Sample records for juan volcanic field

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Exploration...

  2. San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation,EnergySan Juan

  3. Geology, thermal maturation, and source rock geochemistry in a volcanic covered basin: San Juan sag, south-central Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gries, R.R. [Priority Oil & Gas, Denver, CO (United States); Clayton, J.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Leonard, C. [Platte River Associates, Denver, CO (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Juan sag, concealed by the vast San Juan volcanic field of south-central Colorado, has only recently benefited from oil and gas wildcat drilling and evaluations. Sound geochemical analyses and maturation modeling are essential elements for successful exploration and development. Oil has been produced in minor quantities from an Oligocene sill in the Mancos Shale within the sag, and major oil and gas production occurs from stratigraphically equivalent rocks in the San Juan basin to the southwest and in the Denver basin to the northeast. The objectives of this study were to identify potential source rocks, assess thermal maturity, and determine hydrocarbon-source bed relationships. Source rocks are present in the San Juan sag in the upper and lower Mancos Shale (including the Niobrara Member), which consists of about 666 m (2184 ft) of marine shale with from 0.5 to 3.1 wt. % organic carbon. Pyrolysis yields (S{sub 1} + S{sub 2} = 2000-6000 ppm) and solvent extraction yields (1000-4000 ppm) indicate that some intervals within the Mancos Shale are good potential source rocks for oil, containing type II organic matter, according to Rock-Eval pyrolysis assay.

  4. San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource HistorySamElectricSan JoseSan

  5. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004)...

  6. Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico, USA, as Inferred from the Envelope Inversion of Active-Experiment Seismic Data Jump to: navigation, search...

  7. Identification and characterization of Hydraulic Flow Units in the San Juan Formation, Orocual Field, Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deghirmandjian, Odilia

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the integration of core and well log data in order to provide a petrophysical characterization of the Hydraulic Flow Units (HFU) in the San Juan Formation, Orocual Field, Venezuela. We used three ...

  8. 1992-93 Results of geomorphological and field studies Volcanic Studies Program, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, S.G.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field mapping and stratigraphic studies were completed of the Black Tank volcanic center, which represents the southwestern most eruptive center in the Cima volcanic field of California. The results of this mapping are presented. Contacts between volcanic units and geomorphic features were field checked, incorporating data from eight field trenches as well as several exposures along Black Tank Wash. Within each of the eight trenches, logs were measured and stratigraphic sections were described. These data indicate that three, temporally separate volcanic eruptions occurred at the Black Tank center. The field evidence for significant time breaks between each stratigraphic unit is the presence of soil and pavement-bounded unconformities.

  9. San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan Francisco Volcanic Field

  10. Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  11. Petroleum geochemistry of San Juan sag, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, J.L.; Gries, R.R. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, oil and gas shows have been reported in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks of the San Juan sag, and minor oil production has been established from volcanic rocks (Kirby Petroleum 1 Jynnifer well, Sec. 9, TT40N, R5E). Potential source rocks present in the San Juan sag are the upper and lower (including the Niobrara Member) Mancos Shale (Upper Cretaceous). The combined upper and lower Mancos Shale is about 660 m thick and contains between about 0.5 and 5.5% organic carbon, although most values are between about 1.5 and 2.0%. The Niobrara Member of the lower Mancos Shale has the highest overall organic matter content in the section (organic carbon averages > 2.0%). Pyrolysis and solvent extraction yields (typically 2,000-6,000 and 1,000-4,000 ppm, respectively) indicate that the upper and lower Mancos Shale and the Niobrara Member are all good potential source rocks for oil and gas. Oil-source rock correlations using gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and stable carbon isotope ratios indicate that the upper Mancos Shale is the most likely source for the oil produced from the 1 Jynnifer discovery well. The source of the oil produced from the nearby Gramps field is less certain but may be the lower Mancos Shale or Niobrara Member. The hydrocarbon generation history of the San Juan sag is complex because of highly variable heat flow in the area caused by Oligocene volcanism. Sills have caused thermal alteration of organic matter in shales on a local scale, and larger volcanic bodies may have produced proportionally larger thermal effects. Localized heating may have caused thermal decomposition of carbonate minerals and generation of high CO{sub 2} gas deposits. Higher regional heat flow associated with volcanism was important in the source rock maturation of this area and maturation was relatively recent (Oligocene to present).

  12. Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | OpenSuperiorEnergy Information GolesOpen

  13. Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to: navigation, searchRobbinsDensityOpenEnergy

  14. Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson &

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel, Et Al., 2011)Reiter,

  15. Magnetotelluric images of the crustal structure of Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meju, Max

    Magnetotelluric images of the crustal structure of Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya V. Sakkas volcanic chain on the eastern flank of the Kenya Rift in East Africa. Transient electromagnetic (TEM flank of the Kenya Rift deduced from wide-angle P-wave data. In: Fuchs, K., Altherr, R., Muller, B

  16. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  17. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  18. Source rock maturation, San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gries, R.R.; Clayton, J.L.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic modeling for thermal histories was simulated for seven wells in the San Juan sag honoring measured geochemical data. Wells in the area of Del Norte field (Sec. 9, T40N, R5E), where minor production has been established from an igneous sill reservoir, show that the Mancos Shale source rocks are in the mature oil generation window as a combined result of high regional heat flow and burial by approximately 2,700 m of Oligocene volcanic rocks. Maturation was relatively recent for this area and insignificant during Laramide subsidence. In the vicinity of Gramps field (Sec. 24, T33N, R2E) on the southwest flank of the San Juan sag, these same source rocks are exposed due to erosion of the volcanic cover but appear to have undergone a similar maturation history. At the north and south margins of the sag, two wells (Champlin 34A-13, Sec. 13, T35N, R4.5E; and Champlin 24A-1, Sec. 1, T44N, R5E) were analyzed and revealed that although the regional heat flow was probably similar to other wells, the depth of burial was insufficient to cause maturation (except where intruded by thick igneous sills that caused localized maturation). The Meridian Oil 23-17 South Fork well (Sec. 17, T39N, R4E) was drilled in a deeper part of the San Juan sag, and source rocks were intruded by numerous igneous sills creating a complex maturation history that includes overmature rocks in the lowermost Mancos Shale, possible CO{sub 2} generation from the calcareous Niobrara Member of the Mancos Shale, and mature source rocks in the upper Mancos Shale.

  19. Field imaging spectroscopy and inferring a blind thrust earthquake history from secondary faulting : 1944 San Juan Earthquake, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragona, Daniel Eduardo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Harrington, H. J. , (1944), El sismo de San Juan; del 15 deHarrington, H. J. , (1944), El sismo de San Juan; del 15 deconla magnitud maxima del sismo probable en la zona de la

  20. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  1. Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

  2. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAM JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps.

  3. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND PORE CASTING: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Louis H. Taylor

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  4. Source rock evaluation, oil-source rock correlation, and kinetic modeling - San Juan Sag, CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, J.L. (Geological survey, Denver, CO (USA)); Gries, R.R.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, oil and gas shows have been reported in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks of the San Juan sag, and minor oil production was established from volcanic rocks (Kirby Petroleum 1 Jynnifer well, Sec. 9, T40N, R5E.). Potential source rocks present in the San Juan sag are the upper and lower (including the Niobrara Member) Mancos Shale (Upper Cretaceous). The combined upper and lower Mancos Shale is about 666 m thick and contains between about 0.5 and 5.5% organic carbon, although most values are between about 1.5 and 2.0%. The Niobrara Member of the lower Mancos Shale has the highest overall organic matter content in the section (organic carbon averages <2.0%). Pyrolysis and solvent extraction data (typically 2,000-6,000 and 1,000-4,000 ppm, respectively) indicate that the upper and lower Mancos Shale and the Niobrara Member are all good potential source rocks for oil and gas. Oil-source rock correlations using gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and stable carbon isotope ratios indicate that the upper Mancos Shale is the most likely source for the oil produced from the 1 Jynnifer discovery well. The source of the oil produced from the nearby Gramps field is less certain, but may be the lower Mancos Shale or Niobrara Member. The hydrocarbon generation history of the San Juan sag is complex because of highly variable heat flow in the area caused by Oligocene volcanism. Sills have caused thermal alteration of organic matter in shales on a local scale, and larger volcanic bodies may have produced proportionality larger thermal effects. More regional heating by larger volcanic bodies is an important factor in the oil generation history of the area. The authors have constructed kinetic models at several locations in the area to estimate the timing and amount of hydrocarbon products generated from the source rocks. The main phase of oil and gas generation and expulsion occurred during the Oligocene.

  5. Role of magnetotellurics in exploration of San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orange, A.; Schofield, J. (Emerald Exploration Consultants, Austin, TX (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado, consisting almost entirely of Tertiary volcanic rocks, are bounded on the southwest by the mature oil and gas province of the San Juan basin and on the east by the San Luis basin. Continuation of the sediments from the San Juan basin eastward beneath the volcanics was suspected based on the reported presence of seeps and the evaluation of regional gravity and magnetic data. The objective of applying MT to the exploration of the San Juan sag area was to determine, through the measurement of subsurface resistivity, whether the hydrocarbon-rich sedimentary rocks of the San Juan basin indeed extended eastward beneath the San Juan volcanics and, if so, to what extent. The MT program the authors describe was a reconnaissance profile, one of the initial investigations of the area. MT data were acquired at 12 sites extending from Pagosa Springs east across Wolf Creek Pass to Del Norte on the western margin of the San Luis basin. Data were acquired for calibration at well sites near Pagosa Springs and northeast of Del Norte. Site spacing was 4-8 mi. The 12-site program was designed to test the geologic concept and evaluate for a minimum expenditure the feasibility of applying MT to the problem.

  6. Magnetotelluric survey of San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furgerson, R.B. (Phoenix Geoscience Inc., Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado, consisting almost entirely of Tertiary volcanic rocks, are bounded on the southwest by the mature oil and gas province of the San Juan basin and on the east by the San Luis basin, continuation of the sediments from the San Juan basin eastward beneath the volcanics was suspected based on the reported presence of seeps and the evaluation of regional gravity and magnetic data. The probability greatly increased when Milestone drilled Tertiary and Cretaceous sediments beneath 3,000 ft of volcanics, 37 mi northeast of the nearest Cretaceous outcrop. The MT (magnetotellurium) program described in this presentation is part of a nonexclusive survey that included magnetotelluric soundings, time-domain electromagnetic soundings, gravity stations, and geochemical sampling. MT data were acquired at 20 sites along an east-west profile centered on the Milestone 1 AMF well, five sites along a north-south cross profile, and three more sites around the wells northeast of the Milestone well. Site spacing was of the order of 1 to 3 mi except for the cross line. The program was designed to map the thickness of the surface volcanics and the thickness and resistivity of the underlying sediments. The MT data acquired near the Milestone well indicated that the Cretaceous sedimentary rocks are characterized by an average resistivity of the order of 4-12 ohm-meters. The MT data acquired in the San Luis basin east of Del Norte also shows 4-12 ohm-meter rocks in the subsurface, correlated in this case with Tertiary volcanics, volcaniclastics, and continental sediments. The MT data show that the low-resistivity 4-12 ohm-meter section extends continuously beneath the more resistive surface volcanics from the San Luis Valley to at least 16 mi west-northwest of Del Norte.

  7. Dakota sandstone and associated rocks adjacent to San Juan sag near Gunnison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartleson, B. (Western State College of Colorado, Gunnison (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stratigraphy and depositional systems of the Dakota Sandstone and associated rocks were studied in outcrop at the northeastern margin of the San Juan volcanic field in southern Gunnison and northern Saguache Counties, Colorado. This study fills in a major gap in regional Mesozoic stratigraphy and provides a last view of these rocks before they are concealed to the south by the volcanic cover of the San Juan sag, a frontier hydrocarbon basin. Locally, the Burro Canyon Formation is interpreted as a dominantly meandering fluvial system formed under oxidizing conditions similar to the underlying Morrison Formation. The Burro Canyon Formation pinches out along a roughly east-west line just south of US Highway 50 and is missing for about 15 mi south to the edge of the continuous volcanics. The Dakota Sandstone consists of a lower, low-sinuosity fluvial system abruptly overlain by an upper, mostly nearshore marine sequence which grades upward into the offshore Mancos Shale. While the total Dakota thickness is relatively constant, the fluvial system thickens markedly to the south where marine rocks are quite thin. To the north, marine rocks thicken irregularly and fluvial rocks are thin. In this area, the Mancos Shale can be readily subdivided into Graneros, Greenhorn, Carlile, Juana Lopez, and upper Niobrara formations, although the Fort Hays limestone is locally missing. The upper Mancos Shale and Mesaverde Group are also missing, presumably due to late Eocene prevolcanic erosion.

  8. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

  9. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for this first phase of the agreement was $386,385.00 as detailed in Phase I Authorization For Expenditure (AFE). This report describes the tasks performed, the results, and conclusions for the first phase (Phase I) of the cooperative agreement.

  10. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pat Fort; Don L. Hanosh

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. Resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain oil fields located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP), determine if this system can reduce lift costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improved the economics. Three Phases of work have been defined in the DOE Form 4600.1 Notice of Financial Assistance Award for this project, in which the project objectives are to be attained through a joint venture between Enerdyne LLC (Enerdyne), owner and operator of the fields and Pumping Solutions Inc. (PSI), developer of the submersible pumping system. Upon analysis of the results of each Phase, the DOE will determine if the results justify the continuation of the project and approve the next Phase to proceed or terminate the project and request that the wells be plugged. This topical report shall provide the DOE with Phase I results and conclusions reached by Enerdyne and PSI.

  11. Using Cable Suspended Submersible Pumps to Reduce Production Costs to Increase Ultimate Recovery in the Red Mountain Field of the San Juan Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells, installing cable suspended submersible pumps ( Phase I ) and operating the oil field for approximately one year ( Phase II ). Upon the completion of Phases I and II ( Budget Period I ), Enerdyne LLC commenced work on Phase III which required additional drilling in an attempt to improve field economics ( Budget Period II ). The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for the two Budget Periods, of the Agreement, was $1,205,008.00 as detailed in Phase I, II & III Authorization for Expenditures (AFE). This report describes tasks performed and results experienced by Enerdyne LLC during the three phases of the cooperative agreement.

  12. Faces of Science: Juan Duque

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFY 2008 FOIAFabricatedJuan Duque March 4,

  13. Fourier Ataca de Nuevo Juan Pablo Pinasco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinasco, Juan Pablo

    Fourier Ataca de Nuevo Juan Pablo Pinasco Basado parcialmente en el trabajo de Kechris, Set theory and uniqueness for trigonometric series 2007 Juan Pablo Pinasco Fourier Ataca de Nuevo #12;Parte I Fourier Juan Pablo Pinasco Fourier Ataca de Nuevo #12;Fourier (1768-1830) 1807 - 1822 Estudia la propagaci´on del

  14. Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan. Final report, May 1, 1995--November 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Pritchett, J.W. [and others

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. This comprehensive report describes the work accomplished during FY 1993-1996. A brief review of the geological and geophysical surveys at the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is presented (Section 2). Chemical data, consisting of analyses of steam and water from Sumikawa wells, are described and interpreted to indicate compositions and temperatures of reservoir fluids (Section 3). The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures (Section 4). Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter (Section 5). New interpretations of pressure transient data from several wells are discussed (Section 6). The available data have been synthesized to formulate a conceptual model for the Sumikawa Geothermal Field (Section 7).

  15. Juan E. Santos PUBLICATIONS Refereed Journals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    J. G. Rubino, C. L. Ravazzoli and J. E. Santos, The role of Biot slow waves in ..... Juan E. Santos and Fabio I. Zyserman, Propagacin de ondas de ultrasonido.

  16. Accusation against Juan Domnguez de Mendoza for blasphemy (1667)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nostas, Alissa; Coll, Magdalena; Imhoff, Brian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simmons, and Jos Antonio Esquibel, eds. Juan Domnguez deconcluido; Simmons y Esquibel reunieron todo el material que

  17. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  18. Arquitecturas Software Juan Jos Moreno Navarro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fredlund, Lars-?ke

    Arquitecturas Software Juan José Moreno Navarro (Curso de Software basado en Componentes, junto a Lars-Ake Fredlund) Arquitecturas Software · Motivación: ­ Complejidad creciente de aplicaciones sus propiedades globales. Arquitecturas Software · Características: ­ Parte del diseño de software

  19. Melt Zones Beneath Five Volcanic Complexes in California: An...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  20. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  1. The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, M.R. Jr.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system.

  2. area san juan: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in computer science declined by 10 Akl, Robert 147 Monitoring, modeling and predicting timber plantations dynamics. The case of San Juan de la Costa (Chile) Physics Websites...

  3. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varney, Peter J.

    2002-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development.

  4. Juan Carlos Algaba Marcos CC --3.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ming-Jye

    #12;#12; #12; Juan Carlos Algaba Marcos CC -- 3.0 CC https VLBI 20 #12;VLBI VLBI Alfred Wegener 1912 VLBI Juan Carlos Algaba Marcos CC -- 3.0 Marcos CC -- 3.0 CC https://isp.moe.edu.tw/ccedu/service.php #12; Summit Camp Polar Service

  5. Extracting knowledge from data originated in web sites Juan D. Velsquez 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baeza-Yates, Ricardo

    Extracting knowledge from data originated in web sites Juan D. Velsquez 2005 1 Web mining Extracting knowledge from data originated in web sites Juan D. VelJuan D. Velsquez Silvasquez Silva knowledge from data originated in web sites Juan D. Velsquez 2005 2 Outline 1. Motivation. 2. Web

  6. Hit from both sides: tracking industrial and volcanic plumes in Mexico City with surface measurements and OMI SO2 retrievals during the MILAGRO field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Foy, B.

    Large sulfur dioxide plumes were measured in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO field campaign. This paper seeks to identify the sources of these plumes and the meteorological processes that affect ...

  7. Volcanic studies at Katmai

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) is a national effort supported by the Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey, and the National Science Foundation. One of the projects proposed for the CSDP consists of drilling a series of holes in Katmai National Park in Alaska to give a third dimension to the model of the 1912 eruption of Novarupta, and to investigate the processes of explosive volcanism and hydrothermal transport of metals (Eichelberger et al., 1988). The proposal for research drilling at Katmai states that ``the size, youth, elevated temperature, and simplicity of the Novarupta vent make it a truly unique scientific target.`` The National Park Service (NPS), which has jurisdiction, is sympathetic to aims of the study. However, NPS wishes to know whether Katmai is indeed uniquely suited to the research, and has asked the Interagency Coordinating Group to support an independent assessment of this claim. NPS suggested the National Academy of Sciences as an appropriate organization to conduct the assessment. In response, the National Research Council -- the working arm of the Academy -- established, under the aegis of its US Geodynamics Committee, a panel whose specific charge states: ``The proposed investigation at Katmai has been extensively reviewed for scientific merit by the three sponsoring and participating agencies. Thus, the scientific merit of the proposed drilling at Katmai is not at issue. The panel will review the proposal for scientific drilling at Katmai and prepare a short report addressing the specific question of the degree to which it is essential that the drilling be conducted at Katmai as opposed to volcanic areas elsewhere in the world.``

  8. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

  9. The Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Times And Its Relationship To San Juan Mountains Thermal Sources Abstract Heat-flow and coal-maturation data suggest that the thermal history of the San Juan Basin has been...

  10. Influences of the Juan de Fuca Eddy on circulation, nutrients, and phytoplankton1 production in the northern California Current System2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Current. Results from three years of field studies5 demonstrate that the eddy increases in spatial extent-driven currents in the surface Ekman12 layer cause the eddy to be "leaky" on its southern perimeter. Eddy surfaceInfluences of the Juan de Fuca Eddy on circulation, nutrients, and phytoplankton1 production

  11. Survey of Rare Plants San Juan Public Lands in Dolores and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest--are in the process of revising their management plan. Since one of their missions has beenSurvey of Rare Plants San Juan Public Lands in Dolores and Montezuma Counties, Colorado Colorado #12;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The San Juan Public Lands agencies--Bureau of Land Management and San Juan

  12. STUDIES IN GEOPHYSICS 4'~xplosiveVolcanism:-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volcanism was modeled in experiments in which thermite melt fFe + AtOj explosively interacted with water

  13. High-index-core Bragg fibers: dispersion Juan A. Monsoriu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernndez de Crdoba, Pedro

    . P. Yeh, A. Yariv, and E. Marom, "Theory of Bragg fiber," J. Opt. Soc. Am. 68, 1196-1201 (1978). 4. Y. Xu, G.X. Ouyang, R.K. Lee, and A. Yariv, "Asymptotic Matrix Theory of Bragg Fibers," J. LightwaveHigh-index-core Bragg fibers: dispersion properties Juan A. Monsoriu Departamento de Fsica

  14. Reasoning about Dynamic Systems and Bifurcations Juan J. Flores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    A bifurcation occurs in a dynamic system when the structure of the system itself and therefore also its qual of an electrical power system changes during the day, etc. Changes in the parameters, even if they are infinitesReasoning about Dynamic Systems and Bifurcations Juan J. Flores juanf@zeus.umich.mx Division de

  15. Information Science in Europe Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Information Science in Europe Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan University of Lyon 3 4, cours Albert Thomas and Information Science Birketinget 6, Copenhagen, Denmark PI@db.dk Tatjana Aparac-Jelusi University of Zadar aims at giving an overview on the situation of information science in a few selected European countries

  16. Re-Positioning Information Science Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Re-Positioning Information Science Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan ELICO - University of Lyon 3, Lyon, to move from librarianship, bibliography, and documentation to an information science. In 1968 the American Documentation Institute was renamed American Society for Information Science. By the twenty

  17. Imaginacion e identidad: los personajes de Juan Tovar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, Susan Michele

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    propios impulsos y quedarse al margen de la corriente. Esta tesis sigue el estilo de Hispania. Entre estos estaba Juan Tovar. Tovar se considera "medio atipico" en su generacion, porque en sus libros la pre- sentacion de la adolescencia es escasa y muy...

  18. Temperature Effects on Electrophoresis Anita Rogacs and Juan G. Santiago*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago, Juan G.

    Temperature Effects on Electrophoresis Anita Rogacs and Juan G. Santiago* Department of Mechanical: We present a model capturing the important contributors to the effects of temperature on the observable electrophoretic mobilities of small ions, and on solution conductivity and pH. Our temperature

  19. Customizing AOSE Methodologies by Reusing AOSE Thomas Juan Leon Sterling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascardi, Viviana

    Customizing AOSE Methodologies by Reusing AOSE Features Thomas Juan Leon Sterling Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering, The University of Melbourne 221 Bouverie Street Carlton engineering support for a diverse range of software quality attributes, such as privacy and openness

  20. A model simulation of Pinatubo volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Turco, R.P. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Toon, O.B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)] [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)

    1995-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional, time-dependent model is used to study the chemical, microphysical, and radiative properties of volcanic aerosols produced by the Mount Pinatubo eruption on June 15, 1991. The authors` model treats gas-phase sulfur photochemistry, gas-to-particle conversion of sulfur, and the microphysics of sulfate aerosols and ash particles under stratospheric conditions. The dilution and diffusion of the volcanic eruption clouds are also accounted for in these conditions. Heteromolecular homogeneous and heterogeneous binary H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O nucleation, acid and water condensational growth, coagulation, and gravitational sedimentation are treated in detail in the model. Simulations suggested that after several weeks, the volcanic cloud was composed mainly of sulfuric acid/water droplets produced in situ from the SO{sub 2} emissions. The large amounts of SO{sub 2} (around 20 Mt) injected into the stratosphere by the Pinatubo eruption initiated homogeneous nucleation which generated a high concentration of small H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O droplets. These newly formed particles grew rapidly by condensation and coagulation in the first few months and then reached their stabilized sizes with effective radii in a range between 0.3 and 0.5 {mu}m approximately one-half year after the eruption. The predicted volcanic cloud parameters reasonably agree with measurements in term of the vertical distribution and lifetime of the volcanic aerosols, their basic microphysical structures (e.g., size distribution, concentration, mass ratio, and surface area) and radiative properties. The persistent volcanic aerosols can produce significant anomalies in the radiation field, which have important climatic consequences. The large enhancement in aerosol surface area can result in measurable global stratospheric ozone depletion. 57 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

  2. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

  3. SNTESIS DE IMGENES EN IMAGEN M. CARMEN JUAN LIZANDRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández Orallo, José

    SÍNTESIS DE IMÁGENES EN IMAGEN M?DICA M. CARMEN JUAN LIZANDRA CARLOS MONSERRAT ARANDA JOS?) #12;1. INTRODUCCI?N Las operaciones de síntesis de imagen crean imágenes partiendo de otras imágenes o métodos por ordenador, una imagen resultante que no existe con anterioridad. Generalmente, las operaciones

  4. Late Quaternary geology of small basaltic volcanic centers, SW USA: Disparity among dating methods and implications for volcanic and geomorphic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences; McFadden, L.; Perry, F. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geology; Forman, S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Byrd Polar Research Center; Crowe, B.; Pothis, J.; Olinger, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of volcanic hazards near the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain provides the impetus for a series of detailed field and geochronologic studies of selected small late Quaternary basaltic scoria cones and lava flows in Nevada and California. Two of the most significant results of these studies are: the presence of chronostratigraphic units which indicate multiple eruptions with significant intervals of no activity between events (polycyclic volcanism); and a marked difference between conventional, numerical ages derived from K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 methods and numerical, calibrated, and relative ages derived from thermoluminescence, cosmogenic He-3, the degree of soil development, and geomorphology of these volcanic landforms. Soil-bounded unconformities and buried stone pavements define the boundaries of chronostratigraphic units within these small volume basaltic centers. Volcanic centers displaying this type of stratigraphy may appear morphological simple but cannot be considered mongenetic. Recent studies by Perry and Crowe demonstrate that geochemical variations within a single basaltic volcanic center in NV are consistent with several magma batches forming a complex polycyclic volcano. The K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 ages are 1--2 orders of magnitude older than either TL or cosmogenic He-3 and appear to have insufficient precision to constrain the ages of chronostratigraphic units within polycyclic volcanoes. In contrast, preliminary data indicate the TL and cosmogenic He-3 dating methods have the ability to resolve the late Quaternary volcanic stratigraphy, and results from these dating methods are consistent with the degree of soil development and geomorphic modification of the volcanic units. K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 dates from these small basaltic volcanic centers have been used to calibrate new Quaternary dating methods, e.g. rock varnish, which in turn have been used to interpret landscape evolution in the SW US.

  5. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile Effects of Volcanism, Crustal...

  6. 2007 WTE Conference San Juan, Puerto Rico, March 14, 2007 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    2007 WTE Conference San Juan, Puerto Rico, March 14, 2007 1 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION San Juan, Puerto Rico March 14, 2007 Location: Inter American University, Metropolitan Campus' Main and (MC) Carl Soderberg, Director, USEPA R2, CEPA The management of solid waste in Puerto Rico presents

  7. Imaginacion e identidad: los personajes de Juan Tovar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, Susan Michele

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    imaginacibn EL MAR BAJO LA TIERRA: EL ARTE I IVA El ambiente Los personajes LA MUCHACHA EN EL BALCON 0 LA PRESENCIA D L R RET RAD : IPOS SI N ESP R TUAL 0 MA I A N P I FATA? Ambiguedades estilisticas y estructurales La encrucijada de dos vidas... propios impulsos y quedarse al margen de la corriente. Esta tesis sigue el estilo de Hispania. Entre estos estaba Juan Tovar. Tovar se considera "medio atipico" en su generacion, porque en sus libros la pre- sentacion de la adolescencia es escasa y muy...

  8. San Juan County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation, searchJuan

  9. San Juan County, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation, searchJuanUtah:

  10. EIS-0477: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, New Mexico and La Plata County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Interiors Bureau of Land Management is preparing an EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct a 230-kilovolt transmission line from the Farmington area in northwest New Mexico to Ignacio, Colorado, to relieve transmission constraints, serve new loads, and offer economic development through renewable energy development in the San Juan Basin. DOEs Western Area Power Administration is a cooperating agency; the proposed transmission line would require an interconnection with Western's Shiprock Substation, near Farmington, and a new Three Rivers Substation on Western's reserved lands.

  11. Volcanic loading: The dust veil index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, H.H. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Climatic Research Unit

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust ejected into the high atmosphere during explosive volcanic eruptions has been considered as a possible cause for climatic change. Dust veils created by volcanic eruptions can reduce the amount of light reaching the Earth`s surface and can cause reductions in surface temperatures. These climatic effects can be seen for several years following some eruptions and the magnitude and duration of the effects depend largely on the density or amount of tephra (i.e. dust) ejected, the latitude of injection, and atmospheric circulation patterns. Lamb (1970) formulated the Dust Veil Index (DVI) in an attempt to quantify the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact of a particular volcanic eruptions release of dust and aerosols over the years following the event. The DVI for any volcanic eruptions are available and have been used in estimating Lamb`s dust veil indices.

  12. Laboratory characterization of a highly weathered old alluvium in San Juan, Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guoping, 1968-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The old alluvium underlying much of metropolitan San Juan was formed in early Pleistocene and has undergone substantial post-depositional weathering in the tropical climate of Puerto Rico, resulting in a special combination ...

  13. A review of "A Companion to Juan Luis Vives" by Charles Fantazzi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Armas Wilson, and Isabel Lozano Renieblas when seeking to understand The Labors of Persiles and Sigismunda. Charles Fantazzi. A Companion to Juan Luis Vives. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2008. viii + 430 pp. $185.00. Review by elizabeth r. wright..., university of georgia. This volume offers detailed analysis and rigorous contextual- ization of the diverse writings of Juan Luis Vives (Valencia, Spain 1492/93?Bruges, Belgium, 1540). In the course of some sixty differ- ent publications, this Valencian...

  14. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  15. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  16. Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity...

  17. B.G. Thomas and S.P. Vanka, 2002 NSF Design, Service, Manufacturing and Industrial Innovation Research Conf., San Juan, Puerto Rico, January 7-10, 2002.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian G.

    Research Conf., San Juan, Puerto Rico, January 7-10, 2002. 1 Flow Dynamics and Inclusion Transport Innovation Research Conf., San Juan, Puerto Rico, January 7-10, 2002. 2 1. INTRODUCTION Continued viability

  18. Proceedings of the International Conference on Modeling and Simulation of Microsystems, Semiconductors, Sensors, and Actuators, MSM'99, April 19-21, 1999, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    , Semiconductors, Sensors, and Actuators, MSM'99, April 19-21, 1999, San Juan, Puerto Rico. Mesoscopic Breathing

  19. Monday, March 12, 2007 MARS VOLCANISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Monday, March 12, 2007 MARS VOLCANISM 2:30 p.m. Crystal Ballroom B Chairs: J. E. Bleacher M. H to the northeast. 2:45 p.m. Baloga S. M. * Glaze L. S. Time-Dependent Levee Growth for Mars Lava Flows [#1276, for very cold climate, sulfur dioxide glaciers and liquid sulfur dioxide runoff. 4:00 p.m. Johnson S. S

  20. Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,...

  1. A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the vents, being flanked or covered with volcaniclastic flow deposits. Each volcanic pile is several kilometers wide and several hundred meters thick, and overlaps one after...

  2. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thompson, 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Thompson,...

  3. archean volcanic hosted: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    greenstone pile Sandiford, Mike 23 Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and...

  4. A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than...

  5. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title...

  6. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    82) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982)...

  7. anatolian volcanic province: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volcanic Province Geosciences Websites Summary: the Lonar crater. Chondrite-normalized Rare Earth Element (REE) patterns in the target basalts and brecciaTrace element and...

  8. Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic Region, New Mexico...

  9. Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range,...

  10. Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The...

  11. Magnetic Modeling Of The Phlegraean Volcanic District With Extension...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Archipelago, Italy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Magnetic Modeling Of The Phlegraean Volcanic District With Extension To The...

  12. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration...

  13. Encoding Molecular Motions in Voxel Maps Juan Cortes, Sophie Barbe, Monique Erard and Thierry Simeon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corts, Juan

    1 Encoding Molecular Motions in Voxel Maps Juan Cortes, Sophie Barbe, Monique Erard and Thierry] have been devel- oped to overcome the limitations of MD. Such methods present however a major drawback, France sbarbe@insa-toulouse.fr M. Erard is with the IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse, France monique

  14. Encoding Molecular Motions in Voxel Maps Juan Cortes, Sophie Barbe, Monique Erard and Thierry Simeon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corts, Juan

    Encoding Molecular Motions in Voxel Maps Juan Cortes, Sophie Barbe, Monique Erard and Thierry Sim] have been developed to overcome the limitations of MD. Such methods present however a major drawback, France sbarbe@insa-toulouse.fr M. Erard is with the IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse, France monique

  15. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake lineae (RSL), thought to represent seasonal brines, has sparked interest in analogous environments watershed and show that this, together with small amounts of meltwater, are capable of generating brines

  16. Some Improvements in 81-Level Inverters for Traction Drive Juan Dixon, Cristin Elgueta and Luis Morn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Catlica de Chile)

    and their drawbacks have been carefully studied to allow its practical use in electric vehicles. Keywords: converterSome Improvements in 81-Level Inverters for Traction Drive Systems Juan Dixon, Cristin Elgueta and Luis Morn Abstract The application of high-level multilevel converters in traction systems is very

  17. DSP Based Ultracapacitor System for Hybrid-Electric Vehicles Juan W. Dixon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Catlica de Chile)

    DSP Based Ultracapacitor System for Hybrid-Electric Vehicles Juan W. Dixon Department of Electrical to an electric vehicle at the Universidad Catlica de Chile. These results will lead to conclusions about of primary source in hybrid-electric vehicles. The efficiency gain is being monitored at the ultracapacitor

  18. Ionospheric Threat Model Methodology for Juan Blanch, Todd Walter, Per Enge. Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Ionospheric Threat Model Methodology for WAAS Juan Blanch, Todd Walter, Per Enge. Stanford of a threat model. The threat model is used to restrict the expected ionospheric behavior. It must not be too driving the ionosphere are not entirely known, a decision has been made to base the threat model

  19. Refining k-means by Bootstrap and Data Depth Aurora Torrente and Juan Romo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romo, Juan

    Refining k-means by Bootstrap and Data Depth Aurora Torrente and Juan Romo Departamento de Estad two simple, computationally fast methods that allow the refinement of the initial points of k-means to cluster a given data set. They are based on alternating k-means and the search of the deepest (most

  20. Impartial Trimmed k-means for Functional Juan Antonio Cuesta-Albertos a 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuesta, Juan Antonio

    Impartial Trimmed k-means for Functional Data Juan Antonio Cuesta-Albertos a 1 , Ricardo Fraiman b. For cluster analysis, impartial trimming techniques offer a resistant alternative to k-means, one of the most widely used cluster methods. A quick description of k-means is the following: For a fixed value of k

  1. Excelencia Internacional La Universidad Rey Juan Carlos,como complemento a las carreras oficiales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    correspondan a claras demandas sociales o del merca- do de trabajo;completar y actualizar la formacin a distancia, desarrollndose uno de los principales objetivos de la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos,como es- ses del mundo del trabajo y que podrn plantearse tanto a instancias de insti- tuciones pblicas como

  2. COLOMBIA'S ELECTORAL AND PARTY SYSTEM: PROPOSALS FOR By Grard Roland and Juan Gonzalo Zapata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    1 COLOMBIA'S ELECTORAL AND PARTY SYSTEM: PROPOSALS FOR REFORMS. By Grard Roland and Juan Gonzalo for their comments on the first draft. #12;2 1. Introduction and summary. Colombia's political system, despite to tackle Colombia's major problems head-on. However, the major obstacle to reforms in Colombia has been

  3. Reversible ratchets as Brownian particles in an adiabatically changing periodic potential Juan M. R. Parrondo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrondo, Juan M.R.

    Reversible ratchets as Brownian particles in an adiabatically changing periodic potential Juan M. R of particles is induced without any energy consumption. These cycles can be called reversible ratchets called ratch- ets, since they are somehow inspired by the discussion in Ref. 16 of a ratchet working

  4. Paradoxical games, ratchets, and related phenomena Juan M.R. Parrondo Luis Dinis Javier Buceta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindenberg, Katja

    Paradoxical games, ratchets, and related phenomena Juan M.R. Parrondo Luis Dinis Javier Buceta states in spatially extended systems [2, 3, 4]. Brownian ratchets show that noise can be rectified a Brownian ratchet. In fact, the paradox came up as a translation to gambling games of the flashing ratchet

  5. DDT in endangered Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) Juan Jose Alava a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gobas, Frank

    DDT in endangered Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) Juan Jose Alava a , Peter S. Ross b Islands Ecuador DDT p,p0 -DDE Health risk a b s t r a c t We characterize for the first time the presence of DDT and its metabolites in tropical Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wolleabeki). P DDT concentrations

  6. Presence in a Distributed Virtual Environment Juan S. Casanueva and Edwin H. Blake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, Edwin

    Presence in a Distributed Virtual Environment Juan S. Casanueva and Edwin H. Blake CS00 Virtual Environments (CVEs) involve the use of a distributed architecture, and advanced interactive user of presence of others in the environment, thus having a feeling that they are directly cooperating with real

  7. Applying MDA to the Development of Data Warehouses Jose-Norberto Mazn, Juan Trujillo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Il-Yeol

    Applying MDA to the Development of Data Warehouses Jose-Norberto Mazón, Juan Trujillo Dept Architecture (MDA) is a standard framework for software development that addresses the complete life cycle. In this paper, we describe how to align the whole DW development process to MDA. Then, we define MD2 A (Multi

  8. Crossflow instability of finite Bdewadt flows: Transients and spiral waves Juan M. Lopez,1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, John M.

    Crossflow instability of finite Bdewadt flows: Transients and spiral waves Juan M. Lopez,1,a is not robust, suffering crossflow instability to multiarmed spiral waves via a supercritical Hopf bifurcation as a canonical three- dimensional flow which exemplifies the crossflow instability.14 In this flow

  9. Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes characterization2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes 13 In this study, we report chemical and isotope data for 23 geothermal water samples collected geothermal waters collected from deep boreholes16 in different geothermal fields (Ohaaki, Wairakei, Mokai

  10. auckland volcanic field: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Academic audit report Cycle 4 August 2009 12;12;New Zealand Universities Academic Audit Unit Te Whanga Ttari University of Auckland Te Whare Wnanga o Tmaki Makaurau Academic...

  11. Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  12. Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  13. San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton Sea Geothermal(Empire) GeothermalFernando,San

  14. Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico, USA,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|InformationInformationHensley,Hershey,Hessen Energie GmbH

  15. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database Data andDarnestown, Maryland:(Blackwell, Et

  16. Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)Energy Information )Et Al.,Energy

  17. The volcanic acidification of glacial Lake Caviahue, Province of Neuquen, Argentina Johan C. Varekamp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    The volcanic acidification of glacial Lake Caviahue, Province of Neuquen, Argentina Johan C (northern Patagonia, Argentina) is a large glacial lake acidified by volcanic fluids from Copahue volcano

  18. Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations be used to infer the location of magma chambers or productive geothermal areas. The Hengill volcanic triple-junction complex has a well-developed geothermal system, which is being exploited to extract hot

  19. Volcanic rifting at Martian grabens Daniel Me`ge,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mege, Daniel

    Volcanic rifting at Martian grabens Daniel Me`ge,1 Anthony C. Cook,2,3 Erwan Garel,4 Yves: Solar System Objects: Mars; 8121 Tectonophysics: Dynamics, convection currents and mantle plumes; 8010: Me`ge, D., A. C. Cook, E. Garel, Y. Lagabrielle, and M.-H. Cormier, Volcanic rifting at Martian

  20. Site Characterization Activities with a focus on NETL MMV efforts: Southwest Regional Partnership, San Juan Basin Pilot, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's San Juan Basin pilot site to aid in the deployment and Verification (MMV) associated with geologic sequestration activities. Our efforts are primarily focused sequestration test in the

  1. Can WAAS Availability Be Inferred From Geomagnetic Data? An Analysis Seebany Datta-Barua, Todd Walter, Juan Blanch, Per Enge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ) was commissioned by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in July of 2003. Its function is to provide high Walter, Juan Blanch, Per Enge Stanford University Abstract The Federal Aviation Administration's Wide

  2. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Relining Lateral A - Final

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popp, Michael; Robinson, John; Sturdivant, Allen; Lacewell, Ronald; Rister, Edward

    Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Juan) to the North American...

  3. San Juan, Puerto Rico -Jueves 07 Diciembre 2006. Actualizado a las 9:52:40 PM LTIMO COMENTARIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    endi.com San Juan, Puerto Rico - Jueves 07 Diciembre 2006. Actualizado a las 9:52:40 PM LTIMO Observatorio opera en Puerto Rico desde 1963 y es visitado por 100,000 personas al ao. Tambin ha sido

  4. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

  5. UNCOVERING BURIED VOLCANOES: NEW DATA FOR PROBABILISTIC VOLCANIC HAZARD ASSESSMENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.V. Perry

    2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Basaltic volcanism poses a potential hazard to the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository because multiple episodes of basaltic volcanism have occurred in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) in the past 11 Ma. Intervals between eruptive episodes average about 1 Ma. Three episodes have occurred in the Quaternary at approximately 1.1 Ma (5 volcanoes), 350 ka (2 volcanoes), and 80 ka (1 volcano). Because Yucca Mountain lies within the Basin and Range Province, a significant portion of the pre-Quaternary volcanic history of the YMR may be buried in alluvial-filled basins. An exceptionally high-resolution aeromagnetic survey and subsequent drilling program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in 2004 and is gathering data that will enhance understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns of Pliocene and Miocene volcanism in the region (Figure 1). DOE has convened a ten-member expert panel of earth scientists that will use the information gathered to update probabilistic volcanic hazard estimates originally obtained by expert elicitation in 1996. Yucca Mountain is a series of north-trending ridges of eastward-tilted fault blocks that are bounded by north to northeast-trending normal faults. Topographic basins filled with up to 500 m of alluvium surround it to the east, south and west. In the past several decades, nearly 50 holes have been drilled in these basins, mainly for Yucca Mountain Project Site Characterization and the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program. Several of these drill holes have penetrated relatively deeply buried (300-400 m) Miocene basalt; a Pliocene basalt dated at 3.8 Ma was encountered at a relatively shallow depth (100 m) in the northern Amargosa Desert (Anomaly B in Figure 1). The current drilling program is the first to specifically target and characterize buried basalt. Based on the new aeromagnetic survey and previous air and ground magnetic surveys (Connor et al. 2000; O'Leary et al. 2002), at least eight drill holes are planned with the goal of sampling each geographic subpopulation of magnetic anomalies in the region (Figure 1). This will result in a more complete characterization of the location, age, volume and composition of buried basaltic features for the purpose of updating the volcanic hazard assessment. Smith and Keenan (2005) suggested that volcanic hazard estimates might be 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than estimated by the DOE expert elicitation in 1996, based on (1) a proposed relationship between recurrence rates in the YMR and the Reveille-Lunar Crater volcanic field to the north, and (2) the implication that a number of so-far-undiscovered buried volcanoes would have a significant impact on hazard estimates. This article presents the new aeromagnetic data and an interpretation of the data that suggests magnetic anomalies nearest the proposed repository site represent buried Miocene basalt that will likely have only a minor impact on the volcanic hazard.

  6. A Handbook for the Application of Seismic Methods for Quantifying Naturally Fractured Gas Reservoirs in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resource in naturally fractured reservoirs? At the beginningheterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, such as the San JuanP-wave velocity when a fractured reservoir is present, can

  7. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and the youngest pulses of volcanism. > Oxygen-isotope data from illitesmectite clays in the Cochiti district are zonally distributed and range from -2.15 to +7.97...

  8. A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

  9. A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico Island, Azores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

  10. The dynamics of genetic and morphological variation on volcanic islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, Roger Stephen

    : volcanism; phylogeography; geographical variation; natural selection; Canary islands; Tarentola 1 and Canary islands). It has been argued that population extinctions, recolonizations and associ- ated a role in shaping geographical variation. The islands of the Canary Archipelago provide an excellent

  11. Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  12. Helium Isotopes in Geothermal and Volcanic Gases of the Western...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Helium Isotopes in Geothermal and Volcanic Gases of the Western United States, II. Long...

  13. Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  14. Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 1978, the Walker "O" No. 1 well at Terminal Geyser was drilled to 1222 m, all in volcanic rocks (Beall, 1981). Temperature-log...

  15. Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Mt Etna (Sicily) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic Area Of...

  16. Volcanic ash: What it is and how it forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.

    1991-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    There are four basic eruption processes that produce volcanic ash: (1) decompression of rising magma, gas bubble growth, and fragmentation of the foamy magma in the volcanic vent (magmatic), (2) explosive mixing of magma with ground or surface water (hydrovolcanic), (3) fragmentation of country rock during rapid expansion of steam and/or hot water (phreatic), and (4) breakup of lava fragments during rapid transport from the vent. Variations in eruption style and the characteristics of volcanic ashes produced during explosive eruptions depend on many factors, including magmatic temperature, gas content, viscosity and crystal content of the magma before eruption, the ratio of magma to ground or surface water, and physical properties of the rock enclosing the vent. Volcanic ash is composed of rock and mineral fragments, and glass shards, which is less than 2 mm in diameter. Glass shard shapes and sizes depend upon size and shape of gas bubbles present within the magma immediately before eruption and the processes responsible for fragmentation of the magma. Shards range from slightly curved, thin glass plates, which were broken from large, thin-walled spherical bubble walls, to hollow needles broken from pumiceous melts containing gas bubbles stretched by magma flow within the volcanic vent. Pumice fragments make up the coarser-grained portions of the glass fraction. Particle sizes range from meters for large blocks expelled near the volcanic vent to nanometers for fine ash and aerosol droplets within well-dispersed eruption plumes. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Halogen emissions from a small volcanic eruption: Modeling the peak concentrations, dispersion, and volcanically induced ozone loss in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    , with lesser quantities of H2S, H2 and CO. Volcanic emissions also often include halogen-bearing species, and the greater water vapor content in the lower troposphere at tropical latitudes, which enhance removal

  18. Characterization and assessment of uncertainty in San Juan Reservoir Santa Rosa Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becerra, Ernesto Jose

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    and posterior distributions.23 Fig. 3.5 ? Cumulative density distribution for prior information....................................24 Fig. 3.6? Graphical display of varying ranges of uncertainty in EUR estimates with time... ........................................25 TABLE 3.7 ? Volumetric EUR Decreased by 33 % of Most Likely Value ...................27 TABLE 3.8 ? Volumetric EUR Increased by 33 % of Most Likely Value.....................28 TABLE 3.9 ? Standard Deviation in Volumetric EUR Doubled...

  19. Identification and characterization of Hydraulic Flow Units in the San Juan Formation, Orocual Field, Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deghirmandjian, Odilia

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into "units" of similar fluid flow characteristics. The HFU method does not presume a relationship between variables. The non-parametric regression/transform technique is based on using variable transformations to generate relationship between dependent...

  20. Plio-Pleistocene time-averaged field in southern Patagonia recorded in lava flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Bradley S.

    Plio-Pleistocene time-averaged field in southern Patagonia recorded in lava flows V. Mejia and N. D of 53 lava flows from southern Patagonia (latitudes 49.5°­52.1°S) that include the Pali-Aike volcanic, 7 figures, 3 tables. Keywords: paleomagnetic secular variation; Patagonia; Pali-Aike Volcanic Field

  1. EIS-0112: Rifle to San Juan 345-kV Transmission Line and Associated Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture - Rural Electrification Administration developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of the Colorado-Ute Electric Association Inc. and the U.s. Department of Energy's Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) constructing and operating a 345-kilovolt transmission line from Rifle, Colorado, to the San Juan Generating Station near Farmington, New Mexico. WAPA served as a cooperating agency in the preparation of this statement and adopted it on 10/30/1984. WAPA assumed the lead role for project implementation after issuance of the final statement.

  2. Petrology and geochemistry of the Late Cenozoic volcanic rocks of the Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vespucci, P.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late Cenozoic rocks of Hispaniola are subdivided into two petrographically and geochemically contrasting series, a calc-alkaline series (CA-series), and a mafic alkaline series (MA-series). The CA-series are basalts, basaltic andesites, trachyandesites, and dacites occurring in several eruptive centers in the southern part of the Cordillera Central of the Dominican Republic. MA-series basalts are alkali-olivine basalts and limburgitic basalts occurring in the San Juan Valley of the Dominican republic and in the Cul de Sac of south central Haiti. Olivine, clinopyroxene, amphibole, mica, feldspar, and titanomagnetite were analyzed for major element chemical composition. MA-series basalts are slightly to moderately silica undersaturated, have high TiO2 (>1.5%) and MgO (>5.0%) and moderately high total alkalis (>2.0%). MA-series basalts are enriched in K, Rb, Sr, Ba, U, Th and LREEs with Ba/La ratios around 0.98. REE patterns are fractionated (chrondrite normalized La/Yb ratios around 62, and La/Sm ratios around 6). HFS elements Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta are high resembling intraplate basalts. 86SR/87SR ratios are high (0.7060-0.7070) with low Rb/Sr ratios (0.03 to 0.15). Basalts, basaltic andesites, trachyandesites, and dacites of the CA-series show low MgO (<5.0%) and TiO2(<2.0%), and moderately high total alkali contents (2 to 7%). Enrichment is seen in K Rb, Sr, Ba, Th, U, and LREEs with Ba/La ratios as high as 5.6 REE patterns are fractionated to a lesser degree compared to the MA-series (chondrite normalized La/Yb around 23, and La/Sm ratios less than 5). HFS elements are lower resembling typical island arc volcanic rocks. CA-series have 87Sr/86Sr ratios (.7043-.7053), with low Rb/Sr ratios as in the MA-series.

  3. Sub-Seafloor Carbon Dioxide Storage Potential on the Juan de Fuca Plate, Western North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Fairley; Robert Podgorney

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Juan de Fuca plate, off the western coast of North America, has been suggested as a site for geological sequestration of waste carbon dioxide because of its many attractive characteristics (high permeability, large storage capacity, reactive rock types). Here we model CO2 injection into fractured basalts comprising the upper several hundred meters of the sub-seafloor basalt reservoir, overlain with low-permeability sediments and a large saline water column, to examine the feasibility of this reservoir for CO2 storage. Our simulations indicate that the sub-seafloor basalts of the Juan de Fuca plate may be an excellent CO2 storage candidate, as multiple trapping mechanisms (hydrodynamic, density inversions, and mineralization) act to keep the CO2 isolated from terrestrial environments. Questions remain about the lateral extent and connectivity of the high permeability basalts; however, the lack of wells or boreholes and thick sediment cover maximize storage potential while minimizing potential leakage pathways. Although promising, more study is needed to determine the economic viability of this option.

  4. Edge effects in finite elongated graphene nanoribbons Oded Hod,1 Juan E. Peralta,2 and Gustavo E. Scuseria1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hod, Oded

    Edge effects in finite elongated graphene nanoribbons Oded Hod,1 Juan E. Peralta,2 and Gustavo E December 2007 We analyze the relevance of finite-size effects to the electronic structure of long graphene graphene nanoribbons, most of the physical features appearing in the density of states of an infinite

  5. ARQUITECTURA RACIONALISTA DE PALMA Professorat: Catalina de Juan Oliver, professora associada de l'rea de Construccions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    FM0840 ARQUITECTURA RACIONALISTA DE PALMA Professorat: Catalina de Juan Oliver, professora a conèixer l'arquitectura racionalista de Palma, una part important del patrimoni de la ciutat pràcticament una de les ciutats espanyoles on es conserven més mostres d'arquitectura racionalista. Objectius Que l

  6. Traction Drive System for Electric Vehicles, Using Multilevel Converters Juan W. Dixon, Micah Ortzar and Felipe Ros

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Catlica de Chile)

    Traction Drive System for Electric Vehicles, Using Multilevel Converters Juan W. Dixon, Micah converters for electric vehicles using multilevel inverters. They are being compared with inverters using vehicles. On the other hand, the PWM techniques used today to control modern static converters for electric

  7. RNAiFold: A web server for RNA inverse folding and molecular Juan Antonio Garcia-Martin, Peter Clote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clote, Peter

    RNAiFold: A web server for RNA inverse folding and molecular design Juan Antonio Garcia title: RNAiFold web server Key words: RNA, inverse folding, molecular design, synthetic biology, RNA to the 21st century. In this paper, we describe a new web server to support in silico RNA molecular design

  8. VTRA 2010 2013 Preventing Oil Spills from Large Ships and Barges in Northern Puget Sound & Strait of Juan de Fuca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan Ren

    VTRA 2010 2013 Preventing Oil Spills from Large Ships and Barges in Northern Puget Sound & Strait of Juan de Fuca 1 Prepared for Puget Sound Partnership and the Makah Tribe Situations Incidents Accidents likely be devastating on the long-term restoration and protection of Puget Sound and Salish Sea waters

  9. CASAS RIGALL, Juan, ed. (2007). Libro de Alexandre, Nueva Biblioteca de Erudicin y Crtica, 28, Madrid, Castalia, 860

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    relación de la vida y fortuna de Alejandro Magno, héroe del poema, Juan Casas Rigall escribe cincuenta y descrita la arquitectura de esta edición. El último apartado de la ,,Introducción ­ ,,Fortuna e influencia

  10. CONSUMPTION OF NATIVE AND NONNATIVE FISHES BY INTRODUCED LARGEMOUTH BASS (MICROPTERUS SALMOIDES) IN THE SAN JUAN RIVER,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gido, Keith B.

    CONSUMPTION OF NATIVE AND NONNATIVE FISHES BY INTRODUCED LARGEMOUTH BASS (MICROPTERUS SALMOIDES native fishes. Introduced largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) in the San Juan River, New Mexico. The disproportional abundance of native fishes in the diet of juvenile largemouth bass suggests greater susceptibility

  11. Fiber-optic sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in PEM fuel cells Juan F. Botero-Cadavid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Fiber-optic sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in PEM fuel cells by Juan F. Botero of an optical fiber and its small size (125 m diameter), make the sensors here developed an ideal solution, by photocopy or other means, without the permission of the author. #12;ii Supervisory Committee Fiber-optic

  12. DDT Strikes Back: Galapagos Sea Lions Face Increasing Health Juan Jose Alava, Sandie Salazar, Marilyn Cruz, Gustavo Jimenez-Uzcategui,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gobas, Frank

    SYNOPSIS DDT Strikes Back: Galapagos Sea Lions Face Increasing Health Risks Juan Jose´ Alava. INTRODUCTION Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is an effective and relatively cheap anti-malaria pesticide; Blus 2003), the WHO has recommitted to the use of the malaria-fighting pesticide DDT in tropical

  13. San Juan, Puerto Rico -Jueves 07 Diciembre 2006. Actualizado a las 12:45:28 PM Investigarn del

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    endi.com San Juan, Puerto Rico - Jueves 07 Diciembre 2006. Actualizado a las 12:45:28 PM Blasini en el concurso Miss Puerto Rico Universe 2007? Era la mejor candidata Haban otras ms bellas e $15 millones para ese pueblo anualmente. El Observatorio opera en Puerto Rico desde 1963 y es visitado

  14. San Juan, Puerto Rico -Jueves 07 Diciembre 2006. Actualizado a las 8:39:48 PM LTIMO COMENTARIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    endi.com San Juan, Puerto Rico - Jueves 07 Diciembre 2006. Actualizado a las 8:39:48 PM LTIMO radiotelescopio ms grande del mundo, tiene un valor cientfico ms all de Puerto Rico, por lo que amerita que el Puerto Rico, como ese observatorio en Arecibo que permite el intercambio de conocimiento en reas

  15. San Juan, Puerto Rico -Jueves 07 Diciembre 2006. Actualizado a las 5:23:26 PM ANTERIOR | SIGUIENTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    endi.com San Juan, Puerto Rico - Jueves 07 Diciembre 2006. Actualizado a las 5:23:26 PM ANTERIOR Puerto Rico", manifest. El radiotelescopio es parte del Centro Nacional de Astronoma e Ionosfera (NAIC / Puerto Rico Hoy Por The Associated Press (10:05 a.m.) Pidi a la NSF que no adopte las recomendaciones de

  16. PO BOX 23400, SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO 00931-3400 TEL. (787) 758-3350, FAX (787) 758-7196

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Gregory J.

    PO BOX 23400, SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO 00931-3400 TEL. (787) 758-3350, FAX (787) 758-7196 JUNTA DE SNDICOS UNIVERSIDAD DE PUERTO RICO CERTIFICACIN NMERO 45 2008-2009 Yo, Salvador Antonetti Zequeira, Secretario de la Junta de Sndicos de la Universidad de Puerto Rico, CERTIFICO QUE: La Junta de Sndicos, en

  17. Walgreens and University of Puerto Rico School of Pharmacy Community Pharmacy Residency Program (PGY1), San Juan, Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Gregory J.

    Walgreens and University of Puerto Rico School of Pharmacy Community Pharmacy Residency Program (PGY1), San Juan, Puerto Rico Walgreens Community Pharmacy Residency Program is a postgraduate training is academically affiliated and financially supported, in part, by the University of Puerto Rico School of Pharmacy

  18. University of Puerto Rico School of Pharmacy and Walgreens Community Pharmacy Residency Program (PGY1), San Juan, Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Gregory J.

    University of Puerto Rico School of Pharmacy and Walgreens Community Pharmacy Residency Program (PGY1), San Juan, Puerto Rico University of Puerto Rico and Walgreens Community Pharmacy Residency, by the University of Puerto Rico School of Pharmacy. The residency will allow the pharmacist to build

  19. Battery Powered Electric Car, Using Photovoltaic Cells Assistance Juan Dixon, Alberto Ziga, Angel Abusleme and Daniel Soto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    Battery Powered Electric Car, Using Photovoltaic Cells Assistance Juan Dixon, Alberto Zúñiga, Angel Vehicles (EVs) is the scarce capacity of conventional electrical energy storage systems. Although. However, if a particular situation is considered, in which a small-sized, high-efficiency EV operates

  20. "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park--Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park-- Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots U, ydrothermal (hot water) and steaming ground. These features are re- lated to active volcanism, the largest fumarole (steam and volcanic-gas vent) in the park. The temperature of the high-velocity steam

  1. SILICATE MELT PROPERTIES AND VOLCANIC Youxue Zhang,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    SILICATE MELT PROPERTIES AND VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS Youxue Zhang,1,2 Zhengjiu Xu,2 Mengfan Zhu,1 2007. [1] Knowledge about the properties of silicate melts is needed by volcanologists and petrologists and diffusivity of volatile components in silicate melts, silicate melt viscosity, and the fragmentation condition

  2. Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING 3:00 p.m. Waterway. The Geological History of Venus: Constraints from Buffered Crater Densities [#1096] We apply buffered crater density technique to a new global geological map of Venus (Ivanov, 2008) and obtain robust constraints

  3. Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

  4. TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

  5. EIS-0355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Environmental Impact Statement and associated supplements and amendments provides information on the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) proposal to (1) remediate approximately 11.9 million tons of contaminated materials located on the Moab site and approximately 39,700 tons located on nearby vicinity properties and (2) develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for the Moab site using the framework of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project (DOE/EIS-0198, October 1996). The surface remediation alternatives analyzed in the EIS include on-site disposal of the contaminated materials and off-site disposal at one of three alternative locations in Utah using one or more transportation options: truck, rail, or slurry pipeline.

  6. Time-resolved pattern evolution in a large-aperture class A laser Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos Group. Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    and Chaos Group. Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28933 Mo´stoles, Madrid, Spain J. M. Guerra Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Ciencias Fi´sicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain Received 15

  7. Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BVEnergy Information Shevenell,Information2004)

  8. Materials compatibility with the volcanic environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Htun, K.M.

    1984-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts were made to run materials compatibility, volcanic gas collection, and heat transfer experiments during the 1977 Kilauea eruption. Preliminary results from the recovered samples showed that Fe, Ni, and Fe-Ni alloys were the most heavily oxidized. The Mo and W alloys showed some attack and only neglible reaction was seen on 310 stainless, Hastelloy C, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Rene 41, and Nichrome. Results are qualitative only. (DLC)

  9. Tectonic Setting and Characteristics of Natural Fractures in MesaVerde and Dakota Reservoirs of the San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LORENZ,JOHN C.; COOPER,SCOTT P.

    2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cretaceous strata that fill the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado were shortened in a generally N-S to NN13-SSW direction during the Laramide orogeny. This shortening was the result of compression of the strata between southward indentation of the San Juan Uplift at the north edge of the basin and northward to northeastward indentation of the Zuni Uplift from the south. Right-lateral strike-slip motion was concentrated at the eastern and western basin margins of the basin to form the Hogback Monocline and the Nacimiento Uplift at the same time, and small amounts of shear may have been pervasive within the basin as well. Vertical extension fractures, striking N-S to NNE-SSW with local variations (parallel to the Laramide maximum horizontal compressive stress), formed in both Mesaverde and Dakota sandstones under this system, and are found in outcrops and in the subsurface of the San Juan Basin. The immature Mesaverde sandstones typically contain relatively long, irregular, vertical extension fractures, whereas the quartzitic Dakota sandstones contain more numerous, shorter, sub-parallel, closely spaced, extension fractures. Conjugate shear planes in several orientations are also present locally in the Dakota strata.

  10. The Long Valley/Mono Basin Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ValleyMono Basin Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotelluric and Magnetic Variation Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  11. Shallow gas well drilling with coiled tubing in the San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, R.G.; Ovitz, R.W.; Guild, G.J.; Biggs, M.D.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coiled tubing is being utilized to drill new wells, for re-entry drilling to deepen or laterally extend existing wells, and for underbalanced drilling to prevent formation damage. Less than a decade old, coiled tubing drilling technology is still in its inaugral development stage. Initially, utilizing coiled tubing was viewed as a {open_quotes}science project{close_quotes} to determine the validity of performing drilling operations in-lieu of the conventional rotary rig. Like any new technology, the initial attempts were not always successful, but did show promise as an economical alternative if continued efforts were made in the refinement of equipment and operational procedures. A multiwell project has been completed in the San Juan Basin of Northwestern New Mexico which provides documentation indicating that coiled tubing can be an alternative to the conventional rotary rig. A 3-well pilot project, a 6-well project was completed uniquely utilizing the combined resources of a coiled tubing service company, a producing company, and a drilling contractor. This combination of resources aided in the refinement of surface equipment, personnel, mud systems, jointed pipe handling, and mobilization. The results of the project indicate that utilization of coiled tubing for the specific wells drilled was an economical alternative to the conventional rotary rig for drilling shallow gas wells.

  12. A Field Demonstration of an Instrument Performing Automatic Classification of Geologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -sensitive classifications of geologic surfaces in mesoscale scenes. A series of tests at the Cima Volcanic Fields in the Mojave Desert, California demonstrate mesoscale surficial mapping at two distinct sites of geologic

  13. Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow Tank Jump to:WindLaoLaredoLassen Volcanic

  14. Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpType B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Jump

  15. Anderson-Gregory; Constable-Steven; Orcutt-John; Staudigel-Hubert; Tolstoy-Maya; Wyatt-Frank-K, Observing seafloor tilt on Axial Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    -Frank-K, Observing seafloor tilt on Axial Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union de Fuca Ridge. Geophysical Research Letters.22; 2, Pages 147-150. 1995. Baker-Edward-T; Fox eruption of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Geophysical Research Letters.26; 23, Pages 3445-3448. 1999

  16. Temporal and petrogenetic constraints on volcanic accretionary processes at 9-10 degrees North East Pacific Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, Christopher L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic accretion at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) occurs over a ~2-4 km wide neo-volcanic zone on either side of the axial summit trough (AST). Eruption ages are critical for understanding the distribution ...

  17. Deep explosive volcanism on the Gakkel Ridge and seismological constraints on Shallow Recharge at TAG Active Mound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontbriand, Claire Willis

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seafloor digital imagery and bathymetric data are used to evaluate the volcanic characteristics of the 85E segment of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge (9 mm yr-). Imagery reveals that ridges and volcanic cones in the ...

  18. Spatio-temporal variability in volcanic sulphate deposition over the past 2 kyr in snow pits and firn cores from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    environmental effects. Apart from volcanic ashes, CO2 and water vapour, the reactive gaseous compounds SO2, H2S Running median RRMi Reduced running mean (after removal of all volcanic peaks) xi Ion concentration

  19. OPEN-FILE REPORT 2005-1164 An Assessment of Volcanic Threat and Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPEN-FILE REPORT 2005-1164 An Assessment of Volcanic Threat and Monitoring Capabilities Reawakens Volcanic Threat Assessment: Analysis of Hazard and Risk Factors......................... 14 Table 2. List of hazard and exposure factors used in the NVEWS threat assessment Figure 3

  20. Ice nucleation and overseeding of ice in volcanic clouds A. J. Durant,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    that such ``overseeded'' volcanic clouds will exhibit enhanced ice crystal concentrations and smaller average ice crystal nucleation in volcanic plumes and clouds affects dynamics [Glaze et al., 1997; Herzog et al., 1998; Mastin- porting water to the stratosphere [Glaze et al., 1997] and these fluxes depend in part on the microphysics

  1. Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, P. Buford

    Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period R ash layers determined by remote optical borehole logging and core assays. We find that the Antarctic. These globally coincident volcanics were associated with abrupt cooling, often simultaneous with onsets or sudden

  2. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Quantitative mapping of active mud volcanism at the western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    to produce a synthetic and objective map of recent mud flows covering a 640 700 km2 area, which representsORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Quantitative mapping of active mud volcanism at the western Mediterranean model for the origin for Mediterranean Ridge mud volcanism. Image analysis techniques are used

  3. Arctic Oscillation response to the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption: Effects of volcanic aerosols and ozone depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    of perturbation experiments, the full radiative effects of the observed Pinatubo aerosol cloud were included eruption, which produced the largest global volcanic aerosol cloud in the twentieth century. A seriesArctic Oscillation response to the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption: Effects of volcanic aerosols

  4. Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Robert Balch; Tom Engler; Roger Ruan; Shaojie Ma

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable for this project will be a web-based GIS providing data, interpretations, and user tools that will be accessible to anyone with Internet access. During this project, the following work has been performed: (1) Assimilation of most special core analysis data into a GIS database; (2) Inventorying of additional data, such as log images or LAS files that may exist for this area; (3) Analysis of geographic distribution of that data to pinpoint regional gaps in coverage; (4) Assessment of the data within both public and proprietary data sets to begin tuning of regional well logging analyses and improve payzone recognition; (5) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort, including data from northwest New Mexico; (6) Acquisition and digitization of logs to create LAS files for a subset of the wells in the special core analysis data set; and (7) Petrophysical analysis of the final set of well logs.

  5. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

  6. Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

  7. Field imaging spectroscopy and inferring a blind thrust earthquake history from secondary faulting : 1944 San Juan Earthquake, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragona, Daniel Eduardo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    faults in the eastern Precordillera of western Argentina.la Asociacin Geolgica Argentina. Molnar, P. , E. T. Brown,laAsociacio?n Geolo?gica Argentina, v. 57, no. 1, p. 45-54.

  8. Session F2D 0-7803-9141-1/05/$20.00 2005 IEEE July 7 9, 2005, Juan Dolio, Dominican Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, Teresa L.

    Session F2D 0-7803-9141-1/05/$20.00 © 2005 IEEE July 7 ­ 9, 2005, Juan Dolio, Dominican Republic including: Brazil, Chile, China, Czech Republic, France; or Germany. The course involves lectures in the Czech Republic, University of Santa Maria in Chile, and University of Nanjing in China. Two trips were

  9. Amnesia Issue in Majority Progress Condition Ruben de Juan-Marin, Luis Irun-Briz and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muoz, Francesc

    . Mu~noz-Escoi Instituto Tecnologico de Informatica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia Camino de in Majority Progress Condition Ruben de Juan-Marin, Luis Irun-Briz and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi Instituto

  10. Scalability Approaches for Causal Broadcasts R. de Juan-Marin, E. Miedes, H. Decker and F. D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muoz, Francesc

    Scalability Approaches for Causal Broadcasts R. de Juan-Marin, E. Miedes, H. Decker and F. D. Mu~noz-Esco and F. D. Mu~noz-Escoi Instituto Tecnologico de Informatica Universidad Politecnica de Valencia

  11. A Characterisation of Dynamic Distributed Systems Felix Garcia-Neiva, Ruben de Juan-Marin and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muoz, Francesc

    -Marin and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi Institut Universitari Mixt Tecnol`ogic d'Inform`atica Universitat Polit`ecnica de Characterisation of Dynamic Distributed Systems Felix Garcia-Neiva, Ruben de Juan-Marin and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco

  12. Mining Discriminative Adjectives and Prepositions for Natural Scene Recognition Bangpeng Yao1, Juan Carlos Niebles2,3, and Li Fei-Fei1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Fei-Fei

    Mining Discriminative Adjectives and Prepositions for Natural Scene Recognition Bangpeng Yao1, Juan and Intelligent Systems Group, Universidad del Norte, Colombia Summary Natural scene recognition: sky sky sand water road road building Coast: sky above water & water above sand; Highway: sky above road; Inside city

  13. San Juan, Puerto Rico -Lunes 12 Febrero 2007. Actualizado a las 5:58:15 PM Sigue en dficit el Observatorio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    endi.com San Juan, Puerto Rico - Lunes 12 Febrero 2007. Actualizado a las 5:58:15 PM Sigue en de Puerto Rico anunci el lunes, como si fuera un logro, que la Fundacin Nacional para las Ciencias Observatorio a la Universidad de Puerto Rico. EL NUEVO DIA Contctenos | Noticias | Deportes | Flash | Por

  14. Direct numerical simulations of multiphase flow with applications to basaltic volcanism and planetary evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suckale, Jenny

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase flows are an essential component of natural systems: They affect the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, shape the landscape of terrestrial planets, and govern subsurface flow in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Advancing ...

  15. Helium and lead isotope geochemistry of oceanic volcanic rocks from the East Pacific and South Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W. (David William)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The isotopic evolution of helium and lead in the Earth is coupled by virtue of their common radioactive parents uranium and thorium. The isotopic signatures in oceanic volcanic rocks provide constraints on the temporal ...

  16. Ice core evidence for a second volcanic eruption around 1809 in the Northern Hemisphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    is reported in the historical volcanism record between 1801 and 1812 [Simkin and Siebert, 1994]. [3] Analysis and a March 1809 eruption date for Cosiguina [Simkin and Siebert, 1994]. However, recent work on Cosiguina has

  17. Stratigraphic cross sections of Upper Cretaceous rocks across San Juan basin, northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molenaar, C.M.; Baird, J.K. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Cretaceous rocks of the San Juan basin, which are as much as 6,500 ft (1,980 m) thick, comprise a classic sequence of intertonguing marine and nonmarine facies. Geophysical logs from closely spaced drill holes throughout most of the basin provide data for detailed correlations of the rock units, which can be made by using numerous time marker beds within the marine shale sections. These marker beds provide a time framework for construction of cross sections that show (1) diachronism and stratigraphic rise of shoreface sandstone bodies associated with the four major transgressions and regressions of the Western Interior seaway within the basin, (2) shelf to very low-angle slope (< 0.25{degree}) to basinal topography, (3) Coniacian (basal Niobrara) unconformity, (4) low-amplitude paleostructural features, and (5) low-relief differential compaction features associated with lateral heterogeneities in sand-shale sections.

  18. Geologic origin of magnetic volcanic glasses in the KBS tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlinger, C.M.; Smith, R.M.; Veblen, D.R.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic glass shards and banded pumice from the KBS tuff of northern Kenya exhibit marked variations in magnetic susceptibility and color (colorless to dark brown). The darker glass shards exhibit superparamagnetism, which they now know to be carried by a population of tiny microcrystals of Fe-rich cubic oxide, approx. 20 to approx. 100 A in size, thought to be magnetite. A theory for their origin is one of nucleation and growth (precipitation) in quenched homogeneous glass (colorless) at temperatures of approx. 700-1000/sup 0/C during and immediately subsequent to eruption. Results from high-temperature heating experiments on KBS shards support this idea. The precipitate appears in the KBS shards as a consequence of their cooling history and is the origin of their coloring; the origin cannot lie in negligible compositional differences between the colorless and darkest shards. On the other hand, banded pumice from the KBS tuff has both dark and colorless glasses of differing compositions. The pumice appears banded because precipitation occurred preferentially in the Fe-rich glass. Although magma mixing may have played a role in the eruption of these materials, on the basis of their survey of distal eruptive products, it would appear that the volumetric amount of the mafic end member (dark pumice) was insubstantial.

  19. Evolution of a mafic volcanic field in the central Great Basin, south central Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Naumann, T. R.; Smith, E. I.; Bradshaw, T. K.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1996-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    2 (basanites and hawaiites) is more restricted (0.7035 - 0.7037, Figure 10). Neodymium isotopes are also more variable in basalts of episode I than episode 2, though the differences are not as great as for Sr (Figure 10). A similar pattern can... Sr=850 ppm .  Nd=10 ppm _ Xl Nd=85) . I I I I I I I 0.70800 0.71000 Figure 12. Neodymium-Sr isotope correlation diagram for Reveille Range basalts with binary mixing lines between low 87Sr/86Sr episode 2 basalts (hawaiites and basanites...

  20. Surface control of desert pavement pedologic process and landscape function, Cima Volcanic field,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    -covered (Musick, 1975; Wood et al., 2002). The closely packed surface clasts are generally coarse gravel to cobble

  1. Oxidation state of Paleozoic subcontinental lithospheric mantle below the Pali Aike volcanic field in southernmost Patagonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in southernmost Patagonia Jian Wang a,b, , Keiko H. Hattori a , Jianping Li a , Charles R. Stern c a Department Patagonia Accretion Slab window Peridotite xenoliths Mantle oxidation condition Mantle metasomatism Mantle xenoliths in the Quaternary Pali Aike alkaline basalts of southernmost Patagonia include lherzolites

  2. Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to:InformationGroton

  3. Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to:InformationGrotonOpenGround|2004) | Open

  4. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to:Pennsylvania: EnergyHopkinsville,WindEnergyOpen Energy

  5. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy ResourcesRock Lab| Open

  6. Application of Advanced Exploration Technologies for the Development of Mancos Formation Oil Reservoirs, Jicarilla Apache Indian Nation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, Scott; Billingsley, Randy

    2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to: (1) develop an exploration rationale for the Mancos shale in the north-eastern San Juan basin; (2) assess the regional prospectivity of the Mancos in the northern Nation lands based on that rationale; (3) identify specific leads in the northern Nation as appropriate; (4) forecast pro-forma production, reserves and economics for any leads identified; and (5) package and disseminate the results to attract investment in Mancos development on the Nation lands.

  7. The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have a lower ash fall hazard. Information is based on data during the past 10,000 years. Bottom, from left

  8. Bull. Soc. gol. Fr., 2008, no The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey): a Late

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Bull. Soc. géol. Fr., 2008, no 4 The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey-words. ­ Alkali basalt, Intraplate volcanism, Triassic (Upper), Neotethys, Turkey, Geochemistry. Abstract. ­ Late belonging to the Kara Dere ­ Sayrun unit of the Middle Antalya nappes, southwestern Turkey. New

  9. Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Breitenmoser a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Climate variability Tree-ring proxies DeVries solar cycle Volcanic activity Past two millennia The Sun cli- mate forcings to continuing global warming. To properly address long-term fingerprints of solar

  10. Evidence for explosive silicic volcanism on the Moon from the extended distribution of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, J T; Massey, R J; Elphic, R C; Jolliff, B L; Lawrence, D J; Llewellin, E W; McElwaine, J N; Teodoro, L F A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconstruct the abundance of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex on the Moon, using data from the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer. We enhance the resolution via a pixon image reconstruction technique, and find that the thorium is distributed over a larger (40 km $\\times$ 75 km) area than the (25 km $\\times$ 35 km) high albedo region normally associated with Compton-Belkovich. Our reconstructions show that inside this region, the thorium concentration is 15 - 33 ppm. We also find additional thorium, spread up to 300 km eastward of the complex at $\\sim$2 ppm. The thorium must have been deposited during the formation of the volcanic complex, because subsequent lateral transport mechanisms, such as small impacts, are unable to move sufficient material. The morphology of the feature is consistent with pyroclastic dispersal and we conclude that the present distribution of thorium was likely created by the explosive eruption of silicic magma.

  11. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Monticello Mill Tailings site, San Juan County, UT. (First remedial action), August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The 300-acre Monticello Mill Tailings site is comprised of a 78-acre inactive uranium and vanadium milling operation and affected peripheral properties in Monticello, San Juan County, Utah. Surrounding land use is rural residential and agricultural. Milling of ore began in 1942, and a vanadium/uranium sludge product was produced onsite from 1943 to 1944. The mill was permanently closed in 1960, and the tailings piles were covered and vegetated. In 1972, 15,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil were excavated and disposed of on the onsite tailings piles. Site investigations from 1989 to 1990 identified the presence of onsite and offsite radioactively-contaminated soil and ground water, and elevated concentrations of metals within the tailings piles. The Record of Decision (ROD)addresses remediation of two Operable Units (OUs): the 78-acre Millsite area (OU1), and the 240-acres of peripheral properties (OU2). The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris are metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead; and radioactive materials including radium-226 and radon.

  12. Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li basins and have strong remanent magnetization. The appli- cation arises in exploration of natural gas identify the volcanic units at large depths. INTRODUCTION Exploration for natural gas hosted in volcanics

  13. GEOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF VOLCANIC ROCK ON THE ISLAND OF SABA (NETHERLANDS ANTILLES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    GEOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF VOLCANIC ROCK ON THE ISLAND OF SABA (NETHERLANDS ANTILLES) Richard Rijkers 1 & Robert Hack 2 ABSTRACT A geomechanical analysis of a shallow small scale landslide, (NITG-TNO), Geomechanical Research, PO box 97, 2600 JA Delft, The Netherlands, tel.: +31 15 2697222, r

  14. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: I. ONE-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence and page proofs should be sent: Atsuyuki Inoue Department-00107011,version1-5Dec2007 Author manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 423-439" DOI

  15. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: II. ONE-D HRTEM structure images of hydrothermal I-S mixed-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 440-451" DOI : 10.1346/CCMN.2005.0530502 hal

  16. Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sleeman, Reinoud

    Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands region located History Several eruptions have taken place in the Canary Islands in the last 500 years, all of them, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION PAGES 61,65 Monitoring the Reawakening of Canary Islands'Teide Volcano

  17. Impacts, volcanism and mass extinction: random coincidence or cause and effect?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in diameter caused significant species extinctions. This includes the 170 km-diameter Chicxulub impact crater or even significant species extinctions. The K/T mass extinction may have been caused by the coincidenceImpacts, volcanism and mass extinction: random coincidence or cause and effect? G. KELLER

  18. Geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    source of geothermal energy, is ulti- 0024-4937/$ - see front matter D 2005 Published by Elsevier BGeochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges Axel K Potsdam, Germany c Philippine Geothermal, Inc., Makati, Philippines Received 1 May 2004; accepted 25 May

  19. Geologic constraints on the existence and distribution of West Antarctic subglacial volcanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemming, Sidney R

    geothermal heat associated with their em- placement and cooling could play a crucial role in basal melt water [2] Geophysical studies suggest that subglacial volcanic activity and geothermal phenomena may help production. For instance, the geothermal flux estimate in the vicinity of a (potential) recently active

  20. Did the Toba volcanic eruption of $74 ka B.P. produce widespread glaciation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    climate models, the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model 3.0 (CCSM3 that the Toba volcanic eruption, approximately 74 ka B.P., was responsible for the extended cooling period a maximum global cooling of 10 K and ModelE runs produced 817 K of cooling within the first years

  1. Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions--What's in Yellowstone's Future?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions-- What's in Yellowstone's Future? U. In the background, steam vigorously rises from the hot Each year, millions of visitors come to admire the hot, such as geysers. Steam and hot water carry huge quantities of thermal en- ergy to the surface from the magma cham

  2. American Journal of Science UTURUNCU VOLCANO, BOLIVIA: VOLCANIC UNREST DUE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Matthew

    American Journal of Science JUNE 2008 UTURUNCU VOLCANO, BOLIVIA: VOLCANIC UNREST DUE TO MID. Uturuncu volcano, SW Bolivia, is a dormant stratovolcano ( 85 km3 ) dominated by dacitic lava domes Empresa Minera Unificada S.A., La Paz, Bolivia; Mayelsuco@hotmail.com Institute of Geophysics, University

  3. Stratigraphic Relations and Lithologic Variations in the Jemez Volcanic

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,SoutheastSt.SteepStimulationStoneacreStow,AnalysisMexico |Field,

  4. The Mount Manengouba, a complex volcano of the Cameroon Line:1 Volcanic history, petrological and geochemical features2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 The Mount Manengouba, a complex volcano of the Cameroon Line:1 Volcanic history, petrological Group 2). Both magmatic groups belong to the under-saturated alkaline40 sodic series. Petrological

  5. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, Aptdo 2759, Quito (Ecuador); Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  6. NREL Response to the Report 'Study of the Effects on Employment of Public Aid to Renewable Energy Sources' from King Juan Carlos University (Spain) (White Paper)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Job generation has been a part of the national dialogue surrounding energy policy and renewable energy (RE) for many years. RE advocates tout the ability of renewable energy to support new job opportunities in rural America and the manufacturing sector. Others argue that spending on renewable energy is an inefficient allocation of resources and can result in job losses in the broader economy. The report, Study of the Effects on Employment of Public Aid to Renewable Energy Sources, from King Juan Carlos University in Spain, is one recent addition to this debate. This report asserts that, on average, every renewable energy job in Spain 'destroyed' 2.2 jobs in the broader Spanish economy. The authors also apply this ratio to the U.S. context to estimate expected job loss from renewable energy development and policy in the United States. This memo discusses fundamental and technical limitations of the analysis by King Juan Carlos University and notes critical assumptions implicit in the ultimate conclusions of their work. The memo also includes a review of traditional employment impact analyses that rely on accepted, peer-reviewed methodologies, and it highlights specific variables that can significantly influence the results of traditional employment impact analysis.

  7. Ibekwe-SanJuan F., Information science in France. Emergence, Evolution and Perspectives. In. Library and Information Science Trends in Europe, Amanda Spink and Jannica Heinstrom (eds.), Emerald Library and Information science book series 1/ 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Ibekwe-SanJuan F., Information science in France. Emergence, Evolution and Perspectives. In. Library and Information Science Trends in Europe, Amanda Spink and Jannica Heinstrom (eds.), Emerald Library and Information science book series 1/ 17 Information science in France. Emergence, Evolution

  8. UNlllERSIDAD DE PUERTO RICO, RECINTO DE CIENCIAS MEDICAS PO BOX ~7 SAN JUAN PA ~~ .TEl7B7.758-2525 EXI: 171 SECRETARiA JUNTA ADMINISTRATIVA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Gregory J.

    UNlllERSIDAD DE PUERTO RICO, RECINTO DE CIENCIAS MEDICAS PO BOX ~7 SAN JUAN PA ~~ .TEl7B7AZ, SecretariaEjecutiva de la Junta Administrativa del Recintode CienciasMedicas de la Universidad de Puerto Rico y acechol' del Recinto de Ciencias Medicas y luego de la discusion de rigor, ACORO6: APROBAR la

  9. Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region in Japan using multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jinyong (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Balasingham, P. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, under contract to Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), is performing research on regional classification of given sites in Japan with respect to potential volcanic disruption using multivariate statistics and geo-statistical interpolation techniques. This report provides results obtained for hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for the Sengan region in Japan by applying multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques on the geologic data provided by NUMO. A workshop report produced in September 2003 by Sandia National Laboratories (Arnold et al., 2003) on volcanism lists a set of most important geologic variables as well as some secondary information related to volcanism. Geologic data extracted for the Sengan region in Japan from the data provided by NUMO revealed that data are not available at the same locations for all the important geologic variables. In other words, the geologic variable vectors were found to be incomplete spatially. However, it is necessary to have complete geologic variable vectors to perform multivariate statistical analyses. As a first step towards constructing complete geologic variable vectors, the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) zone 54 projected coordinate system and a 1 km square regular grid system were selected. The data available for each geologic variable on a geographic coordinate system were transferred to the aforementioned grid system. Also the recorded data on volcanic activity for Sengan region were produced on the same grid system. Each geologic variable map was compared with the recorded volcanic activity map to determine the geologic variables that are most important for volcanism. In the regionalized classification procedure, this step is known as the variable selection step. The following variables were determined as most important for volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate values for each variable at 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system that represents the Sengan region. These values formed complete geologic variable vectors at each of the 23,949 one km cell centers.

  10. RIFLE TO SAN JUAN

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergy Small Team OversightDepartment ofBroadbandREQUESTREVEGETATION= J . . .

  11. Computation of probabilistic hazard maps and source parameter estimation for volcanic ash transport and dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madankan, R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pouget, S. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Singla, P., E-mail: psingla@buffalo.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Bursik, M. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Dehn, J. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States); Jones, M. [Center for Computational Research, University at Buffalo (United States); Patra, A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pavolonis, M. [NOAA-NESDIS, Center for Satellite Applications and Research (United States); Pitman, E.B. [Department of Mathematics, University at Buffalo (United States); Singh, T. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Webley, P. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic ash advisory centers are charged with forecasting the movement of volcanic ash plumes, for aviation, health and safety preparation. Deterministic mathematical equations model the advection and dispersion of these plumes. However initial plume conditions height, profile of particle location, volcanic vent parameters are known only approximately at best, and other features of the governing system such as the windfield are stochastic. These uncertainties make forecasting plume motion difficult. As a result of these uncertainties, ash advisories based on a deterministic approach tend to be conservative, and many times over/under estimate the extent of a plume. This paper presents an end-to-end framework for generating a probabilistic approach to ash plume forecasting. This framework uses an ensemble of solutions, guided by Conjugate Unscented Transform (CUT) method for evaluating expectation integrals. This ensemble is used to construct a polynomial chaos expansion that can be sampled cheaply, to provide a probabilistic model forecast. The CUT method is then combined with a minimum variance condition, to provide a full posterior pdf of the uncertain source parameters, based on observed satellite imagery. The April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajkull volcano in Iceland is employed as a test example. The puff advection/dispersion model is used to hindcast the motion of the ash plume through time, concentrating on the period 1416 April 2010. Variability in the height and particle loading of that eruption is introduced through a volcano column model called bent. Output uncertainty due to the assumed uncertain input parameter probability distributions, and a probabilistic spatial-temporal estimate of ash presence are computed.

  12. A geologic assessment of natural gas from tight gas sandstones in the San Juan Basin. Final report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, M.R.; Lombardi, T.E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors conducted a detailed geologic appraisal, estimated gas in place and recoverable volumes, and evaluated the impact of technology improvements on potential Cretaceous (Pictured Cliffs, Chacra, Cliff House, Point Lookout and Dakota intervals) tight gas reserves of the San Juan Basin. This report summarizes the results of a disaggregated appraisal of the undeveloped San Juan tight gas resource in the context of current and near-term technology, project economics and market potential. A geologic data base was constructed based on location reservoir properties, and typical well recoveries were modeled on a township-specific basis. Project costing and cash flow economics were analyzed to derive potential reserves for various technology specifications and wellhead prices. These data provide a foundation for operators and pipelines to more closely examine these tight formations for development in the near future. Gas in place for the undeveloped tight portion of the five intervals studied was estimated at 17.2 Tcf, with the Dakota Formation accounting for two thirds of this volume. Using current technology, potential ultimate recovery for all intervals is 7.2 Tcf. Potential reserve additions are 1.1 Tcf at $1.50/Mcf, 2.3 Tcf at $2.00/Mcf, and 5.9 Tcf at $5.00/Mcf. The availability of the Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit for eligible wells drilled in 1991 and 1992 could improve project economics by an after tax equivalent of $0.66/Mcf at the wellhead. Over 300 geophysical logs were evaluated to construct depth, overburden and isopach maps and a location-specific resource database. The database was analyzed using TGAS-PC{reg_sign}, an integrated engineering and economics model for tight sands that has the capability to do rapid sensitivity analysis of geological, technology and economic assumptions.

  13. Southwestern Regional Partnership For Carbon Sequestration (Phase 2) Pump Canyon CO2- ECBM/Sequestration Demonstration, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Advanced Resources International

    2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP), three demonstrations of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration are being performed -- one in an oilfield (the SACROC Unit in the Permian basin of west Texas), one in a deep, unmineable coalbed (the Pump Canyon site in the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico), and one in a deep, saline reservoir (underlying the Aneth oilfield in the Paradox basin of southeast Utah). The Pump Canyon CO{sub 2}-enhanced coalbed methane (CO{sub 2}/ECBM) sequestration demonstration project plans to demonstrate the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coal seams via a small-scale geologic sequestration project. The site is located in San Juan County, northern New Mexico, just within the limits of the high-permeability fairway of prolific coalbed methane production. The study area for the SWP project consists of 31 coalbed methane production wells located in a nine section area. CO{sub 2} was injected continuously for a year and different monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques were implemented to track the CO{sub 2} movement inside and outside the reservoir. Some of the MVA methods include continuous measurement of injection volumes, pressures and temperatures within the injection well, coalbed methane production rates, pressures and gas compositions collected at the offset production wells, and tracers in the injected CO{sub 2}. In addition, time-lapse vertical seismic profiling (VSP), surface tiltmeter arrays, a series of shallow monitoring wells with a regular fluid sampling program, surface measurements of soil composition, CO{sub 2} fluxes, and tracers were used to help in tracking the injected CO{sub 2}. Finally, a detailed reservoir model was constructed to help reproduce and understand the behavior of the reservoir under production and injection operation. This report summarizes the different phases of the project, from permitting through site closure, and gives the results of the different MVA techniques.

  14. Volcanic ash in feed coal and its influence on coal combustion products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownfield, M.E.; Affolter, R.H.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.; Hower, J.C.; Stricker, G.D.; O'Connor, J.T.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research are collaborating with an Indiana Utility to determine the physical and chemical properties of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a coal-fired power plant. The plant utilizes a low-sulfur (.23--.47 weight percent S) coal from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of feed coal samples identified two mineral suites. A primary suite (not authigenic) consisting of quartz (detrital and volcanic beta-form grains), biotite, and minor zircon and a secondary authigenic mineral suite containing calcite, alumino-phosphates (crandallite and gorceixite), kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and pyrite. The authigenic minerals are attributed to air-fall and reworked volcanic ash that was deposited in peat-forming mires. The Powder River Basin feed coals contain higher amounts of Ba, Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, and P compared to other analyzed eastern coals. These elements are associated with alumino-phosphate, biotite, calcite, and clay minerals. The element associations are indicative of coal that incorporated volcanic ash during deposition. XRD analysis of CCPs revealed a predominance of glass, perovskite, lime, gehlenite, quartz, and phosphates with minor amounts of periclase, anhydrite, hematite, and spinel group minerals in the fly ash; and quartz, plagioclase (albite and anorthite), pyroxene (augite and fassaite), rhodonite, and akermanite in the bottom ash. Microprobe and SEM analysis of fly ash samples revealed quartz, zircon, monazite, euhedral laths of corundum with merrillite, hematite, dendritic spinels/ferrites, and rounded grains of wollastonite with periclase. The abundant Ca and Mg mineral phases in the fly ashes are related to the presence of carbonate, clay, and phosphate minerals in the feed coal. The Ca- and Mg-rich mineral phases in the CCPs can be attributed to volcanic minerals deposited in the peat-forming mire. Dissolution and alteration of these minerals occurred either in the peat-forming sate or during coalification/diagenesis contributing to the authigenic mineral suite. Additionally, detrital mineral input and epigenetic ground-water flow may have affected the geochemistry of the feed coal.

  15. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two Areas of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:HoldingsTechintIsNumeric JumpTerrace,the Jemez Volcanic

  16. Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpType B: Andesitic Volcanic

  17. Hot Spring Monitoring at Lassen Volcanic National Park, California 1983-1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, Michael L.

    1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Data collected on several occasions between 1983 and 1985 as part of a hydrologic monitoring program by the U.S. Geological Survey permit preliminary estimation of the natural variability in the discharge characteristics of hydrothermal features in Lassen Volcanic National Park and the Lassen KGRA in northern California. The total rate of discharge of high-chloride hot springs along Mill Creek and Canyon Creek in the Lassen KGRA has averaged 20.9 {+-} 1.7 L/s, based on seven measurements of the flux of chloride in these streams. Measured chloride flux does not appear to increase with streamflow during the spring-summer snowmelt period, as observed at Yellowstone and Long Valley Caldera. The corresponding fluxes of arsenic in Mill Creek and Canyon Creek decrease within distances of about 2 km downstream from the hot springs by approximately 30%, most likely due to chemical absorption on streambed sediments. Within Lassen Volcanic National Park, measurements of sulfate flux in streams draining steam-heated thermal features at Sulphur Works and Bumpass Hell have averaged 7.5 {+-} 1.0 and 4.0 {+-} 1.5 g/s, respectively. Calculated rates of steam upflow containing, dissolved H{sub 2}S to supply these sulfate fluxes are 1.8 kg/s at Sulphur Works and 1.0 kg/s at Bumpass Hell.

  18. Oxygen buffering of Kilauea volcanic gases and the oxygen fugacity of Kilauea basalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerlach, T.M. (Geological Survey, Vancouver, WA (United States))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic gases collected during episode 1 of the Puu Oo eruption along the east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, have uniform C-O-H-S-Cl-F compositions that are sharply depleted in CO[sub 2]. The CO[sub 2]-poor gases are typical of Type II volcanic gases (GERLACH and GRAEBER, 1985) and were emitted from evolved magma stored for a prolonged period of time in the east rift zone after releasing CO[sub 2]-rich gases during an earlier period of temporary residence in the summit magma chamber. The samples are remarkably free of contamination by atmospheric gases and meteoric water. Thermodynamic evaluation of the analytical data shows that the episode 1 gases have equilibrium compositions appropriate for temperatures between 935 and 1032[degrees]C. Open- and closed-system equilibrium models of species distributions for the episode 1 gases show unequivocally that coexisting lavas buffered the gas oxygen fugacities during cooling. These models indicate that the F[sub o[sub 2

  19. Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro-Mu~noz , Isneri Talavera, Robert P.W. Duin, Mauricio Orozco-Alzate and John Makario Londo~no-Bonilla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duin, Robert P.W.

    Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro in a natural way. As an example, the classification of seismic volcanic events is used. It is shown features. Keywords-volcanic seismic data, three-way representation, dissimilarity representation

  20. Patrono con Igualdad de Oportunidad en el Empleo M/M/V/I -Equal Employment Opportunity Employer M/W/V/D PO Box 365067, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Gregory J.

    /W/V/D PO Box 365067, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936 Metro Office: (787) 620-8437 Fax (787) 765-4112 Horario de Oficina 8:00am a 12:00m y de 1:00pm a 4:00pm Proveedor 00056 Universidad de Puerto Rico, University of Puerto Rico Recinto de Ciencias Mdicas, Medical Sciences Campus Escuela de Enfermera, School of Nursing

  1. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSAL AND DEPOSITION OF TEPHRA FROM A POTENTIAL VOLCANIC ERUPTION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Harrington

    2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (Ashplume) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. These aspects of volcanism-related dose calculation are described in the context of the entire igneous disruptive events conceptual model in ''Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169989], Section 6.1.1). The Ashplume conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The Ashplume mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report update the previous documentation of the Ashplume mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model. In this report, ''Ashplume'' is used when referring to the atmospheric dispersal model and ''ASHPLUME'' is used when referencing the code of that model. Two analysis and model reports provide direct inputs to this model report, namely ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and Number of Waste Packages Hit by Igneous Intrusion''. This model report provides direct inputs to the TSPA, which uses the ASHPLUME software described and used in this model report. Thus, ASHPLUME software inputs are inputs to this model report for ASHPLUME runs in this model report. However, ASHPLUME software inputs are outputs of this model report for ASHPLUME runs by TSPA.

  2. High CO2 Levels in Boreholes at El Teide Volcano Complex (Tenerife, Canary Islands): Implications for Volcanic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    High CO2 Levels in Boreholes at El Teide Volcano Complex (Tenerife, Canary Islands): Implications emissions at numerous water prospection drillings in the volcanic island of Tenerife. Large concentrations region of the island (Las Can~ adas del Teide caldera). In this work we analysed CO2 concentrations

  3. Storage conditions and eruptive dynamics of central versus flank eruptions in volcanic islands: the case of Tenerife (Canary Islands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : the case of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) Joan Andújara,* , Fidel Costab , Bruno Scailleta a. Université1 Storage conditions and eruptive dynamics of central versus flank eruptions in volcanic islands eruptions (ca. 1 km3 ) of the Teide-Pico Viejo complex (Tenerife Island). Combined with previous

  4. Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic reflection data in their flexural moat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic the seismic stratigraphy of the flexural moat that flanks the Canary Islands. The moat stratigraphy has been the volcanoes that make up the Canary Islands progressively load the underlying lithosphere from east to west

  5. Volcanic activity can have a profound effect on the Earth's atmosphere and environment across many spatial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    . Fink (Eds.) 117 Earth's Deep Interior: Mineral Physics and Tomography From the Atomic to the Global and the atmosphere will find this work an important resource. Volcanism and the Earth's Atmosphere Alan Robock IUGG Volumes Maurice Ewing Volumes Mineral Physics Volumes #12;105 New Perspectives on the Earth

  6. Age, geochemical and SrNdPb isotopic constraints for mantle source characteristics and petrogenesis of Teru Volcanics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    Age, geochemical and SrNdPb isotopic constraints for mantle source characteristics and petrogenesis of Teru Volcanics, Northern Kohistan Terrane, Pakistan S.D. Khana,*, R.J. Sternb , M.I. Mantonb, University of Peshawar, Pakistan Accepted 21 April 2004 Available online 23 September 2004 Abstract

  7. Atmospheric chemistry of a 3334 hour old volcanic cloud from Hekla Volcano (Iceland): Insights from direct sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Geological Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, USA. 2 Department and nitric acid promoted polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation at 201203 K, yielding ice, nitric acid) particles. We show that these volcanically induced PSCs, especially the ice and NAT particles, activated

  8. Volcanic particle aggregation in explosive eruption columns. Part I: Parameterization of the microphysics of hydrometeors and ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    , Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, USA d Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol imply that volcanic particles are active as condensation nuclei for water and ice formation. Ash can: Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, UK. 2 Present address: NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

  9. Long-term desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium in heterogeneous volcanic tuff materials /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, Cynthia A.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium and neptunium desorption were studied in long-term laboratory experiments using four well-characterized volcanic tuff cores collected from southeast of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives of the experiments were to 1. Demonstrate a methodology aimed at characterizing distributions of sorption parameters (attributes of multiple sorption sites) that can be applied to moderately-sorbing species in heterogeneous systems to provide more realistic reactive transport parameters and a more realistic approach to modeling transport in heterogeneous systems. 2. Focus on uranium and neptunium because of their high solubility, relatively weak sorption, and high contributions to predicted dose in Yucca Mountain performance assessments. Also, uranium is a contaminant of concern at many DOE legacy sites and uranium mining sites.

  10. California GAMA Program: Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Results for the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces of Northern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) project (under the GAMA Program) is to assess water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements help determine the recharge water source location. Interpreted together, and in the context of existing water quality and hydrogeologic data, these observable parameters help define the flow field of a groundwater basin, and indicate the degree of vertical communication between near-surface sources (or potential sources) of contamination, and deeper groundwater pumped at high capacity production wells.

  11. Natural Tracers and Multi-Scale Assessment of Caprock Sealing Behavior: A Case Study of the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Heath; Brian McPherson; Thomas Dewers

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The assessment of caprocks for geologic CO{sub 2} storage is a multi-scale endeavor. Investigation of a regional caprock - the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin, USA - at the pore-network scale indicates high capillary sealing capacity and low permeabilities. Core and wellscale data, however, indicate a potential seal bypass system as evidenced by multiple mineralized fractures and methane gas saturations within the caprock. Our interpretation of {sup 4}He concentrations, measured at the top and bottom of the caprock, suggests low fluid fluxes through the caprock: (1) Of the total {sup 4}He produced in situ (i.e., at the locations of sampling) by uranium and thorium decay since deposition of the Kirtland Formation, a large portion still resides in the pore fluids. (2) Simple advection-only and advection-diffusion models, using the measured {sup 4}He concentrations, indicate low permeability ({approx}10-20 m{sup 2} or lower) for the thickness of the Kirtland Formation. These findings, however, do not guarantee the lack of a large-scale bypass system. The measured data, located near the boundary conditions of the models (i.e., the overlying and underlying aquifers), limit our testing of conceptual models and the sensitivity of model parameterization. Thus, we suggest approaches for future studies to better assess the presence or lack of a seal bypass system at this particular site and for other sites in general.

  12. Center for volcanic and tectonic studies, Department of Geoscience, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV. Annual report No. 69, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, E.I.

    1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual report of the Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies (CVTS) contains a series of papers, maps, and reprints that review the progress made by the CVTS between October 1, 1991 and December 31, 1992. During this period CVTS staff focused on several topics that had direct relevance to volcanic hazards related to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These topics included: (1) The role of the mantle during regional extension. (2) The structural controls and emplacement mechanisms of Pliocene/Quaternary basaltic centers and dikes. (3) The detailed geochemistry of individual volcanic centers in Crater Flat, Nevada. (4) Estimating the probability of disruption of the proposed repository by volcanic eruption (this topic is being studied by Dr. C-H. Ho at UNLV).

  13. Abstract The Holocene Parinacota Volcanic Debris Av-alanche (ca. 8,000 years B.P.) is located in the central An-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    that material that travelled further broke up and had an initial greater kinetic energy. Keywords Debris Andes Volcanic Zone of northern Chile (Figs. 1 and 2). Parinacota Volcano is located on the ChileBolivia

  14. Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

  15. Analysis of a multiphase, porous-flow imbibition experiment in fractured volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, R.R.; Bixler, N.E.

    1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A sub-meter-scale imbibition experiment has been analyzed using a finite element, multiphase-flow code. In the experiment, an initially dry cylindrical core of fractured volcanic tuff was saturated by contacting the ends with pressurized water. Our model discretely accounts for three primary fractures that may be present in the core, as indicated by measurements of porosity and saturation. We show that vapor transport has a small (less than 5%) effect on the speed of the wetting front. By using experimental results to estimate apparent spatial variations in permeability along the core, good agreement with measured, transient, saturation data was achieved. The sensitivity of predicted transient wetting fronts to permeability data indicates a need for more extensive measurements. We conclude that it will be difficult to characterize an entire repository - where inhomogeneities due to variations in matrix and fracture properties are not well known - solely from the results of sub-meter-scale laboratory testing and deterministic modeling. 16 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Drying analysis of a multiphase, porous-flow experiment in fractured volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, N.E.; Eaton, R.R.; Russo, A.J.

    1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A submeter-scale drying experiment has been analyzed using a finite element, multiphase-flow code. In the experiment, an initially wet cylindrical core of fractured volcanic tuff was dried by blowing dry nitrogen over the ends. Our model discretely accounts for three primary fractures that may be present in the core, as indicated by measurements of porosity and saturation. We show that vapor transport is unimportant in the interior of the core; the rate of drying is controlled by transport of liquid water to the ends of the core, where it can evaporate and escape into the dry environment outside. By using previous experimental results to estimate apparent spatial variations in permeability along the core, good agreement between measured and calculated drying rates was achieved. However, predicted saturation profiles were much smoother that those measured experimentally, presumably because of centimeter-scale inhomogeneities in the core sample. Our results indicate that water is transported chiefly as liquid from the interior to the edges of the core, where it evaporates and escapes out the ends. Thus, liquid-phase transport controls the overall drying rate. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the San Juan Basin for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, P.D.; Tischer, S.P.; Biezugbe, G.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the completed wells produce methane and wastewater (brine). The produced water is usually treated and released to a surface body of water in conformance with a NPDES permit. Treatment facilities are expensive to construct and operation and maintenance costs can be high. Also, environmental regulations pertaining to the release of wastewater to surface waters of the United States is presently under governmental investigation. A new process patented by Jack W. McIntyre has both economic and environmental advantages over the conventional surface treatment and disposal. This process has been tested in the Michigan Basin and reported to be successful. The process is based on utilizing a single well for both production and water disposal. During production, fluids enter the wellbore, gas rises to the surface and water moves down into the disposal zone either by gravity or mechanical pumping. This method allows separation of gas with simultaneous disposal of the water without the economic and environmental obstacles of bringing the water to the surface. A description and discussion of Jack W. McIntyre`s tool is summarized in the compendium of the seven basins studied under this contract. Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coal bed/sand formations in the San Juan Basin through literature surveys. Limited information exists on the hydrology and water quality of the immediate strata above and below the Fruitland formation. Because of the limited information on the baseline geochemistry of the coal/sand bed waters and the potential disposal zone, minimum effort was put on these zones` compatibility characterization. The study also indicates that water is produced along with gas production from the Fruitland formation. This makes the Basin a potential candidate for Jack McIntyre`s patented tool.

  18. 4/22/08 4:15 PMCientficos estudian origen de los volcanes costarricenses -ALDEA GLOBAL -nacion.com Page 1 of 2http://nacion.com/ln_ee/2008/abril/22/aldea1502437.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, W. Steven

    volcanes y los sismos aquí PABLO FONSECA Q. | pfonseca@nacion.com Un grupo de científicos estadounidenses y

  19. Alteration Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    gradient of < 50Ckm, grading into (ii) a geothermal field type of alteration in mining districts (laumontite subfacies with local transition to wairakite subfacies at...

  20. Field Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13,Conservation BillingFieldField

  1. Tachyonic field interacting with Scalar (Phantom) Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we have considered the universe is filled with the mixture of tachyonic field and scalar or phantom field. If the tachyonic field interacts with scalar or phantom field, the interaction term decays with time and the energy for scalar field is transferred to tachyonic field or the energy for phantom field is transferred to tachyonic field. The tachyonic field and scalar field potentials always decrease, but phantom field potential always increases.

  2. Gigantic Ordovician volcanic ash fall in North America and Europe: Biological, tectonomagmatic, and event-stratigraphic significance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, W.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Bergstroem, S.M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States)); Kolata, D.R. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biostratigraphical, geochemical, isotopic, and paleogeographic data suggest that the Millbrig K-bentonite, one of the thickest and most widespread Ordovician volcanic ash beds in eastern North America, is the same as the so-called 'Big Bentonite' in Baltoscandia. This is the first time that the same K-bentonite has been identified in both North America and Europe, and it serves as a unique event-stratigraphic marker over a large portion of the Northern Hemisphere. This eruption produced at least 340 km[sup 3] of dense-rock-equivalent ash that was deposited in a layer up to 1-2 m thick over several million square kilometers. As much as 800 km[sup 3] of additional ash may have fallen into the Iapetus Ocean, for a total of 1,140 km[sup 3]. Trace element geochemistry shows that the ash was derived from a felsic calc-alkalic magmatic source characteristic of volcanism in a continental crust-based, destructive plate-margin setting. This is one of the largest, if not the largest, ash falls recorded in Earth's Phanerozoic stratigraphic record, but its recognizable effect on faunas and floras was minimal, and it did not result in a global extinction event. The Millbrig-Big Bentonite bed provides accurate time control for sedimentologic, paleoecologic, and paleogeographic reconstructions across plates positioned in tropical (Laurentia) and temperate (Baltica) latitudes during Middle Ordovician time.

  3. Faces of Science: Juan Duque

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget » FY 2014 Budget Justification442José

  4. THE TEPHRA STRATIGRAPHY OF TWO LAKES IN SOUTH-CENTRAL BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MID-LATE HOLOCENE VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AT GLACIER PEAK AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavin, Daniel G.

    FOR THE MID-LATE HOLOCENE VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AT GLACIER PEAK AND MOUNT ST. HELENS, WASHINGTON, USA Objective New evidence of the ages and plume trajectories for four tephras. First evidence of Glacier Peak A, D, and Dusty Creek, and Mt. St. Helens P, as airfall tephra in south-central British Columbia. The Glacier

  5. Sulfur Emissions from Volcanic A c t i v i t y i n 1985 and 1990 Carmen M. Benkovitz and M. A l t a f Mubaraki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a t approximately 0.4 Tg S y-l, emissions from biomass burning a t approximately 2 Tg S Y-' and volcanic emissions localized i n the highly populated and industrialized regions i n Eastern North America, and across Europe from the United Kingdom over Central Europe t o the Donbas region #12;in Russia (Benkovitz et a!., 1996

  6. Smooth Field Theories and Homotopy Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Alan Cameron

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 . . . . . . . . 4 Categories of Field Theories 4.1 Functorto super symmetric field theories. CRM Proceedings and0-dimensional super symmetric field theories. preprint 2008.

  7. Entomology 489 Field Entomology Field Project Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    with information, people, materials). Field Projects (your project should...) FEntomology 489 ­ Field Entomology Field Project Guide A small-group field project is required for ENTO 489 ­ Field Entomology. This guide provides general information about the field-project

  8. First lacustrine varve chronologies from Mexico: impact of droughts, ENSO and human activity since AD 1840 as recorded in maar sediments from Valle de Santiago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    n-Guanajuato, central Mexico: petrology and chemistry. J2000) The geology and petrology of Volcan San Juan (Nayar?Mexico: min- eralogy and petrology of the anhydrite-bearing

  9. On Field Constraint Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wies, Thomas

    2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce field constraint analysis, a new technique for verifying data structure invariants. A field constraint for a field is a formula specifying a set of objects to which the field can point. Field constraints ...

  10. Midcontinent rift volcanism in the Lake Superior region: Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic evidence for a mantle plume origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, S.W. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA) Univ. of Minnesota, MN (USA)); Shirey, S.B. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1091 and 1098 Ma, most of a 15- to 20-km thickness of dominantly tholeiitic basalt erupted in the Midcontinent Rift System of the Lake Superior region, North American. The Portage Lake Volcanics in Michigan, which are the youngest MRS flood basalts, fall into distinctly high- and low-TiO{sub 2} types having different liquid lines of descent. Incompatible trace elements in both types of tholeiites are enriched compared to depleted or primitive mantle (La/Yb = 4.3-5.3; Th/Ta = 2.12-2.16; Zr/Y = 4.3-4.4), and both basalt types are isotopically indistinguishable. Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of the Portage Lake tholeiites have {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr{sub i} {approx}0.7038, {epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}0 {plus minus} 2, and {mu}{sub 1} {approx}8.2. Model ages with respect to a depleted mantle source (T{sub DM}) average about 1950-2100 Ma. Portage Lake rhyolits fall into two groups. Type I rhyolites have Nd and Pb isotopic characteristics ({epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}0 to {minus}4.7; {mu}{sub 1} {approx}8.2-7.8) consistent with contamination of tholeiitic rocks by 5-10% Archean crust. The one type II rhyolite analyzed has Nd and Pb isotopic compositions ({epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}{minus}13 to {minus}16; {mu}{sub 1} {approx}7.6-7.7) which are consistent with partial melting of Archean crust. Early Proterozoic crust was not a major contaminant of MRS rocks in the Lake Superior region. Most reported Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of MRS tholeiites from the main stage of volcanism in the Lake Superior region and of the Duluth Complex are comparable to the Nd and Pb isotopic data for Portage lake tholeiites. The isotopic enrichment of the MRS source compared to depleted mantle is striking and must have occurred at least 700 m.y. before 1100 Ma.

  11. Smooth Field Theories and Homotopy Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Alan Cameron

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHAPTER 3. FIELD THEORIES Definition 3.2.1. A smooth fielda top down definition of field theories. Taking as ourin the following. Definition A field theory is a symmetric

  12. Laboratory and field-based instrumentation developments and noble gas-stable isotope systematics of Rungwe Volcanic Province, Iceland and the Central Indian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, Peter Hagan; Barry, Peter Hagan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    basalts: Characterization of mantle source reservoirs. Inbasalts: characterization of mantle source reservoirs.

  13. Laboratory and field-based instrumentation developments and noble gas-stable isotope systematics of Rungwe Volcanic Province, Iceland and the Central Indian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, Peter Hagan; Barry, Peter Hagan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a combi- nation of geothermal gradient cooling at highercooling fans and backup power in response to a test deployment opportunity at a geothermal

  14. Laboratory and field-based instrumentation developments and noble gas-stable isotope systematics of Rungwe Volcanic Province, Iceland and the Central Indian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, Peter Hagan; Barry, Peter Hagan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Mineralogy and Petrology 122, 97115. http://dx.doi.org/ed cratonic lithosphere: petrology and geochemistry of2002) Geochemistry and petrology of lavas from the submarine

  15. Laboratory and field-based instrumentation developments and noble gas-stable isotope systematics of Rungwe Volcanic Province, Iceland and the Central Indian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, Peter Hagan; Barry, Peter Hagan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    42, 115-130. Gerlach T. M. , Graeber E. J. (1985) Volatileal. , 1985; Gerlach and Graeber, 1985 Hilton et al. , 2002;et al. , 1985; Gerlach and Graeber, 1985). In contrast,

  16. Accessory mineral UThPb ages and 40Ar/39Ar eruption chronology, and their bearing on rhyolitic magma evolution in the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Justin I.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Renne, Paul R.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Bacon, Charles R.; Reid, Mary R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrib Mineral Petrol (2009) 158:421446 DOIAZ, USA Contrib Mineral Petrol (2009) 158:421446 magmabatholith. Contrib Mineral Petrol 133(12):169185. doi:

  17. Laboratory and field-based instrumentation developments and noble gas-stable isotope systematics of Rungwe Volcanic Province, Iceland and the Central Indian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, Peter Hagan; Barry, Peter Hagan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 53, 227239. Nadin P.and solubility models. J. Petrol. 36, 16071631. Dixon J.study. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 67, 3539. Javoy M. ,

  18. Quantitative analysis of the hydrothermal system in Lassen Volcanic National Park and Lassen Known Geothermal Resource Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lassen hydrothermal system is in the southern Cascade Range, approximately 70 kilometers east-southeast of Redding, California. The conceptual model of the Lassen system is termed a liquid-dominated hydrothermal system with a parasitic vapor-dominated zone. The essential feature of this model is that steam and steam-heated discharge at relatively high elevations in Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP) and liquid discharge with high chloride concentrations at relatively low elevations outside LVNP in the Lassen Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) are both fed by an upflow of high-enthalpy, two-phase fluid within the Park. Liquid flows laterally away from the upflow area towards the areas of high-chloride discharge, and steam rises through a vapor-dominated zone to feed the steam and steam-heated features. The geometric model corresponds to an areally restricted flow regime that connects the Bumpass Hell area in LVNP with regions of chloride hot springs in the Mill Creek canyon in the KGRA south of LVNP. Simulations of thermal fluid withdrawal in the Mill Creek Canyon were carried out in order to determine the effects of such withdrawal on portions of the hydrothermal system within the Park. 19 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

  20. Field Mapping At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Bailey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based on surface mapping of the caldera. References Roy A. Bailey, Robert Leland Smith, Clarence Samuel Ross (1969) Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez...

  1. Field Mapping At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based on surface mapping of the caldera. References Roy A. Bailey, Robert Leland Smith, Clarence Samuel Ross (1969) Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez...

  2. Assessment of the activity of antifungal proteins against grain mold in sorghum caryopses in the field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bueso Ucles, Francisco Javier

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    during this two past years. Thanks to my very good friends: Sara Guajardo, Ximena Quintero, my little brother Juan Atkins, Rodrigo Lobeira, Corey Anderson, Oscar Morales, Marcelo Hernandez, Hector Sierra, Raul Quintanilla, Omar Salame, Adrian Quero...

  3. Structural investigations of Great Basin geothermal fields: Applications and implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Hinz, Nicholas H. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Coolbaugh, Mark F [Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because fractures and faults are commonly the primary pathway for deeply circulating hydrothermal fluids, structural studies are critical to assessing geothermal systems and selecting drilling targets for geothermal wells. Important tools for structural analysis include detailed geologic mapping, kinematic analysis of faults, and estimations of stress orientations. Structural assessments are especially useful for evaluating geothermal fields in the Great Basin of the western USA, where regional extension and transtension combine with high heat flow to generate abundant geothermal activity in regions having little recent volcanic activity. The northwestern Great Basin is one of the most geothermally active areas in the USA. The prolific geothermal activity is probably due to enhanced dilation on N- to NNE-striking normal faults induced by a transfer of NW-directed dextral shear from the Walker Lane to NW-directed extension. Analysis of several geothermal fields suggests that most systems occupy discrete steps in normal fault zones or lie in belts of intersecting, overlapping, and/or terminating faults. Most fields are associated with steeply dipping faults and, in many cases, with Quaternary faults. The structural settings favoring geothermal activity are characterized by subvertical conduits of highly fractured rock along fault zones oriented approximately perpendicular to the WNW-trending least principal stress. Features indicative of these settings that may be helpful in guiding exploration for geothermal resources include major steps in normal faults, interbasinal highs, groups of relatively low discontinuous ridges, and lateral jogs or terminations of mountain ranges.

  4. Quantum Field Theory & Gravity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664...

  5. Feedback between Volcanism and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    and Simkin (2002) and a compilation by Bryson, Bryson and Reuter (2006). #12;Eruption frequency (events

  6. Introduction Classical Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Christian

    Introduction Classical Field Theory Locally Covariant Quantum Field Theory Renormalization Time evolution Conclusions and outlook Locality and Algebraic Structures in Field Theory Klaus Fredenhagen II¨utsch and Pedro Lauridsen Ribeiro) Klaus Fredenhagen Locality and Algebraic Structures in Field Theory #12

  7. The May 22, 1915, explosive eruption of Lassen Peak, California, blasted rock fragments and pumice high into the air and rained fine volcanic ash as far away as Winnemucca, Nevada, 200 miles to the east. In this photograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The May 22, 1915, explosive eruption of Lassen Peak, California, blasted rock fragments and pumice of volcanic rock, called lava domes, were created by eruptions of lava too viscous to flow readily away from its source. Eruptions about 27,000 years ago formed Lassen Peak, probably in only a few years

  8. Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current Distributions of Infrared Optical Antennas: A Near-Field Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current...

  9. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

  10. When Fields Collide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, David I.

    Particle cosmology is among the hottest of hot topics in physics today. The field investigates the smallest units of matter and their role in determining the shape and fate of the entire universe. In recent years the field ...

  11. Double field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Chris

    The zero modes of closed strings on a torus the torus coordinates plus dual coordinates conjugate to winding number parameterize a doubled torus. In closed string field theory, the string field depends on all zero-modes ...

  12. String Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Taylor

    2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This elementary introduction to string field theory highlights the features and the limitations of this approach to quantum gravity as it is currently understood. String field theory is a formulation of string theory as a field theory in space-time with an infinite number of massive fields. Although existing constructions of string field theory require expanding around a fixed choice of space-time background, the theory is in principle background-independent, in the sense that different backgrounds can be realized as different field configurations in the theory. String field theory is the only string formalism developed so far which, in principle, has the potential to systematically address questions involving multiple asymptotically distinct string backgrounds. Thus, although it is not yet well defined as a quantum theory, string field theory may eventually be helpful for understanding questions related to cosmology in string theory.

  13. Covariant Noncommutative Field Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estrada-Jimenez, S. [Licenciaturas en Fisica y en Matematicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas Calle 4a Ote. Nte. 1428, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Garcia-Compean, H. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN P.O. Box 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F., Mexico and Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Monterrey Via del Conocimiento 201, Parque de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica (PIIT) Autopista nueva al Aeropuerto km 9.5, Lote 1, Manzana 29, cp. 66600 Apodaca Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Obregon, O. [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato P.O. Box E-143, 37150 Leon Gto. (Mexico); Ramirez, C. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, P.O. Box 1364, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The covariant approach to noncommutative field and gauge theories is revisited. In the process the formalism is applied to field theories invariant under diffeomorphisms. Local differentiable forms are defined in this context. The lagrangian and hamiltonian formalism is consistently introduced.

  14. The Momotombo Geothermal Field, Nicaragua: Exploration and development case history study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case history discusses the exploration methods used at the Momotombo Geothermal Field in western Nicaragua, and evaluates their contributions to the development of the geothermal field models. Subsequent reservoir engineering has not been synthesized or evaluated. A geothermal exploration program was started in Nicaragua in 1966 to discover and delineate potential geothermal reservoirs in western Nicaragua. Exploration began at the Momotombo field in 1970 using geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods. A regional study of thermal manifestations was undertaken and the area on the southern flank of Volcan Momotombo was chosen for more detailed investigation. Subsequent exploration by various consultants produced a number of geotechnical reports on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the field as well as describing production well drilling. Geological investigations at Momotombo included photogeology, field mapping, binocular microscope examination of cuttings, and drillhole correlations. Among the geophysical techniques used to investigate the field sub-structure were: Schlumberger and electromagnetic soundings, dipole mapping and audio-magnetotelluric surveys, gravity and magnetic measurements, frequency domain soundings, self-potential surveys, and subsurface temperature determinations. The geochemical program analyzed the thermal fluids of the surface and in the wells. This report presents the description and results of exploration methods used during the investigative stages of the Momotombo Geothermal Field. A conceptual model of the geothermal field was drawn from the information available at each exploration phase. The exploration methods have been evaluated with respect to their contributions to the understanding of the field and their utilization in planning further development. Our principal finding is that data developed at each stage were not sufficiently integrated to guide further work at the field, causing inefficient use of resources.

  15. Facilities Management Field Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Facilities Management Field Services FieldStationsAnnualReport2006 #12;Cover Photo by Dr Mark Jermy coast #12; Introduction A very wet Steve Weaver emerges from the river. Ah, field work! The Government broadband, at least there is now an alternative to the telephone line. Electrical power spikes (and outages

  16. Decreasing Magmatic Footprints of Individual Volcanos in a Waning Basaltic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A> Valentine; F.V. Perry

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution and characteristics of individual basaltic volcanoes in the waning Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field provide insight into the changing physical nature of magmatism and the controls on volcano location. During Pliocene-Pleistocene times the volumes of individual volcanoes have decreased by more than one order of magnitude, as have fissure lengths and inferred lava effusion rates. Eruptions evolved from Hawaiian-style eruptions with extensive lavas to eruptions characterized by small pulses of lava and Strombolian to violent Strombolian mechanisms. These trends indicate progressively decreasing partial melting and length scales, or magmatic footprints, of mantle source zones for individual volcanoes. The location of each volcano is determined by the location of its magmatic footprint at depth, and only by shallow structural and topographic features that are within that footprint. The locations of future volcanoes in a waning system are less likely to be determined by large-scale topography or structures than were older, larger volume volcanoes.

  17. Covariant Hamiltonian Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jrgen Struckmeier; Andreas Redelbach

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A consistent, local coordinate formulation of covariant Hamiltonian field theory is presented. Whereas the covariant canonical field equations are equivalent to the Euler-Lagrange field equations, the covariant canonical transformation theory offers more general means for defining mappings that preserve the form of the field equations than the usual Lagrangian description. It is proved that Poisson brackets, Lagrange brackets, and canonical 2-forms exist that are invariant under canonical transformations of the fields. The technique to derive transformation rules for the fields from generating functions is demonstrated by means of various examples. In particular, it is shown that the infinitesimal canonical transformation furnishes the most general form of Noether's theorem. We furthermore specify the generating function of an infinitesimal space-time step that conforms to the field equations.

  18. Student Worksheet Lanai Lookout Field Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, Julia Eve

    of magmatic gas or steam. Tuff cones range in size from 60 to 2000 m (200 to 6,500 feet) across and from 10 break with a hammer. The images on the preceding pages clearly show that the surface morphology, but also shows contour lines indicating topographic relief. Two volcanic features are labeled: Koko Crater

  19. High-sulfur coals in the eastern Kentucky coal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Graham, U.M. (Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)); Eble, C.F. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern Kentucky coal field is notable for relatively low-sulfur, [open quotes]compliance[close quotes] coals. Virtually all of the major coals in this area do have regions in which higher sulfur lithotypes are common, if not dominant, within the lithologic profile. Three Middle Pennsylvanian coals, each representing a major resource, exemplify this. The Clintwood coal bed is the stratigraphically lowest coal bed mined throughout the coal field. In Whitley County, the sulfur content increase from 0.6% at the base to nearly 12% in the top lithotype. Pyrite in the high-sulfur lithotype is a complex mixture of sub- to few-micron syngenetic forms and massive epigenetic growths. The stratigraphically higher Pond Creek coal bed is extensively mined in portions of the coal field. Although generally low in sulfur, in northern Pike and southern Martin counties the top one-third can have up to 6% sulfur. Uniformly low-sulfur profiles can occur within a few hundred meters of high-sulfur coal. Pyrite occurs as 10-50 [mu]m euhedra and coarser massive forms. In this case, sulfur distribution may have been controlled by sandstone channels in the overlying sediments. High-sulfur zones in the lower bench of the Fire Clay coal bed, the stratigraphically highest coal bed considered here, are more problematical. The lower bench, which is of highly variable thickness and quality, generally is overlain by a kaolinitic flint clay, the consequence of a volcanic ash fall into the peat swamp. In southern Perry and Letcher counties, a black, illite-chlorite clay directly overlies the lower bench. General lack of lateral continuity of lithotypes in the lower bench suggests that the precursor swamp consisted of discontinuous peat-forming environments that were spatially variable and regularly inundated by sediments. Some of the peat-forming areas may have been marshlike in character.

  20. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zihua Weng

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in the interplanetary space between the sun and the earth.

  1. Non SUSY Searches at Juan A. Valls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    ? 147 GeV/c 2 fi = 0.5 M LQ 1 ? 71 GeV/c 2 fi = 0.0 (95% CL) 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 02pM MRS(A) Kfactor (NLO) Q 2 = Q 2 0 4 Q 2 = Q 2 0 / 4 Second Generation Leptoquark Mass (Ge

  2. The floating marketplace of San Juan Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbonell, Jorge (Jorge R.), 1975-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis seeks to establish the marketplace as a temporal and spatial event that affects a city in a meaningful way. The marketplace was the site of greatest congestion, activity and drama in many cities, often combining ...

  3. George Hesekiel Faust und Don Juan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    einige dunkle Gestalten schlafen- der Sclaven und tritt hochaufathmend hinaus in die #12;-- 2 -- kühle funkelt, tritt Don Ju- an aus der Verandah zurück in sein Haus, er erreicht sein Zimmer, er löscht seine

  4. Richard Paul Vlosky Juan Antonio Aguirre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    properties-in-use and market opportunities for these species and manufacturing by-products. In addition products. However, profitable linkages must be created between LKS supply and the marketplace. In addition

  5. Ser entomlogo Juan F. Barrera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bor, Gil

    interrumpa infinidad de veces para recoger aqu a un escarabajo que brillaba como esmeralda, o por all

  6. PRECIOS ELECTRICOS FLEXIBLES* JUAN-PABLO MONTERO**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Juan

    , and monthly series of nodal and spot prices of the Central Interconnected System (SIC), we find short run losses in the range of 5 to 10%. More importantly, we find that the actual pricing scheme requires more

  7. Juan Pablo Hinestrosa Postdoctoral Research Associate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Special Projects Assistant Engineer, Quimica Basica Colombiana S.A., Colombia. Honors and Awards 2010

  8. San Juan Basin EC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation, search NEPA

  9. Results of investigations at the Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, B.; Goff, F.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Hanold, B. (comps.)

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well logging operations were performed in eight of the geothermal wells at Ahuachapan. High-temperature downhole instruments, including a temperature/rabbit, caliper, fluid velocity spinner/temperature/pressure (STP), and fluid sampler, were deployed in each well. The caliper tool was used primarily to determine if chemical deposits were present in well casings or liners and to investigate a suspected break in the casing in one well. STP logs were obtained from six of the eight wells at various flow rates ranging from 30 to 80 kg/s. A static STP log was also run with the wells shut-in to provide data to be used in the thermodynamic analysis of several production wells. The geochemical data obtained show a system configuration like that proposed by C. Laky and associates in 1989. Our data indicate recharge to the system from the volcanic highlands south of the field. Additionally, our data indicate encroachment of dilute fluids into deeper production zones because of overproduction. 17 refs., 50 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  11. Theory of electromagnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the theory of electromagnetic fields, with an emphasis on aspects relevant to radiofrequency systems in particle accelerators. We begin by reviewing Maxwell's equations and their physical significance. We show that in free space, there are solutions to Maxwell's equations representing the propagation of electromagnetic fields as waves. We introduce electromagnetic potentials, and show how they can be used to simplify the calculation of the fields in the presence of sources. We derive Poynting's theorem, which leads to expressions for the energy density and energy flux in an electromagnetic field. We discuss the properties of electromagnetic waves in cavities, waveguides and transmission lines.

  12. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  13. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  14. Hot Pot Field Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  15. Constructive Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Gallavotti

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the renormalization group approach to the proof of non perturbative ultraviolet stability in scalar field theories in dimension d=2,3.

  16. Electromagnetic Lorenz Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Potter

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauge transformations are potential transformations that leave only specific Maxwell fields invariant. To reveal more, I develop Lorenz field equations with full Maxwell form for nongauge, sans gauge function, transformations yielding mixed, superposed retarded and outgoing, potentials. The form invariant Lorenz condition is then a charge conservation equivalent. This allows me to define three transformation classes that screen for Lorenz relevance. The nongauge Lorentz conditions add polarization fields which support emergent, light-like rays that convey energy on charge conserving phase points. These localized rays escape discovery in modern Maxwell fields where the polarizations are suppressed by gauge transformations.

  17. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schrodinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  18. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schrodinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  19. Hydrothermal flow systems in the Midcontinent Rift: Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic studies of the North Shore Volcanic Group and related hypabyssal sills, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Y.R.; Ripley, E.M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences] [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rift-related lavas of the North Shore Volcanic Group (NSVG) are intruded by plutonic rocks of the Duluth Complex along the unconformity between the NSVG and the underlying Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks (Animikie Group) and Archean volcano-sedimentary and plutonic rocks. Heat associated with the emplacement of the mafic intrusions generated fluid flow in the overlying plateau lavas. {delta}{sup 18}O values for whole rocks from the NSVG and hypabyssal sills range from 5.5 to 17.7{per_thousand} and 5.3 to 11.5{per_thousand}, respectively, and most values are higher than those considered normal for basaltic rocks (5.4 to 6.0{per_thousand}). In general, there is a positive correlation between whole rock {delta}{sup 18}O and water content, which suggests that elevated {delta}{sup 18}O values are related primarily to secondary mineral growth and isotopic exchange during hydrothermal alteration and metamorphism. {delta}{sup 18}O{sub H{sub 2}O} values computed from amygdule-filling minerals such as smectite, chlorite, and epidote found in low- to high-temperature metamorphic zones range from {approximately}{minus}1 to 6{per_thousand} with an average value of {approximately}3{per_thousand}. Smectite in the lower-grade zones gives computed {delta}D{sub H{sub 2}O} values between {minus}26 and {minus}83{per_thousand}, whereas epidote in the higher-grade zones gives {delta}D{sub H{sub 2}O} values of {minus}15 to 6{per_thousand}. Fluid isotopic compositions computed from epidote and smectite values are suggestive of the involvement of at least two fluids during the early stages of amygdule filling. Fluid {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O values determined from epidote at the higher metamorphic grades indicate that seawater dominated the deeper portions of the system where greenschist facies assemblages and elevated {delta}{sup 18}O values were produced in flow interiors, as well as margins. Smectite isotopic compositions suggest that meteoric water was predominant in the shallower portions of the system. The increase in {delta}{sup 18}O values of massive flow interiors with depth is interpreted as a result of rock interaction with a fluid of constant oxygen isotopic composition with increasing temperature. The stable isotopic data are supportive of previous suggestions that seawater was involved in the hydrothermal system associated with the Midcontinent Rift. Although the origin of the seawater remains problematic, it appears that marine incursions may have occurred during the late stages of Portage Lake volcanism, and periodically thereafter.

  20. Radiation Field on Superspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

    1994-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of multiwormhole configurations within the framework of the Euclidean Polyakov approach to string theory, incorporating a modification to the Hamiltonian which makes it impossible to interpret the Coleman Alpha parameters of the effective interactions as a quantum field on superspace, reducible to an infinite tower of fields on space-time. We obtain a Planckian probability measure for the Alphas that allows $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^{2}$ to be interpreted as the energy of the quanta of a radiation field on superspace whose values may still fix the coupling constants.

  1. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar [Advanced Design Consulting USA, 126 Ridge Road, P.O. Box 187, Lansing, NY 14882 (United States); Dunn, Jonathan Hunter [MAX-lab, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  2. field_equipment.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIELD EQUIPMENT INVENTORY Trucks * Five vacpressure trucks, 60-90 bbl, up to 5 bpm at 5,000 lb. * Waterfi re truck, 110 bbl * Two dump trucks: 5-yard and 12-yard * Belly dump...

  3. Manager, Carlsbad Field Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM), Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is seeking a highly experienced and motivated executive-minded individual to fill its...

  4. Three Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    viii Contents. Three Field Theory. 8789. 9095. 9697. 98107. 108114. 115121. De?nition and examples of ?eld structure 67. Vector spaces, bases...

  5. HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlapentokh, Alexandra

    HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields Alexandra Shlapentokh East Carolina University AMS-ASL-MAA Panel on Hilberts Tenth Problem San Francisco January 14, 2010 #12;HTP over Function's known about HTP over Function Fields. Field Results for Characteristic 0 Field Results for Positive

  6. Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wornell, Gregory W.

    Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation Anthony Accardi1,2 and Gregory light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of coherent image formation that strikes a balance between the utility of the light field

  7. Field error lottery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, C.J.; McVey, B. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Quimby, D.C. (Spectra Technology, Inc., Bellevue, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The level of field errors in an FEL is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is utilization of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond mechanical tolerances of {plus minus}25{mu}m, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure utilizing direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  8. STATISTICAL MECHANICS AND FIELD THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel, S.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    York. K. Bardakci, Field Theory for Solitons, II, BerkeleyFart I Applications of Field Theory Methods to StatisticalStatistical Mechanics to Field Theory Chapter IV The Grand

  9. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  10. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  11. Anomalies for Galilean fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristan Jensen

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We initiate a systematic study of `t Hooft anomalies in Galilean field theories, focusing on two questions therein. In the first, we consider the non-relativistic theories obtained from a discrete light-cone quantization (DLCQ) of a relativistic theory with flavor or gravitational anomalies. We find that these anomalies survive the DLCQ, becoming mixed flavor/boost or gravitational/boost anomalies. We also classify the pure Weyl anomalies of Schr\\"odinger theories, which are Galilean conformal field theories (CFTs) with $z=2$. There are no pure Weyl anomalies in even spacetime dimension, and the lowest-derivative anomalies in odd dimension are in one-to-one correspondence with those of a relativistic CFT in one dimension higher. These results classify many of the anomalies that arise in the field theories dual to string theory on Schr\\"odinger spacetimes.

  12. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  13. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were performed enhanced oil recovery field pilot was performed in Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Studies were performed to determine a nutrient system to encourage growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria an inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient material were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor an additional production well in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicated the additional production well monitored during the field trial was also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels of tertiary oil was recovered. Microbial activity increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulphide concentration was experienced. These observations indicate that an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. The three production wells monitored in the pilot area demonstrated significant permeability reduction indicated by interwell pressure interference tests. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform (15 md maximum difference between post-treatment permeability values) indicating that preferential plugging had occurred.

  14. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. During this quarter an additional tracer study was performed in the field to determine pre-treatment flow paths and the first nutrients were injected. 2 figs.

  15. Noncommutative Quantum Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. O. Girotti

    2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We start by reviewing the formulation of noncommutative quantum mechanics as a constrained system. Then, we address to the problem of field theories defined on a noncommutative space-time manifold. The Moyal product is introduced and the appearance of the UV/IR mechanism is exemplified. The emphasis is on finding and analyzing noncommutative quantum field theories which are renormalizable and free of nonintegrable infrared singularities. In this last connection we give a detailed discussion of the quantization of the noncommutative Wess-Zumino model as well as of its low energy behavior.

  16. Experimental quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, J S

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented here, is, in the opinion of the author, the essential minimum of quantum field theory that should be known to cultivated experimental particle physicists. The word experimental describes not only the audience aimed at but also the level of mathematical rigour aspired to. (0 refs).

  17. Matthew Knight Hammer Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    MILLER THEATRE COMPLEX Beall Concert Outdoor Program Barn MRI Bean East Bean West Riverfront Fields Mc Military Science Moss Street Children's Center Knight Law Museum of Natural and Cultural History Bean East Innovation Center Rainier Romania Warehouse Chilled Water Plant Alder PeaceHealth University District

  18. Matthew Knight Hammer Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Outdoor Program Barn MRI Bean East Bean West Riverfront Fields McClure Morton Sheldon Stafford Young Law Museum of Natural and Cultural History Bean East Campus Graduate Village Ford Alumni Center Chilled Water Plant Alder PeaceHealth University District Northwest Christian University Pioneer Cemetery

  19. Single-field $?$-attractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Linde

    2015-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe a simple class of $\\alpha$-attractors, generalizing the single-field GL model of inflation in supergravity. The new class of models is defined for $0<\\alpha \\lesssim 1$, providing a good match to the present cosmological data. I also present a generalized version of these models which can describe not only inflation but also dark energy and supersymmetry breaking.

  20. Algebraic Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans Halvorson; Michael Mueger

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Algebraic quantum field theory provides a general, mathematically precise description of the structure of quantum field theories, and then draws out consequences of this structure by means of various mathematical tools -- the theory of operator algebras, category theory, etc.. Given the rigor and generality of AQFT, it is a particularly apt tool for studying the foundations of QFT. This paper is a survey of AQFT, with an orientation towards foundational topics. In addition to covering the basics of the theory, we discuss issues related to nonlocality, the particle concept, the field concept, and inequivalent representations. We also provide a detailed account of the analysis of superselection rules by S. Doplicher, R. Haag, and J. E. Roberts (DHR); and we give an alternative proof of Doplicher and Roberts' reconstruction of fields and gauge group from the category of physical representations of the observable algebra. The latter is based on unpublished ideas due to Roberts and the abstract duality theorem for symmetric tensor *-categories, a self-contained proof of which is given in the appendix.

  1. Field/source duality in topological field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Delphenich

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the sources of physical fields and the fields themselves is investigated with regard to the coupling of topological information between them. A class of field theories that we call topological field theories is defined such that both the field and its source represent de Rham cocycles in varying dimensions over complementary subspaces and the coupling of one to the other is by way of an isomorphism of the those cohomology spaces, which we refer to as field/source duality. The deeper basis for such an isomorphism is investigated and the process is described for various elementary physical examples of topological field theories.

  2. EIS-0477: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, New

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartmentDepartment ofDepartment of Energy 74:DepartmentMexico

  3. Colleges and Universities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    this field. San Juan College: Renewable Energy Program The Renewable Energy Program gives students a solid foundation in the fundamental physics and designinstallation techniques...

  4. Planetary magnetism : investigations of paleomagnetic properties of the Earth and Moon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Kristin Portle

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    block, western Mexico, Geofisica Internacional, 36, 21-35.volcanic field, Mexico. , Geofisica Internacional, 38, 217-

  5. Geophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2014) 199, 18611877 doi: 10.1093/gji/ggu338

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Robert W.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    near the Cerro Prieto volcanic field, the Ballenas Transform Fault and the East Pacific Rise. Upwelling

  6. HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY FIELD TRIP GUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY FIELD TRIP GUIDEBOOK GEOLOGY 143A ­ Field Geology of Northern Arizona 27 March University Geology 143A Northern Arizona Field Course, 27 March ­ 03 April 2010 Field Trip Guidebook by: Prof. Charles Merguerian 2010 Arizona ­ a Macro View Physically, he was not what you would call an imposing

  7. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report Methane Hydrate Workshop Report Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan Final Scientific/Technical Report

  8. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S., E-mail: shishirk@gmail.com; Raghavan, S. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Duesberg, G. S. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) and School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, D2 (Ireland); Pratap, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ?10?nA ?m{sup ?1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  9. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  10. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  11. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  13. Polymer Parametrised Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alok Laddha; Madhavan Varadarajan

    2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Free scalar field theory on 2 dimensional flat spacetime, cast in diffeomorphism invariant guise by treating the inertial coordinates of the spacetime as dynamical variables, is quantized using LQG type `polymer' representations for the matter field and the inertial variables. The quantum constraints are solved via group averaging techniques and, analogous to the case of spatial geometry in LQG, the smooth (flat) spacetime geometry is replaced by a discrete quantum structure. An overcomplete set of Dirac observables, consisting of (a) (exponentials of) the standard free scalar field creation- annihilation modes and (b) canonical transformations corresponding to conformal isometries, are represented as operators on the physical Hilbert space. None of these constructions suffer from any of the `triangulation' dependent choices which arise in treatments of LQG. In contrast to the standard Fock quantization, the non- Fock nature of the representation ensures that the algebra of conformal isometries as well as that of spacetime diffeomorphisms are represented in an anomaly free manner. Semiclassical states can be analysed at the gauge invariant level. It is shown that `physical weaves' necessarily underly such states and that such states display semiclassicality with respect to, at most, a countable subset of the (uncountably large) set of observables of type (a). The model thus offers a fertile testing ground for proposed definitions of quantum dynamics as well as semiclassical states in LQG.

  14. Noncommutative Dipole Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Dasgupta; M. M. Sheikh-Jabbari

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Assigning an intrinsic constant dipole moment to any field, we present a new kind of associative star product, the dipole star product, which was first introduced in [hep-th/0008030]. We develop the mathematics necessary to study the corresponding noncommutative dipole field theories. These theories are sensible non-local field theories with no IR/UV mixing. In addition we discuss that the Lorentz symmetry in these theories is ``softly'' broken and in some particular cases the CP (and even CPT) violation in these theories may become observable. We show that a non-trivial dipole extension of N=4, D=4 gauge theories can only be obtained if we break the SU(4) R (and hence super)-symmetry. Such noncommutative dipole extensions, which in the maximal supersymmetric cases are N=2 gauge theories with matter, can be embedded in string theory as the theories on D3-branes probing a smooth Taub-NUT space with three form fluxes turned on or alternatively by probing a space with R-symmetry twists. We show the equivalences between the two approaches and also discuss the M-theory realization.

  15. Generalized Gravitational Entropy of Interacting Scalar Field and Maxwell Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wung-Hong Huang

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized gravitational entropy proposed by Lewkowycz and Maldacena in recent is extended to the interacting real scalar field and Maxwell field system. Using the BTZ geometry we first investigate the case of free real scalar field and then show a possible way to calculate the entropy of the interacting scalar field. Next, we investigate the Maxwell field system. We exactly solve the wave equation and calculate the analytic value of the generalized gravitational entropy. We also use the Einstein equation to find the effect of backreaction of the Maxwell field on the area of horizon. The associated modified area law is consistent with the generalized gravitational entropy.

  16. Hamiltonian Vector Fields on Multiphase Spaces of Classical Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Forger; Mrio Otvio Salles

    2010-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a classification of hamiltonian vector fields on multisymplectic and polysymplectic fiber bundles closely analogous to the one known for the corresponding dual jet bundles that appear in the multisymplectic and polysymplectic approach to first order classical field theories.

  17. Quasi light fields: Extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accardi, Anthony J.

    Imaging technologies such as dynamic viewpoint generation are engineered for incoherent radiation using the traditional light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of ...

  18. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Results are reported on the isolation/characterization of anaerobic bacteria; bacterial mobility and the importance of chemotaxis; careflood experiments; microbial modeling; and surface facilities design. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Progress is reported on growth/activity in porous media; coreflooding; and microbial modeling. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  20. ARM - Field Participants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature StoriesgovCampaignsSurface HeatField

  1. The Effective Field Theory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not FoundInformation DOEInformation Summary Big*The Effective Field Theory

  2. Field Office, Osk Ridge

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN551 - g 7 s % @ {rField ,_

  3. Particle decay in Ising field theory with magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesualdo Delfino

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The scaling limit of the two-dimensional Ising model in the plane of temperature and magnetic field defines a field theory which provides the simplest illustration of non-trivial phenomena such as spontaneous symmetry breaking and confinement. Here we discuss how Ising field theory also gives the simplest model for particle decay. The decay widths computed in this theory provide the obvious test ground for the numerical methods designed to study unstable particles in quantum field theories discretized on a lattice.

  4. Volcanic Hazards Introduc1on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    & acid rain ­ lahars (mud flows, debris flows) ­ jokulhaups (glacical outbursts ­ tephra clouds ­ pyroclas1c flows & base surges ­ gases & acid rain

  5. Volcanic Eruption, Tambora Alan Robock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    trudging across a bleak ice-covered wasteland. Byron was also inspired that summer and wrote Darkness. The effects of the 1816 summer on agricultural productivity of New England did not have much to do the growing season. This, along with a severe drought, reduced agricultural output to record low levels

  6. Reservoir quality, sediment source, and regional aspects of Norphlet Formation, South State Line field, Greene County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, A.; Stancliffe, R.J.; Shew, R.D.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    South State Line field, discovered in 1970, is centrally located in the productive Jurassic Norphlet trend of the eastern Gulf Coast. The Norphlet Formation at South State Line has produced gas and condensate from normally pressured eolian sandstones at depths of more than 17,900 ft (5455 m). The 600-ft- (183-m) thick Norphlet Formation is composed of 100% sandstone and consists of two reservoir types: a poorer quality upper sandstone having low permeability (0.6 md) and a good-quality lower sandstone with better permeability (15.5 md). The upper sandstone exhibits tighter compaction of framework grains and more cement than the lower sandstone. Significantly, the upper sandstone contains authigenic illite (which promotes pressure solution), whereas the lower sandstone contains authigenic chlorite (which inhibits cementation and possibly pressure solution). On a regional scale, illite is the principal diagenetic clay mineral in the western area of the Norphlet trend (Mississippi to Texas), whereas chlorite is the principal diagenetic clay mineral in the east (Alabama to Florida). Not surprisingly, reservoir quality is poorer in the western portion of the trend. A comparison of framework grains in the upper and lower sandstones shows no significant compositional differences. Both are mature arkosic sandstones with a transitional-continental source (eastern Appalachians). No evidence was seen of a quartz-rich Ouachita or cratonic source. Volcanic and plutonic rock fragments are slightly more abundant in the lower sandstone, possibly reflecting a shifting of compositional terranes within a single source area along the eastern side of the Appalachians. The lower Norphlet sandstone may have been derived from Triassic volcanics, whereas the upper sandstone may have been derived from a more metamorphic source.

  7. BOUNDLESSLEARNING EXPLORERS FIELD EDUCATION FUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

    FOR FIELD EDUCATION The Department of Earth Sciences is expanding the field study components of our programs account. Claim charitable donations up to 75 per cent of your net income (a five-year carry forward

  8. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  9. Fermions in spherical field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the spherical field formalism for fermions. We find that the spherical field method is free from certain difficulties which complicate lattice calculations, such as fermion doubling, missing axial anomalies, and computational problems regarding internal fermion loops.

  10. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  11. Diamond-graphite field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

  12. Introduction to spherical field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical field theory is a new non-perturbative method for studying quantum field theories. It uses the spherical partial wave expansion to reduce a general d-dimensional Euclidean field theory into a set of coupled one-dimensional systems. The coupled one-dimensional systems are then converted to partial differential equations and solved numerically. We demonstrate the methods of spherical field theory by analyzing Euclidean phi^4 theory in two dimensions.

  13. Field Theory and Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Buchmller; C. Ldeling

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a short introduction to the Standard Model and the underlying concepts of quantum field theory.

  14. Field Museum of Natural History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    Field Museum of Natural History Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended December 31' Report #12;FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 1 AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: We have audited

  15. Field Museum of Natural History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    Field Museum of Natural History Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended December 31 Auditors' Report #12;FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 1 Expenditures 22­23 #12;INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History

  16. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  17. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Sakellariou, Dimitrios (Billancourt, FR); Meriles, Carlos A. (Fort Lee, NJ); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  18. Oil field management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  19. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions or the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Injection of nutrient stimulates the growth and metabolism of reservoir bacteria, which produces beneficial products to enhance oil recovery. Sometimes, chemical treatments are used to clean or condition injection water. Such a chemical treatment has been initiated by Sullivan and Company at the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit. The unit injection water was treated with a mixture of water, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, and three proprietary chemicals. To determine if the chemicals would have an impact on the pilot, it was important to determine the effects of the chemical additives on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria from wells in this field. Two types of media were used: a mineral salts medium with molasses and nitrate, and this medium with 25 ppm of the treatment chemicals added. Samples were collected anaerobically from each of two wells, 1A-9 and 7-2. A sample from each well was inoculated and cultured in the broth tubes of molasses-nitrate medium with and without the chemicals. Culturing temperature was 35{degrees}C. Absorbance, pressure and cell number were checked to determine if the chemicals affected the growth and metabolism of bacteria in the brine samples. 12 figs.

  20. Field practice internship final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, T.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field practice internship final report gives an overview of the field practice, which was completed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Management Department, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field practice focused on the completion of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312, Tier II Report. The field practice internship was conducted on a full-time basis between December 13, 1993 through February 18, 1994. Sheila Poligone, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Coordinator served as the field practice preceptor.

  1. Visual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumoulin, Serge O.

    of processing in human motion-selective cortex. I N T R O D U C T I O N Neuroimaging experiments localize human by additional experiments. Defining human MT based on stimulus selectivity means that the identificationVisual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT

  2. Noncommutative Field Theories and Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor O. Rivelles

    2003-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that after the Seiberg-Witten map is performed the action for noncommutative field theories can be regarded as a coupling to a field dependent gravitational background. This gravitational background depends only on the gauge field. Charged and uncharged fields couple to different backgrounds and we find that uncharged fields couple more strongly than the charged ones. We also show that the background is that of a gravitational plane wave. A massless particle in this background has a velocity which differs from the velocity of light and we find that the deviation is larger in the uncharged case. This shows that noncommutative field theories can be seen as ordinary theories in a gravitational background produced by the gauge field with a charge dependent gravitational coupling.

  3. Alan Robock Department of Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greatbatch, Richard

    Alan Robock Department of Environmental Sciences Mechanisms of Forced Arctic Oscillation Response to Volcanic Eruptions Alan Robock Department of Environmental Sciences Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New of Environmental Sciences Collaborators Georgiy L. Stenchikov, Juan Carlos Antuña, and Luke Oman Department

  4. D-brane effective field theory from string field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Taylor

    2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Open string field theory is considered as a tool for deriving the effective action for the massless or tachyonic fields living on D-branes. Some simple calculations are performed in open bosonic string field theory which validate this approach. The level truncation method is used to calculate successive approximations to the quartic terms \\phi^4, (A^\\mu A_\\mu)^2 and [A_\\mu, A_\

  5. Nonlinear Theory of Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitriy Palatnik

    2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Suggested modification of the Einstein-Maxwell system, such that Maxwell equations become non-gauge and nonlinear. The theory is based on assumption that observable (i.e., felt by particles) metric is $ {\\tilde{g}}_{ab} = g_{ab} - l^2{A}_a{A}_b$, where $g_{ab}$ is metric (found from Einstein equations), $A_a$ is electromagnetic potential, and $l$ is fundamental constant of the theory. Specific model of the mass and charge densities of a fundamental particle is considered. As a result, one obtains solutions corresponding to quantized electrical charge with spectrum $q_{n} = {{2n}\\over3}e$ and $q'_{n} = -{(2n+1)\\over3}e$, where $n = 0, 1, 2, ...$ Theory predicts Coulomb interaction between electrical charges and masses. Namely, if ($m, e$) and ($m',e'$) describe masses and electrical charges of two particles respectively, then energy of interaction (in non-relativistic limit) is $V(r) = [ee' - kmm' - \\sqrt k(em' + e'm)]/r$. It follows, then, that the Earth's mass, $M_E$, contributes negative electrical charge, $Q_E = - \\sqrt k M_E$, which explains why primary cosmic rays consist mainly of positively charged particles. One may attribute the fairweather electric field at the Earth's surface to the charge $Q_E$.

  6. Electronic field permeameter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Mark A. (Madison, WI); Goggin, David J. (Austin, TX); Horne, Patrick J. (Austin, TX); Kocurek, Gary G. (Roundrock, TX); Lake, Larry W. (Austin, TX)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For making rapid, non-destructive permeability measurements in the field, a portable minipermeameter of the kind having a manually-operated gas injection tip is provided with a microcomputer system which operates a flow controller to precisely regulate gas flow rate to a test sample, and reads a pressure sensor which senses the pressure across the test sample. The microcomputer system automatically turns on the gas supply at the start of each measurement, senses when a steady-state is reached, collects and records pressure and flow rate data, and shuts off the gas supply immediately after the measurement is completed. Preferably temperature is also sensed to correct for changes in gas viscosity. The microcomputer system may also provide automatic zero-point adjustment, sensor calibration, over-range sensing, and may select controllers, sensors, and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements. Electronic sensors may provide increased accuracy and precision. Preferably one microcomputer is used for sensing instrument control and data collection, and a second microcomputer is used which is dedicated to recording and processing the data, selecting the sensors and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements, and instructing the user how to set-up and operate the minipermeameter. To provide mass data collection and user-friendly operation, the second microcomputer is preferably a lap-type portable microcomputer having a non-volatile or battery-backed CMOS memory.

  7. Enigmatic compressional structures in an extensional province: Eku field, OML 67, offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinones, M.; Evans, R. [Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States); Alofe, K.; Onyeise, B. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Acquisition of 3-D seismic data over OML 67-70 and a detailed reservoir description study done on the Eku field, have allowed identification of previously unrecognized compressional features. Situated within a depocenter between arcuate normal growth faults, the Eku structure consists of a shale-cored anticlinal fold and fold-and-thrust separated by a zone of lateral displacement. The crests of the folds have been eroded at a major unconformity at the base of the Qua Iboe shale (Early Pliocene). In the absence of definitive biostratigraphic data, correlations among the various fault-blocks are based on the character of sedimentary packages and sequences on wireline logs. Combined with analysis of the geometry of faults and folds, the correlations support a description of pulsatory movement of folding and faulting, that ultimately culminated in extensional reactivation of earlier regional extension and the not coincident. The effect of the anticipated reservoir sections, and deformation, both compressional, was gravity-driven and on shale detachments. A working hypothesis to explain the disparity in direction of earlier extension and subsequent compression is that thermal expansion that accompanied formation of the Cameroon volcanic line to the east of the Niger Delta in Miocene time, caused a change in the direction of structuring, allowing downslope gravity-driven compression to be superimposed on pre-existing extensional features.

  8. Enigmatic compressional structures in an extensional province: Eku field, OML 67, offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinones, M.; Evans, R. (Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States)); Alofe, K.; Onyeise, B. (Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acquisition of 3-D seismic data over OML 67-70 and a detailed reservoir description study done on the Eku field, have allowed identification of previously unrecognized compressional features. Situated within a depocenter between arcuate normal growth faults, the Eku structure consists of a shale-cored anticlinal fold and fold-and-thrust separated by a zone of lateral displacement. The crests of the folds have been eroded at a major unconformity at the base of the Qua Iboe shale (Early Pliocene). In the absence of definitive biostratigraphic data, correlations among the various fault-blocks are based on the character of sedimentary packages and sequences on wireline logs. Combined with analysis of the geometry of faults and folds, the correlations support a description of pulsatory movement of folding and faulting, that ultimately culminated in extensional reactivation of earlier regional extension and the not coincident. The effect of the anticipated reservoir sections, and deformation, both compressional, was gravity-driven and on shale detachments. A working hypothesis to explain the disparity in direction of earlier extension and subsequent compression is that thermal expansion that accompanied formation of the Cameroon volcanic line to the east of the Niger Delta in Miocene time, caused a change in the direction of structuring, allowing downslope gravity-driven compression to be superimposed on pre-existing extensional features.

  9. RESULTS OF FIELD TESTING DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIELD TESTING AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER May through September of 2011 RMOTC is an energy testing center that partners with industry to...

  10. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  11. Continuous Profiling of Magnetotelluric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdin, C.T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    those employed in seismic data interpretation under the nameseismic nature, these techniques power implicit in the at least two decades of continued field and interpretation

  12. Cosmic Electromagnetic Fields due to Perturbations in the Gravitational Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop Mongwane; Peter K. S. Dunsby; Bob Osano

    2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We use non-linear gauge-invariant perturbation theory to study the interaction of an inflation produced seed magnetic field with density and gravitational wave perturbations in an almost Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime. We compare the effects of this coupling under the assumptions of poor conductivity, infinite conductivity and the case where the electric field is sourced via the coupling of velocity perturbations to the seed field in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regime, thus generalizing, improving on and correcting previous results. We solve our equations for long wavelength limits and numerically integrate the resulting equations to generate power spectra for the electromagnetic field variables, showing where the modes cross the horizon. We find that the rotation of the electric field dominates the power spectrum on small scales, in agreement with previous arguments.

  13. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  14. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  15. Fermion measure and axion fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitra, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known from path integral studies of the chiral anomaly that the fermion measure has to depend on gauge fields interacting with the fermion. It is argued here that in the presence of axion fields interacting with the fermion, they too may be involved in the measure, with unexpected consequences.

  16. Unified Field Theories Hitoshi Murayama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    Unified Field Theories Hitoshi Murayama Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley This article explains the idea of unified field theories in particle physics. It starts with a historical review of two successful theories which unified two apparently distinct forces: Maxwell's theory

  17. Gerbes and quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jouko Mickelsson

    2006-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic mechanism how gerbes arise in quantum field theory is explained; in particular the case of chiral fermions in background fields is treated. The role of of various gauge group extensions (central extensions of loop groups and their generalizations) is also explained, in relation to index theory computation of the Dixmier-Douady class of a gerbe.

  18. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  19. Are Cluster Magnetic Fields Primordial ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robi Banerjee; Karsten Jedamzik

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of a detailed and fully non-linear numerical and analytical investigation of magnetic field evolution from the very earliest cosmic epochs to the present. We find that, under reasonable assumptions concerning the efficiency of a putative magnetogenesis era during cosmic phase transitions, surprisingly strong magnetic fields 10^{-13} - 10^{-11} Gauss, on comparatively small scales 100 pc - 10 kpc may survive to the present. Building on prior work on the evolution of magnetic fields during the course of gravitational collapse of a cluster, which indicates that pre-collapse fields of 4\\times 10^{-12} Gauss extant on small scales may suffice to produce clusters with acceptable Faraday rotation measures, we question the widely hold view that cluster magnetic fields may not be entirely of primordial origin.

  20. Plasma Production via Field Ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu,; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

  1. Confluent primary fields in the conformal field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajime Nagoya; Juanjuan Sun

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    For any complex simple Lie algebra, we generalize primary fileds in the Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten conformal field theory with respect to the case of irregular singularities and we construct integral representations of hypergeometric functions of confluent type, as expectation values of products of generalized primary fields. In the case of sl(2), these integral representations coincide with solutions to confluent KZ equations. Computing the operator product expansion of the energy-momentum tensor and the generalized primary field, new differential operators appear in the result. In the case of sl(2), these differential operators are the same as those of the confluent KZ equations.

  2. Reversed field pinch current drive with oscillating helical fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farengo, Ricardo; Clemente, Roberto Antonio [Centro Atomico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, S.C. de Bariloche (8400), RN (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of oscillating helical magnetic fields to produce and sustain the toroidal and poloidal currents in a reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated. A simple physical model that assumes fixed ions, massless electrons, and uniform density and resistivity is employed. Thermal effects are neglected in Ohm's law and helical coordinates are introduced to reduce the number of coupled nonlinear equations that must be advanced in time. The results show that it is possible to produce RFP-like magnetic field profiles with pinch parameters close to the experimental values. The efficiencies obtained for moderate resistivity, and the observed scaling, indicate that this could be a very attractive method for high temperature plasmas.

  3. fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM #12;The Field Museum | Field Trip Planning Guide for Educators 2 Welcome to The Field Museum! The Field Museum is an exciting place to explore and learn time. Taking a field trip to the Museum o ers students and teachers an opportunity to interact

  4. fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM #12;The Field Museum | Field Trip Planning Guide for Educators 2 Welcome to The Field Museum! The Field Museum is an exciting place to explore and learn. Taking a field trip to the Museum o ers students and teachers an opportunity to interact with real

  5. Quantum Field and Cosmic Field-Finite Geometrical Field Theory of Matter Motion Part Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianhua Xiao

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This research establishes an operational measurement way to express the quantum field theory in a geometrical form. In four-dimensional spacetime continuum, the orthogonal rotation is defined. It forms two sets of equations: one set is geometrical equations, another set is the motion equations. The Lorentz transformation can be directly derived from the geometrical equations, and the proper time of general relativity is well expressed by time displacement field. By the motion equations, the typical time displacement field of matter motion is discussed. The research shows that the quantum field theory can be established based on the concept of orthogonal rotation. On this sense, the quantum matter motion in physics is viewed as the orthogonal rotation of spacetime continuum. In this paper, it shows that there are three typical quantum solutions. One is particle-like solution, one is generation-type solution, and one is pure wave type solution. For each typical solution, the force fields are different. Many features of quantum field can be well explained by this theoretic form. Finally, the general matter motion is discussed, the main conclusions are: (1). Geometrically, cosmic vacuum field can be described by the curvature spacetime; (2). The spatial deformation of planet is related with a planet electromagnetic field; (3). For electric charge less matter, the volume of matter will be expanding infinitely; (4).For strong electric charge matter, it shows that the volume of matter will be contracting infinitely.

  6. An overview of craniospinal axis fields and field matching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Robin L., E-mail: robinscott631@gmail.com

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many methods are implemented for craniospinal axis (CSA) radiation treatment (RT). This papers goal is to define correctly matched CSA RT fields. Overlap or a space between matched RT fields can create variances of dose and the possibility of negative side effects or disease recurrence, respectively. An accurate CSA RT match procedure is created with localization markers, immobilization devices, equations, feathered matches, safety gap, and portal imaging. A CS match angle is predetermined to optimize patient position before immobilization device fabrication. Various central axis (CA) placements within the brain and spine fields that effect gantry, table, and collimator rotation are described. An overview of the methods used to create CSA RT fields and matches is presented for optimal CSA RT implementation. In addition, to the authors knowledge, this is the first time that a prone CSA RT with anesthesia has been described.

  7. Noncommutative field with constant background fields and neutral fermion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui-bai Luo; Feng-yao Hou; Zhu-fang Cui; Xiao-jun Liu; Hong-shi Zong

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Introducing constant background fields into the noncommutative gauge theory, we first obtain a Hermitian fermion Lagrangian which involves a Lorentz violation term, then we generalize it to a new deformed canonical noncommutation relations for fermion field. Massless neutrino oscillation in the deformed canonical noncommutation relations is analyzed. The restriction of the noncommutative coefficients is also discussed. By comparing with the existing experimental data of conventional neutrino oscillations, the order of noncommutative deformed coefficients is given from different ways.

  8. A subsurface study of the Denkman sandstone member, Norphlet Formation, hatters Pond field, Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, L.M.; Anderson, E.G.; Baria, L.R. (Northeast Louisiana Univ., Monroe (USA)); Higginbotham, R.S.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hatters Pond field is in east-central Mobile County in southwestern Alabama and it produces from both the Norphlet and Smackover formations. The structural trap involves salt movement along the west side of the Mobile Fault System that resulted in a faulted salt anticline. The Norphlet Formation of southwestern Alabama consists of red to gray siltstone and pinkish to gray sandstone with conglomerate layers. Three facies have been distinguished within the Norphlet Formation: a lower shale, a red siltstone sequence, and an upper quartzose unit. The thickness of the formation ranges from a feather edge to more than 800 ft (234.8 m) in southwestern Alabama. The Upper Jurassic Denkman Sandstone Member of the Norphlet Formation at Hatters Pond field is a medium- to fine-grained, well-sorted arkosic sandstone between the underlying Norphlet redbed lithofacies and the carbonates of the overlying Smackover Formation. Here, the Denkman Member can be subdivided into a massive upper unit and a low- to high-angle cross-stratified lower unit. The sandstones are quartz-rich with a high percentage of feldspars. The majority of the feldspar grains observed are potassium feldspar. Microcline is usually less altered when compared with other types of feldspar grains. The major types of feldspar replacement include illitization, hematitization, dolomitization, chloritization, calcitization, vacuolization, and anhydritization. Carbonate replacement of feldspars is very abundant, mostly by ferroan dolomite. Rock fragments are not abundant in the Denkman Member, although there is good evidence of a metamorphic/volcanic source area. The sandstones are cemented by dolomite, calcite, anhydrite, and quartz and feldspar overgrowths. The lower Denkman unit is slightly more porous than the upper Denkman unit. The pore-lining authigenic clay, illite, greatly reduces permeability and porosity in these sandstones.

  9. Generation of Gaussian Density Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugo Martel

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes analytical and numerical techniques for the generation of Gaussian density fields, which represent cosmological density perturbations. The mathematical techniques involved in the generation of density harmonics in k-space, the filtering of the density fields, and the normalization of the power spectrum to the measured temperature fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background, are presented in details. These techniques are well-known amongst experts, but the current literature lacks a formal description. I hope that this technical report will prove useful to new researchers moving into this field, sparing them the task of reinventing the wheel.

  10. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  11. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  12. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, John A. (Ithaca, NY); Greenwald, Shlomo (Haifa, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  13. Fsusy and Field Theoretical Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Sedra; J. Zerouaoui

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Following our previous work on fractional spin symmetries (FSS) \\cite{6, 7}, we consider here the construction of field theoretical models that are invariant under the $D=2(1/3,1/3)$ supersymmetric algebra.

  14. Field emission from organic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kymissis, Ioannis, 1977-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field emission displays (FEDs) show great promise as high performance flat panel displays. The light emission process is efficient, long lifetimes are possible with high brightness, and bright passive matrix displays can ...

  15. Improvements in Low Field MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogier, Stephen E

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presently dominated by multi-million dollar machines that use large superconducting magnets to generate very high quality images. It is possible to perform MRI at lower magnetic field...

  16. Topics in double field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Seung Ki

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of momentum and winding modes of closed string on a torus leads to a natural idea that the field theoretical approach of string theory should involve winding type coordinates as well as the usual space-time ...

  17. Scalar Field Theory on Supermanifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Hameeda

    2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we will analyse a scalar field theory on a spacetime with noncommutative and non-anticommutative coordinates. This will be done using supermanifold formalism. We will also analyse its quantization in path integral formalism.

  18. Double field theory at order ??

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohm, Olaf

    We investigate ?? corrections of bosonic strings in the framework of double field theory. The previously introduced doubled ??-geometry gives ??-deformed gauge transformations arising in the Green-Schwarz anomaly ...

  19. Field Flows of Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahn, Robert N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Flows of Dark Energy Robert N. Cahn, Roland de Putter,July 8, 2008) Scalar ?eld dark energy evolving from a longthe key aspects of the dark energy evolution during much of

  20. Field ionization from carbon nanofibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeoti, Bosun J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Micro Gas Analyzer project aims to develop power-efficient, high resolution, high sensitivity, portable and real-time gas sensors. We developed a field ionizer array based on gated CNTs. Arrays of CNTs are used because ...

  1. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  2. Diagenesis within the deep Tuscaloosa formation, Profit Island field, Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudder, Karen Ann Gilchrist

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    facies controlled. Initially primary porosity of these turbidite sandstones was obliterated by minor physical compaction and abundant calcite cemen- tation. During deep burial, however, extensive leaching of cement, feldspars, and volcanic rock... and precipitation of abun- dant euhedral chlorite took place. Chlorite occurs as grain coatings and pore-linings which inhibits further cement development, and facilitates maintenance of optimum reservoir qualities. Kaolinite, iv illite, smectite, and some...

  3. Physical fields and Clifford algebras II. Neutrino field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim V. Varlamov

    1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino field is considered in the framework of a complex Clifford algebra $\\C_3\\cong\\C_2\\oplus\\stackrel{\\ast}{\\C}_2$. The factor-algebras ${}^{\\epsilon}\\C_2$ and ${}^{\\epsilon}\\stackrel{\\ast}{\\C}_2$, which are obtained by means of homomorphic mappings $\\C_3\\to\\C_2$ and $\\C_3\\to\\stackrel{\\ast}{\\C}_2$, are identified with the neutrino and antineutrino fields, respectively. In this framework we have natural explanation for absence of right-handed neutrino and left-handed antineutrino.

  4. Noncommutative field gas driven inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luciano Barosi; Francisco A. Brito; Amilcar R. Queiroz

    2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate early time inflationary scenarios in an Universe filled with a dilute noncommutative bosonic gas at high temperature. A noncommutative bosonic gas is a gas composed of bosonic scalar field with noncommutative field space on a commutative spacetime. Such noncommutative field theories was recently introduced as a generalization of quantum mechanics on a noncommutative spacetime. As key features of these theories are Lorentz invariance violation and CPT violation. In the present study we use a noncommutative bosonic field theory that besides the noncommutative parameter $\\theta$ shows up a further parameter $\\sigma$. This parameter $\\sigma$ controls the range of the noncommutativity and acts as a regulator for the theory. Both parameters play a key role in the modified dispersion relations of the noncommutative bosonic field, leading to possible striking consequences for phenomenology. In this work we obtain an equation of state $p=\\omega(\\sigma,\\theta;\\beta)\\rho$ for the noncommutative bosonic gas relating pressure $p$ and energy density $\\rho$, in the limit of high temperature. We analyse possible behaviours for this gas parameters $\\sigma$, $\\theta$ and $\\beta$, so that $-1\\leq\\omega<-1/3$, which is the region where the Universe enters an accelerated phase.

  5. Noncommutative field gas driven inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barosi, Luciano; Brito, Francisco A [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraiba (Brazil); Queiroz, Amilcar R, E-mail: lbarosi@ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: fabrito@df.ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: amilcarq@gmail.com [Centro Internacional de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Brasilia, Caixa Postal 04667, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate early time inflationary scenarios in a Universe filled with a dilute noncommutative bosonic gas at high temperature. A noncommutative bosonic gas is a gas composed of a bosonic scalar field with noncommutative field space on a commutative spacetime. Such noncommutative field theories were recently introduced as a generalization of quantum mechanics on a noncommutative spacetime. Key features of these theories are Lorentz invariance violation and CPT violation. In the present study we use a noncommutative bosonic field theory that, besides the noncommutative parameter {theta}, shows up a further parameter {sigma}. This parameter {sigma} controls the range of the noncommutativity and acts as a regulator for the theory. Both parameters play a key role in the modified dispersion relations of the noncommutative bosonic field, leading to possible striking consequences for phenomenology. In this work we obtain an equation of state p = {omega}({sigma},{theta};{beta}){rho} for the noncommutative bosonic gas relating pressure p and energy density {rho}, in the limit of high temperature. We analyse possible behaviours for these gas parameters {sigma}, {theta} and {beta}, so that -1{<=}{omega}<-1/3, which is the region where the Universe enters an accelerated phase.

  6. RELATIVISTIC QUANTUM FIELD THEORY OF A HYPERNUCLEI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boguta, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0 Nuclei in Relativistic Field Theory of Nuclear Matter, LBLRelativistic Quantum Field Theory of Finite Nuclei, LBL prein a Relativistic Mean-Field Theory, Stanford preprint F.E.

  7. CLASSICAL FIELD THEORY WITH Z (3) SYMMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruck, H.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and H.M. Ruck, Quantum field theory Potts model, J. Math.in cyclic symmetry field theories, Nucl. Phys. B167 M.J.waves in nonlinear field theories, Phys. Rev. Lett. 32. R.

  8. Split string field theory I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. Gross; Washington Taylor

    2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe projection operators in the matter sector of Witten's cubic string field theory using modes on the right and left halves of the string. These projection operators represent a step towards an analytic solution of the equations of motion of the full string field theory, and can be used to construct Dp-brane solutions of the string field theory when the BRST operator Q is taken to be pure ghost, as suggested in the recent conjecture by Rastelli, Sen and Zwiebach. We show that a family of solutions related to the sliver state are rank one projection operators on the appropriate space of half-string functionals, and we construct higher rank projection operators corresponding to configurations of multiple D-branes.

  9. Thermalization in External Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali-Akbari, Mohammad

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the AdS/CFT framework meson thermalization in the presence of a constant external magnetic field in a strongly coupled gauge theory has been studied. In the gravitational description the thermalization of mesons corresponds to the horizon formation on the flavour D7-brane which is embedded in the AdS_5 x S^5 background in the probe limit. The apparent horizon forms due to the time-dependent change in the baryon number chemical potential, the injection of baryons in the gauge theory. We will numerically show that the thermalization happens even faster in the presence of the magnetic field on the probe brane. We observe that this reduction in the thermalization time sustains up to a specific value of the magnetic field.

  10. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A0/%2A en6/%2A

  11. Variational methods for field theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Menahem, S.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four field theory models are studied: Periodic Quantum Electrodynamics (PQED) in (2 + 1) dimensions, free scalar field theory in (1 + 1) dimensions, the Quantum XY model in (1 + 1) dimensions, and the (1 + 1) dimensional Ising model in a transverse magnetic field. The last three parts deal exclusively with variational methods; the PQED part involves mainly the path-integral approach. The PQED calculation results in a better understanding of the connection between electric confinement through monopole screening, and confinement through tunneling between degenerate vacua. This includes a better quantitative agreement for the string tensions in the two approaches. Free field theory is used as a laboratory for a new variational blocking-truncation approximation, in which the high-frequency modes in a block are truncated to wave functions that depend on the slower background modes (Boron-Oppenheimer approximation). This ''adiabatic truncation'' method gives very accurate results for ground-state energy density and correlation functions. Various adiabatic schemes, with one variable kept per site and then two variables per site, are used. For the XY model, several trial wave functions for the ground state are explored, with an emphasis on the periodic Gaussian. A connection is established with the vortex Coulomb gas of the Euclidean path integral approach. The approximations used are taken from the realms of statistical mechanics (mean field approximation, transfer-matrix methods) and of quantum mechanics (iterative blocking schemes). In developing blocking schemes based on continuous variables, problems due to the periodicity of the model were solved. Our results exhibit an order-disorder phase transition. The transfer-matrix method is used to find a good (non-blocking) trial ground state for the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field in (1 + 1) dimensions.

  12. Scully field - Marion County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salgat, B.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Scully field is a multipay new-field discovery located in the southern end of Salina basin, Marion County, Kansas. The Scully field was discovered using a combination of satellite imagery and subsurface control. The overall trapping mechanism at the Scully field is anticlinal closure. Infield drilling has demonstrated, however, that significant stratigraphic variations do exist within the productive area. The Simpson sands have been subdivided in five separate units which range from 4 to 12 ft (1 to 4 m) in thickness. Three of these are of economic importance in the field. In general, the sands with the most economic potential are distributed within relative Ordovician paleolows. The Viola has four main lithologic divisions. The uppermost of these is a relatively thin dolomite cap which ranges from 2 to 15 ft (1 to 5 m). This upper dolomite is the primary Viola pay zone. The Mississippian section is eroded deeply over the Scully structure and demonstrates about 70 ft (20 m) of thinning. The potential pay interval is chert which has 25 to 30% porosity based on log analysis. The trapping mechanism is a combination of erosional truncation and structural closure. In addition to the structural information obtained from satellite imagery, R.J. Walker Oil Co., Inc., evaluated the hydrocarbon potential of T18S, R1E, Marion County, Kansas, which contains the Scully field, using remote sensing technology developed by Earth Reference Systems of Long Beach, California. The technology involves direct detection of hydrocarbons in place, using satellite data, nonlinear mathematics, and the fundamental principles of molecular structure and electromagnetic wave propagation.

  13. Dynamics of generalized tachyon field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong-Jia Yang; Jingzhao Qi

    2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the dynamics of generalized tachyon field in FRW spacetime. We obtain the autonomous dynamical system for the general case. Because the general autonomous dynamical system cannot be solved analytically, we discuss two cases in detail: $\\beta=1$ and $\\beta=2$. We find the critical points and study their stability. At these critical points, we also consider the stability of the generalized tachyon field, which is as important as the stability of critical points. The possible final states of the universe are discussed.

  14. Wide field of view telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide field of view telescope having two concave and two convex reflective surfaces, each with an aspheric surface contour, has a flat focal plane array. Each of the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary reflective surfaces are rotationally symmetric about the optical axis. The combination of the reflective surfaces results in a wide field of view in the range of approximately 3.8.degree. to approximately 6.5.degree.. The length of the telescope along the optical axis is approximately equal to or less than the diameter of the largest of the reflective surfaces.

  15. Solid phase microextraction field kit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunes, Peter J.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A field kit for the collection, isolation and concentration of trace amounts of high explosives (HE), biological weapons (BW) and chemical weapons (CW) residues in air, soil, vegetation, swipe, and liquid samples. The field kit includes a number of Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) fiber and syringe assemblies in a hermetically sealed transportation container or tubes which includes a sampling port, a number of extra SPME fiber and syringe assemblies, the fiber and syringe assemblies including a protective cap for the fiber, and an extractor for the protective cap, along with other items including spare parts, protective glove, and an instruction manual, all located in an airtight container.

  16. String-Organized Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. S. Lam

    1994-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A low energy string theory should reduce to an ordinary quantum field theory, but in reality the structures of the two are so different as to make the equivalence obscure. The string formalism is more symmetrical between the spacetime and the internal degrees of freedom, thus resulting in considerable simplification in practical calculations and novel insights in theoretical understandings. We review here how tree or multiloop field-theoretical diagrams can be organized in a string-like manner to take advantage of this computational and conceptual simplicity.

  17. Spherically symmetric scalar field collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koyel Ganguly; Narayan Banerjee

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that a scalar field, minimally coupled to gravity may have collapsing modes even when the energy condition is violated, that is, for $(\\rho+3p)<0$. This result may be useful in the investigation of the possible clustering of dark energy. All the examples dealt with have apparent horizons which form before the formation of the singularity. The singularities formed are shell focusing in nature. The density of the scalar field distribution is seen to diverge at singularity. The Ricci scalar also diverges at the singularity. The interior spherically symmetric metric is matched with exterior Vaidya metric at the hypersurface and the appropriate junction conditions are obtained.

  18. Negative Energies and Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption that the vacuum is the minimum energy state, invariant under unitary transformations, is fundamental to quantum field theory. However, the assertion that the conservation of charge implies that the equal time commutator of the charge density and its time derivative vanish for two spatially separated points is inconsistent with the requirement that the vacuum be the lowest energy state. Yet, for quantum field theory to be gauge invariant, this commutator must vanish. This essay explores how this conundrum is resolved in quantum electrodynamics.

  19. Phenomenology of Noncommutative Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Carone

    2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental limits on the violation of four-dimensional Lorentz invariance imply that noncommutativity among ordinary spacetime dimensions must be small. In this talk, I review the most stringent bounds on noncommutative field theories and suggest a possible means of evading them: noncommutativity may be restricted to extra, compactified spatial dimensions. Such theories have a number of interesting features, including Abelian gauge fields whose Kaluza-Klein excitations have self couplings. We consider six-dimensional QED in a noncommutative bulk, and discuss the collider signatures of the model.

  20. Renormalization and quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. E. Borcherds

    2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to describe how to use regularization and renormalization to construct a perturbative quantum field theory from a Lagrangian. We first define renormalizations and Feynman measures, and show that although there need not exist a canonical Feynman measure, there is a canonical orbit of Feynman measures under renormalization. We then construct a perturbative quantum field theory from a Lagrangian and a Feynman measure, and show that it satisfies perturbative analogues of the Wightman axioms, extended to allow time-ordered composite operators over curved spacetimes.

  1. Livermore Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Livermore Field Office Livermore Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year...

  2. Sandia Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Sandia Field Office Sandia Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End...

  3. Pantex Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Pantex Field Office Pantex Field Office FY12 Semi Annual Report FY11 Year End...

  4. Nevada Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Nevada Field Office Nevada Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End...

  5. Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission)...

  6. A new magnetic field integral measurement system

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurements. b. Second field integral (horizontal and vertical) measurements. c. Multipole components of first field integral measurements. 2. Translation Coil a. Multipole...

  7. Native copper deposits of the Portage Lake volcanics, Michigan: their implications with respect to canister stability for nuclear waste isolation in the Columbia River basalts beneath the Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crisman, D.P.; Jacobs, G.K.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Copper deposits in the Portage Lake Volcanics of northern Michigan have been evaluated as a natural analogue for canister material to be emplaced in a nuclear waste repository located in the basalts beneath the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Te native copper, which precipitated from high temperature (200/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C) hydrothermal solutions between 500 and 800 million yr ago, has remained relatively unaltered in the Portage lake basalt-groundwater system. The results of this study illustrate the stability of copper in solutions of moderate pH, low to moderate Eh, and low total dissolved solids. Chemical trends and geochemical modeling of te near-surface waters suggestthat similarities (moderate pH, low E, low total dissolved solids) exist between the groundwater-basalt system of the Keweenaw Peninsula and the groundwater-basalt system at the Hanford Site. These similarities and the stability of copper in the Keweenswan basalts imply that copper alloys are adequate materials for nuclear waste canisters emplaced in a repository located in basalt.

  8. SHIP VELOCITY FIELDS , Lichuan Guib

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui, Lichuan

    directions. 1. Introduction Knowledge of flow around ships is important for design, model development, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation. Historically, five-hole pitot probes have been used for measuring of multi-hole pitot and Laser-doppler systems, they both require measurement of ship velocity fields

  9. Quantum Field Theory Mark Srednicki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Azer

    The Spin-Statistics Theorem (3) 45 5 The LSZ Reduction Formula (3) 49 6 Path Integrals in Quantum Mechanics Quantization of Spinor Fields II (38) 246 40 Parity, Time Reversal, and Charge Conjugation (23, 39) 254 #12, 59) 369 #12;6 63 The Vertex Function in Spinor Electrodynamics (62) 378 64 The Magnetic Moment

  10. Covariant Geometric Prequantization of Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanatchikov, I V

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geometric prequantization formula for the Poisson-Gerstenhaber bracket on forms found within the DeDonder-Weyl Hamiltonian formalism earlier is presented. The related aspects of covariant geometric quantization of field theories are sketched. In particular, the importance of the framework of Clifford and spinor bundles and superconnections in this context is underlined.

  11. Covariant Geometric Prequantization of Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Kanatchikov

    2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A geometric prequantization formula for the Poisson-Gerstenhaber bracket of forms found within the DeDonder-Weyl Hamiltonian formalism earlier is presented. The related aspects of covariant geometric quantization of field theories are sketched. In particular, the importance of the framework of Clifford and spinor bundles and superconnections in this context is underlined.

  12. Field Internship Claire P. Curtis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    POLI 402 Field Internship Claire P. Curtis Office: 114 Wentworth, #206 Office Hours: M, 9-11, W 12-2 Phone: 953-6510 e-mail: curtisc@cofc.edu This course provides an opportunity to do an internship in Charleston, to interact with other political science students also doing internships and to ground

  13. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak, or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode, which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum or other duct near the electrode includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode is insulated laterally with insulators, one of which is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode and a vacuum vessel wall, with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable. 11 figs.

  14. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Michael J. (San Diego, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode (56) positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak (20), or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix (40) of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode (56), which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum (54) or other duct near the electrode (56) includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode (56) is insulated laterally with insulators (63,64), one of which (64) is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode (56) and a vacuum vessel wall (22), with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E.times.B/B.sup.2 drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable.

  15. Quantum Field Theory in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Fialkovsky; D. V. Vassilevich

    2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a short non-technical introduction to applications of the Quantum Field Theory methods to graphene. We derive the Dirac model from the tight binding model and describe calculations of the polarization operator (conductivity). Later on, we use this quantity to describe the Quantum Hall Effect, light absorption by graphene, the Faraday effect, and the Casimir interaction.

  16. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  17. FIELD RELIABILITY OF ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    study of in-the-field experience of electronics reliability. Tage Elm. Abstract. This report and internally) induced failures. The report is not meant to be merely an indication of the state of the art for the re- liability prediction methods we know, but also as a contribution to the investigation of man-machine

  18. Calculator simplifies field production forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, B.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forecasting future field production from an assumed average well production schedule and drilling schedule has been programmed for the HP-41C hand-held programmable computer. No longer must tedious row summations be made by hand for staggered well production schedules. Details of the program are provided.

  19. Noncommutative Quantum Scalar Field Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz Barron, L. R.; Lopez-Dominguez, J. C.; Sabido, M. [Departamento de Fisica, DCI-Campus Leon, Universidad de Guanajuato, A.P. E-143, C.P. 37150, Guanajuato (Mexico); Yee, C. [Departamento de Matematicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we study noncommutative Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology coupled to a scalar field endowed with an exponential potential. The quantum scenario is analyzed in the Bohmian formalism of quantum trajectories to investigate the effects of noncommutativity in the evolution of the universe.

  20. Propagators for Noncommutative Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Gurau; V. Rivasseau; F. Vignes-Tourneret

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we provide exact expressions for propagators of noncommutative Bosonic or Fermionic field theories after adding terms of the Grosse-Wulkenhaar type in order to ensure Langmann-Szabo covariance. We emphasize the new Fermionic case and we give in particular all necessary bounds for the multiscale analysis and renormalization of the noncommutative Gross-Neveu model.

  1. Light Field Denoising, Light Field Superresolution and Stereo Camera Based Refocussing using a GMM Light Field Patch Prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    Light Field Denoising, Light Field Superresolution and Stereo Camera Based Refocussing using a GMM Light Field Patch Prior Kaushik Mitra and Ashok Veeraraghavan ECE, Rice University Houston, Tx 77005 Kaushik.Mitra@rice.edu, vashok@rice.edu Abstract With the recent availability of commercial light field

  2. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  3. Equivalence of trans paths in ion channels Juan Alvarez*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajek, Bruce

    approaches in this area one can find molecular dynamic simulations 38 , Brownian dynamics simulations 3 of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Coordinated Science Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana if there is an electric potential difference across the channels. It is shown for simple single ion models

  4. Frontiers in Education Conference -1 San Juan, Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, Teresa L.

    are currently being used with vigor within many domains of science, mathematics, engineering, and technology and impulse to introductory physics students. The laboratory activity makes use of a collision apparatus range of areas in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education. Introduction A growing

  5. "Roses are Rosas": Juan Gmez-Quiones A Chicano Poet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tovar, Ins H.

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    triumphs overexperience. the poet pronounces that come, theabrupt "Por Vida" whereby the poet indicales his recognitionpersonal view from Ihe poet shows US a woman characterized

  6. Juan E. Santos Vita Born: December 4, 1948, Buenos Aires ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    approach, Applied Mathematics and Computations 218 ... media, Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering 196 (2007), 4644-4655. 51.

  7. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Robert Cheng and Juan Meza

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Robert Cheng and Juan Meza

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  8. University of St Andrews Simon Dobson and Juan Ye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Simon

    "Garbage in, garbage out" The wrong data will generate the wrong output If the parameters don't meet provoke such a question. Charles Babbage. Passages from the Life of a Philosopher. 1864. Quoted from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garbage_In,_Garbage if their inputs are "garbage" (or at least imperfect) #12;Sensor networks 1 Sensor networks Lots of small

  9. EMPRESAS COLABORADORAS CON LA UNIVERSIDAD REY JUAN CARLOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    BONIFICADA DE CALIDAD SL http://ap-formacion.es/ A&S SAMPERE ASOCIADOS SL http://www.absampere.com A.C.F.P. SERVICIOS PEDITRICOS Y SANITARIOS SL A.C.M. GESTIONA, C.B. http://www.acmgestiona.com A://www.amcomunicacion.com A3 AUDITORES http://a3auditores.darwinsistemas.es BACO ASESORA Y GESTIN SL ABACO SERVICIO

  10. AMENDED AND RESTATED SAN JUAN PROJECT PARTICIPATION AGREEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MEXICO TUCSON ELECTRIC POWER COMPANY THE CITY OF FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO M-S-R PUBLIC POWER AGENCY THE INCORPORATED COUNTY OF LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PUBLIC POWER AUTHORITY CITY OF ANAHEIM UTAH 12 RIGHTS OF PNM AND TEP IN WATER AND COAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 13 SEVERANCE

  11. Juan Pablo (J.P.) Perez: J&P Organics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to do the rows. We need to put compost, get nutrients in thejust prepare it. Rabkin: Where are you getting your compost?Perez: Compost? Called Comgro, in Spreckels. Its certified

  12. Juan G. Ayala Estudiante Graduado Departamento de Ingeniera Industrial UPRM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    ://www.sheppardsoftware.com/Asiaweb/factfile/UniquefactsAsia17.htmSumatra, Indonesia #12;Vulnerabilidad Atributos del humano y el ambiente que incrementan el se enfoca en el impacto relativo de pérdidas en una comunidad. ¿Qué proporción de los activos del

  13. Rey Juan Carlos University 13th March 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Automation Mechanical Engineering Information Technology Software Development Plastics Industry #12 command of ENGLISH Willingness to learn German Problem Solving Skills #12;TOP PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES IN-DEMAND

  14. Generating Potable Water from Fuel Cell Technology Juan E. Tibaquir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability April 10th /09 2 Outline 1. Project goal and motivation Commercial unit fuel cell 5. Conclusions #12;Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability April 10th /09 3 for Municipal Water Providers #12;Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability April 10th /09 4 Water

  15. Model-Driven Cloud Data Storage Juan Castrejn1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    of attention, due to a growing interest in the challenges and opportuni- ties associated to the NoSQL movement-level data models, and then rely on transformation procedures to deal with particular cloud storage details modifying their core data models. 1 Introduction Cloud computing represents one of the most promising

  16. San Juan County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation, search

  17. San Juan County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation,

  18. San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4.April19. AverageForecast

  19. San Juan Capistrano, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan FranciscoWind

  20. San Juan Mesa Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan FranciscoWindMesa Wind

  1. Soil Sample Questionnaire --Field Crops Sample No. Field Identification Field Size acres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Jay B.

    . Subsoil: (if known) sand gravel clay hardpan lime solid rock 7. Water penetration: rapid moderate slow soil questionnaire on the back of this sheet. Have soil tested at least once every rotation. 2. Sample of the hole and put it in a clean container. Repeat this procedure at 10 or 12 locations in the field. Mix

  2. Field Campaign Guidelines (ARM Climate Research Facility)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to establish a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking database tool and are tailored to meet the scope of each specific field campaign.

  3. The spinor field theory of the photon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruo Peng Wang

    2011-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    I introduce a spinor field theory for the photon. The three-dimensional vector electromagnetic field and the four-dimensional vector potential are components of this spinor photon field. A spinor equation for the photon field is derived from Maxwell's equations,the relations between the electromagnetic field and the four-dimensional vector potential, and the Lorentz gauge condition. The covariant quantization of free photon field is done, and only transverse photons are obtained. The vacuum energy divergence does not occur in this theory. A covariant "positive frequency" condition is introduced for separating the photon field from its complex conjugate in the presence of the electric current and charge.

  4. Apparatuses and methods for generating electric fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R; Tremblay, Paul L

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatuses and methods relating to generating an electric field are disclosed. An electric field generator may include a semiconductive material configured in a physical shape substantially different from a shape of an electric field to be generated thereby. The electric field is generated when a voltage drop exists across the semiconductive material. A method for generating an electric field may include applying a voltage to a shaped semiconductive material to generate a complex, substantially nonlinear electric field. The shape of the complex, substantially nonlinear electric field may be configured for directing charged particles to a desired location. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed.

  5. Split string field theory II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. Gross; Washington Taylor

    2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the ghost sector of cubic string field theory in terms of degrees of freedom on the two halves of a split string. In particular, we represent a class of pure ghost BRST operators as operators on the space of half-string functionals. These BRST operators were postulated by Rastelli, Sen, and Zwiebach to give a description of cubic string field theory in the closed string vacuum arising from condensation of a D25-brane in the original tachyonic theory. We find a class of solutions for the ghost equations of motion using the pure ghost BRST operators. We find a vanishing action for these solutions, and discuss possible interpretations of this result. The form of the solutions we find in the pure ghost theory suggests an analogous class of solutions in the original theory on the D25-brane with BRST operator Q_B coupling the matter and ghost sectors.

  6. Diffeomorphisms in group field theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baratin, Aristide [Triangle de la Physique, CPHT Ecole Polytechnique, IPhT Saclay, LPT Orsay and Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Universite Paris XI, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Girelli, Florian [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Oriti, Daniele [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14467 Golm (Germany)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the issue of diffeomorphism symmetry in group field theories (GFT), using the noncommutative metric representation introduced by A. Baratin and D. Oriti [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 221302 (2010).]. In the colored Boulatov model for 3d gravity, we identify a field (quantum) symmetry which ties together the vertex translation invariance of discrete gravity, the flatness constraint of canonical quantum gravity, and the topological (coarse-graining) identities for the 6j symbols. We also show how, for the GFT graphs dual to manifolds, the invariance of the Feynman amplitudes encodes the discrete residual action of diffeomorphisms in simplicial gravity path integrals. We extend the results to GFT models for higher-dimensional BF theories and discuss various insights that they provide on the GFT formalism itself.

  7. Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneller, Tricia; Salas, Jose

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 1999, the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Halliburton Energy Services cooperated on a field test of Halliburton's new Production Hydraulic Packer technology on Well 46-TPX-10 at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 near Casper, WY. Performance of the packer was evaluated in set and unset operations. The packer's ability to seal the annulus between the casing and tubing was hydraulically tested and the results were recorded.

  8. Quantum fields with classical perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derezi?ski, Jan, E-mail: Jan.Derezinski@fuw.edu.pl [Department of Mathematical Methods in Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 74, 00-682 Warszawa (Poland)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of these notes is a review of various models of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) involving quadratic Lagrangians. We discuss scalar and vector bosons, spin 1/2 fermions, both neutral and charged. Beside free theories, we study their interactions with classical perturbations, called, depending on the context, an external linear source, mass-like term, current or electromagnetic potential. The notes may serve as a first introduction to QFT.

  9. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  10. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  11. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  12. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  13. Two field matter bounce cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Yi-Fu; McDonough, Evan; Duplessis, Francis; Brandenberger, Robert H., E-mail: yifucai@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: evanmc@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: francis.duplessis@mail.mcgill.ca, E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montral, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine the non-singular Matter Bounce scenario first developed in [20], which starts with a matter-dominated period of contraction and transitions into an Ekpyrotic phase of contraction. We consider both matter fields, the first of which plays the role of regular matter, and the second of which is responsible for the non-singular bounce. Since the dominant matter field is massive, the induced curvature fluctuations are initially not scale-invariant, whereas the fluctuations of the second scalar field (which are initially entropy fluctuations) are scale-invariant. We study the transfer of the initial entropy perturbations into curvature fluctuations in the matter-dominated phase of contraction and show that the latter become nearly scale invariant on large scales but are blue tilted on small scales. We study the evolution of both curvature and entropy fluctuations through the bounce, and show that both have a scale-invariant spectrum which is blue-tilted on small scales. However, we find that the entropy fluctuations have an amplitude that is much smaller than that of the curvature perturbations, due to gravitational amplification of curvature perturbations during the bounce phase.

  14. Encoding field theories into gravities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aoki, Sinya; Onogi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method, which encodes the information of a $d$ dimensional quantum field theory into a $d+1$ dimensional gravity in the $1/N$ expansion. We first construct a $d+1$ dimensional field theory from the $d$ dimensional one via the gradient flow equation, whose flow time $t$ represents the energy scale of the system such that $t\\rightarrow 0$ corresponds to the ultra-violet (UV) while $t\\rightarrow\\infty$ to the infra-red (IR). We then define the induced metric from $d+1$ dimensional field operators. We show that the metric defined in this way becomes classical in the large $N$ limit, in a sense that quantum fluctuations of the metric are suppressed as $1/N$ due to the large $N$ factorization property. As a concrete example, we apply our method to the O(N) non-linear $\\sigma$ model in two dimensions. We calculate the induced metric in three dimensions, which is shown to describe De Sitter (dS) or Anti De Sitter (AdS) space in the massless limit, where the mass is dynamically generated in the O(N) non-l...

  15. Command Shaping for Micro-Mills and CNC Controllers Joel Fortgang*, William Singhose*, Juan de Juanes Marquez**, Jesus Perez**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singhose, William

    . The tool spindle is air and oil lubricated, as well as refr shaping is an effective technique for dealing with these inertial forces. The fundamental principle

  16. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Septic Tank/Soil Absorption Field (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Campo de absorci?nTanque s?ptico de dos compartimientos Tuber?a perforada para distribuir residuales Suelo arenoso/limoso Grava Tela geotextil L-5227S 8-00 Figura 1: Una fosa s?ptica y un sistema de campo de absorci?n. Sistemas individuales para el... tratamiento de aguas negras Fosa s?ptica y campo de absorci?n Bruce Lesikar y Juan Enciso Promotores Especialistas de Ingenier?a Agr?cola El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M L a fosa s?ptica y el sistema de campo de absorci?n es el m?todo m?s econ...

  17. Field Equations in the Complex Quaternion Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zi-Hua Weng

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper aims to adopt the complex quaternion and octonion to formulate the field equations for electromagnetic and gravitational fields. Applying the octonionic representation enables one single definition to combine some physics contents of two fields, which were considered to be independent of each other in the past. J. C. Maxwell applied simultaneously the vector terminology and the quaternion analysis to depict the electromagnetic theory. This method edified the paper to introduce the quaternion and octonion spaces into the field theory, in order to describe the physical feature of electromagnetic and gravitational fields, while their coordinates are able to be the complex number. The octonion space can be separated into two subspaces, the quaternion space and the S-quaternion space. In the quaternion space, it is able to infer the field potential, field strength, field source, field equations, and so forth, in the gravitational field. In the S-quaternion space, it is able to deduce the field potential, field strength, field source, and so forth, in the electromagnetic field. The results reveal that the quaternion space is appropriate to describe the gravitational features; meanwhile the S-quaternion space is proper to depict the electromagnetic features.

  18. Efficient Concomitant and Remanence Field Artifact Reduction in Ultra-Low-Field MRI Using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficient Concomitant and Remanence Field Artifact Reduction in Ultra-Low-Field MRI Using: For ultra-low-field MRI, the spatial-encoding mag- netic fields generated by gradient coils can have strong to pre-polarize magnetization can improve the signal-to-noise ratio of ultra- low-field MRI. Yet

  19. Thermal History of the Felsite Unit, Geysers Geothermal Field, From Thermal Modeling of 40Ar/39Ar Incremental Heating Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. M. Harrison (U of California); G. B. Dalrymple (Oregon State U); J. B. Hulen (U of Utah); M. A. Lanphere; M. Grove; O. M. Lovera

    1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Pb study was performed of the Geysers plutonic complex of the Geysers Geothermal Field in California. Sixty-nine ion microprobe spot analyses of zircons from four granite samples from the plutonic complex that underlies the Geysers geothermal field yielded Pb-207/Pb-206 vs. U-238/Pb-206 concordia ages ranging from 1.13 {+-} 0.04 Ma to 1.25 {+-} 0.04 Ma. The U-Pb ages coincide closely with Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateau and ''terminal'' ages from coexisting K-feldspars and with the eruption ages of overlying volcanic rocks. The data indicate that the granite crystallized at 1.18 Ma and had cooled below 350 C by {approximately}0.9-1.0 Ma. Interpretation of the feldspar Ar-40/Ar-39 age data using multi-diffusion domain theory indicates that post-emplacement rapid cooling was succeeded either by slower cooling from 350-300 C between 1.0 and 0.4 Ma or transitory reheating to 300-350 C at about 0.4-0.6 Ma. Heat flow calculations constrained with K-feldspar thermal histories and the pre sent elevated regional heal flow anomaly demonstrate that appreciable heat input from sources external to the known Geysers plutonic complex is required to maintain the geothermal system. This requirement is satisfied by either a large, underlying, convecting magma chamber (now solidified) emplaced at 1.2 Ma or episodic intrusion of smaller bodies from 1.2-0.6 Ma.

  20. Primordial Magnetic Fields in False Vacuum Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Davis; K. Dimopoulos

    1996-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that, during false vacuum inflation, a primordial magnetic field can be created, sufficiently strong to seed the galactic dynamo and generate the observed galactic magnetic fields. Considering the inflaton dominated regime, our field is produced by the Higgs-field gradients, resulting from a grand unified phase transition. The evolution of the field is followed from its creation through to the epoch of structure formation, subject to the relevant constraints. We find that it is possible to create a magnetic field of sufficient magnitude, provided the phase transition occurs during the final 5 e-foldings of the inflationary period.