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1

Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.

Klem, John F. (Sandia Park, NM); Zolper, John C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with epitaxial and textured ferromagnetic layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to magnetic tunnel junctions and methods for making the magnetic tunnel junctions. The magnetic tunnel junctions include a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers both of which are epitaxial or textured with respect to the underlying substrate upon which the magnetic tunnel junctions are grown. The magnetic tunnel junctions provide improved magnetic properties, sharper interfaces and few defects.

Chang, Y. Austin (Middleton, WI); Yang, Jianhua Joshua (Madison, WI)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

3

Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells incorporating a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells which incorporate a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer adjacent to the junction forming metal layer exhibit increased open circuit voltages compared to standard rectifying junction metal devices, i.e., Schottky barrier devices, and rectifying junction metal insulating silicon devices, i.e., MIS devices.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

Chang, Y. Austin (Middleton, WI); Yang, Jianhua J. (Madison, WI); Ladwig, Peter F. (Hutchinson, MN)

2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

5

Ekman Pumping for Stratified Planetary Boundary Layers Adjacent to a Free Surface or Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the classic Ekman pumping formulas for the vertical flow out of a boundary layer are generalized for both the layer above a rigid surface of variable slope and also for the boundary layer underneath a moving free surface. The ...

Benkui Tan

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Nanotube junctions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

Crespi, Vincent Henry (Darien, IL); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA); Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng (Berkeley, CA); Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Evaluation of barrier uniformity in magnetic tunnel junctions prepared using natural oxidation of thin Mg layers  

SciTech Connect

We fabricated submicron magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using natural oxidation of thin Mg layers deposited by dc sputtering. The MTJs exhibited magnetoresistance (MR) ratios of up to about 150% with a low resistance-area product (R{sub p}A) of 8 {Omega} {mu}m{sup 2}, which are comparable to those for radio-frequency-sputtered MgO barriers. The submicron MTJs had highly variable MR and R{sub p}A values due to a high pinhole density (20 {mu}m{sup -2}) in the barriers, whereas current-in-plane-tunneling (CIPT) measurements on the same MTJ films revealed highly reproducible MR and R{sub p}A values. This indicates that reproducible CIPT measurements do not necessarily give accurate results of MR and R{sub p}A at high pinhole densities.

Seki, Takayuki; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yakushiji, Kay; Yuasa, Shinji; Ando, Koji [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science Technology (AIST), Spintronics Research Center, Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Maehara, Hiroki; Yamagata, Shinji; Okuyama, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji [Department of Spin Technology Development, Process Development Center, Canon ANELVA Corporation, Kurigi 2-5-1, Asao, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 215-8550 (Japan)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Effect of magnetic field on quasiparticle branches of intrinsic Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic layer.  

SciTech Connect

The interlayer tunneling spectroscopy has been performed on micron-sized mesa arrays of HgBr{sub 2} intercalated superconducting Bi2212 single crystals. A ferromagnetic multilayer (Au/Co/Au) is deposited on top of the mesas. The spin-polarized current is driven along the c-axis of the mesas through a ferromagnetic Co layer and the hysteretic quasiparticle branches are observed at 4.2 K. Magnetic field evolution of hysteretic quasiparticle branches is obtained to examine the effect of injected spin-polarized current on intrinsic Josephson junction characteristics. It is observed that there is a gradual distribution in quasiparticle branches with the application of magnetic field and increasing field reduces the switching current progressively.

Ozyuzer, L.; Ozdemir, M.; Kurter, C.; Hinks, D. G.; Gray, K. E. (Materials Science Division); (Izmir Inst. of Tech.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Low temperature tunneling magnetoresistance on (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3}/Co junctions with organic spacer layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper concerns with giant magnetoresistance (MR) effects in organic spin valves, which are realized as layered (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3} (LSMO)-based junctions with tris-(8, hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq{sub 3})-spacer and ferromagnetic top layers. The experimental work was focused on the understanding of the transport behavior in this type of magnetic switching elements. The device preparation was carried out in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber equipped with a mask changer by evaporation and sputtering on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates with LSMO stripes deposited by pulsed laser technique. The field and temperature dependences of the MR of the prepared elements are studied. Spin-valve effects at 4.2 K have been observed in a broad resistance interval from 50 {omega} to M{omega} range, however, without systematic dependence on spacer layer thickness and device area. In some samples, the MR changes sign as a function of the bias voltage. The observed similarity in the bias voltages dependences of the MR in comparison with conventional magnetic tunnel junctions with oxide barriers suggests a description of the found effects within the classical tunneling concept. This assumption is also confirmed by a similar switching behavior observed on ferromagnetically contacted carbon nanotube devices. The proposed model implies the realization of the transport via local Co chains embedded in the Alq{sub 3} layer and spin dependent tunneling over barriers at the interface Co grains/Alq{sub 3}/LSMO. The existence of conducting Co chains within the organics is supported by transmission electron microscopic/electron energy loss spectroscopic studies on cross-sectional samples from analogous layer stacks.

Vinzelberg, H.; Schumann, J.; Elefant, D.; Gangineni, R. B.; Thomas, J.; Buechner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Structural and optical studies of GaN pn-junction with AlN buffer layer grown on Si (111) by RF plasma enhanced MBE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GaN pn-junction grown on silicon substrates have been the focus in a number of recent reports and further effort is still necessary to improve its crystalline quality for practical applications. GaN has the high n-type background carrier concentration resulting from native defects commonly thought to be nitrogen vacancies. In this work, we present the growth of pn-junction of GaN on Si (111) substrate using RF plasma-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Both of the layers show uniformity with an average thickness of 0.709 {mu}m and 0.095 {mu}m for GaN and AlN layers, respectively. The XRD spectra indicate that no sign of cubic phase of GaN are found, so it is confirmed that the sample possessed hexagonal structure. It was found that all the allowed Raman optical phonon modes of GaN, i.e. the E2 (low), E1 (high) and A1 (LO) are clearly visible.

Yusoff, Mohd Zaki Mohd; Hassan, Zainuriah; Woei, Chin Che; Hassan, Haslan Abu; Abdullah, Mat Johar [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang, Malaysia and Department of Applied Sciences Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) 13500 Permatang Pauh, Penang (Malaysia); Department of Applied Sciences Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) 13500 Permatang Pauh, Penang (Malaysia)

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

11

Josephson junction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

Wendt, Joel R. (Albuquerque, NM); Plut, Thomas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Josephson junction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

13

Four-Junction Solar Cell with 40% Target Efficiency Fabricated by Wafer Bonding and Layer Transfer: Final Technical Report, 1 January 2005 - 31 December 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We realized high-quality InGaP/GaAs 2-junction top cells on Ge/Si, InGaAs/InP bottom cells, direct-bond series interconnection of tandem cells, and modeling of bonded 3- and 4-junction device performance.

Atwater, H. A.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Cambridge Grand Junction transit implementation : alternatives, scheduling, cost, and performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Grand Junction railroad lies at the heart of East Cambridge adjacent to the Kendall Square business district and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus. Over the last one hundred years the railroad has gone ...

Iglesias Cuervo, Jesus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Method of making semiconductor junctions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A p-n junction on a silicon substrate doped with boron ions (d- dopant) is made in following manner. A shallow silicon surface layer including a n-type dopant is first obtained by ion implantation of the substrate with arsenic atoms. The arsenic-doped silicon layer at the surface has a relatively low initial reflectivity. Then, radiation from a pulsed carbon dioxide laser is directed onto the doped surface. A portion of the pulsed radiation causes melting of the thin arsenic-doped layer at the solid surface, giving the shallow melted surface a reflectivity greater than the initial reflectivity of the solid surface. The increased reflectivity of the melted surface prevents an additional portion of the pulsed radiation from causing further melting, thus controlling the depth of melting. The melted surface is then allowed to cool and solidify to form a p-n junction at a thin (less than 200 angstrom) junction depth. 6 figs.

James, R.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Multi-junction solar cell device  

SciTech Connect

A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

Friedman, Daniel J. (Lakewood, CO); Geisz, John F. (Wheat Ridge, CO)

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

17

High voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery which comprises a plurality of strips of tandem junction solar cells of hydrogenated amorphous silicon having one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, arranged in a tandem configuration, can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps. The tandem junction strip solar cells are series connected to produce a solar battery of any desired voltage.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Junction Hilltop Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Junction Hilltop Wind Junction Hilltop Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Junction Hilltop Wind Facility Junction Hilltop Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Community Owned Developer Tom Wind & Bill Sutton Energy Purchaser Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) Location Grand Junction IA Coordinates 42.04671131°, -94.23969269° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.04671131,"lon":-94.23969269,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

19

Delta Junction Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Junction Wind Farm Delta Junction Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Delta Junction Wind Farm Facility Delta Junction Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Alaska Environmental Power Developer Alaska Environmental Power Location South of Delta Junction AK Coordinates 64.069461°, -145.717661° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.069461,"lon":-145.717661,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

20

Solar Junction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Junction Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Junction Place San Jose, California Zip CA 95131 Sector Efficiency, Solar Product Solar Junction is developing high efficiency solar...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Three-junction solar cell  

SciTech Connect

A photovoltaic solar cell is formed in a monolithic semiconductor. The cell contains three junctions. In sequence from the light-entering face, the junctions have a high, a medium, and a low energy gap. The lower junctions are connected in series by one or more metallic members connecting the top of the lower junction through apertures to the bottom of the middle junction. The upper junction is connected in voltage opposition to the lower and middle junctions by second metallic electrodes deposited in holes 60 through the upper junction. The second electrodes are connected to an external terminal.

Ludowise, Michael J. (Cupertino, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

A market analysis for high efficiency multi-junction solar cells grown on SiGe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications, markets and a cost model are presented for III-V multi-junction solar cells built on compositionally graded SiGe buffer layers currently being developed by professors Steven Ringell of Ohio State University ...

Judkins, Zachara Steele

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

High temperature superconductor step-edge Josephson junctions using Ti-Ca-Ba-Cu-O  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for formulating non-hysteretic and hysteretic Josephson junctions using HTS materials which results in junctions having the ability to operate at high temperatures while maintaining high uniformity and quality. The non-hysteretic Josephson junction is formed by step-etching a LaAlO[sub 3] crystal substrate and then depositing a thin film of TlCaBaCuO on the substrate, covering the step, and forming a grain boundary at the step and a subsequent Josephson junction. Once the non-hysteretic junction is formed the next step to form the hysteretic Josephson junction is to add capacitance to the system. In the current embodiment, this is accomplished by adding a thin dielectric layer, LaA1O[sub 3], followed by a cap layer of a normal metal where the cap layer is formed by first depositing a thin layer of titanium (Ti) followed by a layer of gold (Au). The dielectric layer and the normal metal cap are patterned to the desired geometry. 8 figs.

Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.; Martens, J.S.; Plut, T.A.; Tigges, C.P.; Vawter, G.A.; Zipperian, T.E.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

25

Josephson junction Q-spoiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); Hilbert, Claude (Austin, TX); Hahn, Erwin L. (Berkeley, CA); Sleator, Tycho (Berkeley, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Josephson junction Q-spoiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

Properties of tunnel junctions with fluorocarbon dielectric barriers  

SciTech Connect

Thesis. The electrical characteristics of In/I/In and In/I/Pb superconducting tunnel junctions have been studied in detail. Since In does not readily form pinhole free oxide layers, a thin insulating dielectric was formed on freshly deposited In film by passing an electric discharge through an atmosphere of fluorocarbon gas. Junctions were then completed by depositing a thin counter electrode of In or Pb. The same process was used to prepare high resistance junctions with Au as the base electrode; these were not however, studied in detail. In/I/In and In/I/Pb junctions were produced with resistances in the range 0.01 ohms to 10/sup 10/ ohms at liquid helium temperatures. Low resistance junctions exhibited nonlinear electrical characteristics associated with good quality oxide'' superconducting junctions including (a) the dc Josephson effcct, (b) quasiparticle tunneling characteristics. (c) phonon structure and (d) inelastic tunneling phenomena. The magnitude of the Josephson current for In/I/In junctions agreed to within a few percent of the value predicted by strong coupling theory. Current voltage (I-V) and first and second derivative curves for In/I/In and In/I/Pb were compared with curves for Al/I/In and Pb/I/Pb junctions. Discrepancies between the characteristics can be, for the most part, explained on the basis of existing theories of phonon mediated superconductivity using recent data from inelastic neutron scattering studies of In. Nonlinear structure at voltages below the phonon spectrum was observed and is most likely associated with Kohn singularities. At higher voltages, second derivative curves exhibited resonances characteristic of CH and OH impurities in the barrier as well as a complex spectrum associated with the vibrational spectrum of the fluorocarbon dielectric. To better characterize this dielectric, a variety of surface analytic techniques were used to determine the complex index of refraction, the chemical composition and chemical homogeneity of the barrier. I-V curves for high resistance junctions were used to determine the potential at the metal-insulator interface. (auth)

Jack, M.D.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

Panahi, Behrouz M. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29-A H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

29

Thin-film metal coated insulation barrier in a Josephson tunnel junction. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A highly stable, durable, and reproducible Josephson tunnel junction consists of a thin-film electrode of a hard superconductor, a thin oxide insulation layer over the electrode constituting a Josephson tunnel junction barrier, a thin-film layer of stabilizing metal over the barrier, and a second thin-film hard superconductive electrode over the stabilizing film. The thin stabilizing metal film is made only thick enough to limit penetration of the electrode material through the insulation layer so as to prevent a superconductive short.

Hawkins, G.A.; Clarke, J.

1975-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

The development of magnetic tunnel junction fabrication techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The effect of grain size, shape, voltage bias, temperature, layer thickness and roughness should be understood and controllable, in order to produce reproducible junctions. The most problematic requirement has been that of low resistance. Magnetic tunnel... . The effect of roughness, aluminium thickness and voltage on the number of pinholes and weak-links per unit area was studied. High frequency testing of read heads at wafer level was performed with a network analyser. Design implications for read head...

Elwell, Clifford Alastair

31

Junction Transport in Epitaxial Film Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report our progress toward low-temperature HWCVD epitaxial film silicon solar cells on inexpensive seed layers, with a focus on the junction transport physics exhibited by our devices. Heterojunctions of i/p hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si) on our n-type epitaxial crystal Si on n++ Si wafers show space-charge-region recombination, tunneling or diffusive transport depending on both epitaxial Si quality and the applied forward voltage.

Young, D. L.; Li, J. V.; Teplin, C. W.; Stradins, P.; Branz, H. M.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Electronic properties of nanoribbon junctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the effects of nitrogen impurities on the electronic properties of quantum dots realized in Z-shaped graphene nanoribbon junction. The system is studied using first principle calculations, based on the local spin density approximation ... Keywords: Graphene, Nanoribbon, Quantum dots

A. Len; Z. Barticevic; M. Pacheco

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Spin-torque diode spectrum of ferromagnetically coupled (FeB/CoFe)/Ru/(CoFe/FeB) synthetic free layer  

SciTech Connect

We investigated systematically the spin torque diode spectrum of a ferromagnetically coupled (FeB/CoFe)/Ru/(CoFe/FeB) synthetic free layer in an MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction. In the spectra, we observed single peaks shifted to higher frequency with increasing the in-plane magnetic fields, as expected from the ferromagnetic resonance of the FeB/CoFe adjacent to the MgO tunnel barrier. On the other hand, under the perpendicular fields, we observed several peaks below 6 GHz and around 10 GHz, which were rather insensitive to the field. These behaviors are different from our simple calculation taking account the interlayer coupling, suggesting that the excitation of magnetizations occurs in a complicated manner for the synthetic free layers.

Bang, Do; Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yorozu, Takehiko; Imamura, Hiroshi; Yakushiji, Kay; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Ando, Koji [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

Deng, Xunming (Syvania, OH)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

35

Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

Deng, Xunming (Sylvania, OH); Liao, Xianbo (Toledo, OH); Du, Wenhui (Toledo, OH)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells  

SciTech Connect

A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

Deng, Xunming (Syvania, OH); Liao, Xianbo (Toledo, OH); Du, Wenhui (Toledo, OH)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

37

Process For Direct Integration Of A Thin-Film Silicon P-N Junction Diode With A Magnetic Tunnel Junction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

Toet, Daniel (Mountain View, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

38

Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

Toet, Daniel (Mountain View, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Princeton Junction, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Junction, New Jersey: Energy Resources Junction, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3173301°, -74.6198791° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3173301,"lon":-74.6198791,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

Iron Junction, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Junction, Minnesota: Energy Resources Junction, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.416427°, -92.60665° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.416427,"lon":-92.60665,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Monmouth Junction, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Junction, New Jersey: Energy Resources Junction, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3789957°, -74.5465436° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3789957,"lon":-74.5465436,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Biggs Junction, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biggs Junction, Oregon: Energy Resources Biggs Junction, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.669846°, -120.8328408° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.669846,"lon":-120.8328408,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Grand Junction, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Junction, Colorado: Energy Resources Junction, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.0638705°, -108.5506486° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.0638705,"lon":-108.5506486,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Pacific Junction, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Junction, Iowa: Energy Resources Junction, Iowa: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.0186105°, -95.7991734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0186105,"lon":-95.7991734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

Essex Junction, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Junction, Vermont: Energy Resources Junction, Vermont: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.4906054°, -73.1109604° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.4906054,"lon":-73.1109604,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

Coso Junction, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Coso Junction, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name Coso Junction, California Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 5339829 Coordinates 36.0449439°, -117.9472993° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.0449439,"lon":-117.9472993,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

Photovoltaic devices comprising zinc stannate buffer layer and method for making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic device has a buffer layer zinc stannate Zn.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 disposed between the semiconductor junction structure and the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer to prevent formation of localized junctions with the TCO through a thin window semiconductor layer, to prevent shunting through etched grain boundaries of semiconductors, and to relieve stresses and improve adhesion between these layers.

Wu, Xuanzhi (Golden, CO); Sheldon, Peter (Lakewood, CO); Coutts, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Photovoltaic Cell Having A P-Type Polycrystalline Layer With Large Crystals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic cell has an n-type polycrystalline layer and a p-type polycrystalline layer adjoining the n-type polycrystalline layer to form a photovoltaic junction. The p-type polycrystalline layer comprises a substantially planar layer portion having relatively large crystals adjoining the n-type polycrystalline layer. The planar layer portion includes oxidized impurities which contribute to obtainment of p-type electrical properties in the planar layer portion.

Albright, Scot P. (Lakewood, CO); Chamberlin, Rhodes R. (El Paso, TX)

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

50

Junction, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Junction, Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

51

Nanoscale heat conduction across tunnel junctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?2005? Nanoscale heat conduction across tunnel junctions Y.May 2005? Nanoscale heat conduction across tunnel junctionsprevailing theory of heat conduction in highly disordered

Ju, Y. Sungtaek; Hung, M T; Carey, M J; Cyrille, M C; Childress, J R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Thermal activation of superconducting Josephson junctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting quantum circuits (SQCs) are being explored as model systems for scalable quantum computing architectures. Josephson junctions are extensively used in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) ...

Devalapalli, Aditya P. (Aditya Prakash)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Observations of Thermohaline Convection adjacent to Brunt Ice Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations were made of ocean microstructure and horizontal currents adjacent to Brunt Ice Shelf in the southeastern Weddell Sea. Periods of in situ supercooled water extending as deep as 65 m were associated with ice nucleation and frazil ...

Ilker Fer; Keith Makinson; Keith W. Nicholls

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A Model for the Behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions  

SciTech Connect

A magnetic tunnel junction is a device that changes its electrical resistance with a change in an applied magnetic field. A typical junction consists of two magnetic electrodes separated by a nonmagnetic insulating layer. The magnetizations of the two electrodes can have two possible extreme configurations, parallel and antiparallel. The antiparallel configuration is observed to have the higher measured resistance and the parallel configuration has the lower resistance. To switch between these two configurations a magnetic field is applied to the device which is primarily used to change the orientation of the magnetization of one electrode usually called the free layer, although with sufficient high magnetic field the orientation of the magnetizations of both of the electrodes can be changed. The most commonly used models for describing and explaining the electronic behavior of tunnel junctions are the Simmons model and the Brinkman model. However, both of these models were designed for simple, spin independent tunneling. The Simmons model does not address the issue of applied magnetic fields nor does it address the form of the electronic band structure in the metallic electrodes, including the important factor of spin polarization. The Brinkman model is similar, the main difference between the two models being the shape of the tunneling barrier potential between the two electrodes. Therefore, the research conducted in this thesis has developed a new theoretical model that addresses these important issues starting from basic principles. The main features of the new model include: the development of equations for true spin dependent tunneling through the insulating barrier, the differences in the orientations of the electrode magnetizations on either side of the barrier, and the effects of the density of states function on the behavior of the junction. The present work has explored densities of states that are more realistic than the simplified free electron density of states function, and has developed an exact analytic solution for the case of an electron band of finite width. The approach taken in this thesis easily allows extension to cases where the band structure is different on either side of the barrier (known as heterojunctions) which are of greater interest in real magnetic tunnel junction devices rather than the simple, identical band structure devices.

Bryan John Baker

2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Organic light emitting device having multiple separate emissive layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic light emitting device having multiple separate emissive layers is provided. Each emissive layer may define an exciton formation region, allowing exciton formation to occur across the entire emissive region. By aligning the energy levels of each emissive layer with the adjacent emissive layers, exciton formation in each layer may be improved. Devices incorporating multiple emissive layers with multiple exciton formation regions may exhibit improved performance, including internal quantum efficiencies of up to 100%.

Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

56

Design of Flexible-Duct Junction Boxes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design of Flexible-duct Design of Flexible-duct Junction Boxes Robert Beach, IBACOS Duncan Prahl, IBACOS Design of Flexible-duct Junction Boxes Presentation Outline * Current Standards and Practice * Analysis Methods * Recommendations Design of Flexible-duct Junction Boxes * Detailed report is in peer review anticipated to be published T3 this year. - http://www1.eere.energy.gov/library/default.aspx?page=2&spi d=2. * Measure guide to be part of Building America Solutions Center - http://basc.pnnl.gov/ Design of Flexible-duct Junction Boxes Typical Installations As Plenum As Monster Design of Flexible-duct Junction Boxes Current Standards * ASHRAE 2012 HVAC Systems and Equipment, Box Plenum Systems Using Flexible Duct - Constrains Box Width to 2-3x Entrance Width - Constrains Box Length to 2 x Box Width

57

Triple Junction Distributions in Grain Boundary Engineered Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A triple junction distribution function for junctions with at least one coherent ... Strain Gradient and Degradation in Magnetic Properties: Focus Transformer Steel.

58

Monolithic interconnected module with a tunnel junction for enhanced electrical and optical performance  

SciTech Connect

An improved thermophotovoltaic (TPV) n/p/n device is provided. Monolithic Interconnected Modules (MIMS), semiconductor devices converting infrared radiation to electricity, have been developed with improved electrical and optical performance. The structure is an n-type emitter on a p-type base with an n-type lateral conduction layer. The incorporation of a tunnel junction and the reduction in the amount of p-type material used results in negligible parasitic absorption, decreased series resistance, increased voltage and increased active area. The novel use of a tunnel junction results in the potential for a TPV device with efficiency greater than 24%.

Murray, Christopher S. (Bethel Park, PA); Wilt, David M. (Bay Village, OH)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A Monolithic Interconnected module with a tunnel Junction for Enhanced Electrical and Optical Performance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved thermophotovoltaic (TPV) n/p/n device is provided. Monolithic Interconnected Modules (MIMs), semiconductor devices converting infrared radiation to electricity, have been developed with improved electrical and optical performance. The structure is an n-type emitter on a p-type base with an n-type lateral conduction layer. The incorporation of a tunnel junction and the reduction in the amount of p-type material used results in negligible parasitic absorption, decreased series resistance, increased voltage and increased active area. The novel use of a tunnel junction results in the potential for a TPV device with efficiency greater than 24%.

Murray, Christopher Sean; Wilt, David Morgan

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Gallium phosphide high-temperature bipolar junction transistor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results are reported on the development of a high-temperature (> 350/sup 0/C) gallium phosphide bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for goethermal and other energy applications. This four-layer p/sup +/n/sup -/pp/sup +/ structure was fromed by liquid phase epitaxy using a supercooling technique to insure uniform nucleation of the thin layers. Magnesium was used as the p-type dopant to avoid excessive out-diffusion into the lightly doped base. By appropriate choice of electrodes, the device may also be driven as an n-channel junction field-effect transistor. The gallium phosphide BJT is observed to have a common-emitter current gain peaking in the range of 6 to 10 (for temperatures from 20/sup 0/C to 400/sup 0/C) and a room-temperature, punchthrough-limited, collector-emitter breakdown voltage of approximately -6V. Other parameters of interest include an f/sub/ = 400 KHz (at 20/sup 0/C) and a collector base leakage current = 200 ..mu..A (at 350/sup 0/C).

Zipperian, T.E.; Dawson, L.R.; Caffin, R.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

62

Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell with thin doped region adjacent metal Schottky barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a thin highly doped p-type region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon disposed between a Schottky barrier high work function metal and the intrinsic region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon wherein said high work function metal and said thin highly doped p-type region forms a surface barrier junction with the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer. The thickness and concentration of p-type dopants in said p-type region are selected so that said p-type region is fully ionized by the Schottky barrier high work function metal. The thin highly doped p-type region has been found to increase the open circuit voltage and current of the photovoltaic device.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA); Wronski, Christopher R. (Princeton, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Josephson Junctions Fabricated by Focussed Ion Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Devices (SQUIDs) are the worlds most sensitive detectors of magnetic flux, capable of measuring the magnetic fields produced by a single living cell. Josephson junctions have formed the basis of the international standardization of the volt since...

Hadfield, Robert Hugh

65

Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation  

SciTech Connect

Time and frequency dependent intensity variations in sequences of Raman spectra recorded at plasmonic junctions can be assigned to molecular reorientation. This is revealed through Raman trajectories recorded at a nanojunction formed between a silver AFM tip and a corrugated silver surface coated with biphenyl-4,4-dithiol. Molecular motion is not observed when the tip is retracted and only surface enhancement is operative. In effect, junction plasmon induced molecular reorientation is tracked.

El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Hess, Wayne P.

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

66

Multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-layer resistive carbon film field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications. The multi-layered film of the present invention consists of at least two layers of a conductive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, where the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure can be a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film can be a plurality of carbon layers, where adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced.

Sullivan, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); Friedmann, Thomas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Shapiro steps and stimulated radiation of electromagnetic waves due to Josephson oscillations in layered superconductors.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single crystals of layered high-temperature superconductors intrinsically behave as stacks of Josephson junctions. We analyze response of current-biased stack of intrinsic junctions to irradiation by the external electromagnetic (em) wave. In addition to well-known Shapiro steps in the current-voltage characteristics, irradiation promotes stimulated radiation which adds with spontaneous Josephson radiation from the crystal. Such enhancement of radiation from current-biased crystal may be used for amplification of em waves. Irradiation also facilitates synchronization of Josephson oscillations in all intrinsic Josephson junctions of a single crystal as well as oscillations in intrinsic junctions of different crystals.

Bulaevskii, L. N.; Kosehlev, A. E.; Tachiki, M.; Materials Science Division; LANL; Univ. of Tokyo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Effects of elemental distributions on the behavior of MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions.  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional atom-probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy have been utilized to study the effects of Ta getter presputtering and either a Mg or Ru free-layer cap on the elemental distributions and properties of MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions after annealing. Annealing the samples resulted in crystallization of the amorphous CoFeB layer and diffusion of the majority of the boron away from the crystallized CoFeB layers. The Ta getter presputter is found to reduce the segregation of boron at the MgO/CoFeB interface after annealing, improving the tunneling magnetoresistance of the tunnel junction. This effect is observed for samples with either a Ru free-layer cap or a Mg free-layer cap and is thought to be a result of a reduced oxygen concentration within the MgO due to the effect of Ta getter presputtering. A Ru free-layer cap provides superior magnetic and magnetotransport properties compared to a Mg free-layer cap. Mg from the Mg free-layer cap is observed to diffuse toward the MgO tunnel barrier upon annealing, degrading both the crystalline quality of the CoFeB and magnetic isolation of the CoFeB free-layer from the CoFeB reference-layer. Lateral variations in the B distribution within the CoFeB free-layer are observed in the samples with a Ru free-layer cap, which are associated with crystalline and amorphous grains. The B-rich, amorphous grains are found to be depleted in Fe, while the B-poor crystalline grains are slightly enriched in Fe.

Schreiber, D. K.; Choi, Y. S.; Liu, Y.; Chiaramonti, A. N.; Seidman, D. N.; Petford-Long, A. K. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Northwestern Univ.); (Canon-ANELVA Corp.)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Method for closing a drift between adjacent in-situ oil shale retorts  

SciTech Connect

A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

Hines, A.E.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

70

Method for closing a drift between adjacent in situ oil shale retorts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

Hines, Alex E. (Grand Junction, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Search for a correlation between Josephson junctions and gravity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Woodwards transient mass shift (TMS) formula has commonality with Modaneses anomalous coupling theory (ACT) and Woodwards capacitor experiment has commonality with Podkletnovs layered superconductor disk experiment. The TMS formula derives a mass fluctuation from a time-varying energy density. The ACT suggests that the essential ingredient for the gravity phenomenon is the presence of strong variations or fluctuations of the Cooper pair density (a time-varying energy density). Woodwards experiment used a small array of capacitors whose energy density was varied by an applied 11 kHz signal. Podkletnovs superconductor disk contained many Josephson junctions (small capacitive like interfaces)

Glen A. Robertson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Method utilizing laser-processing for the growth of epitaxial p-n junctions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a new method for the formation of epitaxial p-n junctions in silicon. The method is relatively simple, rapid, and reliable. It produces doped epitaxial layers which are of well-controlled thickness and whose electrical properties are satisfactory. An illustrative form of the method comprises co-depositing a selected dopant and amorphous silicon on a crystalline silicon substrate to form a doped layer of amorphous silicon thereon. This layer then is irradiated with at least one laser pulse to generate a melt front which moves through the layer, into the silicon body to a depth effecting melting of virginal silicon, and back to the surface of the layer. The method may be conducted with dopants (e.g., boron and phosphorus) whose distribution coefficients approximate unity.

Young, R.T.; Narayan, J.; Wood, R.F.

1979-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

73

Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Title Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5887E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hult, Erin L., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and Phillip N. Price Date Published 09/2012 Keywords infiltration, leakage, residential ventilation Abstract Air leakage between adjacent zones of a building can lead to indoor air quality and energy efficiency concerns, however there is no existing standard for measuring inter-zonal leakage.In this study, synthesized data and field measurements are analyzed in order to explore the uncertainty associated with different methods for collecting and analyzing fan pressurization measurements to calculate inter- zone leakage. The best of the measurement and analysis methods was a method that uses two blower doors simultaneously based on the methods of Herrlin and Modera (1988) to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 16% of the inter-zone leakage flow at 4Pa, over the range of expected conditions for a house and attached garage. Methods were also identified that use a single blower door to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 30% of its value. The test configuration selected can have a large impact on the uncertainty of the results and there are testing configurations and methods that should definitely be avoided. The most rigorous calculation method identified assumes a fixed value for the pressure exponent for the interface between the two zones (rather than determining the interface pressure exponent from the measured data) and then uses an optimization routine to fit a single set of air leakage coefficients and pressure exponents for each of three wall interfaces using both pressurization and depressurization data. Multiple pressure station tests have much less uncertainty than single pressure station approaches. Analyses of field data sets confirm a similar level of variation between test methods as was expected from the analysis of synthesized data sets and confirm the selection of specific test methods to reduce experimental uncertainty.

74

Distribution of the spacing between two adjacent avoided crossings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the frequency at which avoided crossings appear in an energy level structure when an external field is applied to a quantum chaotic system. The distribution of the spacing in the parameter between two adjacent avoided crossings is investigated. Using a random matrix model, we find that the distribution of these spacings is well fitted by a power-law distribution for small spacings. The powers are 2 and 3 for the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble and Gaussian unitary ensemble, respectively. We also find that the distributions decay exponentially for large spacings. The distributions in concrete quantum chaotic systems agree with those of the random matrix model.

Manabu Machida; Keiji Saito

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

Semiconductor liquid-junction solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor liquid junction photocell in which the photocell is in the configuration of a light concentrator and in which the electrolytic solution both conducts current and facilitates the concentration of incident solar radiation onto the semiconductor. The photocell may be in the configuration of a non-imaging concentrator such as a compound parabolic concentrator, or an imaging concentrator such as a lens.

Parkinson, B.A.

1982-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

76

Oxygen-Induced Symmetrization and Structural Coherency in Fe/MgO/Fe(001) Magnetic Tunnel Junctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present x-ray diffraction experiments and multiple-scattering calculations on the structure and transport properties of a Fe/MgO/Fe(001) magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). Coherent growth of the top Fe electrode on the MgO spacer is observed only for Fe deposition in ambient oxygen atmosphere leading to a coherent and symmetric MTJ structure characterized by FeO layers at both Fe/MgO interfaces. This goes in parallel with calculations indicating large positive tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) values in such symmetric junctions. The results have important implications for achieving giant TMR values.

Tusche, C.; Meyerheim, H.L.; Ernst, A.; Henk, J.; Bruno, P.; Kirschner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Jedrecy, N. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Universites Paris 6 et 7, et CNRS-UMR 7588, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Renaud, G. [CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

77

Coexistence Analysis of Adjacent Long Term Evolution (LTE) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the licensing and deployment of Long term evolution (LTE) systems are ramping up, the study of coexistence of LTE systems is an essential topic in civil and military applications. In this paper, we present a coexistence study of adjacent LTE systems aiming at evaluating the effect of inter-system interference on system capacity and performance as a function of some of the most common mitigation techniques: frequency guard band, base station (BS) antenna coupling loss, and user equipment (UE) antenna spacing. A system model is constructed for two collocated macro LTE networks. The developed model takes into consideration the RF propagation environment, power control scheme, and adjacent channel interference. Coexistence studies are performed for a different combination of time/frequency division duplex (TDD/FDD) systems under three different guard-bands of 0MHz, 5MHz, and 10MHz. Numerical results are presented to advice the minimum frequency guard band, BS coupling loss, and UE antenna isolation required for a healthy system operation.

Aulama, Mohannad M. [University of Jordan; Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Research on high-efficiency, single-junction, monolithic, thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the progress made in obtaining stable, a-Si-based submodules that have a large area and high efficiency. Conversion efficiencies of up to 11.95% were obtained in small-area, single-junction a-Si solar cells using textured TiO{sub 2}, superlattice p-layers, graded carbon concentrations near the p/i interface, and highly reflective ITO/silver back contacts. Single- junction a-SiC and a-SiGe p-i-n cells were also fabricated that had conversion efficiencies of 9%--11%, and some recently fabricated stacked-junction cells had conversion efficiencies of about 10%. In materials research boron-doped microcrystalline SiC films were recently developed containing up to 6 at. % carbon with conductivities of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}/{Omega}-cm at room temperature and activation energies of 0.11 eV. Microcrystalline film growth was shown to be strongly influenced by the nature of the substrate, with nucleation occurring more readily on a-Si substrates than on TiO{sub 2}. Stability studies show that light-induced degradation is usually enhanced by the presence of carbon grading near the p/i interface. In general, adding either germanium (from GeH{sub 4}) or carbon (from CH{sub 4}) to the i-layer of a p-i-n cell leads to enhanced light-induced degradation. 13 refs., 80 figs., 17 tabs.

Catalano, A.W.; Carlson, D.E.; Ayra, R.R.; Bennett, M.S.; D'Aiello, R.V.; Dickson, C.R.; Fortmann, C.M.; Goldstein, B.; McVeigh, J.; Morris, J.; Newton, J.L.; Wiedeman, S. (Solarex Corp., Newtown, PA (USA). Thin Film Div.)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Josephson-Junction Qubits with Controlled Couplings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-capacitance Josephson junctions, where Cooper pairs tunnel coherently while Coulomb blockade effects allow the control of the total charge, provide physical realizations of quantum bits (qubits), with logical states differing by one Cooper-pair charge on an island. The single- and two-bit operations required for quantum computation can be performed by applying a sequence of gate voltages. A basic design, described earlier [cond-mat/9706016], is sufficient to demonstrate the principles, but requires a high precision time control, and residual two-bit interactions introduce errors. Here we suggest a new nano-electronic design, close to ideal, where the Josephson junctions are replaced by controllable SQUIDs. This relaxes the requirements on the time control and system parameters substantially, and the two-bit coupling can be switched exactly between zero and a non-zero value for arbitrary pairs. The phase coherence time is sufficiently long to allow a series of operations.

Yuriy Makhlin; Gerd Schoen; Alexander Shnirman

1998-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

80

Semiconductor junction formation by directed heat  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The process of the invention includes applying precursors 6 with N- and P-type dopants therein to a silicon web 2, with the web 2 then being baked in an oven 10 to drive off excessive solvents, and the web 2 is then heated using a pulsed high intensity light in a mechanism 12 at 1100.degree.-1150.degree. C. for about 10 seconds to simultaneously form semiconductor junctions in both faces of the web.

Campbell, Robert B. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1988-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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81

Corrosion protected, multi-layer fuel cell interface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. The multi-layer configuration for the interface comprises a non-cupreous metal-coated metallic element to which is film-bonded a conductive layer by hot pressing a resin therebetween. The multi-layer arrangement provides bridging electrical contact.

Feigenbaum, Haim (Ramat Ilan, IL); Pudick, Sheldon (Sayreville, NJ); Wang, Chiu L. (Edison, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Organic photosensitive cells having a reciprocal-carrier exciton blocking layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photosensitive cell includes an anode and a cathode; a donor-type organic material and an acceptor-type organic material forming a donor-acceptor junction connected between the anode and the cathode; and an exciton blocking layer connected between the acceptor-type organic material of the donor-acceptor junction and the cathode, the blocking layer consisting essentially of a material that has a hole mobility of at least 10.sup.-7 cm.sup.2/V-sec or higher, where a HOMO of the blocking layer is higher than or equal to a HOMO of the acceptor-type material.

Rand, Barry P. (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Princeton, NJ); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

83

Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device  

SciTech Connect

A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Ager, III, Joel W. (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

84

Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device  

SciTech Connect

A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Ager, III, Joel W. (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

85

Thermoelectricity in Molecular Junctions Science 315, 1568 (2007);  

DOI: 10.1126/science.1137149 Science 315, 1568 (2007); Pramod Reddy, et al. Thermoelectricity in Molecular Junctions www.sciencemag.org (this ...

86

NN3, Conductance Statistics of Molecular Junctions Fabricated with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The I-V curves are dominated by a tunneling behavior as usually observed in the MMM junctions of alkyl chains. The TVS (transient voltage spectroscopy)...

87

High Efficiency Multiple-Junction Solar Cells - Energy ...  

Technology Marketing Summary Single junction solar cells have limited efficiency and fail to extract maximum energy from photons outside of a specific ...

88

Road to AC Voltage Standard Leads to Important Junction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Road to AC Voltage Standard Leads to Important Junction. ... Grumman in the mid-1990s.*** A number of innovations since then have led to the first ...

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

89

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Grand Junction Sites  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

90

Sandia National Laboratories High Efficiency Multiple-Junction ...  

Sandia National Laboratories TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY Single junction solar cells have limited efficiency and fail to extract maximum energy from photons outside of a specific

91

Junction temperature measurement of light emitting diode by electroluminescence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Junction temperature (JT) is a key parameter of the performance and lifetime of light emitting diodes(LEDs). In this paper

S. M. He; X. D. Luo; B. Zhang; L. Fu; L. W. Cheng; J. B. Wang; W. Lu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Quantum manipulation and simulation using Josephson junction arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the prospect of using quantum properties of large scale Josephson junction arrays for quantum manipulation and simulation. We study the collective vibrational quantum modes of a Josephson junction array and show that they provide a natural and practical method for realizing a high quality cavity for superconducting qubit based QED. We further demonstrate that by using Josephson junction arrays we can simulate a family of problems concerning spinless electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions. These protocols require no or few controls over the Josephson junction array and are thus relatively easy to realize given currently available technology.

Xingxiang Zhou; Ari Mizel

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Local layering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a conventional 2d painting or compositing program, graphical objects are stacked in a user-specified global order, as if each were printed on an image-sized sheet of transparent film. In this paper we show how to relax this restriction so that users ... Keywords: animation, compositing, image editing, layers, stacking, visibility

James McCann; Nancy Pollard

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials.

Sullivan, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); Friedmann, Thomas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Josephson junctions in high-T/sub c/ superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention includes a high T/sub c/ Josephson sperconducting junction as well as the method and apparatus which provides the junction by application of a closely controlled and monitored electrical discharge to a microbridge region connecting two portions of a superconducting film.

Falco, C.M.; Lee, T.W.

1981-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

96

Molecular nanoplasmonics: self-consistent electrodynamics in current carrying junctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a biased molecular junction subjected to external time-dependent electromagnetic field. We discuss local field formation due to both surface plasmon-polariton excitations in the contacts and the molecular response. Employing realistic parameters we demonstrate that such self-consistent treatment is crucial for proper description of the junction transport characteristics.

White, Alexander J; Galperin, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Photovoltaic Device Including A Boron Doping Profile In An I-Type Layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic cell for use in a single junction or multijunction photovoltaic device, which includes a p-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon, an i-type layer of an amorphous semiconductor compound including silicon, and an n-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon formed on the i-type layer. The i-type layer including an undoped first sublayer formed on the p-type layer, and a boron-doped second sublayer formed on the first sublayer.

Yang, Liyou (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

98

Multi-junction, monolithic solar cell using low-band-gap materials lattice matched to GaAs or Ge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-junction, monolithic, photovoltaic solar cell device is provided for converting solar radiation to photocurrent and photovoltage with improved efficiency. The solar cell device comprises a plurality of semiconductor cells, i.e., active p/n junctions, connected in tandem and deposited on a substrate fabricated from GaAs or Ge. To increase efficiency, each semiconductor cell is fabricated from a crystalline material with a lattice constant substantially equivalent to the lattice constant of the substrate material. Additionally, the semiconductor cells are selected with appropriate band gaps to efficiently create photovoltage from a larger portion of the solar spectrum. In this regard, one semiconductor cell in each embodiment of the solar cell device has a band gap between that of Ge and GaAs. To achieve desired band gaps and lattice constants, the semiconductor cells may be fabricated from a number of materials including Ge, GaInP, GaAs, GaInAsP, GaInAsN, GaAsGe, BGaInAs, (GaAs)Ge, CuInSSe, CuAsSSe, and GaInAsNP. To further increase efficiency, the thickness of each semiconductor cell is controlled to match the photocurrent generated in each cell. To facilitate photocurrent flow, a plurality of tunnel junctions of low-resistivity material are included between each adjacent semiconductor cell. The conductivity or direction of photocurrent in the solar cell device may be selected by controlling the specific p-type or n-type characteristics for each active junction.

Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO); Friedman, Daniel J. (Lakewood, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Data Compendium for the Logging Test Pits at the ERDA Grand Junction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data Compendium for the Logging Test Pits at the ERDA Grand Junction Compound (December 1975) Data Compendium for the Logging Test Pits at the ERDA Grand Junction Compound...

100

Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for ...  

A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Development of high, stable-efficiency triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes Energy Conversion Devices, Inc.`s (ECD) research under this program. ECD researchers explored the deposition of a-Si at high rates using very-high-frequency plasma MHz, and compared these VHF i-layers with radio-frequency (RF) plasma-deposited i-layers. ECD conducted comprehensive research to develop a {mu}c-Si p{sup +} layer using VHF deposition process with the objectives of establishing a wider process window for the deposition of high-quality p{sup +} materials and further enhancing their performance of a-Si solar cells by improving its p-layers. ECD optimized the deposition of the intrinsic a-Si layer and the boron-doped {mu}c-Si p{sup +} layer to improve the V{sub oc}. Researchers deposited wide-bandgap a-Si films using high hydrogen dilution; investigated the deposition of the ZnO layer (for use in back-reflector) using a sputter deposition process involving metal Zn targets; and obtained a baseline fabrication for single-junction a-Si n-i-p devices with 10.6% initial efficiency and a baseline fabrication for triple-junction a-Si devices with 11.2% initial efficiency. ECD researchers also optimized the deposition parameters for a-SiGe with high Ge content; designed a novel structure for the p-n tunnel junction (recombination layer) in a multiple-junction solar cell; and demonstrated, in n-i-p solar cells, the improved stability of a-Si:H:F materials when deposited using a new fluorine precursor. Researchers investigated the use of c-Si(n{sup +})/a-Si alloy/Pd Schottky barrier device as a tool for the effective evaluation of photovoltaic performance on a-Si alloy materials. Through alterations in the deposition conditions and system hardware, researchers improved their understanding for the deposition of uniform and high-quality a-Si and a-SiGe films over large areas. ECD researchers also performed extensive research to optimize the deposition process of the newly constructed 5-MW back-reflector deposition machine.

Deng, X.; Jones, S.J.; Liu, T.; Izu, M. [Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., Troy, MI (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Tandem junction amorphous semiconductor photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic stack comprising at least two p.sup.+ i n.sup.+ cells in optical series, said cells separated by a transparent ohmic contact layer(s), provides a long optical path for the absorption of photons while preserving the advantageous field-enhanced minority carrier collection arrangement characteristic of p.sup.+ i n.sup.+ cells.

Dalal, Vikram L. (Newark, DE)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Tandem junction amorphous semiconductor photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic stack comprising at least two p[sup +]i n[sup +] cells in optical series, said cells separated by a transparent ohmic contact layer(s), provides a long optical path for the absorption of photons while preserving the advantageous field-enhanced minority carrier collection arrangement characteristic of p[sup +]i n[sup +] cells. 3 figs.

Dalal, V.L.

1983-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

Cryogenic ion implantation near amorphization threshold dose for halo/extension junction improvement in sub-30 nm device technologies  

SciTech Connect

We report on junction advantages of cryogenic ion implantation with medium current implanters. We propose a methodical approach on maximizing cryogenic effects on junction characteristics near the amorphization threshold doses that are typically used for halo implants for sub-30 nm technologies. BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant at a dose of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13}cm{sup -2} does not amorphize silicon at room temperature. When implanted at -100 Degree-Sign C, it forms a 30 - 35 nm thick amorphous layer. The cryogenic BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant significantly reduces the depth of the boron distribution, both as-implanted and after anneals, which improves short channel rolloff characteristics. It also creates a shallower n{sup +}-p junction by steepening profiles of arsenic that is subsequently implanted in the surface region. We demonstrate effects of implant sequences, germanium preamorphization, indium and carbon co-implants for extension/halo process integration. When applied to sequences such as Ge+As+C+In+BF{sub 2}{sup +}, the cryogenic implants at -100 Degree-Sign C enable removal of Ge preamorphization, and form more active n{sup +}-p junctions and steeper B and In halo profiles than sequences at room temperature.

Park, Hugh; Todorov, Stan; Colombeau, Benjamin; Rodier, Dennis; Kouzminov, Dimitry; Zou Wei; Guo Baonian; Khasgiwale, Niranjan; Decker-Lucke, Kurt [Applied Materials, Varian Semiconductor Equipment, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

105

Investigation of Junction Properties in CdS/CdTe Solar Cells and Their Correlation to Device Properties: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Secondary-ion mass spectrometry analysis of the CdS/CdTe interface shows that S diffusion in CdTe increases with substrate temperature and CdCl2 heat treatment. There is also an accumulation of Cl at the interface for CdCl2-treated samples. Modulated photo-reflectance studies shows that devices with CdCl2 heat treatment and open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 835 mV have a distinct high electric-field region in the layer with bandgap of 1.45 eV. Electron-beam induced current measurements reveal a one-sided junction for high Voc devices. The nature of the junction changes with processing. For heterojunction devices, the depletion region includes the highly defective CdS/CdTe interface, which would increase the recombination current and consequently the dark current, leading to lower Voc. In the case of CdCl2-treated cells, the n+-p junction and its high electric-field results in the junction between structurally compatible CdTe and the Te-rich CdSTe alloy, and thus, in higher Voc.

Dhere, R. G.; Zhang, Y.; Romero, M. J.; Asher, S. E.; Young, M.; To, B.; Noufi, R.; Gessert, T. A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Junction Formation in CuInSe{sub 2} Based Thin Film Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nature of the interface between CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) and the chemical bath deposited CdS layer has been investigated. We show that heat-treating the absorbers in Cd- or Zn-containing solutions in the presence of ammonium hydroxide sets up a chemical reaction which facilitates an extraction of Cu from the lattice and an in-diffusion of Cd. The characteristics of devices made in this manner suggest that the reaction generates a thin, n-doped region in the absorber. It is quite possible that the CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} device is a buried, shallow junction with a CdS window layer, rather than a heterojunction. We have used these ideas to develop methods for fabricating devices without CdS or Cd. A 14.2% efficiency ZnO/CIGS device was obtained through aqueous treatment in Zn solutions.

Ramanathan, K.; Wiesner, H.; Asher, S.; Bhattacharya, R. N.; Keane, J.; Contreras, M.; Noufi, R.

1998-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

Development of high stable-efficiency, triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells. Annual subcontract report, July 18, 1994--July 17, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) under a 3-year, cost-shared amorphous silicon (a-Si) research program to develop advanced technologies and to demonstrate stable 14%-efficient, triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells. The technologies developed under the program will then be incorporated into ECD`s continuous roll-to-roll deposition process to further enhance ECD`s photovoltaic manufacturing technology. In ECD`s solar cell design, triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells are deposited onto stainless-steel substrates coated with Ag/ZnO back-reflector layers. This type of cell design enabled ECD to use a continuous roll- to-roll deposition process to manufacture a-Si PV materials in high volume at low cost. Using this cell design, ECD previously achieved 13.7% initial solar cell efficiency using the following features: (1) a triple-junction, two-band-gap, spectrum-splitting solar cell design; (2) a microcrystalline silicon p-layer; (3) a band-gap-profiled a- SiGe alloy as the bottom cell i-layer; (4) a high-performance AgZnO back-reflector; and (5) a high-performance tunnel junction between component cells. ECD also applied the technology into its 2-MW/yr a- Si production line and achieved the manufacturing of 4-ft{sup 2} PV modules with 8% stable efficiency. During this program, ECD is also further advancing its existing PV technology toward the goal of 14% stable solar cells by performing the following four tasks: (1) improving the stability of the intrinsic a-Si alloy materials; (2) improving the quality of low-band-gap a-SiGe alloy; (3) improving p{sup +} window layers, and (4) developing high stable-efficiency triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells.

Deng, X. [Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., Troy, MI (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Cadmium-free junction fabrication process for CuInSe.sub.2 thin film solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides an economical, simple, dry and controllable semiconductor layer junction forming process to make cadmium free high efficiency photovoltaic cells having a first layer comprised primarily of copper indium diselenide having a thin doped copper indium diselenide n-type region, generated by thermal diffusion with a group II(b) element such as zinc, and a halide, such as chlorine, and a second layer comprised of a conventional zinc oxide bilayer. A photovoltaic device according the present invention includes a first thin film layer of semiconductor material formed primarily from copper indium diselenide. Doping of the copper indium diselenide with zinc chloride is accomplished using either a zinc chloride solution or a solid zinc chloride material. Thermal diffusion of zinc chloride into the copper indium diselenide upper region creates the thin n-type copper indium diselenide surface. A second thin film layer of semiconductor material comprising zinc oxide is then applied in two layers. The first layer comprises a thin layer of high resistivity zinc oxide. The second relatively thick layer of zinc oxide is doped to exhibit low resistivity.

Ramanathan, Kannan V. (Lakewood, CA); Contreras, Miguel A. (Golden, CA); Bhattacharya, Raghu N. (Littleton, CA); Keane, James (Lakewood, CA); Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

EA-1037: Uranium Lease Management Program, Grand Junction, Colorado |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Uranium Lease Management Program, Grand Junction, Colorado 37: Uranium Lease Management Program, Grand Junction, Colorado EA-1037: Uranium Lease Management Program, Grand Junction, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Projects Office's proposal to maintain and preserve the nation's immediately accessible supply of domestic uranium and vanadium ores, to maintain a viable domestic mining and milling infrastructure required to produce and mill these ores, and to provide assurance of a fair monetary return to the U.S. Government. The Uranium Lease Management Program gives The Department of Energy the flexibility to continue leasing these lands. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 22, 1995

110

Gap junction-mediated electrical transmission: Regulatory mechanisms and plasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gap junction-mediated electrical transmission: Regulatory mechanisms and plasticity Alberto E of synaptic transmission: chemical and electrical. While most efforts have been dedicated to the understanding of synaptic transmission: chemical and electrical. In chemical synapses, presynaptic electrical currents

Rash, John E.

111

EA-0930: Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30: Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction 30: Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado EA-0930: Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to expand and upgrade the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Projects Office facilities and operations in Grand Junction, Colorado. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD June 8, 1996 EA-0930: Finding of No Significant Impact Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado June 8, 1996 EA-0930: Final Environmental Assessment Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand

112

Modified laser-annealing process for improving the quality of electrical P-N junctions and devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for producing improved electrical-junction devices. The invention is applicable, for example, to a process in which a light-sensitive electrical-junction device is produced by: (1) providing a body of crystalline semiconductor material having a doped surface layer; (2) irradiating the layer with at least one laser pulse to effect melting of the layer; (3) permitting recrystallization of the melted layer; and (4) providing the resulting body with electrical contacts. In accordance with the invention, the fill-factor and open-circuit-voltage parameters of the device are increased by conducting the irradiation with the substrate as a whole at a selected elevated temperature, the temperature being selected to effect a reduction in the rate of the recrystallization but insufficient to effect substantial migration of impurities within the body. In the case of doped silicon substrates, the substrate may be heated to a temperature in the range of from about 200/sup 0/C to 500/sup 0/C.

Wood, R.F.; Young, R.T.

1982-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

113

Raman Scattering at Plasmonic Junctions Shorted by Conductive Molecular Bridges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intensity spikes in Raman scattering, accompanied by switching between line spectra and band spectra, can be assigned to shorting the junction plasmon through molecular conductive bridges. This is demonstrated through Raman trajectories recorded at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated either with biphenyl-4,4-dithiol or biphenyl-4-thiol. The fluctuations are absent in the monothiol. In effect, the making and breaking of chemical bonds is tracked.

El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Apkarian, V. Ara; Hess, Wayne P.

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

The origins and limits of metalgraphene junction resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ming Lin, Yanqing Wu and Phaedon Avouris* A high-quality junction between graphene and metallic contacts is crucial in the creation of high-performance graphene transistors. In an ideal metal­graphene junction in the calculation: h ¼ 5 meV, t1 ¼ 300 meV, d1 ¼ 1 ?. Red line, contact resistance in an ideal metal­graphene

Perebeinos, Vasili

115

Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: From 1957 to 1961 a regional gravity survey was made over the northern part of the Great Salt Lake Desert and adjacent areas in Utah, eastern Nevada, and southeastern Idaho. A total of 1040 stations were taken over an area of about 7000 square miles. The results were compiled as a Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 2 mgal. The Bouguer values ranged from a high of about -120 mgal over the outcrop areas to a

116

Ternary metal-rich sulfide with a layered structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ternary Nb-Ta-S compound is provided having the atomic formula, Nb.sub.1.72 Ta.sub.3.28 S.sub.2, and exhibiting a layered structure in the sequence S-M3-M2-M1-M2-M3-S wherein S represents sulfur layers and M1, M2, and M3 represent Nb/Ta mixed metal layers. This sequence generates seven sheets stacked along the [001] direction of an approximate body centered cubic crystal structure with relatively weak sulfur-to-sulfur van der Waals type interactions between adjacent sulfur sheets and metal-to-metal bonding within and between adjacent mixed metal sheets.

Franzen, Hugo F. (Ames, IA); Yao, Xiaoqiang (Ames, IA)

1993-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

117

Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 1 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also is the remedial action contractor. Building 1 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1996. The soil beneath and adjacent to the building was remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

Widdop, M.R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Ultrathin Co/Pt and Co/Pd superlattice films for MgO-based perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

Ultrathin [Co/Pt]{sub n} and [Co/Pd]{sub n} superlattice films consisting of 0.14-0.20-nm-thick Co and Pt(Pd) layers were deposited by sputtering. A large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy [(3-9)x10{sup 6} ergs/cm{sup 3}] and an ideal square out-of-plane hysteresis loop were attained even for ultrathin superlattice films with a total thickness of 1.2-2.4 nm. The films were stable against annealing up to 370 deg. C. MgO-based perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with this superlattice layer as the free layer showed a relatively high magnetoresistance ratio (62%) and an ultralow resistance-area product (3.9 {Omega} {mu}m{sup 2}) at room temperature. The use of these films will enable the development of gigabit-scale nonvolatile memory.

Yakushiji, K.; Saruya, T.; Kubota, H.; Fukushima, A.; Nagahama, T.; Yuasa, S.; Ando, K. [Spintronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

Method for forming p-n junctions and solar-cells by laser-beam processing  

SciTech Connect

This invention is an improved method for preparing p-n junction devices, such as diodes and solar cells. High-quality junctions are prepared by effecting laser-diffusion of a selected dopant into silicon by means of laser pulses having a wavelength of from about 0.3 to 1.1 .mu.m, an energy area density of from about 1.0 to 2.0 J/cm.sup.2, and a duration of from about 20 to 60 nanoseconds. Initially, the dopant is deposited on the silicon as a superficial layer, preferably one having a thickness in the range of from about 50 to 100 A. Depending on the application, the values for the above-mentioned pulse parameters are selected to produce melting of the silicon to depths in the range from about 1000 A to 1 .mu.m. The invention has been used to produce solar cells having a one-sun conversion efficiency of 10.6%, these cells having no antireflective coating or back-surface fields.

Narayan, Jagdish (Knoxville, TN); Young, Rosa T. (Knoxville, TN)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Mathematical Formulation of Multi-Layer Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A network representation is useful for describing the structure of a large variety of complex systems. However, most real and engineered systems have multiple subsystems and layers of connectivity, and the data produced by such systems is very rich. Achieving a deep understanding of such systems necessitates generalizing "traditional" network theory, and the newfound deluge of data now makes it possible to test increasingly general frameworks for the study of networks. In particular, although adjacency matrices are useful to describe traditional single-layer networks, such a representation is insufficient for the analysis and description of multiplex and time-dependent networks. One must therefore develop a more general mathematical framework to cope with the challenges posed by multi-layer complex systems. In this paper, we introduce a tensorial framework to study multi-layer networks, and we discuss the generalization of several important network descriptors and dynamical processes --including degree centrality, clustering coefficients, eigenvector centrality, modularity, Von Neumann entropy, and diffusion-- for this framework. We examine the impact of different choices in constructing these generalizations, and we illustrate how to obtain known results for the special cases of single-layer and multiplex networks. Our tensorial approach will be helpful for tackling pressing problems in multi-layer complex systems, such as inferring who is influencing whom (and by which media) in multichannel social networks and developing routing techniques for multimodal transportation systems.

Manlio De Domenico; Albert Sol-Ribalta; Emanuele Cozzo; Mikko Kivel; Yamir Moreno; Mason A. Porter; Sergio Gmez; Alex Arenas

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Thinking in layers: modeling with layered materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This course serves as a guide to the considerable potential of layered surface models that are available in many commercial products. The key advantage of using such layered materials over traditional shading language constructs is that the end result ...

Andrea Weidlich; Alexander Wilkie

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Assessment of cover systems at the Grand Junction, Colorado, uranium mill tailings pile: 1987 field measurements  

SciTech Connect

Four Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientists and a technician conducted an onsite evaluation of radon gas exhalation, water content profiles, and plant and animal intrusion for a series of cover systems located on the uranium mill tailings pile at Grand Junction, Colorado. These six plots were sampled extensively down to the radon control layer (e.g., asphalt or wet clay) for soil moisture content and permeability. Radon gas emission through the surface was measured. Soil samples were collected and analyzed in the lab for particle-size distribution, particle density, bulk density, and ambient water content. Prairie dog burrows were excavated to discover the extent to which they penetrated the barriers. Plant type, density, and cover characteristics were measured.

Gee, G.W.; Campbell, M.D.; Freeman, H.D.; Cline, J.F.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

1989-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

124

City of Grand Junction, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grand Junction City of Grand Junction City of Place Iowa Utility Id 7486 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Electric Commercial Demand Service Commercial Residential Eletric Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1340/kWh Commercial: $0.1300/kWh Industrial: $0.0899/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Grand_Junction,_Iowa_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409673

125

NREL: Awards and Honors - Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar Cell Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar Cell Developers: Dr. Jerry Olson, Dr. Sarah Kurtz, Dr. Daniel Friedman, Alan Kibbler, and Charlene Karmer, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Dr. Richard King, Jim Ermer, Dmitri D. Krut, Hector Cotal, Peter Colter, Hojun Yoon, Nassar Karam, and Gregory S. Glenn, Spectrolab, Inc. The triple-junction solar cell - or TJ solar cell - generates a lot of energy from just a very little amount of material. How much energy? A 1-cm2 cell can generate as much as 35 W of power and produce as much as 86.3 kWh of electricity during a typical year under a Phoenix, AZ sun. This means that 100 to 150 of these cells could produce enough electricity to power the typical American household. This cell can do this, first, because it

126

Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Benefits of Damage Engineering for PMOS Junction Stability  

SciTech Connect

As CMOS devices continue to shrink, the formation of ultra shallow junction (USJ) in the source/drain extension remains to be a key challenge requiring high dopant activation, shallow dopant profile and abrupt junctions. The next generations of sub nano-CMOS devices impose a new set of challenges such as elimination of residual defects resulting in higher leakage, difficulty to control lateral diffusion, junction stability post anneal and junction formation in new materials. To address these challenges for advanced technological nodes beyond 32 nm, it is imperative to explore novel species and techniques. Molecular species such as Carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}), a novel doping species and a promising alternative to monomer Boron is of considerable interest due to the performance boost for 22 nm low power and high performance devices. Also, to reduce residual defects, damage engineering methodologies have generated a lot of attention as it has demonstrated significant benefits in device performance. Varian proprietary techniques to perform implants at cold temperatures (PTC II) have demonstrated lower junction leakage, enhanced activation, reduced dopant diffusion and less dopant deactivation due to the reduction of self-interstitial atoms present at the end-of-range (EOR) with low implant temperatures. In this paper, for the first time, there is a comprehensive study of the effect of implant temperature on defect engineering affecting deactivation/reactivation, and it is well established in this paper that colder the implant temperature the better it is for damage engineering with reduced EOR defects and better amorphization. The effect has been studied over a wide range of implant temperature. To understand any difference in deactivation between molecular and monomer Boron and to provide direct comparison equivalent Boron implants, co-implanted with Carbon were also studied. Implants with wide range of temperatures are implemented using PTC II. This paper will also show how damage reduction correlates with optimum junction formation and stability.

Khaja, Fareen; Colombeau, Benjamin; Thanigaivelan, Thirumal; Ramappa, Deepak; Henry, Todd [Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc. 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

InGaAsN/GaAs heterojunction for multi-junction solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An InGaAsN/GaAs semiconductor p-n heterojunction is disclosed for use in forming a 0.95-1.2 eV bandgap photodetector with application for use in high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction is formed by epitaxially growing on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) or germanium (Ge) substrate an n-type indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN) layer having a semiconductor alloy composition In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As.sub.1-y N.sub.y with 0layer, with the InGaAsN and GaAs layers being lattice-matched to the substrate. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction can be epitaxially grown by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction provides a high open-circuit voltage of up to 0.62 volts and an internal quantum efficiency of >70%.

Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Klem, John F. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Eric D. (Edgewood, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Emission of terahertz waves from stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions.  

SciTech Connect

By patterning mesoscopic crystals of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (BSCCO) into electromagnetic resonators the oscillations of a large number of intrinsic Josephson junctions can be synchronized into a macroscopic coherent state accompanied by the emission of strong continuous wave THz-radiation. The temperature dependence of the emission is governed by the interplay of self-heating in the resonator and by re-trapping of intrinsic Josephson junctions which can yield a strongly non-monotonic temperature dependence of the emission power. Furthermore, proper shaping of the resonators yields THz-sources with voltage-tunable emission frequencies.

Gray, K. E.; Koshelev, A. E.; Kurter, C.; Kadowaki, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Minami, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Tachiki, M.; Kwok, W.-K.; Welp, U.; Materials Science Division; Izmir Inst. of Tech.; Univ. Tsukuba; Univ. Tokyo

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

EA-1338: Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office 8: Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office to Non-DOE Ownership, Grand Junction, Colorado EA-1338: Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office to Non-DOE Ownership, Grand Junction, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed transfer of real and personal property at the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Office to non-DOE ownership. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 25, 2000 EA-1338: Finding of No Significant Impact Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office to Non-DOE Ownership April 25, 2000 EA-1338: Final Environmental Assessment Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office to Non-DOE Ownership

131

3-D Nano-mechanics of an Erythrocyte Junctional Comples in Equibiaxial and Anisotropic Deformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L.D. Sturges. Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics. Wiley, 1995.3-D Nano-mechanics of an Erythrocyte Junctional Complex inUSA Running title: Nano-mechanics of Erythrocyte Junctional

Vera, Carlos; Skelton, Robert; Sung, Amy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Estimating commuter rail demand to Kendall Square along the Grand Junction Corridor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since acquiring the Grand Junction Railroad in June 2010 from CSX, the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA) has explored the possibility of using the line for commuter rail service. In addition the Grand Junction ...

Bockelie, Adam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Layer-by-Layer Assembled Thin Films for Battery Electrolytes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Layer-by-Layer Assembled Thin Films for Battery Electrolytes ... Abstract Scope, Exponential layer-by-layer (eLBL) assembled battery...

134

Novel InGaAsN pn Junction for High-Efficiency Multiple-Junction Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report the application of a novel material, InGaAsN, with bandgap energy of 1.05 eV as a junction in an InGaP/GaAs/InGaAsN/Ge 4-junction design. Results of the growth and structural, optical, and electrical properties were demonstrated, showing the promising perspective of this material for ultra high efficiency solar cells. Photovoltaic properties of an as-grown pn diode structure and improvement through post growth annealing were also discussed.

Allerman, A.A.; Chang, P.C.; Gee, J.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Hou, H.Q.; Jones, E.D.; Kurtz, S.R.; Reinhardt, K.C.

1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

Optimized Triple-Junction Solar Cells Using Inverted Metamorphic Approach (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Record efficiencies with triple-junction inverted metamorphic designs, modeling useful to optimize, and consider operating conditions before choosing design.

Geisz, J. F.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A variational approach to motion of triple junction of gas, liquid and solid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variational approach to motion of triple junction of gas, liquid and solid Kensuke Yokoia;b;c;1 a to deal with motion of triple junctions of gas, liquid (or two kinds of uid) and solid based on the level with triple junctions of gas, liquid and solid. Numerical simulations for free surface ows with moving

Soatto, Stefano

137

Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement.

Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert. (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); Sahm, Aaron (University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Crawford, Clark (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S. (Emcore, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Gap junction-mediated electrical transmission: Regulatory mechanisms and plasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gap junction-mediated electrical transmission: Regulatory mechanisms and plasticity Alberto E of synaptic transmission: chemical and electrical. While most efforts have been dedicated to the understanding in revised form 16 May 2012 Accepted 23 May 2012 Available online 31 May 2012 Keywords: Electrical synapse

Rash, John E.

139

Josephson Junctions and Devices fabricated by Focused Electron Beam Irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This relation provides a way of quantum-mechanically linking frequency and voltage and is therefore utilised in the international standardisation of the Volt. 1.2.1 The Resistively Shunted Junction (RSJ) model At finite values of the voltage bias not only an ac...

Booij, Wilfred Edwin

140

Earth's Core Hottest Layer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth's Core Hottest Layer Earth's Core Hottest Layer Name: Alfred Status: Grade: 6-8 Location: FL Country: USA Date: Spring 2011 Question: Why is the inner core the hottest layer? How is that possible? Replies: There are two factors causing the center of the Earth hotter than various layers of the Earth's. First, the more dense is the layer. The denser layer, the hotter it will be. In addition, the source of the heating is due to heat produced by nuclear decay. These substances tend to be more dense than lower dense substances. So the source of heat (temperature) is higher, the greater will be the temperature. Having said all that, the reasons are rather more complicated in the "real" Earth. If the inner layers were less dense they would rise (bubble) to the "surface" leaving the inner layers more dense and thus hotter layers.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Antireflection Coating Design for Series Interconnected Multi-Junction Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

AR coating design for multi-junction solar cells can be more challenging than in the single junction case. Reasons for this are discussed. Analytical expressions used to optimize AR coatings for single junction solar cells are extended for use in monolithic, series interconnected multi-junction solar cell AR coating design. The result is an analytical expression which relates the solar cell performance (through J{sub SC}) directly to the AR coating design through the device reflectance. It is also illustrated how AR coating design can be used to provide an additional degree of freedom for current matching multi-junction devices.

AIKEN,DANIEL J.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

142

Growth sequence and interface formation in the Fe/MgO/Fe(001) tunnel junction analyzed by surface x-ray diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a surface x-ray diffraction study of the interface geometric structure in the Fe/MgO/Fe(001) magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). While the lower MgO/Fe(001) interface is characterized by a substoichiometric FeO{sub x} (x=0.6{+-}0.1) layer in agreement with previous studies, growth of Fe on the MgO spacer and the upper Fe/MgO interface structure strongly depends on the preparation method. If 0.4 monolayers of Fe are initially deposited in ambient oxygen atmosphere (p=10{sup -7} mbar) followed by Fe deposition under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions, structural coherence across the trilayer junction is observed. In this case, substoichiometric FeO{sub x} layers are present at both Fe/MgO interfaces corresponding to a symmetric MTJ structure. In contrast, lattice registry is not preserved if Fe deposition is carried out solely under UHV conditions. Our results might have important implications for the preparation of magnetic tunnel junctions optimized to achieve giant tunneling-magnetoresistance amplitudes.

Tusche, C.; Meyerheim, H. L.; Kirschner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Jedrecy, N. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Universites Paris 6 et 7 et CNRS-UMR 7588, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Renaud, G. [CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Quantifying the Interfractional Displacement of the Gastroesophageal Junction During Radiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Accounting for interfractional changes in tumor location improves the accuracy of radiation treatment delivery. The purpose of this study was to quantify the interfractional displacement of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) based on standard treatment setup in patients with esophageal cancer undergoing radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Free-breathing four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) datasets were acquired weekly from 22 patients during treatment for esophageal adenocarcinoma. Scans were registered to baseline (simulation) 4D-CT scans by using bony landmarks. The distance between the center of the GEJ contour on the simulation scan and the mean location of GEJ centers on subsequent scans was used to assess changes in GEJ location between fractions; displacement was also correlated with clinical and respiratory variables. Results: The mean absolute random error was 1.69 mm (range, 0.11-4.11 mm) in the lateral direction, 1.87 mm (range, 0.51-4.09 mm) in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction, and 3.09 mm (range, 0.99-6.16 mm) in the superior-inferior (SI) direction. The mean absolute systemic GEJ displacement between fractions was 2.88 mm lateral ({>=}5 mm in 14%), mostly leftward; 2.90 mm ({>=}5 mm in 14%) AP, mostly anterior; and 6.77 mm ({>=}1 cm in 18%) SI, mostly inferior. Variations in tidal volume and diaphragmatic excursion during treatment correlated strongly with systematic SI GEJ displacement (r = 0.964, p =}60 Gy) to the GEJ, with increased hot-spot to the adjacent stomach and lung base. Conclusion: We found large (>1-cm) interfractional displacements in the GEJ in the SI (especially inferior) direction that was not accounted for when skeletal alignment alone was used for patient positioning. Because systematic displacement in the SI direction had dosimetric impact and correlated with tidal volume, better accounting for depth of breathing is needed to reduce interfractional variability.

Wang Jingya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lin, Steven H., E-mail: shlin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong Lei; Balter, Peter; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Starkschall, George [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Photonic layered media  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Transient Dynamics in Molecular Junctions: Coherent Bichromophoric Molecular Electron Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility of using single molecule junctions as electron pumps for energy conversion and storage is considered. It is argued that the small dimensions of these systems enable to make use of unique intra-molecular quantum coherences in order to pump electrons between two leads and to overcome relaxation processes which tend to suppress the pumping efficiency. In particular, we demonstrate that a selective transient excitation of one chromophore in a bi-chromophoric donor-bridge-acceptor molecular junction model yields currents which transfer charge (electron and holes) unevenly to the two leads in the absence of a bias potential. The utility of this mechanism for charge pumping in steady state conditions is proposed.

Volkovich, Roie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Transient Dynamics in Molecular Junctions: Coherent Bichromophoric Molecular Electron Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility of using single molecule junctions as electron pumps for energy conversion and storage is considered. It is argued that the small dimensions of these systems enable to make use of unique intra-molecular quantum coherences in order to pump electrons between two leads and to overcome relaxation processes which tend to suppress the pumping efficiency. In particular, we demonstrate that a selective transient excitation of one chromophore in a bi-chromophoric donor-bridge-acceptor molecular junction model yields currents which transfer charge (electron and holes) unevenly to the two leads in the absence of a bias potential. The utility of this mechanism for charge pumping in steady state conditions is proposed.

Roie Volkovich; Uri Peskin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Quadrupolar Effect on Two Layered Thin Film Antiferroelectric Smectic Liquid Crystal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the framework of the discrete Landau phenomenological model, the free energy of an antiferroelectric smectic liquid crystal is analyzed. This model considers the interactions between the liquid crystal molecules within the nearest and the next nearest layers. Electrostatic quadrupolar interaction up to the nearest layers is included. This quadrupolar term, b{sub q{xi}}???{sub i{center_dot}{xi}}???{sub i+1}{sup 2} is positive, thus favouring a perpendicular orientation in the adjacent layer respectively. We show how quadrupolar interaction can affects the planar regions of the phase diagram of a two layered thin antiferroelectric smectic liquid crystal film.

Lum, Chia-Yuee; Ong, Lye-Hock [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Cepic, Mojca [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia, Faculty of Education, University of Ljubljana, Kardeljeva pl. 16. 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Loop Current Mixed Layer Energy Response to Hurricane Lili (2002). Part I: Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean mixed layer response to a tropical cyclone within and immediately adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico Loop Current is examined. In the first of a two-part study, a comprehensive set of temperature, salinity, and current profiles acquired from ...

Eric W. Uhlhorn; Lynn K. Shay

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Environmental assessment of facility operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Because DOE-GJPO regularly proposes and conducts many different on-site activities, DOE decided to evaluate these activities in one sitewide EA rather than in multiple, activity-specific documents. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for facility operations, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Use of very-high-frequency plasmas to prepare a-Si:H-based triple-junction solar cells at high deposition rates: Annual technical status report, 11 March 1998--11 March 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) during this phase of this subcontract. ECD researchers have made significant progress in advancing the very high frequency (VHF), high-rate technology. They demonstrated that 8.0% stable efficiencies can be achieved for a-Si:H cells whose i-layers are prepared at rates near 10 {angstrom}/s using the VHF technique. Presently, there is not a great difference in the performance of a-Si:H cells made using the VHF technique and i-layer deposition rates near 10 {angstrom}/s and that for cells made using the standard 13.56 MHz technique and rates near 1 {angstrom}/s in the same deposition system. In terms of the a-SiGe:H cells, researchers have completed a number of studies of devices with properties appropriate for middle-junction cells-that is, cells without Ag/ZnO back-reflectors having Voc values near 0.75V and Jsc values near 8.0 mA/cm{sup 2} when measured using AM1.5 light filtered using a 530-nm, low-band-pass filter. The stabilized proper ties for these cells prepared at i-layer rates near 10 {angstrom}/s are again similar to a-SiGe:H cells made using the same deposition hardware and the low-rate 13.56 MHz method. Establishing an initial 10.5% for a triple-junction cell whose i-layers are prepared at the high rates sets the baseline for ECD's future studies. The triple-junction cell degradation (10%--13%) with prolonged light soaking is similar to that regularly obtained for cells prepared at low i-layer deposition rates (1 {angstrom}/s). This is important because the use of high-rate methods to prepare i-layers typically leads to less-stable materials and cells. Increasing the buffer-layer deposition rate to 6 {angstrom}/s leads to nearly a 15-min decrease in the total deposition time, whereas the increase in the n-layer and p-layer deposition rates both decrease the total time by 5 and 5.8 min, respectively. Thus, besides the i-layer growth rates, increasing the buffer layer growth rate has the strongest effect on the deposition time of the triple-junction semiconductor structures.

Jones, S.J.; Liu, T.; Tsu, D.; Izu, M.

1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

151

Self-consistent solution for proximity effect and Josephson current in ballistic graphene SNS Josephson junctions  

SciTech Connect

We use a tight-binding Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) formalism to self-consistently calculate the proximity effect, Josephson current, and local density of states in ballistic graphene SNS Josephson junctions. Both short and long junctions, with respect to the superconducting coherence length, are considered, as well as different doping levels of the graphene. We show that self-consistency does not notably change the current-phase relationship derived earlier for short junctions using the non-selfconsistent Dirac-BdG formalism but predict a significantly increased critical current with a stronger junction length dependence. In addition, we show that in junctions with no Fermi level mismatch between the N and S regions superconductivity persists even in the longest junctions we can investigate, indicating a diverging Ginzburg-Landau superconducting coherence length in the normal region.

Black-Schaffer, Annica M.

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

152

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

GaInNAs Junctions for Next-Generation Concentrators: Progress and Prospects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We discuss progress in the development of GaInNAs junctions for application in next-generation multijunction concentrator cells. A significant development is the demonstration of near-100% internal quantum efficiencies in junctions grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Testing at high currents validates the compatibility of these devices with concentrator operation. The efficiencies of several next-generation multijunction structures incorporating these state-of-the-art GaInNAs junctions are projected.

Friedman, D. J.; Ptak, A. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Geisz, J. F.; Kiehl, J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Layered plasma polymer composite membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

Babcock, W.C.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

156

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Office of Legacy Management (LM), Grand Junction (See LM APS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Office of Legacy Management (LM), Grand Junction (See LM APS).

157

EE2, Regrown InGaAs Tunnel Junctions for TFETs - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CBr4 and elemental Si were used as the dopant sources in the MBE ... Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of regrown tunnel junctions on the...

158

Comment on "Analysis of quantum coherent semiconductor quantum dot p-i-n junction photovoltaic cells"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a comment on PRL paper by A.P. Kirk "Analysis of quantum coherent semiconductor quantum dot p-i-n junction photovoltaic cells"

Scully, Marlan O

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Novel applications of the Josephson Effect: Ferroelectric Characterisation and Capacitively Shunted Grain Boundary Junctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are presented from bicrystal grain boundary YBa2Cu3 O7-? junctions shunted with a YBa2Cu3 O7-?/SrTiO 3/Au multilayer external capacitor, to make a junction with a hysteretic current voltage characteristic operating at high temperatures. A hysteretic junction with a... McCumber parameter of 1.01 at 72.3K, with a critical current of 451A and a resistance of 0.56? was achieved for a junction shunted with a 150m2 external capacitor with a 50nm SrTiO 3 dielectric. The measured capacitance was less than that expected...

McBrien, Philip Francis

160

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface remedial action will be completed at the Grand Junction processing site during the summer of 1994. Results of 1993 water sampling indicate that ground water flow conditions and ground water quality at the processing site have remained relatively constant with time. Uranium concentrations in ground water continue to exceed the maximum concentration limits, providing the best indication of the extent of contaminated ground water. Evaluation of surface water quality of the Colorado River indicate no impact from uranium processing activities. No compliance monitoring at the Cheney disposal site has been proposed because ground water in the Dakota Sandstone (uppermost aquifer) is classified as limited-use (Class 111) and because the disposal cell is hydrogeologically isolated from the uppermost aquifer. The following water sampling and water level monitoring activities are planned for calendar year 1994: (i) Semiannual (early summer and late fall) sampling of six existing monitor wells at the former Grand Junction processing site. Analytical results from this sampling will be used to continue characterizing hydrogeochemical trends in background ground water quality and in the contaminated ground water area resulting from source term (tailings) removal. (ii) Water level monitoring of approximately three proposed monitor wells projected to be installed in the alluvium at the processing site in September 1994. Data loggers will be installed in these wells, and water levels will be electronically monitored six times a day. These long-term, continuous ground water level data will be collected to better understand the relationship between surface and ground water at the site. Water level and water quality data eventually will be used in future ground water modeling to establish boundary conditions in the vicinity of the Grand Junction processing site. Modeling results will be used to help demonstrate and document the potential remedial alternative of natural flushing.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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161

The effects of geometry and adjacent regenerators on shell-and-tube heat exchangers in oscillating flows.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An experimental study into the effects of geometry and the presence of adjacent screens on the acoustic impedances and heat transfer performance of shell-and-tube heat (more)

Brady, John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Multiple density layered insulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

Alger, T.W.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

163

Multiple density layered insulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Multiple layer insulation cover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

Farrell, James J. (Livingston Manor, NY); Donohoe, Anthony J. (Ovid, NY)

1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

165

Fabrication and characterization of GaN junction field effect transistors  

SciTech Connect

Junction field effect transistors (JFET) were fabricated on a GaN epitaxial structure grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The DC and microwave characteristics, as well as the high temperature performance of the devices were studied. These devices exhibited excellent pinch-off and a breakdown voltage that agreed with theoretical predictions. An extrinsic transconductance (g{sub m}) of 48 mS/mm was obtained with a maximum drain current (I{sub D}) of 270 mA/mm. The microwave measurement showed an f{sub T} of 6 GHz and an f{sub max} of 12 GHz. Both the I{sub D} and the g{sub m} were found to decrease with increasing temperature, possibly due to lower electron mobility at elevated temperatures. These JFETs exhibited a significant current reduction after a high drain bias was applied, which was attributed to a partially depleted channel caused by trapped electrons in the semi-insulating GaN buffer layer.

Zhang, L.; Lester, L.F.; Baca, A.G.; Shul, R.J.; Chang, P.C.; Willison, C.L.; Mishra, U.K.; Denbaars, S.P.; Zolper, J.C.

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

166

Determination of HEat Capacity of Yucca Mountain Strtigraphic Layers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The heat generated from the radioactive waste to be placed in the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will affect the thermal-hydrology of the Yucca Mountain stratigraphic layers. In order to assess the effect of the movement of repository heat into the fractured rocks accurate determination of thermodynamic and hydraulic properties is important. Heat capacity is one of the properties that are required to evaluate energy storage in the fractured rock. Rock-grain heat capacity, the subject of this study, is the heat capacity of the solid part of the rock. Yucca Mountain consists of alternating lithostratigraphic units of welded and non-welded ash-flow tuff, mainly rhyolitic in composition and displaying varying degrees of vitrification and alteration. A number of methods exist that can be used to evaluate heat capacity of the stratigraphic layers that consist of different compositions. In this study, the mineral summation method has been used to quantify the heat capacity of the stratigraphic layers based on Kopp's rule. The mineral summation method is an addition of the weighted heat capacity of each mineral found in a specific layer. For this study the weighting was done based on the mass percentage of each mineral in the layer. The method utilized a mineralogic map of the rocks at the Yucca Mountain repository site. The Calico Hills formation and adjacent bedded tuff layers display a bimodal mineral distribution of vitric and zeolitic zones with differing mineralogies. Based on this bimodal distribution in zeolite abundance, the boundary between the vitric and zeolitic zones was selected to be 15% zeolitic abundance. Thus, based on the zeolite abundance, subdivisions have been introduced to these layers into ''vitric'' and ''zeolitic'' zones. Heat capacity values have been calculated for these layers both as ''layer average'' and ''zone average''. The heat capacity determination method presented in this report did not account for spatial variability in the horizontal direction within each layer.

T. Hadgu; C. Lum; J.E. Bean

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

167

On the Chaotic Flux Dynamics in a Long Josephson Junction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux dynamics in an annular long Josephson junction is studied. Three main topics are covered. The first is chaotic flux dynamics and its prediction via Melnikov integrals. It turns out that DC current bias cannot induce chaotic flux dynamics, while AC current bias can. The existence of a common root to the Melnikov integrals is a necessary condition for the existence of chaotic flux dynamics. The second topic is on the components of the global attractor and the bifurcation in the perturbation parameter measuring the strength of loss, bias and irregularity of the junction. The global attractor can contain co-existing local attractors e.g. a local chaotic attractor and a local regular attractor. In the infinite dimensional phase space setting, the bifurcation is very complicated. Chaotic attractors can appear and disappear in a random fashion. Three types of attractors (chaos, breather, spatially uniform and temporally periodic attractor) are identified. The third topic is ratchet effect. Ratchet effect can be achieved by a current bias field which corresponds to an asymmetric potential, in which case the flux dynamics is ever lasting chaotic. When the current bias field corresponds to a symmetric potential, the flux dynamics is often transiently chaotic, in which case the ratchet effect disappears after sufficiently long time.

Z. C. Feng; Y. Charles Li

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

Inverted GaInP/(In)GaAs/InGaAs Triple-Junction Solar Cells with Low-Stress Metamorphic Bottom Junctions: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We demonstrate high efficiency performance in two ultra-thin, Ge-free III-V semiconductor triple-junction solar cell device designs grown in an inverted configuration. Low-stress metamorphic junctions were engineered to achieve excellent photovoltaic performance with less than 3 x 106 cm-2 threading dislocations. The first design with band gaps of 1.83/1.40/1.00 eV, containing a single metamorphic junction, achieved 33.8% and 39.2% efficiencies under the standard one-sun global spectrum and concentrated direct spectrum at 131 suns, respectively. The second design with band gaps of 1.83/1.34/0.89 eV, containing two metamorphic junctions achieved 33.2% and 40.1% efficiencies under the standard one-sun global spectrum and concentrated direct spectrum at 143 suns, respectively.

Geisz, J. F.; Kurtz, S. R.; Wanlass, M. W.; Ward, J. S.; Duda, A.; Friedman, D. J.; Olson, J. M.; McMahon, W. E.; Moriarty, T. E.; Kiehl, J. T.; Romero, M. J.; Norman, A. G.; Jones, K. M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A magnetic tunnel junction based zero standby leakage current retention flip-flop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), which is a strong candidate as a next-generation memory element, has been used not only as a memory cell but also in spintronics logic because of its excellent properties of nonvolatility, no silicon area occupation, ... Keywords: magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) logic, nonvolatile flip-flop, retention flip-flop, spintronics logic

Kyungho Ryu, Jisu Kim, Jiwan Jung, Jung Pill Kim, Seung H. Kang, Seong-Ook Jung

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Performing bitwise logic operations in cache using spintronics-based magnetic tunnel junctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent exciting developments in the emerging field of spintronics have enabled rapid advances in spintronic devices such as magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). While MTJs are being primarily used as the basic devices in non-volatile memory, they have also ... Keywords: magnetic tunnel junctions, spintronic logic functions, spintronics logic in memory

Shruti Patil; David J. Lilja

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Development, characterization, and applications of high temperature superconductor nanobridge Josephson junctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A well-controlled, high-yield Josephson junction process in high temperature superconductors (HTS) is necessary for the demonstration of ultra-high-speed devices and circuits which exceed the capabilities of conventional electronics. The authors developed nanobridge Josephson junctions in high quality thin-film YBaCuO with dimensions below 100 nm fabricated using electron-beam nanolithography. They characterized this Josephson junction technology for process yield, junction parameter uniformity, and overall applicability for use in high-performance circuits. To facilitate the determination of junction parameters, they developed a measurement technique based on spectral analysis in the range of 90--160 GHz of phase-locked, oscillating arrays of up to 2,450 Josephson junctions. Because of the excellent yield and uniformity of the nanobridge junctions, they successfully applied the junction technology to a wide variety of circuits. These circuits included transmission-line pulse formers and 32 and 64-bit shift registers. The 32-bit shift register was shown to operate at clock speeds near 100 GHz and is believed to be one of the faster and more complex digital circuit demonstrated to date using high temperature superconductor technology.

Wendt, J.R.; Tigges, C.P.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martens, J.S.; Char, K.; Johansson, M.E. [Conductus, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Reconfigurable multi-function logic based on graphene P-N junctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce a novel reconfigurable graphene logic based on graphene p-n junctions. In this logic device, switching is accomplished by using co-planar split gates that modulate the properties that are unique to graphene, including ambipolar ... Keywords: device, graphene, logic gate, p-n junction, reconfigurable logic

Sansiri Tanachutiwat; Ji Ung Lee; Wei Wang; Chun Yung Sung

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Coherent electron transport through freestanding graphene junctions with metal contacts: a materials approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we highlight recent work in which we computed the spin unpolarized coherent electron transport through two terminal nanoscale graphene/metal junctions using equilibrium Green's functions coupled to Density functional theory, capturing ... Keywords: First-principles quantum transport, Graphene/metal junctions, Tight-binding method

Salvador Barraza-Lopez

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Fact Sheet, July 2001  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Grand Junction Disposal Site Grand Junction Disposal Site Uranium ore was processed at the Climax millsite at Grand Junction, Colorado, between 1951 and 1970. The milling operations created process-related waste and tailings, a sandlike material containing radioactive materials and other contaminants. The tailings were an ideal and inexpensive construction material suitable for concrete, mortar, and fill. Accordingly, the tailings were widely used in the Grand Junction area for these purposes. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) encapsulated the tailings and other contaminated materials from the millsite and more than 4,000 vicinity properties in the Grand Junction area in an engineered disposal cell. Part of the disposal cell was completed in 1994; the remainder of the cell remains open until it is

175

Dislocation Dynamics Simulations of Junctions in Hexagonal Close-Packed Crystals  

SciTech Connect

The formation and strength of dislocations in the hexagonal closed packed material beryllium are studied through dislocation junctions and the critical stress required to break them. Dislocation dynamics calculations (using the code ParaDiS) of junction maps are compared to an analytical line tension approximation in order to validate our model. Results show that the two models agree very well. Also the critical shear stress necessary to break 30{sup o} - 30{sup o} and 30{sup o} - 90{sup o} dislocation junctions is computed numerically. Yield surfaces are mapped out for these junctions to describe their stability regions as function of resolved shear stresses on the glide planes. The example of two non-coplanar binary dislocation junctions with slip planes [2-1-10] (01-10) and [-12-10] (0001) corresponding to a prismatic and basal slip respectively is chosen to verify and validate our implementation.

Wu, C; Aubry, S; Chung, P; Arsenlis, A

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

176

Research on high-efficiency, single-junction, monolithic, thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells: Phase II annual subcontract report, 1 January 1985--31 January 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of the second phase of research on high-efficiency, single-junction, monolithic, thin-film a-Si solar cells. Five glow-discharge deposition systems, including a new in-line, multichamber system, were used to grow both doped and undoped a-Si:H. A large number of silane and disilane gas cylinders were analyzed with a gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy system. Strong correlations were found between the breakdown voltage, the deposition rate, the diffusion length, and the conversion efficiency for varying cathode-anode separations in a DC glow-discharge deposition mode. Tin oxide films were grown by chemical vapor deposition with either tetramethyl tin (TMT) or tin tetrachloride (TTC). The best were grown with TMT, but TTC films had a more controlled texture for light trapping and provided a better contact to the p-layer. The best results were obtained with 7059 glass substrates. Efficiencies as high as 10.86% were obtained in p-i-n cells with superlattice p-layers and as high as 10.74% in cells with both superlattice p- and n-layers. Measurements showed that the boron-doping level in the p-layer can strongly affect transport in the i-layer, which can be minimized by reactive flushing before i-layer deposition. Stability of a-Si:H cells is improved by light doping. 51 refs., 64 figs., 21 tabs.

Carlson, D.E.; Ayra, R.R.; Bennett, M.S.; Catalano, A.; D'Aiello, R.V.; Dickson, C.R.; McVeigh, J.; Newton, J.; O'Dowd, J.; Oswald, R.S.; Rajan, K.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Effective photoelectric converters of ultraviolet radiation with graded-gap ZnS-based layers  

SciTech Connect

The use of ultrathin ({approx}10 nm) stable p-Cu{sub 1.8}S films as a transparent component of the p-Cu{sub 1.8}S-n-ZnS heterojunction as well as of the graded-gap layers made it possible to obtain effective photoconverters of ultraviolet radiation. The results of examination of the properties of photoactive Cu{sub 1.8}S-ZnS junctions grown on the CdS or CdSe substrates with intermediate graded-gap layers CdS-Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}S or CdSe-(ZnS){sub x}(CdSe){sub 1-} {sub x}, respectively, are presented. With the correct selection of parameters of the substrates, the graded-gap layers allows one to attain the optimal characteristics of the p-n junction, to realize high electric fields at the Cu{sub 1.8}S-ZnS contact, and to solve the problem of fabrication of the back ohmic contact to ZnS without additional doping of all components of the heterostructure with a foreign impurity. Varying the thickness of a thin ZnS layer, it is possible to control the extension of the space charge in the graded-gap layer and thereby to control the long-wavelength edge of photoconverter sensitivity.

Bobrenko, Yu. N.; Pavelets, S. Yu., E-mail: pavelets@voliacable.com; Pavelets, A. M. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkarev Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Structured luminescence conversion layer  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement. Large photovoltaic systems are typically developed as projects which supply electricity to a utility and are owned by independent power producers. Obtaining financing at favorable rates and attracting investors requires confidence in the projected energy yield from the plant. In this paper, various performance models for projecting annual energy yield from Concentrating Photovoltaic (CPV) systems are assessed by comparing measured system output to model predictions based on measured weather and irradiance data. The results are statistically analyzed to identify systematic error sources.

Stein, Joshua S.; Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert. (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); Sahm, Aaron (University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Crawford, Clark (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S. (Emcore, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Front contact solar cell with formed electrically conducting layers on the front side and backside  

SciTech Connect

A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by a silicon substrate and a first doped layer of a first dopant type on the backside of the solar cell. A second doped layer of a second dopant type makes an electrical connection to the substrate from the front side of the solar cell. A first metal contact of a first electrical polarity electrically connects to the first doped layer on the backside of the solar cell, and a second metal contact of a second electrical polarity electrically connects to the second doped layer on the front side of the solar cell. An external electrical circuit may be electrically connected to the first and second metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell.

Cousins, Peter John

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Layered electrode for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided an electrode structure comprising a current collector sheet and first and second layers of electrode material. Together, the layers improve catalyst utilization and water management.

Swathirajan, Swathy (West Bloomfield, MI); Mikhail, Youssef M. (Sterling Heights, MI)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Surface geology of the northern Midway-Sunset Field and adjacent Temblor Range, Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New surface mapping at a 1:12000 scale adjacent to the 2 billion barrel Midway Sunset Field has revealed complex intraformational stratigraphy within the upper Miocene Santa Margarita Formation (Tms). Locally known as the Potter and Spellacy Formations in the subsurface, these sandstone and conglomerate heavy oil reservoirs produce the majority of Midway Sunset daily production of 164,000 barrels of oil via thermal EOR processes. The Tms consists mostly of conglomerate inserted into the Belridge Diatomite (Tmb) interval. The stratigraphically lower intervals of the Tms clearly fill deeply incised valleys or submarine canyons cut into Tmb and locally into the underlying Antelope Shale (Tma). The basal intervals of Tms; are very coarse grained, containing boulders of granitic and metamorphic rock as large as 4 meters that were derived from the Salinian block west of the San Andreas Fault. The upper intervals of Tms are more sheet-like and interbedded containing clasts less than 50 cm in length. The incised valleys have a spacing of about one mile in outcrop, with a gap located in the area of the older Republic Sandstone (Tmr). Paleocurrents from Tms regionally suggest sediment transport to the northeast. The sedimentary structures of Tms suggest deposition in deep-water conditions, probably a slope (bathyal) setting. Shelf environments should have been present to the southwest (now stripped away by erosion) and submarine-fan and basin-floor environments to the northeast.

Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Sturm, D.H.; Gardiner, R.L.; Mercer, M.F. (Santa Fe Energy Resources, Bakersfield, CA (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Layered semiconductor neutron detectors  

SciTech Connect

Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

Effects of mesoscale surface inhomogeneities on atmospheric boundary layer transfer  

SciTech Connect

Defining the nature of turbulent transfer over horizontally inhomogeneous surfaces remains one of the challenges in meteorology. Because the transfer of energy and momentum through the atmospheric boundary layer forms part of the lower boundary condition for global climate models (GCMs), the problem is important. Over the last two decades, advances in sensor and computer technology wave made good point measurements of turbulent fluxes fairly routine. A fundamental question with respect to climate models, however, is how such point measurements are related to average fluxes over the area of a GCM grid box. In this paper we will use data from the field program to depict the evolution of the boundary layer over adjacent, sharply contrasting surface types on two separate occasions. We will then use simple scaling based on the observations to argue that sub-gridscale motions would often be likely to significantly alter the estimates and resulting parameterizations of GCM-scale surface fluxes in the region.

Shaw, W.J.; Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Resonant Andreev transmission in two-dimensional array of SNS junctions.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an experimental study of transport properties of a large two-dimensional array of superconductor-normal-metal-superconductor (SNS) junctions comprised of the nanopatterned superconducting film, ensuring that NS interfaces of our SNS junctions are highly transparent. We find the anomalously high charge transmission at certain applied voltages commensurate with the magnitude of the gap in superconducting islands. This indicates the nonlocal nature of the charge transfer in multiply connected SNS systems. We propose the mechanism of the correlated transmission of Cooper pairs in large arrays of SNS junctions based on the combined action of the proximity effect and the simultaneous Andreev conversion processes at many NS-interfaces.

Baturina, T. I.; Mironov, A. Yu.; Vinokur, V. M.; Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Glatz, A.; Nasimov, D. A.; Latyshev, A. V.; Materials Science Division; Inst. Semiconductor Physics; Russian Academy of Science; Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

High Efficiency Narrow Gap and Tandem Junction Devices: Final Technical Report, 1 May 2002--31 October 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work described in this report uses a modified pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique that has been successfully developed to fabricate state-of-the-art nc-Si materials and devices. Specifically, we have achieved the following benchmarks: nc SiH device with an efficiency of 8% achieved at a deposition rate of {approx}1 A/s; nc SiH device with an efficiency of 7% achieved at a deposition rate of {approx}5 A/s; large-area technology developed using pulsed PECVD with uniformity of +/-5% over 25 cm x 35 cm; devices have been fabricated in the large-area system (part of Phase 3); an innovative stable four-terminal (4-T) tandem-junction device of h> 9% fabricated. (Note that the 4-T device was fabricated with existing technology base and with further development can reach stabilized h of 12%); and with improvement in Voc {approx} 650 mV, from the current value of 480 mV can lead to stable 4-T device with h>16%. Toward this objective, modified pulsed PECVD was developed where layer- by-layer modification of nc-SiH has been achieved. (Note that due to budget cuts at NREL, this project was curtailed by about one year.)

Madan, A

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Cities Compared: Cosmopolitanism in the Mediterranean and adjacent Prof. Ulrike Freitag and Dr. Nora Lafi, Zentrum Moderner Orient (ZMO, Berlin)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cities Compared: Cosmopolitanism in the Mediterranean and adjacent regions Prof. Ulrike Freitag The object of this programme is to bring together research on cosmopolitanism in order to compare cities is to confront theories of cosmopolitanism and civil society with concrete historical urban case studies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

188

Method and Apparatus for Remote Delivery and Manipulation of a Miniature Tool Adjacent a Work Piece in a Restricted Space  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for remote delivery and manipulation of a miniature tool adjacent a work piece in a restricted space, includes a tool camer, a camage for manipulating the tool carrier relative to the work piece, a first actuator for operating the carnage, and an optional remote secondary operating actuator for operating the first actuator.

Sale, Christopher H.; Kaltenbaugh, Daniel R.

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

189

THE ENERGY CAMPUS The University of Houston is developing the Energy Research Park (ERP) on 74 acres adjacent to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ENERGY CAMPUS The University of Houston is developing the Energy Research Park (ERP) on 74 acres adjacent to I-45 as a unique campus dedicated to energy research and education. Public partnerships on one site. ENERGY TO MARKET The park's first corporate partner, SuperPower Inc., is working

Bittner, Eric R.

190

A climatology of springtime convection systems over the Northwest Gulf of Mexico and adjacent coasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Springtime (March 15-June 15) climatology of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) has been established on the basis of satellite imagery and radar reflectivities over the Northwest Gulf of Mexico and adjacent coastal areas during 1985-1994. The systems are tracked using hourly to half-hourly GOES-7 enhanced infrared satellite imagery. After tracking the storm's upper level cloud shield, radar reflectivities were used to classify the organization of convection within the MCS. The nine primary classes of convective structure were enhanced stratiform rain, embedded unorganized storms, unorganized storms, organized cells, solid line, symmetric line, asymmetric line, multiple convective bands, and embedded line. An examination was performed of the relationship between the synoptic-scale environment with the structure and evolution of these storms. Particular attention was given to synoptic-scale factors that affect convective organization. Climatological attributes such as diurnal characteristics and average durations were extracted from a documentation of more than 3@O meso-systems. Also, severe weather produced by the MCSs was examined. In addition, wind shear and thermodynamic parameters were analyzed during the initial phases of storm development. Since a climatological study has never been recorded for this region, the analysis will be informative for determining what type of interactions there are between synoptic scale forcing and mesoscale weather features in this area. Comparison with similar climatologies conducted in the Central Plains of the US was made to determine if MCS activity in a semi-tropical location was similar to that in more northern latitudes. Moreover, this radar climatology may be used as a resource in the planning of field experiments or operations concerning mesoscale weather throughout the southern portion of the US.

Hashem, Magda Sami

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Lithium implantation at low temperature in silicon for sharp buried amorphous layer formation and defect engineering  

SciTech Connect

The crystalline-to-amorphous transformation induced by lithium ion implantation at low temperature has been investigated. The resulting damage structure and its thermal evolution have been studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy channelling (RBS/C) and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Lithium low-fluence implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature is shown to produce a three layers structure: an amorphous layer surrounded by two highly damaged layers. A thermal treatment at 400 Degree-Sign C leads to the formation of a sharp amorphous/crystalline interfacial transition and defect annihilation of the front heavily damaged layer. After 600 Degree-Sign C annealing, complete recrystallization takes place and no extended defects are left. Anomalous recrystallization rate is observed with different motion velocities of the a/c interfaces and is ascribed to lithium acting as a surfactant. Moreover, the sharp buried amorphous layer is shown to be an efficient sink for interstitials impeding interstitial supersaturation and {l_brace}311{r_brace} defect formation in case of subsequent neon implantation. This study shows that lithium implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature can be suitable to form a sharp buried amorphous layer with a well-defined crystalline front layer, thus having potential applications for defects engineering in the improvement of post-implantation layers quality and for shallow junction formation.

Oliviero, E. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, Batiment 108, 91405 Orsay (France); David, M. L.; Beaufort, M. F.; Barbot, J. F. [Institut Pprime, CNRS-Universite de Poitiers-ENSMA, SP2MI, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP30179, 86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Fichtner, P. F. P. [Departamento de Metalurgia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av Bento Goncalves 9500, Caixa Postal 15051, 90035-190 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

192

Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction, Colorado, for Long-Term Radiation Variations (August 1978) Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction, Colorado, for Long-Term Radiation Variations (August 1978) Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction, Colorado, for Long-Term Radiation Variations (August 1978) Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction, Colorado, for Long-Term Radiation Variations (August 1978) More Documents & Publications Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report

193

Photo of the Week: An Express Train to Crescent Junction | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Express Train to Crescent Junction An Express Train to Crescent Junction Photo of the Week: An Express Train to Crescent Junction January 4, 2013 - 1:53pm Addthis In the 1950s, one of the largest uranium deposits in the U.S. was found near Moab, Utah. The Department of Energy began cleaning up the uranium mill tailings from the Moab Site in April 2009, using steel containers to transport more than five million tons of tailings for safe disposal near Crescent Junction, Utah. In this May 2012 photo, one of the trains is shown on the Union Pacific Railroad in Utah, passing a butte capped by a familiar southwest U.S. rock formation known as Navajo Sandstone. | Photo courtesy of the Department of Energy. In the 1950s, one of the largest uranium deposits in the U.S. was found near Moab, Utah. The Department of Energy began cleaning up the uranium

194

3-D Nano-mechanics of an Erythrocyte Junctional Comples in Equibiaxial and Anisotropic Deformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3-D Nano-mechanics of an Erythrocyte Junctional Complex inCA, 92093, USA Running title: Nano-mechanics of Erythrocytefashion. This newly predicted nano-mechanics in response to

Vera, Carlos; Skelton, Robert; Sung, Amy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Back to the crossroads of Flatbush--the junction--student housing for Brooklyn College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The crossroads of Flatbush (often called The Junction) is a five point intersection of vehicular and pedestrian traffic. A crossroad where ethnic groups step beyond subtle neighborhood boundaries and merge to use public ...

Campbell, Keith A. (Keith Anthony)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

DOE/Grand Junction Office Bluewater LTSP July 1997 Doc. No. S00012AA, Page iii  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE/Grand Junction Office Bluewater LTSP DOE/Grand Junction Office Bluewater LTSP July 1997 Doc. No. S00012AA, Page iii Contents Page 1.0 Introduction .........................................................................................................................................1 1.1 Purpose ................................................................................................................................1 1.2 Legal and Regulatory Requirements .................................................................................. 1 1.3 Role of the Department of Energy ..................................................................................... 2 1.4 Disposal of Mill Waste Containing Polychlorinated Biphenyls ........................................ 2 2.0 Bluewater Disposal Site .....................................................................................................................

197

Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Single Molecule Junctions: A Laboratory for Chemistry, Mechanics and Bond Rupture  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous measurement [1] of junction conductance and sustained force in single molecule junctions bridging metal electrodes provides a powerful tool in the quantitative study of the character of molecule-metal bonds. In this talk I will discuss three topics. First, I will describe chemical trends in link bond strength based on experiments and Density Functional Theory based calculations. Second, I will focus on the specific case of pyridine-linked junctions. Bond rupture from the high conductance junction structure shows a requires a force that exceeds the rupture force of gold point contacts and clearly indicates the role of additional forces, beyond the specific N-Au donor acceptor bond. DFT-D2 calculations with empirical addition of dispersion interactions illustrates the interplay between the donor-acceptor bonding and the non-specific van der Waals interactions between the pyridine rings and Au asperities. Third, I will describe recent efforts to characterize the diversity of junction structures realized in break-junction experiments with suitable models for the potential surfaces that are observed. [1] Venkataraman Group, Columbia University.

Hybertsen M. S.

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

199

Method and apparatus for reducing sample dispersion in turns and junctions of microchannel systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The performance of microchannel devices is improved by providing turns, wyes, tees, and other junctions that produce little dispersions of a sample as it traverses the turn or junction. The reduced dispersion results from contraction and expansion regions that reduce the cross-sectional area over some portion of the turn or junction. By carefully designing the geometries of these regions, sample dispersion in turns and junctions is reduced to levels comparable to the effects of ordinary diffusion. A numerical algorithm was employed to evolve low-dispersion geometries by computing the electric or pressure field within candidate configurations, sample transport through the turn or junction, and the overall effective dispersion. These devices should greatly increase flexibility in the design of microchannel devices by permitting the use of turns and junctions that do not induce large sample dispersion. In particular, the ability to fold electrophoretic and electrochrornatographic separation columns will allow dramatic improvements in the miniaturization of these devices. The low-lispersion devices are particularly suited to electrochromatographic and electrophoretic separations, as well as pressure-driven chromatographic separation. They are further applicable to microfluidic systems employing either electroosrnotic or pressure-driven flows for sample transport, reaction, mixing, dilution or synthesis.

Griffiths, Stewart K. (Danville, CA); Nilson, Robert H. (Cardiff-by-the-Sea, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ion transport and structure of layer-by-layer assemblies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Layer-by-layer (LbL) films of various architectures were examined as potential solid state electrolytes for electrochemical systems (e.g. batteries and fuel cells). The relationship between materials properties and ion ...

Lutkenhaus, Jodie Lee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Layer-by-layer assembly in confined geometries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental nature of layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly in confined geometries was investigated for a number of different chemical systems. The first part of this thesis concerns the modification of microfluidic and ...

DeRocher, Jonathan P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Engineering electroresponsive layer-by-layer thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electroresponsive layer-by-layer (LbL) polymer films and polymer nanocomposite films were investigated as model systems for electrically triggered drug delivery applications and "mechanomutable" surface coating applications. ...

Schmidt, Daniel J., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Role of Amorphous Silicon and Tunneling in Heterojunction with Intrinsic Thin Layer (HIT) Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work analyzes heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) solar cells using numerical simulations. The differences between the device physics of cells with p- and n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers are substantial. HIT solar cells with n-type wafers essentially form a n/p/n structure, where tunneling across the junction heterointerfaces is a critical transport mechanism required to attain performance exceeding 20%. For HIT cells with p-type wafers, only tunneling at the back-contact barrier may be important. For p-wafer cells, the hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) between the indium tin oxide (ITO) and crystalline silicon may act as a passivating buffer layer but, otherwise, does not significantly contribute to device performance. For n-wafer cells, the carrier concentration and band alignment of this a-Si:H layer are critical to device performance.

Kanevce, A.; Metzger, W. K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Investigation of Junction Properties of CdS/CdTe Solar Cells and their Correlation to Device Properties (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Junction Studies are: (1) understand the nature of the junction in the CdTe/CdS device; (2) correlate the device fabrication parameters to the junction formation; and (3) develop a self consistent device model to explain the device properties. Detailed analysis of CdS/CdTe and SnO{sub 2}/CdTe devices prepared using CSS CdTe is discussed.

Dhere, R. G.; Zhang, Y.; Romero, M. J.; Asher, S. E.; Young, M.; To, B.; Noufi, R.; Gessert, T. A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 5 Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication:Carotenoids and Retinoids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 5 Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication:Carotenoids and Retinoids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

206

Junction Evolution During Fabrication of CdS/CdTe Thin-film PV Solar Cells (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussion of the formation of CdTe thin-film PV junctions and optimization of CdTe thin-film PV solar cells.

Gessert, T. A.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Laser processing technique for fabricating series-connected and tandem junction series-connected solar cells into a solar battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating series-connected and tandem junction series-connected solar cells into a solar battery with laser scribing.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Method of junction formation for CIGS photovoltaic devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sulfur is used to improve the performance of CIGS devices prepared by the evaporation of a single source ZIS type compound to form a buffer layer on the CIGS. The sulfur may be evaporated, or contained in the ZIS type material, or both. Vacuum evaporation apparatus of many types useful in the practice of the invention are known in the art. Other methods of delivery, such as sputtering, or application of a thiourea solution, may be substituted for evaporation.

Delahoy, Alan E. (Rocky Hill, NJ)

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

209

DOE/EA-1312: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) (September 1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) Final September 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site DOE Grand Junction Office Page ii Final September 1999 Contents Executive Summary.........................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction...............................................................................................................................1 1.1 Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site Location and Description.........................................1

210

Photocurrent Generation in Layer-By-Layer Assembled Dendrimers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photocurrent Generation in Layer-By-Layer Assembled Dendrimers with Photocurrent Generation in Layer-By-Layer Assembled Dendrimers with Ruthenium Tris-bipyridine Peripheral Groups and a Viologen-like Core Manal Abi Saab, Rouba Abdel-Malak, James F. Wishart, and Tarek H. Ghaddar Langmuir 23, 10807-10815 (2007). [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: The photophysical and photoelectrochemical properties of first- and second-generation dendrimers with ruthenium tris-bipyridine peripheral groups and a tri-viologen like core (Ru3V3 and Ru6V3) were investigated in solution and when embedded within assembled films. The stepwise assembly of these dendrimers on quartz and ITO surfaces utilizing the layer-by-layer approach was investigated. The amount of the assembled dendrimers was found to increase on going to the higher generation dendrimer. This dendrimer

211

UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1, Version 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This water sampling and analysis plan describes the planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the Grand Junction US DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site (GRJ-01) in Grand Junction, Colorado, and at the Cheney Disposal Site (GRJ-03) near Grand Junction. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for the routine monitoring stations at the sites. Regulatory basis is in the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA ground water quality standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). This plan summarizes results of past water sampling activities, details water sampling activities planned for the next 2 years, and projects sampling activities for the next 5 years.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A theoretical investigation of ferromagnetic tunnel junctions with 4-valued conductances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In considering a novel function in ferromagnetic tunnel junctions consisting of ferromagnet(FM)/barrier/FM junctions, we theoretically investigate multiple valued (or multi-level) cell property, which is in principle realized by sensing conductances of four states recorded with magnetization configurations of two FMs; that is, (up,up), (up,down), (down,up), (down,down). To obtain such 4-valued conductances, we propose FM1/spin-polarized barrier/FM2 junctions, where the FM1 and FM2 are different ferromagnets, and the barrier has spin dependence. The proposed idea is applied to the case of the barrier having localized spins. Assuming that all the localized spins are pinned parallel to magnetization axes of the FM1 and FM2, 4-valued conductances are explicitly obtained for the case of many localized spins. Furthermore, objectives for an ideal spin-polarized barrier are discussed.

Satoshi Kokado; Kikuo Harigaya

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project, final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 36 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also is the remedial action contractor. Building 36 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1996. The soil beneath the building was remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

Widdop, M.R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-junction solar cell is described having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of ''pinning'' the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14[+-]0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap. 7 figures.

Wanlass, M.W.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

215

Evaluation of power production from the solar electric generating systems at Kramer Junction: 1988 to 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The five Solar Electric Generating Systems (SEGS) at Kramer Junction, California, now have nearly 30 years of cumulative operating experience. These 30 MW plants employ parabolic trough technology originally deployed by LUZ International in the late 1980`s and are now managed, operated and maintained by the Kramer Junction Company. In this paper, Sandia National Laboratories performed an analysis of the annual energy production from the five plants. Annual solar-to-electric conversion efficiencies are calculated and the major factors that influenced the results are presented. The generally good efficiencies are primarily attributed to the excellent equipment availabilities achieved at all plants.

Kolb, G.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Apparatus and methods for impingement cooling of an undercut region adjacent a side wall of a turbine nozzle segment  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The inturned flange has a plurality of apertures for directing cooling steam to cool the side wall between adjacent nozzle segments.

Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effect of Front-Side Silver Metallization on Underlying n+-p Junction in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the effect of front-side Ag metallization on the underlying n+-p junction of multicrystalline Si solar cells. The junction quality beneath the contacts was investigated by characterizing the uniformities of the electrostatic potential and doping concentration across the junction, using scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. We investigated cells with a commercial Ag paste (DuPont PV159) and fired at furnace setting temperatures of 800 degrees, 840 degrees, and 930 degrees C, which results in actual cell temperatures ~100 degrees C lower than the setting temperature and the three cells being under-, optimal-, and over-fired. We found that the uniformity of the junction beneath the Ag contact was significantly degraded by the over-firing, whereas the junction retained good uniformity with the optimal- and under-fire temperatures. Further, Ag crystallites with widely distributed sizes from <100 nm to several ?m were found at the Ag/Si interface of the over-fired cell. Large crystallites were imaged as protrusions into Si deeper than the junction depth. However, the junction was not broken down; instead, it was reformed on the entire front of the crystallite/Si interface. We propose a mechanism of the junction-quality degradation, based on emitter Si melting at the temperature around the Ag-Si eutectic point during firing, and subsequent recrystallization with incorporation of impurities in the Ag paste and with formation of crystallographic defects during quenching.

Jiang, C. S.; Li, Z. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; Liang, L.; Ionkin, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

O' Brien, Dennis P. (Maplewood, MN); Schmoeckel, Alison K. (Stillwater, MN); Vernstrom, George D. (Cottage Grove, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Wood, Thomas E. (Stillwater, MN); Yang, Ruizhi (Halifax, CA); Easton, E. Bradley (Halifax, CA); Dahn, Jeffrey R. (Hubley, CA); O' Neill, David G. (Lake Elmo, MN)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

219

DOE/EA-1338: Finding of No Significant Impact Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Project Office To Non-DOE Ownership (04/25/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 F I N A L Environmental Assessment for the Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office to Non-DOE Ownership April 2000 U.S. Department of Energy * Grand Junction Office * 2597 B ¾ Road * Grand Junction, CO 81503 Grand Junction Office Environmental Assessment Final DOE/EA-1338 FINAL Environmental Assessment for the Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office to Non-DOE Ownership April 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office 2597 B ¾ Road Grand Junction, CO 81503 Grand Junction Office Environmental Assessment Final i April 2000 TABLE OF CONTENTS Title Page Table of Contents ......................................................................................................................................... i List of Figures ............................................................................................................................................iii

220

Multijunction photovoltaic device and fabrication method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multijunction photovoltaic device includes first and second amorphous silicon PIN photovoltaic cells in a stacked arrangement. An interface layer, composed of a doped silicon compound, is disposed between the two cells and has a lower bandgap than the respective n- and p-type adjacent layers of the first and second cells. The interface layer forms an ohmic contact with the one or the adjacent cell layers of the same conductivity type, and a tunnel junction with the other of the adjacent cell layers. The disclosed device is fabricated by a glow discharge process.

Arya, Rajeewa R. (Jamison, PA); Catalano, Anthony W. (Furlong, PA)

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

White River Junction, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6489596°, -72.3192579° 6489596°, -72.3192579° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.6489596,"lon":-72.3192579,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

222

Apache Junction, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3.4150485°, -111.5495777° 3.4150485°, -111.5495777° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.4150485,"lon":-111.5495777,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

223

A solvable model for scattering on a junction and a modified analytic perturbation procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a one-body spin-less electron spectral problem for a resonance scattering system constructed of a quantum well weakly connected to a noncompact exterior reservoir, where the electron is free. The simplest kind of the resonance scattering system is a quantum network, with the reservoir composed of few disjoint cylindrical quantum wires, and the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation on the network, with the real bounded potential on the wells and constant potential on the wires. We propose a Dirichlet-to-Neumann - based analysis to reveal the resonance nature of conductance across the star-shaped element of the network (a junction), derive an approximate formula for the scattering matrix of the junction, construct a fitted zero-range solvable model of the junction and interpret a phenomenological parameter arising in Datta-Das Sarma boundary condition, see {\\cite{DattaAPL}, for T-junctions. We also propose using of the fitted zero-range solvable model as the first step in a modified analytic perturbation procedure of calculation of the corresponding scattering matrix.

B. Pavlov

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

224

Silicon Solar Cells with Front Hetero-Contact and Aluminum Alloy Back Junction: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We prototype an alternative n-type monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell structure that utilizes an n/i-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) front hetero-contact and a back p-n junction formed by alloying aluminum (Al) with the n-type Si wafer.

Yuan, H.-C.; Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; Roybal, L.; Wang, Q.; Branz, H. M.; Meier, D. L.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Bottom-up superconducting and Josephson junction devices inside a Group-IV semiconductor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose superconducting devices made from precision hole-doped regions within a silicon (or germanium) single crystal. We analyze the properties of this superconducting semiconductor and show that practical superconducting wires, Josephson tunnel junctions or weak links, SQUIDs, and qubits are realizable. This work motivates the pursuit of bottom-up superconductivity for improved or fundamentally different technology and physics.

Yun-Pil Shim; Charles Tahan

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Transport through quantum spin Hall insulator/metal junctions in graphene ribbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum spin Hall insulator/metal interfaces are formed in graphene ribbons with intrinsic spin-orbit coupling by selectively doping two regions creating a potential step. For a clean graphene ribbon, the transmission of the topological edge states through ... Keywords: Graphene ribbons, Quantum spin Hall effect, Quantum transport, pn Junctions

Elsa Prada, Georgo Metalidis

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Reliable Formation of Single Molecule Junctions with Air-Stable Diphenylphosphine Linkers  

SciTech Connect

We measure the conductance of single Au-molecule-Au junctions with a series of air-stable diphenylphosphine-terminated molecules using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break junction technique. Thousands of conductance versus displacement traces collected for each molecule are used to statistically analyze junction conductance and evolution upon elongation. Measured conductances for a series of alkane-based molecules exhibit an exponential decrease with increasing length, as expected for saturated molecules, with a tunneling decay constant of 0.98 {+-} 0.04. Measurements of junction elongation indicate strong metal-molecule binding, with a length that increases with the number of methylene groups in the backbone. Measured conductance histograms for four molecules with short, unsaturated backbones (e.g., benzene) are much broader with less well-defined peaks. These measurements are supported by density function theory calculations. The phosphine binds selectively to under-coordinated gold atoms through a donor-acceptor bond with a binding energy of about 1 eV. The calculated tunnel coupling correlates very well with experiment.

Parameswaran, R.; Hybertsen, M.; Widawsky, J.R.; Vzquez H.; Park, Y.S.; Boardman, B.M.; Nuckolls, C.; Steigerwald, M.L.; Venkataraman, L.

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. Part I. Gravity survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1980 and 1981 a total of 569 new gravity stations were taken in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. The new stations were combined with 530 other gravity stations taken in previous surveys which resulted in a compilation of 1099 stations which were used in this study. The additional surveys were undertaken to assist in the evaluation of the area for the possible development of geothermal resources by providing an interpreted structural framework by delineating faults, structural trends, intrusions, thickness of valley fill, and increased density of host rock. The gravity data are presented as (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a 2 mgal contour interval on a scale of 1:100,000 and (2) five generally east-trending gravity profiles. A geologic interpretation of the study area was made from the gravity map and from the interpretive geologic cross sections which were modeled along the gravity profiles.

Davis, D.A.; Cook, K.L.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Effects of low-temperature postannealing on a n{sup +}-p shallow junction fabricated by plasma doping  

SciTech Connect

A low-temperature activation annealing process following plasma doping (PLAD) was investigated. A dramatic reduction of sheet resistance R{sub s} occurred in the postactivation annealing temperature range of 400 deg. C-480 deg. C after PLAD. The R{sub s} of 30 {omega}/sq. and the junction depth X{sub j} of 30 nm was obtained without the additional diffusion of a dopant from the postactivation annealing in the fabricated junction. The electrical characteristics of a n{sup +}-p junction diode fabricated by PLAD were also improved after low-temperature postannealing.

Im, Kiju; Baek, Sungkweon; Hwang, Hyunsang; Ahn, Chang-Geun; Yang, Jong-Heon; Baek, In-Bok; Lee, Seongjae; Cho, Won-ju [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryongdong, Buk-gu, Gwangju, 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Nanoelectric Devices Team, Future Technology Research Division, ETRI, 161 Gajeong-dong, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Semiconductors and New Materials, College of Electronics and Information, Kwangwoon University, 447-1 Wolgye-Dong, Nowon-Gu, 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2005-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

230

The Subinertial Mixed Layer Approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The density of the mixed layer is approximately uniform in the vertical but has dynamically important horizontal gradients. These nonuniformities in density result in a vertically sheared horizontal pressure gradient. Subinertial motions balance ...

W. R. Young

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Density Coordinate Mixed Layer Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of mixed layer models in so-called density coordinates is discussed. Density coordinates, or isopycnal coordinates as they are sometimes called, are becoming increasingly popular for use in ocean models due to their highly ...

William K. Dewar

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Modeling the Benthic Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A second-order turbulence closure model is used to study the development of the benthic boundary layer. Results are presented on the effects of a time-dependent oscillatory forcing flow and an initially stably stratified density gradient. Using ...

K. J. Richards

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Mixed Layer Instabilities and Restratification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The restratification of the oceanic surface mixed layer that results from lateral gradients in the surface density field is studied. The lateral gradients are shown to be unstable to ageostrophic baroclinic instabilities and slump from the ...

Giulio Boccaletti; Raffaele Ferrari; Baylor Fox-Kemper

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes  

SciTech Connect

In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations within the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moveover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discuses some initial findings from those campaigns.

Doran, J.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Barnes, F.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Coulter, R.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Crawford, T.L. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes  

SciTech Connect

In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moreover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations? To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discusses some initial findings from those campaigns.

Doran, J.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Barnes, F.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coulter, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Crawford, T.L. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes  

SciTech Connect

In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations within the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moveover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations? To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discuses some initial findings from those campaigns.

Doran, J.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Barnes, F.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coulter, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Crawford, T.L. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes  

SciTech Connect

In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moreover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discusses some initial findings from those campaigns.

Doran, J.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Barnes, F.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Coulter, R.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Crawford, T.L. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hole in the ozone layer?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hole in the ozone layer? Hole in the ozone layer? Name: Kelley Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is there really a hole in the ozone layer? Replies: That depends on what one means by a "hole". There is a thinning of the layer that is particularly severe during certain seasons at the poles. But the ozone layer is thinning most everywhere. The thinning around the south pole of earth is particularly stunning, and has been referred to as a hole even though some ozone still exists there, it is much less concentrated. As you may know, this ozone destruction is probably due to human release of pollutants such as clorofluorocarbons (CFCs) an due to natural sources such as chemicals from volcanic eruptions. CFCs are used is cooling systems such as refrigerators and air conditioning. There is an international agreement to phase out the use of these destructive chemicals but they won't be banned entirely for years for fears of losing money. Meanwhile the ozone layer thins and we are exposed to increasingly higher doses of cancer causing radiation

239

High Efficiency Triple-Junction Amorphous Silicon Alloy Photovoltaic Technology, Final Technical Report, 6 March 1998 - 15 October 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the research program intended to expand, enhance, and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for developing high-performance, two-terminal multijunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) alloy cells, and modules with low manufacturing cost and high reliability. United Solar uses a spectrum-splitting, triple-junction cell structure. The top cell uses an amorphous silicon alloy of {approx}1.8-eV bandgap to absorb blue photons. The middle cell uses an amorphous silicon germanium alloy ({approx}20% germanium) of {approx}1.6-eV bandgap to capture green photons. The bottom cell has {approx}40% germanium to reduce the bandgap to {approx}1.4-eV to capture red photons. The cells are deposited on a stainless-steel substrate with a predeposited silver/zinc oxide back reflector to facilitate light-trapping. A thin layer of antireflection coating is applied to the top of the cell to reduce reflection loss. The major research activities conducted under this program were: (1) Fundamental studies to improve our understanding of materials and devices; the work included developing and analyzing a-Si alloy and a-SiGe alloy materials prepared near the threshold of amorphous-to-microcrystalline transition and studying solar cells fabricated using these materials. (2) Deposition of small-area cells using a radio-frequency technique to obtain higher deposition rates. (3) Deposition of small-area cells using a modified very high frequency technique to obtain higher deposition rates. (4) Large-area cell research to obtain the highest module efficiency. (5) Optimization of solar cells and modules fabricated using production parameters in a large-area reactor.

Guha, S.

2001-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

240

US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 52 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Building 52 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1994. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

Krabacher, J.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

U.S. Department of Energy at Grand Junction 2003 Annual Inspection⎯Monticello, Utah  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

at Grand Junction 2003 Annual Inspection⎯Monticello, Utah at Grand Junction 2003 Annual Inspection⎯Monticello, Utah November 2003 Page 1 2003 Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites Summary The Monticello site, which includes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties site, was inspected September 23-25, 2003. A follow-up inspection of the Soil and Sediment properties was conducted on October 8, 2003. The Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties site is also called the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) and will be referred to as MVP in this report. Restoration work at MVP is complete and is nearly complete at MMTS. MVP is in good

242

Magnetism of Semiconductor-Based Magnetic Tunnel Junctions under Electric Field from First Principles  

SciTech Connect

Semiconductor magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), composed of diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) sandwiching a semiconductor barrier, have potential applications in spintronics but their development has been slow due to the difficulty of controlling the magnetism of DMSs. In terms of density functional calculations for model semiconductor MTJs, (Zn,Co)O/ZnO/(Zn,Co)O and (Ga,Mn)N/GaN/(Ga,Mn)N, we show that the magnetic coupling between the transition metal ions in each DMS electrode of such semiconductor MTJs can be switched from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic, or vice versa, under the application of external electric field across the junctions. Our results suggest a possible avenue for the application of semiconductor MTJs.

Kan, E.; Xiang, H.; Yang, J.; Whangbo, M. H.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Reliable transport through a microfabricated X-junction surface-electrode ion trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a microfabricated surface-electrode ion trap that supports controlled transport through the two-dimensional intersection of linear trapping zones arranged in a ninety-degree cross. The trap is fabricated with very-large-scalable-integration (VLSI) techniques which are compatible with scaling to a larger quantum information processor. The shape of the radio-frequency (RF) electrodes is optimized with a genetic algorithm to minimize axial pseudopotential barriers and to minimize ion heating during transport. Seventy-eight independent DC control electrodes enable fine control of the trapping potentials. We demonstrate reliable ion transport between junction legs, trapping of ion chains with nearly-equal spacing in one of the trap's linear sections, and merging and splitting ions from these chains. Doppler-cooled ions survive more than 10^5 round-trip transits between junction legs without loss and more than sixty-five consecutive round trips without laser cooling.

Kenneth Wright; Jason M. Amini; Daniel L. Faircloth; Curtis Volin; S. Charles Doret; Harley Hayden; C. -S. Pai; David W. Landgren; Douglas Denison; Tyler Killian; Richart E. Slusher; Alexa W. Harter

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

244

Low-cost process for P-N junction-type solar cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spray pyrolysis of CuInS/sub 2/ was studied. The concentrations of copper and sulfur in the spray solutions were increased so as to increase the copper content of the films to the stoichiometric level. Although Auger analysis indicates that this was successful, x ray microanalysis has identified the growth of copper-rich crystals on the surfaces of the deposit. Heat treatment in H/sub 2/S did not improve the stoichiometry. The copper-rich crystals were also found on a sample sprayed from a solution with no excess copper. Heterojunctions of glass/SnO/sub 2/(Sb)/CdS/CdTe/carbon(Cu)/Ag-In were prepared with a number of methods used to restrict the junction. The various devices failed to exhibit a diode characteristic or a photo-response. Work on this project is being directed toward understanding the type of junction and how it is formed.

Mooney, J.B.; Cubicciotti, D.D.; Bates, C.W. Jr.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

First-principles study of the critical thickness in asymmetric ferroelectric tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The absent critical thickness of fully relaxed asymmetric ferroelectric tunnel junctions is investigated by first-principles calculations. The results show that PbTiO{sub 3} thin film between Pt and SrRuO{sub 3} electrodes can still retain a significant and stable polarization down to thicknesses as small as 0.8 nm, quite unlike the case of symmetric ferroelectric tunnel junctions. We trace this surprising result to the generation of a large electric field by the charge transfer between the electrodes caused by their different electronic environments, which acts against the depolarization field and enhances the ferroelectricity, leading to the reduction, or even complete elimination, for the critical thickness.

Cai Mengqiu [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); School of Physics and Microelectronics Science, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510275, Guangdong (China); Du Yong; Huang Boyun [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon-supported metal catalysts are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis. In this paper, we report a novel method to deposit metal catalysts and metal oxide nanoparticles on two-dimensional graphene sheets to improve the catalytic performance and stability of the catalyst materials. The new synthesis method allows indium tin oxide (ITO) nanocrystals to be directly grown on functionalized graphene sheets forming the ITO-graphene hybrids. Pt nanoparticles are then deposited to form a special triple-junction structure (Pt-ITO-graphene). Both experimental study and periodic density functional theory calculations show that the supported Pt nanoparticles are stable at Pt-ITO-graphene triple junction points. The new catalyst materials were tested for oxygen reduction for potential applications in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, and they exhibited greatly enhanced stability and activity. The reasons for the high stability and activity of Pt-ITO-graphene are analyzed.

Kou, Rong; Shao, Yuyan; Mei, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Wang, Chong M.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Park, Seh K.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

247

Development and fabrication of a solar cell junction processing system. Quarterly progress report No. 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic objectives of the program are the following: (1) to design, develop, construct and deliver a junction processing system which will be capable of producing solar cell junctions by means of ion implantation followed by pulsed electron beam annealing; (2) to include in the system a wafer transport mechanism capable of transferring 4-inch-diameter wafers into and out of the vacuum chamber where the ion implantation and pulsed electron beam annealing processes take place; (3) to integrate, test and demonstrate the system prior to its delivery to JPL along with detailed operating and maintenance manuals; and (4) to estimate component lifetimes and costs, as necessary for the contract, for the performance of comprehensive analyses in accordance with the Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Costing Standards (SAMICS). Progress is reported. (WHK)

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A quantum optical diode in a nonlinear-linear resonators junction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electronic diodes, which enable the rectification of an electrical energy flux, have played a crucial role in the development of current microelectronics after the invention of semiconductor p-n junctions. Analogously, creating complete optical rectification at specific target wavelengths has recently become a key goal in optical communication and signal processing on-chip. Here we propose a genuinely quantum optical diode, designed as a universal quantum nonlinear device working as a valve for photonic transport at the single or few photons level. The essential rectifying features are demonstrated in a general model of a nonlinear-linear junction of coupled resonators. It is shown that such a surprisingly simple structure behaves as a single- or two-photon rectifier, depending on the input frequency. Given the relevance of non-reciprocal operations in integrated circuits, the quantum optical diode realizes a crucial building component in prospective quantum photonic applications.

Eduardo Mascarenhas; Daniel Valente; Simone Montangero; Alexia Auffeves; Dario Gerace; M. Franca Santos

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

249

Microphysical Structure of the Marine Boundary Layer under Strong Wind and Spray Formation as Seen from Simulations Using a 2D Explicit Microphysical Model. Part II: The Role of Sea Spray  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of sea spray on the thermodynamics and microphysical structure of the lowest 400-m layer under strong wind speeds is investigated using a 2D hybrid LagrangianEulerian model with spectral bin microphysics. A large number of adjacent and ...

J. Shpund; J. A. Zhang; M. Pinsky; A. Khain

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Water Uptake in PEMFC Catalyst Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Uptake in PEMFC Catalyst Layers H. P. Gunterman, a A.membrane fuel-cell catalyst layers are characterized in thecurves indicate that the catalyst layers tested are highly

Gunterman, Haluna P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Large-Eddy Boundary Layer Entrainment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of large-eddy simulations have been performed to explore boundary layer entrainment under conditions of a strongly capped inversion layer with the boundary layer dynamics driven dominantly by buoyant forcing. Different conditions ...

D. C. Lewellen; W. S. Lewellen

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Exploring the potential of layered BRDF models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key advantage of using layered BRDFs over traditional, more general shading-language constructs is that the automatic result is highly plausible. This course is a survey of the considerable potential of layered surface models. On a simple layered ...

Andrea Weidlich; Alexander Wilkie

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Scaling Turbulent Dissipation in the Transition Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from three midlatitude, month-long surveys are examined for evidence of enhanced vertical mixing associated with the transition layer (TL), here defined as the strongly stratified layer that exists between the well mixed layer and the ...

Oliver M. Sun; Steven R. Jayne; Kurt L. Polzin; Bryan A. Rahter; Louis C. St. Laurent

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Vertical Structure of the Tropical Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obsemations presented show that the undisturbed subcloud layer near the ITCZ resembles that of the trades. Mixed and transition layers are also seen between cloud drafts during disturbed periods when shallow mixed layers (200 m) can persist for ...

Dayid R. Fitzjarrald; Michael Garstang

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Stratification Effects in a Bottom Ekman Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stratified bottom Ekman layer over a nonsloping, rough surface is studied using a three-dimensional unsteady large eddy simulation to examine the effects of an outer layer stratification on the boundary layer structure. When the flow field is ...

John R. Taylor; Sutanu Sarkar

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Wind and Temperature Profiles in the Radix Layer: The Bottom Fifth of the Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the middle of the convective atmospheric boundary layer is often a deep layer of vertically uniform wind speed (MUL), wind direction, and potential temperature (?UL). A radix layer is identified as the whole region below this uniform layer, ...

Edi Santoso; Roland Stull

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Grand Junction, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This site observational work plan (SOWP) is one of the first Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement. This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The US Department of Energy (DOE) goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards. The conceptual model demonstrates that the uranium processing-related contamination at the site has affected the unconfined alluvial aquifer, but not the deeper confined aquifer.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 19 at the Grand Junction Office Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 19 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 11 at the Grand Junction Office Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 11 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 29 at the Grand Junction Office Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailing during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 29 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Competition between cotunneling, Kondo effect, and direct tunneling in discontinuous high-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The transition between Kondo and Coulomb blockade effects in discontinuous double magnetic tunnel junctions is explored as a function of the size of the CoPt magnetic clusters embedded between AlO{sub x} tunnel barriers. A gradual competition between cotunneling enhancement of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and the TMR suppression due to the Kondo effect has been found in these junctions, with both effects having been found to coexist even in the same sample. It is possible to tune between these two states with temperature (at a temperature far below the cluster blocking temperature). In addition, when further decreasing the size of the CoPt clusters, another gradual transition between the Kondo effect and direct tunneling between the electrodes takes place. This second transition shows that the spin-flip processes found in junctions with impurities in the barrier are in fact due to the Kondo effect. A simple theoretical model able to account for these experimental results is proposed.

Ciudad D.; Arena D.; We, Z.-C.; Hindmarch, A.T.; Negusse, E.; Han, X.-F.Han; Marrows, C.H.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus_minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker`s theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

Mears, C.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

Mears, C.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

An epidermal plakin that integrates actin and microtubule networks at cellular junctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Plakins are cytoskeletal linker proteins initially thought to interact exclusively with intermediate filaments (IFs), but recently were found to associate additionally with actin and microtubule networks. Here, we report on ACF7, a mammalian orthologue of the Drosophila kakapo plakin genetically involved in epidermalmuscle adhesion and neuromuscular junctions. While ACF7/kakapo is divergent from other plakins in its IF-binding domain, it has at least one actin (K d ? 0.35 ?M) and one microtubule (K d ?6 ?M) binding domain. Similar to its fly counterpart, ACF7 is expressed in the epidermis. In well spread epidermal keratinocytes, ACF7 discontinuously decorates the cytoskeleton at the cell periphery, including microtubules (MTs) and actin filaments (AFs) that are aligned in parallel converging at focal contacts. Upon calcium induction of intercellular adhesion, ACF7 and the cytoskeleton reorganize at cellcell borders but with different kinetics from adherens junctions and desmosomes. Treatments with cytoskeletal depolymerizing drugs reveal that ACF7s cytoskeletal association is dependent upon the microtubule network, but ACF7 also appears to stabilize actin at sites where microtubules and microfilaments meet. We posit that ACF7 may function in microtubule dynamics to facilitate actinmicrotubule interactions at the cell periphery and to couple the microtubule network to cellular junctions. These attributes provide a clear explanation for the kakapo mutant phenotype in flies. Key words: kakapo ACF7 cytoskeleton integrins cell adhesion

Iakowos Karakesisoglou; Yanmin Yang; Elaine Fuchs

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Pi-Josephson Junction and Spontaneous Superflow in Rings from Ultracold Fermionic Atomic Gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The BCS-like pairing in ultracold fermionic atomic ($UCFAG$) gases is studied in the model of "isotopic-spin" pairing proposed in 1991 \\cite% {Ku-Hof-SSC}. This model assumes a mismatch ($\\delta $) in chemical potentials of pairing fermionic atoms. It is shown that a $\\pi $-Josephson junction can be realized in $UCFAG$ systems, where the left and right banks $% S$ are the $UCFAG$ superfluids. The weak link $M$ consists from the normal $% UCFAG$ with the finite mismatch $\\delta $. If the $\\pi $-junction is a part of a closed ring the superfluid mass-current flows spontaneously in the ring, i.e., the time-reversal symmetry is broken spontaneously. This is realized if the radius of the ring $R$ is larger than the critical one $% R_{c} $. All these effects exist also in the case when $\\delta \\gg \\Delta $, where $\\Delta $ is the superfluid gap, but with the reduced thickness of the weak link. It is also discussed, that if junctions $SM_{1}M_{2}S$ and trilayers $% M_{1}SM_{2}$ from $UCFAG$ are realizable this renders a possibility for a novel electronics - \\textit{hypertronics}.

Miodrag L. Kulic

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

266

Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing using multiple electrodes and with resistances being defined between the electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of operation are disclosed for different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information related to the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from inside the cased well. The multiple electrode apparatus have a minimum of three spaced-apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage the interior of the cased well. Measurement information is obtained related to current which is caused to flow from the cased well into the adjacent geological formation. First compensation information is obtained related to a first casing resistance between a first pair of the spaced-apart voltage measurement electrodes. Second compensation information is obtained related to a second casing resistance between a second pair of the spaced-apart voltage measurement electrodes. The measurement information, and first and second compensation information are used to determine a magnitude related to the adjacent formation resistivity. 13 figs.

Vail, W.B. III

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

267

Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing using multiple electrodes and with resistances being defined between the electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of operation of different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information related to the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from inside the cased well. The multiple electrode apparatus have a minimum of three spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage the interior of the cased well. Measurement information is obtained related to current which is caused to flow from the cased well into the adjacent geological formation. First compensation information is obtained related to a first casing resistance between a first pair of the spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes. Second compensation information is obtained related to a second casing resistance between a second pair of the spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes. The measurement information, and first and second compensation information are used to determine a magnitude related to the adjacent formation resistivity.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Water Uptake in PEMFC Catalyst Layers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Uptake in PEMFC Catalyst Layers Title Water Uptake in PEMFC Catalyst Layers Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5322E Year of Publication 2011 Authors...

269

Polymer/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites from Thermally ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... from a variety of polymers [polystyrene (PS), poly ... cap containing a 6.35-mm graphite rod counter ... 3-7-layer) tactoids with expanded layer spacings. ...

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

270

$p$-th Clustering coefficients $C_{p}$ and Adjacent Matrix for Networks: Formulation based on String  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phenomenon of six degrees of separation is an old but interesting problem. The considerations of the clustering coefficient reflecting triangular structures and its extension to square one to six degrees of separation have been made\\cite{Newm21}. Recently, Aoyama\\cite{Aoyama} has given some considerations to this problem in networks without loops, using a sort of general formalism, "string formalism". In this article, we describe relations between the string formulation proposed by Aoyama and an adjacent matrix. Thus we provided a reformulation of the string formulation proposed by \\cite{Aoyama} to analyze networks. According to it, we introduced a series of generalized $q$-$th$ clustering coefficients. The available rules between diagrams of graphs and formulae are also given based on the formulation. Next we apply the formulation to some subjects in order to mainly check consistency with former studies. By evaluating the clustering coefficient for typical networks studied well earlier, we confirm a validity of our formulation. Lastly we applied it to the subject of two degrees of separation.

Norihito Toyota

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Evaluation of fall chinook salmon spawning adjacent to the In-Situ Redox Manipulation treatability test site, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) experiment is being evaluated as a potential method to remove contaminants from groundwater adjacent to the Columbia River near the 100-D Area. The ISRM experiment involves using sodium dithionate (Na{sub 2}O{sub 6}S{sub 2}) to precipitate chromate from the groundwater. The treatment will likely create anoxic conditions in the groundwater down-gradient of the ISRM treatability test site; however, the spatial extent of this anoxic plume is not exactly known. Surveys were conducted in November 1997, following the peak spawning of fall chinook salmon. Aerial surveys documented 210 redds (spawning nests) near the downstream island in locations consistent with previous surveys. Neither aerial nor underwater surveys documented fall chinook spawning in the vicinity of the ISRM treatability test site. Based on measurements of depth, velocity, and substrate, less than 1% of the study area contained suitable fall chinook salmon spawning habitat, indicating low potential for fall chinook salmon to spawn in the vicinity of the ISRM experiment.

Mueller, R.P.; Geist, D.R.

1998-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

272

Vortex lattices in layered superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study vortex lattices in a superconductor--normal-metal superlattice in a parallel magnetic field. Distorted lattices, resulting from the shear deformations along the layers, are found to be unstable. Under field variation, nonequilibrium configurations undergo an infinite sequence of continuous transitions, typical for soft lattices. The equilibrium vortex arrangement is always a lattice of isocell triangles, without shear.

Prokic, V. (Department of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, 11001 Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Davidovic, D. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg Center, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States) Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Dobrosavljevic-Grujic, L. (Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Yugoslavia))

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Doped LZO buffer layers for laminated conductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laminated conductor includes a metallic substrate having a surface, a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the surface of the substrate, the biaxially textured buffer layer comprising LZO and a dopant for mitigating metal diffusion through the LZO, and a biaxially textured conductor layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer.

Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans (Knoxville, TN); Schoop, Urs (Westborough, MA); Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN); Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans (Westborough, MA); Verebelyi, Darren T. (Oxford, MA); Rupich, Martin W. (Framingham, MA)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

274

Path selection in multi-layer networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-layer networks are computer networks where the configuration of the network can be changed dynamically at multiple layers. However, in practice, technologies at different layers may be incompatible to each other, which necessitates a careful choice ... Keywords: Multi-layer network, Network description, Path selection

Fernando Kuipers; Freek Dijkstra

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Layered Graphene Sheets Could Solve Hydrogen Storage ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Layered Graphene Sheets Could Solve Hydrogen Storage Issues. For Immediate Release: March 16, 2010. ...

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

276

Two-Dimensional Measurement of n+-p Asymmetrical Junctions in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Using AFM-Based Electrical Techniques with Nanometer Resolution: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lateral inhomogeneities of modern solar cells demand direct electrical imaging with nanometer resolution. We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based electrical techniques provide unique junction characterizations, giving a two-dimensional determination of junction locations. Two AFM-based techniques, scanning capacitance microscopy/spectroscopy (SCM/SCS) and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), were significantly improved and applied to the junction characterizations of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells. The SCS spectra were taken pixel by pixel by precisely controlling the tip positions in the junction area. The spectra reveal distinctive features that depend closely on the position relative to the electrical junction, which allows us to indentify the electrical junction location. In addition, SKPFM directly probes the built-in potential over the junction area modified by the surface band bending, which allows us to deduce the metallurgical junction location by identifying a peak of the electric field. Our results demonstrate resolutions of 10-40 nm, depending on the techniques (SCS or SKPFM). These direct electrical measurements with nanometer resolution and intrinsic two-dimensional capability are well suited for investigating the junction distribution of solar cells with lateral inhomogeneities.

Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Li, J. V.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Heath, J. T.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney Disposal Site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Interim long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near, Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This interim long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Interconversion of dark soliton and Josephson vortex in a quasi-1D long Bose Josephson junction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dark soliton (DS) and Josephson vortex (JV) in quasi-1D long Bose Josephson junction (BJJ) can be interconverted by tuning Josephson coupling. Rates of the interconversion as well as of the thermally activated phase-slip effect, resulting in the JV switching its vorticity, have been evaluated. The role of quantum phase-slip in creating superposition of JVs with opposite vorticities as a qubit is discussed as well. Utilization of the JV for controlled and coherent transfer of atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) is suggested.

V. M. Kaurov; A. B. Kuklov

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

280

PCB usage at the Grand Junction Area Office Facility. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development, implementation, and results of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) identification project at the Grand Junction Area Office (GJAO) are summarized. Methodology for the PCB analysis is described, and results are tabulated. Of the 51 transformers and disconnects in use at GJAO, 15 unites were determined to be PCB-contaminated or filled with PCBs. This number falls within EPA's estimate of 25 to 40 percent of all transformers in use being at least contaminated. Approximately 324 gallons of PCBs and 515 gallons of PCB-contaminated fluids are being used currently. No contaminated transformers or disconnects are in a position to contaminate food or feed products at the facility.

Miller, M.E.; Donivan, S.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This visualization shows the results of the simulation of a Mach 4 flow into two cone nosed cylindrical bodies adjacent to a flat plate. The analysis was computed with a Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) code utilizing a Spalart-Allmaras Turbulent ... Keywords: CFD, blender, raytracing, scientific visualization, visit, volume rendering

Michael A. Matheson; Allan D. Grosvenor; Alexander A. Zheltovodov

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Progress on First-Principles Calculations and Experimental Results of Single-crystalline Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with MgO barriers  

SciTech Connect

Since the theoretical prediction and experimental observation of giant tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect at room temperature in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with single-crystalline MgO(001) barrier, MgO-based MTJs have been extensively studied due to their broad potential applications in spintronic devices. In this paper, progress on theoretical calculations and experimental results in MgO-based MTJs is reported. Spin-dependent electronic structure and transport properties of MgO-based MTJs, including structures of Fe(001)/MgO/Fe, Fe(001)/FeO/MgO/Fe, Fe(001)/Mg/MgO/Fe, Fe(001)/Co/MgO/Co/Fe, and Fe(001)/MgO/Fe/MgO/Fe, have been studied using the Layer-KKR first-principles method. The quantitative result not only provide a better way to understand the electronic structures and spin-dependent transport properties of MgO-based MTJs, but also shows a direction to exploit new kinds of spintronic materials with high room-temperature TMR ratio.

Wang, Y. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science; Zhang, J. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL; Wang, Shouguo [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science; Han, Xiufeng [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Nanostructured ZnO arrays with self-ZnO layer created using simple electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formation of unique ZnO nanoarrays utilizing photodynamic polymer, surface-relief grating structures, and unique electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly as a simple and economical methodology was demonstrated. Atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron ...

PilHo Huh; Seong-Cheol Kim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Layer-by-Layer Nanoparticles with a pH-Sheddable Layer for in Vivo Targeting of Tumor Hypoxia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inspired by the simplicity and versatility of layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly, we applied multilayered polyelectrolyte assemblies on nanoparticles to create viable systemic delivery systems. Focusing on tumor-specific delivery, ...

Poon, Zhiyong

285

Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO); Anderson, Ren (Broomfield, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

0.7-eV GaInAs Junction for a GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs(1-eV)/GaInAs(0.7-eV) Four-Junction Solar Cell: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction solar cells, focusing on adding a fourth junction to the Ga0.5In0.5P/GaAs/Ga0.75In0.25As inverted three-junction cell. This cell, grown inverted on GaAs so that the lattice-mismatched Ga0.75In0.25As third junction is the last one grown, has demonstrated 38% efficiency, and 40% is likely in the near future. To achieve still further gains, a lower-bandgap GaxIn1-xAs fourth junction could be added to the three-junction structure for a four-junction cell whose efficiency could exceed 45% under concentration. Here, we present the initial development of the GaxIn1-xAs fourth junction. Junctions of various bandgaps ranging from 0.88 to 0.73 eV were grown, in order to study the effect of the different amounts of lattice mismatch. At a bandgap of 0.88 eV, junctions were obtained with very encouraging {approx}80% quantum efficiency, 57% fill factor, and 0.36 eV open-circuit voltage. The device performance degrades with decreasing bandgap (i.e., increasing lattice mismatch). We model the four-junction device efficiency vs. fourth junction bandgap to show that an 0.7-eV fourth-junction bandgap, while optimal if it could be achieved in practice, is not necessary; an 0.9-eV bandgap would still permit significant gains in multijunction cell efficiency while being easier to achieve than the lower-bandgap junction.

Friedman, D. J.; Geisz, J. F.; Norman, A. G.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Grand Junction Projects Office site environmental report for calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1992 at the US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO) facility in Colorado. Environmental activities conducted at the GJPO facility during 1992 included those associated with environmental compliance, site remediation, off-site dose modeling, and radiological and nonradiological monitoring. Four phases of the on-site Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project were completed in 1992. Remediation activities, which included the removal of 161,589 tons of uranium-mill-tailings-contaminated material from the facility, were conducted in compliance with all applicable permits. Off-site dose modeling for the GJPO was conducted to determine compliance with current National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, and applicable DOE Orders (5400.1 and 5400.5). The total off-site EDE to the public from all sources of radiation emanating from the facility (radon, air particulates, gamma) was calculated as 9 mrem/yr, which is well below the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr above background. The radiological and nonradiological monitoring program at the GJPO facility included monitoring of activities that generate potentially hazardous or toxic wastes and monitoring of ambient air, surface water, and ground water.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Terahertz wave emission from intrinsic Josephson junctions in high-T{sub c} superconductors.  

SciTech Connect

Recently, we experimentally demonstrated that rectangular mesa structures of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+d} (Bi2212) can be used as a compact solid-state generator of continuous, coherent and polarized terahertz (THz) radiation. In the present work, we will exhibit tall mesas (over 600 junctions) which were fabricated using UV lithography, e-beam lithography with photoresist and e-beam lithography with a Ti selective etching technique. We will present measurements of the c-axis resistance as a function of temperature and of current-voltage characteristics of THz emitting mesas with lateral sizes ranging from 30 x 300 to 100 x 300 {micro}m{sup 2}. Furthermore, we will discuss the dependence of the characteristics of the mesa structures on the oxygen doping level of the Bi2212 crystals. We will also experimentally show that the voltage-frequency relation of the ac Josephson effect has to match the cavity resonance for successful emission.

Ozyuzer, L.; Simsek, Y.; Koseoglu, H.; Turkoglu, F.; Kurter, C.; Welp, U.; Koshelev, A. E.; Gray, K. E.; Kwok, W. K.; Yamamoto, T.; Kadowaki, K.; Koval, Y.; Wang, H. B.; Muller, P.; Materials Science Division; Izmir Inst. of Tech.; Univ. of Erlangen-Nurnberg; Univ. of Tsukuba; National Inst. for Materials Science

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

289

ZnO PN Junctions for Highly-Efficient, Low-Cost Light Emitting Diodes  

SciTech Connect

By 2015, the US Department of Energy has set as a goal the development of advanced solid state lighting technologies that are more energy efficient, longer lasting, and more cost-effective than current technology. One approach that is most attractive is to utilize light-emitting diode technologies. Although III-V compound semiconductors have been the primary focus in pursuing this objective, ZnO-based materials present some distinct advantages that could yield success in meeting this objective. As with the nitrides, ZnO is a direct bandgap semiconductor whose gap energy (3.2 eV) can be tuned from 3.0 to 4 eV with substitution of Mg for higher bandgap, Cd for lower bandgap. ZnO has an exciton binding energy of 60 meV, which is larger than that for the nitrides, indicating that it should be a superior light emitting semiconductor. Furthermore, ZnO thin films can be deposited at temperatures on the order of 400-600 C, which is significantly lower than that for the nitrides and should lead to lower manufacturing costs. It has also been demonstrated that functional ZnO electronic devices can be fabricated on inexpensive substrates, such as glass. Therefore, for the large-area photonic application of solid state lighting, ZnO holds unique potential. A significant impediment to exploiting ZnO in light-emitting applications has been the absence of effective p-type carrier doping. However, the recent realization of acceptor-doped ZnO material overcomes this impediment, opening the door to ZnO light emitting diode development In this project, the synthesis and properties of ZnO-based pn junctions for light emitting diodes was investigated. The focus was on three issues most pertinent to realizing a ZnO-based solid state lighting technology, namely (1) achieving high p-type carrier concentrations in epitaxial and polycrystalline films, (2) realizing band edge emission from pn homojunctions, and (3) investigating pn heterojunction constructs that should yield efficient light emission. The project engaged established expertise at the University of Florida in ZnO film growth (D. Norton), device fabrication (F. Ren) and wide bandgap photonics (S. Pearton). It addressed p-type doping and junction formation in (Zn,Mg)O alloy thin films. The project employed pulsed laser deposition for film growth. The p-type dopant of interest was primarily phosphorus, given the recent results in our laboratory and elsewhere that this anions can yield p-type ZnO-based materials. The role of Zn interstitials, oxygen vacancies, and/or hydrogen complexes in forming compensating shallow donor levels imposes the need to simultaneously consider the role of in situ and post-growth processing conditions. Temperature-dependent Hall, Seebeck, C-V, and resistivity measurements was used to determine conduction mechanisms, carrier type, and doping. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence was used to determine the location of the acceptor level, injection efficiency, and optical properties of the structures. X-ray diffraction will used to characterize film crystallinity. Using these materials, the fabrication and characterization of (Zn,Mg)O pn homojunction and heterojunction devices was pursued. Electrical characterization of the junction capacitance and I-V behavior was used to extract junction profile and minority carrier lifetime. Electroluminescence from biased junctions was the primary property of interest.

David P. Norton; Stephen Pearton; Fan Ren

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Monsoon Trough Boundary Layer Experiment (MONTBLEX)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Monsoon Trough Boundary Layer Experiment (MONTBLEX) is a multi-institutional, all-India coordinated program to study the atmospheric boundary-layer processes in the monsoon trough (MT) area of northern India. The experiment is being organized ...

Malti Goel; H. N. Srivastava

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers Thomasconditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of areaction of reactant gases (1). A number of strategies exist

Dursch, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

On the Background Stratospheric Aerosol Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balloonborne aerosol particle counter measurements are used in studying the stratospheric sulfate layer at Laramie, Wyoming, during 1978 and 1979, a 2-year volcanically quiescent period in which the layer appears to have been in a near ...

D. J. Hofmann; J. M. Rosen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Advanced Titanium Powder Processing - Additive Layer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Cost Affordable Titanium IV. Presentation Title, Advanced Titanium Powder Processing - Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) and Metal Injection...

294

2013 Special Issue: Solution to the inverse problem of estimating gap-junctional and inhibitory conductance in inferior olive neurons from spike trains by network model simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inferior olive (IO) possesses synaptic glomeruli, which contain dendritic spines from neighboring neurons and presynaptic terminals, many of which are inhibitory and GABAergic. Gap junctions between the spines electrically couple neighboring neurons ... Keywords: ANOVA, Cerebellum, Gap junction, Inferior olive, PCA

Miho Onizuka, Huu Hoang, Mitsuo Kawato, Isao T. Tokuda, Nicolas Schweighofer, Yuichi Katori, Kazuyuki Aihara, Eric J. Lang, Keisuke Toyama

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Real-Space Microscopic Electrical Imaging of n+-p Junction Beneath Front-Side Ag Contact of Multicrystalline Si Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the quality of the n+-p diffused junction beneath the front-side Ag contact of multicrystalline Si solar cells by characterizing the uniformities of electrostatic potential and doping concentration across the junction using the atomic force microscopy-based electrical imaging techniques of scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. We found that Ag screen-printing metallization fired at the over-fire temperature significantly degrades the junction uniformity beneath the Ag contact grid, whereas metallization at the optimal- and under-fire temperatures does not cause degradation. Ag crystallites with widely distributed sizes were found at the Ag-grid/emitter-Si interface of the over-fired cell, which is associated with the junction damage beneath the Ag grid. Large crystallites protrude into Si deeper than the junction depth. However, the junction was not broken down; instead, it was reformed on the entire front of the crystallite/Si interface. We propose a mechanism of junction-quality degradation, based on emitter Si melting at the temperature around the Ag-Si eutectic point during firing, and subsequent re-crystallization with incorporation of Ag and other impurities and with formation of crystallographic defects during quenching. The effect of this junction damage on solar cell performance is discussed.

Jiang, C. S.; Li, Z. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; Liang, L.; Ionkin, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Stability of Free Surface Ekman Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of free surface, laminar Ekman layers is examined for both the homogeneous and the two-layer case. The eigenvalues of the homogeneous case depend upon the wavenumbers ? and ? and the Reynolds number Re. Those of the two-layer case ...

George F. Spooner

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Magnetism reflectometer study shows LiF layers improve efficiency in spin valve devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New, more efficient materials for spin valves - a device used in magnetic sensors, random access memories, and hard disk drives - may be on the way based on research using the magnetism reflectometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Spin valve devices work by means of two or more conducting magnetic material layers that alternate their electrical resistance depending on the layers alignment. Giant magnetoresistance is a quantum mechanical effect first observed in thin film structures about 20 years ago. The effect is observed as a significant change in electrical resistance, depending on whether the magnetization of adjacent ferromagnetic layers is in a parallel or an antiparallel magnetic alignment. 'What we are doing here is developing new materials. The search for new materials suitable for injecting and transferring carriers with a preferential spin orientation is most important for the development of spintronics,' said Valeria Lauter, lead instrument scientist on the magnetism reflectometer at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), who collaborated on the experiment. The researchers discovered that the conductivity of such materials is improved when an organic polymer semiconductor layer is placed between the magnetic materials. Organic semiconductors are now the material of choice for future spin valve devices because they preserve spin coherence over longer times and distances than conventional semiconductors. While research into spin valves has been ongoing, research into organic semiconductors is recent. Previous research has shown that a 'conductivity mismatch' exists in spin valve systems in which ferromagnetic metal electrodes interface with such organic semiconductors as Alq3 ({pi}-conjugated molecule tris(8-hydroxy-quinoline) aluminium). This mismatch limits the efficient injection of the electrons from the electrodes at the interface with the semiconductor material. However, lithium fluoride (LiF), commonly used in light-emitting diodes, has been found to enhance the injection of electrons through the semiconductor. Researchers from the University of Alabama and ORNL used polarized neutrons at the magnetism reflectometer at SNS to investigate the electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of the electrodes in a novel system. In this system, the magnetic layers cobalt and Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} are interfaced with spacer layers composed of the organic semiconductor Alq3. A coupling layer of LiF is inserted to separate the magnetized layers from the semiconductor. 'ALQ3 is an organic semiconductor material,' said Lauter. 'Normally in these systems a first magnetic layer is grown on a hard substrate so that one can get the controlled magnetic parameters. Then you grow the organic semiconductor layer, followed by another magnetic material layer, such as cobalt.' In addition to determining the effect of the LiF layers on the efficiency of the electron injection, the researchers wanted to determine the magnetic properties of the cobalt and Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} as well as the interfacial properties: whether there is interdiffusion of cobalt through the LiF layer to the semiconductor, for example. The researchers used polarized neutrons at beam line 4A to probe the entire, layer-by-layer assembly of the system. 'Reflectometry with polarized neutrons is a perfect method to study thin magnetic films,' Lauter said. 'These thin films - if you put one on a substrate, you see it just like a mirror. However, this mirror has a very complicated internal multilayer structure. The neutrons look inside this complicated structure and characterize each and every interface. Due to the depth sensitivity of the method, we measure the structural and magnetic properties of each layer with the resolution of 0.5 nm. The neutron scattering results found that inserting LiF as a barrier significantly improves the quality of the interface, increasing the injection of electrons from the magnetic layer through the organic semiconductor in the spin valve and enhancing the overall properties of the system. In related work the magneti

Bardoel, Agatha A [ORNL; Lauter, Valeria [ORNL; Szulczewski, Greg J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Layer-by-Layer Characterization of a Model Biofuel Cell Anode by (in Situ) Vibrational Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Layer-by-Layer Characterization of a Model Biofuel Cell Anode by (in Situ) Vibrational Spectroscopy during the construction of a model biofuel cell anode. The model anode was a layered structure formedDH to the CB layer confirmed successful enzyme immobilization. 1. Introduction Biofuel cells use microorganisms

Brolo, Alexandre G.

300

Evaluation of the Performance of the PVUSA Rating Methodology Applied to Dual Junction PV Technology: Preprint (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The PVUSA (Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications) project in the 1990's developed a rating methodology for PV performance evaluation which has become popular, and even incorporated into concentrating PV rating standards This report apply that method to rack-mounted dual-junction PV system, and produces a system rating.

Myers, D. R.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Measurements and Predictions of the Heat Transfer at the Tube-Fin Junction for Louvered Fin Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the International Journal of Compact Heat Exchangers, May 2003 #12;2 Measurements and Predictions of the Heat Transfer at the Tube-Fin Junction for Louvered Fin Heat Exchangers Abstract The dominant thermal resistance for most compact heat exchangers occurs on the air side and thus a detailed understanding of air side heat

Thole, Karen A.

302

Microblock rotations and fault coupling in SE Asia triple junction (Sulawesi, Indonesia) from GPS and earthquake slip vector data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microblock rotations and fault coupling in SE Asia triple junction (Sulawesi, Indonesia) from GPS; accepted 23 May 2006; published 31 August 2006. [1] The island of Sulawesi, eastern Indonesia, is located, Indonesia) from GPS and earthquake slip vector data, J. Geophys. Res., 111, B08409, doi:10.1029/2005JB003963

Vigny, Christophe

303

Junction temperature, spectral shift, and efficiency in GaInN-based blue and green light emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords: GaInN/GaN Light emitting diode temperature Micro-Raman Photoluminescence Electroluminescence well light emitting diode (LED) dies is analyzed by micro-Raman, photoluminescence, cathodoluminescenceJunction temperature, spectral shift, and efficiency in GaInN-based blue and green light emitting

Wetzel, Christian M.

304

Evaluating In-Clique and Topological Parallelism Strategies for Junction Tree-Based Bayesian Inference Algorithm on the Cray XMT  

SciTech Connect

Long viewed as a strong statistical inference technique, Bayesian networks have emerged to be an important class of applications for high-performance computing. We have applied an architecture-conscious approach to parallelizing the Lauritzen-Spiegelhalter Junction Tree algorithm for exact inferencing in Bayesian networks. In optimizing the Junction Tree algorithm, we have implemented both in-clique and topological parallelism strategies to best leverage the fine-grained synchronization and massive-scale multithreading of the Cray XMT architecture. Two topological techniques were developed to parallelize the evidence propagation process through the Bayesian network. One technique involves performing intelligent scheduling of junction tree nodes based on its topology and relative size. The second technique involves decomposing the junction tree into a much finer tree-like representation to offer much more opportunities for parallelism. We evaluate these optimizations on five different Bayesian networks and report our findings and observations. Another important contribution of this paper is to demonstrate the application of massive-scale multithreading for load balancing and use of implicit parallelism-based compiler optimizations in designing scalable inferencing algorithms.

Chin, George; Choudhury, Sutanay; Kangas, Lars J.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Marquez, Andres

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Florence & Oracle Junction, Pinal County, AZ, RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

emergency wood pole emergency wood pole replacement at 59 structures located along the Coolidge-Oracle 115-kV T.L. , near Cooiidge, Florence & Oracle Junction, Pinal County, AZ, RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western plans to replace deteriorated wood poles, cross arms and X-braces at 59 existing H-frame or 3-pole-turning structures (Table 1) located along the Coolidge-Oracle 115-kV Transmission Line in Pinal County, Arizona (Figure 1), Built in 1943, its aging components are beyond repair and require replacement. These poles performed poorly during structural tests, and we consider them unstable, This project ensures the safety of Western's workers and the public as well as reliability of the bulk electric system, Western will accomplish the work by clearing vegetation and blading a level pad at

306

Atomistic calculation of the thermal conductance of large scale bulk-nanowire junctions  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a stable and efficient kernel method to compute thermal transport in open systems, based on the scattering-matrix approach. This method is applied to compute the thermal conductance of a junction between bulk silicon and silicon nanowires with diameter up to 10 nm. We have found that beyond a threshold diameter of 7 nm, transmission spectra and contact conductances scale with the cross section of the contact surface, whereas deviations from this general trend are observed in thinner wires. This result allows us to predict the thermal resistance of bulk-nanowire interfaces with larger cross sections than those tractable with atomistic simulations, and indicate the characteristic size beyond which atomistic systems can in principle be treated accurately by mean-field theories. Our calculations also elucidate how dimensionality reduction and shape affect interfacial heat transport.

Duchemin, Ivan; Donadio, Davide [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Current-matched, high-efficiency, multi-junction monolithic solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In this invention, the efficiency of a two-junction (cascade) tandem photovoltaic device is improved by adjusting (decreasing) the top cell thickness to achieve current matching. An example of the invention was fabricated out of Ga{sub 0.52}In{sub 0.48}P and GaAs. Additional lattice-matched systems to which the invention pertains include Al{sub x}Ga{sub l-x}/GaAs (x=0.3 {minus} 0.4), GaAs/Ge and Ga{sub y}In{sub 1-y}P/Ga{sub y+0.5}In{sub 0.5-{sub Y}} As (O

Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

1991-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

308

Characterizing the effects of silver alloying in chalcopyrite CIGS solar cells with junction capacitance methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A variety of junction capacitance-based characterization methods were used to investigate alloys of Ag into Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 photovoltaic solar cells over a broad range of compositions. These alloys show encouraging trends of increasing VOC with increasing Ag content, opening the possibility of wide-gap cells for use in tandem device applications. Drive level capacitance profiling (DLCP) has shown very low free carrier concentrations for all Ag-alloyed devices, in some cases less than 1014 cm-3, which is roughly an order of magnitude lower than that of CIGS devices. Transient photocapacitance spectroscopy has revealed very steep Urbach edges, with energies between 10 meV and 20 meV, in the Ag-alloyed samples. This is in general lower than the Urbach edges measured for standard CIGS samples and suggests a significantly lower degree of structural disorder.

Erslev, Peter T.; Hanket, Gregory M.; Shafarman, William N.; Cohen, J. David

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Multiple pass and multiple layer friction stir welding and material enhancement processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for friction stir welding, typically for comparatively thick plate materials using multiple passes and multiple layers of a friction stir welding tool. In some embodiments a first portion of a fabrication preform and a second portion of the fabrication preform are placed adjacent to each other to form a joint, and there may be a groove adjacent the joint. The joint is welded and then, where a groove exists, a filler may be disposed in the groove, and the seams between the filler and the first and second portions of the fabrication preform may be friction stir welded. In some embodiments two portions of a fabrication preform are abutted to form a joint, where the joint may, for example, be a lap joint, a bevel joint or a butt joint. In some embodiments a plurality of passes of a friction stir welding tool may be used, with some passes welding from one side of a fabrication preform and other passes welding from the other side of the fabrication preform.

Feng, Zhili (Knoxville, TN); David, Stan A. (Knoxville, TN); Frederick, David Alan (Harriman, TN)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

310

Surface tension of multi-phase flow with multiple junctions governed by the variational principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore a computational model of an incompressible fluid with a multi-phase field in three-dimensional Euclidean space. By investigating an incompressible fluid with a two-phase field geometrically, we reformulate the expression of the surface tension for the two-phase field found by Lafaurie, Nardone, Scardovelli, Zaleski and Zanetti (J. Comp. Phys. \\vol{113} \\yr{1994} \\pages{134-147}) as a variational problem related to an infinite dimensional Lie group, the volume-preserving diffeomorphism. The variational principle to the action integral with the surface energy reproduces their Euler equation of the two-phase field with the surface tension. Since the surface energy of multiple interfaces even with singularities is not difficult to be evaluated in general and the variational formulation works for every action integral, the new formulation enables us to extend their expression to that of a multi-phase ($N$-phase, $N\\ge2$) flow and to obtain a novel Euler equation with the surface tension of the multi-phase field. The obtained Euler equation governs the equation of motion of the multi-phase field with different surface tension coefficients without any difficulties for the singularities at multiple junctions. In other words, we unify the theory of multi-phase fields which express low dimensional interface geometry and the theory of the incompressible fluid dynamics on the infinite dimensional geometry as a variational problem. We apply the equation to the contact angle problems at triple junctions. We computed the fluid dynamics for a two-phase field with a wall numerically and show the numerical computational results that for given surface tension coefficients, the contact angles are generated by the surface tension as results of balances of the kinematic energy and the surface energy.

Shigeki Matsutani; Kota Nakano; Katsuhiko Shinjo

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nanomanufacturing : nano-structured materials made layer-by-layer.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale, high-throughput production of nano-structured materials (i.e. nanomanufacturing) is a strategic area in manufacturing, with markets projected to exceed $1T by 2015. Nanomanufacturing is still in its infancy; process/product developments are costly and only touch on potential opportunities enabled by growing nanoscience discoveries. The greatest promise for high-volume manufacturing lies in age-old coating and imprinting operations. For materials with tailored nm-scale structure, imprinting/embossing must be achieved at high speeds (roll-to-roll) and/or over large areas (batch operation) with feature sizes less than 100 nm. Dispersion coatings with nanoparticles can also tailor structure through self- or directed-assembly. Layering films structured with these processes have tremendous potential for efficient manufacturing of microelectronics, photovoltaics and other topical nano-structured devices. This project is designed to perform the requisite R and D to bring Sandia's technology base in computational mechanics to bear on this scale-up problem. Project focus is enforced by addressing a promising imprinting process currently being commercialized.

Cox, James V.; Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary Stephen; Tjiptowidjojo, Kristianto (University of New Mexico); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Fan, Hongyou; Schunk, Peter Randall; Chandross, Michael Evan; Roberts, Scott A.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure.

Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Manganese containing layer for magnetic recording media  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for a magnetic recording media incorporating Mn-containing layers between a substrate and a magnetic layer to provide media having increased coercivity and lower noise. The Mn-containing layer can be incorporated in a rotating, translating or stationary recording media to operate in conjunction with magnetic transducing heads for recording and reading of magnetic data, as well as other applications. The magnetic recording medium of the invention preferably includes a Co or Co alloy film magnetic layer, and Mn-containing layer, preferably comprised of VMn, TiMn, MnZn, CrMnMo, CrMnW, CrMnV, and CrMnTi, and most preferably a CrMn alloy, disposed between the substrate and the magnetic layer to promote an epitaxial crystalline structure in the magnetic layer. The medium can further include seed layers, preferably polycrystalline MgO for longitudinal media, underlayers, and intermediate layers. Underlayers and intermediate layers are comprised of materials having either an A2 structure or a B2-ordered crystalline structure disposed between the seed layer and the magnetic layer. Materials having an A2 structure are preferably Cr or Cr alloys, such as CrV, CrMo, CrW and CrTi. Materials having a B2-ordered structure having a lattice constant that is substantially comparable to that of Cr, such as those preferably selected from the group consisting of NiAl, AILCo, FeAl, FeTi, CoFe, CoTi, CoHf, CoZr, NiTi, CuBe, CuZn, A-LMn, AlRe, AgMg, and Al.sub.2 FeMn.sub.2, and is most preferably FeAl or NiAl.

Lambeth, David N. (Pittsburgh, PA); Lee, Li-Lien (Santa Clara, CA); Laughlin, David E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Processing Effects on Junction Interdiffusion in CdS/CdTe Polycrystalline Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of CdS/CdTe solar cells is strongly impacted by the process used to grow the CdS layer. CdS films grown by chemical-bath deposition (CBD) exhibit lower sublimation (CSS).

Albin, D.; Yan, Y.; King, D.; Moutinho, H.; Jones, K.; Matson, R.; Al-Jassim, M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photosensitive device includes a plurality of organic photoconductive materials disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode, including a first continuous layer of donor host material, a second continuous layer of acceptor host material, and at least one other organic photoconductive material disposed as a plurality of discontinuous islands between the first continuous layer and the second continuous layer. Each of these other photoconductive materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor host material and the acceptor host material. Preferably, each of the discontinuous islands consists essentially of a crystallite of the respective organic photoconductive material, and more preferably, the crystallites are nanocrystals.

Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Yang, Fan (Piscataway, NJ); Rand, Barry P. (Somers, NY)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

318

Layered Electrodes for Lithium Cells and Batteries  

AV AILABLE FOR LICENSING Layered lithium metal oxide compounds for ultra-high capacity, rechargeable cathodes. The Invention High-capacity, rechargeable cathodes made ...

319

Enhanced Densification of SDC Barrier Layers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical report explores the Enhanced Densification of SCD Barrier Layers A samaria-doped ceria (SDC) barrier layer separates the lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode from the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to prevent the formation of electrically resistive interfacial SrZrO{sub 3} layers that arise from the reaction of Sr from the LSCF with Zr from the YSZ. However, the sintering temperature of this SDC layer must be limited to {approx}1200 C to avoid extensive interdiffusion between SDC and YSZ to form a resistive CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} solid solution. Therefore, the conventional SDC layer is often porous and therefore not as impervious to Sr-diffusion as would be desired. In the pursuit of improved SOFC performance, efforts have been directed toward increasing the density of the SDC barrier layer without increasing the sintering temperature. The density of the SDC barrier layer can be greatly increased through small amounts of Cu-doping of the SDC powder together with increased solids loading and use of an appropriate binder system in the screen print ink. However, the resulting performance of cells with these barrier layers did not exhibit the expected increase in accordance with that achieved with the prototypical PLD SDC layer. It was determined by XRD that increased sinterability of the SDC also results in increased interdiffusivity between the SDC and YSZ, resulting in formation of a highly resistive solid solution.

Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

320

Conductive layer for biaxially oriented semiconductor film ...  

... a photovoltaic cell, or a light emitting diode (LED) that includes a crystallographically oriented semiconducting film disposed on the conductive layer.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Survey of Lava Tubes in the Former Puna Forest Reserve and on Adjacent State of Hawaii Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was initiated after members of the Puna community brought to the attention of the Historic Preservation Office that major lava tube systems extended from the Pahoa area into at least portions of the former Puna Forest Reserve. They were concerned that planned geothermal exploration and development could damage these lava tubes which they said contained extensive evidence of past Hawaiian use including fortifications, shrines, platforms and burials. Geothermal development is currently being planned by Campbell Estate and True Geothermal Energy Company in the southern portion of the former Reserve which has been designated by the State of Hawaii as one of the three Geothermal Sub-Zones in Puna. To demonstrate these claims, two staff members of the Historic Sites Section were shown examples in a lava tube makai of the Campbell Estate boundary. After reviewing the archaeological and historical reports commissioned for geothermal exploration, it was agreed that if these lava tubes did extend inland and continued to contain archaeological sites or burials then the potential of significant sub-surface sites had not been adequately addressed in the Historic Sites Section review process. Most reports acknowledged the possibility of lava tubes in the area and that they could contain burials, but no tube systems were ever identified or explored during any of the field surveys. These surveys primarily assessed the presence or absence of cultural properties that occur on the surface or as deposits within the soil layer. With the assistance of the Division of Water Resource Management (DWRM), the Historic Sites Section agreed to conduct this survey because those community members who came forward requested that this information be handled by a neutral party. They asked that documentation occur in such a manner that it could be kept as confidential as possible while still providing enough information to protect any sites from damage. The survey had three major aims. The first was to establish whether or not the lava tubes continued into the land now held by Campbell Estate or the Geothermal Sub-Zone. The second was to assess the extent to which any lava tube systems found contained archaeological remains or burials and, if so, to evaluate their general significance. The third was to define, if possible, any patterns in the distribution of the lava tube systems or the archaeological remains within them. Such patterns can allow general predictions to be made about which areas are most likely to have similar tube systems with significant archaeological sites. This is of particular importance in this region where large portions of the former Forest Reserve and the Geothermal Sub-Zone have not been inspected, and conducting extensive surveys is extremely difficult because of dense vegetation, hazardous conditions and poor ground visibility. One of the authors (Stone) has a background in Hawaiian lava tube biology, so we were able to include a preliminary survey of the invertebrate fauna found in these underground ecosystems.

McEldowney, H.; Stone, F.D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Multijunction photovoltaic device and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multijunction photovoltaic device includes first, second, and third amorphous silicon p-i-n photovoltaic cells in a stacked arrangement. The intrinsic layers of the second and third cells are formed of a-SiGe alloys with differing ratios of Ge such that the bandgap of the intrinsic layers respectively decrease from the first uppermost cell to the third lowermost cell. An interface layer, composed of a doped silicon compound, is disposed between the two cells and has a lower bandgap than the respective n- and p-type adjacent layers of the first and second cells. The interface layer forms an ohmic contact with the one of the adjacent cell layers of the same conductivity type, and a tunnel junction with the other of the adjacent cell layers.

Arya, Rejeewa R. (Jamison, PA); Catalano, Anthony W. (Boulder, CO); Bennett, Murray (Longhorne, PA)

1995-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

Combustion fronts in porous media with two layers Steve Schecter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion fronts in porous media with two layers layer 1 layer 2 Steve Schecter North Carolina Subject: Propagation of a combustion front through a porous medium with two parallel layers having different properties. · Each layer admits a traveling combustion wave. · The layers are coupled by heat

Schecter, Stephen

324

The Boundary Layer of Mars: Fluxes, Stability, Turbulent Spectra, and Growth of the Mixed Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectra of wind from high-frequency measurements in the Martian atmospheric surface layer, along with the diurnal variation of the height of the mixed surface layer, are calculated for the first time for Mars. Heat and momentum fluxes, stability, ...

James E. Tillman; Lars Landberg; Sren E. Larsen

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Engineering the electrochromism and ion conduction of layer-by-layer assembled films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work applies the processing technique of layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly to the creation and development of new electrochemically active materials. Elements of the thin-film electrochromic cell were chosen as a particular ...

DeLongchamp, Dean M. (Dean Michael), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The NRL Layered Global Ocean Model (NLOM) with an Embedded Mixed Layer Submodel: Formulation and Tuning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bulk-type (modified KrausTurner) mixed layer model that is embedded within the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Layered Ocean Model (NLOM) is introduced. It is an independent submodel loosely coupled to NLOM's dynamical core, requiring only ...

Alan J. Wallcraft; A. Birol Kara; Harley E. Hurlburt; Peter A. Rochford

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Lidar Observations of Mixed Layer Dynamics: Tests of Parameterized Entrainment Models of Mixed Layer Growth Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric mixed layer depth, the entrainment zone depth and the wind speed and wind direction were used to test various parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate. Six case studies under ...

R. Boers; E. W. Eloranta; R. L. Coulter

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Layered Structure of the Winter Atmospheric Boundary Layer in the Interior of Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-latitude winter atmospheric boundary layer of interior Alaska continually exhibits a complex layered structure as a result of extreme meteorological conditions. In this paper the occurrence of elevated inversions (EI), surface-based ...

John A. Mayfield; Gilberto J. Fochesatto

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Surface engineering using layer-by-layer assembly of pH-sensitive polymers and nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface engineering of a variety of materials including colloidal particles and porous membranes has been achieved by using layer-by-layer assembly of pH-sensitive polymers and nanoparticles. In the first part of this ...

Lee, Daeyeon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

An ultra-thin buffer layer for Ge epitaxial layers on Si  

SciTech Connect

Using an Fe{sub 3}Si insertion layer, we study epitaxial growth of Ge layers on a Si substrate by a low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy technique. When we insert only a 10-nm-thick Fe{sub 3}Si layer in between Si and Ge, epitaxial Ge layers can be obtained on Si. The detailed structural characterizations reveal that a large lattice mismatch of {approx}4% is completely relaxed in the Fe{sub 3}Si layer. This means that the Fe{sub 3}Si layers can become ultra-thin buffer layers for Ge on Si. This method will give a way to realize a universal buffer layer for Ge, GaAs, and related devices on a Si platform.

Kawano, M.; Yamada, S.; Tanikawa, K.; Miyao, M.; Hamaya, K. [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)] [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Sawano, K. [Advanced Research Laboratories, Tokyo City University, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan)] [Advanced Research Laboratories, Tokyo City University, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

331

Analytical steam injection model for layered systems  

SciTech Connect

Screening, evaluation and optimization of the steam flooding process in homogeneous reservoirs can be performed by using simple analytical predictive models. In the absence of any analytical model for layered reservoirs, at present, only numerical simulators can be used. And these are expensive. In this study, an analytical model has been developed considering two isolated layers of differing permeabilities. The principle of equal flow potential is applied across the two layers. Gajdica`s (1990) single layer linear steam drive model is extended for the layered system. The formulation accounts for variation of heat loss area in the higher permeability layer, and the development of a hot liquid zone in the lower permeability layer. These calculations also account for effects of viscosity, density, fractional flow curves and pressure drops in the hot liquid zone. Steam injection rate variations in the layers are represented by time weighted average rates. For steam zone calculations, Yortsos and Gavalas`s (1981) upper bound method is used with a correction factor. The results of the model are compared with a numerical simulator. Comparable oil and water flow rates, and breakthrough times were achieved for 100 cp oil. Results with 10 cp and 1000 cp oils indicate the need to improve the formulation to properly handle differing oil viscosities.

Abdual-Razzaq; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Maximizing Buoyancy Flux across Layered Geostrophic Sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For layered analogues of the ocean stratification, the problem of maximizing buoyancy flux across a section with zero mass flux is considered. The two layer situation on an f-plane is particularly simple and it is shown that the buoyancy flux is ...

Nelson G. Hogg; Henry M. Stommel

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Steady water waves with multiple critical layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

Mats Ehrnstrm; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahln

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

334

Texture of atomic layer deposited ruthenium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ruthenium films were grown by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si(100) and ALD TiN. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the as-deposited films on Si(100) were polycrystalline, on TiN they were (002) oriented. After annealing at 800^oC ... Keywords: Ammonia plasma, Atomic layer deposition, Ruthenium, Silicide, Texture

J. Musschoot; Q. Xie; D. Deduytsche; K. De Keyser; D. Longrie; J. Haemers; S. Van den Berghe; R. L. Van Meirhaeghe; J. D'Haen; C. Detavernier

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

ARM - Measurement - Planetary boundary layer height  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsPlanetary boundary layer height govMeasurementsPlanetary boundary layer height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Planetary boundary layer height Top of the planetary boundary layer; also known as depth or height of the mixing layer. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments VCEIL : Vaisala Ceilometer External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments

336

Comments and responses on the Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information concerning public comments and responses on the remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site in Grand Junction, Colorado.

NONE

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Selective Chemical Vapor Deposition of Heavily Boron Doped Silicon-Germanium Films from Disilane, Germane and Chlorine for Source/ Drain Junctions of Nanoscale CMOS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) are scaled for higher speed and reduced power, new challenges are imposed on the source/drain junctions and their (more)

Pesovic, Nemanja

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Understanding Tunneling Magnetoresistance During Thermal Annealing in MgO-based Junctions with CoFeB Electrodes  

SciTech Connect

The competition between the interface crystallization and diffusion processes, their influence on the onset of symmetry-filtering coherent tunneling of {Delta}{sub 1} band electrons in the MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions is investigated. Systematic study of the transport and magnetoresistance during thermal annealing of these junctions shows a unique behavior of the tunneling conductance in the parallel state. The optimal annealing time for achieving giant tunneling magnetoresistance at different temperatures is determined. The evolution of magnetoresistance consists of three distinct regions, responsible by different contributions from CoFeB electrodes and the MgO barrier. The whole phenomenon can be understood through an empirical model based on the Landauer tunneling picture.

Wang, W.; Ni, C; Miao, X; Weiland, C; Shah, L; Fan, X; Parson, P; Jordan-Sweet, J; Kou, X; Zhang, Y

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Polarization-Induced Charge Distribution at Homogeneous Zincblende/Wurtzite Heterostructural Junctions in ZnSe Nanobelts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Homogeneous heterostructural wurtzite (WZ)/zincblende (ZB) junctions are successfully fabricated in ZnSe nanobelts. Polarity continuity across the ZB/WZ interface is demonstrated. The saw-tooth-like potential profile induced by spontaneous polarization across the WZ/ZB/WZ interfaces is identified directly at the nanoscale. The polarization-induced charge distribution across the homogeneous heterostructural interfaces is proposed as a viable alternative approach towards charge tailoring in semiconductor nanostructures.

Li, L.; Jin, L.; Wang, J.; Smith, D. J.; Yin, W. J.; Yan, Y.; Sang, H.; Choy, W. C. H.; McCartney, M. R.

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

340

Thermoelectric generator with hinged assembly for fins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cylindrical casing has a central shielded capsule of radioisotope fuel. A plurality of thermonuclear modules are axially arranged with their hot junctions resiliently pressed toward the shield and with their cold junctions adjacent a transition member having fins radiating heat to the environment. For each module, the assembly of transition member and fins is hinged to the casing for swinging to permit access to and removal of such module. A ceramic plate having gold layers on opposite faces prevents diffusion bonding of the hot junction to the shield.

Purdy, David L. (Indiana, PA); Shapiro, Zalman M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Hursen, Thomas F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Maurer, Gerould W. (Apollo, PA)

1976-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Electrical isolation of component cells in monolithically interconnected modules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithically interconnected photovoltaic module having cells which are electrically connected which comprises a substrate, a plurality of cells formed over the substrate, each cell including a primary absorber layer having a light receiving surface and a p-region, formed with a p-type dopant, and an n-region formed with an n-type dopant adjacent the p-region to form a single pn-junction, and a cell isolation diode layer having a p-region, formed with a p-type dopant, and an n-region formed with an n-type dopant adjacent the p-region to form a single pn-junction, the diode layer intervening the substrate and the absorber layer wherein the absorber and diode interfacial regions of a same conductivity type orientation, the diode layer having a reverse-breakdown voltage sufficient to prevent inter-cell shunting, and each cell electrically isolated from adjacent cells with a vertical trench trough the pn-junction of the diode layer, interconnects disposed in the trenches contacting the absorber regions of adjacent cells which are doped an opposite conductivity type, and electrical contacts.

Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 30B at the Grand Junction Office Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 30B and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

Krauland, P.A.; Corle, S.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 34 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7 acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, was also the remedial action contractor. Building 34 was radiologically contaminated and the building was demolished in 1996. The soil area within the footprint of the building was analyzed and found to be not contaminated. The area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual closeout report for each contaminated GJPO building.

Widdop, M.R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 44 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7 acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, is also the remedial action contractor. Building 44 was radiologically contaminated and the building was demolished in 1994. The soil area within the footprint of the building was not contaminated; it complies with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

Widdop, M.R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Electronic transport in oligo-para-phenylene junctions attached to carbon nanotube electrodes: Transition-voltage spectroscopy and chirality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated, by means of a nonequilibrium Green's function method coupled to density functional theory, the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions composed of oligo-para-phenylene (with two, three, four, and five phenyl rings) covalently bridging the gap between metallic carbon nanotubes electrodes. We have found that the current is strongly correlated to a purely geometrical chiral parameter, both on-resonance and off-resonance. The Fowler-Nordheim plot exhibits minima, V{sub min}, that occur whenever the tail of a resonant transmission peak enters in the bias window. This result corroborates the scenario in which the coherent transport model gives the correct interpretation to transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). We have shown that V{sub min} corresponds to voltages where a negative differential resistance (NDR) occurs. The finding that V{sub min} corresponds to voltages that exhibit NDR, which can be explained only in single-molecule junctions within the coherent transport model, further confirms the applicability of such models to adequately interpret TVS. The fact that the electrodes are organic is at the origin of differences in the behavior of V{sub min} if compared to the case of molecular junctions with nonorganic contacts treated so far.

Brito Silva, C. A. Jr. [Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Eletrica, Universidade Federal do Para, 66075-900, Belem, PA (Brazil); Faculdade de Ciencias Naturais, Universidade Federal do Para, 68800-000, Breves, PA (Brazil); Silva, S. J. S. da; Leal, J. F. P. [Pos-Graduacao em Fisica, Universidade Federal do Para, 66075-110, Belem, PA (Brazil); Pinheiro, F. A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Del Nero, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Para, 66075-110, Belem, PA (Brazil); Departement de Physique, Ecole Normale Superieure, F-75231, Paris (France)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney disposal site. The site is in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site may be licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Cheney disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete and the NRC formally accepts this plan. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure that the Cheney disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify potential threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Spin polarized current injection through HgBr{sub 2} intercalated Bi2212 intrinsic Josephson junctions.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate the effect of polarized current on tunneling characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs), spin-polarized and spin-degenerate current have been injected through the c-axis of HgBr{sub 2} intercalated Bi{sub 2.1}Sr{sub 1.5}Ca{sub 1.4}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8+delta} (Bi2212) single crystals on which 10 times 10 mum{sup 2} mesas have been fabricated. These two spin conditions are achieved by depositing either Au (15 nm)/Co (80 nm)/Au (156 nm) multilayers or single Au film on HgBr{sub 2} intercalated Bi2212 with T{sub c} = 74 K followed by photolithography and Ar ion beam etching. The I-V characteristics have been measured with and without a magnetic field parallel to c-axis at 4.2 K. A fine, soft Au wire is used to make a gentle mechanical contact on the top of a particular mesa in the array. Tunneling conductance characteristics were obtained and the magnetic field dependence of sumgap voltage peaks was investigated. These peaks do not change in position with increasing magnetic field for both contact configurations. In addition, the temperature dependence of tunneling characteristics of the IJJs are obtained and existence of pseudogap feature is observed above T{sub c} for HgBr{sub 2} intercalated Bi2212.

Ozyuzer, L.; Kurter, C.; Ozdemir, M.; Zasadzinski, J. F.; Gray, K. E.; Hinks, D. G. (Materials Science Division); (Izmir Inst. of Tech.); (Illinois Inst. of Tech.)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Development of Ta-based Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detectors for Fluorescence XAS  

SciTech Connect

We are developing superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) soft X-ray detectors for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our 36-pixel Nb-based STJ spectrometer covers a solid angle {Omega}/4{pi} {approx} 10{sup -3}, offers an energy resolution of {approx}10-20 eV FWHM for energies up to {approx}1 keV, and can be operated at total count rates of {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For increased quantum efficiency and cleaner response function, we have now started the development of Ta-based STJ detector arrays. Initial devices modeled after our Nb-based STJs have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and pulse rise time discrimination can be used to improve their response function for energies up to several keV. We discuss the performance of the Ta-STJs and outline steps towards the next-generation of large STJ detector arrays with higher sensitivity.

Friedrich, S; Drury, O; Hall, J; Cantor, R

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. 5 figs.

Fife, A.B.; Ballas, G.J.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

350

Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

Fife, Alex Blair (San Jose, CA); Ballas, Gary J. (San Jose, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2.

Morris, R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Technical basis for radiological release of Grand Junction Office Building 2. Volume 1, dose assessment  

SciTech Connect

Building 2 on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) site is part of the GJO Remedial Action Program (GJORAP). During evaluation of Building 2 for determination of radiological release disposition, some inaccessible surface contamination measurements were detected to be greater than the generic surface contamination guidelines of DOE Order 5400.5 (which are functionally equivalent to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission [NRC] Regulatory Guide 1.86). Although the building is nominal in size, it houses the site telecommunications system, that is critical to continued GJO operations, and demolition is estimated at $1.9 million. Because unrestricted release under generic surface contamination guidelines is cost-prohibitive, supplemental standards consistent with DOE Order 5400.5 are being pursued. This report describes measurements and dose analysis modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might occupy or demolish Building 2, a 2,480 square-foot (ft) building constructed in 1944. The north portion of the building was used as a shower facility for Manhattan Project uranium-processing mill workers and the south portion was a warehouse. Many originally exposed surfaces are no longer accessible for contamination surveys because expensive telecommunications equipment have been installed on the floors and mounted on panels covering the walls. These inaccessible surfaces are contaminated above generic contamination limits.

Morris, R.; Warga, J.; Thorne, D.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Estimating AS relationships for application-layer traffic optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships among autonomous systems (ASes) on the Internet are categorized into two major types: transit and peering. We propose a method for quantifying AS' network size called magnitude by recursively analyzing the AS adjacency matrix converted ...

Hirochika Asai; Hiroshi Esaki

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Infrared Heating of Hydrogen Layers in Hohlraums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors report results of modeling and experiments on infrared heated deuterium-hydride (HD) layers in hohlraums. A 2 mm diameter, 40 {micro}m thick shell with 100-400 {micro}m thick HD ice inside a NIF scale-1 gold hohlraum with 1-3 {micro}m rms surface roughness is heated by pumping the HD vibrational bands. Models indicate control of the low-mode layer shape by adjusting the infrared distribution along the hohlraum walls. They have experimentally demonstrated control of the layer symmetry perpendicular to the hohlraum axis.

Kozioziemski, B J; McEachern, R L; London, R A; Bitter, D N

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Strained layer Fabry-Perot device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An asymmetric Fabry-Perot reflectance modulator (AFPM) consists of an active region between top and bottom mirrors, the bottom mirror being affixed to a substrate by a buffer layer. The active region comprises a strained-layer region having a bandgap and thickness chosen for resonance at the Fabry-Perot frequency. The mirrors are lattice matched to the active region, and the buffer layer is lattice matched to the mirror at the interface. The device operates at wavelengths of commercially available semiconductor lasers.

Brennan, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM); Fritz, Ian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Hammons, Burrell E. (Tijeras, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing with an apparatus having all current conducting electrodes within the cased well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of operation of different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information useful to determine the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from within the cased well are described. The multiple electrode apparatus has a plurality of spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage a portion of the interior of the cased well. During measurements of information useful to determine formation resistivity, current is conducted between a first current conducting electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the cased well to a second current conducting electrode that is also in electrical contact with the interior of the cased well. The first and second current conducting electrodes are separated by a distance sufficient so that at least a portion of the current conducted between the first and second current conducting electrodes is conducted through the geological formation of interest.

Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

X-ray Crystallographic Observation of 'In-line' and 'Adjacent' Conformations in a Bulged Self-Cleaving RNA/DNA Hybrid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RNA strand in an RNA/DNA duplex with unpaired ribonucleotides can undergo self-cleavage at bulge sites in the presence of a variety of divalent metal ions (Husken et al., Biochemistry, 1996, 35:16591-16600). Transesterification proceeds via an in-line mechanism, with the 2'-OH of the bulged nucleotide attacking the 3'-adjacent phosphate group. The site-specificity of the reaction is most likely a consequence of the greater local conformational freedom of the RNA backbone in the bulge region. A standard A-form backbone geometry prohibits formation of an in-line arrangement between 2'-oxygen and phosphate. However, the backbone in the region of an unpaired nucleotide appears to be conducive to an in-line approach. Therefore, the bulge-mediated phosphoryl transfer reaction represents one of the simplest RNA self-cleavage systems. Here we focus on the conformational features of the RNA that underlie site-specific cleavage. The structures of an RNA/DNA duplex with single ribo-adenosyl bulges were analyzed in two crystal forms, permitting observation of 10 individual conformations of the RNA bulge moiety. The bulge geometries cover a range of relative arrangements between the 2'-oxygen of the bulged nucleotide and the P-O5' bond (including adjacent and near in-line ) and give a detailed picture of the conformational changes necessary to line up the 2'-OH nucleophile and scissile bond. Although metal ions are of crucial importance in the catalysis of analogous cleavage reactions by ribozymes, it is clear that local strain or conformational flexibility in the RNA also affect cleavage selectivity and rate (Soukup & Breaker, RNA, 1999, 5:1308-1325). The geometries of the RNA bulges frozen out in the crystals provide snapshots along the reaction pathway prior to the transition state of the phosphoryl transfer reaction.

Tereshko, V.; Wallace, S.T.; Usman, N.; Wincott, F.; Egli, M. (Northwestern)

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

360

Review of science issues, deployment strategy, and status for the ARM north slope of Alaska-Adjacent Arctic Ocean climate research site  

SciTech Connect

Recent climate modeling results point to the Arctic as a region that is particularly sensitive to global climate change. The Arctic warming predicted by the models to result from the expected doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide is two to three times the predicted mean global warming, and considerably greater than the warming predicted for the Antarctic. The North Slope of Alaska-Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA-AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is designed to collect data on temperature-ice-albedo and water vapor-cloud-radiation feedbacks, which are believed to be important to the predicted enhanced warming in the Arctic. The most important scientific issues of Arctic, as well as global, significance to be addressed at the NSA-AAO CART site are discussed, and a brief overview of the current approach toward, and status of, site development is provided. ARM radiometric and remote sensing instrumentation is already deployed and taking data in the perennial Arctic ice pack as part of the SHEBA (Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic ocean) experiment. In parallel with ARM`s participation in SHEBA, the NSA-AAO facility near Barrow was formally dedicated on 1 July 1997 and began routine data collection early in 1998. This schedule permits the US Department of Energy`s ARM Program, NASA`s Arctic Cloud program, and the SHEBA program (funded primarily by the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research) to be mutually supportive. In addition, location of the NSA-AAO Barrow facility on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration land immediately adjacent to its Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory Barrow Observatory includes NOAA in this major interagency Arctic collaboration.

Stamnes, K. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.; Ellingson, R.G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Meteorology; Curry, J.A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Aerospace and Engineering Sciences; Walsh, J.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Zak, B.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Evaluating Formulations of Stable Boundary Layer Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stable boundary layer height h is determined from eddy correlation measurements of the vertical profiles of the buoyancy flux and turbulence energy from a tower over grassland in autumn, a tower over rangeland with variable snow cover during ...

D. Vickers; L. Mahrt

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Interaction of Ekman Layers and Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The circulation induced by the interaction of surface Ekman transport with an island is considered using both numerical models and linear theory. The basic response is similar to that found for the interaction of Ekman layers and an infinite ...

Michael A. Spall; Joseph Pedlosky

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Tracer dispersion in the turbulent convective layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental results for passive tracer dispersion in the turbulent surface layer under convective conditions are presented. In this case, the dispersion of tracer particles is determined by the interplay of two mechanisms: buoyancy and advection. ...

Alex Skvortsov; Milan Jamriska; Timothy C. DuBois

364

Ocean Boundary Mixing during Ekman Layer Arrest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a water parcel comes into contact with an ocean boundary, energy is dissipated within the boundary layer with some fraction directed into vertical mixing. In a stratified flow this increases the potential energy associated with the density ...

Scott A. Condie

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Eddy Formation in 2-Layer, Quasigeostrophic Jets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of nonlinear eddies in unstable 2-layer, quasigeostrophic jets is investigated using a piecewise constant potential vorticity, contour dynamical model. Both infinite and semi-infinite jet dynamics are explored, considering a ...

Ilson C. A. da Silveira; Glenn R. Flierl

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Double layer capacitors : automotive applications and modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis documents the work on the modeling of double layer capacitors (DLCs) and the validation of the modeling procedure. Several experiments were conducted to subject the device under test to a variety of ...

New, David Allen, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Puff Growth in an Ekman Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of dispersion from a ground-level, instantaneous point source into an Ekman boundary layer is studied. First and second moments of the material are found for all heights, directions and times, considerably extending the results found ...

Albion D. Taylor

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Subsidence in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nights with clear skies and strong radiative cooling that favor the formation of statically stable nocturnal boundary layers (NBL) are also those nights most likely to have subsidence, because of the presence of synoptic high-pressure regions. ...

Merrilee A. Carlson; Roland B. Stull

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Mixed Layer Deepening Due to Langmuir Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between wind-driven Langmuir circulation and preexisting stratification is examined in order to elucidate its role in the deepening of the ocean surface mixed layer. For linear stratification, a numerical model suggests that ...

Ming Li; Chris Garrett

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Multi-layer waste containment barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for constructing an underground containment barrier for containing an in-situ portion of earth. The apparatus includes an excavating device for simultaneously (i) excavating earthen material from beside the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming an open side trench defined by opposing earthen sidewalls, and (ii) excavating earthen material from beneath the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming a generally horizontal underground trench beneath the in-situ portion defined by opposing earthen sidewalls. The apparatus further includes a barrier-forming device attached to the excavating device for simultaneously forming a side barrier within the open trench and a generally horizontal, multi-layer barrier within the generally horizontal trench. The multi-layer barrier includes at least a first layer and a second layer.

Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nickelson, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Satellite Remote Sensing of Multiple Cloud Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the current study are threefold: 1) to present a multispectral, multiresolution (MSMR) methodology for analysis of scenes containing multiple cloud layers; 2) to apply the MSMR method to two multilevel cloud scenes recorded by the ...

B.A. Baum; T. Uttal; M. Poellot; T.P. Ackerman; J.M. Alvarez; J. Intrieri; D.O'C. Starr; J. Titlow; V. Tovinkere; E. Clothiaux

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Cermet layer for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transparent high work function metal cermet forms a Schottky barrier in a Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell and adheres well to the P+ layer in a PIN amorphous silicon solar cell.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Membrane catalyst layer for fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas reaction fuel cell incorporates a thin catalyst layer between a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membrane and a porous electrode backing. The catalyst layer is preferably less than about 10 {mu}m in thickness with a carbon supported platinum catalyst loading less than about 0.35 mgPt/cm{sup 2}. The film is formed as an ink that is spread and cured on a film release blank. The cured film is then transferred to the SPE membrane and hot pressed into the surface to form a catalyst layer having a controlled thickness and catalyst distribution. The layer has adequate gas permeability so that cell performance is not affected and has a density and particle distribution effective to optimize proton access to the catalyst and electronic continuity for electron flow from the half-cell reaction occurring at the catalyst.

Wilson, M.S.

1991-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

374

The GATE Boundary Layer Instrumentation System (BLIS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tethered sonde, the Boundary Layer Instrument System (BLIS), was designed for use from shipboard platforms in the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE). This system was able to monitor the thermal and kinematic properties of the boundary ...

Donald P. Wylie; Chester F. Ropelewski

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Marine Stratocumulus Layers. Part 1: Mean Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean radiational, dynamical and thermodynamical structure of the marine stratocumulus-topped mixed layers of the California coast is described for two days in June 1976 using data from the NCAR Electra aircraft. We suggest that the synoptic ...

R. A. Brost; D. H. Lenschow; J. C. Wyngaard

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Buoyancy Effects in a Stratified Ekman Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The K-profile parameterization scheme is used to investigate the stratified Ekman layer in a fair weather regime of weak mean surface heating, persistently stable density stratification, diurnal solar cycle, and broadband fluctuations in the ...

James C. McWilliams; Edward Huckle; Alexander F. Shchepetkin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Physical layer model design for wireless networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wireless network analysis and simulations rely on accurate physical layer models. The increased interest in wireless network design and cross-layer design require an accurate and efficient physical layer model especially when a large number of nodes are to be studied and building the real network is not possible. For analysis of upper layer characteristics, a simplified physical layer model has to be chosen to model the physical layer. In this dissertation, the widely used two-state Markov model is examined and shown to be deficient for low to moderate signal-to-noise ratios. The physical layer statistics are investigated, and the run length distributions of the good and bad frames are demonstrated to be the key statistics for accurate physical layer modeling. A four-state Markov model is proposed for the flat Rayleigh fading channel by approximating the run length distributions with a mixture of exponential distributions. The transition probabilities in the four-state Markov model can be established analytically without having to run extensive physical layer simulations, which are required for the two-state Markov model. Physical layer good and bad run length distributions are compared and it is shown that the four-state Markov model reasonably approximates the run length distributions. Ns2 simulations are performed and the four-state Markov model provides a much more realistic approximation compared to the popular two-state Markov model. Achieving good results with the flat Rayleigh fading channel, the proposed four-state Markov model is applied to a few diversity channels. A coded orthogonal fre- quency division multiplexing (OFDM) system with a frequency selective channel and the Alamouti multiple-input multiple-output system are chosen to verify the accuracy of the four-state Markov model. The network simulation results show that the four-state Markov model approximates the physical layer with diversity channel well whereas the traditional two-state Markov model estimates the network throughput poorly. The success of adapting the four-state Markov model to the diversity channel also shows the flexibility of adapting the four-state Markov model to various channel conditions.

Yu, Yi

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Evolution of the lower planetary boundary layer over strongly contrasting surfaces  

SciTech Connect

In a multilaboratory field study held near Boardman in northeastern Oregon in June 1991, various properties of the surface and lower atmospheric boundary layer over heavily irrigated cropland and adjacent desert steppe were investigated in the initial campaign of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The locale was selected because its disparate characteristics over various spatial scales stress the ability of general circulation models (GCMS) to describe lower boundary conditions, particularly across the discontinuity between desert (in which turbulent flux of heat must be primarily as sensible heat) and large irrigated tracts (in which turbulent flux of latent heat should be the larger term). This campaign of ARM seeks to increase knowledge in three critical areas: (1) determination of the relationships between surface heat fluxes measured over multiple scales and the controlling surface parameters within each scale, (2) integration of local and nearly local heat flux estimates to produce estimates appropriate for GCM grid cells of 100-200 km horizontal dimension, and (3) characterization of the growth and development of the atmospheric boundary layer near transitions between surfaces with strongly contrasting moisture availabilities.

Coulter, R.L.; Gao, W.; Martin, T.J.; Shannon, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Shaw, W.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Evolution of the lower planetary boundary layer over strongly contrasting surfaces  

SciTech Connect

In a multilaboratory field study held near Boardman in northeastern Oregon in June 1991, various properties of the surface and lower atmospheric boundary layer over heavily irrigated cropland and adjacent desert steppe were investigated in the initial campaign of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The locale was selected because its disparate characteristics over various spatial scales stress the ability of general circulation models (GCMS) to describe lower boundary conditions, particularly across the discontinuity between desert (in which turbulent flux of heat must be primarily as sensible heat) and large irrigated tracts (in which turbulent flux of latent heat should be the larger term). This campaign of ARM seeks to increase knowledge in three critical areas: (1) determination of the relationships between surface heat fluxes measured over multiple scales and the controlling surface parameters within each scale, (2) integration of local and nearly local heat flux estimates to produce estimates appropriate for GCM grid cells of 100-200 km horizontal dimension, and (3) characterization of the growth and development of the atmospheric boundary layer near transitions between surfaces with strongly contrasting moisture availabilities.

Coulter, R.L.; Gao, W.; Martin, T.J.; Shannon, J.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Shaw, W.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Symmetry Breaking in Few Layer Graphene Films  

SciTech Connect

Recently, it was demonstrated that the quasiparticledynamics, the layer-dependent charge and potential, and the c-axisscreening coefficient could be extracted from measurements of thespectral function of few layer graphene films grown epitaxially on SiCusing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In this articlewe review these findings, and present detailed methodology for extractingsuch parameters from ARPES. We also present detailed arguments againstthe possibility of an energy gap at the Dirac crossing ED.

Bostwick, A.; Ohta, T.; McChesney, J.L.; Emtsev, K.; Seyller,Th.; Horn, K.; Rotenberg, E.

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Optical devices featuring nonpolar textured semiconductor layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor emitter, or precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate in a nonpolar orientation. The textured layers enhance light extraction, and the use of nonpolar orientation greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency compared to conventional devices. Both the internal and external quantum efficiencies of emitters of the invention can be 70-80% or higher. The invention provides highly efficient light emitting diodes suitable for solid state lighting.

Moustakas, Theodore D; Moldawer, Adam; Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Abell, Joshua

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

382

Optical devices featuring textured semiconductor layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor sensor, solar cell or emitter, or a precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate. The textured layers enhance light extraction or absorption. Texturing in the region of multiple quantum wells greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency if the semiconductor is polar and the quantum wells are grown along the polar direction. Electroluminescence of LEDs of the invention is dichromatic, and results in variable color LEDs, including white LEDs, without the use of phosphor.

Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA); Cabalu, Jasper S. (Cary, NC)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

383

Optical devices featuring textured semiconductor layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor sensor, solar cell or emitter, or a precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate. The textured layers enhance light extraction or absorption. Texturing in the region of multiple quantum wells greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency if the semiconductor is polar and the quantum wells are grown along the polar direction. Electroluminescence of LEDs of the invention is dichromatic, and results in variable color LEDs, including white LEDs, without the use of phosphor.

Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA); Cabalu, Jasper S. (Cary, NC)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

384

Dual-Layer Asymmetric Microporous Silica Membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report a novel sol-gel dip-coating process to form dual-layer microporous silica membranes with improved membrane performance and reproducibility. First, we deposit a surfactant-templated silica (STS) intermediate layer on top of a commercial {gamma}-alumina support both to improve its ''surface finish'' and to prevent a subsequently deposited microporous overlayer from penetrating into the support. Second, membranes are processed under clean room conditions to avoid dust contamination and, third, membranes are vacuum-calcined to promote further pore shrinkage and impart surface hydrophobicity. The resulting asymmetric membrane exhibits a gradual change in pore diameter from 50{angstrom} ({gamma}-alumina support layer) to 10-12{angstrom} (STS intermediate layer), and then to 3-4{angstrom} (30nm thick, ultramicroporous silica top-layer). Compared to a single-layer process using only the microporous overlayer, the dual-layer process improves both flux and selectivity. For the industrially important problem of natural gas purification, the combined CO{sub 2} flux [(3{approx} 0.5) x 10{sup {minus}4} cm{sup 3}(STP)/(s{center_dot}cm{sup 2}{center_dot}cm-Hg)] and CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation factors [200{approx}600] are superior to all previously reported values for separation of a 50/50 (v/v) CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} gas mixture. In addition, the membrane selectively separated hydrogen from a simulated reformate from partial oxidation of methanol as evidenced by a high concentration of hydrogen recovery.

TSAI,CHUNG-YI; TAM,SIU-YUE; LU,YUNFENG; BRINKER,C. JEFFREY

1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

385

A General Framework for an Unmixed Layer PBL Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixed-layer models are computationally efficient, but they do not realistically represent the structure of the boundary layer under many conditions. Many of the deficiencies of the mixed-layer model can be attributed to the assumed flat profiles. ...

Martin J. Otte; John C. Wyngaard

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

25-28, 2007. Topic: Soot GRAPHENE LAYER GROWTH CHEMISTRY:on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer isomerizes to reversea possibly important step in graphene layer growth, thus

Whitesides, Russell; Domin, Dominik; Lester Jr., William A.; Frenklach, Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are incorporated into growing graphene layers and hence willGRAPHENE LAYER GROWTH CHEMISTRY: FIVE-SIX-RING FLIP REACTIONon the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. A new reaction

Whitesides, R.; Domin, D.; Salomon-Ferrer, R.; Lester Jr., W.A.; Frenklach, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Membrane catalyst layer for fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas reaction fuel cell incorporates a thin catalyst layer between a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membrane and a porous electrode backing. The catalyst layer is preferably less than about 10 .mu.m in thickness with a carbon supported platinum catalyst loading less than about 0.35 mgPt/cm.sup.2. The film is formed as an ink that is spread and cured on a film release blank. The cured film is then transferred to the SPE membrane and hot pressed into the surface to form a catalyst layer having a controlled thickness and catalyst distribution. Alternatively, the catalyst layer is formed by applying a Na.sup.+ form of a perfluorosulfonate ionomer directly to the membrane, drying the film at a high temperature, and then converting the film back to the protonated form of the ionomer. The layer has adequate gas permeability so that cell performance is not affected and has a density and particle distribution effective to optimize proton access to the catalyst and electronic continuity for electron flow from the half-cell reaction occurring at the catalyst.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Inorganic dual-layer microporous supported membranes  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides for a dual-layer inorganic microporous membrane capable of molecular sieving, and methods for production of the membranes. The inorganic microporous supported membrane includes a porous substrate which supports a first inorganic porous membrane having an average pore size of less than about 25 .ANG. and a second inorganic porous membrane coating the first inorganic membrane having an average pore size of less than about 6 .ANG.. The dual-layered membrane is produced by contacting the porous substrate with a surfactant-template polymeric sol, resulting in a surfactant sol coated membrane support. The surfactant sol coated membrane support is dried, producing a surfactant-templated polymer-coated substrate which is calcined to produce an intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane. The intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane is then contacted with a second polymeric sol producing a polymeric sol coated substrate which is dried producing an inorganic polymeric coated substrate. The inorganic polymeric coated substrate is then calcined producing an inorganic dual-layered microporous supported membrane in accordance with the present invention.

Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Tsai, Chung-Yi (6 Mount Vernon Dr., Apt. C, Vernon, CT 06066); Lu, Yungfeng (1055 N. Capital Ave., #20, San Jose, CA 95133)

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

390

Causal Viscosity in Accretion Disc Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of the boundary layer region between the disc and a comparatively slowly rotating star is studied using a causal prescription for viscosity. The vertically integrated viscous stress relaxes towards its equilibrium value on a relaxation timescale $\\tau$, which naturally yields a finite speed of propagation for viscous information. For a standard alpha prescription with alpha in the range 0.1-0.01, and ratio of viscous speed to sound speed in the range 0.02-0.5, details in the boundary layer are strongly affected by the causality constraint. We study both steady state polytropic models and time dependent models, taking into account energy dissipation and transport. Steady state solutions are always subviscous with a variety of $\\Omega$ profiles which may exhibit near discontinuities. For alpha =0.01 and small viscous speeds, the boundary layer adjusted to a near steady state. A long wavelength oscillation generated by viscous overstability could be seen at times near the outer boundary. Being confined there, the boundary layer remained almost stationary. However, for alpha =0.1 and large viscous speeds, short wavelength disturbances were seen throughout which could significantly affect the power output in the boundary layer. This could be potentially important in producing time dependent behaviour in accreting systems such as CVs and protostars.

W. Kley; J. C. B. Papaloizou

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

Layered Electrodes for Lithium Cells and Batteries | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Layered Electrodes for Lithium Cells and Batteries Technology available for licensing: Layered lithium metal oxide compounds for ultra-high-capacity, rechargeable cathodes...

392

Strategies for Joining Nano- and Micro-multi-layered Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Strategies for Joining Nano- and Micro-multi-layered Materials Preserving Layer Structure and Properties Using the Example of Composite...

393

Heat transfer in excimer laser melting of thin polysilicon layers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat transfer in excimer laser melting of thin polysilicon layers Title Heat transfer in excimer laser melting of thin polysilicon layers Publication Type Journal Article Year of...

394

Graphene Layer Growth: Collision of Migrating Five-Member Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monte Carlo simulations of graphene edge buildup, the rateGraphene layer growth: Collision of migrating five- memberon the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. The process is

Whitesides, Russell; Kollias, Alexander C.; Domin, Dominik; Lester Jr., William A.; Frenklach, Michael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color...

396

Evidence of a barrier oxidation dependence on the interfacialmagnetism in co/alumina based magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic circular dichroism at the Co L{sub 2,3} edge have been applied to explore the near-interfacial magnetism of Co electrodes in Co/alumina based magnetic tunnel junctions. By taking into account the formation of CoO at the FM/barrier interface, the change in the total magnetic moment on metallic Co atoms as a function of barrier oxidation has been determined. The results demonstrate a strong correlation between the Co moments and measured TMR values, and an enhancement in the Co moments for moderate oxidation times.

Telling, N.D.; van der Laan, G.; Ladak, S.; Hicken, R.J.; Arenholz, E.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

397

Proposed Junction-Box Stress Test (Using an Added Weight) for Use During the Module Qualification (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. Furthermore, there are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the j-box adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to the preliminary results conducted using representative materials and components.

Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP Campaign Links Campaign Images Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer Cloud IOP 2005.07.11 - 2005.08.07 Lead Scientist : William Shaw For data sets, see below. Description Investigators from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from a number of other institutions, carried out a month of intensive measurements at the ARM Climate Research Facility on the North Slope of Alaska in the summer of 2005. The purpose of these measurements was to determine how much the arctic land surface modifies the way low clouds reflect, absorb, and transmit solar and infrared radiation. This is an important problem because arctic clouds play a prominent role in

399

Growth of oxide exchange bias layers  

SciTech Connect

An oxide (NiO, CoO, NiCoO) antiferromagnetic exchange bias layer produced by ion beam sputtering of an oxide target in pure argon (Ar) sputtering gas, with no oxygen gas introduced into the system. Antiferromagnetic oxide layers are used, for example, in magnetoresistive readback heads to shift the hysteresis loops of ferromagnetic films away from the zero field axis. For example, NiO exchange bia layers have been fabricated using ion beam sputtering of an NiO target using Ar ions, with the substrate temperature at 200.degree. C., the ion beam voltage at 1000V and the beam current at 20 mA, with a deposition rate of about 0.2 .ANG./sec. The resulting NiO film was amorphous.

Chaiken, Alison (Fremont, CA); Michel, Richard P. (Bloomington, MN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Geostrophic Adjustment and Restratification of a Mixed Layer with Horizontal Gradients above a Stratified Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The restratification of a mixed layer with horizontal density gradients above a stratified layer is considered. Solutions are obtained on the assumption that the width across this front is much larger than the local radius of deformation ?bh?/|f| based ...

Amit Tandon; Chris Garrett

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Photovoltaic cell with thin CS layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved photovoltaic panel and method of forming a photovoltaic panel are disclosed for producing a high efficiency CdS/CdTe photovoltaic cell. The photovoltaic panel of the present invention is initially formed with a substantially thick Cds layer, and the effective thickness of the CdS layer is substantially reduced during regrowth to both form larger diameter CdTe crystals and substantially reduce the effective thickness of the C This invention was made with Government support under Subcontract No. ZL-7-06031-3 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

Jordan, John F. (El Paso, TX); Albright, Scot P. (El Paso, TX)

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

402

An experimental and numerical study of the modifications of mixed-layer structure by inhomogeneous surface fluxes and secondary circulations  

SciTech Connect

The problem of scale interactions in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), i.e., how forcing mechanisms of differing spatial and temporal scales affect the properties of the PBL, has been a subject of considerable interest for some time. One aspect of this problem that has received increasing attention in recent years is the representation, in mesoscale and general circulation models. of the effects of subgrid-scale inhomogeneities in surface properties. Differences in sensible and latent heat fluxes between adjacent areas can result in secondary circulations. modifications to the boundary layer structure, and the transport of heat and moisture from one area to another. Despite their potential included on local PBL properties, such effects can not be resolved by numerical models whose scale is too coarse; thus, suitable parameterizations that account for these phenomena are needed. In this paper the authors present some results of wind and temperature measurements over an area with significant variations in surface fluxes on scales of O(10 km). They then use fine resolution numerical simulations to show how synoptic, topographical, and thermal forcing combine to affect the properties of the PBL in the region. Specifically, they consider the relative importance of topography and land-use differences on the generation of secondary circulations and on the depth of the mixed layer, and they show how these effects are modified by synoptic wind fields. Implications for coarser resolution models are also discussed.

Zhong, S.; Doran, J.C.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Measurement of Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Exp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Experiment and WVIOP 2000 V. Y. Leuski and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction A scanning 5-mm-wavelength radiometer was deployed during two Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) facilities. The first was conducted at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Adjacent arctic Ocean (AAO) site near Barrow, Alaska, during March 1999. One goal was to evaluate the ability of an

404

New Thin Film CuGaSe2/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Bifacial, Tandem Solar Cell with Both Junctions Formed Simultaneously  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin films of CuGaSe2 and Cu(In,Ga)Se2 were evaporated by the 3-stage process onto opposite sides of a single piece of soda-lime glass, coated bifacially with an n+/-TCO. Junctions were formed simultaneously with each of the p-type absorbers by depositing thin films of n-CdS via chemical bath deposition (CBD) at 60C. The resulting four-terminal device is a non-mechanically stacked, two-junction tandem. The unique growth sequence protects the temperature-sensitive p/n junctions. The initial device (h= 3.7%, Voc= 1.1 V[AM1.5]) suffered from low quantum efficiencies. Initial results are also presented from experiments with variations in growth sequence and back reflectors.

Young, D. L.; Abu-Shama, J.; Noufi, R.; Li, X.; Keane, J.; Gessert, T. A.; Ward, J. S.; Contreas, M.; Symko-Davies, M.; Coutts, T. J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Free Surface Turbulent Shear layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In applying the Wall layer analogy to a wind blown free surface it is necessary to decide in what coordinate system such an anology is realistic. A smoothed sea surface is taken to be that produced by the nearly irrotational components of the ...

G. T. Csanady

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Intrusive gravity currents in two-layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intrusive gravity currents in two-layer stratified media Morris R. Flynn & Paul F. Linden Dept to as a gravity current · In contrast to waves, gravity currents transport significant mass (e.g. fluid parcels, sediment, insects, etc.) Introduction Gravity currents in the environment www

Flynn, Morris R.

407

Water Uptake in PEMFC Catalyst Layers  

SciTech Connect

Water uptake profiles of proton-exchange-membrane fuel-cell catalyst layers are characterized in the form of capillary-pressure saturation (Pc-S) curves. The curves indicate that the catalyst layers tested are highly hydrophilic and require capillary pressures as low as -80 kPa to eject imbibed water. Comparison of materials made with and without Pt indicates a difference in water ejection and uptake phenomena due to the presence of Pt. The addition of Pt increases the tendency of the catalyst layer to retain water. Dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) is used to characterize the water-vapor sorption onto Nafion, Pt/C, and C surfaces. The DVS results align with the trends found from the Pc-S curves and show an increased propensity for water uptake in the presence of Pt. The effect of the ion in Nafion, sodium or protonated form, is also compared and demonstrates that although the protonation of the Nafion in the catalyst layer also increases hydrophilicity, the effect is not as great as that caused by Pt.

Gunterman, Haluna P.; Kwong, Anthony H.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Weber, Adam Z.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Boundary-Layer Damping of Baroclinic Instability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shooting method is applied to a 100-level perturbation model with an explicit Ekman layer. Growth rates for a no-slip boundary condition are similar to those found previously. It is noted that the large cross-isobaric flow of the classic Ekman ...

D. O. Staley

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Spectral Scaling in a Tidal Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simple scaling of a tidal bottom boundary layer by the shear velocity, u*, and the wall to the wall describes well the mean Bow field. To test the full extent of this scaling measurements were made of the turbulence spectra in a natural tidal ...

Thomas F. Gross; Arthur R. M. Nowell

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Does Stommel's Mixed Layer Demon Work?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stommel argued that the seasonal cycle leads to a bias in the coupling between the surface mixed layer and the main thermocline of the ocean. He suggested that a demon operated that effectively only allowed fluid at the end of winter to pass ...

Richard G. Williams; John C. Marshall; Michael A. Spall

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

An ATM Adaptation Layer for Reliable Transfers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been much attention given to ATM Adaptation Layers (AAL) over the ten-year history of ATM standardization. Yet none of the existing standards include a retransmission protocol to ensure reliability of the transfers. In this paper we propose ...

Gunnar Karlsson

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Origin of undesirable cracks during layer transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the origin of undesirable transverse cracks often observed in thin films obtained by the layer transfer technique. During this process, two crystals bonded to each other containing a weak plan produced by ion implantation are heated to let a thin layer of one of the material on the other. The level of stress imposed on the film during the heating phase due to the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients of the substrate and the film is shown to be the relevant parameter of the problem. In particular, it is shown that if the film is submitted to a tensile stress, the microcracks produced by ion implantation are not stable and deviate from their straight trajectory making the layer transfer process impossible. However, if the compressive stress exceeds a threshold value, after layer transfer, the film can buckle and delaminate, leading to transverse cracks induced by bending. As a result, we show that the imposed stress \\sigma_m - or equivalently the heating temperature - must be within the ran...

Ponson, Laurent; Atwater, Harry; Ravichandran, Guruswami; Bhattacharya, Kaushik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Impedance of surface footings on layered ground  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally only the static bearing capacity and stiffness of the ground is considered in the design of wind turbine foundations. However, modern wind turbines are flexible structures with resonance frequencies as low as 0.2Hz. Unfortunately, environmental ... Keywords: Boundary elements, Domain-transformation method, Dynamic stiffness, Footing, Foundation, Layered soil, Wind turbine

L. Andersen; J. Clausen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Quantum Security for the Physical Layer  

SciTech Connect

The physical layer describes how communication signals are encoded and transmitted across a channel. Physical security often requires either restricting access to the channel or performing periodic manual inspections. In this tutorial, we describe how the field of quantum communication offers new techniques for securing the physical layer. We describe the use of quantum seals as a unique way to test the integrity and authenticity of a communication channel and to provide security for the physical layer. We present the theoretical and physical underpinnings of quantum seals including the quantum optical encoding used at the transmitter and the test for non-locality used at the receiver. We describe how the envisioned quantum physical sublayer senses tampering and how coordination with higher protocol layers allow quantum seals to influence secure routing or tailor data management methods. We conclude by discussing challenges in the development of quantum seals, the overlap with existing quantum key distribution cryptographic services, and the relevance of a quantum physical sublayer to the future of communication security.

Humble, Travis S [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Nano-soldering to single atomic layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple technique to solder submicron sized, ohmic contacts to nanostructures has been disclosed. The technique has several advantages over standard electron beam lithography methods, which are complex, costly, and can contaminate samples. To demonstrate the soldering technique graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, has been contacted, and low- and high-field electronic transport properties have been measured.

Girit, Caglar O. (Berkeley, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

416

Field Calibration of Mixed-Layer Drifters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of field experiments was conducted to determine the water-following characteristics of mixed-layer drifters with holey-sock drogues. Through the use of a drifting current meter array, direct estimates of slip velocity (or the difference ...

W. Rockwell Geyer

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 18 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also is the remedial action contractor. The soil beneath Building 18 was found to be radiologically contaminated; the building was not contaminated. The soil was remediated in accordance with identified standards. Building 18 and the underlying soil can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

Widdop, M.R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Final report of the decontamination and decommission of Building 31 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the domestic uranium procurement program funded by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Radiological contamination was identified in Building 31 and the building was demolished in 1992. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This area was addressed in the summary final report of the remediation of the exterior areas of the GJPO facility. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

Krabacher, J.E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 6 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the domestic uranium procurement program funded by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, is also the remedial action contractor. Radiological contamination was identified in Building 6, and the building was demolished in 1992. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

Widdop, M.R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 39 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, is also the remedial action contractor. The soil beneath Building 39 was radiologically contaminated and the building was demolished in 1992. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

Widdop, M.R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Development of 1.25 eV InGaAsN for triple junction solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of next generation high efficiency space monolithic multifunction solar cells will involve the development of new materials lattice matched to GaAs. One promising material is 1.05 eV InGaAsN, to be used in a four junction GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/InGaAsN/Ge device. The AMO theoretical efficiency of such a device is 38--42%. Development of the 1.05 eV InGaAsN material for photovoltaic applications, however, has been difficult. Low electron mobilities and short minority carrier lifetimes have resulted in short minority carrier diffusion lengths. Increasing the nitrogen incorporation decreases the minority carrier lifetime. The authors are looking at a more modest proposal, developing 1.25 eV InGaAsN for a triple junction GaInP{sub 2}/InGaAsN/Ge device. The AMO theoretical efficiency of this device is 30--34%. Less nitrogen and indium are required to lower the bandgap to 1.25 eV and maintain the lattice matching to GaAs. Hence, development and optimization of the 1.25 eV material for photovoltaic devices should be easier than that for the 1.05 eV material.

LI,N.Y.; SHARPS,P.R.; HILLS,J.S.; HOU,H.; CHANG,PING-CHIH; BACA,ALBERT G.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

422

Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer  

SciTech Connect

One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

423

Conductive layer for biaxially oriented semiconductor film growth  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conductive layer for biaxially oriented semiconductor film growth and a thin film semiconductor structure such as, for example, a photodetector, a photovoltaic cell, or a light emitting diode (LED) that includes a crystallographically oriented semiconducting film disposed on the conductive layer. The thin film semiconductor structure includes: a substrate; a first electrode deposited on the substrate; and a semiconducting layer epitaxially deposited on the first electrode. The first electrode includes a template layer deposited on the substrate and a buffer layer epitaxially deposited on the template layer. The template layer includes a first metal nitride that is electrically conductive and has a rock salt crystal structure, and the buffer layer includes a second metal nitride that is electrically conductive. The semiconducting layer is epitaxially deposited on the buffer layer. A method of making such a thin film semiconductor structure is also described.

Findikoglu, Alp T. (Los Alamos, NM); Matias, Vladimir (Santa Fe, NM)

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

A Two-Layer First-Order Closure Model for the Study of the Baroclinic Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A steady-state two-layer model has been developed for the baroclinic boundary layer. The lower layer is the constant flux surface layer (SL) in which the eddy viscosity K varies with height and stability according to the Monin-Obukhov similarity ...

K. Krishna

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

CdS/CdTe Solar Cells Containing Directly Deposited CdSxTe1-x Alloy Layers: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A CdSxTe1-x layer forms by interdiffusion of CdS and CdTe during the fabrication of thin-film CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices. The CdSxTe1-x layer is thought to be important because it relieves strain at the CdS/CdTe interface that would otherwise exist due to the 10% lattice mismatch between these two materials. Our previous work [1] has indicated that the electrical junction is located in this interdiffused CdSxTe1-x region. Further understanding, however, is essential to predict the role of this CdSxTe1-x layer in the operation of CdS/CdTe devices. In this study, CdSxTe1-x alloy films were deposited by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering and co-evaporation from CdTe and CdS sources. Both RF-magnetron-sputtered and co-evaporated CdSxTe1-x films of lower S content (x<0.3) have a cubic zincblende (ZB) structure akin to CdTe, whereas those of higher S content have a hexagonal wurtzite (WZ) structure like that of CdS. Films become less preferentially oriented as a result of a CdCl2 heat treatment (HT) at ~400 degrees C for 5 min. Films sputtered in a 1% O2/Ar ambient are amorphous as deposited, but show CdTe ZB, CdS WZ, and CdTe oxide phases after a CdCl2 HT. Films sputtered in O2 partial pressure have a much wider bandgap than expected. This may be explained by nanocrystalline size effects seen previously [2] for sputtered oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) films. Initial PV device results show that the introduction of a directly-deposited CdSxTe1-x alloy layer into the device structure produces devices of comparable performance to those without the alloy layer when a CdCl2 HT is performed. Further investigation is required to determine whether the CdCl2 heat treatment step can be altered or eliminated through direct deposition of the alloy layer.

Duenow, J. N.; Dhere, R. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; To, B.; Pankow, J. W.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Pulsed atomic layer epitaxy of quaternary AlInGaN layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this letter, we report on a material deposition scheme for quaternary Al{sub x}In{sub y}Ga{sub 1-x--y}N layers using a pulsed atomic layer epitaxy (PALE) technique. The PALE approach allows accurate control of the quaternary layer composition and thickness by simply changing the number of aluminum, indium, and gallium pulses in a unit cell and the number of unit cell repeats. Using PALE, AlInGaN layers with Al mole fractions in excess of 40% and strong room-temperature photoluminescence peaks at 280 nm can easily be grown even at temperatures lower than 800{sup o}C. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

Zhang, J.; Kuokstis, E.; Fareed, Q.; Wang, H.; Yang, J.; Simin, G.; Asif Khan, M.; Gaska, R.; Shur, M.

2001-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

427

On Mixed-Layer Modeling of the Stratocumulus-Topped Marine Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research aircraft measurements of a well-developed marine stratocumulus cloud-topped boundary layer, made in June 1981 off the coast of California, are analyzed using the saturation point method developed by Betts. Estimates of the cloud-top ...

Howard P. Hanson

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

PRESTRESSING A TWO-LAYER PRESSURE VESSEL BY CONTROLLED YIELDING OF THE INNER LAYER  

SciTech Connect

A method of designing a two-layer pressure vessel is presented wherein contact between the layers is produced by controlled yielding of the inner vessel by internal pressure. The amount of prestress depends upon the dimensions of the vessel, the properties of the material of construction, and the prestressing pressure. The method takes into account the actual stress-strain curve of the material and satisfies the rales of plastic flow with work hardening. (auth)

Schneider, R.W.

1964-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

PRESTRESSING A TWO-LAYER PRESSURE VESSEL BY CONTROLLED YIELDING OF THE INNER LAYER  

SciTech Connect

A method is presented for designing a two-layer pressure vessel wherein contact between the layers is produced by controlled yielding of the inner vessel by internal pressure. The amount of prestress depends upon the dimensions of the vessel, the properties of the material of construction, and the prestressing pressure. The method takes into account the actual stress-strain curve of the material and satisfies the rules of plastic flow with work hardening. (auth)

Schneider, R.W.

1964-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

430

Shock Dynamics in Layered Periodic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions of constant-coefficient nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs generically develop shocks, even if the initial data is smooth. Solutions of hyperbolic PDEs with variable coefficients can behave very differently. We investigate formation and stability of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation, no shock formation is detected even after times much greater than the time of shock formation in a homogeneous medium. Furthermore, weak shocks are observed to be dynamically unstable in the sense that they do not lead to significant long-term entropy decay. We propose a characteristic condition for admissibility of shocks in heterogeneous media that generalizes the classical Lax entropy condition and accurately predicts the formation or absence of shocks in these media.

David I Ketcheson; Randall J. LeVeque

2011-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

431

Double layer capacitance of carbon foam electrodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have evaluated a wide variety of microcellular carbon foams prepared by the controlled pyrolysis and carbonization of several polymers including: polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), divinylbenzene/methacrylonitrile (DVB), phenolics (furfuryl/alcohol), and cellulose polymers such as Rayon. The porosity may be established by several processes including: Gelation (1-5), phase separation (1-3,5-8), emulsion (1,9,10), aerogel/xerogel formation (1,11,12,13), replication (14) and activation. In this report we present the complex impedance analysis and double layer charging characteristics of electrodes prepared from one of these materials for double layer capacitor applications, namely activated cellulose derived microcellular carbon foam.

Delnick, F.M.; Ingersoll, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Firsich, D. [EG& G Mound Lab., Miamisburg, OH (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities  

SciTech Connect

We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: 1) evidence from point contact tunneling showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, 2) experimental results showing the production sharp niobium/oxide interfaces from a high temperature bake of ALD coated Al2O3 on niobium surfaces, 3) results from ALD coated structures.

Norem, J; Pellin, M J; Antoine, C Z; Ciovati, G; Kneisel, P; Reece, C E; Rimmer, R A; Cooley, L; Gurevich, A V; Ha, Y; Proslier, Th

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Layered Atom Arrangements in Complex Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, we develop an atom layer stacking model to describe systematically the crystal structures of complex materials. To illustrate the concepts, we consider a sequence of oxide compounds in which the metal cations progress in oxidation state from monovalent (M{sup 1+}) to tetravalent (M{sup 4+}). We use concepts relating to geometric subdivisions of a triangular atom net to describe the layered atom patterns in these compounds (concepts originally proposed by Shuichi Iida). We demonstrate that as a function of increasing oxidation state (from M{sup 1+} to M{sup 4+}), the layer stacking motifs used to generate each successive structure (specifically, motifs along a 3 symmetry axis), progress through the following sequence: MMO, MO, M{sub r}O, MO{sub r/s}O{sub u/v}, MOO (where M and O represent fully dense triangular atom nets and r/s and u/v are fractions used to describe partially filled triangular atom nets). We also develop complete crystallographic descriptions for the compounds in our oxidation sequence using trigonal space group R{bar 3}.

K.E. Sikafus; R.W.Grimes; S.M.Corish; A.R. Cleave; M.Tang; C.R.Stanek; B.P. Uberuaga; J.A.Valdez

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Method Of Transferring A Thin Crystalline Semiconductor Layer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Method Of Transferring A Thin Crystalline Semiconductor Layer Method Of Transferring A Thin Crystalline Semiconductor Layer Method Of Transferring A Thin Crystalline Semiconductor Layer A method for transferring a thin semiconductor layer from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a thin epitaxial monocrystalline semiconductor layer on a substrate having surface contaminants. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Method Of Transferring A Thin Crystalline Semiconductor Layer A method for transferring a thin semiconductor layer from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a thin epitaxial monocrystalline semiconductor layer on a substrate having surface contaminants. An interface that includes the contaminants is formed in between the deposited layer and the substrate. Hydrogen atoms are introduced into the structure

435

Analysis of the Younger Dryas Impact Layer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have uncovered a thin layer of magnetic grains and microspherules, carbon spherules, and glass-like carbon at nine sites across North America, a site in Belgium, and throughout the rims of 16 Carolina Bays. It is consistent with the ejecta layer from an impact event and has been dated to 12.9 ka BP coinciding with the onset of Younger Dryas (YD) cooling and widespread megafaunal extinctions in North America. At many locations the impact layer is directly below a black mat marking the sudden disappearance of the megafauna and Clovis people. The distribution pattern of the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) ejecta layer is consistent with an impact near the Great Lakes that deposited terrestrial-like ejecta near the impact site and unusual, titanium-rich projectile-like ejecta further away. High water content associated with the ejecta, up to 28 at. percent hydrogen (H), suggests the impact occurred over the Laurentide Ice Sheet. YDB microspherules and magnetic grains are highly enriched in TiO{sub 2}. Magnetic grains from several sites are enriched in iridium (Ir), up to 117 ppb. The TiO{sub 2}/FeO, K/Th, TiO{sub 2}/Zr, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeO+MgO, CaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, REE/ chondrite, FeO/MnO ratios and SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}O, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni, Co, U, Th and other trace element abundances are inconsistent with all terrestrial and extraterrestrial (ET) sources except for KREEP, a lunar igneous rock rich in potassium (K), rare-earth elements (REE), phosphorus (P), and other incompatible elements including U and Th. Normal Fe, Ti, and {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U isotopic abundances were found in the magnetic grains, but {sup 234}U was enriched over equilibrium values by 50 percent in Murray Springs and by 130 percent in Belgium. 40K abundance is enriched by up to 100 percent in YDB sediments and Clovis chert artifacts. Highly vesicular carbon spherules containing nanodiamonds, glass-like carbon, charcoal and soot found in large quantities in the YDB layer are consistent with an impact followed by intense burning. Four holes in the Great Lakes, some deeper than Death Valley, are proposed as possible craters produced by the airburst breakup of a loosely aggregated projectile.

Firestone, Richard B.; West, Allen; Revay, Zsolt; Hagstrum, Jonathon T,; Belgya, Thomas; Hee, Shane S. Que; Smith, Alan R.

2010-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

436

RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS TAKEN NEAR JUNCTION OF HIGHWAY 3I AND MILITARY ROAD IN NIAGARA FALLSI NEI{ YOR  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

7At 7At a z'/a tlYr'/ ORNL/RASA-85/ 42 RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS TAKEN NEAR JUNCTION OF HIGHWAY 3I AND MILITARY ROAD IN NIAGARA FALLSI NEI{ YOR Accesr to thc inlormalion in thlt rcport is limitcd to tho!. indacatod on the di3tribution lilt and to oopartmont ot Encrgy lnd Oeplrtmcnt of Enorgy Contracton vd' This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U nited States Government. N€ither the U nited States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied' or assum€s any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness' or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not inf ringe privately owned rights. Reference herein

437

Tunnel magnetoresistance in epitaxially grown magnetic tunnel junctions using Heusler alloy electrode and MgO barrier  

SciTech Connect

Epitaxially grown magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a stacking structure of Co{sub 2}MnSi/MgO/CoFe were fabricated. Their tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effects were investigated. The TMR ratio and tunnelling conductance characteristics of MTJs were considerably different between those with an MgO barrier prepared using sputtering (SP-MTJ) and those prepared using EB evaporation (EB-MTJ). The EB-MTJ exhibited a very large TMR ratio of 217% at room temperature and 753% at 2 K. The bias voltage dependence of the tunnelling conductance in the parallel magnetic configuration for the EB-MTJ suggests that the observed large TMR ratio at RT results from the coherent tunnelling process through the crystalline MgO barrier. The tunnelling conductance in the anti-parallel magnetic configuration suggests that the large temperature dependence of the TMR ratio results from the inelastic spin-flip tunnelling process.

Tsunegi, S.; Sakuraba, Y.; Oogane, M.; Telling, N. D.; Shelford, L. R.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Hicken, R. J.; Takanashi, K.; Ando, Y.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

X-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism studies of Co2FeAl in magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The bulk magnetic moment and the element specific magnetic moment of Co{sub 2}FeAl thin films were examined as a function of annealing temperature by alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS)/X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), respectively. A high magnetic moment can be achieved for all annealing temperatures and the predicted bulk and interface magnetic moment of about 5 {tilde A}{sub B} are reached via heating. We will also present tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) values of up to 153% at room temperature and 260% at 13 K for MgO based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Co{sub 2}FeAl and Co-Fe electrodes.

Ebke, D.; Kugler, Z.; Thomas, P.; Schebaum, O.; Schafers, M.; Nissen, D.; Schmalhorst, J.; Hutten, A.; Arenholz, E.; Thomas, A.

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

439

Universal Short-Range Repulsion in the Baryon System Originating from the Confinement --Approach in String-Junction Model--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show a way to unifiedly understand the origins of the repulsive core of baryon-baryon interaction and the universal repulsion of three-baryon interaction needed to avoid dramatic softening of the equation of state of neutron stars due to hyperon mixing. For this aim we adopt the string-junction model which embodies the essential aspects of the confinement in the baryon system confirmed by recent lattice QCD calculations. Key concept of this study lies in the recognition that baryonic short-range repulsion appears as the latent effect implying the energy necessary for full overlap of baryons, for the confinement to persist at such situation. Numerical results are shown and related problems are discussed.

Ryozo Tamagaki

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Static contrast enhancement layer for photolithographic processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the ever expanding microelectronic industry, there is a constant demand for improved photolithographic techniques useful in the manufacture of integrated circuits and the like. Over the years, however, the linewidths of structures patterned for microelectronic fabrication have continued to decrease. At present, 0.8 {mu}m lines and spaces are now imaged in commercial production and much smaller features are predicted for the near future. These feature sizes represent a significant drop below the previously predicted limit of optical lithography, originally thought to be around 1.25 {mu}m. These advances have been due in large part to the extensive worldwide research effort in improved optical patterning techniques. One of the more significant developments in optical patterning has been the advent of contrast enhancement layer lithography. A static stable contrast enhancement layer is provided for improving the resolution possible in photolithographic processes which comprises a photoacid generator such as an onium salt and acid-base indicator dye such as methyl yellow incorporated into a polymeric binder. The contrast enhancement layer is coated onto a conventional photoresist, and upon exposure to light in the appropriate absorption range, the salt undergoes a transformation to a strong Bronsted acid which will then bleach the indicator dye. The system is particularly designed so that an in situ contact mask is formed in a first deep UV exposure which is used to mask light projected upon the photoresist at a second wavelength. The present invention allows for exposure using deep UV sources without the need for the development of new photoresist chemistry. 1 fig.

Renschler, C.L.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

An Analysis of Tropical Ocean Diurnal Warm Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During periods of light surface wind, a warm stable layer forms at the ocean surface with a maximum sea surface temperature (SST) in the early afternoon. The diurnal SST amplitude (DSA) associated with these diurnal warm layers (DWLs) can reach ...

Hugo Bellenger; Jean-Philippe Duvel

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Behavior of Turbulence Statistics in the Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Velocity variances in the convective boundary layer are examined using data derived in PBL experiments over land (Minnesota) and ocean (the Coral Sea) supported by data from the Kansas study of the surface boundary layer. In the freely convective ...

B. B. Hicks

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A Balanced Approach to Stable Boundary Layer Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semiempirical arguments from Roach and Nieuwstadt concerning Richardson numbers Ri, Rf in stably stratified shear layers and boundary layers appear to bypass uncertainties of turbulence closures. Here it is shown that these arguments can be ...

S. H. Derbyshire

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Dynamical Adjustment of the Trade Wind Inversion Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In schematic northsouth cross sections the trade inversion layer is often depicted as sloping upward as air flows toward the intertropical convergence zone. This conceptual view is consistent with purely thermodynamic boundary-layer models, ...

Wayne H. Schubert; Paul E. Ciesielski; Chungu Lu; Richard H. Johnson

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Water Vapor Layers in STORM-FEST Rawinsonde Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The STORM-FEST (Fronts Experiment Systems Test) rawinsonde data were analyzed to determine the abundance and characteristics of moist layers within the troposphere. A moist layer was defined as a local maximum in relative humidity with lower ...

John P. Iselin; William J. Gutowski Jr.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Temperature Fields in the Tropical Tropopause Transition Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been increasing recognition of the role of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) in determining stratospheric water vapor concentrationsthe TTL being a layer of transition between air showing tropospheric properties below and ...

Xue Long Zhou; Marvin A. Geller; Minghua Zhang

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Single-Point Closures in a Neutrally Stratified Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Closure assumptions often employed in single-point closure models for boundary-layer applications are evaluated against a neutrally stratified planetary boundary-layer flow generated by large-eddy simulation. The contributions from slow and rapid ...

Anders Andrn; Chin-Hoh Moeng

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Autumnal Mixed-Phase Cloudy Boundary Layers in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two mixed-phase cloudy boundary layer events observed over the Arctic ice pack in autumn are extensively analyzed. The local dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layers is determined from aircraft measurements including analysis of ...

James O. Pinto

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Boundary Layer of Tropical Cyclone Kerry (1979)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The boundary layer structure of Tropical Cyclone Kerry (1979) is investigated using composite analysis of research aircraft, surface ship, and automatic weather station observations. The boundary layer was moist, convective, and strongly ...

Peter G. Black; Greg J. Holland

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Choosing a Boundary Layer Parameterization for Tropical Cyclone Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The boundary layer in a tropical cyclone is in some respects unlike that elsewhere in the atmosphere. It is therefore necessary to evaluate boundary layer parameterizations for their suitability for use in tropical cyclone simulation. Previous ...

Jeffrey D. Kepert

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Water Uptake of Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Uptake of Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layers Title Water Uptake of Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layers Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kusoglu, Ahmet, Anthony...

452

Mixing in the Transition Layer during Two Storm Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-ocean dynamics analyzed from mooring-array observations are contrasted between two storms of comparable magnitude. Particular emphasis is put on the role of the transition layer, the strongly stratified layer between the well-mixed upper ...

Kathleen Dohan; Russ E. Davis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

The Role of Boundary Layer Processes in Limiting PV Homogenization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ?-plane multilevel quasigeostrophic channel model with interactive static stability and a simplified parameterization of atmospheric boundary layer physics is used to study the role of different boundary layer processes in eddy equilibration ...

Yang Zhang; Peter H. Stone; Amy Solomon

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

A Cloudiness Transition in a Marine Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ aircraft data and lidar data are used to analyze a transition in the boundary layer thermodynamic structure from a clear boundary layer through small cumulus and broken stratocumulus to a deck of solid stratocumulus. The data was ...

Alan K. Betts; Reinout Boers

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Entrainment into a Stratocumulus Layer with Distributed Radiative Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the radiative cooling of a cloud layer strongly influences the turbulent flux profiles and the entrainment rate, and that the radiative cooling should be modeled as acting inside the turbulent layer. Numerical experiments ...

David A. Randall

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Subwavelength image manipulation through an oblique layered system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show in this work an oblique layered system that is capable of manipulating two dimensional subwavelength images. Through properly designed planar layered system, we demonstrate analytically that lateral image shift ...

Fung, Kin Hung

457

BLIPS: A System for Studying Benthic Boundary Layer Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Boundary Layer Interaction Profiting System (BLIPS) has been developed to measure kinematic quantities necessary for verification of theoretical, two-phase boundary layer flow models. BLIPS sensors include electromagnetic current meters, ...

Charles E. Adams Jr.; Winfield Hill; Rodney Fredericks

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Cross-layer protocol interactions in heterogeneous data networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) TCP timeout backoff and MAC layer retransmissions, are studied in detail. The results show that the system performance is a balance of idle slots and collisions at the MAC layer, and a tradeoff between packet loss ...

Liu, Chunmei, 1970-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Alternative Nonlocal Descriptions of Boundary-Layer Evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two alternative parameterizations for nonlocal turbulence mixing are tested in a 1D boundary-layer model against a dataset from the 1983 Boundary-Layer Experiment (BLX83) in Oklahoma. One method, proposed previously by Stull and Driedonks, is ...

Qing Zhang; Roland Stull

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Evaluation of Boundary Layer Depth Estimates at Summit Station, Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boundary layer conditions in polar regions have been shown to have a significant impact on the levels of trace gases in the lower atmosphere. The ability to properly describe boundary layer characteristics (e.g., stability, depth, and variations ...

B. Van Dam; D. Helmig; W. Neff; L. Kramer

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "junction adjacent layers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Mixed Layer Restratification Due to a Horizontal Density Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The restratification in the surface mixed layer driven by a horizontal density gradient following a storm is examined. For a constant layer depth H and constant buoyancy gradient |bx| = M2, geostrophic adjustment leads to new stratification with ...

Amit Tandon; Chris Garrett

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Lateral Mixing in the Pycnocline by Baroclinic Mixed Layer Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a process study model, the effect of mixed layer submesoscale instabilities on the lateral mixing of passive tracers in the pycnocline is explored. Mixed layer eddies that are generated from the baroclinic instability of a front within the ...

Gualtiero Badin; Amit Tandon; Amala Mahadevan

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Boundary Layer Clouds and VegetationAtmosphere Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of boundary layer cumulus clouds and their impact on land surfaceatmosphere exchange is presented. Seasonal trends indicate that in response to increasing insolation and sensible heat flux, both the mixed-layer height (zi) and the ...

Jeffrey M. Freedman; David R. Fitzjarrald; Kathleen E. Moore; Ricardo K. Sakai

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

A Theory of Gravity Wave Absorption by a Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-layer model of the atmospheric boundary layer (BL) is proposed to explain the nature of lee-wave attenuation and gravity wave absorption seen in numerical simulations. Two complex coefficients are defined: the compliance coefficient and the ...

Ronald B. Smith; Qingfang Jiang; James D. Doyle

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Physical phenomena of thin surface layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(solid line in figure 2.3) long wavelength fluctuations with 0 < q < qc = ? ??hpex/? are amplified and the film will become unstable, while short wavelength fluctuations are damped. The fastest growing mode qmax is given by the maximum of equation 2.17, q... 2max = ?1 2? ?hpex (2.18) 13 Physical phenomena of thin surface layers qc 0 q ? -1 Ampli#30;ed Damped qmax Figure 2.3: Graphical representation of the dispersion relation. In the absence of an applied external field, all fluctuations are damped...

Thomas, Katherine Ruth

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

466

UFO: A Resilient Layered Routing Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional wisdom has held that routing protocols cannot achieve both scalability and high availability. Despite scaling relatively well, todays Internet routing system does not react quickly to changing network conditions (e.g., link failures or excessive congestion). Overlay networks, on the other hand, can respond quickly to changing network conditions, but their reliance on aggressive probing does not scale to large topologies. The paper presents a layered routing architecture called UFO (Underlay Fused with Overlays), which achieves the best of both worlds by having the underlay provide explicit notification about network conditions to help improve the efficiency and scalability of routing overlays.

Yaping Zhu; Andy Bavier; Nick Feamster; Sampath Rangarajan; Jennifer Rexford

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results  

SciTech Connect

The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan to look more closely at Vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2-8(H2O)] and Siderite [FeCO3] in the next stage of the project.

Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

468

The minisodar and planetary boundary layer studies  

SciTech Connect

The minisodar, in addition to being smaller than conventional sodar, operates at higher frequencies, obtains usable signal returns closer to the surface, and can use smaller range gates. Because the max range is generally limited to the lower 200 m above the surface, the minisodar is not able to interrogate the entire daytime atmospheric Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL); however it can be a very useful tool for understanding the PBL. In concert with other instruments, the minisodar can add significant new insights to our understanding of the PBL. This paper gives examples of past and potential uses of minisodars in such situations.

Coulter, R.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

469