing facility and adjacent car charging stations. #12;IN THIS REPORT 2 Message From the Director 3 PNNL Overview 5

  12. Layered Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Layered Cathode Materials presented by Michael Thackeray Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne Annual Merit Review DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Washington, D.C....

  13. Group-III nitride based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with barrier/spacer layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chavarkar, Prashant; Smorchkova, Ioulia P.; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh; Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Wu, Yifeng

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Group III nitride based high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) is disclosed that provides improved high frequency performance. One embodiment of the HEMT comprises a GaN buffer layer, with an Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N (y=1 or y 1) layer on the GaN buffer layer. An Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N (0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5) barrier layer on to the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer, opposite the GaN buffer layer, Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer having a higher Al concentration than that of the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer. A preferred Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer has y=1 or y.about.1 and a preferred Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer has 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. A 2DEG forms at the interface between the GaN buffer layer and the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer. Respective source, drain and gate contacts are formed on the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer. The HEMT can also comprising a substrate adjacent to the buffer layer, opposite the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer and a nucleation layer between the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N buffer layer and the substrate.

  14. Variety of c-axis collective excitations in layered multigap superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yukihiro Ota; Masahiko Machida; Tomio Koyama

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a dynamical theory for the phase differences along a stacked direction of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ's) in layered multigap superconductors, motivated by the discovery of highly-anisotropic iron-based superconductors with thick perovskite-type blocking layers. The dynamical equations describing AC and DC intrinsic Josephson effects peculiar to multigap IJJ's are derived, and collective Leggett mode excitations in addition to the Josephson plasma established in single-gap IJJ's are predicted. The dispersion relations of their collective modes are explicitly displayed, and the remarkable peculiarity of the Leggett mode is demonstrated.

  15. Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-1 Layering as OptimizationLayering as Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Xingzhe

    1 Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-1 Layering as OptimizationLayering as Optimization DecompositionDecomposition Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-2 CONTENTSCONTENTS Introduction (Marta;2 Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-3 Layering as Optimization Decomposition Introduction By Marta

  16. Topological p-n junctions in helical edge states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disha Wadhawan; Poonam Mehta; Sourin Das

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum spin Hall effect is endowed with topologically protected edge modes with gapless Dirac spectrum. Applying a magnetic field locally along the edge leads to a gapped edge spectrum with opposite parity for winding of spin texture for conduction and valence band. Using Pancharatnam's prescription for geometric phase it is shown that mismatch of this parity across a p-n junction, which could be engineered into the edge by electrical gate induced doping, leads to a phase dependence in the two-terminal conductance which is purely topological (0 or $\\pi$). This fact results in a ${\\mathbb{Z}}_2$ classification of such junctions with an associated duality. Current asymmetry measurements which are shown to be robust against electron-electron interactions are proposed to infer this topology.

  17. Transient Dynamics in Molecular Junctions: Coherent Bichromophoric Molecular Electron Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roie Volkovich; Uri Peskin

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of using single molecule junctions as electron pumps for energy conversion and storage is considered. It is argued that the small dimensions of these systems enable to make use of unique intra-molecular quantum coherences in order to pump electrons between two leads and to overcome relaxation processes which tend to suppress the pumping efficiency. In particular, we demonstrate that a selective transient excitation of one chromophore in a bi-chromophoric donor-bridge-acceptor molecular junction model yields currents which transfer charge (electron and holes) unevenly to the two leads in the absence of a bias potential. The utility of this mechanism for charge pumping in steady state conditions is proposed.

  18. Electron transport in normal-metal/superconductor junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, XZ; Zhao, HW; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    junction, the electron PRB 610163-1829/2000/61~21!/14759~6!/$15.00 l?superconductor junctions g Yan , College Station, Texas 77843-4242 , P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100080, China d Chia-Ren Hu , College Station, Texas 77843-4242 y 2000! systems, we...tanh@~v1eVs3!/2kBT#~L10 2L20 !, PRB 61ZHAO, AND CHIA-REN HU R f5tanh~v/2kBT !~R10 2R20 !, L1 0 5L 2 0? 5L0~k ,v1eVs31i0 !, R1 0 5R 2 0? 5R0~k ,v1i0 !. Here L1 0 and R1 0 (L 2 0 and R 2 0 ) are the retarded ~advanced! Green...

  19. Epithelial cell polarity and cell junctions in drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tepass, Ulrich; Tanentzapf­ , Guy; Ward, Robert; Fehon, Richard

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18 Oct 2001 10:14 AR AR144-24.tex AR144-24.sgm ARv2(2001/05/10) P1: GJB Annu. Rev. Genet. 2001. 35:747?84 Copyright c 2001 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved EPITHELIAL CELL POLARITY AND CELL JUNCTIONS IN DROSOPHILA Ulrich Tepass and Guy....35:747-784. Downloaded from arjournals.annualreviews.org by University of Kanas-Lawrence & Edwards on 09/26/05. For personal use only. 18 Oct 2001 10:14 AR AR144-24.tex AR144-24.sgm ARv2(2001/05/10) P1: GJB 748 TEPASS ET AL. THE SEPTATE JUNCTION...

  20. Instability of superconducting state in Josephson tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nevirkovets, I.P.; Rudenko, =.M.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments on low-resistance Josephson Sn--I--Sn tunnel junctions have shown the superconductor to exhibit an instability that manifests itself on the current--voltage characteristic (IVC) in the form of a jumplike decrease of the voltage when it reaches a value 2..delta../e. When a weak magnetic field H is applied parallel to the junction plane and suppresses the nonstationary Josephson effect, the negative-slope IVC section vanishes. The H-dependent instability-current component, as well as the dc component of the Josephson current near 2..delta../e, can be approximated by a function of H/sup -2/. The singularity observed is attributed to the presence of a maximum of the superconducting component, due to the Riedel singularity, at V = 2..delta../e.

  1. Strain designed Josephson $?$ junction qubits with topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin Benjamin

    2015-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A Josephson qubit is designed via the application of a tensile strain to a topological insulator surface sandwiched between two s-wave superconductors. The strain applied leads to a shift in the Dirac point without changing the pre-existing conducting states, on the surface of a topological insulator. Strain applied can be tuned to form a $\\pi$ junction in such a structure. Combining two such junctions in a ring architecture leads to the ground state of the ring being in doubly degenerate state- the "0" and "1" states of a qubit. A qubit designed this way is quite easily controlled via the tunable strain applied. We report on the conditions necessary to design such a qubit. Finally the operating time of a single qubit phase gate is derived.

  2. Nonlinear thermal control in an N-terminal junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvira Segal

    2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate control over heat flow in an N-terminal molecular junction. Using simple model Hamiltonians we show that the heat current through two terminals can be tuned, switched, and amplified, by the temperature and coupling parameters of external gating reservoirs. We discuss two models: A fully harmonic system, and a model incorporating anharmonic interactions. For both models the control reservoirs induce thermal fluctuations of the transition elements between molecular vibrational states. We find that a fully harmonic model does not show any controllability, while for an anharmonic system the conduction properties of the junction strongly depend on the parameters of the gates. Realizations of the model system within nanodevices and macromolecules are discussed.

  3. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  4. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  5. Nanopillar Spin Filter Tunnel Junctions with Manganite Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Bhagwati; Egilmez, Mehmet; Schoofs, Frank; Fix, Thomas; Vickers, Mary E; Zhang, Wenrui; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Blamire, Mark G

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge, CB3 0FS, UK ‡ Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 77843-3128, USA KEYWORDS: Spin filter, Nano... magnetic memories, reprogrammable logic and quantum computers.1,2 These devices rely on the generation of highly spin-polarized currents. Spin filter tunnel junction (SFTJ) has emerged as a promising alternative for this purpose. A possible way...

  6. Comparative life-cycle energy payback analysis of multi-junction a-SiGe and nanocrystalline/a-Si modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, V.; Kim, H.

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the publicity of nanotechnologies in high tech industries including the photovoltaic sector, their life-cycle energy use and related environmental impacts are understood only to a limited degree as their production is mostly immature. We investigated the life-cycle energy implications of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV designs using a nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) bottom layer in the context of a comparative, prospective life-cycle analysis framework. Three R and D options using nc-Si bottom layer were evaluated and compared to the current triple-junction a-Si design, i.e., a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe. The life-cycle energy demand to deposit nc-Si was estimated from parametric analyses of film thickness, deposition rate, precursor gas usage, and power for generating gas plasma. We found that extended deposition time and increased gas usages associated to the relatively high thickness of nc-Si lead to a larger primary energy demand for the nc-Si bottom layer designs, than the current triple-junction a-Si. Assuming an 8% conversion efficiency, the energy payback time of those R and D designs will be 0.7-0.9 years, close to that of currently commercial triple-junction a-Si design, 0.8 years. Future scenario analyses show that if nc-Si film is deposited at a higher rate (i.e., 2-3 nm/s), and at the same time the conversion efficiency reaches 10%, the energy-payback time could drop by 30%.

  7. Ion Mobility Separation of Isomeric Phosphopeptides from a Protein with Variant Modification of Adjacent Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Singer, David; Smith, Richard D.; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and particularly differential IMS or field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS), was recently shown capable of separating post-translationally modified peptides with variant PTM localization. However, that work was limited to a model peptide with serine phosphorylation on fairly distant alternative sites. Here, we demonstrate that FAIMS (coupled to ESI/MS) can broadly baseline-resolve variant phosphopeptides from a biologically modified human protein, including those involving phosphorylation of different residues and adjacent sites that existing MS/MS methods are most challenged to distinguish. Singly and doubly phosphorylated variants can be resolved equally well and identified without dissociation, based on accurate separation properties. The results are unchanged over a range of infusion solvent pH, hence present approach should work in conjunction with chromatographic separations using a mobile phase gradient.

  8. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrell, James J. (Livingston Manor, NY); Donohoe, Anthony J. (Ovid, NY)

    1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  9. United States Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grand Junction Office (GJO), US Department of Energy (DOE), develops and administers programs for evaluating domestic uranium resources and the production capability of industry; for developing resource planning information for DOE; and for advancing geologic and geophysical exploration concepts and techniques. In addition, GJO administers the leasing of mineral lands under DOE control, and carries out activities relating to the environmental aspects of uranium mining and milling, including remedial programs. The Office is staffed by administrative and technical program-management personnel. Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (Bendix) is the DOE operating contractor at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Government-owned/contractor-operated (GOCO) facility. The technical staffs of both GJO and Bendix are primarily geoscience-oriented. Specifically during 1980, uranium resource assessment on 135 National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangles was completed, along with other specific studies, to yield October 1980 national resource estimates. In addition, updated uranium supply analysis and production capability projections were completed. Another key aspect of this successful program was the development of improved geophysical and geochemical equipment and techniques in support of uranium resource assessment. Much of the hardware and know-how developed was turned over to the public and to the uranium industry at large for application to uranium exploration and the assessment of uranium company resources. The Grand Junction Office also participated actively during 1980 in international cooperative research on uranium exploration techniques and on the geology of uranium deposits.

  10. SEISMIC RESPONSE PREDICTION OF NUPEC'S FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES WITH ADJACENT BUILDING EFFECT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU,J.COSTANTINO,C.HOFMAYER,C.ALI,S.

    2004-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis computer codes for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model tests to address the dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effect on the seismic response of NPP structures built in close proximity to each other. The program provided field data to study the methodologies commonly associated with seismic analyses considering the DCI effect. As part of a collaborative program between the United States and Japan on seismic issues related to NPP applications, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored a program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform independent seismic analyses which applied common analysis procedures to predict the building response to recorded earthquake events for the test models with DCI effect. In this study, two large-scale DCI test model configurations were analyzed: (1) twin reactor buildings in close proximity and (2) adjacent reactor and turbine buildings. This paper describes the NUPEC DCI test models, the BNL analysis using the SASSI 2000 program, and comparisons between the BNL analysis results and recorded field responses. To account for large variability in the soil properties, the conventional approach of computing seismic responses with the mean, mean plus and minus one-standard deviation soil profiles is adopted in the BNL analysis and the three sets of analysis results were used in the comparisons with the test data. A discussion is also provided in the paper to address (1) the capability of the analysis methods to capture the DCI effect, and (2) the conservatism of the practice for considering soil variability in seismic response analysis for adjacent NPP structures.

  11. Environmental assessment of facility operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Because DOE-GJPO regularly proposes and conducts many different on-site activities, DOE decided to evaluate these activities in one sitewide EA rather than in multiple, activity-specific documents. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for facility operations, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  12. A study of the influence of boron diffusion sources on the material and electrical characteristics of silicon p-n junctions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Kuan-Chun Andrew

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is . he sheet resistance x. is the junc. ion dep. h. This average ccnductivity is then applied to Irvin's cu ve cr a p-+yoe Gaussian layer in silicon to obtain the surface concentration. Impurity Profile Incremental etching is a technique... for removing thin sections of silicon by a timed etch in a PNO -HF mixture (23). It is a relatively rough but quick technique to determine the impurity profile of a deep junction. A volume mixture of 2$ HF, 98fo HNO is experimentally determined to be best...

  13. Fabrication of contacts for silicon solar cells including printing burn through layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S; Kaydanova, Tatiana; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabricating a contact (240) for a solar cell (200). The method includes providing a solar cell substrate (210) with a surface that is covered or includes an antireflective coating (220). For example, the substrate (210) may be positioned adjacent or proximate to an outlet of an inkjet printer (712) or other deposition device. The method continues with forming a burn through layer (230) on the coating (220) by depositing a metal oxide precursor (e.g., using an inkjet or other non-contact printing method to print or apply a volume of liquid or solution containing the precursor). The method includes forming a contact layer (240) comprising silver over or on the burn through layer (230), and then annealing is performed to electrically connect the contact layer (240) to the surface of the solar cell substrate (210) through a portion of the burn through layer (230) and the coating (220).

  14. Shunt-capacitor-assisted synchronization of oscillations in intrinsic Josephson junctions stack.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, I.; Halasz, G. B.; Bulaevskii, L. N.; Koshelev, A. E.; Materials Science Division; LANL

    2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a shunt capacitor, by coupling each Josephson junction to all the other junctions, stabilizes synchronized oscillations in an intrinsic Josephson junction stack biased by a dc current. This synchronization mechanism is similar to the previously discussed radiative coupling between junctions, however, it is not defined by the geometry of the stack. It is particularly important in crystals with smaller numbers of junctions (where the radiation coupling is weak), and is comparable with the effect of strong super-radiation in crystals with many junctions. The shunt also helps to enter the phase-locked regime in the beginning of the oscillations, after switching on the bias current. Furthermore, it may be used to tune radiation power, which drops as the shunt capacitance increases.

  15. Temperature dependent junction capacitance-voltage characteristics of Ni embedded TiN/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si metal–insulator–semiconductor structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panda, J.; Nath, T. K., E-mail: tnath@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Chattopadhyay, S. [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Amity Institute of Nano Technology, Amity University, Sector-125, Noida, Uttar Pradesh 201313 (India)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents the junction capacitance–voltage characteristics of highly textured/epitaxial Ni nanoparticle embedded in TiN matrix (TiN(Ni)) metal-insulator-semiconductor TiN(Ni)/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si (100) heterojunction in the temperature range of 10–300?K. This heterojunction behaves as metal-semiconductor junction with unavoidable leakage through native oxide SiO{sub 2} layer. The clockwise hysteresis loop has been observed in the capacitance-voltage characteristics measured at various frequencies mainly due to presence of trap centers at the TiN(Ni)/SiO{sub 2} interface and these are temperature dependent. The spin-dependent trap charge effect at the interface influences the quadratic nature of the capacitance with magnetic field. The junction magnetocapacitance (JMC) is observed to be dependent on both temperature and frequency. The highest JMC of this heterojunction has been observed at 200?K at higher frequencies (100?kHz–1?MHz). It is found that there is not much effect of band structure modification under magnetic field causing the JMC.

  16. Front contact solar cell with formed electrically conducting layers on the front side and backside

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cousins, Peter John

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by a silicon substrate and a first doped layer of a first dopant type on the backside of the solar cell. A second doped layer of a second dopant type makes an electrical connection to the substrate from the front side of the solar cell. A first metal contact of a first electrical polarity electrically connects to the first doped layer on the backside of the solar cell, and a second metal contact of a second electrical polarity electrically connects to the second doped layer on the front side of the solar cell. An external electrical circuit may be electrically connected to the first and second metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell.

  17. Mode stabilization mechanism of buried waveguide lasers with lateral diffused junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, K.L.; Chen, T.R.; Koren, U.; Lau, K.Y.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mode stabilization behavior of the buried active waveguide with lateral diffused junction is theoretically investigated. The study shows that for an active waveguide of width around 5 ..mu..m with a lateral diffused junction in the middle, the single fundamental transverse mode is preferred as the injection level is raised. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental results observed in the groove transverse junction InGaAsP/InP laser.

  18. Electronic transport transition at graphene/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??} junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Q. J.; Wang, H. S. [School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China) [School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Wang, H. M., E-mail: hmwang@mail.sim.ac.cn; Gao, B.; Li, Q.; Xie, X. M. [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Deng, L. W.; Hu, Z. W. [School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)] [School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the fabrication of graphene/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??} contacts and their superconducting proximity effect. Both the temperature dependence of resistance and the current bias dependence of resistance for the contacts are investigated, respectively. The results are compared with that of pure YBCO Hall bar. It is found that the differential resistance transits from a non-zero value to zero at high bias across graphene/YBCO junction below the transition temperature of YBCO, the phenomena indicate the tunneling of Cooper pairs from YBCO to graphene. As the YBCO film deposited by pulsed laser deposition has a rough surface, the graphene layer can contact with the edge of CuO{sub 2} planes. It allows that Cooper pairs could leak into graphene along the CuO{sub 2} planes.

  19. Very low 1/f barrier noise in sputtered MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with high tunneling magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, J. F.; Chen, J. Y.; Kurt, H.; Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Low frequency 1/f barrier noise has been investigated in sputtered MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a tunneling magnetoresistance ratio of up to 330% at room temperature. The lowest normalized noise parameter {alpha} of the tunnel barrier reaches 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12}-2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} {mu}m{sup 2}, which is comparable to that found in MTJs with the MgO barrier grown by MBE or electron-beam evaporation. This normalized barrier noise is almost bias independent in the voltage range of up to {+-}1.2 V. The low noise level and high voltage stability may reflect the high quality of the sputtered MgO with a uniform distribution of defects in the MgO layer.

  20. Compliant layer chucking surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaedel, Kenneth L. (Dublin, CA); Spence, Paul A. (Pleasanton, CA); Thompson, Samuel L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a thin layer of complaint material is deposited on the surface of a chuck to mitigate the deformation that an entrapped particle might cause in the part, such as a mask or a wafer, that is clamped to the chuck. The harder particle will embed into the softer layer as the clamping pressure is applied. The material composing the thin layer could be a metal or a polymer for vacuum or electrostatic chucks. It may be deposited in various patterns to affect an interrupted surface, such as that of a "pin" chuck, thereby reducing the probability of entrapping a particle.

  1. Superconducting qubit without Josephson junctions manipulated by orbital angular momentum of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Jae Yun

    2015-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous superconducting qubits have used Josephson junctions as an essential part which gives anharmonicity to make well-separated energy-level spacings. However, since a superconductor ring without Josephson junctions has intrinsically well-separated energy-level spacings, Josephson junctions are not necessary as long as one can achieve single-qubit operations. We show that orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light can be adopted as a qubit-control means and can eliminate the need of Josephson junctions. We provide theoretical analysis for the interaction between a superconducting ring and OAM of light. Feasibility study reveals that the proposed qubit has many advantages over the previous ones.

  2. Comment on "Analysis of quantum coherent semiconductor quantum dot p-i-n junction photovoltaic cells"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scully, Marlan O

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a comment on PRL paper by A.P. Kirk "Analysis of quantum coherent semiconductor quantum dot p-i-n junction photovoltaic cells"

  3. GaSb based ternary and quaternary diffused junction devices for TPV applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaram, V.S.; Saban, S.B.; Morgan, M.D.; Horne, W.E.; Evans, B.D.; Ketterl, J.R. [EDTEK Inc. 7082 S. 220th Street Kent, Washington 98032 (United States); Morosini, M.B.; Patel, N.B. [Instituto de Fisica, UNICAMP, Campinas, Brasil (Brazil); Field, H. [NREL, Golden, Colorado (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we report the characteristics of ternary, GaInSb (Eg=0.70eV) and quarternary, GaInAsSb (Eg=0.5eV) diffused junction photovoltaic devices. The unique feature of the quarternary device is the extended long-wavelength response to 2.1 microns enabling the efficient use of the blackbody-like thermal sources operating at 1373 K in thermophotovoltaic energy conversion systems. The ternary device was fabricated by diffusing zinc into a n-type (100) oriented GaInSb substrate. For the quarternary, a four micron thick Te doped GaInAsSb layer grown by LPE on a n-type GaSb(100) wafer was used as the starting substrate for zinc diffusion. The ternary device exhibits an open circuit voltage of 0.38 V, Fill Factor of 0.63 and a short circuit current of 0.8A/cm{sup 2}, while the corresponding values for the quarternary device are 0.25 V, 0.58 and 0.8A/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The peak internal quantum efficiency for the ternary is over 90{percent} and that of the quarternary is above 75{percent}. Process optimization should improve the performance charcateristics of the quarternary. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Influence of hydrogen patterning gas on electric and magnetic properties of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, J. H., E-mail: juno@fris.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Semiconductor R and D Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Hwasung (Korea, Republic of); Endoh, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Center for Innovative Integrated Electronic Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Kim, Y.; Kim, W. K.; Park, S. O. [Semiconductor R and D Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Hwasung (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    To identify the degradation mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using hydrogen, the properties of the MTJs were measured by applying an additional hydrogen etch process and a hydrogen plasma process to the patterned MTJs. In these studies, an additional 50?s hydrogen etch process caused the magnetoresistance (MR) to decrease from 103% to 14.7% and the resistance (R) to increase from 6.5?k? to 39?k?. Moreover, an additional 500?s hydrogen plasma process decreased the MR from 103% to 74% and increased R from 6.5?k? to 13.9?k?. These results show that MTJs can be damaged by the hydrogen plasma process as well as by the hydrogen etch process, as the atomic bonds in MgO may break and react with the exposed hydrogen gas. Compounds such as MgO hydrate very easily. We also calculated the damaged layer width (DLW) of the patterned MTJs after the hydrogen etching and plasma processes, to evaluate the downscaling limitations of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random-access memory (STT-MRAM) devices. With these calculations, the maximum DLWs at each side of the MTJ, generated by the etching and plasma processes, were 23.8?nm and 12.8?nm, respectively. This result validates that the hydrogen-based MTJ patterning processes cannot be used exclusively in STT-MRAMs beyond 20?nm.

  5. Layered Spinach Salad Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    cucumbers 2 tomatoes 1/2 cup low-fat mayonnaise 1/2 cup parmesan cheese, grated 1/4 cup milk 1 1/2 teaspoons size pieces, layer on bottom of a large bowl. 2. Rinse mushrooms off under cool water and use a soft half. Layer on top of vegetables. 6. To make salad dressing, add mayonnaise, cheese, milk, dill weed

  6. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  7. Iron Junction, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar Energy JumpIrem Geothermal Power PlantUtah:Junction,

  8. Monmouth Junction, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana:Northeast Asia | Open EnergyMongoliaJunction, New

  9. Wafer Bonding and Layer Transfer Processes for High Efficiency Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahler, J. M.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Ahn, C. G.; Atwater, H. A.; Wanlass, M. W.; Chu, C.; Iles, P. A.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wafer-bonded four-junction cell design consisting of InGaAs, InGaAsP, GaAs, and Ga0.5In0.5P subcells that could reach one-sun AM0 efficiencies of 35.4% is described. The design relies on wafer-bonding and layer transfer for integration of non-lattice-matched subcells. Wafer bonding and layer transfer processes have shown promise in the fabrication of InP/Si epitaxial templates for growth of the bottom InGaAs and InGaAsP subcells on a Si support substrate. Subsequent wafer bonding and layer transfer of a thin Ge layer onto the lower subcell stack can serve as an epitaxial template for GaAs and Ga0.5In0.5P subcells. Additionally, wafer bonded Ge/Si substrates offer the possibility to improve the mechanical performance of existing triple-junction solar cell designs, while simultaneously reducing their cost. Present results indicate that optically active III/V compound semiconductors can be grown on both Ge/Si and InP/Si heterostructures. Current-voltage electrical characterization of the interfaces of these structures indicates that both InP/Si and Ge/Si interfaces have specific resistances lower than 0.1 W?cm2 for heavily doped wafer bonded interfaces, enabling back surface power extraction from the finished cell structure.

  10. Lithium implantation at low temperature in silicon for sharp buried amorphous layer formation and defect engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliviero, E. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, Batiment 108, 91405 Orsay (France); David, M. L.; Beaufort, M. F.; Barbot, J. F. [Institut Pprime, CNRS-Universite de Poitiers-ENSMA, SP2MI, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP30179, 86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Fichtner, P. F. P. [Departamento de Metalurgia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av Bento Goncalves 9500, Caixa Postal 15051, 90035-190 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystalline-to-amorphous transformation induced by lithium ion implantation at low temperature has been investigated. The resulting damage structure and its thermal evolution have been studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy channelling (RBS/C) and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Lithium low-fluence implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature is shown to produce a three layers structure: an amorphous layer surrounded by two highly damaged layers. A thermal treatment at 400 Degree-Sign C leads to the formation of a sharp amorphous/crystalline interfacial transition and defect annihilation of the front heavily damaged layer. After 600 Degree-Sign C annealing, complete recrystallization takes place and no extended defects are left. Anomalous recrystallization rate is observed with different motion velocities of the a/c interfaces and is ascribed to lithium acting as a surfactant. Moreover, the sharp buried amorphous layer is shown to be an efficient sink for interstitials impeding interstitial supersaturation and {l_brace}311{r_brace} defect formation in case of subsequent neon implantation. This study shows that lithium implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature can be suitable to form a sharp buried amorphous layer with a well-defined crystalline front layer, thus having potential applications for defects engineering in the improvement of post-implantation layers quality and for shallow junction formation.

  11. Are ecosystem carbon inputs and outputs coupled at short time scales? A case study from adjacent pine and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Are ecosystem carbon inputs and outputs coupled at short time scales? A case study from adjacent and responses of Rsoil have been found on time scales of hours to weeks for different ecosystems, but most ecosystems over six and four measurement years, respectively, using both autocorrelation analysis

  12. VASCULAR PLANTS OF ADJACENT SERPENTINE AND GRANITE OUTCROPS ON THE DEER ISLES, MAINE, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    VASCULAR PLANTS OF ADJACENT SERPENTINE AND GRANITE OUTCROPS ON THE DEER ISLES, MAINE, U study of the vascular flora of a serpentine outcrop, Pine Hill, and that of a granite outcrop from serpentine and 89 from granite. Fifty-seven taxa were shared by both sites. Species richness (a

  13. Method and Apparatus for Remote Delivery and Manipulation of a Miniature Tool Adjacent a Work Piece in a Restricted Space

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sale, Christopher H.; Kaltenbaugh, Daniel R.

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for remote delivery and manipulation of a miniature tool adjacent a work piece in a restricted space, includes a tool camer, a camage for manipulating the tool carrier relative to the work piece, a first actuator for operating the carnage, and an optional remote secondary operating actuator for operating the first actuator.

  14. Inverted GaInP/(In)GaAs/InGaAs Triple-Junction Solar Cells with Low-Stress Metamorphic Bottom Junctions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J. F.; Kurtz, S. R.; Wanlass, M. W.; Ward, J. S.; Duda, A.; Friedman, D. J.; Olson, J. M.; McMahon, W. E.; Moriarty, T. E.; Kiehl, J. T.; Romero, M. J.; Norman, A. G.; Jones, K. M.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate high efficiency performance in two ultra-thin, Ge-free III-V semiconductor triple-junction solar cell device designs grown in an inverted configuration. Low-stress metamorphic junctions were engineered to achieve excellent photovoltaic performance with less than 3 x 106 cm-2 threading dislocations. The first design with band gaps of 1.83/1.40/1.00 eV, containing a single metamorphic junction, achieved 33.8% and 39.2% efficiencies under the standard one-sun global spectrum and concentrated direct spectrum at 131 suns, respectively. The second design with band gaps of 1.83/1.34/0.89 eV, containing two metamorphic junctions achieved 33.2% and 40.1% efficiencies under the standard one-sun global spectrum and concentrated direct spectrum at 143 suns, respectively.

  15. Photovoltaic nanopillar radial junction diode architecture enhanced by integrating semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals as light harvesters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Photovoltaic nanopillar radial junction diode architecture enhanced by integrating semiconductor hybridized, radial p-n junction based, nanopillar solar cells with photovoltaic performance enhanced. By furnishing Si based nanopillar photovoltaic diodes with CdSe quantum dots, we experimentally showed up

  16. Reliability of normal-state currentvoltage characteristics as an indicator of tunnel-junction barrier quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabson, David A.

    Department of Physics, PHY 114, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 Received 21 April 2000 conductance below Tc , we divide samples into junctions with an integral barrier and junctions having metallic pinholes in the barrier. © 2000 American Institute of Physics. S0003-6951 00 01138-4 Ferromagnet

  17. C-V Profiling of Ultrashallow Junctions using a Step-Like Background Doping Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technische Universiteit Delft

    C-V Profiling of Ultrashallow Junctions using a Step-Like Background Doping Profile Milos Popadi, Delft, The Netherlands m.popadic@tudelft.nl Abstract--A novel C-V profiling method that enables profiling of ultrashallow and ultra-abrupt junctions is described. The method takes advantage of a peculiar

  18. Tight JunctionAssociated Signaling Pathways Modulate Cell Proliferation in Uveal Melanoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tight Junction­Associated Signaling Pathways Modulate Cell Proliferation in Uveal Melanoma Ashwath the role of tight junction (TJ)­associ- ated signaling pathways in the proliferation of uveal melanoma. METHODS. Human uveal melanoma cell lines overexpressing the TJ molecule blood vessel epicardial substance

  19. A new junction termination technique: the Deep Trench Termination (DT2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A new junction termination technique: the Deep Trench Termination (DT2 ) L. Théolier1,2 , H. Mahfoz. In this work, a new concept of low cost, low surface and high efficiency junction termination for power devices is presented and experimentally validated. This termination is based on a large and deep trench filled by BCB

  20. Efficient broadband energy transfer via momentum matching at hybrid junctions of guided-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficient broadband energy transfer via momentum matching at hybrid junctions of guided://apl.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Efficient broadband energy transfer via momentum matching at hybrid junctions of guided, The American University in Cairo, New Cairo 11835, Egypt (Received 2 August 2012; accepted 5 September 2012

  1. OPTIMIZATION OF a-SiGe BASED TRIPLE, TANDEM AND SINGLE-JUNCTION SOLAR Xunming Deng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    OPTIMIZATION OF a-SiGe BASED TRIPLE, TANDEM AND SINGLE-JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS Xunming Deng Department cells, all employing high- quality a-SiGe cells, are reviewed in this paper. Incorporating various improvements in device fabrication, the UT group fabricated 1) triple-junction a-Si/a-SiGe/a- SiGe solar cells

  2. Josephson junction of non-Abelian superconductors and non-Abelian Josephson vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitta, Muneto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Josephson junction is made of two superconductors sandwiching an insulator, and a Josephson vortex is a magnetic vortex absorbed into the Josephson junction, whose dynamics can be described by the sine-Gordon equation. In a field theory framework, a flexible Josephson junction was proposed, in which the Josephson junction is represented by a domain wall separating two condensations and a Josephson vortex is a sine-Gordon soliton in the domain wall effective theory. In this paper, we propose a Josephson junction of non-Abelian color superconductors, that is described by a non-Abelian domain wall, and show that a non-Abelian vortex (color magnetic flux tube) absorbed into it is a non-Abelian Josephson vortex represented as a non-Abelian sine-Gordon soliton in the domain wall effective theory.

  3. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  4. Measurement of Component Cell Current-Voltage Characteristics in a Tandem-JunctionTwo-Terminal Solar Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    Measurement of Component Cell Current-Voltage Characteristics in a Tandem- JunctionTwo-Terminal-V) characteristics in a tandem-junction two-terminal solar cell is described. The measurements are performed with (a, solar cells Introduction In the course of fabricating and optimizing multiple-junction, two-terminal

  5. High Efficiency Narrow Gap and Tandem Junction Devices: Final Technical Report, 1 May 2002--31 October 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madan, A

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report uses a modified pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique that has been successfully developed to fabricate state-of-the-art nc-Si materials and devices. Specifically, we have achieved the following benchmarks: nc SiH device with an efficiency of 8% achieved at a deposition rate of {approx}1 A/s; nc SiH device with an efficiency of 7% achieved at a deposition rate of {approx}5 A/s; large-area technology developed using pulsed PECVD with uniformity of +/-5% over 25 cm x 35 cm; devices have been fabricated in the large-area system (part of Phase 3); an innovative stable four-terminal (4-T) tandem-junction device of h> 9% fabricated. (Note that the 4-T device was fabricated with existing technology base and with further development can reach stabilized h of 12%); and with improvement in Voc {approx} 650 mV, from the current value of 480 mV can lead to stable 4-T device with h>16%. Toward this objective, modified pulsed PECVD was developed where layer- by-layer modification of nc-SiH has been achieved. (Note that due to budget cuts at NREL, this project was curtailed by about one year.)

  6. Contactless electronic transport in a bio-molecular junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, Faruque M., E-mail: fhossain@unimelb.edu.au; Al-Dirini, Feras; Skafidas, Efstratios [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Center for Neural Engineering (CfNE), The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular electronics hold promise for next generation ultra-low power, nano-scale integrated electronics. The main challenge in molecular electronics is to make a reliable interface between molecules and metal electrodes. Interfacing metals and molecules detrimentally affects the characteristics of nano-scale molecular electronic devices. It is therefore essential to investigate alternative arrangements such as contact-less tunneling gaps wherever such configurations are feasible. We conduct ab initio density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions calculations to investigate the transport properties of a biocompatible glycine molecular junction. By analyzing the localized molecular orbital energy distributions and transmission probabilities in the transport-gap, we find a glycine molecule confined between two gold electrodes, without making a contact, is energetically stable and possesses high tunneling current resembling an excellent ohmic-like interface.

  7. Layer-by-layer assembly in confined geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeRocher, Jonathan P

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental nature of layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly in confined geometries was investigated for a number of different chemical systems. The first part of this thesis concerns the modification of microfluidic and ...

  8. Ion transport and structure of layer-by-layer assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutkenhaus, Jodie Lee

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) films of various architectures were examined as potential solid state electrolytes for electrochemical systems (e.g. batteries and fuel cells). The relationship between materials properties and ion ...

  9. Thermal Transitions in Layer-By-Layer Assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Choonghyun

    2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal transitions in layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies were investigated under dry and hydrated conditions. In the dry state, the effects of film thickness and the film deposition method on the glass transition temperature (Tg) were studied...

  10. Engineering electroresponsive layer-by-layer thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Daniel J., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroresponsive layer-by-layer (LbL) polymer films and polymer nanocomposite films were investigated as model systems for electrically triggered drug delivery applications and "mechanomutable" surface coating applications. ...

  11. Stability of winding cosmic wall lattices with X type junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandon Carter

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work confirms the stability of a class of domain wall lattice models that can produce accelerated cosmological expansion, with pressure to density ratio $w=-1/3$ at early times, and with $w=-2/3$ at late times when the lattice scale becomes large compared to the wall thickness. For walls of tension $T_{I}$, the relevant X type junctions could be unstable (for a sufficiently acute intersection angle $\\alpha$) against separation into a pair of Y type junctions joined by a compound wall, only if the tension $T_{II}$ of the latter were less than $2T_{I}$ (and for an approximately right-angled intersection if it were less that $\\sqrt{2} T_{I}$) which can not occur in the class considered here. In an extensive category of multicomponent scalar field models of forced harmonic (linear or non-linear) type it is shown how the relevant tension -- which is the same as the surface energy density $U$ of the wall -- can be calculated as the minimum (geodesic) distance between the relevant vacuum states as measured on the space of field values $\\Phi^i$ using a positive definite (Riemannian) energy metric $dU^2=\\tilde G_{ij} d\\Phi^i d\\Phi^j$ that is obtained from the usual kinetic metric (which is flat for a model with ordinary linear kinetic part) by application of a conformal factor proportional to the relevant potential function $V$. For suitably periodic potential functions there will be corresponding periodic configurations -- with parallel walls characterised by incrementation of a winding number -- in which the condition for stability of large scale bunching modes is shown to be satisfied automatically. It is suggested that such a configuration -- with a lattice lengthscale comparable to intergalactic separation distances -- might have been produced by a late stage of cosmological inflation.

  12. Multijunction photovoltaic device and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arya, Rajeewa R. (Jamison, PA); Catalano, Anthony W. (Furlong, PA)

    1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A multijunction photovoltaic device includes first and second amorphous silicon PIN photovoltaic cells in a stacked arrangement. An interface layer, composed of a doped silicon compound, is disposed between the two cells and has a lower bandgap than the respective n- and p-type adjacent layers of the first and second cells. The interface layer forms an ohmic contact with the one or the adjacent cell layers of the same conductivity type, and a tunnel junction with the other of the adjacent cell layers. The disclosed device is fabricated by a glow discharge process.

  13. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-8:4 Fuel Storage Basin West Side Adjacent and Side Slope Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. D. Habel

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance with cleanup criteria for the 118-F-8:4 Fuel Storage Basin West Side Adjacent and Side Slope Soils. The rectangular-shaped concrete basin on the south side of the 105-F Reactor building served as an underwater collection, storage, and transfer facility for irradiated fuel elements discharged from the reactor.

  14. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy analyses of GaAs/Si interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    -bonded multi-junction solar cells Dietrich Häussler a , Lothar Houben b , Stephanie Essig c , Mert Kurttepeli online 20 July 2013 Keywords: Multi-junction solar cell Wafer bonding Interfaces Aberration corrected and composition fluctuations near interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells. Multi-junction solar

  15. Reduced low frequency noise in electron beam evaporated MgO magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diao, Z.; Feng, J. F.; Kurt, H.; Feng, G.; Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare low frequency noise in magnetic tunnel junctions with MgO barriers prepared by electron-beam evaporation with those prepared by radiofrequency sputtering, both showing a high tunneling magnetoresistance. The normalized noise parameter in the parallel state of junctions with evaporated barriers is at least one order of magnitude lower than that in junctions with sputtered barriers, and exhibits a weaker bias dependence. The lowest normalized noise is in the 10{sup -11} mum{sup 2} range. A lower density of oxygen vacancies acting as charge trap states in the evaporated MgO is responsible for the lower noise.

  16. Performance of single-junction and dual-junction InGaP/GaAs solar cells under low concentration ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Aurangzeb; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Takamoto, Tatsuya [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama 36688 (United States); Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Sharp Corporation, 282-1 Hajikami, Shinjo, Nara 639-2198 (Japan)

    2004-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the performance of single-junction InGaP/GaAs and dual-junction InGaP/GaAs tandem cells under low concentration ratios (up to 15 suns), before and after 1 MeV electron irradiation is presented. Analysis of the tunnel junction parameters under different concentrated light illuminations reveals that the peak current (J{sub P}) and valley current (J{sub V}) densities should be greater than the short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) for better performance. The tunnel junction behavior against light intensity improved after irradiation. This led to the suggestion that the peak current density (J{sub P}) and valley current density (J{sub V}) of the tunnel junction were enhanced after irradiation or the peak current was shifted to higher concentration. The recovery of the radiation damage under concentrated light illumination conditions suggests that the performance of the InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cell can be enhanced even under low concentration ratios.

  17. The effect of averaging adjacent planes for artifact reduction in matrix inversion tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godfrey, Devon J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Page McAdams, H. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Dobbins, James T. III [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Physics, and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) uses linear systems theory and knowledge of the imaging geometry to remove tomographic blur that is present in conventional backprojection tomosynthesis reconstructions, leaving in-plane detail rendered clearly. The use of partial-pixel interpolation during the backprojection process introduces imprecision in the MITS modeling of tomographic blur, and creates low-contrast artifacts in some MITS planes. This paper examines the use of MITS slabs, created by averaging several adjacent MITS planes, as a method for suppressing partial-pixel artifacts. Methods: Human chest tomosynthesis projection data, acquired as part of an IRB-approved pilot study, were used to generate MITS planes, three-plane MITS slabs (MITSa3), five-plane MITS slabs (MITSa5), and seven-plane MITS slabs (MITSa7). These were qualitatively examined for partial-pixel artifacts and the visibility of normal and abnormal anatomy. Additionally, small (5 mm) subtle pulmonary nodules were simulated and digitally superimposed upon human chest tomosynthesis projection images, and their visibility was qualitatively assessed in the different reconstruction techniques. Simulated images of a thin wire were used to generate modulation transfer function (MTF) and slice-sensitivity profile curves for the different MITS and MITS slab techniques, and these were examined for indications of partial-pixel artifacts and frequency response uniformity. Finally, mean-subtracted, exposure-normalized noise power spectra (ENNPS) estimates were computed and compared for MITS and MITS slab reconstructions, generated from 10 sets of tomosynthesis projection data of an acrylic slab. The simulated in-plane MTF response of each technique was also combined with the square root of the ENNPS estimate to yield stochastic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) information about the different reconstruction techniques. Results: For scan angles of 20 Degree-Sign and 5 mm plane separation, seven MITS planes must be averaged to sufficiently remove partial-pixel artifacts. MITSa7 does appear to subtly reduce the contrast of high-frequency 'edge' information, but the removal of partial-pixel artifacts makes the appearance of low-contrast, fine-detail anatomy even more conspicuous in MITSa7 slices. MITSa7 also appears to render simulated subtle 5 mm pulmonary nodules with greater visibility than MITS alone, in both the open lung and regions overlying the mediastinum. Finally, the MITSa7 technique reduces stochastic image variance, though the in-plane stochastic SNR (for very thin objects which do not span multiple MITS planes) is only improved at spatial frequencies between 0.05 and 0.20 cycles/mm. Conclusions: The MITSa7 method is an improvement over traditional single-plane MITS for thoracic imaging and the pulmonary nodule detection task, and thus the authors plan to use the MITSa7 approach for all future MITS research at the authors' institution.

  18. 0.7-eV GaInAs Junction for a GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs(1eV)/GaInAs(0.7eV) Four-Junction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Geisz, J. F.; Norman, A. G.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction solar cells, focusing on adding a fourth junction to the Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5} P/GaAs/Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As inverted three-junction cell. This cell, grown inverted on GaAs so that the lattice-mismatched Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As third junction is the last one grown, has demonstrated 38% efficiency, and 40% is likely in the near future. To achieve still further gains, a lower-bandgap Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction could be added to the three-junction structure for a four-junction cell whose efficiency could exceed 45% under concentration. Here, we present the initial development of the Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction. Junctions of various bandgaps ranging from 0.88 to 0.73 eV were grown, in order to study the effect of the different amounts of lattice mismatch. At a bandgap of 0.88 eV, junctions were obtained with very encouraging {approx}80% quantum efficiency, 57% fill factor, and 0.36 eV open-circuit voltage. The device performance degrades with decreasing bandgap (i.e., increasing lattice mismatch). We model the four-junction device efficiency vs. fourth junction bandgap to show that an 0.7-eV fourth-junction bandgap, while optimal if it could be achieved in practice, is not necessary; an 0.9-eV bandgap would still permit significant gains in multijunction cell efficiency while being easier to achieve than the lower-bandgap junction.

  19. Spin-polarized tunneling in MgO-based tunnel junctions with superconducting electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schebaum, Oliver

    We prepared magnetic tunnel junctions with one ferromagnetic and one superconducting Al–Si electrode. Pure cobalt electrodes were compared with a Co–Fe–B alloy and the Heusler compound Co[subscript 2]FeAl. The polarization ...

  20. Superconducting qubit without Josephson junctions manipulated by the orbital angular momentum of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Jae Yun

    2015-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional superconducting qubits have used Josephson junctions as an essential part to provide anharmonicity for well-separated energy-level spacings. However, because a superconducting ring without Josephson junctions has intrinsically well-separated energy-level spacings, Josephson junctions are not necessary as long as one can achieve single-qubit operations. We show that the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light can be adopted as a qubit-control means and can eliminate the need for Josephson junctions. We provide theoretical analysis for the interaction between a superconducting ring and the OAM of light. The feasibility study reveals that the proposed qubit has many advantages over the previous ones. Moreover, because the qubits are controlled optically, no-circuit architecture would be possible if two-qubit gates were achieved by moving the rings.

  1. Motion of fluxons in distributed two-dimensional Josephson tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nevirkovets, I.P.; Rudenko, E.M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A strong asymmetry is observed in the current--voltage characteristics of distributed two-dimensional Sn--I--Sn, Sn--I--Pb tunnel junctions with dimensions L>>lambda/sub J/ when an external magnetic field is applied in the plane of the junction perpendicular to the L dimension for different orientations of the field. A resistive section in the form of an almost vertical step appears in the IVC in one orientation of the field and is absent in the opposite orientation. It is shown that the appearance of the steps is related to the conditions of motion of Josephson vortices in tunnel junctions under the action of the Lorentz force in the presence of a current domain at the edge of the distributed junction.

  2. EFFECT OF PREPARATION PARAMETERS ON LIGHT SENSITIVITY IN SUPERCONDUCTIVE TUNNEL JUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Italy Résumé. 2014 Des jonctions « tunnel » supraconductrices utilisant du sulfure de cadmium et du al. [17] have considered semiconductor barriers for low capacitance tunnel junctions. Light can be depo- sited in ultra high vacuum systems without fear of contamination. Work

  3. Gap junction intercellular communication: a microinjection investigation of fibroblast and epithelial cell lines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pahlka, Raymond Benton

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters as well as optimal cell conditions for effective, repeatable studies using the microinjection protocol. The second objective was to determine whether or not the AG1522 cell line exhibited gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) through...

  4. Back to the crossroads of Flatbush--the junction--student housing for Brooklyn College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Keith A. (Keith Anthony)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The crossroads of Flatbush (often called The Junction) is a five point intersection of vehicular and pedestrian traffic. A crossroad where ethnic groups step beyond subtle neighborhood boundaries and merge to use public ...

  5. Device characterization for design optimization of 4 junction inverted metamorphic concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, John F.; France, Ryan M.; Steiner, Myles A.; Friedman, Daniel J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); García, Iván [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401 USA and Instituto de Energía Solar, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Avda Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative electroluminescence (EL) and luminescent coupling (LC) analysis, along with more conventional characterization techniques, are combined to completely characterize the subcell JV curves within a fourjunction (4J) inverted metamorphic solar cell (IMM). The 4J performance under arbitrary spectral conditions can be predicted from these subcell JV curves. The internal radiative efficiency (IRE) of each junction has been determined as a function of current density from the external radiative efficiency using optical modeling, but this required the accurate determination of the individual junction current densities during the EL measurement as affected by LC. These measurement and analysis techniques can be applied to any multijunction solar cell. The 4J IMM solar cell used to illustrate these techniques showed excellent junction quality as exhibited by high IRE and a one-sun AM1.5D efficiency of 36.3%. This device operates up to 1000 suns without limitations due to any of the three tunnel junctions.

  6. Grain boundary and triple junction constraints during martensitic transformation in shape memory alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueland, Stian Melhus

    We investigate the role of grain constraint upon martensitic transformation through in situ scanning electron microscope tensile experiments on shape memory microwires with a small number of grains and grain junctions. The ...

  7. Formation of Porous Layers by Electrochemical Etching of Germanium and Gallium Arsenide for Cleave Engineered Layer Transfer (CELT) Application in High Efficiency Multi-Junction Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fong, David Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photovoltaic devices with a world record efficiency ofhigh efficiencies as compared to traditional photovoltaic

  8. Formation of Porous Layers by Electrochemical Etching of Germanium and Gallium Arsenide for Cleave Engineered Layer Transfer (CELT) Application in High Efficiency Multi-Junction Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fong, David Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    film photovoltaics [1]. This roughly doubling of efficiencyMJ photovoltaics. MJ solar cells achieve higher efficiencies

  9. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  10. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar (Pleasantville, NY); Holland, Orin Wayne (Lenoir, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  11. Transverse-modal behavior of a transverse junction stripe laser excited by a short electrical pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, K.Y.; Yariv, A.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transverse-modal behavior of a lateral injection gain-guided laser (the transverse junction strip (TJS) laser) excited by a short (70 ps) electrical pulse is investigated experimentally and theoretically. It is predicted theoretically and observed experimentally that the transverse mode strongly depends on the excitation pulse amplitude and the dc bias current (which is set below threshold). This dependence is found to be due to transient lateral carrier diffusion at the lasing junction.

  12. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

  13. Apparatus and methods for impingement cooling of an undercut region adjacent a side wall of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The inturned flange has a plurality of apertures for directing cooling steam to cool the side wall between adjacent nozzle segments.

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beach, R.; Prahl, D.; Lange, R.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  15. Spin Josephson effect in topological superconductor-ferromagnet junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, C. D.; Wang, J., E-mail: jwang@seu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The composite topological superconductor (TS), made of one-dimensional spin-orbit coupled nanowire with proximity-induced s-wave superconductivity, is not a pure p-wave superconductor but still has a suppressed s-wave pairing. We propose to probe the spin texture of the p-wave pairing in this composite TS by examining possible spin supercurrents in an unbiased TS/ferromagnet junction. It is found that both the exchange-coupling induced and spin-flip reflection induced spin currents exist in the setup and survive even in the topological phase. We showed that besides the nontrivial p-wave pairing state accounting for Majorana Fermions, there shall be a trivial p-wave pairing state that contributes to spin supercurrent. The trivial p-wave pairing state is diagnosed from the mixing effect between the suppressed s-wave pairing and the topologically nontrivial p-wave pairing. The d vector of the TS is proved not to be rigorously perpendicular to the spin projection of p-wave pairings. Our findings are also confirmed by the Kitaev's p-wave model with a nonzero s-wave pairing.

  16. Quantum interference in thermoelectric molecular junctions: A toy model perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nozaki, Daijiro, E-mail: daijiro.nozaki@gmail.com, E-mail: research@nano.tu-dresden.de [Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Avdoshenko, Stas M. [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, 100 E. 24th St. A1590, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Sevinçli, Hâldun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, Gulbahce Kampusu 35430 Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Cuniberti, Gianaurelio [Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Dresden Center for Computational Materials Science (DCCMS), TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfAED), TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum interference (QI) phenomena between electronic states in molecular circuits offer a new opportunity to design new types of molecular devices such as molecular sensors, interferometers, and thermoelectric devices. Controlling the QI effect is a key challenge for such applications. For the development of single molecular devices employing QI effects, a systematic study of the relationship between electronic structure and the quantum interference is needed. In order to uncover the essential topological requirements for the appearance of QI effects and the relationship between the QI-affected line shape of the transmission spectra and the electronic structures, we consider a homogeneous toy model where all on-site energies are identical and model four types of molecular junctions due to their topological connectivities. We systematically analyze their transmission spectra, density of states, and thermoelectric properties. Even without the degree of freedom for on-site energies an asymmetric Fano peak could be realized in the homogeneous systems with the cyclic configuration. We also calculate the thermoelectric properties of the model systems with and without fluctuation of on-site energies. Even under the fluctuation of the on-site energies, the finite thermoelectrics are preserved for the Fano resonance, thus cyclic configuration is promising for thermoelectric applications. This result also suggests the possibility to detect the cyclic configuration in the homogeneous systems and the presence of the QI features from thermoelectric measurements.

  17. Investigation of redox processes at semiconductor electrode liquid junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koval, C.A.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in fundamental aspects of photoelectrochemical cells has been in the following areas: chemical probes for hot carrier processes, electrostatic theory for describing electrical interactions at interfaces, and kinetics of electron transfer at ideal semiconductor solution interfaces. Our goal is to achieve a better understanding of dark and photo-induced current flow at the semiconductor electrode/redox electrolyte interface (SEI) so that devices and processes utilizing this interface for solar energy conversion can be developed or improved. Our most important accomplishment has been the development of a redox system capable of detecting hot electrons at the p-InP/acetonitrile interface. Also, we have examined electrostatic theory for the image potential of an ion as a function of distance from the SEI. Finally, our group was one of the first to realize that the 2-dimensional metal chalcogenides (MC) are excellent materials for fundamental studies of electron transfer at the SEI. One of the chief potential advantages for use of MC's is the formation of semiconductor/liquid junctions with nearly ideal electrochemical properties. 27 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Artificial Neural Networks Single Layer Networks Multi Layer Networks Generalization Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjellström, Hedvig

    Artificial Neural Networks Single Layer Networks Multi Layer Networks Generalization Artificial Neural Networks Artificial Neural Networks Single Layer Networks Multi Layer Networks Generalization 1 Artificial Neural Networks Properties Applications Classical Examples Biological Background 2 Single Layer

  19. Two-dimensional double layer in plasma in a diverging magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, S. K.; Raychaudhuri, S.; Chowdhury, S.; Janaki, M. S.; Hui, A. K. [Plasma Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma created by an inductive RF discharge is allowed to expand along a diverging magnetic field. Measurement of the axial plasma potential profile reveals the formation of an electric double layer near the throat of the expansion chamber. An accelerated ion beam has been detected in the downstream region, confirming the presence of the double layer. The 2-D nature of the ion energy distribution function of the downstream plasma has been studied by a movable ion energy analyser, which shows that the beam radius increases along the axial distance. The 2-D structure of the plasma potential has been studied by a movable emissive probe. The existence of a secondary lobe in the contour plot of plasma equipotential is a new observation. It is also an interesting observation that the most diverging magnetic field line not intercepting the junction of the discharge tube and the expansion chamber has an electric field aligned with it.

  20. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Dennis P. (Maplewood, MN); Schmoeckel, Alison K. (Stillwater, MN); Vernstrom, George D. (Cottage Grove, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Wood, Thomas E. (Stillwater, MN); Yang, Ruizhi (Halifax, CA); Easton, E. Bradley (Halifax, CA); Dahn, Jeffrey R. (Hubley, CA); O'Neill, David G. (Lake Elmo, MN)

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  1. Hyaluronic Acid Gel Injection to Prevent Thermal Injury of Adjacent Gastrointestinal Tract during Percutaneous Liver Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasegawa, Takaaki, E-mail: hasegawat@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Takaki, Haruyuki; Miyagi, Hideki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Fujimori, Masashi; Sakuma, Hajime; Yamakado, Koichiro [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of hyaluronic acid gel injection to separate the gastrointestinal tract from the tumor during liver radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Eleven patients with liver tumors measuring 0.9-3.5 cm (mean {+-} standard deviation, 2.1 {+-} 0.8 cm) that were adjacent to the gastrointestinal tracts received RFA after the mixture of hyaluronic acid gel and contrast material (volume, 26.4 {+-} 14.5 mL; range, 10-60 mL) was injected between the tumor and the gastrointestinal tract under computed tomographic-fluoroscopic guidance. Each tumor was separated from the gastrointestinal tract by 1.0-1.5 cm (distance, 1.2 {+-} 0.2 cm) after injection of hyaluronic acid gel, and subsequent RFA was performed without any complications in all patients. Although tumor enhancement disappeared in all patients, local tumor progression was found in a patient (9.1 %, 1 of 11) during the follow-up of 5.5 {+-} 3.2 months (range, 0.4-9.9 months). In conclusion, hyaluronic acid gel injection is a safe and useful technique to avoid thermal injury of the adjacent gastrointestinal tract during liver RFA.

  2. Challenges associated with final status survey implementation at a Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (Fusrap) Site's adjacent properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokody, K.J. [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Tonawanda, NY (United States); Boyle, J.D. [U. S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several properties located adjacent to the Linde Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site in Tonawanda, New York were radiologically contaminated during Manhattan Engineer District (MED) era activities. These properties exhibited a combination of unique characteristics not previously encountered at the Linde Site. This included the properties being littered with building debris, a combination of metals and cesium-137 (Cs-137) commingled in the soil, thorium-230 (Th-230) being the dominant radioactive MED contaminant, and the radioactive contamination consisting of a five to seventy six centimeter thick black colored lens located at various depths below the ground surface. Because of the unique characteristics, several challenges were encountered with the characterization, implementation of the final status survey process to demonstrate compliance with the Record of Decision (ROD) [1], and subsequent remediation of these properties. Overcoming these challenges required a reevaluation of the previously developed gross gamma screening and soil core screening correlation values that ensured both the primary ROD requirements and expected residual concentrations would be met. Furthermore, modifications to the sampling, field implementation, and documentation process necessitated a revision to the Final Status Survey Plan (FSSP) to accommodate the unique conditions present at the adjacent properties. (authors)

  3. Paleoenvironments and hydrocarbon potential of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation of southwestern Alabama and adjacent coastal water area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Jurassic Norphlet sediments in southwestern Alabama and the adjacent coastal water area accumulated under arid climatic conditions. The Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States extended into southwestern Alabama, providing a barrier for air and water circulation during Norphlet deposition. Norphlet paleogeography was dominated by a broad desert plain rimmed to the north and east by the Appalachians and to the south by a developing shallow sea. Initiation of Norphlet sedimentation was a result of erosion of the southern Appalachians. Norphlet conglomerates were deposited in coalescing alluvial fans in proximity to an Appalachian source. The conglomeratic sandstones grade downdip into red-bed lithofacies that accumulated in distal portions of alluvial fan and wadi systems. Quartzose sandstones (Denkman Member) were deposited as dune and interdune sediments on a broad desert plain. The source of the sand was the updip and adjacent alluvial fan, plain, and wadi deposits. A marine transgression was initiated late in Denkman deposition, resulting in the reworking of previously deposited Norphlet sediments. Norphlet hydrocarbon potential in southwestern and offshore Alabama is excellent with four oil and gas fields already established. Petroleum traps discovered to date are primarily structural traps involving salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps associated with salt movement. Reservoir rocks consist of quartzose sandstones, which are principally eolian in origin. Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were probably the source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons.

  4. Diagnostics of the Coronal Hole and the adjacent Quiet Sun by The Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kayshap, P; Srivastava, A K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison between a Coronal Hole (CH) and the adjacent Quiet-Sun (QS) has been performed using spectroscopic diagnostics of Hinode/ the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Coronal funnels play an important role in the formation and propagation of the nascent fast solar wind. Applying Gaussian fitting procedures to the observed line profiles, Doppler velocity, intensity, line width (FWHM) and electron density have been estimated over CH and adjacent QS region of a North Polar Coronal Hole (NPCH). The aim of this study is to identify the coronal funnels based on spectral signatures. Excess width regions (excess FWHM above a threshold level) have been identified in QS and CH. The plasma flow inversion (average red-shifts changing to blue-shifts at a specific height) in CH and excess width regions of QS take place at ~ 5.01$\\times$10$^{5}$ K. Furthermore, high density concentration in excess width regions of QS provides an indication that these regions are the footprints of coronal funnels. We have also found that...

  5. Distribution of Pd, Ag & U in the SiC Layer of an Irradiated TRISO Fuel Particle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas M. Lillo; Isabella J. van Rooyen

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of silver, uranium and palladium in the silicon carbide (SiC) layer of an irradiated TRISO fuel particle was studied using samples extracted from the SiC layer using focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. Transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy was used to identify the presence of the specific elements of interest at grain boundaries, triple junctions and precipitates in the interior of SiC grains. Details on sample fabrication, errors associated with measurements of elemental migration distances and the distances migrated by silver, palladium and uranium in the SiC layer of an irradiated TRISO particle from the AGR-1 program are reported.

  6. Method of junction formation for CIGS photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delahoy, Alan E. (Rocky Hill, NJ)

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur is used to improve the performance of CIGS devices prepared by the evaporation of a single source ZIS type compound to form a buffer layer on the CIGS. The sulfur may be evaporated, or contained in the ZIS type material, or both. Vacuum evaporation apparatus of many types useful in the practice of the invention are known in the art. Other methods of delivery, such as sputtering, or application of a thiourea solution, may be substituted for evaporation.

  7. Method of junction formation for CIGS photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delahoy, Alan E.

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur is used to improve the performance of CIGS devices prepared by the evaporation of a single source ZIS type compound to form a buffer layer on the CIGS. The sulfur may be evaporated, or contained in the ZIS type material, or both. Vacuum evaporation apparatus of many types useful in the practice of the invention are known in the art. Other methods of delivery, such as sputtering, or application of a thiourea solution, may be substituted for evaporation.

  8. Transition voltages of vacuum-spaced and molecular junctions with Ag and Pt electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kunlin; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin, E-mail: smhou@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition voltage of vacuum-spaced and molecular junctions constructed with Ag and Pt electrodes is investigated by non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that, similarly to the case of Au-vacuum-Au previously studied, the transition voltages of Ag and Pt metal-vacuum-metal junctions with atomic protrusions on the electrode surface are determined by the local density of states of the p-type atomic orbitals of the protrusion. Since the energy position of the Pt 6p atomic orbitals is higher than that of the 5p/6p of Ag and Au, the transition voltage of Pt-vacuum-Pt junctions is larger than that of both Ag-vacuum-Ag and Au-vacuum-Au junctions. When one moves to analyzing asymmetric molecular junctions constructed with biphenyl thiol as central molecule, then the transition voltage is found to depend on the specific bonding site for the sulfur atom in the thiol group. In particular agreement with experiments, where the largest transition voltage is found for Ag and the smallest for Pt, is obtained when one assumes S binding at the hollow-bridge site on the Ag/Au(111) surface and at the adatom site on the Pt(111) one. This demonstrates the critical role played by the linker-electrode binding geometry in determining the transition voltage of devices made of conjugated thiol molecules.

  9. Network layer Connectionless datagram forwarding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (passed down by transport layer) into datagrams Destination host delivers segments up to transport layer by the cold war " If there exists a path, routers will put it in the routing table automatically Forwarding in the original order Physical Link Network Transport Application Physical Link Network Transport Application

  10. Nonequilibrium transport through quantum-wire junctions and boundary defects for free massless bosonic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaw?dzki, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a model of quantum-wire junctions where the latter are described by conformal-invariant boundary conditions of the simplest type in the multicomponent compactified massless scalar free field theory representing the bosonized Luttinger liquids in the bulk of wires. The boundary conditions result in the scattering of charges across the junction with nontrivial reflection and transmission amplitudes. The equilibrium state of such a system, corresponding to inverse temperature $\\beta$ and electric potential $V$, is explicitly constructed both for finite and for semi-infinite wires. In the latter case, a stationary nonequilibrium state describing the wires kept at different temperatures and potentials may be also constructed. The main result of the present paper is the calculation of the full counting statistics (FCS) of the charge and energy transfers through the junction in a nonequilibrium situation. Explicit expressions are worked out for the generating function of FCS and its large-deviations asym...

  11. Delocalised oxygen as the origin of two-level defects in Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy C. DuBois; Manolo C. Per; Salvy P. Russo; Jared H. Cole

    2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key problems facing superconducting qubits and other Josephson junction devices is the decohering effects of bi-stable material defects. Although a variety of phenomenological models exist, the true microscopic origin of these defects remains elusive. For the first time we show that these defects may arise from delocalisation of the atomic position of the oxygen in the oxide forming the Josephson junction barrier. Using a microscopic model, we compute experimentally observable parameters for phase qubits. Such defects are charge neutral but have non-zero response to both applied electric field and strain. This may explain the observed long coherence time of two-level defects in the presence of charge noise, while still coupling to the junction electric field and substrate phonons.

  12. Physical Layer Characteristics and Techniques for Visible Light Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Kaiyun

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the illuminance variation with adjacent LED lamp distance4.4.2 E?ect of the adjacent LED lamp distance 4.4.3 E?ect ofof di?erent LED lamps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Input

  13. arXiv:cond-mat/0301467v219Mar2003 Quantum effects in small-capacitance single Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    is that the effective impedance of an array can be varied in situ by applying an external magnetic field perpen- dicular measured the current-voltage (I-V ) characteristics of small-capacitance single Josephson junctions at low devices (SQUIDs). The single-junction I-V curve is sensitive to the impedance of the environment, which

  14. FILM ADHESION IN TRIPLE JUNCTION a-Si SOLAR CELLS ON POLYIMIDE and X. Deng1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    FILM ADHESION IN TRIPLE JUNCTION a-Si SOLAR CELLS ON POLYIMIDE SUBSTRATES A. Vijh1,2 , X. Yang1 , W encountered during fabrication of triple junction a-Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex

  15. MODELING OF TRIPLE JUNCTION A-SI SOLAR CELLS USING ASA: ANALYSIS OF DEVICE PERFORMANCE UNDER VARIOUS FAILURE SCENARIOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    have experienced a significant increase in the recent years. Solar panels with triple- junction found. To assist the optimization of solar cell fabrication and cost-effective industrial photovoltaicMODELING OF TRIPLE JUNCTION A-SI SOLAR CELLS USING ASA: ANALYSIS OF DEVICE PERFORMANCE UNDER

  16. Effect of Front-Side Silver Metallization on Underlying n+-p Junction in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. S.; Li, Z. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; Liang, L.; Ionkin, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the effect of front-side Ag metallization on the underlying n+-p junction of multicrystalline Si solar cells. The junction quality beneath the contacts was investigated by characterizing the uniformities of the electrostatic potential and doping concentration across the junction, using scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. We investigated cells with a commercial Ag paste (DuPont PV159) and fired at furnace setting temperatures of 800 degrees, 840 degrees, and 930 degrees C, which results in actual cell temperatures ~100 degrees C lower than the setting temperature and the three cells being under-, optimal-, and over-fired. We found that the uniformity of the junction beneath the Ag contact was significantly degraded by the over-firing, whereas the junction retained good uniformity with the optimal- and under-fire temperatures. Further, Ag crystallites with widely distributed sizes from <100 nm to several ?m were found at the Ag/Si interface of the over-fired cell. Large crystallites were imaged as protrusions into Si deeper than the junction depth. However, the junction was not broken down; instead, it was reformed on the entire front of the crystallite/Si interface. We propose a mechanism of the junction-quality degradation, based on emitter Si melting at the temperature around the Ag-Si eutectic point during firing, and subsequent recrystallization with incorporation of impurities in the Ag paste and with formation of crystallographic defects during quenching.

  17. HIGH-EFFICIENCY BACK-JUNCTION SILICON SOLAR CELL WITH AN IN-LINE EVAPORATED ALUMINUM FRONT GRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HIGH-EFFICIENCY BACK-JUNCTION SILICON SOLAR CELL WITH AN IN-LINE EVAPORATED ALUMINUM FRONT GRID M-diffused back-junction emitter. The aluminum front side grid is evaporated in an industrial-type in-thick silicon shadow masks for the in-line evaporation of the aluminum front grid. The masks are fabricated

  18. D0 layer 0 innermost layer of silicon microstrip tracker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanagaki, K.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new inner layer silicon strip detector has been built and will be installed in the existing silicon microstrip tracker in D0. They report on the motivation, design, and performance of this new detector.

  19. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell is described having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of ''pinning'' the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14[+-]0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap. 7 figures.

  20. Hetero-junctions of Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis and Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yap, Yoke Khin

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Hetero-junctions of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are expected to have appealing new properties that are not available from pure BNNTs and CNTs. Theoretical studies indicate that BNNT/CNT junctions could be multifunctional and applicable as memory, spintronic, electronic, and photonics devices with tunable band structures. This will lead to energy and material efficient multifunctional devices that will be beneficial to the society. However, experimental realization of BNNT/CNT junctions was hindered by the absent of a common growth technique for BNNTs and CNTs. In fact, the synthesis of BNNTs was very challenging and may involve high temperatures (up to 3000 degree Celsius by laser ablation) and explosive chemicals. During the award period, we have successfully developed a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique to grow BNNTs at 1100-1200 degree Celsius without using dangerous chemicals. A series of common catalyst have then been identified for the synthesis of BNNTs and CNTs. Both of these breakthroughs have led to our preliminary success in growing two types of BNNT/CNT junctions and two additional new nanostructures: 1) branching BNNT/CNT junctions and 2) co-axial BNNT/CNT junctions, 3) quantum dots functionalized BNNTs (QDs-BNNTs), 4) BNNT/graphene junctions. We have started to understand their structural, compositional, and electronic properties. Latest results indicate that the branching BNNT/CNT junctions and QDs-BNNTs are functional as room-temperature tunneling devices. We have submitted the application of a renewal grant to continue the study of these new energy efficient materials. Finally, this project has also strengthened our collaborations with multiple Department of Energy�s Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), including the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINTs) at Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results obtained during the current funding period have led to the publication of twelve peer reviewed articles, three review papers, two book and one encyclopedia chapters, and thirty eight conference/seminar presentation. One US provisional patent and one international patent have also been filed.

  1. METEOROLOGY 130 Boundary Layer Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    4) Turbulence Kinetic Energy · TKE budget and terms · Stability concepts · Richardson number 5) Measuring the Boundary Layer · Balloons · Radars · Sodars · Towers (micrometeorology) · Measuring Turbulence Time Series Analysis 8) Similarity Theory and Turbulence Closure 9) Surface Energy Budgets 10) Special

  2. THE MARTIAN ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    THE MARTIAN ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER A. Petrosyan,1 B. Galperin,2 S. E. Larsen,3 S. R. Lewis,4 A [Haberle et al., 1993a; Larsen et al., 2002; Hinson et al., 2008]. At night, convection is inhibited

  3. General Comparison of Power Loss in Single-Layer and Multi-Layer Windings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    General Comparison of Power Loss in Single-Layer and Multi-Layer Windings M. E. Dale C. R. Sullivan the IEEE. #12;General Comparison of Power Loss in Single-Layer and Multi-Layer Windings Magdalena E. Dale

  4. Artificial Neural Networks Single Layer Networks Multi Layer Networks Generalization Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjellström, Hedvig

    Artificial Neural Networks Single Layer Networks Multi Layer Networks Generalization Artificial Neural Networks #12;Artificial Neural Networks Single Layer Networks Multi Layer Networks Generalization 1 Artificial Neural Networks Properties Applications Classical Examples Biological Background 2

  5. Phreatic flow on sloping soil layers from a finite source: An analytical solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filley, T.H.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sloping clay layers beneath percolation ponds can cause infiltrating wastewater to pond and move in directions not predicted by vertical infiltration equations. This report presents a method for estimating the potential of wastewater from percolation sumps located over sloping clay layers to interact with nearby groundwater resources. The analytical solution developed is for steady-state conditions and includes a procedure to estimate the time needed to reach steady state. The fundamental assumption used in the mathematical development requires that elevation-head gradients be much larger than pressure-head gradients. A method for testing the validity of this assumption is also included. An example calculation was performed for percolation sumps on the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in Elk Hills, California. That analysis showed that, under the assumptions used, the sumps may have enabled oil field wastewater to reach groundwater resources within the adjacent San Joaquin Valley. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  6. The limited growth of vegetated shear layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghisalberti, M.

    In contrast to free shear layers, which grow continuously downstream, shear layers generated by submerged vegetation grow only to a finite thickness. Because these shear layers are characterized by coherent vortex structures ...

  7. Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing using multiple electrodes and with resistances being defined between the electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of operation of different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information related to the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from inside the cased well. The multiple electrode apparatus have a minimum of three spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage the interior of the cased well. Measurement information is obtained related to current which is caused to flow from the cased well into the adjacent geological formation. First compensation information is obtained related to a first casing resistance between a first pair of the spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes. Second compensation information is obtained related to a second casing resistance between a second pair of the spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes. The measurement information, and first and second compensation information are used to determine a magnitude related to the adjacent formation resistivity.

  8. Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing using multiple electrodes and with resistances being defined between the electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, W.B. III

    1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of operation are disclosed for different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information related to the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from inside the cased well. The multiple electrode apparatus have a minimum of three spaced-apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage the interior of the cased well. Measurement information is obtained related to current which is caused to flow from the cased well into the adjacent geological formation. First compensation information is obtained related to a first casing resistance between a first pair of the spaced-apart voltage measurement electrodes. Second compensation information is obtained related to a second casing resistance between a second pair of the spaced-apart voltage measurement electrodes. The measurement information, and first and second compensation information are used to determine a magnitude related to the adjacent formation resistivity. 13 figs.

  9. Superconducting electromechanical rotating device having a liquid-cooled, potted, one layer stator winding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dombrovski, Viatcheslav V. (Willoughby Hills, OH); Driscoll, David I. (South Euclid, OH); Shovkhet, Boris A. (Beachwood, OH)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting electromechanical rotating (SER) device, such as a synchronous AC motor, includes a superconducting field winding and a one-layer stator winding that may be water-cooled. The stator winding is potted to a support such as the inner radial surface of a support structure and, accordingly, lacks hangers or other mechanical fasteners that otherwise would complicate stator assembly and require the provision of an unnecessarily large gap between adjacent stator coil sections. The one-layer winding topology, resulting in the number of coils being equal to half the number of slots or other mounting locations on the support structure, allows one to minimize or eliminate the gap between the inner radial ends of adjacent straight sections of the stator coilswhile maintaining the gap between the coil knuckles equal to at least the coil width, providing sufficient room for electrical and cooling element configurations and connections. The stator winding may be potted to the support structure or other support, for example, by a one-step VPI process relying on saturation of an absorbent material to fill large gaps in the stator winding or by a two-step process in which small gaps are first filled via a VPI or similar operation and larger gaps are then filled via an operation that utilizes the stator as a portion of an on-site mold.

  10. Nonequilibrium transport through quantum-wire junctions and boundary defects for free massless bosonic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzysztof Gaw?dzki; Clément Tauber

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a model of quantum-wire junctions where the latter are described by conformal-invariant boundary conditions of the simplest type in the multicomponent compactified massless scalar free field theory representing the bosonized Luttinger liquids in the bulk of wires. The boundary conditions result in the scattering of charges across the junction with nontrivial reflection and transmission amplitudes. The equilibrium state of such a system, corresponding to inverse temperature $\\beta$ and electric potential $V$, is explicitly constructed both for finite and for semi-infinite wires. In the latter case, a stationary nonequilibrium state describing the wires kept at different temperatures and potentials may be also constructed. The main result of the present paper is the calculation of the full counting statistics (FCS) of the charge and energy transfers through the junction in a nonequilibrium situation. Explicit expressions are worked out for the generating function of FCS and its large-deviations asymptotics. For the purely transmitting case they coincide with those obtained in the litterature, but numerous cases of junctions with transmission and reflection are also covered. The large deviations rate function of FCS for charge and energy transfers is shown to satisfy the fluctuation relations and the expressions for FCS obtained here are compared with the Levitov-Lesovic formulae.

  11. Chemical Doping and Enhanced Solar Energy Conversion of Graphene/Silicon Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinming; Wang, Kunlin; Wei, Jinquan; Fan, Guifeng; Li, Xiao; Wu, Dehai

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of chemical doping of graphene films on the photovoltaic properties of the graphene/silicon Schottky junction solar cells was investigated. Thionyl chloride modification greatly enhanced the conductivity of graphene film, resulting in a significant improvement in cell performance with a 3-fold increase in conversion efficiency (up to 3.9%) and good short-term stability.

  12. Kinked p-n Junction Nanowire Probes for High Spatial Resolution Sensing and Intracellular Recording

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, David R.

    - conducting nanoscale materials configured as field-effect transistors have been studied extensively localized near the junction, and while nanowire p-n diodes have been widely studied as photovoltaic devices studies have shown that nanoscale field- effect transistors (nanoFETs) can be synthetically encoded

  13. Tuning electron transport through a single molecular junction by bridge modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiao-Fei, E-mail: xf.li@uestc.edu.cn; Qiu, Qi [School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Luo, Yi [Division of Theoretical Chemistry and Biology, School of Biotechnology, KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of controlling electron transport in a single molecular junction represents the ultimate goal of molecular electronics. Here, we report that the modification of bridging group makes it possible to improve the performance and obtain new functions in a single cross-conjugated molecular junction, designed from a recently synthesized bipolar molecule bithiophene naphthalene diimide. Our first principles results show that the bipolar characteristic remains after the molecule was modified and sandwiched between two metal electrodes. Rectifying is the intrinsic characteristic of the molecular junction and its performance can be enhanced by replacing the saturated bridging group with an unsaturated group. A further improvement of the rectifying and a robust negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior can be achieved by the modification of unsaturated bridge. It is revealed that the modification can induce a deviation angle about 4° between the donor and the acceptor ?-conjugations, making it possible to enhance the communication between the two ? systems. Meanwhile, the low energy frontier orbitals of the junction can move close to the Fermi level and encounter in energy at certain biases, thus a transport channel with a considerable transmission can be formed near the Fermi level only at a narrow bias regime, resulting in the improvement of rectifying and the robust NDR behavior. This finding could be useful for the design of single molecular devices.

  14. Title of Dissertation: MASKLESS FABRICATION OF JUNCTION FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTORS VIA FOCUSED ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: MASKLESS FABRICATION OF JUNCTION FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTORS VIA FOCUSED ION BEAMS Anthony John De Marco, Doctor of Philosophy, 2004 Dissertation directed by: Professor Dissertation submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Maryland, College Park

  15. 1364 Brief Communication Gap junction protein connexin-43 interacts directly with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullen, Sean P.

    Increasing evidence indicates that gap-junctional Cx43 ismediate intercellular communication-terminal tail of connexin-43 (Cx43), the phorylate the Cx43 C-terminal tail (CT) via SH2 and SH3 domain in the regulation of Cx43 channel C-terminal residues of Cx43 interact with the second PDZ domain of the Zona

  16. N-PERT BACK JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS: AN OPTION FOR THE NEXT INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY GENERATION?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are introducing a new solar cell design: the Passivated Emitter and Rear Cell (PERC), which features a full-PERT (Passivated Emitter, Rear Totally Diffused) solar cells with a processing sequence based on an industrialN-PERT BACK JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS: AN OPTION FOR THE NEXT INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY GENERATION? Bianca

  17. Control of the electromagnetic environment for single Josephson junctions using arrays of dc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    ;ective impedance of the array can be varied in situ by applying an external magnetic #12;eld and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA Abstract. We have measured the current-pair tunneling is induced in the single junction. The measured blockade voltage agrees with the theoretical

  18. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 1 DECEMBER 2013 | DOI: 10.1038/NMAT3811 Adaptive semiconductor/electrocatalyst junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    as an EC. Impedance and current­voltage measurements have been used to show that Co­Pi collects and stores in situ using two working electrodes to independently monitor and control the potential and current `adaptive' SC/EC junctions where the effective Schottky barrier height changes in situ with the oxidation

  19. Control of the Electromagnetic Environment for Single Josephson Junctions Using Arrays of dc SQUIDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    is that the effective impedance of the SQUID array can be varied in situ by applying an external magnetic field Postdoctoral Researcher), E-mail: michio@postman.riken.go.jp. Abstract--We have measured the current. This environmental effect on nano-scale junctions can be studied by measuring the current- voltage (IV

  20. NREL scientists develop near-field optical microscopy techniques for imaging solar cell junctions and identify

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar cell producers are facing urgent pressures to lower module production cost.This achievementNREL scientists develop near-field optical microscopy techniques for imaging solar cell junctions is an increasingly important issue for silicon solar cells. The issue has taken center stage now that the solar

  1. Thermal conductance of the junction between single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    conductances of the carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions that would be found in a CNT aerogel are predicted using of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (e.g., aligned films, mats, and aerogels) are candidates for use in electronic issue in all of these applications. Our focus here is related to single-walled CNT aerogels, which

  2. Andreev-level spectroscopy and Josephson-current switching in a three-terminal Josephson junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Andreev-level spectroscopy and Josephson-current switching in a three-terminal Josephson junction H. The voltage V applied to the normal-metal terminal controls the occupation of Andreev energy levels En the Andreev level. The differential conductance along the normal-metal terminal permits spectroscopy

  3. Etching suspended superconducting hybrid junctions from a multilayer H. Q. Nguyen,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by an insulating oxide bar- rier (I) are a central component to mesoscopic electronic devices. The isothermal multilayer. The process involves few fabrication steps, is reliable and produces extremely high-quality tunnel junctions. Under an appropriate voltage bias, a significant electronic cooling is demonstrated

  4. A solvable model for scattering on a junction and a modified analytic perturbation procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Pavlov

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a one-body spin-less electron spectral problem for a resonance scattering system constructed of a quantum well weakly connected to a noncompact exterior reservoir, where the electron is free. The simplest kind of the resonance scattering system is a quantum network, with the reservoir composed of few disjoint cylindrical quantum wires, and the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation on the network, with the real bounded potential on the wells and constant potential on the wires. We propose a Dirichlet-to-Neumann - based analysis to reveal the resonance nature of conductance across the star-shaped element of the network (a junction), derive an approximate formula for the scattering matrix of the junction, construct a fitted zero-range solvable model of the junction and interpret a phenomenological parameter arising in Datta-Das Sarma boundary condition, see {\\cite{DattaAPL}, for T-junctions. We also propose using of the fitted zero-range solvable model as the first step in a modified analytic perturbation procedure of calculation of the corresponding scattering matrix.

  5. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this initial site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Grand Junction, Colorado. This SOWP is one of the first UMTRA Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards (40 CFR Part 192, as amended by 60 FR 2854) for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The DOE goal is to use the observational method to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation based on the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards.

  6. Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene hexagonal boron nitride graphene junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene ­ hexagonal boron nitride ­ graphene junctions T. Roy1 , L. Liu2 , S. de la Barrera,3 B. Chakrabarti1,4 , Z. R. Hesabi1 , C. A. Joiner1 Abstract: Large area chemical vapor deposited graphene and hexagonal boron nitride was used to fabricate

  7. In situ Formation of Highly Conducting Covalent Au-C Contacts for Single-Molecule Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Z.L.; Hybertsen, M.; Skouta, R.; Vazquez, H.; Widawsky, J.R.; Schneebeli, S.; Chen, W.; Breslow, R.; Venkataraman, L.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charge transport across metal-molecule interfaces has an important role in organic electronics. Typically, chemical link groups such as thiols or amines are used to bind organic molecules to metal electrodes in single-molecule circuits, with these groups controlling both the physical structure and the electronic coupling at the interface. Direct metal-carbon coupling has been shown through C60, benzene and {pi}-stacked benzene but ideally the carbon backbone of the molecule should be covalently bonded to the electrode without intervening link groups. Here, we demonstrate a method to create junctions with such contacts. Trimethyl tin (SnMe{sub 3})-terminated polymethylene chains are used to form single-molecule junctions with a break-junction technique. Gold atoms at the electrode displace the SnMe{sub 3} linkers, leading to the formation of direct Au-C bonded single-molecule junctions with a conductance that is {approx}100 times larger than analogous alkanes with most other terminations. The conductance of these Au-C bonded alkanes decreases exponentially with molecular length, with a decay constant of 0.97 per methylene, consistent with a non-resonant transport mechanism. Control experiments and ab initio calculations show that high conductances are achieved because a covalent Au-C sigma ({sigma}) bond is formed. This offers a new method for making reproducible and highly conducting metal-organic contacts.

  8. Microsimulation analysis of a hybrid system model of multiple merge junction highway and semiautomatic vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girault, Alain

    , it receives its exit number, which of course has to be after the entry junction. Of course, all these figures Exit 3 9600 m Exit 1 960 m Exit 2 8640 m Entry 3 7680 m Entry 2 2640 m 10320 m Figure 1: Highwa section, which includes three merge junc­ tion and three exit ramps. We show through micro­ simulation

  9. FRONTIERS ARTICLE Efficiency enhancement of copper contaminated radial pn junction solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    energy represents one of the most important sustainable and renewable energy sources. The most common power from solar cells [1]. The reason is that crystalline silicon solar cell manufacturingFRONTIERS ARTICLE Efficiency enhancement of copper contaminated radial p­n junction solar cells

  10. SUPERCONDUCTING TUNNEL JUNCTION BOLOMETERS J. CLARKE, G. I. HOFFER and P. L. RICHARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    69 SUPERCONDUCTING TUNNEL JUNCTION BOLOMETERS J. CLARKE, G. I. HOFFER and P. L. RICHARDS DepartmentIioration possible de ces performances. Abstract. 2014 Two new types of superconducting infrared bolometer doped germanium, are widely used as sensitive broadband infrared detectors. Superconducting bolometers

  11. Growth optimization and structural analysis for ferromagnetic Mn-doped ZnO layers deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abouzaid, M.; Ruterana, P.; Liu, C.; Morkoc, H. [SIFCOM UMR 6176 CNRS-ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard du Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France); Department of Electrical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond Virginia 23284 (United States)

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the deposition temperature on the crystalline quality of (Zn,Mn)O is investigated in thin films prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering on c-plane sapphire and GaN substrates. The layers are made of a 0.5 {mu}m Mn-doped layer towards the surface on top of a 150 nm pure ZnO buffer. Depending on the deposition temperature, the layers can exhibit a columnar structure; the adjacent domains are rotated from one another by 90 deg. , putting [1010] and [1120] directions face to face. At high Mn concentration the columnar structure is blurred by the formation of Mn rich precipitates. Only one variety of domains is observed at an optimal deposition temperature of 500 deg. C: they are slightly rotated around the [0001] axis (mosaic growth) and bounded by threading dislocations.

  12. Reduction of COD in leachate from a hazardous waste landfill adjacent to a coke-making facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, K.; O`Toole, T.J. [Chester Environmental, Moon Township, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hazardous waste landfill adjacent to a coke manufacturing facility was in operation between July 1990 and December 1991. A system was constructed to collect and treat the leachate from the landfill prior to discharge to the river. Occasionally, the discharge from the treatment facility exceeded the permit limitations for Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), and Total Organic Carbon (TOC). The objectives of this study were to determine treatment methods which would enable compliance with the applicable discharge limits; to establish the desired operating conditions of the process; and to investigate the effect of various parameters such as pH, catalyst dosage, and reaction time on the COD destruction efficiency. The characteristics of the landfill leachate in question were significantly variable in terms of chemical composition. A review of the influent quality data suggests that the COD concentration ranges between 80 and 390 mg/l. The oxidation processes using Fenton`s reagent or a combination of UV/hydrogen peroxide/catalyst are capable of reducing the COD concentration of the leachate below the discharge limitation of 35 mg/l. The estimated capital cost associated with the Fenton`s reagent process is approximately $525,000, and the annual operating and maintenance cost is $560,000. The estimated capital cost for the UV/hydrogen peroxide/catalyst treatment system is $565,000. The annual operating and maintenance cost of this process would be approximately $430,000.

  13. The Announcement Layer: Beacon Coordination for the Sensornet Stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunkels, Adam

    consumption. #12;MAC / Link layers ... ... Multiple, uncoordinated beacons Collect Trickle Deluge Collect Trickle Deluge Coordinated beacons Announcement layer MAC / Link layers Fig. 1. The announcement layer

  14. Modeling of capacitance transients of thin-film solar cells: A valuable tool to gain information on perturbing layers or interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauwaert, Johan, E-mail: Johan.Lauwaert@UGent.be; Van Puyvelde, Lisanne; Vrielinck, Henk [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S1, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Lauwaert, Jeroen; Thybaut, Joris W. [Laboratory for Chemical Technology (LCT), Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S5, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin-film electronic and photovoltaic devices often comprise, in addition to the anticipated p-n junctions, additional non-ideal ohmic contacts between layers. This may give rise to additional signals in capacitance spectroscopy techniques that are not directly related to defects in the structure. In this paper, we present a fitting algorithm for transient signals arising from such an additional junction. The fitting results are in excellent agreement with the diode characteristics extracted from static measurements on individual components. Finally, the algorithm is applied for determining the barriers associated with anomalous signals reported for selected CuIn{sub 1–x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} and CdTe solar cells.

  15. Radiation response of single and dual junction p{sup +}n InGaP/GaAs space solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, R.J.; Xapsos, M.A.; Summers, G.P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Cotal, H.L.; Messenger, S.R. [SFA, Inc., Largo, MD (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation response of single and dual-junction p{sup +}n InGaP/GaAs solar cells is studied. The degradation mechanisms of single-junction InGaP cells are identified, and characteristic degradation curves in terms of displacement damage dose are calculated. The response of dual-junction cells is presented, and the response of each sub-cell is discussed. The cell response is compared with those of other technologies. The effect of current injection on irradiated InGaP cell is presented.

  16. Layered architecture for quantum computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Cody Jones; Rodney Van Meter; Austin G. Fowler; Peter L. McMahon; Jungsang Kim; Thaddeus D. Ladd; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a layered quantum computer architecture, which is a systematic framework for tackling the individual challenges of developing a quantum computer while constructing a cohesive device design. We discuss many of the prominent techniques for implementing circuit-model quantum computing and introduce several new methods, with an emphasis on employing surface code quantum error correction. In doing so, we propose a new quantum computer architecture based on optical control of quantum dots. The timescales of physical hardware operations and logical, error-corrected quantum gates differ by several orders of magnitude. By dividing functionality into layers, we can design and analyze subsystems independently, demonstrating the value of our layered architectural approach. Using this concrete hardware platform, we provide resource analysis for executing fault-tolerant quantum algorithms for integer factoring and quantum simulation, finding that the quantum dot architecture we study could solve such problems on the timescale of days.

  17. Geological Setting, Mineral Resources and ancient works of Samos and adjacent islands of the Aegean Sea, 26-30 August 2013, Karlovassi, Samos Island, Greece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geological Setting, Mineral Resources and ancient works of Samos and adjacent islands of the Aegean (modified from Vigil and Tilling, 2006). #12;Geological Setting, Mineral Resources and ancient works spreading centers compose a global ridge system where new ocean crust is formed (divergent boundary

  18. Layered Manufacturing Sara McMains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMains, Sara

    ­ Sintering (vector) ­ 3D Printing (raster) #12;Stereolithography (SLA) · First commercial layered

  19. Amorphous silicon passivated contacts for diffused junction silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, J., E-mail: james.bullock@anu.edu.au; Yan, D.; Wan, Y.; Cuevas, A. [Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Demaurex, B.; Hessler-Wyser, A.; De Wolf, S. [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of micro engineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronic Laboratory, Maladière 71, CH-200 Neuchâtel (Switzerland)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Carrier recombination at the metal contacts is a major obstacle in the development of high-performance crystalline silicon homojunction solar cells. To address this issue, we insert thin intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon [a-Si:H(i)] passivating films between the dopant-diffused silicon surface and aluminum contacts. We find that with increasing a-Si:H(i) interlayer thickness (from 0 to 16?nm) the recombination loss at metal-contacted phosphorus (n{sup +}) and boron (p{sup +}) diffused surfaces decreases by factors of ?25 and ?10, respectively. Conversely, the contact resistivity increases in both cases before saturating to still acceptable values of ? 50 m? cm{sup 2} for n{sup +} and ?100 m? cm{sup 2} for p{sup +} surfaces. Carrier transport towards the contacts likely occurs by a combination of carrier tunneling and aluminum spiking through the a-Si:H(i) layer, as supported by scanning transmission electron microscopy–energy dispersive x-ray maps. We explain the superior contact selectivity obtained on n{sup +} surfaces by more favorable band offsets and capture cross section ratios of recombination centers at the c-Si/a-Si:H(i) interface.

  20. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO); Anderson, Ren (Broomfield, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  1. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  2. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  3. Chemical solution seed layer for rabits tapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyal, Amit; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Wee, Sung-Hun

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for making a superconducting article includes the steps of providing a biaxially textured substrate. A seed layer is then deposited. The seed layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different rare earth or transition metal cations. A superconductor layer is grown epitaxially such that the superconductor layer is supported by the seed layer.

  4. 3D convection simulations of the outer layers of the Sun using realistic physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. J. Robinson; P. Demarque; L. H. Li; S. Sofia; Y. -C. Kim; K. L. Chan; D. B. Guenther

    2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a series of 3D simulations of shallow inefficient convection in the outer layers of the Sun. The computational domain is a closed box containing the convection-radiation transition layer, located at the top of the solar convection zone. The most salient features of the simulations are that: i)The position of the lower boundary can have a major effect on the characteristics of solar surface convection (thermal structure, kinetic energy and turbulent pressure). ii)The width of the box has only a minor effect on the thermal structure, but a more significant effect on the dynamics (rms velocities). iii)Between the surface and a depth of 1 Mm, even though the density and pressure increase by an order of magnitude, the vertical correlation length of vertical velocity is always close to 600 km. iv) In this region the vertical velocity cannot be scaled by the pressure or the density scale height. This casts doubt on the applicability of the mixing length theory, not only in the superadiabatic layer, but also in the adjacent underlying layers. v) The final statistically steady state is not strictly dependent on the initial atmospheric stratification.

  5. Distinct regions of right temporo-parietal junction are selective for theory of mind and exogenous attention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triantafyllou, Christina

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, a cortical region in the right temporo-parietal junction (RTPJ) is recruited when participants read stories about people's thoughts (‘Theory of Mind’). Both fMRI and ...

  6. InGaP/GaAs and InGaAs mechanically-stacked triple-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takamoto, T.; Ikeda, E.; Agui, T. [Japan Energy Corp., Toda, Saitama (Japan)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Triple-junction cells with AM1.5 efficiencies of over 33% have been demonstrated. A planar type InGaP/GaAs monolithic dual-junction cell was fabricated on a semi-insulating FaAs substrate, which has high infra-red transparency. Then a dual-junction cell, with efficiency of 27--28%, was mechanically stacked on an InGaAs cell fabricated on an InP substrate. The bottom InGaAs cell showed an efficiency of 6.2% under the InGaP/GaAs cell, and a total efficiency of 33--34% was achieved for the four-terminal triple-junction cell.

  7. EIS-0126: Remedial Actions at the Former Climax Uranium Company Uranium Mill Site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assess the environmental impacts of remediating the residual radioactive materials left from the inactive uranium processing site and associated properties located in Grand Junction, Colorado.

  8. Observation of spin-dependent quantum well resonant tunneling in textured CoFeB layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teixeira, J. M., E-mail: jmteixeira@fc.up.pt; Costa, J. D.; Ventura, J.; Sousa, J. B. [IFIMUP and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Wisniowski, P. [Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Freitas, P. P. [INESC-MN and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Rua Alves Redol, 9-1, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of spin-dependent quantum well (QW) resonant tunneling in textured CoFeB free layers of single MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy spectra clearly show the presence of resonant oscillations in the parallel configuration, which are related with the appearance of majority-spin ?{sub 1} QW states in the CoFeB free layer. To gain a quantitative understanding, we calculated QW state positions in the voltage-thickness plane using the so-called phase accumulation model (PAM) and compared the PAM solutions with the experimental resonant voltages observed for a set of MTJs with different CoFeB free layer thicknesses (t{sub fl}?=?1.55, 1.65, 1.95, and 3.0?nm). An overall good agreement between experiment and theory was obtained. An enhancement of the tunnel magnetoresistance with bias is observed in a bias voltage region corresponding to the resonant oscillations.

  9. Influence of uniaxial pressure on the critical temperature for long delays in GaAs junction lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morosini, M.B.Z.; Patel, N.B.; Nunes, F.D.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we report on the influence of uniaxial pressure applied perpendicularly to junction laser on the behavior of the critical temperature for the onset of long delays in GaAs junction lasers. Experimental data showing this influence for lasers operating in a TE or TM polarization are presented and explained on the basis of a thermal theory of long delays and related phenomena.

  10. Antenna-coupled Photon Emission from hexagonal Boron Nitride Tunnel Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parzefall, Markus; Jain, Achint; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Novotny, Lukas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultrafast conversion of electrical to optical signals at the nanoscale is of fundamental interest for data processing, telecommunication and optical interconnects. However, the modulation bandwidths of semiconductor LEDs are limited by the spontaneous recombination rate of electron-hole pairs and the footprint of electrically-driven ultrafast lasers is too large for practical on-chip integration. A metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junction approaches the ultimate size limit of electronic devices and its operating speed is fundamentally limited only by the tunneling time. Here we study the conversion of electron energy - localized in vertical gold-h-BN-gold tunnel junctions - into free space photons, mediated by resonant slot antennas. Optical antennas efficiently bridge the size-mismatch between nanoscale volumes and far-field radiation and strongly enhance the electron-photon conversion efficiency. We achieve polarized, directional and resonantly enhanced light emission from inelastic electron tunnelin...

  11. Theory of microwave spectroscopy of Andreev bound states with a Josephson junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Bretheau; Ç. Girit; M. Houzet; H. Pothier; D. Esteve; C. Urbina

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a microscopic theory for the current through a tunnel Josephson junction coupled to a non-linear environment, which consists of an Andreev two-level system coupled to a harmonic oscillator. It models a recent experiment [Bretheau, Girit, Pothier, Esteve, and Urbina, Nature (London) 499, 312 (2013)] on photon spectroscopy of Andreev bound states in a superconducting atomic-size contact. We find the eigenenergies and eigenstates of the environment and derive the current through the junction due to inelastic Cooper pair tunneling. The current-voltage characteristic reveals the transitions between the Andreev bound states, the excitation of the harmonic mode that hybridizes with the Andreev bound states, as well as multi-photon processes. The calculated spectra are in fair agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Giant amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance in a molecular junction: Molecular spin-valve transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhungana, Kamal B.; Pati, Ranjit, E-mail: patir@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance by gate field in a molecular junction is the most important requirement for the development of a molecular spin valve transistor. Herein, we predict a giant amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance in a single molecular spin valve junction, which consists of Ru-bis-terpyridine molecule as a spacer between two ferromagnetic nickel contacts. Based on the first-principles quantum transport approach, we show that a modest change in the gate field that is experimentally accessible can lead to a substantial amplification (320%) of tunnel magnetoresistance. The origin of such large amplification is attributed to the spin dependent modification of orbitals at the molecule-lead interface and the resultant Stark effect induced shift in channel position with respect to the Fermi energy.

  13. Synthesis and single crystal structure refinement of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalo, Hussein; Milius, Wolfgang [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)] [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Braeu, Michael [BASF Construction Chemicals GmbH, 83308 Trostberg (Germany)] [BASF Construction Chemicals GmbH, 83308 Trostberg (Germany); Breu, Josef, E-mail: Josef.Breu@uni-bayreuth.de [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)] [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A sodium brittle mica with the ideal composition [Na{sub 4}]{sup inter}[Mg{sub 6}]{sup oct}[Si{sub 4}Al{sub 4}]{sup tet}O{sub 20}F{sub 4} was synthesized via melt synthesis in a gas tight crucible. This mica is unusual inasmuch as the known mica structure holds only room for two interlayer cations per unit cell and inasmuch as it readily hydrates despite the high layer charge while ordinary micas and brittle micas are non-swelling. The crystal structure of one-layer hydrate sodium brittle mica was determined and refined from single crystal X-ray data. Interlayer cations reside at the center of the distorted hexagonal cavities and are coordinated by the three inner basal oxygen atoms. The coordination of the interlayer cation is completed by three interlayer water molecules residing at the center of the interlayer region. The relative position of adjacent 2:1-layers thus is fixed by these octahedrally coordinated interlayer cations. Pseudo-symmetry leads to extensive twinning. In total five twin operations generate the same environment for the interlayer species and are energetically degenerate. - Graphical abstract: The sodium brittle mica has been successfully synthesized by melt synthesis and the crystal structure of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melt synthesis yielded coarse grained sodium brittle mica which showed little disorder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium brittle mica hydrated completely to the state of one-layer hydrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica could therefore be determined and refined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arrangement of upper and lower tetrahedral sheet encompassing interlayer cation were clarified.

  14. Plasma depletion layer model for low Alfven Mach number: Comparison with ISEE observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrugia, C.J. [Department of Mathematics, Science and Technical Education, University of Malta, Msida (Malta)] [Department of Mathematics, Science and Technical Education, University of Malta, Msida (Malta); [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham; Erkaev, N.V. [Computer Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russia)] [Computer Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russia); Biernat, H.K. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz (Austria)] [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz (Austria); Lawrence, G.R. [Space Science Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton (England)] [Space Science Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton (England); Elphic, R.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Together with the magnetic shear across the magnetopause, the solar wind Alfven Mach number, M{sub A{infinity}} plays a central role in determining the structure of the magnetosheath. Recent theoretical modeling has shown, in particular, that as M{sub A{infinity}} decreases, the region adjacent to the sunward side of the magnetopause where the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) exerts a strong influence on the flow (i.e., the so-called plasma depletion layer), is no longer confined to a thin layer {approximately}0.3 Earth radii (R{sub E}) thick but occupies an increasingly larger fraction of the magnetosheath. Furthermore, the model predicts the possibility of a plasma depletion layer for low M{sub A{infinity}}, irrespective of the size of the magnetic shear at the magnetopause. In this paper we study three examples of low latitude ISEE 2 passes through the dayside magnetosheath near noon: December 3, 1979; October 5, 1979; and November 11, 1979. In all three examples, M{sub A{infinity}} was lower than normal. During the December 3 pass (which we treat qualitatively), we find evidence of a plasma depletion layer when the IMF was pointing south. On the other two passes (which we study quantitatively), the interplanetary magnetic field was strongly northward pointing, leading to low magnetic shear at the respective magnetopause crossings. The October 5 pass was under steady interplanetary conditions and we find good agreement between theory and data. Temporal variations of the interplanetary medium during the November 11 pass necessitated an extension of the steady state theory to encompass piecewise steady (on average) interplanetary conditions. Better agreement with the data results when the theory is extended further to correct the total pressure at the sunward side of the magnetopause by integrating the magnetic tension term across the layer. For wide plasma depletion layers, this correction can be substantial.{copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union

  15. Bedrock acquifer geometry in the Panther Junction area of Big Bend National Park, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, Caroline Lownes

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    areas where an igneous intrusive i. s known to exist as indicated by well data and geologic maps . The location of these impermeable igneous intrusions and their relationship to the water bearing sediments is important as a trapping mechanism. , espec.... Bouguer gravity map of the Big Bend region by Metcalfe and Clarke with the location of the gravity study in the Panther Juncti. on area. Generalised stratigraphic nomenclature and correlation, Panther Junction Area, Big Bend National Park...

  16. Conductance states of molecular junctions for encoding binary information: a computational approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agapito, Luis Alberto

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    CONDUCTANCE STATES OF MOLECULAR JUNCTIONS FOR ENCODING BINARY INFORMATION: A COMPUTATIONAL APPROACH A Dissertation by LUIS ALBERTO AGAPITO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... Dissertation by LUIS ALBERTO AGAPITO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Jorge M...

  17. Magnetism reflectometer study shows LiF layers improve efficiency in spin valve devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardoel, Agatha A [ORNL; Lauter, Valeria [ORNL; Szulczewski, Greg J [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New, more efficient materials for spin valves - a device used in magnetic sensors, random access memories, and hard disk drives - may be on the way based on research using the magnetism reflectometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Spin valve devices work by means of two or more conducting magnetic material layers that alternate their electrical resistance depending on the layers alignment. Giant magnetoresistance is a quantum mechanical effect first observed in thin film structures about 20 years ago. The effect is observed as a significant change in electrical resistance, depending on whether the magnetization of adjacent ferromagnetic layers is in a parallel or an antiparallel magnetic alignment. 'What we are doing here is developing new materials. The search for new materials suitable for injecting and transferring carriers with a preferential spin orientation is most important for the development of spintronics,' said Valeria Lauter, lead instrument scientist on the magnetism reflectometer at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), who collaborated on the experiment. The researchers discovered that the conductivity of such materials is improved when an organic polymer semiconductor layer is placed between the magnetic materials. Organic semiconductors are now the material of choice for future spin valve devices because they preserve spin coherence over longer times and distances than conventional semiconductors. While research into spin valves has been ongoing, research into organic semiconductors is recent. Previous research has shown that a 'conductivity mismatch' exists in spin valve systems in which ferromagnetic metal electrodes interface with such organic semiconductors as Alq3 ({pi}-conjugated molecule tris(8-hydroxy-quinoline) aluminium). This mismatch limits the efficient injection of the electrons from the electrodes at the interface with the semiconductor material. However, lithium fluoride (LiF), commonly used in light-emitting diodes, has been found to enhance the injection of electrons through the semiconductor. Researchers from the University of Alabama and ORNL used polarized neutrons at the magnetism reflectometer at SNS to investigate the electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of the electrodes in a novel system. In this system, the magnetic layers cobalt and Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} are interfaced with spacer layers composed of the organic semiconductor Alq3. A coupling layer of LiF is inserted to separate the magnetized layers from the semiconductor. 'ALQ3 is an organic semiconductor material,' said Lauter. 'Normally in these systems a first magnetic layer is grown on a hard substrate so that one can get the controlled magnetic parameters. Then you grow the organic semiconductor layer, followed by another magnetic material layer, such as cobalt.' In addition to determining the effect of the LiF layers on the efficiency of the electron injection, the researchers wanted to determine the magnetic properties of the cobalt and Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} as well as the interfacial properties: whether there is interdiffusion of cobalt through the LiF layer to the semiconductor, for example. The researchers used polarized neutrons at beam line 4A to probe the entire, layer-by-layer assembly of the system. 'Reflectometry with polarized neutrons is a perfect method to study thin magnetic films,' Lauter said. 'These thin films - if you put one on a substrate, you see it just like a mirror. However, this mirror has a very complicated internal multilayer structure. The neutrons look inside this complicated structure and characterize each and every interface. Due to the depth sensitivity of the method, we measure the structural and magnetic properties of each layer with the resolution of 0.5 nm. The neutron scattering results found that inserting LiF as a barrier significantly improves the quality of the interface, increasing the injection of electrons from the magnetic layer through the organic semiconductor in the spin valve and enhancing the overall properties of the system. In related work the magneti

  18. Physical model of the contact resistivity of metal-graphene junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaves, Ferney A., E-mail: ferneyalveiro.chaves@uab.cat; Jiménez, David [Departament d'Enginyeria Electrònica, Escola d'Enginyeria, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Cummings, Aron W. [ICN2–Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Roche, Stephan [ICN2–Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, 08070 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    While graphene-based technology shows great promise for a variety of electronic applications, including radio-frequency devices, the resistance of the metal-graphene contact is a technological bottleneck for the realization of viable graphene electronics. One of the most important factors in determining the resistance of a metal-graphene junction is the contact resistivity. Despite the large number of experimental works that exist in the literature measuring the contact resistivity, a simple model of it is still lacking. In this paper, we present a comprehensive physical model for the contact resistivity of these junctions, based on the Bardeen Transfer Hamiltonian method. This model unveils the role played by different electrical and physical parameters in determining the specific contact resistivity, such as the chemical potential of interaction, the work metal-graphene function difference, and the insulator thickness between the metal and graphene. In addition, our model reveals that the contact resistivity is strongly dependent on the bias voltage across the metal-graphene junction. This model is applicable to a wide variety of graphene-based electronic devices and thus is useful for understanding how to optimize the contact resistance in these systems.

  19. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This site observational work plan (SOWP) is one of the first Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement. This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The US Department of Energy (DOE) goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards. The conceptual model demonstrates that the uranium processing-related contamination at the site has affected the unconfined alluvial aquifer, but not the deeper confined aquifer.

  20. National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Bibliographic index of Grand Junction office uranium reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.B.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 1978, Mesa College entered into subcontract with Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) to prepare a bibliographic index of the uranium raw materials reports issued by the Grand Junction Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Bendix, prime contractor to the Grand Junction Office, operates the Technical Library at the DOE facility. Since the early 1950s, approximately 2700 reports have been issued by the Grand Junction Office. These reports were the results of uranium investigations conducted by federal agencies and their subcontractors. The majority of the reports cover geology, mineralogy, and metallurgy of uranium and/or thorium. No single, complete list of these reports existed. The purpose of this subcontract was to compile a comprehensive index to these reports. The Mesa College geology faculty worked with the BFEC and DOE staffs to develop the format for the index. Undergraduate geology students from Mesa compiled a master record sheet for each report. All reports issued up to January 1, 1979 were included in the bibliography. The bibliography is in preliminary, unedited form. It is being open-filed at this time, on microfiche, to make the information available to the public on a timely basis. The bibliography is divided into a master record list arranged in alpha-numeric order by report identification number, with separate indices arranged by title, author, state and county, 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangle, key words, and exploration area.

  1. Interface dynamics for layered structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takao Ohta; David Jasnow

    1997-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate dynamics of large scale and slow deformations of layered structures. Starting from the respective model equations for a non-conserved system, a conserved system and a binary fluid, we derive the interface equations which are a coupled set of equations for deformations of the boundaries of each domain. A further reduction of the degrees of freedom is possible for a non-conserved system such that internal motion of each domain is adiabatically eliminated. The resulting equation of motion contains only the displacement of the center of gravity of domains, which is equivalent to the phase variable of a periodic structure. Thus our formulation automatically includes the phase dynamics of layered structures. In a conserved system and a binary fluid, however, the internal motion of domains turns out to be a slow variable in the long wavelength limit because of concentration conservation. Therefore a reduced description only involving the phase variable is not generally justified.

  2. West Nile virus (WNV) genome RNAs with up to three adjacent mutations that disrupt long distance 5'-3' cyclization sequence basepairs are viable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Mausumi; Brinton, Margo A., E-mail: mbrinton@gsu.ed

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mosquito-borne flavivirus genomes contain conserved 5' and 3' cyclization sequences (CYC) that facilitate long distance RNA-RNA interactions. In previous studies, flavivirus replicon RNA replication was completely inhibited by single or multiple mismatching CYC nt substitutions. In the present study, full-length WNV genomes with one, two or three mismatching CYC substitutions showed reduced replication efficiencies but were viable and generated revertants with increased replication efficiency. Several different three adjacent mismatching CYC substitution mutant RNAs were rescued by a second site mutation that created an additional basepair (nts 147-10913) on the internal genomic side of the 5'-3' CYC. The finding that full-length genomes with up to three mismatching CYC mutations are viable and can be rescued by a single nt spontaneous mutation indicates that more than three adjacent CYC basepair substitutions would be required to increase the safety of vaccine genomes by creating mismatches in inter-genomic recombinants.

  3. New approach to the treatment of separatrix chaos and its application to the global chaos onset between adjacent separatrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Soskin; R. Mannella; O. M. Yevtushenko

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed the {\\it general method} for the description of {\\it separatrix chaos}, basing on the analysis of the separatrix map dynamics. Matching it with the resonant Hamiltonian analysis, we show that, for a given amplitude of perturbation, the maximum width of the chaotic layer in energy may be much larger than it was assumed before. We apply the above theory to explain the drastic facilitation of global chaos onset in time-periodically perturbed Hamiltonian systems possessing two or more separatrices, previously discovered (PRL 90, 174101 (2003)). The theory well agrees with simulations. We also discuss generalizations and applications. Examples of applications of the facilitation include: the increase of the DC conductivity in spatially periodic structures, the reduction of activation barriers for noise-induced transitions and the related acceleration of spatial diffusion, the facilitation of the stochastic web formation in a wave-driven or kicked oscillator.

  4. Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

  5. Electronic transport in atomically thin layered materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baugher, Britton William Herbert

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic transport in atomically thin layered materials has been a burgeoning field of study since the discovery of isolated single layer graphene in 2004. Graphene, a semi-metal, has a unique gapless Dirac-like band ...

  6. Physical layer model design for wireless networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Yi

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    the relationship between wireless protocol design and physical layer models, it is necessary to first comprehend the network architecture, which groups the communication functions into related and manageable layers. The journal model is IEEE Transactions... data to the network format and vice versa. It is intended to provide independence from different represen- tations of application layer data. The session layer deals with sessions and connections between applications. It manages conversations between...

  7. Multijunction photovoltaic device and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arya, Rejeewa R. (Jamison, PA); Catalano, Anthony W. (Boulder, CO); Bennett, Murray (Longhorne, PA)

    1995-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A multijunction photovoltaic device includes first, second, and third amorphous silicon p-i-n photovoltaic cells in a stacked arrangement. The intrinsic layers of the second and third cells are formed of a-SiGe alloys with differing ratios of Ge such that the bandgap of the intrinsic layers respectively decrease from the first uppermost cell to the third lowermost cell. An interface layer, composed of a doped silicon compound, is disposed between the two cells and has a lower bandgap than the respective n- and p-type adjacent layers of the first and second cells. The interface layer forms an ohmic contact with the one of the adjacent cell layers of the same conductivity type, and a tunnel junction with the other of the adjacent cell layers.

  8. Unraveling the voltage fade mechanism in layer Li-Mn-rich electrode: formation of the tetrahedral cations for spinel conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, Debasish [ORNL; Li, Jianlin [ORNL; Abraham, Daniel P [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Huq, Ashfia [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Wood III, David L [ORNL; Daniel, Claus [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discovery of high-voltage layered lithium-and manganese-rich (LMR) composite oxide electrode has dramatically enhanced the energy density of current Li-ion energy storage systems. However, practical usage of these materials is currently not viable because of their inability to maintain a consistent voltage profile (voltage fading) during subsequent charge-discharge cycles. This report rationalizes the cause of this voltage fade by providing the evidence of layer to spinel-like (LSL) structural evolution pathways in the host Li1.2Mn0.55Ni0.15Co0.1O2 LMR composite oxide. By employing neutron powder diffraction, and temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility, we show that LSL structural rearrangement in LMR oxide occurs through a tetrahedral cation intermediate via: i) diffusion of lithium atoms from octahedral to tetrahedral sites of the lithium layer [(LiLioct LiLitet] which is followed by the dispersal of the lithium ions from the adjacent octahedral site of the metal layer to the tetrahedral sites of lithium layer [LiTM oct LiLitet]; and ii) migration of Mn from the octahedral sites of the transition metal layer to the permanent octahedral site of lithium layer via tetrahedral site of lithium layer [MnTMoct MnLitet MnLioct)]. The findings opens the door to the potential routes to mitigate this atomic restructuring in the high-voltage LMR composite oxide cathodes by manipulating the composition/structure for practical use in high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries.

  9. Two-Dimensional Measurement of n+-p Asymmetrical Junctions in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Using AFM-Based Electrical Techniques with Nanometer Resolution: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Li, J. V.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Heath, J. T.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lateral inhomogeneities of modern solar cells demand direct electrical imaging with nanometer resolution. We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based electrical techniques provide unique junction characterizations, giving a two-dimensional determination of junction locations. Two AFM-based techniques, scanning capacitance microscopy/spectroscopy (SCM/SCS) and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), were significantly improved and applied to the junction characterizations of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells. The SCS spectra were taken pixel by pixel by precisely controlling the tip positions in the junction area. The spectra reveal distinctive features that depend closely on the position relative to the electrical junction, which allows us to indentify the electrical junction location. In addition, SKPFM directly probes the built-in potential over the junction area modified by the surface band bending, which allows us to deduce the metallurgical junction location by identifying a peak of the electric field. Our results demonstrate resolutions of 10-40 nm, depending on the techniques (SCS or SKPFM). These direct electrical measurements with nanometer resolution and intrinsic two-dimensional capability are well suited for investigating the junction distribution of solar cells with lateral inhomogeneities.

  10. Multiple pass and multiple layer friction stir welding and material enhancement processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Zhili (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; David, Stan A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Frederick, David Alan (Harriman, TN) [Harriman, TN

    2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes for friction stir welding, typically for comparatively thick plate materials using multiple passes and multiple layers of a friction stir welding tool. In some embodiments a first portion of a fabrication preform and a second portion of the fabrication preform are placed adjacent to each other to form a joint, and there may be a groove adjacent the joint. The joint is welded and then, where a groove exists, a filler may be disposed in the groove, and the seams between the filler and the first and second portions of the fabrication preform may be friction stir welded. In some embodiments two portions of a fabrication preform are abutted to form a joint, where the joint may, for example, be a lap joint, a bevel joint or a butt joint. In some embodiments a plurality of passes of a friction stir welding tool may be used, with some passes welding from one side of a fabrication preform and other passes welding from the other side of the fabrication preform.

  11. Testing epitaxial Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Ge(001) electrodes in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neggache, A. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS 7198, Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre lès Nancy (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL-CNRS, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hauet, T.; Petit-Watelot, S.; Boulet, P.; Andrieu, S., E-mail: stephane.andrieu@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS 7198, Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre lès Nancy (France); Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Ohresser, P. [Synchrotron SOLEIL-CNRS, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Devolder, T. [Institut d'Electronique Fondamentale, CNRS, UMR 8622, 91405 Orsay (France); Mewes, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy/Center for Materials for Information Technology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Maat, S.; Childress, J. R. [San Jose Research Center, HGST, a Western Digital company, San Jose, California 95135 (United States)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of the full Heusler alloy Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Ge(001) (CFG) to be a Half-Metallic Magnetic (HMM) material is investigated. Epitaxial CFG(001) layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The results obtained using electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism are consistent with the full Heusler structure. The pseudo-gap in the minority spin density of state typical in HMM is examined using spin-resolved photoemission. Interestingly, the spin polarization found to be negative at E{sub F} in equimolar CoFe(001) is observed to shift to positive values when inserting Ge in CoFe. However, no pseudo-gap is found at the Fermi level, even if moderate magnetization and low Gilbert damping are observed as expected in HMM materials. Magneto-transport properties in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions using CFG electrodes are investigated via spin and symmetry resolved photoemission.

  12. Layer-by-Layer Characterization of a Model Biofuel Cell Anode by (in Situ) Vibrational Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brolo, Alexandre G.

    Layer-by-Layer Characterization of a Model Biofuel Cell Anode by (in Situ) Vibrational Spectroscopy during the construction of a model biofuel cell anode. The model anode was a layered structure formedDH to the CB layer confirmed successful enzyme immobilization. 1. Introduction Biofuel cells use microorganisms

  13. Overcoming the Boundary Layer Turbulence at Dome C: Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics versus Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, Michael C. B.

    Overcoming the Boundary Layer Turbulence at Dome C: Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics versus Tower T the boundary layer: mounting a telescope on a tower that physically puts it above the turbulent layer such a goal, two solutions can be proposed. The most intuitive one is to place a telescope on a tower

  14. Dense, layered membranes for hydrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roark, Shane E.; MacKay, Richard; Mundschau, Michael V.

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides hydrogen-permeable membranes for separation of hydrogen from hydrogen-containing gases. The membranes are multi-layer having a central hydrogen-permeable layer with one or more catalyst layers, barrier layers, and/or protective layers. The invention also relates to membrane reactors employing the hydrogen-permeable membranes of the invention and to methods for separation of hydrogen from a hydrogen-containing gas using the membranes and reactors. The reactors of this invention can be combined with additional reactor systems for direct use of the separated hydrogen.

  15. InGaN/GaN tunnel junctions for hole injection in GaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram, E-mail: krishnamoorthy.13@osu.edu, E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu; Akyol, Fatih [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth, E-mail: krishnamoorthy.13@osu.edu, E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaN/GaN tunnel junction contacts were grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on top of a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown InGaN/GaN blue (450?nm) light emitting diode. A voltage drop of 5.3?V at 100?mA, forward resistance of 2 × 10{sup ?2} ? cm{sup 2}, and a higher light output power compared to the reference light emitting diodes (LED) with semi-transparent p-contacts were measured in the tunnel junction LED (TJLED). A forward resistance of 5?×?10{sup ?4} ? cm{sup 2} was measured in a GaN PN junction with the identical tunnel junction contact as the TJLED, grown completely by MBE. The depletion region due to the impurities at the regrowth interface between the MBE tunnel junction and the MOCVD-grown LED was hence found to limit the forward resistance measured in the TJLED.

  16. Electron microscopic single particle analysis of a tetrameric RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayanagi, Kouta [Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura-cho, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); Takara-Bio Endowed Division, Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 6-2-3 Furuedai, Suita, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); BIRD, JST (Japan)], E-mail: maya@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp; Fujiwara, Yoshie [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Miyata, Tomoko [Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 1-3 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Morikawa, Kosuke [The Takara-Bio Endowed Division, Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 6-2-3 Furuedai, Suita, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); CREST, JST (Japan)], E-mail: morikako@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    During the late stage of homologous recombination in prokaryotes, RuvA binds to the Holliday junction intermediate and executes branch migration in association with RuvB. The RuvA subunits form two distinct complexes with the Holliday junction: complex I with the single RuvA tetramer on one side of the four way junction DNA, and complex II with two tetramers on both sides. To investigate the functional roles of complexes I and II, we mutated two residues of RuvA (L125D and E126K) to prevent octamer formation. An electron microscopic analysis indicated that the mutant RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex formed the characteristic tripartite structure, with only one RuvA tetramer bound to one side of the Holliday junction, demonstrating the unexpected stability of this complex. The novel bent images of the complex revealed an intriguing morphological similarity to the structure of SV40 large T antigen, which belongs to the same AAA+ family as RuvB.

  17. 0.7-eV GaInAs Junction for a GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs(1-eV)/GaInAs(0.7-eV) Four-Junction Solar Cell: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Geisz, J. F.; Norman, A. G.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction solar cells, focusing on adding a fourth junction to the Ga0.5In0.5P/GaAs/Ga0.75In0.25As inverted three-junction cell. This cell, grown inverted on GaAs so that the lattice-mismatched Ga0.75In0.25As third junction is the last one grown, has demonstrated 38% efficiency, and 40% is likely in the near future. To achieve still further gains, a lower-bandgap GaxIn1-xAs fourth junction could be added to the three-junction structure for a four-junction cell whose efficiency could exceed 45% under concentration. Here, we present the initial development of the GaxIn1-xAs fourth junction. Junctions of various bandgaps ranging from 0.88 to 0.73 eV were grown, in order to study the effect of the different amounts of lattice mismatch. At a bandgap of 0.88 eV, junctions were obtained with very encouraging {approx}80% quantum efficiency, 57% fill factor, and 0.36 eV open-circuit voltage. The device performance degrades with decreasing bandgap (i.e., increasing lattice mismatch). We model the four-junction device efficiency vs. fourth junction bandgap to show that an 0.7-eV fourth-junction bandgap, while optimal if it could be achieved in practice, is not necessary; an 0.9-eV bandgap would still permit significant gains in multijunction cell efficiency while being easier to achieve than the lower-bandgap junction.

  18. Regulation of gap junction function and Connexin 43 expression by cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polusani, Srikanth R.; Kar, Rekha; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Masters, Bettie Sue [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Biochemistry, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)] [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Biochemistry, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Panda, Satya P., E-mail: panda@uthscsa.edu [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Biochemistry, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} Humans with severe forms of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) mutations show bone defects as observed in Antley-Bixler Syndrome. {yields} First report showing knockdown of CYPOR in osteoblasts decreased Connexin 43 (Cx43) protein levels. Cx43 is known to play an important role in bone modeling. {yields} Knockdown of CYPOR decreased Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and hemichannel activity. {yields} Knockdown of CYPOR decreased Cx43 in mouse primary calvarial osteoblasts. {yields} Decreased Cx43 expression was observed at the transcriptional level. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) is a microsomal electron-transferring enzyme containing both FAD and FMN as co-factors, which provides the reducing equivalents to various redox partners, such as cytochromes P450 (CYPs), heme oxygenase (HO), cytochrome b{sub 5} and squalene monooxygenase. Human patients with severe forms of CYPOR mutation show bone defects such as cranio- and humeroradial synostoses and long bone fractures, known as Antley-Bixler-like Syndrome (ABS). To elucidate the role of CYPOR in bone, we knocked-down CYPOR in multiple osteoblast cell lines using RNAi technology. In this study, knock-down of CYPOR decreased the expression of Connexin 43 (Cx43), known to play a critical role in bone formation, modeling, and remodeling. Knock-down of CYPOR also decreased Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) and hemichannel activity. Promoter luciferase assays revealed that the decrease in expression of Cx43 in CYPOR knock-down cells was due to transcriptional repression. Primary osteoblasts isolated from bone specific Por knock-down mice calvariae confirmed the findings in the cell lines. Taken together, our study provides novel insights into the regulation of gap junction function by CYPOR and suggests that Cx43 may play an important role(s) in CYPOR-mediated bone defects seen in patients.

  19. Electrical isolation of component cells in monolithically interconnected modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithically interconnected photovoltaic module having cells which are electrically connected which comprises a substrate, a plurality of cells formed over the substrate, each cell including a primary absorber layer having a light receiving surface and a p-region, formed with a p-type dopant, and an n-region formed with an n-type dopant adjacent the p-region to form a single pn-junction, and a cell isolation diode layer having a p-region, formed with a p-type dopant, and an n-region formed with an n-type dopant adjacent the p-region to form a single pn-junction, the diode layer intervening the substrate and the absorber layer wherein the absorber and diode interfacial regions of a same conductivity type orientation, the diode layer having a reverse-breakdown voltage sufficient to prevent inter-cell shunting, and each cell electrically isolated from adjacent cells with a vertical trench trough the pn-junction of the diode layer, interconnects disposed in the trenches contacting the absorber regions of adjacent cells which are doped an opposite conductivity type, and electrical contacts.

  20. Temperature study of Zero Bias Features using self-assembling tunnel junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savitski, Stephen Ronald

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 04 1. 02 0. 90 -100 -20 20 60 100 Bias Voltage (mV) FIG. 3. Conductance vs. voltage, highlighting the Zero-Bias Feature (ZBF). Data curves are shown for a 100'70 neon junction at 1. 5 K, with some curves appropriately shifted in 6r so as to fit... of currents of 11-30 A corresponding to 1. 0-3. 2 Tesla were used, although for test purposes the magnet was periodically cycled to its full capability. 17 7 6 Fe n tX 3 '4 n II ee 1 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Supply Current (A) FIG. 7...

  1. Dynamical properties of three terminal magnetic tunnel junctions: Spintronics meets spin-orbitronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasello, R. [Department of Computer Science, Modeling, Electronics and System Science, University of Calabria, Rende (CS) (Italy)] [Department of Computer Science, Modeling, Electronics and System Science, University of Calabria, Rende (CS) (Italy); Carpentieri, M., E-mail: m.carpentieri@poliba.it [Department of Electrical and Information Engineering, Politecnico of Bari, via E. Orabona 4, I-70125 Bari (Italy); Finocchio, G. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Engineering, University of Messina, C.da di Dio, I-98166 Messina (Italy)] [Department of Electronic Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Engineering, University of Messina, C.da di Dio, I-98166 Messina (Italy)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter introduces a micromagnetic model able to characterize the magnetization dynamics in three terminal magnetic tunnel junctions, where the effects of spin-transfer torque and spin-orbit torque are taken into account. Our results predict that the possibility to separate electrically those two torque sources is very promising from a technological point of view for both next generation of nanoscale spintronic oscillators and microwave detectors. A scalable synchronization scheme based on the parallel connection of those three terminal devices is also proposed.

  2. Asymmetric current-phase relation due to spin-orbit interaction in semiconductor nanowire Josephson junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokoyama, Tomohiro; Eto, Mikio [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Nazarov, Yuli V. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft, The Netherlands (Netherlands)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study the current-phase relation in semiconductor nanowire Josephson junction in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. In the nanowire, the impurity scattering with strong SO interaction is taken into account using the random matrix theory. In the absence of magnetic field, the Josephson current I and phase difference ? between the superconductors satisfy the relation of I(?) = –I(–?). In the presence of magnetic field along the nanowire, the interplay between the SO interaction and Zeeman effect breaks the current-phase relation of I(?) = –I(–?). In this case, we show that the critical current depends on the current direction, which qualitatively agrees with recent experimental findings.

  3. Parametric excitation in a magnetic tunnel junction-based spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Åkerman, J. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Materials Physics, School of ICT, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Muduli, P. K. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, 110016 New Delhi (India)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Using microwave current injection at room temperature, we demonstrate parametric excitation of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ)-based spin-torque oscillator (STO). Parametric excitation is observed for currents below the auto-oscillation threshold, when the microwave current frequency f{sub e} is twice the STO free-running frequency f{sub 0}. Above threshold, the MTJ becomes parametrically synchronized. In the synchronized state, the STO exhibits an integrated power up to 5 times higher and a linewidth reduction of two orders of magnitude, compared to free-running conditions. We also show that the parametric synchronization favors single mode oscillations in the case of multimode excitation.

  4. The effect of environmental coupling on tunneling of quasiparticles in Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad H. Ansari; Frank K. Wilhelm; Urbasi Sinha; Aninda Sinha

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study quasiparticle tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions embedded in an electromagnetic environment. We identify tunneling processes that transfer electrical charge and couple to the environment in a way similar to that of normal electrons, and processes that mix electrons and holes and are thus creating charge superpositions. The latter are sensitive to the phase difference between the superconductor and are thus limited by phase diffusion even at zero temperature. We show that the environmental coupling is suppressed in many environments, thus leading to lower quasiparticle decay rates and thus better superconductor qubit coherence than previously expected. Our approach is nonperturbative in the environmental coupling strength.

  5. Ground-water hydrology of the Panther Junction area of Big Bend National Park, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, John Lawrence

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -made discharge in the Panther Junction area is 52 acre-ft/yr. The possible ground-water deficit from total discharge is calculated at nine acre-ft/ yr. Therefore, recharge and discharge may be in balance. Transmissivity coefficients for six wells penetrating... the Aguja aquifer are 600 gpd/ft or less. The transmissi- vity at well 47-201, which also penetrates the Aguja aqui- fer, is 30, 000 gpd/ft. The transmissivity is 5500 gpd/ft at one of two production wells penetrating the Chisos aquifer in the K-Bar area...

  6. Electron transport in graphene/graphene side-contact junction by plane-wave multiple scattering method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang-Guo; Zhang, X -G; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron transport in graphene is along the sheet but junction devices are often made by stacking different sheets together in a "side-contact" geometry which causes the current to flow perpendicular to the sheets within the device. Such geometry presents a challenge to first-principles transport methods. We solve this problem by implementing a plane-wave based multiple scattering theory for electron transport. This implementation improves the computational efficiency over the existing plane-wave transport code, scales better for parallelization over large number of nodes, and does not require the current direction to be along a lattice axis. As a first application, we calculate the tunneling current through a side-contact graphene junction formed by two separate graphene sheets with the edges overlapping each other. We find that transport properties of this junction depend strongly on the AA or AB stacking within the overlapping region as well as the vacuum gap between two graphene sheets. Such transport beh...

  7. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  8. Tunneling spectroscopy of superconducting MoN and NbTiN grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groll, Nickolas R., E-mail: ngroll@anl.gov; Klug, Jeffrey A.; Claus, Helmut; Pellin, Michael J.; Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: proslier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Cao, Chaoyue; Becker, Nicholas G.; Zasadzinski, John F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Altin, Serdar [Fen Edebiyat Fakultesi, Fizik Bolumu, Inonu Universitesi, 44280 Malatya (Turkey)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunneling spectroscopy study is presented of superconducting MoN and Nb{sub 0.8}Ti{sub 0.2}N thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The films exhibited a superconducting gap of 2?meV and 2.4?meV, respectively, with a corresponding critical temperature of 11.5?K and 13.4?K, among the highest reported T{sub c} values achieved by the ALD technique. Tunnel junctions were obtained using a mechanical contact method with a Au tip. While the native oxides of these films provided poor tunnel barriers, high quality tunnel junctions with low zero bias conductance (below ?10%) were obtained using an artificial tunnel barrier of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the film's surface grown ex situ by ALD. We find a large critical current density on the order of 4?×?10{sup 6}?A/cm{sup 2} at T?=?0.8T{sub c} for a 60?nm MoN film and demonstrate conformal coating capabilities of ALD onto high aspect ratio geometries. These results suggest that the ALD technique offers significant promise for thin film superconducting device applications.

  9. Nonlinear thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions with vibrational coupling M. Leijnse,1 M. R. Wegewijs,2,3,4 and K. Flensberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonlinear thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions with vibrational coupling M. Leijnse,1 M 17 June 2010; published 13 July 2010 We present a detailed study of the nonlinear thermoelectric of molecular junctions for thermoelectric applications. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.045412 PACS number s : 84

  10. Three-dimensional analysis of the rectifying properties of geometrically asymmetric metal-vacuum-metal junctions treated as an oscillating barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Alexandre

    -vacuum-metal junctions treated as an oscillating barrier A. Mayer,1,* M. S. Chung,2 B. L. Weiss,3 N. M. Miskovsky,4 and P-vacuum-metal junctions treated as an oscillating barrier. In particular, we focus on systems in which an oscillating bias on these approximations but rather treat these aspects exactly by taking account of three-dimensional aspects

  11. The effects of laser scanning on the characteristics of a p-n junction diode in dislocated silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael, Mark Wayne

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF LASER SCANNING ON THE CHARACTERISTICS OF A p-n JUNCTION DIODE IN DISLOCATED SILICON A Thesis by NARK WAYNE MICHAEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December l9SQ Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THE EPFECTS OP LASER SCANNING ON THE CHARACTERISTICS 07 A p-n JUNCTION DIODE IN DISLOCATED SILICON A Thesis NARK WAYNE NICHAEL Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee...

  12. GaN-based vertical-cavity laser performance improvements using tunnel-junction-cascaded active regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piprek, Joachim, E-mail: piprek@nusod.org [NUSOD Institute LLC, P.O. Box 7204, Newark, Delaware 19714 (United States)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter investigates the output power enhancement achieved by tunnel junction insertion into the InGaN multi-quantum well (MQW) active region of a 410?nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser which enables the repeated use of carriers for light generation (carrier recycling). While the number of quantum wells remains unchanged, the tunnel junction eliminates absorption caused by the non-uniform MQW carrier distribution. The thermal resistance drops and the excess bias lead to a surprisingly small rise in self-heating.

  13. Optimization of exchange bias in Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.5}Si{sub 0.5} Heusler alloy layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirohata, Atsufumi, E-mail: ah566@ohm.york.ac.uk [Department of Electronics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Izumida, Keisuke; Ishizawa, Satoshi; Nakayama, Tadachika [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Sagar, James [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have fabricated and investigated IrMn{sub 3}/Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.5}Si{sub 0.5} stacks to meet the criteria for future spintronic device applications which requires low-temperature crystallisation (<250?°C) and a large exchange bias H{sub ex} (>500?Oe). Such a system would form the pinned layer in spin-valve or tunnel junction applications. We have demonstrated that annealing at 300?°C which can achieve crystalline ordering in the Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.5}Si{sub 0.5} layer giving ?80% of the predicted saturation magnetisation. We have also induced an exchange bias of ?240?Oe at the interface. These values are close to the above criteria and confirm the potential of using antiferromagnet/Heusler-alloy stacks in current Si-based processes.

  14. VOLUME 77, NUMBER 20 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 11 NOVEMBER 1996 One-Dimensional Localization of Quantum Vortices in Disordered Josephson Junction Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    of a square network of Josephson junctions in which each superconducting island is coupled to four nearest

  15. Grand Junction Projects Office site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1992 at the US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO) facility in Colorado. Environmental activities conducted at the GJPO facility during 1992 included those associated with environmental compliance, site remediation, off-site dose modeling, and radiological and nonradiological monitoring. Four phases of the on-site Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project were completed in 1992. Remediation activities, which included the removal of 161,589 tons of uranium-mill-tailings-contaminated material from the facility, were conducted in compliance with all applicable permits. Off-site dose modeling for the GJPO was conducted to determine compliance with current National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, and applicable DOE Orders (5400.1 and 5400.5). The total off-site EDE to the public from all sources of radiation emanating from the facility (radon, air particulates, gamma) was calculated as 9 mrem/yr, which is well below the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr above background. The radiological and nonradiological monitoring program at the GJPO facility included monitoring of activities that generate potentially hazardous or toxic wastes and monitoring of ambient air, surface water, and ground water.

  16. Thermal influence on charge carrier transport in solar cells based on GaAs PN junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osses-Márquez, Juan; Calderón-Muñoz, Williams R., E-mail: wicalder@ing.uchile.cl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Chile, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron and hole one-dimensional transport in a solar cell based on a Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) PN junction and its dependency with electron and lattice temperatures are studied here. Electrons and heat transport are treated on an equal footing, and a cell operating at high temperatures using concentrators is considered. The equations of a two-temperature hydrodynamic model are written in terms of asymptotic expansions for the dependent variables with the electron Reynolds number as a perturbation parameter. The dependency of the electron and hole densities through the junction with the temperature is analyzed solving the steady-state model at low Reynolds numbers. Lattice temperature distribution throughout the device is obtained considering the change of kinetic energy of electrons due to interactions with the lattice and heat absorbed from sunlight. In terms of performance, higher values of power output are obtained with low lattice temperature and hot energy carriers. This modeling contributes to improve the design of heat exchange devices and thermal management strategies in photovoltaic technologies.

  17. Lessons Learned: The Grand Junction Office Site Transfer to Private Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office (DOE?GJO) in Grand Junction, Colorado, has played an integral role within the DOE complex for many years. GJO has a reputation for outstanding quality in the performance of complex environmental restoration projects, utilizing state-of-the-art technology. Many of the GJO missions have been completed in recent years. In 1998, DOE Headquarters directed GJO to reduce its mortgage costs by transferring ownership of the site and to lease space at a reasonable rate for its ongoing work. A local community group and GJO have entered into a sales contract; signing of the Quitclaim Deed is planned for February 16, 2001. Site transfer tasks were organized as a project with a critical-path schedule to track activities and a Site Transition Decision Plan was prepared that included a decision process flow chart, key tasks, and responsibilities. Specifically, GJO identified the end state with affected parties early on, successfully dealt with site contamination issues, and negotiated a lease-back arrangement, resulting in an estimated savings of more than 60 percent of facility maintenance costs annually. Lessons learned regarding these transition activities could be beneficial to many other sites.

  18. Quantitative interpretation of the transition voltages in gold-poly(phenylene) thiol-gold molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kunlin; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin, E-mail: smhou@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)] [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition voltage of three different asymmetric Au/poly(phenylene) thiol/Au molecular junctions in which the central molecule is either benzene thiol, biphenyl thiol, or terphenyl thiol is investigated by first-principles quantum transport simulations. For all the junctions, the calculated transition voltage at positive polarity is in quantitative agreement with the experimental values and shows weak dependence on alterations of the Au-phenyl contact. When compared to the strong coupling at the Au-S contact, which dominates the alignment of various molecular orbitals with respect to the electrode Fermi level, the coupling at the Au-phenyl contact produces only a weak perturbation. Therefore, variations of the Au-phenyl contact can only have a minor influence on the transition voltage. These findings not only provide an explanation to the uniformity in the transition voltages found for ?-conjugated molecules measured with different experimental methods, but also demonstrate the advantage of transition voltage spectroscopy as a tool for determining the positions of molecular levels in molecular devices.

  19. Combustion fronts in porous media with two layers Steve Schecter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schecter, Stephen

    Combustion fronts in porous media with two layers layer 1 layer 2 Steve Schecter North Carolina Subject: Propagation of a combustion front through a porous medium with two parallel layers having different properties. · Each layer admits a traveling combustion wave. · The layers are coupled by heat

  20. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  1. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  2. Manganese containing layer for magnetic recording media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambeth, David N. (Pittsburgh, PA); Lee, Li-Lien (Santa Clara, CA); Laughlin, David E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for a magnetic recording media incorporating Mn-containing layers between a substrate and a magnetic layer to provide media having increased coercivity and lower noise. The Mn-containing layer can be incorporated in a rotating, translating or stationary recording media to operate in conjunction with magnetic transducing heads for recording and reading of magnetic data, as well as other applications. The magnetic recording medium of the invention preferably includes a Co or Co alloy film magnetic layer, and Mn-containing layer, preferably comprised of VMn, TiMn, MnZn, CrMnMo, CrMnW, CrMnV, and CrMnTi, and most preferably a CrMn alloy, disposed between the substrate and the magnetic layer to promote an epitaxial crystalline structure in the magnetic layer. The medium can further include seed layers, preferably polycrystalline MgO for longitudinal media, underlayers, and intermediate layers. Underlayers and intermediate layers are comprised of materials having either an A2 structure or a B2-ordered crystalline structure disposed between the seed layer and the magnetic layer. Materials having an A2 structure are preferably Cr or Cr alloys, such as CrV, CrMo, CrW and CrTi. Materials having a B2-ordered structure having a lattice constant that is substantially comparable to that of Cr, such as those preferably selected from the group consisting of NiAl, AILCo, FeAl, FeTi, CoFe, CoTi, CoHf, CoZr, NiTi, CuBe, CuZn, A-LMn, AlRe, AgMg, and Al.sub.2 FeMn.sub.2, and is most preferably FeAl or NiAl.

  3. ZnO PN Junctions for Highly-Efficient, Low-Cost Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David P. Norton; Stephen Pearton; Fan Ren

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    By 2015, the US Department of Energy has set as a goal the development of advanced solid state lighting technologies that are more energy efficient, longer lasting, and more cost-effective than current technology. One approach that is most attractive is to utilize light-emitting diode technologies. Although III-V compound semiconductors have been the primary focus in pursuing this objective, ZnO-based materials present some distinct advantages that could yield success in meeting this objective. As with the nitrides, ZnO is a direct bandgap semiconductor whose gap energy (3.2 eV) can be tuned from 3.0 to 4 eV with substitution of Mg for higher bandgap, Cd for lower bandgap. ZnO has an exciton binding energy of 60 meV, which is larger than that for the nitrides, indicating that it should be a superior light emitting semiconductor. Furthermore, ZnO thin films can be deposited at temperatures on the order of 400-600 C, which is significantly lower than that for the nitrides and should lead to lower manufacturing costs. It has also been demonstrated that functional ZnO electronic devices can be fabricated on inexpensive substrates, such as glass. Therefore, for the large-area photonic application of solid state lighting, ZnO holds unique potential. A significant impediment to exploiting ZnO in light-emitting applications has been the absence of effective p-type carrier doping. However, the recent realization of acceptor-doped ZnO material overcomes this impediment, opening the door to ZnO light emitting diode development In this project, the synthesis and properties of ZnO-based pn junctions for light emitting diodes was investigated. The focus was on three issues most pertinent to realizing a ZnO-based solid state lighting technology, namely (1) achieving high p-type carrier concentrations in epitaxial and polycrystalline films, (2) realizing band edge emission from pn homojunctions, and (3) investigating pn heterojunction constructs that should yield efficient light emission. The project engaged established expertise at the University of Florida in ZnO film growth (D. Norton), device fabrication (F. Ren) and wide bandgap photonics (S. Pearton). It addressed p-type doping and junction formation in (Zn,Mg)O alloy thin films. The project employed pulsed laser deposition for film growth. The p-type dopant of interest was primarily phosphorus, given the recent results in our laboratory and elsewhere that this anions can yield p-type ZnO-based materials. The role of Zn interstitials, oxygen vacancies, and/or hydrogen complexes in forming compensating shallow donor levels imposes the need to simultaneously consider the role of in situ and post-growth processing conditions. Temperature-dependent Hall, Seebeck, C-V, and resistivity measurements was used to determine conduction mechanisms, carrier type, and doping. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence was used to determine the location of the acceptor level, injection efficiency, and optical properties of the structures. X-ray diffraction will used to characterize film crystallinity. Using these materials, the fabrication and characterization of (Zn,Mg)O pn homojunction and heterojunction devices was pursued. Electrical characterization of the junction capacitance and I-V behavior was used to extract junction profile and minority carrier lifetime. Electroluminescence from biased junctions was the primary property of interest.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: atomic layer deposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    layer deposition Combining 'Tinkertoy' Materials with Solar Cells for Increased Photovoltaic Efficiency On December 4, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News & Events,...

  5. Enhanced Densification of SDC Barrier Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical report explores the Enhanced Densification of SCD Barrier Layers A samaria-doped ceria (SDC) barrier layer separates the lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode from the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to prevent the formation of electrically resistive interfacial SrZrO{sub 3} layers that arise from the reaction of Sr from the LSCF with Zr from the YSZ. However, the sintering temperature of this SDC layer must be limited to {approx}1200 C to avoid extensive interdiffusion between SDC and YSZ to form a resistive CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} solid solution. Therefore, the conventional SDC layer is often porous and therefore not as impervious to Sr-diffusion as would be desired. In the pursuit of improved SOFC performance, efforts have been directed toward increasing the density of the SDC barrier layer without increasing the sintering temperature. The density of the SDC barrier layer can be greatly increased through small amounts of Cu-doping of the SDC powder together with increased solids loading and use of an appropriate binder system in the screen print ink. However, the resulting performance of cells with these barrier layers did not exhibit the expected increase in accordance with that achieved with the prototypical PLD SDC layer. It was determined by XRD that increased sinterability of the SDC also results in increased interdiffusivity between the SDC and YSZ, resulting in formation of a highly resistive solid solution.

  6. Electronic Transport in Few-layer Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Zeng

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Charge Neutral Bilayer Graphene Introduction In thisstudy on heterogeneous graphene devices in a differentto probe few layer graphene to determine their dependence on

  7. Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Yang, Fan (Piscataway, NJ); Rand, Barry P. (Somers, NY)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A photosensitive device includes a plurality of organic photoconductive materials disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode, including a first continuous layer of donor host material, a second continuous layer of acceptor host material, and at least one other organic photoconductive material disposed as a plurality of discontinuous islands between the first continuous layer and the second continuous layer. Each of these other photoconductive materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor host material and the acceptor host material. Preferably, each of the discontinuous islands consists essentially of a crystallite of the respective organic photoconductive material, and more preferably, the crystallites are nanocrystals.

  8. Nanomanufacturing : nano-structured materials made layer-by-layer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, James V.; Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary Stephen; Tjiptowidjojo, Kristianto (University of New Mexico); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Fan, Hongyou; Schunk, Peter Randall; Chandross, Michael Evan; Roberts, Scott A.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale, high-throughput production of nano-structured materials (i.e. nanomanufacturing) is a strategic area in manufacturing, with markets projected to exceed $1T by 2015. Nanomanufacturing is still in its infancy; process/product developments are costly and only touch on potential opportunities enabled by growing nanoscience discoveries. The greatest promise for high-volume manufacturing lies in age-old coating and imprinting operations. For materials with tailored nm-scale structure, imprinting/embossing must be achieved at high speeds (roll-to-roll) and/or over large areas (batch operation) with feature sizes less than 100 nm. Dispersion coatings with nanoparticles can also tailor structure through self- or directed-assembly. Layering films structured with these processes have tremendous potential for efficient manufacturing of microelectronics, photovoltaics and other topical nano-structured devices. This project is designed to perform the requisite R and D to bring Sandia's technology base in computational mechanics to bear on this scale-up problem. Project focus is enforced by addressing a promising imprinting process currently being commercialized.

  9. GaAs Nanowire Array Solar Cells with Axial p-i-n Junctions Maoqing Yao, Ningfeng Huang, Sen Cong, Chun-Yung Chi, M. Ashkan Seyedi, Yen-Ting Lin, Yu Cao,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    for future low-cost, high-efficiency photovoltaics. KEYWORDS: Nanowires, solar cells, gallium arsenide, axial.58% efficiency. Simulations show that axial junctions are more tolerant to doping variation than radial junctions and shallow junctions are essential for a high extraction efficiency. Our approach opens up great opportunity

  10. Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing by generating constant current flow in portion of casing and using at least two voltage measurement electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of operation of different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information related to the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from within the cased well are described. The multiple electrode apparatus has a minimum of two spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage a first portion of the interior of the cased well and that provide at least first voltage information. Current control means are used to control the magnitude of any selected current that flows along a second portion of the interior of the casing to be equal to a predetermined selected constant. The first portion of the interior of the cased well is spaced apart from the second portion of the interior of the cased well. The first voltage information and the predetermined selected constant value of any selected current flowing along the casing are used in part to determine a magnitude related to the formation resistivity adjacent to the first portion of the interior of the cased well. Methods and apparatus having a plurality of voltage measurement electrodes are disclosed that provide voltage related information in the presence of constant currents flowing along the casing which is used to provide formation resistivity.

  11. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of a pH-Responsive and Electrochromic Thin Film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Daniel J.

    This article summarizes an experiment on thin-film fabrication with layer-by-layer assembly that is appropriate for undergraduate laboratory courses. The purpose of this experiment is to teach students about self-assembly ...

  12. An ultra-thin buffer layer for Ge epitaxial layers on Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawano, M.; Yamada, S.; Tanikawa, K.; Miyao, M.; Hamaya, K. [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)] [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Sawano, K. [Advanced Research Laboratories, Tokyo City University, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan)] [Advanced Research Laboratories, Tokyo City University, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan)

    2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an Fe{sub 3}Si insertion layer, we study epitaxial growth of Ge layers on a Si substrate by a low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy technique. When we insert only a 10-nm-thick Fe{sub 3}Si layer in between Si and Ge, epitaxial Ge layers can be obtained on Si. The detailed structural characterizations reveal that a large lattice mismatch of {approx}4% is completely relaxed in the Fe{sub 3}Si layer. This means that the Fe{sub 3}Si layers can become ultra-thin buffer layers for Ge on Si. This method will give a way to realize a universal buffer layer for Ge, GaAs, and related devices on a Si platform.

  13. Surface engineering using layer-by-layer assembly of pH-sensitive polymers and nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Daeyeon

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface engineering of a variety of materials including colloidal particles and porous membranes has been achieved by using layer-by-layer assembly of pH-sensitive polymers and nanoparticles. In the first part of this ...

  14. Amperometric Glucose Biosensor by Means of Electrostatic Layer-by-layer Adsorption onto Electrospun Polyaniline Fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Young J.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    were formed and collected by electrospinning. Glucose oxidase was immobilized onto these fibers using an electrostatic layer-by-layer adsorption technique. In this method, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) was used as the counter ion source...

  15. automated spin-assisted layer-by-layer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thomas 2005-01-01 16 Layer-by-Layer Assembly of a pH-Responsive and Electrochromic Thin Film MIT - DSpace Summary: This article summarizes an experiment on thin-film fabrication...

  16. Engineering the electrochromism and ion conduction of layer-by-layer assembled films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLongchamp, Dean M. (Dean Michael), 1975-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work applies the processing technique of layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly to the creation and development of new electrochemically active materials. Elements of the thin-film electrochromic cell were chosen as a particular ...

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Cationic Antiseptics in Layer-by-Layer Thin Film Assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvoracek, Charlene M.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly has proven to be a powerful technique for assembling thin films with a variety of properties including electrochromic, molecular sensing, oxygen barrier, and antimicrobial. LbL involves the deposition of alternating...

  18. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krishna, Coimbatore R. (Mt. Sinai, NY); Milau, Julius S. (Port Jefferson, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  19. Steady water waves with multiple critical layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnström; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahlén

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

  20. Channel cracks in atomic-layer and molecular-layer deposited multilayer thin film coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Rong, E-mail: rlongmech@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G8 (Canada); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Dunn, Martin L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore 138682 (Singapore)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal oxide thin film coatings produced by atomic layer deposition have been shown to be an effective permeation barrier. The primary failure mode of such coatings under tensile loads is the propagation of channel cracks that penetrate vertically into the coating films. Recently, multi-layer structures that combine the metal oxide material with relatively soft polymeric layers produced by molecular layer deposition have been proposed to create composite thin films with desired properties, including potentially enhanced resistance to fracture. In this paper, we study the effects of layer geometry and material properties on the critical strain for channel crack propagation in the multi-layer composite films. Using finite element simulations and a thin-film fracture mechanics formalism, we show that if the fracture energy of the polymeric layer is lower than that of the metal oxide layer, the channel crack tends to penetrate through the entire composite film, and dividing the metal oxide and polymeric materials into thinner layers leads to a smaller critical strain. However, if the fracture energy of the polymeric material is high so that cracks only run through the metal oxide layers, more layers can result in a larger critical strain. For intermediate fracture energy of the polymer material, we developed a design map that identifies the optimal structure for given fracture energies and thicknesses of the metal oxide and polymeric layers. These results can facilitate the design of mechanically robust permeation barriers, an important component for the development of flexible electronics.

  1. Short-time OD matrix estimation for a complex junction using Fuzzy-Timed High-Level Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Short-time OD matrix estimation for a complex junction using Fuzzy-Timed High-Level Petri Nets cedex, France, E-mail: krystyna.biletska@utc.fr (corresponding author) Abstract--The OD matrix systems. A new dynamic two-steps method is proposed to estimate such an OD matrix. First, a vehicle

  2. Junction temperature, spectral shift, and efficiency in GaInN-based blue and green light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    Keywords: GaInN/GaN Light emitting diode temperature Micro-Raman Photoluminescence Electroluminescence well light emitting diode (LED) dies is analyzed by micro-Raman, photoluminescence, cathodoluminescenceJunction temperature, spectral shift, and efficiency in GaInN-based blue and green light emitting

  3. High efficiency single Ag nanowire/p-GaN substrate Schottky junction-based ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.; Hasan, T.; Li, X.; Xu, P.; Wang, Y.; Shen, X.; Liu, X.; Yang, Q.

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a high efficiency single Ag nanowire (NW)/p-GaN substrate Schottky junction-based ultraviolet light emitting diode (UV-LED). The device demonstrates deep UV free exciton electroluminescence at 362.5?nm. The dominant emission, detectable...

  4. Calcium niobate nanosheets as a novel electron transport material for solution-processed multi-junction polymer solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterloh, Frank

    from a common solvent. Nanoscale interpenetrating networks are formed as the donor and acceptor phase-junction polymer solar cells Lilian Chang,a Michael A. Holmes,b Mollie Waller,b Frank E. Osterlohb and Adam J-processed tandem polymer solar cells are demonstrated using stacked perovskite, (TBA,H) Ca2Nb3O10 (CNO

  5. The lid wiper and muco-cutaneous junction anatomy of the human eyelid margins: an in vivo confocal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Ron

    The lid wiper and muco-cutaneous junction anatomy of the human eyelid margins: an in vivo confocal thickness (lid wiper). This continued for 0.3­1.5 mm and formed a slope. The MCJ and lid wiper extended all border has distinct zones. Due to its location and morphology, the epithelial lip of the lid wiper

  6. Simulation assisted design of a gallium phosphide np photovoltaic junction Charles R. Allen, Jong-Hyeok Jeon , Jerry M. Woodall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    University, 1205 W State Street, West Lafayette, IN, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 27 February 2010 Keywords: Gallium phosphide Solar cell Multi-junction CPV Simulation a b s t r a c with measurements of the dark and light response. The light current was measured under an illumination of air mass

  7. Survey of Seeps and Springs within the Bureau of Land Management's Grand Junction Field Office Management Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Seeps and Springs within the Bureau of Land Management's Grand Junction Field Office Management Area (Mesa County, CO) Colorado Natural Heritage Program Colorado State University 8002 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-8002 #12;Survey of Seeps and Springs within the Bureau of Land

  8. Survey of Seeps and Springs within the Bureau of Land Management's Grand Junction Field Office Management Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Seeps and Springs within the Bureau of Land Management's Grand Junction Field Office Management Area (Garfield County, CO) Colorado Natural Heritage Program College of Natural Resources, 254 General Services Building Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 #12;Survey of Seeps

  9. The benzene metabolite trans,trans-muconaldehyde blocks gap junction intercellular communication by cross-linking connexin43

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivedal, Edgar [Department of Cancer Prevention, Institute for Cancer Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: edgarr@rr-research.no; Leithe, Edward [Department of Cancer Prevention, Institute for Cancer Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway)

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Benzene is used at large volumes in many different human activities. Hematotoxicity and cancer-causation as a result of benzene exposure was recognized many years ago, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Aberrant regulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) has been linked to both cancer induction and interference with normal hematopoietic development. We have previously suggested that inhibition of GJIC may play a role in benzene toxicity since benzene metabolites were found to block GJIC, the ring-opened trans,trans-muconaldehyde (MUC) being the most potent metabolite. In the present work we have studied the molecular mechanisms underlying the MUC-induced inhibition of gap junctional communication. We show that MUC induces cross-linking of the gap junction protein connexin43 and that this is likely to be responsible for the induced inhibition of GJIC, as well as the loss of connexin43 observed in Western blots. We also show that glutaraldehyde possesses similar effects as MUC, and we compare the effects to that of formaldehyde. The fact that glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde have been associated with induction of leukemia as well as disturbance of hematopoiesis, strengthens the possible link between the effect of MUC on gap junctions, and the toxic effects of benzene.

  10. Instability limits for spontaneous double layer formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, J. Jr. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States) [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Department of Physics, Texas Lutheran University, Seguin, Texas 78155 (United States); Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S.; VanDervort, R. W. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Magee, R. M. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States) [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); TriAlpha Energy, Inc., Foothill Ranch, California 92610 (United States); Reynolds, E. [Department of Physics and Engineering, West Virginia Wesleyan, Buckhannon, West Virginia 26201 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Engineering, West Virginia Wesleyan, Buckhannon, West Virginia 26201 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present time-resolved measurements that demonstrate that large amplitude electrostatic instabilities appear in pulsed, expanding helicon plasmas at the same time as particularly strong double layers appear in the expansion region. A significant cross-correlation between the electrostatic fluctuations and fluctuations in the number of ions accelerated by the double layer electric field is observed. No correlation is observed between the electrostatic fluctuations and ions that have not passed through the double layer. These measurements confirm that the simultaneous appearance of the electrostatic fluctuations and the double layer is not simple coincidence. In fact, the accelerated ion population is responsible for the growth of the instability. The double layer strength, and therefore, the velocity of the accelerated ions, is limited by the appearance of the electrostatic instability.

  11. Electropositive surface layer MPD thruster cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamberlain, F.R.; Kelly, A.J.; Jahn, R.G.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium and barium oxide have been used to generate electropositive surface layers on tungsten cathodes in low power steady state MPD thruster experiments. The electropositive surface layer decreases the cathode work function, resulting in substantial reductions in the steady state cathode operating temperature and erosion rate. Cathode temperature is reduced by 300 degrees with a lithium surface layer and by 800 degrees with a barium oxide surface layer at a 500 ampere thruster current level. These temperature reductions substantially reduce the calculated steady state evaporative erosion rate of the cathode by factors of 20 and 10,000 respectively. Cold cathode startup erosion is also reduced dramatically. The surface melting and arc cratering that is characteristic of pure tungsten cathodes does not occur with an electropositive surface layer cathode. In addition to reducing cathode erosion, the use of these materials increases thruster efficiency. 12 refs.

  12. Main Sequence Evolution with Layered Semiconvection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Kevin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconvection - mixing that occurs in regions that are stable when considering compositional gradients, but unstable when ignoring them - is shown to have the greatest potential impact on main sequence stars with masses in the range 1.2 - 1.7 solar masses. We present the first stellar evolution calculations using a prescription for semiconvection derived from extrapolation of direct numerical simulations of double-diffusive mixing down to stellar parameters. The dominant mode of semiconvection in stars is layered semiconvection, where the layer height is an adjustable parameter analogous to the mixing length in convection. The rate of mixing across the semiconvective region is sensitively dependent on the layer height. We find that there is a critical layer height that separates weak semiconvective mixing (where evolution is well-approximated by using the Ledoux criterion) from strong semiconvective mixing (where evolution is well-approximated by using the Schwarzschild criterion). This critical layer height...

  13. Controllable 0 ? ? transition in iron pnictide superconductor junctions with a spacer of strong ferromagnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S. Y.; Tao, Y. C., E-mail: yctao88@163.com; Ji, T. T.; Di, Y. S. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Hu, J. G. [Department of Physics, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China)

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the control of 0?? transition in Josephson junctions consisting of a highly spin-polarized ferromagnet coupled to two iron pnictide superconductors (SCs). It is shown that, a 0?? transition as a function of interband coupling strength is always exhibited, which can be experimentally used to discriminate the s{sub ±}-wave pairing symmetry in the iron pnictide SCs from the s{sub ++}-wave one in MgB{sub 2}. By tuning the doping level in the s{sub ±}-wave SCs, one can vary the interband coupling strength so as to obtain the controllable 0?? transition. This device may be realized with current technologies and has practical use in Cooper pair spintronics and quantum information.

  14. Investigation of photoelectrode redox polymer junctions. Technical report, 16 November-15 January 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, R.L.; Sammells, A.F.

    1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The n-CdS flatband potential in the solid-state cell n-CdS/Nafion 117 + redox species/Au was shifted progressively in a cathode directed upon the introduction of FeCp2, FeCp2 + Ru(bpy)3(2+) into the SPE. This cathodic shift was consistent with that for the oxidation potentials seen for Ru(bpy)3(2+) (E1/2 = 1.25V vs SCE) and FeCp2 (0.285V vs SCE) in acetonitrile. Such perturbations of semiconductor properties can be expected to form the basis of a detector technology when the semiconductor/SPE junction is exposed to selected chemical species.

  15. Surface tension of multi-phase flow with multiple junctions governed by the variational principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shigeki Matsutani; Kota Nakano; Katsuhiko Shinjo

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore a computational model of an incompressible fluid with a multi-phase field in three-dimensional Euclidean space. By investigating an incompressible fluid with a two-phase field geometrically, we reformulate the expression of the surface tension for the two-phase field found by Lafaurie, Nardone, Scardovelli, Zaleski and Zanetti (J. Comp. Phys. \\vol{113} \\yr{1994} \\pages{134-147}) as a variational problem related to an infinite dimensional Lie group, the volume-preserving diffeomorphism. The variational principle to the action integral with the surface energy reproduces their Euler equation of the two-phase field with the surface tension. Since the surface energy of multiple interfaces even with singularities is not difficult to be evaluated in general and the variational formulation works for every action integral, the new formulation enables us to extend their expression to that of a multi-phase ($N$-phase, $N\\ge2$) flow and to obtain a novel Euler equation with the surface tension of the multi-phase field. The obtained Euler equation governs the equation of motion of the multi-phase field with different surface tension coefficients without any difficulties for the singularities at multiple junctions. In other words, we unify the theory of multi-phase fields which express low dimensional interface geometry and the theory of the incompressible fluid dynamics on the infinite dimensional geometry as a variational problem. We apply the equation to the contact angle problems at triple junctions. We computed the fluid dynamics for a two-phase field with a wall numerically and show the numerical computational results that for given surface tension coefficients, the contact angles are generated by the surface tension as results of balances of the kinematic energy and the surface energy.

  16. Nanopillar Photovoltaics: Photon Management and Junction Engineering for Next-Generation Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariani, Giacomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F. The influence of the InGaP window of GaAs solar cells,F. The influence of the InGaP window layer on the opticalEnhanced PCE using InGaP passivation…………………. ……..…. …………

  17. Analysis of Vision Loss Caused by Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Particle Therapy for Head-and-Neck and Skull-Base Tumors Adjacent to Optic Nerves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demizu, Yusuke, E-mail: y_demizu@nifty.co [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Murakami, Masao; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Niwa, Yasue [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Akagi, Takashi [Department of Accelerator Managing, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Sasaki, Ryohei [Division of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Terashima, Kazuki [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Suga, Daisaku [Department of Radiation Technology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Kamae, Isao [Division of Medical Statistics, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Hishikawa, Yoshio [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan)

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the incident rates of vision loss (VL; based on counting fingers or more severe) caused by radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) after particle therapy for tumors adjacent to optic nerves (ONs), and to evaluate factors that may contribute to VL. Methods and Materials: From August 2001 to August 2006, 104 patients with head-and-neck or skull-base tumors adjacent to ONs were treated with carbon ion or proton radiotherapy. Among them, 145 ONs of 75 patients were irradiated and followed for greater than 12 months. The incident rate of VL and the prognostic factors for occurrence of VL were evaluated. The late effects of carbon ion and proton beams were compared on the basis of a biologically effective dose at alpha/beta = 3 gray equivalent (GyE{sub 3}). Results: Eight patients (11%) experienced VL resulting from RION. The onset of VL ranged from 17 to 58 months. The median follow-up was 25 months. No significant difference was observed between the carbon ion and proton beam treatment groups. On univariate analysis, age (>60 years), diabetes mellitus, and maximum dose to the ON (>110 GyE{sub 3}) were significant, whereas on multivariate analysis only diabetes mellitus was found to be significant for VL. Conclusions: The time to the onset of VL was highly variable. There was no statistically significant difference between carbon ion and proton beam treatments over the follow-up period. Based on multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus correlated with the occurrence of VL. A larger study with longer follow-up is warranted.

  18. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Painful Spinal Tumors Adjacent to the Spinal Cord with Real-Time Monitoring of Spinal Canal Temperature: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro, E-mail: nakatuka@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Uraki, Junji; Makita, Masashi; Oshima, Fumiyoshi; Takeda, Kan [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    PurposeTo prospectively evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical utility of bone radiofrequency (RF) ablation with real-time monitoring of the spinal canal temperature for the treatment of spinal tumors adjacent to the spinal cord.Materials and MethodsOur Institutional Review Board approved this study. Patients gave informed consent. The inclusion criteria were (a) a painful spinal metastasis and (b) a distance of 1 cm or less between the metastasis and the spinal cord. The thermocouple was placed in the spinal canal under CT fluoroscopic guidance. When the spinal canal temperature reached 45{sup o}C, RF application was immediately stopped. RF ablation was considered technically successful when the procedure was performed without major complications. Clinical success was defined as a fall in the visual analogue scale score of at least 2 points.ResultsTen patients with spinal tumors measuring 3-8 cm (mean, 4.9 {+-} 1.5 cm) were enrolled. The distance between the tumor and the spinal cord was 1-6 mm (mean, 2.4 {+-} 1.6 mm). All procedures were judged technically successful (100%). The spinal canal temperature did not exceed 45{sup o}C in 9 of the 10 patients (90%). In the remaining patient, the temperature rose to 48{sup o}C, resulting in transient neural damage, although RF application was immediately stopped when the temperature reached 45{sup o}C. Clinical success was achieved within 1 week in all patients (100%).ConclusionBone RF ablation with real-time monitoring of the spinal canal temperature is feasible, safe, and clinically useful for the treatment of painful spinal metastases adjacent to the spinal cord.

  19. Lance water injection tests adjacent to the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, B.; Myer, L.; Moridis, G.; Cook, P.; James, A.; Pellerin, L.; Pruess, K.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale field demonstration of waste isolation using viscous- liquid containment barriers has been planned for the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. The 281-3H basin is a shallow retention/seepage basin contaminated mainly by radionuclides. The viscous-liquid containment barrier utilizes the permeation of liquid grout to either entomb the contaminants within a monolithic grout structure or to isolate the waste by drastically reducing the permeability, of the soils around the plume. A clear understanding of the hydrogeologic setting of the retention basin is necessary for proper design of the viscous liquid barrier. To aid in the understanding of the hydrogeology of the 281-3H retention basin, and to obtain critical parameters necessary for grout injection design, a series of tests were undertaken in a region immediately adjacent to the basin. The objectives of the LWIT were: 1. To evaluate the general performance of the Lance Injection Technique for grout emplacement at the site, including the range and upper limits of injection pressures, the flow rates applicable for site conditions, as well as the mechanical forces needed for lance penetration. 2. To obtain detailed information on the injectability of the soils immediately adjacent to the H-area retention basin. 3. To identify any high permeability zones suitable for injection and evaluate their spatial distribution. 4. To perform ground penetrating radar (GPR) to gain information on the structure of the soil column and to compare the results with LWIT data. This report will focus on results pertinent to these objectives.

  20. Electrical Engineering and Computer Cross-Layer Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Cross-Layer Design and Analysis of Wireless Networks Layer Design #12;Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Layered Approach Presentation Layer Session;Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Why not cross-layer design? · Difficulty. · Lack of insight

  1. Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure. 7 figures.

  2. Method for forming a barrier layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weihs, Timothy P. (Baltimore, MD); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

  3. Energy transport using natural convection boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection is one of the major modes of energy transport in passive solar buildings. There are two primary mechanisms for natural convection heat transport through an aperture between building zones: (1) bulk density differences created by temperature differences between zones; and (2) thermosyphon pumping created by natural convection boundary layers. The primary objective of the present study is to compare the characteristics of bulk density driven and boundary layer driven flow, and discuss some of the advantages associated with the use of natural convection boundary layers to transport energy in solar building applications.

  4. Abstraction Layers for Scalable Microfluidic Biocomputers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarasinghe, Saman

    Abstraction Layers for Scalable Microfluidic Biocomputers William Thies1 , John Paul Urbanski2 Hatsopoulos Microfluids Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology {thies, urbanski, thorsen, saman}@mit.edu Abstract. Microfluidic devices are emerging as an attractive technol- ogy for automatically orchestrating

  5. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

  6. Counting molecular-beam grown graphene layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaut, Annette S. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Wurstbauer, Ulrich [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Pinczuk, Aron [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States) [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Garcia, Jorge M. [MBE Lab, IMM-Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Madrid, E-28760 (Spain)] [MBE Lab, IMM-Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Madrid, E-28760 (Spain); Pfeiffer, Loren N. [Electrical Engineering Department, Princeton University, New Jersey 08544 (United States)] [Electrical Engineering Department, Princeton University, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the ratio of the integrated intensity of graphene's Raman G peak to that of the silicon substrate's first-order optical phonon peak, accurately to determine the number of graphene layers across our molecular-beam (MB) grown graphene films. We find that these results agree well both, with those from our own exfoliated single and few-layer graphene flakes, and with the results of Koh et al.[ACS Nano 5, 269 (2011)]. We hence distinguish regions of single-, bi-, tri-, four-layer, etc., graphene, consecutively, as we scan coarsely across our MB-grown graphene. This is the first, but crucial, step to being able to grow, by such molecular-beam-techniques, a specified number of large-area graphene layers, to order.

  7. Josephson vortex lattice in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshelev, A. E., E-mail: koshelev@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division (United States); Dodgson, M. J. W. [Cavendish Laboratory, Theory of Condensed Matter Group (United Kingdom)] [Cavendish Laboratory, Theory of Condensed Matter Group (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many superconducting materials are composed of weakly coupled conducting layers. Such a layered structure has a very strong influence on the properties of vortex matter in a magnetic field. This review focuses on the properties of the Josephson vortex lattice generated by the magnetic field applied in the direction of the layers. The theoretical description is based on the Lawrence-Doniach model in the London limit, which takes only the phase degree of freedom of the superconducting order parameter into account. In spite of its simplicity, this model leads to an amazingly rich set of phenomena. We review in detail the structure of an isolated vortex line and various properties of the vortex lattice, in both dilute and dense limits. In particular, we extensively discuss the influence of the layered structure and thermal fluctuations on the selection of lattice configurations at different magnetic fields.

  8. Multi-layer waste containment barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nickelson, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for constructing an underground containment barrier for containing an in-situ portion of earth. The apparatus includes an excavating device for simultaneously (i) excavating earthen material from beside the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming an open side trench defined by opposing earthen sidewalls, and (ii) excavating earthen material from beneath the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming a generally horizontal underground trench beneath the in-situ portion defined by opposing earthen sidewalls. The apparatus further includes a barrier-forming device attached to the excavating device for simultaneously forming a side barrier within the open trench and a generally horizontal, multi-layer barrier within the generally horizontal trench. The multi-layer barrier includes at least a first layer and a second layer.

  9. Finite element analysis of shells with layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiller, Jean-François, 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well established that thin shell structures frequently feature narrow bands of strain concentration and localized displacement irregularities referred to as boundary and internal layers. It is crucial to capture these ...

  10. Double layer capacitors : automotive applications and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New, David Allen, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis documents the work on the modeling of double layer capacitors (DLCs) and the validation of the modeling procedure. Several experiments were conducted to subject the device under test to a variety of ...

  11. Analytical Layer Planning for Nanometer VLSI Designs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chi-Yu

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    i ANALYTICAL LAYER PLANNING FOR NANOMETER VLSI DESIGNS A Thesis by CHI-YU CHANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 2012 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering ii ANALYTICAL LAYER PLANNING FOR NANOMETER VLSI DESIGNS A Thesis by CHI-YU CHANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  12. Symmetry Breaking in Few Layer Graphene Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostwick, A.; Ohta, T.; McChesney, J.L.; Emtsev, K.; Seyller,Th.; Horn, K.; Rotenberg, E.

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, it was demonstrated that the quasiparticledynamics, the layer-dependent charge and potential, and the c-axisscreening coefficient could be extracted from measurements of thespectral function of few layer graphene films grown epitaxially on SiCusing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In this articlewe review these findings, and present detailed methodology for extractingsuch parameters from ARPES. We also present detailed arguments againstthe possibility of an energy gap at the Dirac crossing ED.

  13. Lattice Vibrations and Superconductivity in Layered Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Roland E.; Alldredg, GP; WETTE, FWD.

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 2, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOB ER, 1970 Lattice Vibrations and Superconductivity in Layered Structures* B. E. Allen, G. P. Alldredge, and F. W. de bette DePartment of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (Received 18... May 1970) In order to estimate the influence of both surface and interface effects on phonon frequencies and superconducting transition temperatures in layered structures, we have calculated the vibrational modes of structures composed...

  14. Optical devices featuring textured semiconductor layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA); Cabalu, Jasper S. (Cary, NC)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor sensor, solar cell or emitter, or a precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate. The textured layers enhance light extraction or absorption. Texturing in the region of multiple quantum wells greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency if the semiconductor is polar and the quantum wells are grown along the polar direction. Electroluminescence of LEDs of the invention is dichromatic, and results in variable color LEDs, including white LEDs, without the use of phosphor.

  15. Optical devices featuring textured semiconductor layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA); Cabalu, Jasper S. (Cary, NC)

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor sensor, solar cell or emitter, or a precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate. The textured layers enhance light extraction or absorption. Texturing in the region of multiple quantum wells greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency if the semiconductor is polar and the quantum wells are grown along the polar direction. Electroluminescence of LEDs of the invention is dichromatic, and results in variable color LEDs, including white LEDs, without the use of phosphor.

  16. Optical devices featuring nonpolar textured semiconductor layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D; Moldawer, Adam; Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Abell, Joshua

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor emitter, or precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate in a nonpolar orientation. The textured layers enhance light extraction, and the use of nonpolar orientation greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency compared to conventional devices. Both the internal and external quantum efficiencies of emitters of the invention can be 70-80% or higher. The invention provides highly efficient light emitting diodes suitable for solid state lighting.

  17. Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitesides, R.; Domin, D.; Salomon-Ferrer, R.; Lester Jr., W.A.; Frenklach, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are incorporated into growing graphene layers and hence willGRAPHENE LAYER GROWTH CHEMISTRY: FIVE-SIX-RING FLIP REACTIONon the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. A new reaction

  18. Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitesides, Russell; Domin, Dominik; Lester Jr., William A.; Frenklach, Michael

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    25-28, 2007. Topic: Soot GRAPHENE LAYER GROWTH CHEMISTRY:on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer isomerizes to reversea possibly important step in graphene layer growth, thus

  19. A water-processable organic electron-selective layer for solution-processed inverted organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dongcheng; Zhou, Hu; Cai, Ping; Sun, Shi; Ye, Hua; Su, Shi-Jian, E-mail: mssjsu@scut.edu.cn; Cao, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices (South China University of Technology) and Institute of Polymer Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A triazine- and pyridinium-containing water-soluble material of 1,1?,1?-(4,4?,4?-(1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyl)tris(benzene-4,1-diyl)) tris(methylene)tripyridinium bromide (TzPyBr) was developed as an organic electron-selective layer in solution-processed inverted organic solar cells due to its strong anti-erosion capacity against non-polar organic solvents commonly used for the active layer. Ohmic-like contact with the adjacent active materials like fullerene derivatives is speculated to be formed, as confirmed by the work-function measurements with scanning Kelvin probe and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. Besides, considering the deep highest occupied molecular orbital energy level of TzPyBr, excellent hole-blocking property of the electron-selective layer is also anticipated. The inverted organic photovoltaic devices based on the TzPyBr/ITO (indium tin oxide) bilayer cathode exhibit dramatically enhanced performance compared to the control devices with bare ITO as the cathode and even higher efficiency than the conventional type devices with ITO and Al as the electrodes.

  20. Hybrid inorganic–organic superlattice structures with atomic layer deposition/molecular layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tynell, Tommi; Yamauchi, Hisao; Karppinen, Maarit, E-mail: maarit.karppinen@aalto.fi [Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) and molecular layer deposition (MLD) techniques is successfully employed to fabricate thin films incorporating superlattice structures that consist of single layers of organic molecules between thicker layers of ZnO. Diethyl zinc and water are used as precursors for the deposition of ZnO by ALD, while three different organic precursors are investigated for the MLD part: hydroquinone, 4-aminophenol and 4,4?-oxydianiline. The successful superlattice formation with all the organic precursors is verified through x-ray reflectivity studies. The effects of the interspersed organic layers/superlattice structure on the electrical and thermoelectric properties of ZnO are investigated through resistivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements at room temperature. The results suggest an increase in carrier concentration for small concentrations of organic layers, while higher concentrations seem to lead to rather large reductions in carrier concentration.

  1. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: New Insights for Improving the Designs of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance.

  2. Characterization of the plastic substrates, the reflective layers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the plastic substrates, the reflective layers, the adhesives, and the grooves of today's archival-grade Characterization of the plastic substrates, the reflective layers, the...

  3. antarctic boundary layer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences Websites Summary: Boundary Layer Meteorology (METR 5103) Spring 2014 Syllabus General information Fundamentals of the atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and...

  4. atmosperic boundary layer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences Websites Summary: Boundary Layer Meteorology (METR 5103) Spring 2014 Syllabus General information Fundamentals of the atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and...

  5. Vacancies Ordered in Screw Form (VOSF) and Layered Indium Selenide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ordered in Screw Form (VOSF) and Layered Indium Selenide Thin Film Deposition by Laser Back Ablation. Vacancies Ordered in Screw Form (VOSF) and Layered Indium Selenide Thin Film...

  6. Amorphous layer coating induced brittle to ductile transition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    layer coating induced brittle to ductile transition in single crystalline SiC nanowires: an atomistic simulation. Amorphous layer coating induced brittle to ductile transition in...

  7. Layered Electrodes for Lithium Cells and Batteries | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Layered Electrodes for Lithium Cells and Batteries Technology available for licensing: Layered lithium metal oxide compounds for ultra-high-capacity, rechargeable cathodes Lowers...

  8. Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft Landing. Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft...

  9. Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction enhanced by desiccation and water Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...

  10. Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium by Means of Soil Vapor Extraction Enhanced by Desiccation and Water Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...

  11. anisotropic porous layer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Highly Porous Catalytic Layers for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Based on Carbon Aerogels Physics Websites Summary: Synthesis of Highly Porous Catalytic Layers for Polymer...

  12. Characterization of CZTSSe photovoltaic device with an atomic layer-deposited passivation layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Wei, E-mail: wei.wu@dupont.com; Cao, Yanyan; Caspar, Jonathan V.; Guo, Qijie; Johnson, Lynda K.; Mclean, Robert S.; Malajovich, Irina; Choudhury, Kaushik Roy [DuPont Central Research and Development, Wilmington, Delaware 19880 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a CZTSSe (Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S{sub 1?x},Se{sub x}){sub 4}) photovoltaic (PV) device with an ALD (atomic layer deposition) coated buffer dielectric layer for CZTSSe surface passivation. An ALD buffer layer, such as TiO{sub 2}, can be applied in order to reduce the interface recombination and improve the device's open-circuit voltage. Detailed characterization data including current-voltage, admittance spectroscopy, and capacitance profiling are presented in order to compare the performance of PV devices with and without the ALD layer.

  13. Metal-sensing layer-semiconductor and metal-sensing layer-metal heterostructure gas sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, M.; Li, Zheng; Fonash, S.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely sensitive gas sensors can be fabricated using heterostructures of the form metal-sensing layer-semiconductor or metal-sensing layer-metal. These structures are heterostructure diodes which have the barrier controlling transport at least partially located in the sensing layer. In the presence of the gas species to be detected, the electrical properties of the sensing layer evolve, resulting in a modification of the barrier to electric current transport and, hence, resulting in detection due to changes in the current-voltage characteristics of the device. This type of sensor structure is demonstrated using the Pd/Ti-O/sub x/Ti heterostructure hydrogen detector.

  14. Tip-contact related low-bias negative differential resistance and rectifying effects in benzene–porphyrin–benzene molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Jue-Fei [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Suzhou Vocational University, Suzhou 215104 (China); Zhou, Liping, E-mail: zhoulp@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: leigao@suda.edu.cn; Liu, Man; Yan, Qiang; Han, Qin; Gao, Lei, E-mail: zhoulp@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: leigao@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic transport properties of benzene–porphyrin–benzene (BPB) molecules coupled to gold (Au) electrodes were investigated. By successively removing the front-end Au atoms, several BPB junctions with different molecule-electrode contact symmetries were constructed. The calculated current–voltage (I–V) curves depended strongly on the contact configurations between the BPB molecules and the Au electrodes. In particular, a significant low-voltage negative differential resistance effect appeared at ?0.3 V in the junctions with pyramidal electrodes on both sides. Along with the breaking of this tip-contact symmetry, the low-bias negative differential resistance effect gradually disappeared. This tip-contact may be ideal for use in the design of future molecular devices because of its similarity with experimental processes.

  15. Reconfigurable p-n junction diodes and the photovoltaic effect in exfoliated MoS{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutar, Surajit; Agnihotri, Pratik; Comfort, Everett; Ung Lee, Ji, E-mail: jlee1@albany.edu [The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE), SUNY at Albany, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K. [National Institute of Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba-city, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Realizing basic semiconductor devices such as p-n junctions are necessary for developing thin-film and optoelectronic technologies in emerging planar materials such as MoS{sub 2}. In this work, electrostatic doping by buried gates is used to study the electronic and optoelectronic properties of p-n junctions in exfoliated MoS{sub 2} flakes. Creating a controllable doping gradient across the device leads to the observation of the photovoltaic effect in monolayer and bilayer MoS{sub 2} flakes. For thicker flakes, strong ambipolar conduction enables realization of fully reconfigurable p-n junction diodes with rectifying current-voltage characteristics, and diode ideality factors as low as 1.6. The spectral response of the photovoltaic effect shows signatures of the predicted band gap transitions. For the first excitonic transition, a shift of >4{sub kB}T is observed between monolayer and bulk devices, indicating a thickness-dependence of the excitonic coulomb interaction.

  16. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the exterior land areas at the Grand Junction Projects Office facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility occupies approximately 56.4 acres (22.8 hectares) along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. The site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium-refining activities conducted by the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot-milling experiments conducted for the US Atomic Energy Commission`s (AEC`s) domestic uranium procurement program. The GJPO facility was the collection and assay point for AEC uranium and vanadium oxide purchases until the early 1970s. The DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program sponsored the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to remediate the facility lands, site improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor, Rust Geotech, was the Remedial Action Contractor for GJPORAP. The exterior land areas of the facility assessed as contaminated have been remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unrestricted use. Restoration of the aquifer will be accomplished through the natural flushing action of the aquifer during the next 50 to 80 years. The remediation of the DOE-GJPO facility buildings is ongoing and will be described in a separate report.

  17. U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1995 at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Environmental activities conducted at the GJPO facility during 1995 were associated with mixed-waste treatment, site remediation, off-site dose modeling, and radiological and nonradiological monitoring. As part of the GJPO Mixed-Waste Treatment Program, on-site treatability studies were conducted in 1995 that made use of pilot-scale evaporative-oxidation and thermal-desorption units and bench-scale stabilization. DOE-GJPO used some of its own mixed-waste as well as samples received from other DOE sites for these treatability studies. These studies are expected to conclude in 1996. Removal of radiologically contaminated materials from GJPO facility buildings was conducted under the provisions of the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Remediation activities included the removal of 394 metric tons of contaminated material from Buildings 18 and 28 and revegetation activities on the GJPO site; remediation was conducted in compliance with applicable permits.

  18. Lattice-Mismatched GaAs/InGaAs Two-Junction Solar Cells by Direct Wafer Bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanabe, K.; Aiken, D. J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Morral, A. F.; Atwater, H. A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct bonded interconnect between subcells of a lattice-mismatched III-V compound multijunction cell would enable dislocation-free active regions by confining the defect network needed for lattice mismatch accommodation to tunnel junction interfaces, while metamorphic growth inevitably results in less design flexibility and lower material quality than is desirable. The first direct-bond interconnected multijunction solar cell, a two-terminal monolithic GaAs/InGaAs two-junction solar cell, is reported and demonstrates viability of direct wafer bonding for solar cell applications. The tandem cell open-circuit voltage was approximately the sum of the subcell open-circuit voltages. This achievement shows direct bonding enables us to construct lattice-mismatched III-V multijunction solar cells and is extensible to an ultrahigh efficiency InGaP/GaAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs four-junction cell by bonding a GaAs-based lattice-matched InGaP/GaAs subcell and an InP-based lattice-matched InGaAsP/InGaAs subcell. The interfacial resistance experimentally obtained for bonded GaAs/InP smaller than 0.10 Ohm-cm{sup 2} would result in a negligible decrease in overall cell efficiency of {approx}0.02%, under 1-sun illumination.

  19. Spatial patterns of cadmium and lead deposition on and adjacent to National Park Service lands in the vicinity of Red Dog Mine, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasselbach, L; Ver Hoef, J M.; Ford, Jesse; Neitlich, P; Crecelius, Eric A.; Berryman, Shanti D.; Wolk, B; Boehle, T

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy metal escapement associated with ore trucks is known to affect the DeLong Mountain Regional Transportation System (DMTS) haul road corridor in Cape Krusenstern National Monument, northwest Alaska. Tissue concentrations in Hylocomium splendens moss (n = 226) were used to determine the extent and pattern of airborne heavy metal deposition on Monument lands. A stratified grid-based sample design was used with more intensive sampling near mining-related activities. Spatial predictions using geostatistical models were employed to produce maps of depositional patterns, and to estimate the geographic area affected above various thresholds. Spatial regression analyses indicated that heavy metal deposition decreased with the log of distance from the DMTS haul road and the DMTS port site. Analysis of subsurface soil demonstrated that observed patterns of heavy metal deposition reflected in moss tissue concentrations were not attributable to local subsurface lithology. Based on comparisons with regional background data from arctic Alaska, deposition of airborne heavy metals related to mining activities appears to affect the northern half of the Monument. The affected area extends northward (beyond Monument boundaries) through the Kisimilot/Iyikrok hills (north of the Wulik River), and possibly beyond. South of the DMTS haul road, airborne deposition appears to be constrained by the Tahinichok Mountains. Moss tissue concentrations were highest immediately adjacent to the DMTS haul road (Cd > 24 mg/kg dw; Pb > 900 mg/kg dw). The influence of the mine site was not studied.

  20. Simulation of neutron displacement damage in bipolar junction transistors using high-energy heavy ion beams.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Buller, Daniel L.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Fleming, Robert M; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic components such as bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) are damaged when they are exposed to radiation and, as a result, their performance can significantly degrade. In certain environments the radiation consists of short, high flux pulses of neutrons. Electronics components have traditionally been tested against short neutron pulses in pulsed nuclear reactors. These reactors are becoming less and less available; many of them were shut down permanently in the past few years. Therefore, new methods using radiation sources other than pulsed nuclear reactors needed to be developed. Neutrons affect semiconductors such as Si by causing atomic displacements of Si atoms. The recoiled Si atom creates a collision cascade which leads to displacements in Si. Since heavy ions create similar cascades in Si we can use them to create similar damage to what neutrons create. This LDRD successfully developed a new technique using easily available particle accelerators to provide an alternative to pulsed nuclear reactors to study the displacement damage and subsequent transient annealing that occurs in various transistor devices and potentially qualify them against radiation effects caused by pulsed neutrons.

  1. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  2. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  3. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, Alex Blair (San Jose, CA); Ballas, Gary J. (San Jose, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

  4. Plasma Separation Process: Betacell (BCELL) code: User's manual. [Bipolar barrier junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1987-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of clearly defined applications for (small or large) amounts of long-life and reliable power sources has given the design and production of betavoltaic systems a new life. Moreover, because of the availability of the plasma separation program, (PSP) at TRW, it is now possible to separate the most desirable radioisotopes for betacell power generating devices. A computer code, named BCELL, has been developed to model the betavoltaic concept by utilizing the available up-to-date source/cell parameters. In this program, attempts have been made to determine the betacell energy device maximum efficiency, degradation due to the emitting source radiation and source/cell lifetime power reduction processes. Additionally, comparison is made between the Schottky and PN junction devices for betacell battery design purposes. Certain computer code runs have been made to determine the JV distribution function and the upper limit of the betacell generated power for specified energy sources. A Ni beta emitting radioisotope was used for the energy source and certain semiconductors were used for the converter subsystem of the betacell system. Some results for a Promethium source are also given here for comparison. 16 refs.

  5. Nonlinear vs. bolometric radiation response and phonon thermal conductance in graphene-superconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vora, Heli; Nielsen, Bent; Du, Xu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene is a promising candidate for building fast and ultra-sensitive bolometric detectors due to its weak electron-phonon coupling and low heat capacity. In order to realize a practical graphene-based bolometer, several important issues, including the nature of radiation response, coupling efficiency to the radiation and the thermal conductance need to be carefully studied. Addressing these issues, we present graphene-superconductor junctions as a viable option to achieve efficient and sensitive bolometers, with the superconductor contacts serving as hot electron barriers. For a graphene-superconductor device with highly transparent interfaces, the resistance readout in the presence of radio frequency radiation is dominated by non-linear response. On the other hand, a graphene-superconductor tunnel device shows dominantly bolometric response to radiation. For graphene devices fabricated on SiO{sub 2} substrates, we confirm recent theoretical predictions of T{sup 2} temperature dependence of phonon thermal conductance in the presence of disorder in the graphene channel at low temperatures.

  6. Local dissipation effects in two-dimensional quantum Josephson junction arrays with a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polak, T.P.; Kopec, T.K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Institute for Low Temperatures and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, POB 1410, 50-950 Wroclaw 2 (Poland)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the quantum phase transitions in two-dimensional arrays of Josephson-couples junctions with short range Josephson couplings (given by the Josephson energy E{sub J}) and the charging energy E{sub C}. We map the problem onto the solvable quantum generalization of the spherical model that improves over the mean-field theory method. The arrays are placed on the top of a two-dimensional electron gas separated by an insulator. We include effects of the local dissipation in the presence of an external magnetic flux f={phi}/{phi}{sub 0} in square lattice for several rational fluxes f=0,(1/2),(1/3),(1/4), and (1/6). We also have examined the T=0 superconducting-insulator phase boundary as a function of a dissipation {alpha}{sub 0} for two different geometry of the lattice: square and triangular. We have found a critical value of the dissipation parameter independent on geometry of the lattice and presence magnetic field.

  7. Trial Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Deibert, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires), caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat', 'thermal-cycle', or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine 4 moisture-cured silicones, 4 foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 deg C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden, Miami, and Phoenix for 1 year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  8. Interplay between interband coupling and ferromagnetism in iron pnictide superconductor/ferromagnet/iron pnictide superconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S. Y.; Tao, Y. C., E-mail: yctao88@163.com [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Hu, J. G. [Department of Physics, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An extended eight-component Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation is applied to study the Josephson effect between iron-based superconductors (SCs) with s{sub ±}-wave pairing symmetry, separated by an ferromagnet (FM). The feature of damped oscillations of critical Josephson current as a function of FM thickness, the split of the peaks induced by the interband coupling is much different from that for the junction with the s{sub ±}-wave SCs replaced by s{sub ++}-wave ones. In particular, a 0?? transition as a function of interband coupling strength ? is found to always exhibit with the corresponding dip shifting toward the larger ? due to enhancing the spin polarization in the FM, while there exits no 0?? transition for the SC with s{sub ++}-wave pairing symmetry. The two features can be used to identify the pairing symmetry in the iron pnictide SC different from the s{sub ++}-wave one in MgB{sub 2}. Experimentally, by adjusting the doping level in the s{sub ±}-wave SCs, one can vary ?.

  9. New Insights for Improving the Designs of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  10. Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney disposal site. The site is in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site may be licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Cheney disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete and the NRC formally accepts this plan. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure that the Cheney disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify potential threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

  11. Magnetotransport in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrieu, S., E-mail: stephane.andrieu@univ-lorraine.fr; Bonell, F.; Hauet, T.; Montaigne, F. [Institut Jean Lamour, Nancy University/CNRS, Bd des Aiguillettes, BP239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Calmels, L.; Snoeck, E. [CEMES, CNRS and Toulouse University, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Lefevre, P.; Bertran, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL-CNRS, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong impact of molecular beam epitaxy growth and Synchrotron Radiation characterization tools in the understanding of fundamental issues in nanomagnetism and spintronics is illustrated through the example of fully epitaxial MgO-based Magnetic Tunnel Junctions (MTJs). If ab initio calculations predict very high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in such devices, some discrepancy between theory and experiments still exists. The influence of imperfections in real systems has thus to be considered like surface contaminations, structural defects, unexpected electronic states, etc. The influence of possible oxygen contamination at the Fe/MgO(001) interface is thus studied, and is shown to be not so detrimental to TMR as predicted by ab initio calculations. On the contrary, the decrease of dislocations density in the MgO barrier of MTJs using Fe{sub 1?x}V{sub x} electrodes is shown to significantly increase TMR. Finally, unexpected transport properties in Fe{sub 1?X}Co{sub x}/MgO/Fe{sub 1?X}Co{sub x} (001) are presented. With the help of spin and symmetry resolved photoemission and ab initio calculation, the TMR decrease for Co content higher than 25% is shown to come from the existence of an interface state and the shift of the empty ?1 minority spin state towards the Fermi level.

  12. Layer-by-layer carbon nanotube electrodes for flexible chemical sensor and energy storage applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saetia, Kittipong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spray-assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) technique has been investigated for creating multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) films on porous electrospun fiber mats via LbL assembly of surface-functionalized MWNTs. Negative and ...

  13. Layer-by-layer assembly of conducting membranes for photoelectrochemical cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Nicole R. (Nicole Rose)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spray-assisted layer-by-layer (Spray-LbL) assembly is used to achieve vertical transfer of silicon microwire arrays into an ion-conducting, ultrathin polymer membrane. The choice of LbL platform and the properties of the ...

  14. Atomic Layer-by-Layer Thermoelectric Conversion in Topological Insulator Bismuth/Antimony Tellurides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Moon-Ho

    Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Material design for direct heat-to-electricity conversion with substantial that the thermoelectric conversion can be interiorly achieved at the atomic steps of a homogeneous medium by directAtomic Layer-by-Layer Thermoelectric Conversion in Topological Insulator Bismuth

  15. A Micellar Route to Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Hydrophobic Functional Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yue

    A Micellar Route to Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Hydrophobic Functional Polymers Qi Bo, Xia Tong, Yi, 2008 ABSTRACT: We demonstrate a general approach to introduce hydrophobic functional polymers-chain liquid crystalline polymer (SCLCP) were synthesized using atom transfer radical polymerization, followed

  16. Polyvalent surface modification of hydrocarbon polymers via covalent layer-by-layer self-assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Kang-Shyang

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly based on ionic interactions has proven to be a versatile route for surface modification and construction of ultrathin nanocomposites. Covalent LbL assembly based on facile ‘click’ covalent bond formation is an effective...

  17. Layer-by-layer assembly of electrically conductive polymer thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan, Chien Sy Jason

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly was used to produce highly conductive thin films with carbon black (CB) and polyelectrolytes. The effects of sonication and pHadjustment of the deposition mixtures on the conductivity and transparency of deposited films...

  18. A simplex model for layered niche networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Fraundorf

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The standing crop of correlations in metazoan communities may be assessed by an inventory of niche structures focused inward and outward from the physical boundaries of skin (self), gene-pool (family), and meme-pool (culture). We consider tracking the progression from three and four correlation layers in many animal communities, to five of six layers for the shared adaptation of most humans, with an attention-slice model that maps the niche-layer focus of individuals onto the 6-variable space of a 5-simplex. The measure puts questions about the effect, on culture and species, of policy and natural events into a common context, and may help explore the impact of electronically-mediated codes on community health.

  19. Growth of oxide exchange bias layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiken, A.; Michel, R.P.

    1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxide (NiO, CoO, NiCoO) antiferromagnetic exchange bias layer produced by ion beam sputtering of an oxide target in pure argon (Ar) sputtering gas, with no oxygen gas introduced into the system. Antiferromagnetic oxide layers are used, for example, in magnetoresistive readback heads to shift the hysteresis loops of ferromagnetic films away from the zero field axis. For example, NiO exchange bias layers have been fabricated using ion beam sputtering of an NiO target using Ar ions, with the substrate temperature at 200 C, the ion beam voltage at 1000V and the beam current at 20 mA, with a deposition rate of about 0.2 {angstrom}/sec. The resulting NiO film was amorphous. 4 figs.

  20. Chromatic control in coextruded layered polymer microlenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crescimanno, Michael; Andrews, James H; Zhou, Chuanhong; Petrus, Joshua B; Merlo, Cory; Bagheri, Cameron; Hetzel, Connor; Tancabel, James; Singer, Kenneth D; Baer, Eric

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the formation, characterization and theoretical understanding of microlenses comprised of alternating polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate layers produced by multilayer coextrusion. These lenses are fabricated by photolithography, using a grayscale mask followed by plasma etching, so that the refractive index alternation of the bilayer stack appears across the radius of the microlens. The alternating quarter-wave thick layers form a one-dimensional photonic crystal whose dispersion augments the material dispersion, allowing one to sculpt the chromatic dispersion of the lens by adjusting the layered structure. Using Huygen's principle, we model our experimental measurements of the focal length of these lenses across the reflection band of the multilayer polymer film from which the microlens is fashioned. For a 56 micron diameter multilayered lens of focal length 300 microns, we measured a nearly 25 percent variation in the focal length across a shallow, 50 nm-wide reflection band.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF COMBUSTION IN A TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, R.K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    evaporation, but the thermophoretic migration of particlesboundary layer due to thermophoretic motion and evaporation

  2. Double layer field shaping systems for toroidal plasmas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi (La Jolla, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for plasma generation, confinement and control such as Tokamak plasma systems are described having a two layer field shaping coil system comprising an inner coil layer close to the plasma and an outer coil layer to minimize the current in the inner coil layer.

  3. LVT: A Layered Verification Technique for Distributed Computing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsson, Ron

    LVT: A Layered Verification Technique for Distributed Computing Systems Cui Zhang ? , Brian R of distributed computing systems with multiple component layers. Each lower layer in such a system provides languages as interfaces of systems, LVT treats each layer in a distributed computing system as a distributed

  4. Numerical Simulation of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slinn, Donald

    boundary layer. Oscillatory boundary layers are examined using a high-resolution time-dependent threeNumerical Simulation of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer Over a Smooth Surface. Part 1: Three for turbulent boundary layers that occur over a smooth bottom. Results indicate that turbulence levels

  5. Pd/Ni-WO3 anodic double layer gasochromic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An anodic double layer gasochromic sensor structure for optical detection of hydrogen in improved response time and with improved optical absorption real time constants, comprising: a glass substrate; a tungsten-doped nickel oxide layer coated on the glass substrate; and a palladium layer coated on the tungsten-doped nickel oxide layer.

  6. Fusion Utility in the Knudsen Layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidovits, Seth [PPPL; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [PPPL

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In inertial confi#12;nement fusion, the loss of fast ions from the edge of the fusing hot-spot region reduces the reactivity below its Maxwellian value. The loss of fast ions may be pronounced because of the long mean free paths of fast ions, compared to those of thermal ions. We introduce a fusion utility function to demonstrate essential features of this Knudsen layer e#11;ffect, in both magnetized and unmagnetized cases. The fusion utility concept is also used to evaluate restoring the reactivity in the Knudsen layer by manipulating fast ions in phase space using waves.

  7. Fusion utility in the Knudsen layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In inertial confinement fusion, the loss of fast ions from the edge of the fusing hot-spot region reduces the reactivity below its Maxwellian value. The loss of fast ions may be pronounced because of the long mean free paths of fast ions, compared with those of thermal ions. We introduce a fusion utility function to demonstrate essential features of this Knudsen layer effect, in both magnetized and unmagnetized cases. The fusion utility concept is also used to evaluate the restoring reactivity in the Knudsen layer by manipulating fast ions in phase space using waves.

  8. Energetic particle acceleration in shear layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ostrowski

    1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma velocity shear layer and/or a tangential flow discontinuity provide conditions allowing for energetic particle acceleration. We review such acceleration processes acting both in non-relativistic and in relativistic flows. In heliospheric conditions shear layers can provide particles with energies compatible with the observed values (from several keV up to MeV), while in relativistic extragalactic jets proton energies even in excess of 10^{19} eV can be obtained. Application of the discussed theory to particular astrophysical objects is severely limited by inadequate knowledge of local physical conditions.

  9. Photovoltaic cell with thin CS layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jordan, John F. (El Paso, TX); Albright, Scot P. (El Paso, TX)

    1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved photovoltaic panel and method of forming a photovoltaic panel are disclosed for producing a high efficiency CdS/CdTe photovoltaic cell. The photovoltaic panel of the present invention is initially formed with a substantially thick Cds layer, and the effective thickness of the CdS layer is substantially reduced during regrowth to both form larger diameter CdTe crystals and substantially reduce the effective thickness of the C This invention was made with Government support under Subcontract No. ZL-7-06031-3 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  10. Back contact buffer layer for thin-film solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Plotnikov, Victor V.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic cell structure is disclosed that includes a buffer/passivation layer at a CdTe/Back contact interface. The buffer/passivation layer is formed from the same material that forms the n-type semiconductor active layer. In one embodiment, the buffer layer and the n-type semiconductor active layer are formed from cadmium sulfide (CdS). A method of forming a photovoltaic cell includes the step of forming the semiconductor active layers and the buffer/passivation layer within the same deposition chamber and using the same material source.

  11. Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

    1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

  12. Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once a year for a period of 2-3 months. By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once. Figure 1.g The wet area is flooded by damming up a small streamded by damming up a smded by damwet area Vegetation data are obtained from two ri- parian grassland sites with strong hydro- logical gradients

  13. Conductive layer for biaxially oriented semiconductor film growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Findikoglu, Alp T. (Los Alamos, NM); Matias, Vladimir (Santa Fe, NM)

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A conductive layer for biaxially oriented semiconductor film growth and a thin film semiconductor structure such as, for example, a photodetector, a photovoltaic cell, or a light emitting diode (LED) that includes a crystallographically oriented semiconducting film disposed on the conductive layer. The thin film semiconductor structure includes: a substrate; a first electrode deposited on the substrate; and a semiconducting layer epitaxially deposited on the first electrode. The first electrode includes a template layer deposited on the substrate and a buffer layer epitaxially deposited on the template layer. The template layer includes a first metal nitride that is electrically conductive and has a rock salt crystal structure, and the buffer layer includes a second metal nitride that is electrically conductive. The semiconducting layer is epitaxially deposited on the buffer layer. A method of making such a thin film semiconductor structure is also described.

  14. Physical-Layer Security Alexandra Filip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henkel, Werner

    Physical-Layer Security by Alexandra Filip A thesis for conferral of a Master of Science the bit-error ratio (BER). Secondly, the focus is placed on blind beamforming algorithms, techniques investigate how fast and accurate an eavesdropper can obtain the data as a result of blind beamforming

  15. Functional Data Analysis With Multi Layer Perceptrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleuret, François

    Analysis. We introduce a computation model for functional input data and we show that this model is a wellFunctional Data Analysis With Multi Layer Perceptrons Fabrice Rossi , Brieuc Conan-Guez and Fran as clas- sical multivariate data, because they are in general de- scribed by a finite set of input

  16. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyer, Virginia

    2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  17. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sawyer, Virginia

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  18. Nano-soldering to single atomic layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girit, Caglar O. (Berkeley, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple technique to solder submicron sized, ohmic contacts to nanostructures has been disclosed. The technique has several advantages over standard electron beam lithography methods, which are complex, costly, and can contaminate samples. To demonstrate the soldering technique graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, has been contacted, and low- and high-field electronic transport properties have been measured.

  19. Quantitative methods for Regulatory control layer selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    and the method is evaluated on two distillation column case studies with one, two or more closed loops. Keywords, a single multivariable controller (e.g. using MPC with no lower-layer PID controllers) would be optimal into the MPC design, so tuning would become Corresponding author address. Tel: +47 73 59 41 54; fax: +47 73 59

  20. Double layer capacitor prospects look good

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fourth International Seminar in Double Layer Capacitors and similar energy devices has been sponsored again by Dr. S.P. Wolsky and Dr. Nikola Marincic. The seminar was held in December 1994, at Deerfield Beach, FL. This report provides a brief description of information on supercapacitors.