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1

SWP.SanJuanBasin.factsheet0919  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Principal Investigator Reid Grigg/Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name San Juan Basin, New Mexico: Enhanced Coalbed Methane-Sequestration Test Test Location Near Navajo City, New Mexico Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Source 20,000 - 35,000 tons; CO2 sourced from McElmo Dome, CO ConocoPhillips KinderMorgan CO 2 Company, L.P. Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Summary of Field Test Site and Operations General Geology and Target Reservoirs: The San Juan basin (SJB) is one of the top ranked basins in the world for CO 2 coalbed sequestration because it has: 1) advantageous geology and high methane content; 2) abundant anthropogenic CO

2

The Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous Times And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous Times And Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous Times And Its Relationship To San Juan Mountains Thermal Sources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous Times And Its Relationship To San Juan Mountains Thermal Sources Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Heat-flow and coal-maturation data suggest that the thermal history of the San Juan Basin has been influenced by magmatic and volcanic activity in the San Juan Mountains-San Juan volcanic field located to the north of the Basin. Time-dependent isothermal step models indicate that the observed heat flow may be modelled by a (near) steadystate isothermal step extending from 30-98 km depth whose edge underlies the northern San Juan

3

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAM JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps.

Don L. Hanosh

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Upper San Juan Basin Biological Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the biological assessment. The Colorado Natural Heritage Program began its research by updating its BiologicalUpper San Juan Basin Biological Assessment Colorado State University 8002 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO 80523-8002 June 2003 Colorado Natural Heritage Program #12;Southwest Land Alliance Pagosa

5

EIS-0477: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, New  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, 7: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, New Mexico and La Plata County, Colorado EIS-0477: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, New Mexico and La Plata County, Colorado SUMMARY The Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management is preparing this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct a 230-kilovolt transmission line from the Farmington area in northwest New Mexico to Ignacio, Colorado, to relieve transmission constraints, serve new loads, and offer economic development through renewable energy development in the San Juan Basin. DOE's Western Area Power Administration is a cooperating agency; the proposed transmission line would require an interconnection with Western's Shiprock Substation, near Farmington.

6

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

Don L. Hanosh

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Using Cable Suspended Submersible Pumps to Reduce Production Costs to Increase Ultimate Recovery in the Red Mountain Field of the San Juan Basin Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells, installing cable suspended submersible pumps ( Phase I ) and operating the oil field for approximately one year ( Phase II ). Upon the completion of Phases I and II ( Budget Period I ), Enerdyne LLC commenced work on Phase III which required additional drilling in an attempt to improve field economics ( Budget Period II ). The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for the two Budget Periods, of the Agreement, was $1,205,008.00 as detailed in Phase I, II & III Authorization for Expenditures (AFE). This report describes tasks performed and results experienced by Enerdyne LLC during the three phases of the cooperative agreement.

Don L. Hanosh

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Microsoft Word - SWP.SanJuanBasin.factsheet.10.26.2009.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Principal Investigators Brian McPherson (brian@nmt.edu) and Reid Grigg (reid@prrc.nmt.edu) New Mexico Tech Field Test Information: Field Test Name San Juan Basin, New Mexico: Enhanced Coalbed Methane-Sequestration Test Test Location Near Navajo City, New Mexico Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Source 20,000 - 35,000 tons; CO2 sourced from McElmo Dome, CO ConocoPhillips KinderMorgan CO 2 Company, L.P. Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Summary of Field Test Site and Operations General Geology and Target Reservoirs: The San Juan basin (SJB) is one of the top ranked basins in the world for CO 2 coalbed sequestration because it has: 1) advantageous geology and high methane content; 2) abundant anthropogenic CO

9

Applications of geographic information systems (GIS) to exploration studies in the San Juan basin, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey (USGS) is currently applying geographic information systems (GIS) technology to develop a geologic knowledge base that will provide the framework for an integrated basin analysis for the San Juan basin. GIS technology involves the integration of mapping and data-base functions that enable the user to integrate and manipulate spatial (coordinate) data with attribute (thematic) data in order to combine complex geographic, geologic, and geophysical data sets into resultant overlay and composite maps and to conduct multivariate exploratory data analysis and have access to a variety of options for analyzing these databases. The San Juan basin, a 13,500-mi{sup 2} Laramide structural basin in northwestern New Mexico, was chosen for the pilot project. The basin encompasses a maximum of over 15,000 ft of Paleozoic to Eocene sedimentary rock and contains economic deposits of natural gas, oil, coal, and uranium. Successful exploration in this basin requires an understanding of the complex stratigraphy and structural geology controlling the distribution of these resources. GIS technology applied to the San Juan basin includes both surface and subsurface data sets that establish a three-dimensional perspective of the basin's fundamental stratigraphic and structural framework and aid in the identification of its temporal and tectonic relationships relative to origin and occurrence of its resources. Among the digital data bases used for surface mapping is the US GeoData system from the USGS's national mapping program, which includes digital elevation models (DEM) for terrain elevations: digital line graphs (DLG) for planimetric information on boundaries, transportation, hydrography, and the US Public Land Survey system; and land use and land cover (LULC) data. Additional data bases used for surface mapping include surficial geology, locations of oil and gas wells, well status, and oil and gas fields.

Miller, B.M. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Sources Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Heat-flow and coal-maturation data suggest that the thermal history of the San Juan Basin has been...

11

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area (Redirected from San Juan Volcanic Field Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

12

EIS-0477: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, New Mexico and La Plata County, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management is preparing an EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct a 230-kilovolt transmission line from the Farmington area in northwest New Mexico to Ignacio, Colorado, to relieve transmission constraints, serve new loads, and offer economic development through renewable energy development in the San Juan Basin. DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is a cooperating agency; the proposed transmission line would require an interconnection with Western's Shiprock Substation, near Farmington, and a new Three Rivers Substation on Western's reserved lands.

13

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

14

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In this study we combine thermal maturation models, based on the level of maturation of the Fruitland Formation coals, and time-dependet temperature models, based on heat-flow data in the San Juan region, to further investigate both the thermal history of the region and the nature of the influence of the San Juan volcanic field thermal source on the thermal

15

Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Oxygen isotopes. References Peter B. Larson, Hugh P. Taylor Jr (1986) An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis_At_San_Juan_Volcanic_Field_Area_(Larson_%26_Jr,_1986)&oldid=687474" Categories: Exploration Activities

16

Hydrodynamic potential of upper cretaceous Mesaverde group and Dakota formation, San Juan Basin, northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Geothermal-gradient map of the San Juan Basin area. 25 Diagram relating pressure head, P/p g, to total head, Z + P/p g 29 Index map of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado showing areas of Dakota gas accumulation. 31 Southwest... wells near the present site of the New Mexico Public Service power plants in 1912-13; (6) Mesa Verde Oil Company drilled two wells near Flora Vista in 1918-19; and the T. E. Williams Syndicate drilled the the deepest test to date (3, 900 ft) 5 miles...

Dougless, Thomas Clay

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

17

Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Juan Basin C e n t r a l A p p a l a c h i a n B a s i n Michigan Basin Greater Green River Basin Black Warrior Basin North Central Coal Region Arkoma Basin Denver Basin...

18

PRODUCTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable for this project will be a web-based GIS providing data, interpretations, and user tools that will be accessible to anyone with Internet access. During this project, the following work has been performed: (1) Assimilation of most special core analysis data into a GIS database; (2) Inventorying of additional data, such as log images or LAS files that may exist for this area; (3) Analysis of geographic distribution of that data to pinpoint regional gaps in coverage; (4) Assessment of the data within both public and proprietary data sets to begin tuning of regional well logging analyses and improve payzone recognition; (5) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort, including data from northwest New Mexico; (6) Acquisition and digitization of logs to create LAS files for a subset of the wells in the special core analysis data set; and (7) Petrophysical analysis of the final set of well logs.

Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Robert Balch; Tom Engler; Roger Ruan; Shaojie Ma

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes More than 300 samples were collected from within and adjacent to the Lake City caldera. All specimens consist of single hand samples, approximately 1 kg in size. Care was taken to avoid oxidized or weathered rocks. Twenty

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Identification and characterization of Hydraulic Flow Units in the San Juan Formation, Orocual Field, Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 CHAPTER VI SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS. . 92 6. 1 Summary . 6. 1. 1 Introduction. 6. 1. 2 Objectives of this Study. 6. 1. 3 Results and Summary. 6. 2 Conclusions 6. 3 Recommendations for Future Work . . . 92 92 93 93 94 95 NOMENCLATURE 96... (Head of Department) May 2001 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ABSTRACT Identification and Characterization of Hydraulic Flow Units in the San Juan Formation, Orocual Field, Venezuela. (May 2001) Odilia Deghirmandjian, B. S. , Universidad de...

Deghirmandjian, Odilia

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Diagenesis and petrophysics of the Upper Cretaceous, Pictured Cliffs Formation of the San Juan Basin, North West New Mexico and South West Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. Berg (Member) Ronald M. Brirnhall (Member) Philip D. Rabinowitz (Head of Department) December 1996 Major Subject: Geology ABSTRACT Diagenesis and Petmphysics of the Upper Cretaceous, Pictured Cliffs Formation of the San Juan Basin, North... of normalized detrital constituents of the Pictured Cliffs sandstones. The sands plot as litharenites and feldspathic litharenites according to the Folk (1974) classification scheme. 38 BSE image of a dolomite grain (D) surrounded by an iron enriched...

Goberdhan, Helene C

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Geologic evaluation of critical production parameters for coalbed methane resources. Part 1. San Juan Basin. Annual report, August 1988-July 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the San Juan Basin, Fruitland Formation coal seams contain an estimated 43 to 49 Tcf of methane. With more than 500 producing coalbed methane wells and approximately 1,000 wells scheduled for drilling in 1990, the basin is one of the most active areas of coalbed methane exploration and production in the United States. Among the most important geologic factors affecting the occurrence and producibility of coalbed methane are depositional setting, structural attitude and fracturing of the coal, and regional hydraulic setting. In the second year of the study, the Bureau of Economic Geology evaluated the depositional setting and structure of Fruitland coal seams, which are both source rocks and reservoirs for coalbed methane, throughout the basin. The report summarizes the regional tectonic setting of the San Juan Basin; describes the Cretaceous stratigraphy, structure, and basin evolution; relates these factors to Fruitland coal and coalbed methane occurrence; describes studies of lineaments, fractures, and cleats; presents hydrodynamic controls on the producibility of coalbed methane from the Fruitland Formation; summarizes production from the Fruitland Formation; and evaluates geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility.

Ayers, W.B.; Kaiser, W.R.; Ambrose, W.A.; Swartz, T.E.; Laubach, S.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Analysis of fruitland water production treatment and disposal, San Juan Basin. Topical report, October 1991-March 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The San Juan Basin produces more coalbed methane than the rest of the world combined. Brackish water is produced with the gas. Water production climbed from 40,000 barrels per day in 1989 to 115,000 bpd by late 1992. Underground injection is used to dispose of virtually all the produced water. Water production is projected to increase to 180,000 bpd in 1995. 650 million to 1.1 billion barrels are projected to be produced over the next 20 years. Restricted injection capacity and aquifer storage capacity may necessitate additional disposal wells and, ultimately, other methods to dispose of the water. Alternative treatment technologies, especially electrodialysis and/or reverse osmosis, may be applicable at costs of $0.17 to $0.22 per barrel, a considerable savings over the $0.80 to $1.00/bbl cost of deep injection. With suitable treatment, the majority of the produced water could be made suitable for agricultural or municipal uses. Reservoir analysis and simulations indicate stimulations can be optimized, and that heating water prior to injection might increase injectivity in some wells.

Cox, D.O.; Decker, A.D.; Stevens, S.H.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

CARBON AND OXYGEN ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS: BUG, CHEROKEE, AND PATTERSON CANYON FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan; Stephen T. Nelson

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

CAPILLARY PRESSURE/MERCURY INJECTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

THIN SECTION DESCRIPTIONS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND PORE CASTING: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Louis H. Taylor

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Southwestern Regional Partnership For Carbon Sequestration (Phase 2) Pump Canyon CO2- ECBM/Sequestration Demonstration, San Juan Basin, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP), three demonstrations of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration are being performed -- one in an oilfield (the SACROC Unit in the Permian basin of west Texas), one in a deep, unmineable coalbed (the Pump Canyon site in the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico), and one in a deep, saline reservoir (underlying the Aneth oilfield in the Paradox basin of southeast Utah). The Pump Canyon CO{sub 2}-enhanced coalbed methane (CO{sub 2}/ECBM) sequestration demonstration project plans to demonstrate the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coal seams via a small-scale geologic sequestration project. The site is located in San Juan County, northern New Mexico, just within the limits of the high-permeability fairway of prolific coalbed methane production. The study area for the SWP project consists of 31 coalbed methane production wells located in a nine section area. CO{sub 2} was injected continuously for a year and different monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques were implemented to track the CO{sub 2} movement inside and outside the reservoir. Some of the MVA methods include continuous measurement of injection volumes, pressures and temperatures within the injection well, coalbed methane production rates, pressures and gas compositions collected at the offset production wells, and tracers in the injected CO{sub 2}. In addition, time-lapse vertical seismic profiling (VSP), surface tiltmeter arrays, a series of shallow monitoring wells with a regular fluid sampling program, surface measurements of soil composition, CO{sub 2} fluxes, and tracers were used to help in tracking the injected CO{sub 2}. Finally, a detailed reservoir model was constructed to help reproduce and understand the behavior of the reservoir under production and injection operation. This report summarizes the different phases of the project, from permitting through site closure, and gives the results of the different MVA techniques.

Advanced Resources International

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt Et Al...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005)...

31

Natural Tracers and Multi-Scale Assessment of Caprock Sealing Behavior: A Case Study of the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The assessment of caprocks for geologic CO{sub 2} storage is a multi-scale endeavor. Investigation of a regional caprock - the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin, USA - at the pore-network scale indicates high capillary sealing capacity and low permeabilities. Core and wellscale data, however, indicate a potential seal bypass system as evidenced by multiple mineralized fractures and methane gas saturations within the caprock. Our interpretation of {sup 4}He concentrations, measured at the top and bottom of the caprock, suggests low fluid fluxes through the caprock: (1) Of the total {sup 4}He produced in situ (i.e., at the locations of sampling) by uranium and thorium decay since deposition of the Kirtland Formation, a large portion still resides in the pore fluids. (2) Simple advection-only and advection-diffusion models, using the measured {sup 4}He concentrations, indicate low permeability ({approx}10-20 m{sup 2} or lower) for the thickness of the Kirtland Formation. These findings, however, do not guarantee the lack of a large-scale bypass system. The measured data, located near the boundary conditions of the models (i.e., the overlying and underlying aquifers), limit our testing of conceptual models and the sensitivity of model parameterization. Thus, we suggest approaches for future studies to better assess the presence or lack of a seal bypass system at this particular site and for other sites in general.

Jason Heath; Brian McPherson; Thomas Dewers

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Little Knife field - US Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Little Knife field is a combination structural and stratigraphic trap located near the structural center of the Williston basin, North Dakota. The field is approximately 12 mi (19.3 km) long and 2.5 to 5.5 mi (4 to 8.9 km) wide. Little Knife was discovered by Gulf Oil in 1976 as part of a regional exploration play involving a transition from impermeable to porous carbonate rocks. In 1987, ultimate recovery from the Mission Canyon (Mississippian) reservoir was estimated to be 97.5 MMBO. This included 57.5 MMBO primary, 27 MMBO secondary, and 13 MMBO tertiary (CO{sub 2}) oil. At present the field is still under primary recovery, since utilization efforts have not been successful. Approximately one-third of Little Knife's 130 ft (39.6 m) oil column is trapped by structural closure beneath a regional anhydrite seal in a north-south-trending anticline. The remaining two-thirds of the oil column is trapped where the reservoir beds change facies from porous dolostones and dolomitic limestones to nonporous limestones. Structural entrapment accounts for approximately 50% (127 MMBO) of the OOIP, but covers only 30% of the producing area. Production is from the upper portions of the Mission Canyon Formation, a regressive, shoaling-upward carbonate-anhydrite sequence deposited in a slowly shrinking epeiric sea. The Mission Canyon in the Little Knife area is divided into six zones that record predominantly cyclic, subtidal deposition. These are overlain by prograding lagoonal, tidal flat, and sabkha beds. The source of Mission Canyon oil is thought to be the Bakken Formation, an organic-rich shale at the base of the Mississippian.

Wittstrom, M.D.; Lindsay, R.F. (Chevron USA, Inc., Midland, TX (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO S OT ERO IGNAC IO-BLANCO AZ TEC BALLAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1- 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline AZ UT NM CO 1 2 Index Map for 2 Paradox-San Juan Panels 2001 Reserve Summary for All Paradox-San Juan Basin Fields Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Paradox-San Juan 250 174,193 20,653,622 3,616,464 Basin CO NM IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO BASIN BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BISTI BAL LAR D BASIN BISTI BLA NCO S OT ERO BAL LAR D LIND RITH W BASIN BLA NCO BLA NCO S BLA NCO S TAPAC ITO GAVIL AN BASIN BLA NCO The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

34

BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO S OT ERO IGNAC IO-BLANCO AZ TEC BALLAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Reserve Class Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1- 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline AZ UT NM CO 1 2 Index Map for 2 Paradox-San Juan Panels 2001 Reserve Summary for All Paradox-San Juan Basin Fields Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Paradox-San Juan 250 174,193 20,653,622 3,616,464 Basin CO NM IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO BASIN BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BISTI BAL LAR D BASIN BISTI BLA NCO S OT ERO BAL LAR D LIND RITH W BASIN BLA NCO BLA NCO S BLA NCO S TAPAC ITO GAVIL AN BASIN BLA NCO The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

35

BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO S OT ERO IGNAC IO-BLANCO AZ TEC BALLAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Reserve Class Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1- 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Basin Outline AZ UT NM CO 1 2 Index Map for 2 Paradox-San Juan Panels 2001 Reserve Summary for All Paradox-San Juan Basin Fields Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Paradox-San Juan 250 174,193 20,653,622 3,616,464 Basin CO NM IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO BASIN BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BISTI BAL LAR D BASIN BISTI BLA NCO S OT ERO BAL LAR D LIND RITH W BASIN BLA NCO BLA NCO S BLA NCO S TAPAC ITO GAVIL AN BASIN BLA NCO The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

36

Thermogenic and secondary biogenic gases, San Juan Basin, Colorado and New Mexico - Implications for coalbed gas producibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this paper are to (1) describe the types and the major components of coalbed gases, (2) evaluate the variability of Fruitland coalbed gas composition across the basin, (3) assess factors affecting coalbed gas origin and composition, (4) determine the timing and extent of gas migration and entrapment, and (5) suggest application of these results to coalbed gas producibility. Data from more than 750 Fruitland coalbed gas wells were used to make gas-composition maps and to evaluate factors controlling gas origin. The gas data were divided into overpressured, underpressured, and transitional categories based on regional pressure regime. Also, [delta][sup 13]C isotopic values from 41 methane, 7 ethane and propane, 13 carbon dioxide, and 10 formation-water bicarbonate samples were evaluated to interpret gas origin. The data suggests that only 25-50% of the gas produced in the high-productivity fairway was generated in situ during coalification. 82 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Ayers, W.B. Jr. (Taurus Exploration, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

CROSS SECTIONS AND FIELD MAPS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

GEOPHYSICAL WELL LOG/CORE DESCRIPTIONS, CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

POROSITY/PERMEABILITY CROSS-PLOTS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Geologic controls on transgressive-regressive cycles in the upper Pictured Cliffs sandstone and coal geometry in the lower Fruitland Formation, Northern San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three upper Pictured Cliffs Sandstone tongues in the northern part of the San Juan Basin record high-frequency transgressive episodes during the Late Cretaceous and are inferred to have been caused by eustatic sea level rise coincident with differential subsidence. Outcrop and subsurface studies show that each tongue is an amalgamated barrier strand-plain unit up to 100 ft (30 m) thick. Upper Pictured Cliffs barrier strand-plain sandstones underlie and bound thickest Fruitland coal seams on the seaward side. Controls on Fruitland coal-seam thickness and continuity are a function of local facies distribution in a coastal-plain setting, shoreline positions related to transgressive-regressive cycles, and basin subsidence. During periods of relative sea level rise, the Pictured Cliffs shoreline was temporarily stabilized, allowing thick, coastal-plain peats to accumulate. Although some coal seams in the lower Fruitland tongue override abandoned Pictured Cliffs shoreline deposits, many pinch out against them. Differences in the degree of continuity of these coal seams relative to coeval shoreline sandstones are attributed to either differential subsidence in the northern part of the basin, multiple episodes of sea level rise, local variations in accommodation and progradation, stabilization of the shoreline by aggrading peat deposits, or a combination of these factors. Fruitland coalbed methane resources and productivity are partly controlled by coal-seam thickness; other important factors include thermal maturity, fracturing, and overpressuring. The dominant production trend occurs in the northern part of the basin and is oriented northwestward, coinciding with the greatest Fruitland net coal thickness.

Ambrose, W.A.; Ayers, W.B. [University of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessing the Rye Patch geothermal field, a classic Basin-and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rye Patch geothermal field, a classic Basin-and-Range Resource: Geothermal Resources Council Transactions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

42

Winter Storms over the San Juan Mountains. Part I: Dynamical Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Colorado River Basin Pilot Project was conducted over the San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado and ran for five winter seasons, terminating in 1974–75. The objective of the project was to demonstrate the feasibility of increasing the ...

John D. Marwitz

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Field Mapping At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown References Geoffrey Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Field_Mapping_At_Nw_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Blewitt,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=510752" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages

44

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

45

Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown References Geoffrey Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Field_Mapping_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Blewitt,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=510749"

46

Journal of Geodynamics Offshore Oligo-Miocene volcanic fields within the Corsica-Liguria Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Journal of Geodynamics Offshore Oligo-Miocene volcanic fields within the Corsica-Liguria Basin Mediterranean) have been affected by a geochemically diverse igneous activity, offshore and onshore, since to our initial project. Key-Words: Mediterranean, Ligurian margins and Basin, Offshore Corsica, Miocene

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

The Natural Gas Pools Characteristics in Sulige Gas Field, Ordos Basin, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are abundant natural gas resources in Sulige gas field, Ordos Basin. The ascertained resources ... setting and reservoir heterogeneity. The characteristics of natural gas pools were analyzed from gas compos...

Lin Xiaoying; Zeng Jianhui; Zhang Shuichang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Structural and depositional evolution, KH field, West Natuna Basin, offshore Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STRUCTURAL AND DEPOSITIONAL EVOLUTION, KH FIELD, WEST NATUNA BASIN, OFFSHORE INDONESIA A Thesis by MARIA FRANSISCA MEIRITA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2003 Major Subject: Geophysics STRUCTURAL AND DEPOSITIONAL EVOLUTION, KH FIELD, WEST NATUNA BASIN, OFFSHORE INDONESIA A Thesis by MARIA FRANSISCA MEIRITA...

Meirita, Maria Fransisca

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas-Louisiana- Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin Appalachian Basin Wind River Basin Eastern Shelf NW Shelf Abo Sussex-Shannon Muddy J Mesaverde- Lance-Lewis Medina/Clinton-Tuscarora Bradford-Venango-Elk Berea-Murrysville Piceance Basin Bossier Williston Basin Ft Worth Basin Davis Bighorn Basin Judith River- Eagle Permian Basin Anadarko Basin Denver Basin San Juan Basin North-Central Montana Area Uinta Basin Austin Chalk Codell-Niobrara Penn-Perm Carbonate Niobrara Chalk Dakota Morrow Mesaverde Thirty- One Cleveland Ozona Canyon Wasatch- Mesaverde Red Fork Mesaverde Granite Wash Stuart City-Edwards Bowdoin- Greenhorn Travis Peak Olmos Cotton Valley Vicksburg Wilcox Lobo Pictured Cliffs Cretaceous Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Mancos- Dakota Gilmer Lime Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States

50

Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Range Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Northern Basin & Range Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes On a more local scale, Faulds et al. (2003, 2005a, 2005b, 2006) have conducted structural analysis and detailed geologic mapping at a number of sites throughout Nevada and have found that productive geothermal systems typically occur in one of several structural settings, including step-overs in normal fault zones, near the ends of major normal faults where the

51

San Juan Basin EC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

between Shiprock, New Mexico, and Ignacio, Colorado, across Federal, State, Tribal, and private lands. It would improve reliability of the transmission system and deliver...

52

Field Mapping At Nw Basin & Range Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Nw Basin & Range Region (Shevenell, Field Mapping At Nw Basin & Range Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes On a more local scale, Faulds et al. (2003, 2005a, 2005b, 2006) have conducted structural analysis and detailed geologic mapping at a number of sites throughout Nevada and have found that productive geothermal systems typically occur in one of several structural settings, including step-overs in normal fault zones, near the ends of major normal faults where the faults break into multiple splays, in belts of overlapping faults, at fault intersections, and in small pull aparts along strike-slip faults.

53

Play analysis and stratigraphic position of Uinta Basin tertiary - age oil and gas fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tertiary-age sediments in the Uinta basin produce hydrocarbons from five types of plays. These play types were determined by hydrocarbon type, formation, depositional environment, rock type, porosity, permeability, source, and per-well recovery. Each well was reviewed to determine the stratigraphic position and producing characteristics of each producing interval. The five types of plays are as follows: (1) naturally fractured oil reservoirs, (2) low-permeability oil reservoirs, (3) high-permeability of oil reservoirs, (4) low-permeability gas reservoirs, and (5) tight gas sands. Several fields produce from multiple plays, which made it necessary to segregate the hydrocarbon production into several plays. The stratigraphic position of the main producing intervals is shown on a basin-wide cross section, which is color-coded by play type. This 61-well cross section has several wells from each significant Tertiary oil and gas field in the Uinta basin.

Williams, R.A. (Pennzoil Exploration and Production Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian OH-PA (2) Appalachian Eastern PA (3) Appalachian Southern OH (4) Appalachian Eastern WV (5) Appalachian WV-VA (6) Appalachian TN-KY (7) Piceance Greater Green River Eastern OR-WA Ventura Williston Williston NE (2) Williston NW (1) Williston South (3) Eastern Great Basin Ventura West, Central, East Eastern OR-WA Eastern Great Basin Appalachian Denver Florida Peninsula Black Warrior W Y T h ru st B e lt Powder River Paradox- Uinta- Grtr Green River MT Thrust Belt Powder River North (1) Powder River South (2) Denver North (1) Denver South (3) Denver Middle (2) TX CA MT AZ ID NV NM CO IL OR UT KS WY IA NE SD MN ND OK FL WI MO AL WA GA AR LA MI IN PA NY NC MS TN KY VA OH SC

55

Field Mapping At Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region (1993) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region (1993) Geothermal Region (1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region (1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1993 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes New apatite fission track cooling age and track length data, supplemented by other information, point to the Early to Middle Miocene as an additional time of very significant extension-induced uplift and range formation. Many ranges in a 700-km-long north-south corridor from the Utah-Nevada-Idaho border to southernmost Nevada experience extension and major exhumation in Early to Middle Miocene time. Reconnaissance apatite ages from the Toiyabe

56

Three-dimensional fluvial-deltaic sequence stratigraphy Pliocene-Recent Muda Formation, Belida Field, West Natuna Basin, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Pliocene-Recent Muda formation is essentially undeformed in the West Natuna Basin, and excellent resolution of this interval on three-dimensional seismic data in Belida Field allows detailed interpretation of component fluvial-deltaic systems...

Darmadi, Yan

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

57

Estimation of lignite reserve in the Kalburcayiri field, Kangal basin, Sivas, Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper addresses a case study on global estimation of lignite reserve in the Kalburcayiri field from the Sivas–Kangal basin, which is one of the most productive lignite basins in eastern Anatolia, Turkey. The two lignite seams, which were developed in a fresh-water lacustrine depositional environment during the Pliocene time, are currently being exploited in the Kalburcayiri open-cast mine for feed coal to a power plant with 300-MW capacity. Tonnage, thickness and quality parameters (ash yield, total sulphur content, and calorific value) of the lignite are variables considered in this study. The global estimates of these variables together with 95% confidence limits are obtained using the approximation principle of global estimation. A random stratified grid is fitted to available boreholes; the variograms for thickness and lignite quality parameters are estimated and modeled. The models are used in calculating estimation error variances that will later be used in constructing 95% confidence intervals for the true values.

A.Erhan Tercan; Ali Ihsan Karayigit

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Geology of oil fields and future exploration potential in west African Aptian Salt basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aptian Salt basin of west Africa, extends from Equatorial Guinea southward to Angola, contains recoverable reserves estimated at nearly 4 billion BOE, and is current producing 600,000 BOPD. The basin developed as a result of tensional forces between west Africa and South America initiated at the end of the Jurassic. The prospective sedimentary sequences ranged in age from Early Cretaceous (uppermost Jurassic in places) to Holocene and is divided by the Aptian transgressive sand and salt into a pre-salt, nonmarine, syn-rift sequence and a post-salt, marine, post-rift sequence. Both the pre- and post-salt sequences contain several successful exploration plays, the most prolific of which are the Early Cretaceous nonmarine sandstone fields in tilted fault blocks of Gabon and Cabinda; Early Cretaceous carbonate buildups on the margins of basement highs in Cabinda; Early Cretaceous transgressive marine sandstone fields in anticlines draped over basement highs in Gabon; Late Cretaceous shallow marine sandstone and carbonate fields in salt-related structures in the Congo, Zaire, Cabinda, and Angola; Late Cretaceous dolomites in structural/stratigraphic traps in Angola; Late Cretaceous/early Tertiary deltaic/estuarine sandstone traps formed by salt movement in Gabon, Cabinda, and angola; and Tertiary marine turbidite fields in Cabinda and Angola. Despite the exploration success in these trends, much of the basin is under or poorly explored. The major problems for exploration are the poor quality of seismic definition beneath the salt, which makes it difficult to predict pre-salt structure and stratigraphy, and the importance of a stratigraphic element in many of the post-salt traps, also difficult to detect on seismic.

Bignell, R.D.; Edwards, A.D.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Dobson Butte field, Williston basin, Stark County, North Dakota: nontypical oil production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dobson Butte field (T139N, R96W), Stark County, North Dakota, was discovered in 1982 following a detailed seismic program. Production is primarily from a structural trap in the Interlake Formation of Silurian age. Three oil wells are presently producing from a dolomite reservoir at about 11,000 ft in depth. Primary recoverable reserves of these three producing wells is calculated to be about 2 million bbl of oil. Additional reserves will come from further development of the Interlake reservoir as well as from the deeper Red River (Ordovician) Formation. The Dobson Butte field is a nontypical oil field within the Williston basin as to its high pour point oil (90/sup 0/F), high production water cuts (85-95%), lack of good oil shows in samples, unpredictable noncontinuous oil-producing reservoirs throughout the entire 600-ft Interlake Formation, difficulty in log interpretations, and difficulty in determining the source bed. The interpretation of these nontypical characteristics of Interlake oil production in the Dobson Butte field compared to other Interlake oil production within the Williston basin will have a profound effect upon future Interlake exploration.

Guy, W.J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Improved Basin Analog System to Characterize Unconventional Gas Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identification method. ..................... 31 Fig. 3.4?Probability distribution at petroleum system level. ......................................... 34 Fig. 3.5?Example of generating probability distribution of qualitative parameter. ....... 34 Fig. 3....6?Example of generating probability distribution of quantitative parameter. ..... 35 Fig. 3.7?Probability distributions of kerogen type in San Juan and Piceance basin. ..... 38 Fig. 3.8?Probability distributions of porosity in San Juan and Piceance basin...

Wu, Wenyan 1983-

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Geologic model of a small, intraslope basin: Garden Banks 72 field, offshore Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Garden Banks 72 field is 115 mi off the Louisiana coast and lies near the shelf-slope break in water depths ranging from 450 to 800 ft. During the middle Pleistocene, the area was the site of a small, restricted basin on the upper slope, into which turbidite sandstones were deposited. These sandstones have been slumped, uplifted, and faulted, forming oil and gas traps in the field. Mobil and partners AGIP and Kerr-McGee leased block 72 in 1984. Three wells and two sidetracks have been drilled, discovering oil and gas in middle Pleistocene sandstones. A total of 650 ft of core was cut in two wells. Geologic data in the block have been supplemented by 2-D and 3-D seismic surveys. Trapping mechanisms in the field are both structural and stratigraphic. The structural high is on the southwest flank of a northwest-southeast-trending shale/salt ridge. The middle Pleistocene reservoir sandstones trend northeast, and their seismic signature consists of discontinuous, hummocky reflections; the presence of hydrocarbons in these sandstones causes anomalous seismic responses. Amplitude terminations often cross structural contours, implying stratigraphic pinch-outs. Data from electric logs, seismic, and cores demonstrate that the middle Pleistocene reservoir sandstones are the result of deposition by turbidites into a small, restricted basin. Associated facies identified include channels, levees, and possible sheet (lobe) sandstones. Postdepositional activity has included slumping and reworking by bottom currents (contour currents ). The resulting depositional model for this field can be applied to many of the recent discoveries in the Flexure trend.

Kolb, R.A.; Tuller, J.N.; Link, M.H.; Shanmugam, G.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Greenhouse Gases (GHG) Emissions from Gas Field Water in Southern Gas Field, Sichuan Basin, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to assess correctly the gases emissions from oil/gas field water and its contributions to the source of greenhouse gases (GHG) at the atmospheric temperature and pressure, ... first developed to study th...

Guojun Chen; Wei Yang; Xuan Fang; Jiaai Zhong…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Subsurface models of coal occurrence, Oak Grove field, Black Warrior basin, Alabama  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsurface investigation of coal occurrence in the Black Creek-Cobb interval of Oak Grove field is based on cross sections and isopach maps made from more than 500 density logs. This study was designed to identify styles of coal occurrence in the Black Warrior basin to aid in coalbed-methane exploration and production. Coal occurrence in parts of the Black Warrior basin may be characterized in terms of end-member fluvial and structural control. Fluvial processes apparently were the major controls on coal occurrence in the Black Creek cycle, where sandstone and coal thickness are inversely related. Additionally, occurrence of thick sandstone sequences above the thickest coal beds suggests that peat compaction provided sites for channel avulsion. In the Mary Lee and Cobb cycles, more coal beds occur in a downthrown fault block than in an upthrown block, and in the Pratt and Cobb cycles, the thickest coal beds occur on the downthrown side of a fault. Only in the Mary Lee cycle, where thick peat accumulated in an abandoned tributary system, is coal thickest on the upthrown block. Most coal beds in Oak Grove field are thickest on the downthrown block because differential subsidence apparently promoted peat accumulation. Clastic influx favors beds splits in the downthrown block, but joining of beds in the Pratt cycle may reflect sheltering by the fault. In the Mary Lee cycle, in contrast, channel incision evidently provided local relief sufficient for thick peat to accumulate in lows on the upthrown block. Although fluvial and structural processes result in varied styles of coal occurrence, models of coal occurrence have resulted in a predictive framework that may aid in strategic well siting and completion.

Pashin, J.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake for RSL formation, CaCl2 brines and chloride deposits in basins may provide clues to the origin of ancient,2,10­14 , the composition of the brine is unlike any other body of water in the world, as ,90% of the salt is CaCl2 1

Marchant, David R.

65

Isolation of Tellurite- and Selenite-Resistant Bacteria from Hydrothermal Vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean Christopher Rathgeber 1 Natalia...the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean. MATERIALS AND METHODS Collection...Ridges main Endeavor Field in the Pacific Ocean (47.57N, 129.05W), from...

Christopher Rathgeber; Natalia Yurkova; Erko Stackebrandt; J. Thomas Beatty; Vladimir Yurkov

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geochemistry of hydrothermal fluids from Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emissions Study vent field, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Subseafloor boiling and subsequent fluid-rock interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrothermal fluids collected from the ASHES vent field in 1986, 1987, and 1988 exhibit a very wide range of chemical composition over a small area ({approximately} 60 m in diameter). Compositions range from a 300C, gas-enriched (285 mmol/kg CO{sub 2}), low-chlorinity ({approximately} 33% of seawater) fluid to a 328C, relatively gas-depleted (50 mmol/kg CO{sub 2}), high-chlorinity ({approximately} 116% of seawater) fluid. The entire range of measured compositions at ASHES is best explained by a single hydrothermal fluid undergoing phase separation while rising through the ocean crust, followed by partial segregation of the vapor and brine phases. Other mechanisms proposed to produce chlorinity variations in hydrothermal fluids (precipitation/dissolution of a chloride-bearing mineral or crustal hydration) cannot produce the covariation of chlorinity and gas content observed at ASHES. There is good argument of the measured fluid compositions generated by a simple model of phase separation, in which gases are partitioned according to Henry's law and all salt remains in the liquid phase. Significant enrichments in silica, lithium and boron in the low-chlorinity fluids over levels predicted by the model are attributed to fluid-rock interaction in the upflow zone. Depletions in iron and calcium suggest that these elements have been removed by iron-sulfide and anhydrite precipitation at some time in the history of the low-chlorinity fluids. The distribution of low- and high-chlorinity venting is consistent with mechanisms of phase segregation based on differential buoyancy or relative permeability. The relatively shallow depth of the seafloor (1,540 m) and the observed chemistry of ASHES fluids are consistent with phase separation in the sub-critical or near-critical region.

Butterfield, D.A.; McDuff, R.E.; Lilley, M.D. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)); Massoth, G.J. (NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States)); Lupton, J.E. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States))

1990-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

Dickinson field lodgepole reservoir: Significance of this Waulsortian-type mound to exploration in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conoco`s No. 74 Dickinson State well, a deep test in Dickinson Field, Stark County, North Dakota, was completed in early 1993 capable of producing over 2,000 BOPD. It represents the first commercial oil production from the Lower Mississippian Lodgepole Formation in the U.S. portion of the Williston Basin. Three additional oil producers have now been completed and this Lodgepole discovery is fully developed. The producing reservoir, at depths of 9,700 to 10,000 ft, is a Waulsortian-type mound approximately 300 ft thick with a characteristic faunal assemblage of bryozoans and crinoids. The mound has an areal extent of slightly more than 1 square mile. Similar Waulsortian-type mounds have been recognized in rocks of Paleozoic age around the world, but have only been reported in the Williston Basin during the past decade. Such mounds are shallow to deep water deposits, tend to develop over structurally or topographically-positive areas, and may form by algal or by current action in conjunction with baffling action caused by bryozoans. The prolific nature of the Conoco discovery, plus several more-recent excellent mound discoveries in this same area, have caused renewed drilling and leasing activity. These events have also encouraged a review of existing seismic data, the shooting of new 3-D seismic programs and re-analysis of wells previously drilled through the Lodgepole Formation for evidence of similar mounds elsewhere in the basin.

Johnson, M.S. [Rocky Mountain Association of Geologists, Denver, CO (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Origin and formation of neck in a basin landform: Examples from the Camargo volcanic field, Chihuahua (México)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term “neck in a basin” (NIB) landform is proposed for volcanic structures characterized by nearly circular to elliptical open basins, located near the headwater of small streams or drainages, which contain small volcanic necks and/or erosion remnants of one (or more) cinder cones. NIB landforms are typically 400-1000 m in diameter and 30-100 m deep and are invariably surrounded by steep walls cut into one or more basaltic lava flows. NIB landforms lack evidence for a primary volcanogenic origin through either collapse or youthful eruptive activity. In the Pliocene portion (4 – 2 Ma) of the Plio-Quaternary Camargo volcanic field of Chihuahua (México), they are relatively numerous and are best developed at the margins of a gently sloping (3-5°) basaltic lava plateau and near major fault scarps. Mature NIB landforms have ring-like circular drainage patterns and central elevations marked by small volcanic necks and associated radial dikes intruded into basaltic scoria-fall and /or agglutinate deposits. We interpret NIB landforms to be erosional in origin. They develop where a cinder cone is surrounded by one or more sheet-like lava flows from one or more separate subsequent vents. Once eruptive activity ceases at the younger volcano(es), fluvial erosion gradually produces a ring-like drainage pattern along the contact between the lava and the older cinder cone. As a response to a marked contrast in resistance to erosion between lava flows and unconsolidated or poorly lithified pyroclastic deposits, the older cinder cone is preferentially eroded. In this manner, a ring-shaped, steep sided erosional basin, preformed by the scoria cone, is produced; eventually fluvial erosion exposes the central neck and dikes. The volume, relief, and age of the volcanic field are key factors in the formation and preservation of a NIB landform. They form in volcanic fields where lava emissions are sufficiently vigorous to engulf earlier cinder cones. Relief and associated high rates of fluvial erosion play an important role in NIB development, as demonstrated by their locations in the Camargo volcanic field. Fully developed NIB landforms are not found in Quaternary volcanic fields, probably because erosion has not had sufficient time to generate their characteristics features. NIB landforms are also absent in Miocene fields, because erosion has proceeded too far, and thus has completely removed any NIB landform that may once have existed. The Camargo volcanic field is the only major area of Pliocene intraplate eruptive activity in northern México, and the only place where NIB landforms are relatively abundant.

José Jorge Aranda-Gómez; Todd B. Housh; James F. Luhr; Cristina Noyola-Medrano; Marco Antonio Rojas-Beltrán

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Processes involved in the origin and accumulation of hydrocarbon gases in the Yuanba gas field, Sichuan Basin, southwest China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Natural gases in the superimposed Sichuan Basin commonly experienced a history of remigration in marine carbonate reservoirs since the late Cretaceous. The reservoir in the Changxing Formation (P2c) in the Yuanba gas field in the Sichuan Basin is characterized by a great burial depth of 6200–7000 m and a high temperature about 165 °C. The gas dryness is 99.73–99.99%, and ?13C values of methane and ethane are ?31.0 to ?28.9‰ and ?29.9 to ?25.6‰, respectively. The chemical and isotopic compositions of natural gases, abundant reservoir solid bitumen, and high reservoir temperature (maximum to 240 °C) indicate that the \\{P2c\\} gases are of sapropelic origin and are derived from oil cracking. The paleo-oil layers, recognized by solid bitumen distribution, were mainly developed in high position traps when the paleo-oil accumulated during the early Jurassic. Reconstructed structural evolution shows the northwest was uplifted sharply and southern part dipped gently to the north in the gas field after oil cracking. Fluid potential analyses based on changes in the structural configuration imply that gas should re-migrate mainly to the northwest. The observations that paleo-oil-water contacts are mainly above the present day gas-water contacts in the northwest traps, and are below present day gas-water contacts in the middle and eastern traps also confirm the gas remigration trend. Currently, high gas production wells are mainly located in northwest traps and in high positions in the middle and eastern traps. Systematic analyses on early paleo-oil accumulation and late gas remigration processes can reduce the economic risks associated with natural gas exploration in the northeastern Sichuan Basin.

Pingping Li; Fang Hao; Xusheng Guo; Huayao Zou; Xinya Yu; Guangwei Wang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Coalbed methane production potential in U. S. basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major emphasis of the U.S. DOE's coalbed methane research has been on estimating the magnitude of the resource and developing systems for recovery. Methane resource estimates for 16 basins show that the greatest potential is in the Piceance, Northern Appalachian, Central Appalachian, Powder River, and Greater Green River coal basins. Small, high-potential target areas have been selected for in-depth analysis of the resource. Industry interest is greatest in the Warrior, San Juan, Piceance, Raton Mesa, and Northern and Central Appalachian basins. Production curves for several coalbed methane wells in these basins are included.

Byer, C.W.; Mroz, T.H.; Covatch, G.L.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Big Stick/Four Eyes fields: structural, stratigraphic, and hydrodynamic trapping within Mission Canyon Formation, Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mississippian Mission Canyon formation of the Williston basin is the region's most prolific oil producing horizon. Big Stick/Four Eyes is among the most prolific of the Mission Canyon fields. Primary production from 87 wells is projected to reach 47 million bbl of oil. An additional 10-20 million bbl may be recovered through waterflooding. The complex was discovered in 1977 by the Tenneco 1-29 BN, a wildcat with primary objectives in the Devonian Duperow and Ordovician Red River Formations. A series of Mission Canyon discoveries followed in the Big Stick, Treetop, T-R, and Mystery Creek fields. Early pressure studies showed that these fields were part of an extensive common reservoir covering 44.75 mi/sup 2/ (115.91 km/sup 2/). The reservoir matrix is formed from restricted marine dolostones deposited on a low-relief ramp. Landward are algal-laminated peritidal limestones and saline and supratidal evaporites of a sabkhalike shoreline system. Open-marine limestones, rich in crinoids, brachiopods, and corals, mark the seaward limit of reservoir facies. Regressive deposition placed a blanket of anhydrite over the carbonate sequence providing a seal for the reservoir. Lateral trapping is accomplished through a combination of processes. Upper reservoir zones form belts of porosity that parallel the northeasterly trending shoreline. The trend is cut by the northward plunging Billings anticline, which provides structural closure to the north. Facies changes pinch out porosity to the south and east. Trapping along depositional strike to the southwest is only partially controlled by stratigraphic or structural factors. A gentle tilt of 25 ft per mi (5 m per km) occurs in the oil-water contact to the east-northeast, due to freshwater influx from Mississippian outcrop on the southern and southwestern basin margins.

Breig, J.J.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

High resolution reservoir architecture of late Jurassic Haynesville ramp carbonates in the Gladewater field, East Texas Salt Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The East Texas Salt Basin contains numerous gas fields within Upper Jurassic Haynesville ramp-complex reservoirs. A sequenced-keyed, high-resolution zonation scheme was developed for the Haynesville Formation in Gladewater field by integrating core description, well-log, seismic, porosity and permeability data. The Haynesville at Gladewater represents a high-energy ramp system, localized on paleotopographic highs induced by diapirism of Callovian Age Salt (Louann). Ramp crest grainstones serve as reservoirs. We have mapped the distribution of reservoir facies within a hierarchy of upward-shallowing parasequences grouped into low-frequency sequences. The vertical stacking patterns of parasequences and sequences reflect the interplay of eustasy, sediment accumulation patterns, and local subsidence (including salt movement and compaction). In this study we draw on regional relations from analogous, Jurassic systems in Mexico to constrain the stratigraphic architecture, age model, and facies model. Additionally, salt-cored Holocene, grain-rich shoals from the Persian Gulf provide excellent facies analogs. The result is a new high-resolution analysis of reservoir architecture at a parasequence scale that links reservoir facies to depositional facies. The new stratigraphy scheme demonstrates that different geographic portions of the field have markedly distinct reservoir intervals, both in terms of total pay and the sequence-stratigraphic interval within which it occurs. Results from this study are used to evaluate infill drill well potential, in well planning, for updating reservoir models, and in refining field reserve estimates.

Goldhammer, R.K. [Texas Bureau of Mines and Geology, Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Terry sandstone member of the Pierre Shale, Upper Cretaceous, Spindle field, Denver Basin, Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are not shown. Cores were examined from the circled wells Electric and density log character of Terry sand- stones in the productive interval, Amoco Rocky Mountain E-4, Spindle Field, showing response of depositional units. The basal stratigraphic marker... occurs at 4774 ft (1455. 1 m). Sedimentary structures of Terry sandstones, Amoco Rocky Mountain E-4, Spindle Field. Compositional and textural haracteristics of the Terry sandstone as seen in the Amoco Rocky Mountain E-4, Spindle Field...

Helsley, Robert James

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Definition of structural patterns using dipmeter and magnetism data within the poorly seismic imaged field of Avocette, presalt Gabonese Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Gabonese southern Onshore Basin, several oil fields occur below an Aptian salt sequence. Because of the presence of diapirs and salt walls related to post aptian salt tectonics, the quality of the 2D or 3D seismic imaging of the presalt formations stays very insufficient to well define the structural patterns within the traps below the salt. This problem is particularly important in the Avocette oil field where the poor quality of the seismic is also related to very high dips within the presalt formations. Indeed the dipmeter analysis demonstrates that the values of dips can reach 80 deg. to be vertical within some of the reservoirs. To define the complex geometry of the field, depth cross-sections have been constructed using: (1) magnetism and gravimetric data which allow to propose a depth and also a structural framework for the basement; (2) dipmeter analysis which provides for the whole presalt sequence very good results for the geometry, but also for the age of deformation. Indeed, the biostratigraphy is well defined and it is possible to date characteristic features as growth faulting demonstrated by the dipmeter. This allows to propose a presalt kinematic evolution for the field and adjacent area which can be summarized as follow: the structure corresponds to a faulted roll-over anticline, related to Upper Barremian to Aptian progressive gravity spreading of thick lacustrine deltaic sequences. During Upper Aptian the roll-over anticline is partially eroded and overlaid by a regional sandstone deposits. Last movements on the major faults deformed this horizon which constitutes now the main reservoir of the Avocette oil field.

Guerin, G. (Elf Petroleum Norge, Stavanger (Norway)); Lecanu, H.; Icart, J.C. (Elf Aquitaine Production, Pau-Paris (France)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Definition of structural patterns using dipmeter and magnetism data within the poorly seismic imaged field of Avocette, presalt Gabonese Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Gabonese southern Onshore Basin, several oil fields occur below an Aptian salt sequence. Because of the presence of diapirs and salt walls related to post aptian salt tectonics, the quality of the 2D or 3D seismic imaging of the presalt formations stays very insufficient to well define the structural patterns within the traps below the salt. This problem is particularly important in the Avocette oil field where the poor quality of the seismic is also related to very high dips within the presalt formations. Indeed the dipmeter analysis demonstrates that the values of dips can reach 80 deg. to be vertical within some of the reservoirs. To define the complex geometry of the field, depth cross-sections have been constructed using: (1) magnetism and gravimetric data which allow to propose a depth and also a structural framework for the basement; (2) dipmeter analysis which provides for the whole presalt sequence very good results for the geometry, but also for the age of deformation. Indeed, the biostratigraphy is well defined and it is possible to date characteristic features as growth faulting demonstrated by the dipmeter. This allows to propose a presalt kinematic evolution for the field and adjacent area which can be summarized as follow: the structure corresponds to a faulted roll-over anticline, related to Upper Barremian to Aptian progressive gravity spreading of thick lacustrine deltaic sequences. During Upper Aptian the roll-over anticline is partially eroded and overlaid by a regional sandstone deposits. Last movements on the major faults deformed this horizon which constitutes now the main reservoir of the Avocette oil field.

Guerin, G. [Elf Petroleum Norge, Stavanger (Norway); Lecanu, H.; Icart, J.C. [Elf Aquitaine Production, Pau-Paris (France)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Clothing, Equipment, & Supplies G426 Basin Analysis in the Field 3 Credits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that will be needed upon arrival at the Field Station: Pocket or wrist watch Hand lens Geologic hammer and belt holder, etc.) · Alarm clock (battery operated) · Bug Spray · Deck of cards, musical instrument, Frisbee, etc

Polly, David

77

Reservoir Characterization and Modeling of the Glorieta and the Clearfork Formations, Monahans Field, Permian Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the larger 3rd-order sequence. The models identified multiple flow units in Monahans Field. Preferential injection of water within the reservoir compartments, horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracture stimulation may all provide mechanisms to more...

Yeatman, Ryan Yeatman

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

78

Geological and hydrogeological controls on the accumulation of coalbed methane in the Weibei field, southeastern Ordos Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Commercial exploration and production of coalbed methane (CBM) in the Weibei field, Ordos Basin, China has rapidly increased since 2010. The Weibei field has become one of the most productive CBM areas in China. However, relatively few studies have investigated the migration of gas and water in the coal reservoir and their controls on the gas accumulation. This study conducts stable isotope analyses and quality tests for groundwater samples, discusses the relationships between the fluid flow pathways and tectonics, and concludes by discussing the geological and hydrological controls on potential gas accumulation in the Weibei field. The coalbed groundwaters contain primarily sodium and bicarbonate and are effectively devoid of sulfate, calcium and magnesium. The groundwaters are typically freshwater, with total dissolved solids (TDS) values ranging from 814 to 2657 mg/L. Differences in hydrogeology and structural geology divide the study area into four gas domains. In the northern Hancheng area, the predominant northwest flow of groundwater has resulted in higher gas content in the west (> 12 m3/t) than in the east (8–12 m3/t), even though the coals in the east have high thermal maturity (2.1%–2.3% Ro). The area with the highest gas content (> 16 m3/t) is in the region near the downthrown side of the Xuefeng–Nan Thrust Fault in the northern Hancheng area, and the fault forms a barrier to the northwestward flow of groundwater. The area with the lowest gas content (gas has been flushed out of the coals due to a reduction of hydrostatic pressure and active groundwater flow from the east. Structural and hydrodynamic mechanisms, especially the intensity of the hydrodynamic activity and the groundwater flow pathways, are important for gas accumulation in the Weibei field.

Yanbin Yao; Dameng Liu; Taotao Yan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Remote arctic drilling operations in Russia, case history of Ardalin field operations, Timan Pechora Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In developing the Ardalin field, the Polar Lights Company merged Russian and western expertise to conduct drilling operations in a hostile and ecologically sensitive arctic tundra environment. The field is located above the Arctic Circle in northern Russia. The nearest Russian road system is over 60km away and the nearest railhead is 240 km from the field. Three Russian rigs were constructed with selected western upgrades, twelve development wells were drilled, and three existing Russian wells were worked over within a 24 month period. Operations were supported with a snow road in the winter season and Russian helicopter in the summer season. All materials for one year`s worth of drilling had to be transported to the field prior to break-up (end of trucking activities on the snow roads). Services and equipment were sourced from both inside and outside of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). Temperatures in winter reached -45{degrees}C. The field is located in one of the most ecologically sensitive areas in the world, and numerous precautions were taken for the protection of the environment. Russian operating philosophies were successfully merged with western practices. This paper will focus on the operational criteria initiated and infrastructure system that evolved to support this project.

Reyna, E.M.; Nicholson, S.; Brady, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

In Search of the Correct Wind and Wave Fields in a Minor Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors analyze the accuracy of the surface wind of the Adriatic Sea from a global model. They find it to be substantially underestimated and propose a calibration by a suitable enhancement of the strength of the fields. The reasons for the ...

Luigi Cavaleri; Luciana Bertotti

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Depositional environments and reservoir properties of the upper Queen Formation, Concho Bluff and Concho Bluff North fields, Midland basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The upper Queen Formation (Upper Permian) in Concho Bluff and Concho Bluff North fields (Crane, Upton, and Ector counties, Texas) consists of four thick (6-11 m) clastic members separated by evaporite members, and contains several major sandstone reservoirs. A study of cores and logs from the upper Queen was done to determine its depositional environments and the properties of its sandstone reservoirs. Four facies are present in the upper Queen. Facies 1 consists of planar- and wavy-laminated fine and very fine sandstones and silty sandstones deposited in fluvial sandflats and delta-plains. Facies 2 consists of wavy-laminated siltstones and haloturbated mudstones with anhydrite nodules deposited in subaqueous prodelta environments and subaerial saline mudflats. Facies 3 consists of well-sorted fine to very fine sandstones with horizontal and inclined planar laminae deposited in eolian sand sheets. Facies 4 consists of massive to laminated halite and anhydrite deposited in hypersaline playas. The vertical sequence of these facies indicates that the upper Queen was deposited during four cycles of fan-delta progradation into and retreat from coastal-plain playas during a sea level lowstand in the Midland basin. The sandstones of the fluvial sandflat and eolian sand-sheet facies constitute the reservoirs of the upper Queen in the fields. The average cumulative thickness of these facies is 8 m, and the fields average 16% porosity and 40-50 md of permeability. The remaining facies are all nonproductive with averagge porosities of less than 10% and average permeabilities of less than 1 md.

Mazzullo, J.; Newsom, D.; Harper, J.; McKone, C.; Price, B. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Seismic attribute studies, Mississippian Frobisher-Alida oil fields, northeast Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subtle Mississippian stratigraphic traps of the Wiley and Glenburn fields of North Dakota and the Creelman field of southeast Saskatchewan illustrate similar seismic response to distinctly different geologic settings. Shoreline facies change, thick supratidal salt pans, carbonate porosity zones, buried hills, and structure on the top of the Mississippian unconformity can all cause similar seismic response (seismic facies). In each instance, vertical and lateral thickness and lithologic changes are the dominant influence on the seismic response. In addition, pitfalls due to tuning, multiples, and other causes can make it difficult, if not impossible, to differentiate these anomalies based on seismic response alone. Careful attribute studies must be coordinated with sound geologic control and models to explore effectively for these subtle stratigraphic traps.

Davis, T.L.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Wabek and Plaza fields: Carbonate shoreline traps in the Williston basin of North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wabek and Plaza fields in Mountrail and Ware counties, North Dakota, will ultimately produce 8 million and 3 million bbl of oil, respectively, from reservoirs in the Sherwood and Bluell intervals of the Mississippian Mission Canyon Formation. Both fields produce from porous, oolitic, and pisolitic lime packstones and grainstones deposited as shoals along a low-energy shoreline. A facies change to impermeable dolomitic and salina/sabkha environments to the east provides the updip trap. The Sherwood at Wabek has more than 100 ft of oil column driven by solution gas and water influx. Effective porosity consists of interparticle, vuggy, and minor dolomitic intercrystalline porosity. Log porosities range from 6 to 26%, averaging about 10%, and net pay averages about 26 ft. One mile west of Wabek, Plaza field produces from the Bluell, stratigraphically overlying the Sherwood. Log porosities range from 6 to 16%, averaging about 9%. Net pay averages about 6 ft. An oil-water contact is not yet defined, but at least 120 ft of oil column are present. Regional depositional slope and local depositional topography were major controls on Mission Canyon shoreline trends and the development of reservoir facies. In the Wabek-Plaza complex, the position and trend of the Sherwood and Bluell shorelines can be related to structural trends indentified in the crystalline basement from aeromagnetic data. Locally, thickness variations in the underlying Mohall interval amplified relief on the Wabek-Plaza structure and influenced the deposition of shoreline reservoirs.

Sperr, T. (Presidio Oil Co., Denver, CO (United States)); Hendricks, M.L. (Hendricks and Associates, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)); Stancel, S.G.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Late Paleozoic depositional controls in the Paradox basin, Colorado and Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox evaporite basin formed during the Desmoinesian to Wolfcampian intracratonic Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny in response to the Laurentia-Gondwana collision. Basin subsidence resulted from the southwestward thrusting and probably lateral movement on the Uncompahgre Fault along it's northeastern margin. This created a strongly asymmetrical basin that was similar in geometry to a foreland basin, with the Definace-Zuni and Piute platforms occupying the position of a foreland bulge. The evaporite basin was separated from its southeastern extension, the San Juan Trough, by the northeast-trending Hogback fault zone. An orthogonal pattern of northeast- and northwest-trending basement faults extends from the San Juan Basin into the Paradox Basin and can be shown to have exerted significant control on depositional patterns throughout the Phanerozoic. Paleogeographic and plate reconstructions indicate that the north-south-trending Uncompahgre and Front Range highlands lay at right angles to the prevailing easterly winds--thus removed most of the moisture and produced arid to semiarid conditions throughout the Paradox Basin and San Juan Trough. As many as 35 halite-bearing cycles have been identified in the Desmoinesian Paradox Formation. Each cycle is composed of a transgressive freshening phase and a regressive evaporitic phase with either halite or potash as the final product. All of the evaporite cycles are bounded by unconformities and can be divided into higher order sequences, particularly in the correlative carbonate shelf environments to the southwest.

Huffman, A.C. Jr. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

R Reactor seepage basins soil moisture and resistivity field investigation using cone penetrometer technology, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this report is the summer 1999 investigation of the shallow groundwater system using cone penetrometer technology characterization methods to determine if the water table is perched beneath the R Reactor Seepage Basins (RRSBs).

Harris, M.K.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

86

A feasibility study of ECBM recovery and CO2 storage for a producing CBM field in Southeast Qinshui Basin, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a geo-engineering and economic analysis of the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery and CO2 storage in the South Shizhuang CBM Field, Southeast Qinshui Basin, China. We construct a static model using the well log and laboratory data and then upscale this model to use in dynamic simulations. We history match field water and gas rates using the dynamic model. The parameters varied during the history match include porosity and permeability. Using the history matched dynamic model, we make predictions of CBM and ECBM recoveries for various field developments. We build a techno-economic model that calculates the incremental nominal net present value (NPV) of the ECBM incremental recovery and CO2 storage over the CBM recovery. We analyse how the NPV is affected by well spacing, CH4 price, carbon credit and the type of coal. Our analyses suggest that 300 m is the optimum well spacing for the study area under the current CH4 price in China and with a zero carbon credit. Using this well spacing, we predict the recoveries for different injection gas compositions of CO2 and N2 and different injection starting times. The results show that gas injection yields incremental CBM production whatever the composition of the injected gas. Pure CO2 injection yields highest ECBM for low swelling coals while flue gas injection gives highest ECBM for high swelling coals. However, the differences in recoveries are small. Injection can be economically viable depending on the CH4 price and the carbon credit. At current prices and no carbon credit, flue gas injection is commercial. At higher CH4 prices and/or with the introduction of carbon credits, co-optimisation could be commercially viable. High carbon credits favour injecting pure CO2 rather than other gases because this stores more CO2. Injecting CO2 at late stage increases CO2 storage but decreases the project's NPV. High-swelling coals require about $20/tonnes additional carbon credit.

Fengde Zhou; Wanwan Hou; Guy Allinson; Jianguang Wu; Jianzhong Wang; Yildiray Cinar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Volcanism in the western San Juan Mountains, Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three major cycles of volcanism during the Miocene and Pliocene formed a layered succession of calc-alkaline eruptive materials in the western San Juan Mountains nearly 1.5 miles thick and having a volume grea...

R. G. Luedke; W. S. Burbank

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Imaginacion e identidad: los personajes de Juan Tovar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMAGINACION E IDENTIDAD: LOS PERSONAJES DE JUAN TOVAR A Thesis by SUSAN MICHELE DENNIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS December 1983... Major Subject: Modern Languages IMAGINACION E IDENTIDAD: LOS PERSONAJES DE JUAN TOVAR A Thesis by SUSAN MICHELE DENNIS Approved as to style and content by: e r ?. C ' ti, Jr. (Chairman of Com tee) N c Joe yer (Member) e S. Gra. am (Member) g...

Dennis, Susan Michele

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Command Shaping for Micro-Mills and CNC Controllers Joel Fortgang*, William Singhose*, Juan de Juanes Marquez**, Jesus Perez**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Command Shaping for Micro-Mills and CNC Controllers Joel Fortgang*, William Singhose*, Juan de-mill which can be implemented with a standard CNC controller. The robustness of this technique to modelling

Singhose, William

90

Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bluebell field produces from the Tertiary lower Green River and Wasatch Formations of the Uinta Basin, Utah. The productive interval consists of thousands of feet of interbedded fractured clastic and carbonate beds deposited in a fluvial-dominated deltaic lacustrine environment. Wells in the Bluebell field are typically completed by perforating 40 or more beds over 1,000 to 3,000 vertical feet (300-900 m), then applying an acid-fracture stimulation treatment to the entire interval. This completion technique is believed to leave many potentially productive beds damaged and/or untreated, while allowing water-bearing and low-pressure (thief) zones to communicate with the wellbore. Geologic and engineering characterization has been used to define improved completion techniques. The study identified reservoir characteristics of beds that have the greatest long-term production potential.

Allison, M.L.; Morgan, C.D.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

David E. Huber1 Juan G. Santiago2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

David E. Huber1 Juan G. Santiago2 1 Microfluidics Department, Sandia National Laboratories­Aris dispersion in temperature gradient focusing Microfluidic temperature gradient focusing (TGF) uses an axial the Taylor­Aris dispersion regime. Keywords: Dispersion / Microfluidics / Preconcentration / Taylor

Santiago, Juan G.

92

Model-Driven Cloud Data Storage Juan Castrejn1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model-Driven Cloud Data Storage Juan Castrejón1 , Genoveva Vargas-Solar2 , Christine Collet3 of traditional software development me- thods. In particular, data storage management has received a great deal. However, appropriate selection, administration and use of cloud storage implementations remain a highly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

93

Re-Positioning Information Science Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Re-Positioning Information Science Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan ELICO - University of Lyon 3, Lyon, to move from librarianship, bibliography, and documentation to an information science. In 1968 the American Documentation Institute was renamed American Society for Information Science. By the twenty

Boyer, Edmond

94

Charging of the Penglai 9-1 oil field, Bohai Bay basin, China: Functions of the delta on accumulating petroleum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Penglai 9-1 (PL9-1) oil field, which contains China's third largest offshore oil accumulation (in-place reserves greater than 2.28 × 108 ton or 1.49 × 109 bbl), was found in shallow reservoirs (700–1700 m, 2297–5577 ft) within the most active fault zone in east China. The PL9-1 field contains two oil-bearing series, the granite intrusions in Mesozoic (Mz) and both the sandstone reservoirs in Neogene Guantao (Ng) and Neogene Minghuazhen (Nm) Formation. The origins of the PL9-1 field, both in terms of source rock intervals and generative kitchens, were determined by analyzing biomarker distributions for 61 source rock samples and 33 oil samples. The Mesozoic granite intrusions, which hold more than 80% of the oil reserves in the field, were charged in the west by oil generated from the third member (Es3) of the Shahejie Formation in the Bodong depression. The Neogene reservoirs of the PL9-1 field were charged in the west by oil generated from the third member (Es3) of the Shahejie Formation in the Bodong depression and in the south by oil generated from the first member (Es1) of the Shahejie Formation in the Miaoxibei depression. Interactive contact between the large fan delta and the mature source rocks residing in the Es3 Formation of the Bodong depression resulted in a high expulsion efficiency from the source rocks and rapid oil accumulation in the PL9-1 field, which probably explains how can this large oil field accumulate and preserve within the largest and most active fault zone in east China.

Jinqiang Tian; Fang Hao; Xinhuai Zhou; Huayao Zou; Lei Lan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

San Juan Mesa Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farm Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name San Juan Mesa Wind Farm Facility San Juan Mesa Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Group owns majority Developer Edison Mission Group Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Elida County NM Coordinates 33.9697°, -103.844° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9697,"lon":-103.844,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

96

Poder, resistencia y reacción en Hechos consumados de Juan Radrigán  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPRING 1999 69 Poder, resistencia y reacción en Hechos consumados de Juan Radrigán Enrique Luengo Let us ask... how things work at the level of ongoing subjugation, at the level of those continuous and uninterrupted processes which subject our... discursiva, transformando la escritura y poniéndola en un lugar que le otorga representación como una forma de resistencia que documenta un estilo de vida, una historia personal, una forma de existir particular antes no reconocida en el modelo cultural...

Luengo, Enrique

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A geological and engineering reservoir characterization of the Caballos Formation (Cretaceous), Puerto Colon field Putumayo basin, Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Fetkovich Type Curve Method-Puerto Colon Field. 75 4. 2 Prediction of Oil Recovery Using Fetkovich/McCray Type Curves. . . . . 99 4. 3 Estimation of Reserves Using Log of Cumulative Water Cut Versus Cumulative Oil Production-Puerto Colon Field 100 4. 4... Miguel-l. . . . . 4. 20 Oil Rate and Water Cut Production History ? Well San Miguel-4. . . . . 4. 21 Oil Rate and Water Cut Production History - Well San Miguel-5. . . . . 70 72 73 4. 22 Oil Rate Versus Time on the Fetkovich Type Curve ? Well Acae...

Ruiz Castellanos, Hector

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - area san juan Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Through Accident Summary: Industries " Busco, Inc. (dba Arrow Stage Lines) " San Juan County, Utah 12;34 Investigative Groups... Emergency Response - Ejections 12;Accident...

99

Seismic characterization of multiple fracture sets at Rulison Field, Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...workshop demonstrated that current industry capabilities...scattering of elastic energy on the closely spaced...carried out during summer internship of Vasconcelos at Shell...fractures in the San Juan and Green River Basin, in Piceance...geology, geology of energy sources Applied geophysics...

Ivan Vasconcelos; Vladimir Grechka

100

Depositional environment and hydrodynamic flow in Guadalupian Cherry Canyon sandstone, West Ford and West Geraldine fields, Delaware Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and entrapment of hydrocarbons. Delaware Mountain Group sediments are currently generating oil. Decementation enhances the reservoir by the formation of secondary porosity. The reservoir sandstones have an aver age porosity of 26$ and an aver age permeability... of 24 md. Oil accumulates in stratigraphic traps located along the updip meander loops of tur bidite channels. A tilted oil/water contact in West Ford and West Ger aldine fields indicates that hydrodynamic flow is pr esent. Heads calculated...

Linn, Anne Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission Project Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission Project Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0378 October 2007 Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission Project Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS - 0378 D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability and Bonneville Power Administration October 2007 Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission Project DOE/EIS-0378 Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE): Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Title of Proposed Project: Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission Project State Affected: Washington (WA) Abstract: Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP (Sea Breeze) has applied to DOE for authorizations and approvals

102

Adsorption of Pure Methane, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide and Their Mixtures on San Juan Basin Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objectives of this project were to (a) measure the adsorption behavior of pure methane, nitrogen, CO{sub 2} and their binary and ternary mixtures on wet Tiffany coal at 130 F and pressures to 2000 psia; (b) correlate the equilibrium adsorption isotherm data using the extended Langmuir model, the Langmuir model, the loading ratio correlation and the Zhou-Gasem-Robinson equation of state; and (c) establish sorption-time estimates for the pure components. Specific accomplishments are summarized below regarding the complementary tasks involving experimental work and data correlation. Representative coal samples from BP Amoco Tiffany Injection Wells No.1 and No.10 were prepared, as requested. The equilibrium moisture content and particle size distribution of each coal sample were determined. Compositional coal analyses for both samples were performed by Huffman Laboratories, Inc. Pure gas adsorption for methane on wet Tiffany coal samples from Injection Wells No.1 and No.10 was measured separately at 130 F (327.6 K) and pressures to 2000 psia (13.7 MPa). The average expected uncertainty in these data is about 3% (9 SCF/ton). Our measurements indicate that the adsorption isotherms of the two coal samples exhibit similar Langmuir-type behavior. For the samples from the two wells, a maximum variation of about 5% in the amount adsorbed is observed at 2000 psia. Gas adsorption isotherms were measured for pure methane, nitrogen and CO{sub 2} on a wet, mixed Tiffany coal sample. The coal sample was an equal-mass mixture of coals from Well No.1 and Well No.10. The adsorption measurements were conducted at 130 F at pressures to 2000 psia. The adsorption isotherms have average expected experimental uncertainties of 3% (9 SCF/ton), 6% (8 SCF/ton), and 7% (62 SCF/ton) for methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}, respectively. Adsorption isotherms were measured for methane/nitrogen, methane/CO{sub 2} and nitrogen/CO{sub 2} binary mixtures on wet, mixed Tiffany coal at 130 F and pressures to 2000 psia. These measurements were conducted for a single molar feed composition for each mixture. The expected uncertainties in the amount adsorbed for these binary mixtures vary with pressure and composition. In general, average uncertainties are about 5% (19 SCF/ton) for the total adsorption; however, the expected uncertainties in the amount of individual-component adsorption are significantly higher for the less-adsorbed gas at lower molar feed concentrations (e.g., nitrogen in the 20/80 nitrogen/CO{sub 2} system). Adsorption isotherms were measured for a single methane/nitrogen/CO{sub 2} ternary mixture on wet, mixed Tiffany coal at 130 F and pressures to 2000 psia. The nominal molar feed composition was 10/40/50. The average expected uncertainty for the total adsorption and CO{sub 2} adsorption is about 5% (16 SCF/ton). However, the low adsorption of nitrogen and methane in this ternary yield average experimental uncertainties of 14% (9 SCF/ton) and 27% (9 SCF/ton), respectively. Limited binary and ternary gas-phase compressibility factor measurements at 130 F and pressures to 2000 psia involving methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} were conducted to facilitate reduction of our ternary adsorption data. These newly acquired data (and available data from the literature) were used to improve the Benedict-Webb-Rubin (BWR) equation-of-state (EOS) compressibility factor predictions, which are used in material balance calculations for the adsorption measurements. In general, the optimized BWR EOS represents the experimental compressibility factor data within 0.5% AAD. The Langmuir/loading ratio correlation (LRC) and the Zhou-Gasem-Robinson (ZGR) two-dimensional EOS were used to analyze the newly acquired adsorption data. Model parameters were obtained for the systems studied. The LRC and ZGR EOS were used to correlate the adsorption data for methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} and their mixtures on wet Tiffany coal. The model parameters were determined by minimizing the sum of squares of weighted errors in the calculated amounts of gas adsorbed. The results

K. A. M. Gasem; R. L. Robinson; S. R. Reeves

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Compendium of basins for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geological and hydrological feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed formations in the San Juan, Powder River, Greater Green River, Piceance, Black Warrior, Appalachian and Michigan basins. Results from the surveys indicated that geology dominated research efforts for many of the basins. Limited information exists on the hydrology and water quality of the basins. All of the basins contain some potential for the use of Jack McIntyre`s patented production process. This process is designed specifically to separate produced water and produced gas in a downhole environment and may allow for more efficient and economical development of coalbed methane resources in this area.

Reed, P.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $28.49 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $38.51 $39.67 - 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $20.35 $16.14 $16.64 -9.6 3.1 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $19.64 $19.60 $20.41 1.9 4.2 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $14.02 $16.13 $16.23 7.6 0.6 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $43.43 $40.18 $39.62 -4.5 -1.4

105

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $26.24 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $35.10 $35.74 - 1.8 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $18.74 $14.70 $14.99 -10.6 1.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $18.09 $17.86 $18.39 0.8 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $12.91 $14.70 $14.63 6.4 -0.5 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $40.00 $36.62 $35.70 -5.5 -2.5

106

San Juan Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility San Juan Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility San Juan Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location San Juan Capistrano, California Coordinates 33.5016932°, -117.6625509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

107

Geomorphic and Geochemical Characteristics of Five Alpine Fens in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fens are abundant in the San Juan Mountains. By exploring the geomorphology and geochemistry of fen wetlands, the functions that fens serve can be better understood. In this research, two main studies were conducted involving the geomorphology...

McClenning, Bree Kathleen 1985-

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

108

Laboratory characterization of a highly weathered old alluvium in San Juan, Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The old alluvium underlying much of metropolitan San Juan was formed in early Pleistocene and has undergone substantial post-depositional weathering in the tropical climate of Puerto Rico, resulting in a special combination ...

Zhang, Guoping, 1968-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Appalachian basin coal-bed methane: Elephant or flea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, interest in the Appalachian basin coal-bed methane resource extends at least over the last 50 years. The Northern and Central Appalachian basins are estimated to contain 61 tcf and 5 tcf of coal-bed methane gas, respectively. Development of this resource has not kept pace with that of other basins, such as the Black Warrior basin of Alabama of the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico and Colorado. Without the benefit of modern completion, stimulation, and production technology, some older Appalachian basin coal-bed methane wells were reported to have produced in excess of 150 used here to characterize some past projects and their results. This work is not intended to comprise a comprehensive survey of all Appalachian basin projects, but rather to provide background information from which to proceed for those who may be interested in doing so. Several constraints to the development of this resource have been identified, including conflicting legal rights of ownership of the gas produced from the coal seams when coal and conventional oil and gas rights are controlled by separate parties. In addition, large leaseholds have been difficult to acquire and finding costs have been high. However, the threshold of minimum economic production may be relatively low when compared with other areas, because low-pressures pipelines are available and gas prices are among the highest in the nation. Interest in the commercial development of the resource seems to be on the increase with several projects currently active and more reported to be planned for the near future.

Hunt, A.M. (Dames and Moore, Cincinnati, OH (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Great Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Great Basin Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Great Basin Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.609920257001,"lon":-114.0380859375,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

111

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins. Topical report, January 1991-July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins was evaluated in the context of geologic and hydrologic characteristics identified in the San Juan Basin, the nation's leading coalbed methane producing basin. The major comparative criteria were (1) coalbed methane resources, (2) geologic and hydrologic factors that predict areas of high gas producibility and high coalbed reservoir permeability, and (3) coalbed thermal maturity. The technical criteria were expanded to include structure, depositional systems, and data base and then combined with economic criteria (production, industry activity, and pipeline availability) to evaluate the coalbed methane potential of the basins. The Greater Green River and Piceance Basins have primary potential to make a significant near-term contribution to the nation's gas supply. These basins have large gas resources, high-rank coals, high gas contents, and established coalbed methane production. The Greater Green River Basin has numerous coalbed methane targets, good coal-seam permeability, and extensive hydrologic areas favorable for production. The Powder River and Raton Basins were judged to have secondary potential. Coal beds in the Powder River Basin are thermally immature and produce large volumes of water; the Raton Basin has a poor data base and has no gas pipeline infrastructure. Low production and minimal industry activity further limit the near-term potential of the Raton Basin. However, if economic criteria are discounted and only major technical criteria are considered, the Greater Green River and Raton Basins are assigned primary potential. The Raton Basin's shallow, thermally mature coal beds of good permeability are attractive coalbed methane targets, but low coal-seam permeability limits the coalbed methane potential of the Piceance Basin.

Tyler, R.; Ambrose, W.A.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - 43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0161 W W W W $0.0216 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0296 $0.0277 $0.0292 $0.0309 $0.0325 $0.0328 $0.0357 $0.0451 $0.0427 4.7 -5.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

113

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - $15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $19.46 W W W W $29.49 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $10.33 $9.58 $10.68 $12.03 $13.69 $14.71 $16.11 $19.72 $20.69 9.1 4.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

114

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - $0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0146 W W W W $0.0223 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0269 $0.0255 $0.0275 $0.0299 $0.0325 $0.0339 $0.0380 $0.0490 $0.0468 7.2 -4.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

115

SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project were to test and evaluate technologies that would result in improved characterization of fractured natural-gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin. The Bureau of Economic Geology (Bureau) worked jointly with industry partner Atlas Resources, Inc. to design, execute, and evaluate several experimental tests toward this end. The experimental tests were of two types: (1) tests leading to a low-cost methodology whereby small-scale microfractures observed in matrix grains of sidewall cores can be used to deduce critical properties of large-scale fractures that control natural-gas production and (2) tests that verify methods whereby robust seismic shear (S) waves can be generated to detect and map fractured reservoir facies. The grain-scale microfracture approach to characterizing rock facies was developed in an ongoing Bureau research program that started before this Appalachian Basin study began. However, the method had not been tested in a wide variety of fracture systems, and the tectonic setting of rocks in the Appalachian Basin composed an ideal laboratory for perfecting the methodology. As a result of this Appalachian study, a low-cost commercial procedure now exists that will allow Appalachian operators to use scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of thin sections extracted from oriented sidewall cores to infer the spatial orientation, relative geologic timing, and population density of large-scale fracture systems in reservoir sandstones. These attributes are difficult to assess using conventional techniques. In the Henderson Dome area, large quartz-lined regional fractures having N20E strikes, and a subsidiary set of fractures having N70W strikes, are prevalent. An innovative method was also developed for obtaining the stratigraphic and geographic tops of sidewall cores. With currently deployed sidewall coring devices, no markings from which top orientation can be obtained are made on the sidewall core itself during drilling. The method developed in this study involves analysis of the surface morphology of the broken end of the core as a top indicator. Together with information on the working of the tool (rotation direction), fracture-surface features, such as arrest lines and plume structures, not only give a top direction for the cores but also indicate the direction of fracture propagation in the tough, fine-grained Cataract/Medina sandstones. The study determined that microresistivity logs or other image logs can be used to obtain accurate sidewall core azimuths and to determine the precise depths of the sidewall cores. Two seismic S-wave technologies were developed in this study. The first was a special explosive package that, when detonated in a conventional seismic shot hole, produces more robust S-waves than do standard seismic explosives. The importance of this source development is that it allows S-wave seismic data to be generated across all of the Appalachian Basin. Previously, Appalachian operators have not been able to use S-wave seismic technology to detect fractured reservoirs because the industry-standard S-wave energy source, the horizontal vibrator, is not a practical source option in the heavy timber cover that extends across most of the basin. The second S-wave seismic technology that was investigated was used to verify that standard P-wave seismic sources can create robust downgoing S-waves by P-to-S mode conversion in the shallow stratigraphic layering in the Appalachian Basin. This verification was done by recording and analyzing a 3-component vertical seismic profile (VSP) in the Atlas Montgomery No. 4 well at Henderson Dome, Mercer County, Pennsylvania. The VSP data confirmed that robust S-waves are generated by P-to-S mode conversion at the basinwide Onondaga stratigraphic level. Appalachian operators can thus use converted-mode seismic technology to create S-wave images of fractured and unfractured rock systems throughout the basin.

BOB A. HARDAGE; ELOISE DOHERTY; STEPHEN E. LAUBACH; TUCKER F. HENTZ

1998-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Basin Basin Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware W W $16.45 $14.29 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $21.45 W W W W $28.57 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $11.39 $10.39 $11.34 $12.43 $13.69 $14.25 $15.17 $18.16 $18.85 6.5 3.8

117

field  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

field field-type-text field-field-page-name">

118

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

119

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

120

Fiber-optic sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in PEM fuel cells Juan F. Botero-Cadavid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fiber-optic sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in PEM fuel cells by Juan F. Botero-optic sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in PEM fuel cells by Juan F. Botero-Cadavid Mech electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), and the presence and formation of this peroxide has been associated

Victoria, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery Through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A previously idle portion of the Midway-Sunset field, the ARCO Western Energy Pru Fee property, is being brought back into commercial production through tight integration of geologic characterization, geostatistical modeling, reservoir simulation, and petroleum engineering. This property, shut-in over a decade ago as economically marginal using conventional cyclic steaming methods, has a 200-300 foot thick oil column in the Monarch Sand. However, the sand lacks effective steam barriers and has a thick water-saturation zone above the oil-water contact. These factors require an innovative approach to steam flood production design that will balance optimal total oil production against economically viable steam-oil ratios and production rates. The methods used in the Class III demonstration are accessible to most operators in the Midway-Sunset field and could be used to revitalize properties with declining production of heavy oils throughout the region.

Steven Schamel

1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery Through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A previously idle portion of the Midway-Sunset field, the ARCO Western Energy Pru Fee property, is being brought back into commercial production through tight integration of geologic characterization, geostatistical modeling, reservoir simulation, and petroleum engineering. This property, shut-in over a decade ago as economically marginal using conventional cyclic steaming methods, has a 200-300 foot thick oil column in the Monarch Sand. However, the sand lacks effective steam barriers and has a thick water-saturation zone above the oil-water contact. These factors require an innovative approach to steam flood production design that will balance optimal total oil production against economically viable steam-oil ratios and production rates. The methods used in the Class III demonstration are accessible to most operators in the Midway-Sunset field and could be used to revitalize properties with declining production of heavy oils throughout the region.

Steven Schamel

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

EIS-0355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and 355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah EIS-0355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah Summary The Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Environmental Impact Statement and associated supplements and amendments provides information on the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) proposal to (1) remediate approximately 11.9 million tons of contaminated materials located on the Moab site and approximately 39,700 tons located on nearby vicinity properties and (2) develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for the Moab site using the framework of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water

124

Divergent/passive margin basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book discusses the detailed geology of the four divergent margin basins and establishes a set of analog scenarios which can be used for future petroleum exploration. The divergent margin basins are the Campos basin of Brazil, the Gabon basin, the Niger delta, and the basins of the northwest shelf of Australia. These four petroleum basins present a wide range of stratigraphic sequences and structural styles that represent the diverse evolution of this large and important class of world petroleum basins.

Edwards, J.D. (Shell Oil Company (US)); Santogrossi, P.A. (Shell Offshore Inc. (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A previously idle portion of the Midway-Sunset field, the ARCO Western Energy Pru Fee property, is being brought back into commercial production through tight integration of geologic characterization, geostatistical modeling, reservoir simulation, and petroleum engineering. This property, shut-in over a decade ago as economically marginal using conventional cyclic steaming methods, has a 200-300 foot thick oil column in the Monarch Sand. However, the sand lacks effective steam barriers and has a thick water-saturation zone above the oil-water contact. These factors require an innovative approach to steam flood production design that will balance optimal total oil production against economically viable steam-oil ratios and production rates. The methods used in the Class III demonstration are accessible to most operators in the Midway-Sunset field and could be used to revitalize properties with declining production of heavy oils throughout the region. In January 1997 the project entered its second and main phase with the purpose of demonstrating whether steamflood can be a more effective mode of production of the heavy, viscous oils from the Monarch Sand reservoir than the more conventional cyclic steaming. The objective is not just to produce the pilot site within the Pru Fee property south of Taft, but to test which production parameters optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

Steven Schamel

1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

126

Recativation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery Through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project reactivates ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway- Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modem reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

Schamel, Steven

1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery Through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project reactivates ARCO?s idle Pru Fee property in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming was used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase begun in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery was initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and the recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

Steven Schamel

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project reactivates ARCO's idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming was used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project completed in December 1996. During the demonstration phase begun in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery is testing the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having simular producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially t o other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

Deo, M.; Forster, C.; Jenkins, C.; Schamel, S.; Sprinkel, D.; and Swain, R.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery Through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Resrvoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project reactivates ARCO?s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

Creties Jenkins; Doug Sprinkel; Milind Deo; Ray Wydrinski; Robert Swain

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

130

Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project reactivates ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway- Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program. One of the main objectives of Budget Period I was to return the Pru Fee property to economic production and establish a baseline productivity with cyclic steaming. By the end of the second quarter 1996, all Pru producers except well 101 had been cyclic steamed two times. Each steam cycle was around 10,000 barrels of steam (BS) per well. No mechanical problems were found in the existing old wellbores. Conclusion is after several years of being shut-in, the existing producers on the Pru lease are in reasonable mechanical condition, and can therefore be utilized as viable producers in whatever development plan we determine is optimum. Production response to cyclic steam is very encouraging in the new producer, however productivity in the old producers appears to be limited in comparison.

Schamel, S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

132

Origin of cratonic basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tectonic subsidence curves show that the Illinois, Michigan, and Williston basins formed by initial fault-controlled mechanical subsidence during rifting and by subsequent thermal subsidence. Thermal subsidence began around 525 Ma in the Illinois Basin, 520-460 Ma in the Michigan Basin, and 530-500 Ma in the Williston Basin. In the Illinois Basin, a second subsidence episode (middle Mississippian through Early Permian) was caused by flexural foreland subsidence in response to the Alleghanian-Hercynian orogeny. Past workers have suggested mantle phase changes at the base of the crust, mechanical subsidence in response to isostatically uncompensated excess mass following igneous intrusions, intrusion of mantle plumes into the crust, or regional thermal metamorphic events as causes of basin initiation. Cratonic basins of North America, Europe, Africa, and South America share common ages of formation, histories of sediment accumulation, temporal volume changes of sediment fills, and common dates of interregional unconformities. Their common date of formation suggests initiation of cratonic basins in response to breakup of a late Precambrian supercontinent. This supercontinent acted as a heat lens that caused partial melting of the lower crust and upper mantle followed by emplacement of anorogenic granites during extensional tectonics in response to supercontinent breakup. Intrusion of anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks weakened continental lithosphere, thus providing a zone of localized regional stretching and permitting formation of cratonic basins almost simultaneously over sites of intrusion of these anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks.

de V. Klein, G.; Hsui, A.T.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Pre-Laramide tectonics - possible control on locus of Turonian-Coniacian parallic Coal Basins, west-central New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Published evidence indicates that Late Cretaceous shorelines trended northwest through west-central New Mexico and adjacent Arizona. Our investigations delineate these shorelines through time and relate them to the prominent northwest-trending monoclinal flexures in the Zuni and southwestern San Juan basins. We related the transgressive (T)-regressive (R) marine cycles (T2-R2, T3-R3, T4-R4) of C.M. Molenaar to deep-rooted monoclinal or asymmetric anticlinal structures. The T2-R2 turn-around is coincident with the Pinon Springs anticline in the northern part of the Zuni basin and appears to be controlled by the Atarque and Gallestina monoclines in the southern part of this basin. Shoreline configurations during the T3 and T4 transgressive maximums coincide with the axis of the Nutria monocline and relate to some subtle pre-Laramide movements along this structure. The R2 regression is unique to New Mexico, suggesting local tectonic control on the configuration of the seaway. The subsequent T3 transgression, which was a major widespread event elsewhere in the Western Interior, was abbreviated in west-central New Mexico near the location of the Nutria monocline. The T2-R2 through T4-R4 shoreline turnarounds produced numerous parallic basins favorable for the accumulation of organic detritus. A turn-around probably represents a period of slow rates of shoreline migration which allowed a thicker, more extensive accumulation of plant material and hence thicker coals. The present and most of the past coal production in the Zuni and southwestern San Juan basins is from coals formed in parallic basins just landward of the turnarounds caused by pre-Laramide tectonics.

Stricker, G.D.; Anderson, O.J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Single tensionless transition in the Laplacian roughening model Juan Jess Ruiz-Lorenzo,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single tensionless transition in the Laplacian roughening model Juan Jesús Ruiz-Lorenzo,1 Esteban Laplacian roughening dLr model, originally introduced as the simplest one accommodating the hexatic phase in two-dimensional melting. The dLr model is also relevant to surface roughening in molecular beam

Cuerno, Rodolfo

135

Power-Aware Control Speculation through Selective Throttling Juan L. Aragn1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power-Aware Control Speculation through Selective Throttling Juan L. Aragón1 , José González2-aware techniques (fetch throttling, decode throttling or disabling the selection logic). The particular set fetch bandwidth reduction along with select logic disabling provides the best performance both in terms

Gupta, Rajiv

136

Ionospheric Threat Model Methodology for Juan Blanch, Todd Walter, Per Enge. Stanford University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ionospheric Threat Model Methodology for WAAS Juan Blanch, Todd Walter, Per Enge. Stanford of a threat model. The threat model is used to restrict the expected ionospheric behavior. It must not be too driving the ionosphere are not entirely known, a decision has been made to base the threat model

Stanford University

137

Enaction and Enactive Interfaces: A Handbook of Terms 3 Jorge Juan Gil [CEIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enaction and Enactive Interfaces: A Handbook of Terms 3 7&$3'8'&9! Jorge Juan Gil [CEIT] Jean Loup such interac- tion, the physical real bilateral interaction is transformed into electro-mechanical in- put the two inter- acting bodies (for example between forces and positions), whereas such causality does

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

138

OIL SPILL BACKGROUND Marcia K McNutt, Juan Lasheras, 'Franklin Shaffer',  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL SPILL BACKGROUND Marcia K McNutt, Juan Lasheras, 'Franklin Shaffer', BlIIlehr to: pmbommer on the fate and behavior of spilled oil. Of course, since this spill originates a mile deep, some. ~ Lehr book chapter .pdf #12;Review of modeling procedures for oil spill weathering behavior William J

Fleskes, Joe

139

Depositional environment of the Middle Pennsylvanian granite wash: Lambert 1, Hryhor, and Sundance fields, northern Palo Duro basin, Oldham County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, electric logs, drill stem tests, dip logs, and seismic records. Five granite wash fields have been discovered adjacent to the Bravo Dome in Oldham County, Texas; the Lambert 'I, Hryhor, Sundance, Pond, and Brandi. The section at Lambert 1, Hryhor..., electric logs, drill stem tests, dip logs, and seismic records. Five granite wash fields have been discovered adjacent to the Bravo Dome in Oldham County, Texas; the Lambert 'I, Hryhor, Sundance, Pond, and Brandi. The section at Lambert 1, Hryhor...

Wharton, Amy Laura

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Geology of the Douala basin, offshore Cameroon, West Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Douala basin is predominantly an offshore basin extending from the Cameroon volcanic line in the north to the Corisco arch in the south near the Equatorial Guinea-Gabon border. The basin lies wholly within the territorial borders of Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea. The Douala basin is one of a series of divergent margin basins occurring along the southwest African coastline resulting from the rifting of Africa from South America. Continental rifting in the Doula basin was initiated at least by Aptian-Albian time and possibly as early as Jurassic. The rift stage persisted until Albian time when the onset of drifting occurred. The sedimentary section in the basin has a maximum thickness of 8-10 km, based on exploration drilling and gravity and magnetics modeling. The synrift section consists of Aptian-Albian sands and shales, deposited primarily as submarine fans, fan-deltas, and turbidite deposits. These are overlain by salt, thought to be equivalent to the Ezagna salt of Aptian age in the Gabon basin to the south. The synrift section is separated from the overlying postrift shale sequence of Late Cretaceous and Tertiary age by a major late Albian unconformity. The Douala basin has been explored for hydrocarbons intermittently over the last 25 years. Results show a distinct tendency for gas-proneness. The largest field recorded to date is the Sanaga Sud gas field, discovered in 1979, offshore, near the coastal city of Kribi.

Pauken, R.J.; Thompson, J.M.; Schumann, J.R. (Mobil New Exploration Ventures Co., Dallas, TX (United States)); Cooke, J.C. (Mobil Exploration and Production Services Inc., Dallas, TX (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Seismic inversion and attributes analysis for porosity evaluation of the tight gas sandstones of the Whicher Range field in the Perth Basin, Western Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A comprehensive understanding of porosity variations in tight gas sandstones plays an important role in reservoir management and provision of plans for developing of the field. This is especially important when we encounter with some degree of complexity in reservoir characteristics of these sandstones. Reservoir properties of tight gas sandstones of the Whicher Range field, the target reservoir of this study, were affected by internal reservoir heterogeneity mostly related to depositional and diagenetic features of the reservoir sandstones. In this study, 2D seismic data in combination with well log data were used for prediction of porosity based on seismic inversion technique and multi-attribute regression analysis. The results show that acoustic impedance from model based inversion is the main seismic attribute in reservoir characterization of tight sandstones of the field. Wide variations in this parameter can be effectively used to differentiate the reservoir sandstones based on their tightness degree. Investigation of porosity by this method resulted in 2D-view of porosity variations in sandstone reservoir which is in accordance with variations in geological characteristics of tight gas sandstones in the field. This view can be extended to a 3D-view in the framework of reservoir model to follow the variations throughout the field.

Rahim Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi; Reza Moussavi-Harami; Reza Rezaee; Majid Nabi-Bidhendi; Ali Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

K-Basins.pub  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 AUDIT REPORT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES COMPLETION OF K BASINS MILESTONES APRIL 2002 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Completion of K Basins Milestones" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (Department) has been storing 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The fuel, used in support of Hanford's former mission, is currently stored in canisters that are kept in two enclosed water-filled pools known as the K Basins. The K Basins represent a significant risk to the environment due to their deteriorating condition. In fact, the K East Basin, which is near the Columbia River, has

143

Relating Geothermal Resources To Great Basin Tectonics Using Gps | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Relating Geothermal Resources To Great Basin Tectonics Using Gps Relating Geothermal Resources To Great Basin Tectonics Using Gps Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Relating Geothermal Resources To Great Basin Tectonics Using Gps Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: The Great Basin is characterized by non-magmatic geothermal fields, which we hypothesize are created, sustained, and controlled by active tectonics. In the Great Basin, GPS-measured rates of tectonic "transtensional" (shear plus dilatational) strain rate is correlated with geothermal well temperatures and the locations of known geothermal fields. This has led to a conceptual model in which non-magmatic geothermal systems are controlled by the style of strain, where shear (strike-slip faulting)

144

Traction Drive System for Electric Vehicles, Using Multilevel Converters Juan W. Dixon, Micah Ortzar and Felipe Ros  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traction Drive System for Electric Vehicles, Using Multilevel Converters Juan W. Dixon, Micah converters for electric vehicles using multilevel inverters. They are being compared with inverters using. Introduction Power Electronics technologies contribute with important part in the development of electric

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

145

ID-based One-pass Authenticated Key Establishment M. Choudary Gorantla Colin Boyd Juan Manuel Gonzalez Nieto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ID-based One-pass Authenticated Key Establishment M. Choudary Gorantla Colin Boyd Juan Manuel Gonz, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia. Email: mc.gorantla@isi.qut.edu.au, {c.boyd

Boyd, Colin

146

Site Characterization Activities with a focus on NETL MMV efforts: Southwest Regional Partnership, San Juan Basin Pilot, New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Site Characterization Activities with a focus on NETL MMV efforts: Southwest Regional Partnership faults and fracture zones and help the NETL MMV team interpret post-injection observations. The geophysical logging and VSP data will help other NETL and SWP researchers develop geomechanical and flow

Wilson, Thomas H.

147

The economic feasibility of enhanced coalbed methane recovery using CO2 sequestration in the San Juan Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide emissions are considered a major source of increased atmospheric CO2 levels leading towards global warming. CO2 sequestration in coal bed reservoirs is one technique that can reduce the concentration of CO2 in the air. In addition...

Agrawal, Angeni

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

148

MHK Projects/San Juan Channel Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Channel Tidal Energy Project San Juan Channel Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.5896,"lon":-123.012,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

149

‘The Controlless Core of Human Hearts’: Writing the Self in Byron’s Don Juan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

‘The life we image’, separate from but informed by its author, is both performative and genuinely reliant on reality – both mask and the admitted persona of an individualist poet burning his path to immortality. In the London Cantos of Don Juan... ’. And yet it is also this ordering force of rhyme that displays the ability of a mind to work figuratively, gathering up conflicting impulses. The ‘glance’ (96) of perception is pitted through sound against staged spectacle, ‘dance’, and the potential...

Plygawko, Michael J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

O Don Juan da Rua Nova: um estudo-itinerÃrio sobre A Emparedada da Rua Nova, de Joaquim Maria Carneiro Vilela.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Don Juan à o personagem central da peÃa El Burlador de Sevilla y El Convidado de Piedra, criada pelo religioso espanhol Frei Gabriel TÃllez (ou… (more)

Helena Maria Ramos de MendonÃa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Details Activities (12) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy

152

Oil and gas resources in the West Siberian Basin, Russia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to assess the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The study does not analyze the costs or technology necessary to achieve the estimates of the ultimate recoverable oil and gas. This study uses reservoir data to estimate recoverable oil and gas quantities which were aggregated to the field level. Field totals were summed to a basin total for discovered fields. An estimate of undiscovered oil and gas, from work of the US Geological Survey (USGS), was added to give a total basin resource volume. Recent production decline points out Russia`s need to continue development of its discovered recoverable oil and gas. Continued exploration is required to discover additional oil and gas that remains undiscovered in the basin.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Authors David D. Blackwell, Kenneth W. Wisian, Maria C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith and Jason McKenna Published U.S. Department of Energy, 2003 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Citation David D. Blackwell,Kenneth W. Wisian,Maria C. Richards,Mark Leidig,Richard Smith,Jason McKenna. 2003. Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of

154

Mississippian Lodgepole Play, Williston Basin: A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waulsortian-type carbonate mud mounds in the lower Mississippian Lodgepole formation (Bottineau interval, Madison Group) comprise an important new oil play in the Williston basin with strong regional potential. The play is typified by wells capable of producing 1000-2500 bbl of oil per day and by reserves that have as much as 0.5-3.0 million bbl of oil per well. Currently centered in Stark County, North Dakota, along the southern flank of the basin, the play includes 38 wells, with 21 producers and 6 new fields. Initial discovery was made at a Silurian test in Dickinson field, traditionally productive from Pennsylvanian sands. The largest pool discovered to date is Eland field, which has 15 producers and estimated total reserves of 12-15 million bbl. This report summarizes geologic, well-log, seismic, and production data for this play, which promises to expand considerably in the years to come.

Montgomery, S.L. [Petroleum Consultant, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Evolution and hydrocarbon prospectivity of the Douala Basin, Cameroon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Douala Basin is a stable Atlantic-type, predominantly offshore basin and forms the northern terminal of a series of divergent passive margin basins located on the Southwest coast of Africa that resulted from the rifting of Africa from South America. An integration of new studies including detailed well, biostratigraphic, sedimentological, geochemical and seismic data has confirmed that the tectonostratigraphic evolution in the basin can be broadly divided into three developmental phases: the Syn-rift, Transitional and Drift phases. This basis has been explored intermittently for hydrocarbon for the past 40 years with two important gas fields discovered and no commercial oil found as yet. This early gas discovery and a corresponding lack of any significant oil discovery, led early operators to term this basin as essentially a gas province. However, recent geochemical analyses of various oil-seeps and oil samples from various localities in the basin, using state-of-the-art techniques have demonstrated that this basin is a potential oil prone basin. The results show that two models of oil sourcing are possible: a Lower Cretaceous lacustrine saline source, similar to the presalt basins of Gabon or a marine Upper Cretaceous to lower Tertiary source, similar to the neighbouring Rio del Rey/Niger Delta Complex. Additionally, seismic reflection data also demonstrate a variety of reservoir horizons, including submarine fans, channel-like features and buried paleohighs, all interbedded within regionally extensive, uniformity bounded mudstone units. Hence, it is now quite evident that within this basin, there exist a vast potential for a wide variety of stratigraphic, structural and combined traps. These features, which are considered to have significantly enhanced the prospectivity of this basin, will be discussed in this paper.

Batupe, M.; Tampu, S.; Aboma, R.S. [National Hydrocarbons Corporation, Yaounde (Cameroon)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Characterization and assessment of uncertainty in San Juan Reservoir Santa Rosa Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study proposes a new, easily applied method to quantify uncertainty in production forecasts for a volumetric gas reservoir based on a material balance model (p/z vs. Gp). The new method uses only observed data and mismatches between regression...

Becerra, Ernesto Jose

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

157

Basin center - fractured source rock plays within tectonically segmented foreland (back-arc) basins: Targets for future exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production from fractured reservoirs has long been an industry target, but interest in this type play has increased recently because of new concepts and technology, especially horizontal drilling. Early petroleum exploration programs searched for fractured reservoirs from shale, tight sandstones, carbonates, or basement in anticlinal or fault traps, without particular attention to source rocks. Foreland basins are some of the best oil-generating basins in the world because of their rich source rocks. Examples are the Persian Gulf basin, the Alberta basin and Athabasca tar sands, and the eastern Venezuela basin and Orinoco tar sands. Examples of Cretaceous producers are the wrench-faulted La Paz-Mara anticlinal fields, Maracaibo basin, Venezuela; the active Austin Chalk play in an extensional area on the north flank of the Gulf of Mexico continental margin basin; and the Niobrara Chalk and Pierre Shale plays of the central Rocky Mountains, United States. These latter plays are characteristic of a foreland basin fragmented into intermontane basins by the Laramide orogeny. The Florence field, Colorado, discovered in 1862, and the Silo field, Wyoming, discovered in 1980, are used as models for current prospecting and will be described in detail. The technologies applied to fracture-source rock plays are refined surface and subsurface mapping from new log suites, including resistivity mapping; 3D-3C seismic, gravity, and aeromagnetic mapping; borehole path seismic mapping associated with horizontal drilling; fracture mapping with the Formation MicroScanner and other logging tools; measurements while drilling and other drilling and completion techniques; surface geochemistry to locate microseeps; and local and regional lineament discrimination.

Weimer, R.J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

agentTool III: From Process Definition to Code Generation Juan C. Garcia-Ojeda Scott A. DeLoach Robby  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13931393 agentTool III: From Process Definition to Code Generation Juan C. Garcia-Ojeda Scott A. DeTool III: From Process Definition to Code Generation, Juan C. Garca-Ojeda, Scott A. DeLoach, and Robby, Sierra, and Castelfranchi (eds.), May, 10­15., 2009, Budapest, Hungary, pp. XXX-XXX. Copyright © 2009

Deloach, Scott A.

159

Dissolved inorganic carbon isotopic composition of low-temperature axial and ridge-flank hydrothermal fluids of the Juan de Fuca Ridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon isotopic composition of low-temperature axial and ridge-flank hydrothermal fluids of the Juan deDissolved inorganic carbon isotopic composition of low-temperature axial and ridge-flank hydrothermal fluids of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Brett D. Walker a,, Matthew D. McCarthy a , Andrew T. Fisher b

Fisher, Andrew

160

Isolation of Aerobic Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Bacteria from Black Smoker Plume Waters of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean Vladimir Yurkov J. Thomas Beatty...Atlantic, Indian, and other Pacific ocean sites. The initial reports of...Juan de Fuca Ridge (northeastern Pacific Ocean; ca. 47N, 129 2,000 m beneath...

Vladimir Yurkov; J. Thomas Beatty

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EIS-0112: Rifle to San Juan 345-kV Transmission Line and Associated Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Agriculture - Rural Electrification Administration developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of the Colorado-Ute Electric Association Inc. and the U.s. Department of Energy's Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) constructing and operating a 345-kilovolt transmission line from Rifle, Colorado, to the San Juan Generating Station near Farmington, New Mexico. WAPA served as a cooperating agency in the preparation of this statement and adopted it on 10/30/1984. WAPA assumed the lead role for project implementation after issuance of the final statement.

162

La variedad linguistica de la mujer del Area Metropolitana de San Juan, Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

de la misma manera, y que la mujer utiliza mks formas estandar que el hombre, no se ha prestado bastante atencion al habla de la mujer. En Hispanoam6rica, la mayoria de los sujetos de los estudios dialecto16gicos han sido hombres, y se han sacado... conclusiones basadas en las generalizaciones que han resultado de los estudios unilaterales. Corno contribuci6n al estudio de la variedad lingOistica de la mujer, esta tesis analiza el habla de la mujer del Area Metropolitana de San Juan con el fin de...

Pratt-Panford, Comfort

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

TRIBUNAL ALUMNO FECHA HORA AULA 1 Jimnez Martnez, Gabriel Juan 22/07/2013 9,30 EP/023G  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRIBUNAL ALUMNO FECHA HORA AULA 1 Jiménez Martínez, Gabriel Juan 22/07/2013 9,30 EP/023G Navarro Monzó, Ruben/Planelles Buendía, Miguel Ángel 9,50 EP/023G Miñana Hidalgo, Juan Fco. 10,10 EP/023G Piñol Díez, Lucía 10,30 EP/023G Lozano lópez, Mª Dolores 10,50 EP/023G DESCANSO 11,10 Barreras Moreno, Carmen

Escolano, Francisco

164

Data Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Basin Data Basin Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Data Basin Agency/Company /Organization: Conservation Biology Institute Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: databasin.org/ Data Basin Screenshot References: Data Basin [1] Overview "Data Basin is an innovative, online system that connects users with spatial datasets, tools, and expertise. Individuals and organization can explore and download a vast library of datasets, upload their own data, create and publish projects, form working groups, and produce customized maps that can be easily shared. The building blocks of Data Basin are: Datasets: A dataset is a spatially explicit file, currently Arcshape and ArcGrid files. These can be biological, physical, socioeconomic, (and

165

EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Basin Electric Power Cooperative EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Order authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to export electric energy to Canada EA-64 Basin Electric...

166

Intensity of the Earth's magnetic field since Precambrian from Thellier-type palaeointensity data and inferences on the thermal history of the core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......field in Lower Permian, Fizika Zemli...of the Hartford Basin, Connecticut...application to five historic lavas and five...of the Hartford Basin, Connecticut, and the Newark Basin, New Jersey...application to five historic lavas and five......

Michel Prévot; Mireille Perrin

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Coal Pile Basin Project (4595), 5/31/2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coal Pile Basin Project (4595) Coal Pile Basin Project (4595) Program or Field Office: Y-12 Site Office Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: Submit by E-mail The proposed action is provide demolish and deactivate the coal pile basin to grade where practical and backfill below grade portion of basin; the remaining underground portion of the stock out conveyor structure, both entrances and backfill pit; and remove universal waste, conveyor belt, asbestos; and, miscellaneous shed type structure at the south entrance to the coal pile. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: 81.29- Disposal facilities for construction and demolition waste For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, including the full text of each

168

ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Petroleum basin studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book reviews the tectonic setting, basin development and history of exploration of a number of selected petroleum provinces located in a variety of settings in the Middle East, North Sea, Nigeria, the Rocky Mountains, Gabon and China. This book illustrates how ideas and models developed in one area may be applied to other regions. Regional reviews and the reassessment of petroleum provinces are presented.

Shannon, P.M. (Univ. College, Dublin (IE)); Naylor, D. (Westland Exploration Ltd., Dublin (IE))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Caribbean basin framework, 3: Southern Central America and Colombian basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors recognize three basin-forming periods in southern Central America (Panama, Costa Rica, southern Nicaragua) that they attempt to correlate with events in the Colombian basin (Bowland, 1984): (1) Early-Late Cretaceous island arc formation and growth of the Central American island arc and Late Cretaceous formation of the Colombian basin oceanic plateau. During latest Cretaceous time, pelagic carbonate sediments blanketed the Central American island arc in Panama and Costa Rica and elevated blocks on the Colombian basin oceanic plateau; (2) middle Eocene-middle Miocene island arc uplift and erosion. During this interval, influx of distal terrigenous turbidites in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks the uplift and erosion of the Central American island arc. In the Colombian basin, turbidites fill in basement relief and accumulate to thicknesses up to 2 km in the deepest part of the basin. In Costa Rica, sedimentation was concentrated in fore-arc (Terraba) and back-arc (El Limon) basins; (3) late Miocene-Recent accelerated uplift and erosion of segments of the Central American arc. Influx of proximal terrigenous turbidites and alluvial fans in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks collision of the Panama arc with the South American continent (late Miocene early Pliocene) and collision of the Cocos Ridge with the Costa Rican arc (late Pleistocene). The Cocos Ridge collision inverted the Terraba and El Limon basins. The Panama arc collision produced northeast-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults and fault-related basins throughout Panama as Panama moved northwest over the Colombian basin.

Kolarsky, R.A.; Mann, P. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Economic appraisal of oil potential of Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An economic appraisal was made of the potential of more than 80 producing fields in the Williston basin of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota. The major oil producing formations investigated were in the Mississippian, Devonian, Silurian and Ordovician. Data for the study came from field production and drilling statistics. An extrapolated oil production decline curve for a theoretical average producing well first was made for each field. The value of the total extrapolated amount of producible oil for the average well was then calculated, discounted for royalty, taxes, etc., and divided by the estimated cost for a completed producing well. This gave an estimate of the return per dollar invested. No considerations were given for exploration and land acquisition costs. The estimated return per dollar values, after posting on Williston basin geologic maps, show relative economic comparisons of producing formations and where within the basin the best economic returns can be expected.

Jennings, A.H.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2002-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

173

Anaerobic Respiration on Tellurate and Other Metalloids in Bacteria from Hydrothermal Vent Fields in the Eastern Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Hydrothermal Vent Fields in the Eastern Pacific Ocean Julius T. Csotonyi 1 Erko Stackebrandt...hydrothermal vent fields in the eastern Pacific Ocean. In 2003, samples of sulfide...the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean. Appl. Environ. Microbiol...

Julius T. Csotonyi; Erko Stackebrandt; Vladimir Yurkov

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Results of a sea-floor electromagnetic survey over a sedimented hydrothermal area on the Juan de Fuca Ridge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......northern Juan de Fuca Ridge is complex where it intersects the Sovanco Fracture Zone (see location map, Fig. 1).West Valley is the current spreading axis, but Middle Valley was the centre of spreading until recent times (

D. C. Nobes; L. K. Law; R. N. Edwards

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Mixing of magmas from enriched and depleted mantle sources in the northeast Pacific: West Valley segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 50 km-long West Valley segment of the northern Juan de Fuca ... . A suite of basalts dredged from the West Valley floor, the adjacent Heck Seamount chain,...cn?0.3, 87Sr/86Sr=0.70235–0.70242, and 206Pb/204Pb=...

Brian L. Cousens; James F. Allan…

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Battery Powered Electric Car, Using Photovoltaic Cells Assistance Juan Dixon, Alberto Ziga, Angel Abusleme and Daniel Soto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Battery Powered Electric Car, Using Photovoltaic Cells Assistance Juan Dixon, Alberto Zúñiga, Angel Vehicles (EVs) is the scarce capacity of conventional electrical energy storage systems. Although Abusleme and Daniel Soto Abstract One of the major problems for the massive applicability of Electric

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

177

Gathering Datasets for Activity Identification Lorcan Coyle, Juan Ye, Susan McKeever, Stephen Knox, Matthew Stabeler,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gathering Datasets for Activity Identification Lorcan Coyle, Juan Ye, Susan McKeever, Stephen Knox is proceedings well, without publicly available datasets on which to compare results it is difficult to consolidate the disparate work being done. This prob- lem exists because realistic datasets describing human

Hammerton, James

178

Juan de la Cosa’s Projection: A Fresh Analysis of the Earliest Preserved Map of the Americas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coordinates Series A, no. 9 Juan de la Cosa?s Projection: A Fresh Analysis of the Earliest Preserved Map of the Americas Persistent URL for citation: http://purl.oclc.org/coordinates/a9.htm Date of Publication: May 24, 2010 Luis A...

Robles Macias, Luis A.

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

179

This is the author version of an article published as: Gorantla, M. Choudary and Boyd, Colin and Gonzalez Nieto, Juan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the author version of an article published as: Gorantla, M. Choudary and Boyd, Colin Boyd and Juan Manuel Gonz`alez Nieto Information Security Institute, Queensland University of Technology GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia. mc.gorantla@isi.qut.edu.au, {c.boyd

Boyd, Colin

180

An Approach to Reduction of Hysteresis in Smart Materials Juan Manuel Cruz-Hernandez and Vincent Hayward  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Approach to Reduction of Hysteresis in Smart Materials Juan Manuel Cruz-Hernandez and Vincent and Control of Hysteresis Modeling of hysteresis in smart materials has been studied by Hughes and Wen in 7, 8,haywardg/Home.html Abstract This paper addresses the problem of reducing the hysteresis found in the actuation of most smart

Hayward, Vincent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Overview of the structural geology and tectonics of the Central Basin Platform, Delaware Basin, and Midland Basin, West Texas and New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural geology and tectonics of the Permian Basin were investigated using an integrated approach incorporating satellite imagery, aeromagnetics, gravity, seismic, regional subsurface mapping and published literature. The two primary emphases were on: (1) delineating the temporal and spatial evolution of the regional stress state; and (2) calculating the amount of regional shortening or contraction. Secondary objectives included delineation of basement and shallower fault zones, identification of structural style, characterization of fractured zones, analysis of surficial linear features on satellite imagery and their correlation to deeper structures. Gandu Unit, also known as Andector Field at the Ellenburger level and Goldsmith Field at Permian and younger reservoir horizons, is the primary area of interest and lies in the northern part of Ector county. The field trends northwest across the county line into Andrews County. The field(s) are located along an Ellenburger thrust anticline trap on the eastern margin of the Central Basin Platform.

Hoak, T. [Kestrel Geoscience, Littleton, CO (United States); Sundberg, K. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Ortoleva, P. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

183

Field Guide to the Wetland and Riparian Plant Associations of Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;2 Field Guide to the Wetland and Riparian Plant Associations of Colorado Colorado Natural Heritage Program College of Natural Resources Colorado State University 254 General Services Building 8002. Colorado Natural Areas Program file photo. 2. Slope (1) - iron fen at Chattanooga, San Juan Co. Colorado

184

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blackwell,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Northern Basin & Range Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Blackwell,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=401422

185

Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

This summary includes information regarding the following elements of the draft environmental impact statement (EIS) prepared for the Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission Project: * purpose and need for action; * Proposed Action and No Action Alternative; and * affected environment, environmental impacts, and mitigation measures. S.1 Purpose and Need for Action Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP (Sea Breeze) has applied to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for authorizations and approvals necessary to construct the U.S. portion of a proposed international electric power transmission cable. Specifically, Sea Breeze has applied to the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE/OE), an organizational unit within DOE, for a Presidential permit for its project. Sea Breeze has also submitted a request to

186

Paleotopography and hydrocarbon accumulation: Williston, Powder River, and Denver basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent geomorphic analyses of 1:24,000 scale topographic maps in the three major basins of the northern Great Plains have disclosed a persistent system of basement paleotopographic features that trend north-northeast throughout the region. Superimposed across this system and subtly influenced by it, are the northwesterly trending Laramide structural features. Paleozoic depositional patterns have been strongly influenced by the paleoridge and trough system formed by the north-northeast features. Mesozoic deposition has also been affected by the ancient subsurface system but in a more subtle manner. Many of the Paleozoic and Mezoxoic hydrocarbon locations in the three basins appear to be the results of paleotopographic control on hydrocarbon accumulation sites. This affect ranges from Paleozoic reef sites in the Williston basin through paleotrough localization of Pennsylvanian Minnelusa production in the Powder River basin to fractured Cretaceous Niobrara production at the Silo field in the Denver basin. Basement paleotopography is the underlying factor in all deposition and subsequent hydrocarbon migration in any basin. As such, it should be considered a major factor in the exploration for oil and gas.

Thomas, G.E. (Thomas and Associates, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Freshwater Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Bruce Aylward, Jayanta Bandyopadhyay, Juan-Carlos Belausteguigotia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-making 7.2.4 River Basin Organizations 7.2.5 Regulatory Responses 7.3 Economic Incentives for Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 7.4.1 Large Dams 7.4.2 Wetland Restoration and Mitigation 7.4.3 Desalination REFERENCES-Darling Basin Cap 7.6 Water as a Human Right and an Economic Good in South Africa 7.7 Implementation

188

Anomalous roughening of wood fractured surfaces Ste phane Morel, 1 Jean Schmittbuhl, 2 Juan M. Lo pez, 3 and Ge rard Valentin 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anomalous roughening of wood fractured surfaces Ste â?? phane Morel, 1 Jean Schmittbuhl, 2 Juan M. Lo in some models of nonequilibrium kinetic roughening @20--24#. The anomalous scaling is defined as follows

Schmittbuhl, Jean

189

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

190

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

191

Understanding Long-Term Solute Transport in Sedimentary Basins: Simulating Brine Migration in the Alberta Basin. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass transport in deep sedimentary basins places important controls on ore formation, petroleum migration, CO2 sequestration, and geochemical reactions that affect petroleum reservoir quality, but large-scale transport in this type of setting remains poorly understood. This lack of knowledge is highlighted in the resource-rich Alberta Basin, where geochemical and hydrogeologic studies have suggested residence times ranging from hundreds of millions of years to less than 5 My, respectively. Here we developed new hydrogeologic models that were constrained by geochemical observations to reconcile these two very different estimates. The models account for variable-density fluid flow, heat transport, solute transport, sediment deposition and erosion, sediment compressibility, and dissolution of salt deposits, including Cl/Br systematics. Prior interpretations of Cl/Br ratios in the Alberta Basin concluded that the brines were derived from evaporatively-concentrated brines that were subsequently diluted by seawater and freshwater; models presented here show that halite dissolution must have contributed strongly as well, which implies significantly greater rates of mass transport. This result confirms that Cl/Br ratios are subject to significant non-uniqueness and thus do not provide good independent indicators of the origin of brines. Salinity and Cl/Br ratios provided valuable new constraints for basin-scale models, however. Sensitivity studies revealed that permeabilities obtained from core- and field-scale tests were appropriate for basin-scale models, despite the differences in scale between the tests and the models. Simulations of groundwater age show that the residence time of porefluids in much of the basin is less than 100 My. Groundwater age increases with depth and approaches 200 My in the deepest part of the basin, but brines are significantly younger than their host rocks throughout the basin.

Alicia M. Wilson

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 'nested graben' structural model, in which multiple faults successively displace rocks downward to the deepest part of the basin, is supported by recent field geologic analysis and correlation of results to geophysical data for Dixie Valley. Aerial photographic analysis and detailed field mapping provide strong evidence for a deep graben separated from the ranges to the east and west by multiple normal faults that affect the Tertiary/Quaternary basin-fill sediments. Correlation with seismic

193

Paluxy of the Central Basin-East Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paluxy Formation (Lower Cretaceous) has been a consistent sandstone exploration objective in the central East Texas basin, occurring at moderate depths on the order of 5000-8000 ft with oil in reservoirs with good permeability and porosity and reserves in the range of 200,000 to 500,000 bbl per well. Since the 1940s, the pace of Paluxy field discovery has been steady, generally a new field or two every one or two years, and there is every reason to believe that there is continued potential for the Paluxy in the future. The central part of the East Texas basin, in Smith County and adjacent areas, has complex structure with numerous salt domes and intervening sediment wedges (turtles) that formed during movement of the salt. Paluxy oil and gas in this area occurs mainly in combination structural-stratigraphic traps along normal faults that cut turtles. Major exploration trends in the central basin include (1) the Lindale turtle with a number of widely spaced fields, generally with only a few wells but with relatively good per-well reserves, (2) the Tyler turtle with the largest fields and some of the most prolific Paluxy production in the central basin, (3) the Flint and Irene turtles with relatively thin sandstones and modest production, (4) the Lane Chapel turtle with some exciting new Paluxy discoveries, and (5) the rim areas of salt domes.

Presley, M.W. (Pentra Research, McKinney, TX (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Impact assessment of hydroclimatic change on water stress in the Indus Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ninety percent of Pakistan's agricultural output is produced in fields irrigated by the Indus basin irrigation system, the world's largest network of canals, dams, barrages and tubewells. River flows, primarily fed by snow ...

Rasheed, Bilhuda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Inventing the Charles River Basin : urban images and civic discourse in Boston, 1844-1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Charles River Basin, extending from the foot of Beacon Hill upstream past Harvard's Soldiers Field, has been called Boston's "Central Park." The river looks to all appearances tranquil and unchanging, one of the most ...

Haglund, Karl T

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

KE Basin Sludge Flocculant Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the revised path forward and schedule for the K Basins Sludge Retrieval and Disposal Project, the sludge in K East (KE) Basin will be moved from the floor and pits and transferred to large, free-standing containers located in the pits (so as to isolate the sludge from the basin). When the sludge is pumped into the containers, it must settle fast enough and clarify sufficiently that the overflow water returned to the basin pool will not cloud the water or significantly increase the radiological dose rate to the operations staff as a result of increased suspended radioactive material. The approach being evaluated to enhance sludge settling and speed the rate of clarification is to add a flocculant to the sludge while it is being transferred to the containers. In February 2004, seven commercial flocculants were tested with a specific K Basin sludge simulant to identify those agents that demonstrated good performance over a broad range of slurry solids concentrations. From this testing, a cationic polymer flocculant, Nalco Optimer 7194 Plus (7194+), was shown to exhibit superior performance. Related prior testing with K Basin sludge and simulant in 1994/1996 had also identified this agent as promising. In March 2004, four series of jar tests were conducted with 7194+ and actual KE Basin sludge (prepared by combining selected archived KE sludge samples). The results from these jar tests show that 7194+ greatly improves settling of the sludge slurries and clarification of the supernatant.

Schmidt, Andrew J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Gano, Sue

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

Williston basin Seislog study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of Seislog (trade name) processing and interpretation of an east-west line in the North Dakota region of the Williston basin. Seislog processing involves inversion of the seismic trace data to produce a set of synthetic sonic logs. These resulting traces, which incorporate low-frequency velocity information, are displayed in terms of depth and isotransit times. These values are contoured and colored, based on a standard stratigraphic color scheme. The section studied is located just north of a dual producing oil pool from zones in the Ordovician Red River and Devonian Duperow Formations. A sonic log from the Long Creek 1 discovery well was digitized and filtered to match the frequency content of the original seismic data. This allows direct comparison between units in the well and the pseudosonic log (Seislog) trace nearest the well. Porosity development and lithologic units within the lower Paleozoic stratigraphic section can be correlated readily between the well and Seislog traces. Anomalous velocity zones within the Duperow and Red River Formations can be observed and correlated to producing intervals in the nearby wells. These results emphasize the importance of displaying inversion products that incorporate low-frequency data in the search for hydrocarbons in the Williston basin. The accumulations in this region are local in extent and are difficult to pinpoint by using conventional seismic data or displays. Seislog processing and displays provide a tested method for identification and delineation of interval velocity anomalies in the Red River and Duperow stratigraphic sections. These techniques can significantly reduce risks in both exploration and delineation drilling of these types of targets.

Mummery, R.C.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this Class 3 project was demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstone's of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover oil more economically through geologically based field development. This project was focused on East Ford field, a Delaware Mountain Group field that produced from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The field, discovered in 9160, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit. A CO2 flood was being conducted in the unit, and this flood is the Phase 2 demonstration for the project.

Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Mendez, Daniel L.

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

199

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Relining Lateral A - Final  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irrigation district rehabilitation efforts and largely responsible for successful collaborative efforts of involved stakeholders. We wish him well with his new endeavors with the Montana Forestry Service. Nick... District No. 2 (San Juan) page xvi of 52 Economic and Conservation Analysis Features of RGIDECON? RGIDECON? is an Excel spreadsheet developed by TAES/TCE economists to investigate the economic and conservation merits of capital renovation projects proposed...

Popp, Michael; Robinson, John; Sturdivant, Allen; Lacewell, Ronald; Rister, Edward

200

Controls of coal fabric on coalbed gas production and compositional shift in both field production and canister desorption tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production rates of coalbed gas wells commonly vary significantly, even in the same field with similar reservoir permeability and gas content. The compositional variation in produced gas is also not everywhere predictable, although in most fields produced gas becomes progressively enriched in CO, through the production life of a reservoir, such as parts of the San Juan basin. In contrast, it is generally observed that the ratio of CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} declines with time during field and laboratory desorption testing of coal cores. In this study, we investigate numerically the importance of coal fabric, namely cleat spacing and aperture width, on the performance of coalbed gas wells and gas compositional shifts during production. Because of the cubic relationship between fracture permeability and fracture aperture width (and thus fracture porosity) for a given cleat permeability, the production profile of coal seams varies depending on whether the permeability is distributed among closely spaced fractures (cleat) with narrower apertures or more widely spaced fractures (cleat) with wider apertures. There is a lower fracture porosity for coal with widely spaced fractures than for coal with closely spaced fractures. Therefore, the relative permeability to gas increases more rapidly for coals with more widely spaced cleats as less dewatering from fractures is required, assuming that the fractures are initially water saturated. The enrichment of CO{sub 2} in the production gas with time occurs because of the stronger adsorption of coals for CO{sub 2} than CH{sub 4}. However, during desorption of coal cores, CO{sub 2} desorbs more rapidly than methane because desorption rate is governed more by diffusion than by sorption affinity, and CO{sub 2} has much higher effective diffusivity in microporous coals than CH{sub 4}.

Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

203

Coal Supply Basin Destination State  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Implicit Price Deflators for Gross Domestic Product, as published by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. For the composition of coal basins, refer to the definition of...

204

GRR/Section 19-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process 9-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Ground Water Commission Colorado Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies CRS 37-90-107 Application for Use of Ground Water 2 CCR 410-1 Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf

205

Microsoft Word - JAS-WillistonBasin-Oct09  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EOR Field Test EOR Field Test 1 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership - Phase II Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail Andrea McNemar, U.S. Department of Energy, andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Edward Steadman Field Test Information: Field Test Name Williston Basin EOR Field Test Test Location Northwest McGregor Oil Field, Williams County, North Dakota Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons 440 tons Source Commercial vendor Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Eagle Operating, Inc. Schlumberger Carbon Services Praxair Summary of Field Test Site and Operations: The Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, working closely with Eagle Operating, Inc. (Eagle), has

206

K Basins Sludge Treatment Process | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basins Sludge Treatment Process K Basins Sludge Treatment Process Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Process Summary - K...

207

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Project...

208

Contemporary Strain Rates in the Northern Basin and Range Province from GPS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contemporary Strain Rates in the Northern Basin and Range Province from GPS Contemporary Strain Rates in the Northern Basin and Range Province from GPS Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Contemporary Strain Rates in the Northern Basin and Range Province from GPS Data Abstract [1] We investigate the distribution of active deformation in the northern Basin and Range province using data from continuous GPS (CGPS) networks, supplemented by additional campaign data from the Death Valley, northern Basin and Range, and Sierra Nevada-Great Valley regions. To understand the contemporary strain rate field in the context of the greater Pacific (P)-North America (NA) plate boundary zone, we use GPS velocities to estimate the average relative motions of the Colorado Plateau (CP), the Sierra Nevada-Great Valley (SNGV) microplate, and a narrow north-south

209

Supai salt karst features: Holbrook Basin, Arizona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 300 sinkholes, fissures, depressions, and other collapse features occur along a 70 km (45 mi) dissolution front of the Permian Supai Formation, dipping northward into the Holbrook Basin, also called the Supai Salt Basin. The dissolution front is essentially coincident with the so-called Holbrook Anticline showing local dip reversal; rather than being of tectonic origin, this feature is likely a subsidence-induced monoclinal flexure caused by the northward migrating dissolution front. Three major areas are identified with distinctive attributes: (1) The Sinks, 10 km WNW of Snowflake, containing some 200 sinkholes up to 200 m diameter and 50 m depth, and joint controlled fissures and fissure-sinks; (2) Dry Lake Valley and contiguous areas containing large collapse fissures and sinkholes in jointed Coconino sandstone, some of which drained more than 50 acre-feet ({approximately}6 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3}) of water overnight; and (3) the McCauley Sinks, a localized group of about 40 sinkholes 15 km SE of Winslow along Chevelon Creek, some showing essentially rectangular jointing in the surficial Coconino Formation. Similar salt karst features also occur between these three major areas. The range of features in Supai salt are distinctive, yet similar to those in other evaporate basins. The wide variety of dissolution/collapse features range in development from incipient surface expression to mature and old age. The features began forming at least by Pliocene time and continue to the present, with recent changes reportedly observed and verified on airphotos with 20 year repetition. The evaporate sequence along interstate transportation routes creates a strategic location for underground LPG storage in leached caverns. The existing 11 cavern field at Adamana is safely located about 25 miles away from the dissolution front, but further expansion initiatives will require thorough engineering evaluation.

Neal, J.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Electrical resistivity structure of the Valu Fa Ridge, Lau Basin, from marine controlled-source electromagnetic sounding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Basin is a small back-arc basin, separating the...the active Tofua Island Arc ( Fig.1). It is thought...west of the Tofua Island Arc.-Spreading has been...position of the ridge axis. Electric field receiver locations...extensive low-temperature discharge related to the high permeability......

Lucy MacGregor; Martin Sinha; Steven Constable

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/EVAPORATION (FTE) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS. Task 45. Final topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TASK 45 FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/ EVAPORATION (FTE ) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS coupling evaporation with freezing. This offers operators a year- round method for treating produced water. Treating water with the FTE process reduces the volume of water to be disposed of as well as purifying the water to a level acceptable for watering livestock and agricultural lands. This process is currently used at two evaporation facilities, one in the San Juan Basin in New Mexico and one in the Green River Basin in Wyoming. the freezing point below that of pure water. When such a solution is cooled below 32EF, relatively pure ice crystals form, along with an unfrozen brine solution that contains elevated concentrations of salts. Because of the brine's high concentration of these constituents, its density is greater than that of the ice, and the purified ice and brine are easily separated. Coupling the natural processes of freezing and evaporation makes the FTE process a more cost- effective and efficient method for the treatment and disposal of produced water and allows for year-round operation of an FTE facility. drops below 32 F, produced water is automatically pumped from a holding pond and sprayed onto a freezing pad. The freezing pad consists of an elevated framework of piping with regularly placed, upright, extendable spray heads similar to those used to irrigate lawns. As the spray freezes, an ice pile forms over the elevated framework of pipes, and the brine, with an elevated constituent concentration, drains from the ice pile. The high-salinity brine, identified by its high electrical conductivity, is separated using automatic valves and pumped to a pond where it can subsequently be disposed of by conventional methods. As the ice pile increases in height, the sprayers are extended. When the ice on the freezing pad melts, the relatively pure water is pumped from the freezing pad and discharged or stored for later use . No new wastes are generated by the FTE process. and the U. S. Department of Energy has been conducted since 1992 to develop a commercial FTE purification process for produced waters. Numeric process and economic modeling, as well as the laboratory-scale process simulation that confirmed the technical and economic feasibility of the process, was performed by B. C. Technologies, Ltd., and the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) from 1992 to 1995. They then conducted a field evaluation from 1995 to 1997 in New Mexico's San Juan Basin at a conventional evaporation facility operated by Amoco Production Company. The results of this evaluation confirmed that the FTE process has significant commercial economic potential. A new facility was designed in 1998, and its construction is expected to begin in 1999.

Ames A. Grisanti; James A. Sorensen

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Denver Basin Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Map Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Denver Basin Map Abstract This webpage contains a map of the Denver Basin. Published Colorado...

213

Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

214

Atlas of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Atlas of the Columbia River Basin Oregon State University Computer-Assisted Cartography Course & GEOVISUALIZATION GROUP UNIVERSITY #12;2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin FOREWORDAtlas, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. 2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin

Jenny, Bernhard

215

LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter WM LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN By T.T. Taber and S.A. Kinney In U.S. Geological........................................WM-1 Map Information for the Williston Basin Land Use And Land Cover Map.........................................................WM-2 Map Information for the Williston Basin Subsurface Ownership map

216

Oil and gas resources of the Fergana basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan). Advance summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA), in cooperation with the US Geological Survey (USGS), has assessed 13 major petroleum producing regions outside of the United States. This series of assessments has been performed under EIA`s Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). The basic approach used in these assessments was to combine historical drilling, discovery, and production data with EIA reserve estimates and USGS undiscovered resource estimates. Field-level data for discovered oil were used for these previous assessments. In FESAP, supply projections through depletion were typically formulated for the country or major producing region. Until now, EIA has not prepared an assessment of oil and gas provinces in the former Soviet Union (FSU). Before breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Fergana basin was selected for a trial assessment of its discovered and undiscovered oil and gas. The object was to see if enough data could be collected and estimated to perform reasonable field-level estimates of oil and gas in this basin. If so, then assessments of other basins in the FSU could be considered. The objective was met and assessments of other basins can be considered. Collected data for this assessment cover discoveries through 1987. Compared to most other oil and gas provinces in the FSU, the Fergana basin is relatively small in geographic size, and in number and size of most of its oil and gas fields. However, with recent emphasis given to the central graben as a result of the relatively large Mingbulak field, the basin`s oil and gas potential has significantly increased. At least 7 additional fields to the 53 fields analyzed are known and are assumed to have been discovered after 1987.

Not Available

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

217

NILE BASIN INITIATIVE Claire Stodola  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Climate Change #12;Upstream states · Low water needs Downstream states · High water needs #12;Historical #12;Research Question How has the Nile Basin Initiative influenced the riparian states' management states 1959 ­ Still only BILATERAL 1960s to 1990s - Increasing frustration by upstream states #12;What

New Hampshire, University of

218

Tropical forests: Include Congo basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 478, 378–381; 2011). But their meta-analysis of 138 studies overlooks the Congo basin, the second-largest continuous area of rainforest in the world; moreover, only ... the lack of recent and accessible legacy data for this region. The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), which contains 98 million hectares of rainforest (60% of the ...

Hans Verbeeck; Pascal Boeckx; Kathy Steppe

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

219

GOLF COURSES FRASER RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practices (BMP's) for golf courses, entitled Greening your BC Golf Course. A Guide to Environmental. It also summarizes conditions and practices in the Fraser Basin, reviews best management practices.C. Prepared by: UMA ENVIRONMENTAL A Division of UMA Engineering Ltd. Burnaby, B.C. March 1996 #12;THIRD PARTY

220

Refinishing contamination floors in Spent Nuclear Fuels storage basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The floors of the K Basins at the Hanford Site are refinished to make decontamination easier if spills occur as the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is being unloaded from the basins for shipment to dry storage. Without removing the contaminated existing coating, the basin floors are to be coated with an epoxy coating material selected on the basis of the results of field tests of several paint products. The floor refinishing activities must be reviewed by a management review board to ensure that work can be performed in a controlled manner. Major documents prepared for management board review include a report on maintaining radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable, a waste management plan, and reports on hazard classification and unreviewed safety questions. To protect personnel working in the radiation zone, Operational Health Physics prescribed the required minimum protective methods and devices in the radiological work permit. Also, industrial hygiene safety must be analyzed to establish respirator requirements for persons working in the basins. The procedure and requirements for the refinishing work are detailed in a work package approved by all safety engineers. After the refinishing work is completed, waste materials generated from the refinishing work must be disposed of according to the waste management plan.

Huang, F.F.; Moore, F.W.

1997-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Seismic reflection evidence for two phase development of Tertiary basins from east-central Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two east-west seismic reflection profiles crossing Antelope Valley, Smokey Valley, Railroad Valley and Big Sand Springs Valley demonstrate the evolution of Tertiary extension from broad sags to narrow, fault-bounded basins. Seismic reflection data was acquired for the Anschutz Corporation by the Digicon Corporation during the winter of 1988/1989. Reprocessing of a 480 channel, 60 fold, dynamite source experiment enabled good imaging of the basin stratigraphy. These data suggest two distinct phases of basin development occurred, separated by a regional unconformity. The early phase is characterized by development of a broad basin riddled with many small offset normal faults. The later phase shows a narrowing of the basin and subsidence along one dominant structure, an apparent planar normal fault. The unconformity separating the two phases of extension marks a transition from broad subsidence to local asymmetric tilting that took place over a short period of time relative to sedimentation rates. Antelope Valley and Railroad Valley clearly show strong evidence for two phase development, whereas Smokey Valley represents mostly the early phase and Big Sand Springs Valley represents only the later phase of extension. The absence of dating within the basins precludes the authors from determining if the abrupt tectonic transition within the basins resulted from differences in local strain rates or amounts, or was due to changes in regional stress fields.

Liberty, L.M.; Heller, P.L.; Smithson, S.B. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

223

Activation of Au/TiO2 Catalyst for CO Oxidation Jeff H. Yang, Juan D. Henao, Mpfunzeni C. Raphulu, Yingmin Wang, Tiziana Caputo,|  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activation of Au/TiO2 Catalyst for CO Oxidation Jeff H. Yang, Juan D. Henao, Mpfunzeni C. Raphulu; In Final Form: March 29, 2005 Changes in a Au/TiO2 catalyst during the activation process from an as and FTIR spectroscopy, complemented with XPS, microcalorimetry, and TEM characterization. When the catalyst

Marks, Laurence D.

224

Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, San Jaoquin Basin, California. Annual report, June 13, 1995--June 13, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project reactivates ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

Deo, M.; Jenkins, C.; Sprinkel, D.; Swain, R.; Wydrinski, R.; Schamel, S.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Geology of interior cratonic sag basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interior cratonic sag basins are thick accumulations of sediment, generally more or less oval in shape, located entirely in the interiors of continental masses. Some are single-cycle basins and others are characterized by repeated sag cycles or are complex polyhistory basins. Many appear to have developed over ancient rift systems. Interior cratonic sag basins are typified by a dominance of flexural over fault-controlled subsidence, and a low ratio of sediment volume to surface area of the basin. The Baltic, Carpentaria, Illinois, Michigan, Parana, Paris, and Williston basins are examples of interior cratonic sag basins. Tectonics played a dominant role in controlling the shapes and the geometries of the juxtaposed packets of sedimentary sequences. While the mechanics of tectonic control are not clear, evidence suggests that the movements are apparently related to convergence of lithospheric plates and collision and breakup of continents. Whatever the cause, tectonic movements controlled the freeboard of continents, altering base level and initiating new tectono-sedimentologic regimes. Sag basins situated in low latitudes during their development commonly were sites of thick carbonates (e.g., Illinois, Michigan, Williston, and Paris basins). In contrast, siliciclastic sedimentation characterized basins that formed in higher latitudes (e.g., Parana and Carpentaria basins). Highly productive sag basins are characterized by widespread, mature, organic-rich source rocks, large structures, and good seals. Nonproductive basins have one or more of the following characteristics: immature source rocks, leaky plumbing, freshwater flushing, and/or complex geology due to numerous intrusions that inhibit mapping of plays.

Leighton, M.W.; Eidel, J.J.; Kolata, D.R.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blackwell,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Determining heat loss is one more tool to use in geothermal exploration. It is relatively easy to calculate if the thermal aureole has been mapped with thermal gradient well measurements. With the heat loss information, predicted production capacity can be used to help review the system being explored. References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada

227

Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

- The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

Faulds, James E.

228

Petroleum geology of the Estancia basin, New Mexico: An exploration frontier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Estancia basin of central New Mexico is an asymmetric, north-south-trending structural depression that originated during the Pennsylvanian. The present-day basin covers 1600 mi[sup 2]. The basin is bounded on the east by the late Paleozoic Pedernal uplift, on the west by the Tertiary Manzano and Los Pinos Mountains, on the north by the Espanola basin, an do the south by Chupadera Mesa. The depth to the Precambrian ranges from 9000 ft in the eastern part of the basin to less than 1500 ft in the western part. Basin fill consists primarily of Pennsylvanian and Wolfcampian (Permian) clastics. The Pennsylvanian section contains significant shelf limestones in the western part of the basin. Forty-three exploratory wells have been drilled in the basin; only 17 have been drilled to Precambrian. Numerous shows of oil and gas have been reported. From the 1930s until the 1960s, CO[sub 2] was produced from lower Pennsylvanian sandstones in two small fields on the western flank of the basin. Dark-gray to black Pennsylvanian shales are probable source rocks. They are mature to marginally mature; TAI values range from less than 2.0 to 3.2. TOC is greater than 0.5% in many of these shales. Kerogen types are mixed amorphous, algal, herbaceous, and woody, indicating that gas, or both gas and oil, may have been generated. Pennsylvanian sandstones are good reservoirs. They are fine- to coarse-grained subarkosic arenites and quartz arenites. Porosity ranges from 10 to 20% in the more porous, coarser-grained sandstones.

Broadhead, R.F. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Characterizing Structural Controls of Geothermal Fields in the Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characterizing Structural Controls of Geothermal Fields in the Northwestern Characterizing Structural Controls of Geothermal Fields in the Northwestern Great Basin- A Progress Report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characterizing Structural Controls of Geothermal Fields in the Northwestern Great Basin- A Progress Report Abstract Considering a lack of recent volcanism, the abundant geothermal activity in the northwestern Great Basin is somewhat anomalous. The prolific activity may result from enhanced dilation on N- to NNE-striking normal faults induced by a transfer of NW-directed dextral shear from the Walker Lane to NW-directed extension in the Great Basin. Although faults control most geothermal activity in the Great Basin, few detailed investigations have been conducted on the specific structural controls of individual fields.

230

Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, San Joaquin basin, California. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will reactivate ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conduct a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program. The producibility problems initially thought to be responsible for the low recovery in the Pru Fee property are: (a) the shallow dip of the bedding; (b) complex reservoir structure, (c) thinning pay zone; and (d) the presence of bottom water. The project is using tight integration of reservoir characterization and simulation modeling to evaluate the magnitude of and alternative solutions to these problems. Two main activities were brought to completion during the first quarter of 1996: (1) lithologic and petrophysical description of the core taken form the new well Pru 101 near the center of the demonstration site and (2) development of a stratigraphic model for the Pru Fee project area. In addition, the first phase of baseline cyclic steaming of the Pru Fee demonstration site was continued with production tests and formation temperature monitoring.

Schamel, S.

1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

231

Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, San Joaquin Basin, California. Quarterly report, June 14--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will reactivate ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conduct a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming will be used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recover will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class 3 reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program. A summary of technical progress discusses the literature compilation, assembly of digitized log suites, development of a stratigraphic framework, installation of lease production facilities, return wells to production, drill producer and observation wells, and reservoir characterization.

Schamel, S.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

232

Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, San Joaquin Basin, California. [Quarterly report], June 14, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will reactivate ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conduct a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming will be used to re-establish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recover will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program. A summary of technical progress covers: geological and reservoir characterization, and reservoir simulation.

Schamel, S.

1996-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

233

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project reactivates ARCO's idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steam was used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project completed in December 1996. During the demonstration phase begun in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery is testing the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objective of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

Schamel, Steven

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

THE INTRACONTINENTAL BASINS (ICONS) ATLAS APPLICATIONS IN EASTERN AUSTRALIA PESA Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium III Sydney, 1417 September, 2008 275  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INTRACONTINENTAL BASINS (ICONS) ATLAS ­ APPLICATIONS IN EASTERN AUSTRALIA PESA Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium III Sydney, 14­17 September, 2008 275 The IntraCONtinental basinS (ICONS) atlas of intracontinental basins (ICONS atlas), using freely available global and regional datasets. Firstly, we are trying

Müller, Dietmar

235

Intermediate wavelength magnetic anomalies over ocean basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have examined three very long magnetic field profiles taken over ocean basins for the presence of intermediate wavelength magnetic anomalies. One profile was from the Atlantic Ocean in the Transatlantic Geotraverse area, one ran along latitude 35/sup 0/S in the SE Pacific, and one ran along 150/sup 0/W in the Pacific. All three profiles show the presence of intermediate wavelength (65--1500 km) magnetic anomalies generated in the crust or upper mantle. The analysis of magnetic field power spectra shows that the core field becomes unimportant at about a wavelength of 1500 km. Sea floor spreading anomalies should produce a maximum in power at about a wavelength of 65 km. Between these two wavelengths there should be a minimum in power which is not seen on observed records. Inverting the anomalous field to obtain some idea of the magnetization necessary to explain these intermediate wavelength magnetic anomalies shows that values of magnetization in excess of 1 A m/sup -1/ are needed if the magnetized layer is as thick as the ocean crust. Alternatively, rather large thicknesses of upper mantle material with lower intensities of magnetization need to be used. The reason why such magnetization variations exist is not known. It can be shown that upward continuation of the magnetic anomaly signature to an altitude of 350 km (about the perihelion altitude of MAGSAT) will produce anomalies up to 10 nT in amplitude. These should be capable of being seen by MAGSAT, and thus allow us to determine the spatial arrangement of the intermediate wavelength anomalies and hence, hopefully, a clue as to their origin.

Harrison, C.G.A.; Carle, H.M.

1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

236

Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

James E. Faulds

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

CD-1: Intracratonic Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal conductivity of salt rock, and might provide suitable geothermal reservoirs for district heating.4 Formations encountered in deeper parts of an intracratonic basin...

238

Hack's law of debris-flow basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hack's law was originally derived from basin statistics for varied spatial scales and regions. The exponent value of the law has been shown to vary between 0.47 and 0.70, causing uncertainty in its application. This paper focuses on the emergence of Hack's law from debris-flow basins in China. Over 5,000 debris-flow basins in different regions of China with drainage areas less than 100km2 are included in this study. Basins in the different regions are found to present similar distributions. Hack's law is derived from maximum probability and conditional distributions, suggesting that the law should describe some critical state of basin evolution. Results suggest the exponent value is approximately 0.5. Further analysis indicates that Hack's law is related to other scaling laws underlying the evolution of a basin and that the exponent is not dependent on basin shape but rather on the evolutionary stage. A case study of a well known debris-flow basin further confirms Hack's law and its implications in basin evolution.

Yong LI; Z.Q. YUE; C.F. LEE; R.E. BEIGHLEY; Xiao-Qing CHEN; Kai-Heng HU; Peng CUI

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

NMOSE Basin Guidelines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OtherOther: NMOSE Basin GuidelinesLegal Abstract The New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (NMOSE) provides links to final rules and administrative guidelines for particular...

240

Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah David J. Ratliff, Captain United States Air Force Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 DOE/GO-102010-3005 March 2010 The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. The authors thank Marshall Goldberg and Elise Brown for assistance with data collection and analysis and Sandra Reategui, Suzanne Tegen, and Sara Baldwin for the helpful comments on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Transient hydrodynamics within intercratonic sedimentary basins during glacial cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ka B.P.), such as the Williston, Michigan, and Illinois basins. We show that in such basins fluid of the Williston and Alberta basins. Under such con- ditions fluid fluxes in aquifers can be expected

Bense, Victor

242

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System...

243

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

244

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD,...

245

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section...

246

Refraction Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Northern Basin &...

247

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal...

248

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

249

Reservoir heterogeneity in Carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ecology: Drought in the Congo Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... significantly expanded the tropical-forest research programme by focusing on chronic drought in Africa's Congo Basin, a region that has been the subject of much less investigation than the ... optical, microwave and gravity remote-sensing data to evaluate long-term drought response in the Congo Basin (Fig. 1). Annual precipitation in this region is bimodal, and the ...

Jeffrey Q. Chambers; Dar A. Roberts

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

6, 839877, 2006 Mexico City basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emitters of air pollutants leading to negative health effects and environmental degradation. The rate altitude basin with air pollutant concentrations above the health limits most days of the year. A mesoscale-dimensional wind patterns in25 the basin and found that the sea-breeze transports the polluted air mass up the moun

Boyer, Edmond

252

Solid state 13C NMR analysis of shales and coals from Laramide Basins. Final report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Western Research Institute (WRI) jointly sponsored research (JSR) project augmented and complemented research conducted by the University of Wyoming Institute For Energy Research for the Gas Research Institute. The project, {open_quotes}A New Innovative Exploitation Strategy for Gas Accumulations Within Pressure Compartments,{close_quotes} was a continuation of a project funded by the GRI Pressure Compartmentalization Program that began in 1990. That project, {open_quotes}Analysis of Pressure Chambers and Seals in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana,{close_quotes} characterized a new class of hydrocarbon traps, the discovery of which can provide an impetus to revitalize the domestic petroleum industry. In support of the UW Institute For Energy Research`s program on pressure compartmentalization, solid-state {sup 13}C NMR measurements were made on sets of shales and coals from different Laramide basins in North America. NMR measurements were made on samples taken from different formations and depths of burial in the Alberta, Bighorn, Denver, San Juan, Washakie, and Wind River basins. The carbon aromaticity determined by NMR was shown to increase with depth of burial and increased maturation. In general, the NMR data were in agreement with other maturational indicators, such as vitrinite reflectance, illite/smectite ratio, and production indices. NMR measurements were also obtained on residues from hydrous pyrolysis experiments on Almond and Lance Formation coals from the Washakie Basin. These data were used in conjunction with mass and elemental balance data to obtain information about the extent of carbon aromatization that occurs during artificial maturation. The data indicated that 41 and 50% of the original aliphatic carbon in the Almond and Lance coals, respectively, aromatized during hydrous pyrolysis.

Miknis, F.P.; Jiao, Z.S.; Zhao, Hanqing; Surdam, R.C.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

East Basin Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East Basin Creek Geothermal Area East Basin Creek Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: East Basin Creek Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.2633,"lon":-114.811,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

254

Thermal analysis of the southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature and geologic data from over 3,000 oil and gas wells within a 180 km x 30 km area that transect across the southern Powder River Basin in Wyoming, U.S.A., were used to determine the present thermal regime of the basin. Three-dimensional temperature fields within the transect, based on corrected bottom-hole temperatures (BHTs) and other geologic information, were assessed using: (1) A laterally constant temperature gradient model in conjunction with an L{sub 1} norm inversion method, and (2) a laterally variable temperature gradient model in conjunction with a stochastic inversion technique. The mean geothermal gradient in the transect is 29 C/km, but important lateral variations in the geothermal gradient exist. The average heat flow for the southern Powder River Basin is 52 mW/m{sup 2} with systematic variations between 40 mW/m{sup 2} and 60 mW/m{sup 2} along the transect. Extremely high local heat flow (values up to 225 mW/m{sup 2}) in the vicinity of the Teapot Dome and the Salt Creek Anticline and low heat flow of 25 mW/m{sup 2} occurring locally near the northeast end of the transect are likely caused by groundwater movement.

McPherson, B.J.O.L.; Chapman, D.S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics] [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

DOE/EIS-0355 Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summary Summary U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management COVER SHEET Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Cooperating Agencies: * National Park Service * Bureau of Land Management * U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission * U.S. Army Corps of Engineers * U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service * State of Utah * U.S. Environmental Protection Agency * Ute Mountain Ute Tribe * San Juan County * Grand County * City of Blanding * Community of Bluff Title: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0355). Contact: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: Don Metzler Moab Federal Project Director U.S. Department of Energy 2597 B ¾ Road

256

DOE/EIS-0355 Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I I Chapters 1-11 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management COVER SHEET Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Cooperating Agencies: * National Park Service * Bureau of Land Management * U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission * U.S. Army Corps of Engineers * U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service * State of Utah * U.S. Environmental Protection Agency * Ute Mountain Ute Tribe * San Juan County * Grand County * City of Blanding * Community of Bluff Title: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0355). Contact: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: Don Metzler Moab Federal Project Director U.S. Department of Energy

257

Hydrodynamic analysis as an aid in exploration within mature basins: Examples from Sawtooth and Sunburst Reservoirs, northwestern Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Linking hydrodynamics to detailed stratigraphic and structural analyses is a powerful tool in hydrocarbon exploration in mature basins, In southernmost Canada straddling the Alberta-Saskatchewan border, significant petroleum reserves are encountered within Mesozoic units which are largely controlled by subsurface flow cells. The Jurassic Sawtooth Formation is characterized by an eastward shift from lower shoreface quartzarenites to basinal coquinas. The Sawtooth is a blanket deposit and crops out along the flanks of several Tertiary uplifts in northern Montana. In the subsurface the Sawtooth is draped over several relatively young structures. Potentiometric mapping illustrates a northerly flow orientation within the Sawtooth, and oil pools under artesian conditions are located where flow paths cross steeply flanked structures. The Lower Cretaceous Sunburst Formation is a series of valley-fill sandstones with mainly southwesterly paleoflow orientations. Hydrocarbon pools (e.g., Manyberries field) are located within a regional potentiometric low formed by three converging cells which recharge in the south, northwest, and east. This potentiometric low is characterized by systematic changes in oil and water compositions, with progressively lighter oils and NaCl-rich waters found toward the low's center. Stratigraphic variability controls pooling within the low, with hydrocarbons located on the updip flanks of valley fills which border nonreservoir rocks. In the northwestern Williston basin regional hydrodynamic analysis, combined with standard subsurface approaches, allows operators to discern large new hydrocarbon-bearing trends within and between densely drilled areas characterized by complex structure and stratigraphy.

Putnam, P.E.; Moore, S. (Petrel Robertson Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Ward, G. (Ward Hydrodynamics, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

DOE/EIS-0355 Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Volumes IV Volumes IV Chapters 4 -5 Comment Responses U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah Final Environmental Impact Statement i Contents Volume IV 4.0 Responses............................................................................................................................4-1 4.1 Response Index Tables ..............................................................................................4-1 4.2 Responses to Comments ..........................................................................................4-70 5.0 References...........................................................................................................................5-1

259

Landslide Inventory in the Area of Dubra?ina River Basin (Croatia)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Systematic landslide mapping was performed for an area of 9.35 km2 of the geomorphological unit of hills in the Dubra?ina River Basin. Based on the visual interpretation of LiDAR imagery, supplemented by field re...

Petra ?omlija; Sanja Bernat…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

K Basins isolation barriers summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 105-K East and 105-K West fuel storage basins (105-K Basins) were designed and constructed in the early 1950`s for interim storage of irradiated fuel following its discharge from the reactors. The 105-K- East and 105-K West reactor buildings were constructed first, and the associated storage basins were added about a year later. The construction joint between each reactor building structure and the basin structure included a flexible membrane waterstop to prevent leakage. Water in the storage basins provided both radiation shielding and cooling to remove decay heat from stored fuel until its transfer to the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility for chemical processing. The 105-K West Reactor was permanently shut down in February 1970; the 105-K East Reactor was permanently shut down in February 1971. Except for a few loose pieces, fuel stored in the basins at that time was shipped to the PUREX Facility for processing. The basins were then left idle but were kept filled with water. The PUREX Facility was shut down and placed on wet standby in 1972 while N Reactor continued to operate. When the N Reactor fuel storage basin began to approach storage capacity, the decision was made to modify the fuel storage basins at 105-K East and 105-K West to provide additional storage capacity. Both basins were subsequently modified (105-K East in 1975 and 105-K West in 1981) to provide for the interim handling and storage of irradiated N Reactor fuel. The PUREX Facility was restarted in November 1983 to provide 1698 additional weapons-grade plutonium for the United States defense mission. The facility was shut down and deactivated in December 1992 when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the plant was no longer needed to support weapons-grade plutonium production. When the PUREX Facility was shut down, approximately 2.1 x 1 06 kg (2,100 metric tons) of irradiated fuel aged 7 to 23 years was left in storage in the 105-K Basins pending a decision on final disposition of the material. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1994), also known as the Tri-Party Agreement, commits to the removal of all fuel and sludge from the 105-K Basins by the year 2002.

Strickland, G.C., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Optimization of a CO2 flood design Wesson Field - west Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Denver Unit of Wasson Field, located in Gaines and Yoakum Counties in west Texas, produces oil from the San Andres dolomite at a depth of 5,000 ft. Wasson Field is part of the Permian Basin and is one of the largest petroleum-producing basins...

Garcia Quijada, Marylena

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 Mark Person*1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Mount Simon, Illinois Basin, CO2, earthquakes, pressure, brine transport69 #12;Page | 3 1. IntroductionPage | 1 Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 2 3 4 sharp-interface models of CO2 injection were constructed for the Illinois49 Basin in which porosity

Gable, Carl W.

266

Death of a carbonate basin: The Niagara-Salina transition in the Michigan basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The A-O Carbonate in the Michigan basin comprises a sequence of laminated calcite/anhydrite layers intercalated with bedded halite at the transition between normal marine Niagaran carbonates and lower Salina Group evaporites. The carbonate/anhydrite interbeds represent freshing events during initial evaporative concentration of the Michigan basin. Recent drilling in the Michigan basin delineates two distinct regions of A-O Carbonate development: a 5 to 10 m thick sequence of six 'laminites' found throughout most of the western and northern basin and a 10 to 25 m thick sequence in the southeastern basin containing both thicker 'laminates' and thicker salt interbeds. Additionally, potash deposits of the overlying A-1 evaporite unit are restricted to the northern and western basin regions. The distribution of evaporite facies in these two regions is adequately explained by a source of basin recharge in the southeast-perhaps the 'Clinton Inlet' of earlier workers. This situation suggest either that: (1) the source of basin recharge is alternately supplying preconcentrated brine and more normal marine water, or (2) that the basin received at least two distinct sources of water during A-O deposition.

Leibold, A.W.; Howell, P.D. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Simulation of CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production in Multiple Appalachian Basin Coal Seams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A DOE-funded field injection of carbon dioxide is to be performed in an Appalachian Basin coal seam by CONSOL Energy and CNX Gas later this year. A preliminary analysis of the migration of CO2 within the Upper Freeport coal seam and the resulting ground movements has been performed on the basis of assumed material and geometric parameters. Preliminary results show that ground movements at the field site may be in a range that are measurable by tiltmeter technology.

Bromhal, G.S.; Siriwardane, H.J.; Gondle, R.K.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Oil exploration and development in the North Dakota Williston Basin: 1981 update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article gives recent and historical development of the Williston Basin of North Dakota, along with numerous maps, oil and gas well data, and discoveries. Tabular data gives operators, fields, well depth, production, and producing horizons. The maps show locations of oil fields and new discoveries. Some information on production, taxes, profits and drilling activity is also given in graphical means. 14 figures, 3 tables.

Anderson, S.B.; Bluemle, J.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 104.0 Beam(m) 3.7 Depth(m) 4.6 Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 1.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 12' by 12' concrete slabs anchored to flume walls

270

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report Herb G. Sutter Michael Poirier Art W. Etchells Gary Smith Kris Thomas Jim J. Davis Paul Macbeth November 16, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009 ii Herbert G. Sutter, Team Lead Date Michael Poirier, Team Member Date Arthur W. Etchells, Team Member Date Gary Smith, Team Member Date Kris Thomas, Team Member Date Jim J. Davis, Team Member Date Paul Macbeth, Team Member Date Signatures 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009

271

Alden Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Alden Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Alden Research Laboratory, Inc Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 33.5 Beam(m) 21.3 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Depends on study Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 1.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 1.8 Wave Period Range(s) 1.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Period adjustable electronically, height adjustable mechanically Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Designed as needed using commercially available sand/sediment

272

Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

273

Flathead Basin Commission Act of 1983 (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act establishes the Flathead Basin Commission, the purpose of which is to protect the Flathead Lake aquatic environment, its waters, and surrounding lands and natural resources. The Commission...

274

The Uinta Basin Case Robert J. Bayer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overburden Tailings Oil Shale Mining Open Pit Underground Ex situ extraction Ex situ thermal conversion EIS for Oil Sands and Oil Shale Ongoing concerns with Basin-wide air quality Wildlife and wildlife

Utah, University of

275

Sheets Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sheets Wave Basin Sheets Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sheets Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Rhode Island Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 30.0 Beam(m) 3.6 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) $750(+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.0 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Pre-programmed for regular and irregular waves, but wavemaker is capable of any input motion. Wave Direction Uni-Directional

276

Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 38.1 Beam(m) 22.9 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $150/hour (excluding labor) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.3 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10.7 Wave Period Range(s) 3.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.2 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Directional, irregular, any spectrum, cnoidal or solitary wave Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Stone Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None

277

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Project: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Relining Lateral A – Preliminary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Nick Palacios. These engineers and managers with the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) have provided valuable feedback on the methodology and data, as well as insights on accommodating the requirements.../TCE economists to investigate the economic and conservation merits of capital renovation projects proposed by Rio Grande Basin Irrigation Districts. RGIDECON© facilitates integration and analysis of information pertaining to proposed projects’ costs, productive...

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

278

Assessment of undiscovered carboniferous coal-bed gas resources of the Appalachian Basin and Black Warrior Basin Provinces, 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the Appalachian basin, which extends almost continuously from New York to Alabama. In general, the basin includes three structural subbasins: the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi. For assessment purposes, the Appalachian basin was divided into two assessment provinces: the Appalachian Basin Province from New York to Alabama, and the Black Warrior Basin Province in Alabama and Mississippi. By far, most of the coalbed methane produced in the entire Appalachian basin has come from the Black Warrior Basin Province. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Milici, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mineralogy and organic petrology of oil shales in the Sangkarewang formation, Ombilin Basin, West Sumatra, Indonesia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Ombilin Basin, which lies in Sumatra Island, is one of the Tertiary basins in Indonesia. This basin contains a wide variety of rock units,… (more)

Fatimah, Fatimah

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Basin evolution, diagenesis and uranium mineralization in the PaleoproterozicThelon Basin,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin evolution, diagenesis and uranium mineralization in the PaleoproterozicThelon Basin, Nunavut,Canada Eric E. Hiatt,n Sarah E. Palmer,w1 T. Kurt Kyserw and Terrence K. O'Connorz n Geology Department, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh,Wisconsin, USA wDepartment of Geological Sciences and Engineering

Hiatt, Eric E.

283

DOE/EIS-0378-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0378-SA-01) (02/05/08)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 5, 2008 February 5, 2008 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmssion Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0378/SA-01) Mark Korsness Project Manager - TEP TPP-3 Proposed Action: Relocation of the marine exit hole for the horizontal directionally drilled (HDD) hole that would be drilled under the Proposed Action. Proposed by: Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP (Sea Breeze). Location: Port Angeles Harbor near Port Angeles, Washington. Background: As part of its proposed international transmission cable analyzed in the Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmssion Project EIS, Sea Breeze has proposed the drilling of a HDD hole to transition the cable from the sea bed of the Strait of Juan de Fuca to land. The HDD hole

284

Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

Wilson, T.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Crosswell seismic imaging in the Permian Basin, West Texas, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crosswell seismic imaging technology has advanced rapidly over the last three years as the processing methods have become more robust, the cost of data acquisition has fallen, and the interwell distances of operation have increased. The Permian Basin of west Texas, USA is proving to be an ideal environment in which to develop this technology because of the relatively low seismic attenuation of the carbonate-dominated lithology, the moderate well spacings in the large number of mature fields, and the unusually high number of reflecting horizons. Current technology permits us to operate in carbonates at well spacings on the order of 2000 ft (650 m) and to image P- and S-wave reflecting horizons on a scale of 8 to 25 ft (2.4 to 7.6 m). Crosswell technology is not limited to carbonates, although the majority of recent applications have been in this environment. We are involved in three separate crosswell experiments in the Permian Basin, each with unique objectives. The first experiment involves a CO{sub 2} pilot project in a Grayburg Formation reservoir on the eastern edge of the Central Basin Platform. Here we are attempting to characterize the reservoir at a scale unobtainable from 3-D surface seismic data and to image CO{sub 2} fronts directly. The second experiment deals with a waterflood in a Middle Clearfork Formation reservoir on the Eastern Shelf, where we are trying to explain the erratic response of adjacent wells to water injection. In the third project we are trying to image the structure and stratigraphy of subtle {open_quotes}anomalies{close_quotes} in 3-D surface seismic images of the Wolfcamp Formation.

Langan, R.T.; Harris, J.M.; Jensen, T.L. [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Field Mapping At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wesnousky, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wesnousky, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Steven Wesnousky, S. John Caskey, John W. Bell (2003) Recency Of Faulting And Neotechtonic Framework In The Dixie Valley Geothermal Field And Other Geothermal Fields Of The Basin And Range Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Field_Mapping_At_Dixie_Valley_Geothermal_Field_Area_(Wesnousky,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=510736" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here

287

Integrated study of Mississippian Lodgepole Waulsortian Mounds, Williston Basin, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waulsortian-type carbonate buildups in the Mississippian Lodgepole Formation, Williston Basin, constitute prolific oil reservoirs. Since the initial discovery in 1993, five fields have been discovered: Dickinson Field (Lodgepole pool); Eland Field; Duck Creek Field, Versippi Field; and Hiline Field. Cumulative production (October, 1995) is 2.32 million barrels of oil and 1.34 BCF gas, with only 69,000 barrels of water. Oil gravity ranges from 41.4 to 45.3 API. Both subsurface cores from these fields as well as outcrop (Bridget Range, Big Snowy and Little Belt Mountains, Montana) are composed of facies representing deposition in mound, reworked mound, distal reworked mound, proximal flank, distal flank, and intermound settings. Porosity values within the mound and reworked mound facies are up to 15%; permeability values (in places fracture-enhanced) are up to tens of Darcies. Geometries of the mounds are variable. Mound thicknesses in the subsurface range from approximately 130-325 feet (40-100 meters); in outcrop thicknesses range from less than 30 ft (9 m) to over 250 ft (76 m). Subsurface areal dimensions range from approximately 0.5 x 1.0 mi (0.8 x 1.6 km) to 3.5 x 5.5 mi (5.6 x 8.8 km). Integration of seismic data with core and well-log models sheds light on the exploration for Lodgepole mounds. Seismic modeling of productive mounds in the Dickinson and Eland fields identifies characteristics useful for exploration, such as local thickening of the Lodgepole to Three Forks interval. These observations are confirmed in reprocessed seismic data across Eland field and on regional seismic data. Importantly, amplitude versus offset modeling identifies problems with directly detecting and identifying porosity within these features with amplitude analyses. In contrast, multicomponent seismic data has great potential for imaging these features and quantifying porous zones within them.

Kupecz, J.A.; Arestad, J.F.; Blott, J. E. [Kupecz and Associates, Ltd., Denver, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Williston in the family of cratonic basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Williston basin is one of a clan of subcircular to elliptical elements in the interiors of all cratons; such basins are distinguished by characteristics common to all. In each, the basement consists of continental crust and each basin is surrounded by areas of continental crust. Subsidence rates are typically low, so that conditions near depositional base level prevailed during much of the history of sediment accumulation. Episodic subsidence occurred over time spans of 10/sup 7/-10/sup 8/ years; major episodes of subsidence are broadly concurrent on all cratons. Tectonic tempo and mode of subsidence evolved synchronously on all cratons; therefore, similar isopach and facies patterns (and similar oil or gas maturation, migration, and trap potentials) occur on all cratons. All members of the clan exhibit a range of individual variations imposed by latitude and climate. Intraplate tectonism and volcanism, approach to or distance from source areas, and distribution paths of detrital sediment. Nevertheless, facts and concepts developed by intensive study of basins with high-density documentation (outcrop and subsurface) are commonly applicable to basins such as the Williston, which is in a less mature stage of exploration.

Sloss, L.L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - athabasca basin western Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thelon Basin Boomerang Lake Western Thelon Basin Eastern Thelon... to the world-class uranium-producing Athabasca basin. At present, the Thelon basin is only known to host......

290

DOE/EIS-0355 Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

II II Appendices A-H U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah Final Environmental Impact Statement i Contents Page Volume II Appendix A, Biological Assessment/Screening Level Risk Assessment/Biological Opinion Appendix A1, Biological Assessment A1-1.0 Introduction ..............................................................................................................A1-1 A1-2.0 Species Evaluated.....................................................................................................A1-3 A1-2.1 Critical Habitat..................................................................................................A1-3 A1-3.0 Consultation to Date.................................................................................................A1-4

291

Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida W $38.51 W $140.84 27.3% 134 W 100.0% Florida W $38.51 W $140.84 27.3% 134 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - W W W - W Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W $16.14 W $63.35 25.5% 1,681 W 88.5% Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $20.69 $19.60 -5.3% $74.23 26.4% 4,845 31.9% 97.7% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $13.74 $16.13 17.4% $99.82 16.2% 840 32.1% 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W $40.18 W $94.03 42.7% 699 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Jersey W $32.44 W $89.13 36.4% 1,064 W 47.6% Northern Appalachian Basin New York $21.87 $18.86 -13.8% $59.40 31.7% 2,373 49.3% 91.9%

292

Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware W $28.49 W $131.87 21.6% 59 W 100.0% Delaware W $28.49 W $131.87 21.6% 59 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin Florida W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W $20.35 W $64.82 31.4% 1,715 W 75.9% Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $19.73 $19.64 -0.4% $81.15 24.2% 4,650 24.8% 99.3% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan W $14.02 W $76.22 18.4% 713 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W $43.43 W $90.90 47.8% 499 W 89.6% Northern Appalachian Basin New Jersey W $27.19 W $74.81 36.3% 1,864 W 44.1% Northern Appalachian Basin New York $20.08 $15.26 -24.0% $53.68 28.4% 3,726 39.2% 79.1%

293

Strontium isotopic study of subsurface brines from Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The abundance of the radiogenic isotope /sup 87/Sr in a subsurface brine can be used as a tracer of brine origin, evolution, and diagenetic effects. The authors have determined the /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of over 60 oil-field waters from the Illinois basin, where brine origin is perplexing because of the absence of any significant evaporite strata. Initially, they analyzed brines from 15 petroleum-producing sandstone and carbonate units; waters from Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian strata have /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios in the range 0.7079-0.7108. All but those from the Ste. Genevieve Limestone (middle Mississippian) are more radiogenic in /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr than seawater values for this interval of geologic time. The detrital source of the more radiogenic /sup 87/Sr may be the New Albany Shale group, considered to be a major petroleum source rock in the basin. The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of Ste. Genevieve brines apparently evolved without a contribution from fluid-shale interaction.

hetherington, E.A.; Stueber, A.M.; Pushkar, P.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Sediment Basin Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sediment Basin Flume Sediment Basin Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sediment Basin Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 22.7 Beam(m) 5.1 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Two pumps provide up to 18 cfs of flow capacity Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Available Sensors Acoustics, Flow, Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time Yes Test Services Test Services Yes On-Site fabrication capability/equipment Machine shop, carpenter shop, welding shop, instrumentation and electronics shop

295

Dan Klempel Basin Electric Power Cooperative DOE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dan Dan Klempel Basin Electric Power Cooperative DOE 2009 Congestion Study Workshop Oklahoma City, Oklahoma June 18, 2008 Page 1 of 5 Basin Electric Power Cooperative would like to thank the Department of Energy for this opportunity to share some of our thoughts on transmission congestion issues. Basin Electric is a wholesale power supplier to rural electric cooperatives located in the mid-west and in both the east and west interconnections. Naturally, our generation and transmission facilities also reside in both interconnections so we use asynchronous back-to-back DC facilities to balance loads with resources. With headquarters in Bismarck, North Dakota; we find ourselves in the heart of some of the nations most desirable wind patterns for potential renewable energy development as well as electric energy production from more traditional sources. Lignite coal has been a reliable

296

Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin 2 Wave Basin 2 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Length(m) 48.8 Beam(m) 26.5 Depth(m) 2.1 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Built to client specifications, currently rigid concrete over gravel fill

297

REGIONAL PARADOX FORMATION STRUCTURE AND ISOCHORE MAPS, BLANDING SUB-BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field (figure 1). However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan; Thomas C. Chidsey Jr.; David E. Eby

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Southern Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basin and Range Geothermal Region Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} North-south-striking and west-dipping Basin and Range province normal faults form the western edge of the Sierra Madre Occidental plateau in northeastern Sonora. These faults and associated half-grabens extend over a distance of more than 300 km between the San Bernardino basin in the north and the Sahuaripa basin in the south. Active Tectonics of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (Southern Basin and Range Province) and the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.4 Earthquake [1] References ↑ "Active Tectonics of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (Southern Basin and Range Province) and the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.4 Earthquake"

299

Sources of Atmospheric Moisture for the La Plata River Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The La Plata River basin (LPRB) is the second largest basin of South America and extends over a highly populated and socioeconomically active region. In this study, the spatiotemporal variability of sources of moisture for the LPRB are quantified ...

J. Alejandro Martinez; Francina Dominguez

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Improvement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore reparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Colorado Division of Water Resources Denver Basin Webpage | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Denver Basin Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Division of Water Resources Denver Basin Webpage Abstract This is the...

302

Radionuclide transport from yucca Mountain and Inter-basin Flow in Death Valley  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrodynamics and the U.S. Geological survey conducted studies to evaluate far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, of radionuclide into Inyo County from Yucca Mountain, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Our oversight and completed Cooperative Agreement research, and a number of other investigators research indicate that there is groundwater flow between the alluvial and carbonate aquifers both at Yucca Mountain and in Inyo County. The specific purpose of our research was to acquire geological, subsurface geology, and hydrologic data to: 1. Establish the existence of inter-basin flow between the Amargosa Basin and Death Valley Basin, 2. Characterize groundwater flow paths in the LCA through Southern Funeral Mountain Range, and 3. Evaluate the hydraulic connection between the Yucca Mountain repository and the major springs in Death Valley through the LCA. 4. Evaluate the hydraulic connection between the Yucca Mountain repository and Franklin Lake Playa. The hydraulic characterization of the LCA is of critical interest to Inyo County and the U.S. Department of Energy because: 1. The upward gradient in the LCA at Yucca Mountain provides a natural barrier to radionuclide transport, 2. The LCA is a necessary habitat resource for the endangered Devil's Hole pup fish, and 3. The LCA is the primary water supply and source of water to the major springs in Death Valley National Park. This paper presents the results of our study program to evaluate if inter-basin flow exists between the Amargosa and Death Valley Basins through the LCA. The study presents the results of our structural geology analysis of the Southern Funeral Mountain range, geochemical source analysis of spring waters in the region, and a numerical groundwater model to simulate inter-basin flow in the Southern Funeral Mountain range. (authors)

Bredehoeft, J. [The Hydrodynamics Group (United States); Fridrich, C. [U.S. Geological Survey-Denver (United States); King, C.HG.M. [The Hydrodynamics Group, LLC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Microsoft Word - MRCSP Michigan Basin 2009 FactSheet _11-09_.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 2009 November 2009 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42589 DOE/NETL Project Manager: Traci Rodosta, Traci.Rodosta@NETL.DOE.GOV Submitted by Battelle November 2009 Michigan Basin Geologic Test, Otsego County Michigan Principal Investigator Dave Ball, Battelle (614-424-4901; balld@battelle.org) Test Location Charlton 30/31 Field, Otsego County, Michigan Amount and Source of CO 2 Approx. 60,000 metric tons Source = DTE Turtle Lake Gas Processing Plant, Otsego Co., Michigan Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) DTE Energy (Detroit Edison) Core Energy LLC

304

NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

305

Lithosphere structure beneath the Phanerozoic intracratonic basins of North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Four intracratonic basins of North America, the Hudson Bay, Michigan, Illinois and Williston. The Williston and Illinois basins are associated with wide (V200 km) and thin anomalies (V100 km), whereas basin and 270 km beneath the Williston [4,6]. For two ba- sins of similar age located on the same Precam

Kaminski, Edouard

306

BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, WILLISTON BASIN By D.J. Nichols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter WB BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, WILLISTON BASIN By D.J. Nichols in U.S. Geological Survey Professional .........................................................................................................WB-3 Figures WB-1. Biostratigraphic reference sections in the Williston Basin. WB-2. Occurrences. Palynostratigraphic zones of the Paleocene in the Williston Basin composite reference section. WB-4. Distribution

307

Hydrocarbon potential of Spearfish Formation in eastern Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 36 million bbl of oil have been produced from stratigraphic traps in sandstones of the Triassic-Jurassic Spearfish Formation in the eastern part of the Williston basin. Newburg field has produced 32 million bbl of oil and Waskada field, discovered in 1980, is estimated to have over 10 million bbl of oil in reserves. A binocular microscopic and petrographic examination of cores from each of the fields has revealed considerable differences in the characteristics of producing sandstones. Cores and sample cuttings from 30 wells in the US and Canada form the basis for this comparison of the two fields. The Spearfish Formation consists of porous, permeable, well-sorted, very fine-grained sandstones with a sucrosic dolomite matrix that are interbedded with impermeable sandstones, siltstones, and shale. The environment of deposition is believed to be the intertidal zone (tidal flat). Sediments of the Spearfish Formation were deposited by a transgressive sea on an eroded Mississippian carbonate section. Oil found in the Spearfish sandstones is derived from the Mississippian.

Dodge C.J.N.; Reid, F.S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume II. Palo Duro basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and high variable precipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume I. Dalhart Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and highly variable prcipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Timing and Tectonic implications of basin inversion in the Nam Con Son Basin and adjacent areas, southern South China Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Malay basins. Contraction in the Western NCS, West Natuna, and Malay basins was accommodated through reactivation of major basin-bounding fault systems that resulted in asymmetric fault-bend folding of syn- and early post-rift strata. Inversion...

Olson, Christopher Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Tobacco vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers Tobacco use vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tobacco vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers 1 Tobacco use vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers: Self-medication in humans? Casey J-546-9257 #12;Tobacco vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers 2 Summary

312

OTRC Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OTRC Wave Basin OTRC Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name OTRC Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (OTRC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 45.7 Beam(m) 30.5 Depth(m) 5.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $300/hour (excluding labor) Special Physical Features 4.6m wide x 9.1m long x 16.8m deep pit with adjustable depth floor in test area Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.6 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.9 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 4.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 25 Wave Period Range(s) 4.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.6 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description GEDAP 3D wave generation software, 48 hinged flap wave generator

313

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The State of the Columbia River Basin in 2012 07 Northwest Energy Efficiency Achievements, 1978-2011 10 Council undertakes mid-term review of Sixth Power Plan 11 Energy Efficiency met most of the new and Commerce United states House of representatives and Committee on Natural resources United states House

314

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Washington. The Act authorized the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish Overview 11 Sixth Northwest Power Plan boosts energy efficiency, renewable energy, Energy efficiency

315

GUNNISON BASIN CLIMATE CHANGE VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change is already changing ecosystems and affecting people in the southwestern United States, as well as ecosystem services, e.g., water supply. The climate of the Gunnison Basin, Colorado Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, Upper Gunnison River Water Conservancy District, Western

Neff, Jason

316

Summary - K Basins Sludge Treatment Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basin K Basin DOE is Proces the va at Han subsys oxidati objecti of-fact maturi Eleme Techn The as which seven * M * M * Pr * Pr * As The Ele Site: H roject: K P Report Date: A ited States Why DOE ns Sludge Treatme s constructing ss (STP) for re rious sludge st nford. The STP stems: sludge ion, assay, pac ive of the asse t" appraisal of t ty by first ident ents (CTEs) of t ology Readine What th ssessment team was further div CTEs and the Material Mobiliza Material Transfe rocess Chemis rocess Instrum ssay (TRL=2) To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP K Basins Slud Process/STP August 2007 Departmen K Bas E-EM Did This ent Process Flow D a K Basins Slu trieving, treatin treams stored i P is comprised containerizatio ckaging, and dr ssment was to the project's ov

317

Coalbed methane technology development in the Appalachian basin. Topical Report, July 1989-October 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the field-based research is to determine the applicability of the current coalbed methane technology to the production of gas from the Appalachian Basin coal resource. Related objectives are to: (1) provide techniques to characterize and hydraulically stimulate this resource; (2) predict and measure gas production and correlate with assumed production mechanisms; (3) disseminate information learned to interested parties; and (4) recommend further research to optimize production from this resource.

Hunt, A.M.; Steele, D.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Structural characterization of the Emperor and Halley fields, Winkler County, West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Halley and Emperor fields, Winkler County, West Texas, are located along the western margin of the Central Basin Platform (CBP), a late Paleozoic fault-bounded structural high in the Permian Basin. Well data, regional 2D seismic lines, and a 3 D...

Leone, John Vincent

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

Nitrogen gas emissions from stormwater retention basins during wet weather events in the Phoenix Metropolitan area: an additional ecosystem service?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrogen gas emissions from stormwater retention basins during wet weather events in the Phoenix Special thanks to all of our field and lab help: Rebecca Hale, Stevan Earl, Bony Ahmed, Lin Ye, Jolene. Samples were then taken throughout the day to assess water concentrations and gas losses (see photos

Hall, Sharon J.

320

Laboratory Evaluation of Base Materials for Neutralization of the Contaminated Aquifer at the F-Area Seepage Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory studies were performed to support field-testing of base injection into the F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater. The general purpose of these experiments is to provide information to guide the test of base injection and to identify potential adverse effects.

Serkiz, S.M.

2001-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Development of coalbed methane in Mississippi Warrior Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1980, over 3,863 coalbed methane wells have been drilled in the Warrior basin of Alabama at a drilling cost of $1.138 billion. Production of 119 bcf of gas has been sold. The important findings of this study were probable coalbeds across Monroe County at depths and thicknesses being produced profitably in Alabama as well as in the Northern Appalachian and Central Appalachian basins. The logs showed the coal to often be close to conventional gas reservoirs in sandstone, indicating a probable equilibrium gas content of the adjacent coals. The most prevalent depth of the coal seams was 1,600-1,800 ft across northeast Monroe County from near the Alabama state line in the Splunge Field to the Four Mile Creek Field near the Tombigbee River. Individual seam thickness ranged up to 11 ft. Cumulative thickness of all coal in a single well was a maximum of 30 ft in the 1,000 ft to 2,000 ft interval usually logged. These estimates were based on density, compensated neutron, caliper, and gamma ray logs. A core hole would be necessary to verify exact thicknesses, presence of a seam, gas content, and permeability of the coal seams. It is stressed that conventional well logs have limitations, but they are a valid first estimate of the potential of an area. The subject study also verified the discovery of coal in Clay County reported by the Mississippi Bureau of Geology in 1989. Also, deep-lying coals were observed on logs of single wells in Noxubee, Oktibbeha, and Lowndes Counties, where one deep well had a cumulative 72 ft of coal indicated. Although beyond the reach of industry now, technology of the coalbed methane process is progressing toward eventually managing coal at those depths.

Rogers, R.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

K Basin sludge dissolution engineering study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this engineering study is to investigate the available technology related to dissolution of the K Basin sludge in nitric acid. The conclusion of this study along with laboratory and hot cell tests with actual sludge samples will provide the basis for beginning conceptual design of the sludge dissolver. The K Basin sludge contains uranium oxides, fragments of metallic U, and some U hydride as well as ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum oxides and hydroxides, windblown sand that infiltrated the basin enclosure, ion exchange resin, and miscellaneous materials. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be conditioned so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System waste acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the underground storage tanks. Sludge conditioning will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and then reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. There will be five distinct feed streams to the sludge conditioning process two from the K East (KE) Basin and three from the K West (KW) Basin. The composition of the floor and pit sludges which contain more iron oxides and sand than uranium is much different than the canister sludges which are composed of mostly uranium oxides. The sludge conditioning equipment will be designed to process all of the sludge streams, but some of the operating parameters will be adjusted as necessary to handle the different sludge stream compositions. The volume of chemical additions and the amount of undissolved solids will be much different for floor and pit sludge than for canister sludge. Dissolution of uranium metal and uranium dioxide has been studied quite thoroughly and much information is available. Both uranium metal and uranium dioxide have been dissolved on a large scale in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in Europe, Japan, and the USA. Ash and sludge containing uranium compounds also have been dissolved in reprocessing or plutonium scrap recovery plants, but only a limited amount of information is available on how the ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum compounds and silicates in the sand will behave during nitric acid dissolution. Laboratory work with simulants and hot cell work with actual K Basin sludge is in progress to obtain data in these areas.

Westra, A.G.

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

Gravity-driven structures and rift basin evolution: Rio Muni Basin, offshore equatorial West Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Offshore Equatorial Guinea, west Africa, gravity-driven nappes, more than 1 km thick and 15 km from head to toe, provide key evidence in reconstructing the late synrift: evolution of this part of the South Atlantic margin basin system. Furthermore, Aptian-Cenomanian carbonate and clastic rocks in the nappes` allochthonous hanging walls are attracting interest as a new exploration play in west Africa. The nappes exhibit a range of geometries that suggest they share many of the same deformation processes as thin-skin thrust and linked extensional fault systems. Not only are these structures significant in their own right, representing a rare example of gravity tectonics in the virtual absence of major halokinesis, but their presence may record an other-wise undetectable process active during the transition from a rift basin to a passive continental margin. A review of Equatorial Guinea in its pre-Atlantic configuration, alongside neighboring basins in Brazil (the Sergipe-Alagoas basin) and Gabon, suggests that gravity gliding was sustained by a relatively steep, westward paleoslope promoted by east-ward offset of the locus of thermal uplift from the rift basin (i.e., a simple shear model of basin formation). In contrast to gravity-driven structures in most postrift settings, the Equatorial Guinea nappes developed at the close of the Aptian-Albian synrift episode in response to a growing bathymetric deep caused by rapid subsidence outpacing restricted sedimentation.

Turner, J.P. [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Systems Integrator Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 1961 State Delaware Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Project Review Section The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states (Pennsylvania, New York, New

325

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Rappahannock River Basin Commission The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity

326

Seismic stratigraphy and structure of the Progreso Basin, Ecuador  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Watkins Examination of seismic, well log and magnetic data across the Progreso Basin shows that more than 5. 5 km of sediment has been deposited in the basin with a thick sedimentary wedge io the east. The basin, bounded by two prominent normal faults... and the La Cruz fault a small sub-basin l, as been formed with considerable deposition onlv during the iast period of basin developnient. Facies, structurah isochron and velocity maps were produced for each of the five units identified on the seismic...

Goyes Arroyo, Patricio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through regional and interstate

328

UNlllERSIDAD DE PUERTO RICO, RECINTO DE CIENCIAS MEDICAS PO BOX ~7 SAN JUAN PA ~~ .TEl7B7.758-2525 EXI: 171 SECRETARiA JUNTA ADMINISTRATIVA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNlllERSIDAD DE PUERTO RICO, RECINTO DE CIENCIAS MEDICAS PO BOX ~7 SAN JUAN PA ~~ .TEl7B7AZ, SecretariaEjecutiva de la Junta Administrativa del Recintode CienciasMedicas de la Universidad de Puerto Rico y acechol' del Recinto de Ciencias Medicas y luego de la discusion de rigor, ACORO6: APROBAR la

Quirk, Gregory J.

329

Study of gas production potential of New Albany Shale (group) in the Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) is recognized as both a source rock and gas-producing reservoir in the Illinois basin. The first gas discovery was made in 1885, and was followed by the development of several small fields in Harrison County, Indiana, and Meade County, Kentucky. Recently, exploration for and production of New Albany gas has been encouraged by the IRS Section 29 tax credit. To identify technology gaps that have restricted the development of gas production form the shale gas resource in the basin, the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC), composed of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geological surveys, is conducting a cooperative research project with the Gas Research Institute (GRI). An earlier study of the geological and geochemical aspects of the New Albany was conducted during 1976-1978 as part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The current IBC/GRI study is designed to update and reinterpret EGSP data and incorporate new data obtained since 1978. During the project, relationships between gas production and basement structures are being emphasized by constructing cross sections and maps showing thickness, structure, basement features, and thermal maturity. The results of the project will be published in a comprehensive final report in 1992. The information will provide a sound geological basis for ongoing shale-gas research, exploration, and development in the basin.

Hasenmueller, N.R.; Boberg, W.S.; Comer, J.; Smidchens, Z. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States)); Frankie, W.T.; Lumm, D.K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, J.D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Economic Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Powder River Basin Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unminable coalbeds are potentially large storage reservoirs for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and offer the benefit of enhanced methane production, which can offset some of the costs associated with CO2 sequestration. The objective of this paper is to study the economic feasibility of CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. Economic analyses of CO2 injection options are compared. Results show that injecting flue gas to recover methane from CBM fields is marginally economical; however, this method will not significantly contribute to the need to sequester large quantities of CO2. Separating CO2 from flue gas and injecting it into the unminable coal zones of the Powder River Basin seam is currently uneconomical, but can effectively sequester over 86,000 tons (78,200 tonne) of CO2 per acre while recovering methane to offset costs. The cost to separate CO2 from flue gas was identified as the major cost driver associated with CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams. Improvements in separations technology alone are unlikely to drive costs low enough for CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin to become economically viable. Breakthroughs in separations technology could aid the economics, but in the Powder River Basin they cannot achieve the necessary cost reductions for breakeven economics without incentives.

Eric P. Robertson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Subsurface stratigraphy and depositional history of Madison Limestone (Mississippian), Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cyclic carbonate-evaporite deposits of the Madison Limestone (Mississippian) in the Williston basin are made up of four main facies. From basin to shelf, the normal facies transition is from offshore deeper water (Lodgepole) facies to crinoidal-algal banks and back-bank fine carbonate, evaporite, and minor terrigenous clastic beds on the shallow shelf. Five major depositional cycles are correlated and mapped on the basis of shaley marker beds identified on gamma-ray-neutron or gamma-ray-sonic logs. The marker beds are interpreted as reworked and redistributed silt and clay-size sediments originally deposited, possibly by eolian processes, on the emergent shelf during low sea level phases of cycle development. From oldest to youngest, the first two cycles are characterized by increasing amounts of crinoidal-bioclastic and oolite-algal carbonates, culminating in the Mission Canyon facies of the middle cycle. The upper two cycles are characterized by increasing amounts of evaporite deposits, culminating in the Charles salt facies of the youngest cycle. Much of the Madison section on the south and east flanks of the basin consists of dolomite. Dolomite content decreased toward the basin center, where a major share of Madison petroleum production is located. Reservoir beds in the oil fields are primarily partially dolomitized oolite-algal or crinoidal-bioclastic bank carbonates. Most of the productive petroleum reservoirs are located in the middle cycles of the Madison.

Peterson, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Top-down and bottom-up estimates of CO2 storage capacity in the United Kingdom sector of the southern North Sea basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...formations oil and gas fields, if any...on the injection strategy, the reservoir properties...except in oil- and gas-bearing regions...Combined Cycle Gas Turbine power plant. Their...has been a prolific gas-producing basin...gas fields under development. This is realistic...

Sam Holloway; Ceri J. Vincent; Michelle S. Bentham; Karen L. Kirk

333

Gas potential of new Albany shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study to update and evaluate publicly available data relating to present and potential gas production from New Albany Shale in the Illinois basin was conducted cooperatively by the Indiana. Illinois, and Kentucky geological surveys (Illinois Basin Consortium), and was partially funded by the Gas Research Institute. Deliverables included a plate of stratigraphic cross sections and six basin-wide maps at a scale of 1:1,000,000. The New Albany Shale is an organic-rich brownish black shale present throughout the Illinois basin. Gas potential of the New Albany Shale may be great because it contains an estimated 86 tcf of natural gas and has produced modest volumes since 1858 from more than 60 fields, mostly in the southeastern part of the basin. Reservoir beds include organic-rich shales of the Grassy Creek (Shale), Clegg Creek, and Blocher (Shale) members. Limited geologic and carbon isotope data indicate that the gas is indigenous and thermogenic. T[sub max] data suggest that the gas generation begins at R[sub o] values of 0.53% and may begin at R[sub 0] values as low as 0.41% in some beds. New Albany Shale reservoirs contain both free gas in open-pore space and gas adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. Natural fracturing is essential for effective reservoir permeability. Fractures are most common near structures such as faults, flexures, and buried carbonate banks. Based on limited data, fractures and joints have preferred orientations of 45-225[degrees] and 135-315[degrees]. Commercial production requires well stimulation to connect the well bore with the natural fracture system and to prop open pressure-sensitive near-borehole fractures. Current stimulations employ hydraulic fracture treatments using nitrogen and foam, with sand as a propping agent.

Comer, J.B.; Hasenmueller, N.R. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, IN (United States)); Frankie, W.T. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Hydrocarbon potential of basins along Australia's southern margin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven discrete sedimentary basins are recognized along the southern margin of the Australian continent; namely, from east to west, the Gippsland, Bass, Sorell, Otway, Duntroon, Bight, and Bremer. All formed since the Late Jurassic in response to the separation of Australia and Antarctica, and to the opening of the Tasman Sea. Only the Gippsland basin, which has proved initial oil reserves exceeding 3.6 billion barrels, is a prolific oil province. The search for oil in the other basins has been virtually fruitless despite many similarities between these basins and the Gippsland in terms of stratigraphy and structural geology. Rift and drift components are discernible in the sedimentary successions of all basins but the precise tectonic controls on respective basin formation remain conjectural. The lack of drilling success in the Bremer, Bight, Duntroon, Otway, and Sorell basins has been attributed mainly to the paucity of mature, oil-prone source rocks. The common occurrence of stranded bitumens along the entire coastline, however, indicates oil generation. The Bass and Gippsland basins are both characterized by excellent oil-prone source rocks developed in Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary sediments. Limited exploration success in the Bass basin is due to poorer reservoir development. The Gippsland basin is at a mature stage of exploration whereas the other basins are moderately to very sparsely explored. Consequently, there is a comparable potential for undiscovered hydrocarbons in all basins. Success in the under-explored basins will come only to those prepared to challenge the perception of low prospectivity. Many play types remain to be tested by the drill.

Willink, R.J. (SAGASCO Resources Limited, Adelaide (Australia))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Why Sequencea Near-Shore Anoxic Basin?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a Near-Shore Anoxic Basin? a Near-Shore Anoxic Basin? Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs; areas of low dissolved oxygen concentrations) play a major role in biogeochemical cycling within the world's oceans. They are major sinks for nitrogen and sources for the gases carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide. Microbially mediated biological activity associated with these systems affects the productivity of the deep blue sea and the balance of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Thus, studies aimed at evaluating the phylogenetic variation and metabolic capacity of microbial communities within these systems have great promise to enhance our understanding of the patterns and processes that drive global biogeochemical phenomena in both aquatic and atmospheric compartments of the biosphere. To this end, JGI and

336

Depositional environment of Red Fork sandstones, deep Anadarko Basin, western Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Moore (1979) and Evans (1979) Page Regional structure on top of the Red Fork Formation in the deep Anadarko basin of west-central Oklahoma showing locations of cored wells and fields. Typical gamma-ray log character of the two main Red Fork... Clinton Field, Custer County, Oklahoma. Line A-A' is the location of the stratigraphic cross section (Fig. 18) . Contour interval 50 ft (15. 7 m) 48 17 Net sand isopach of the upper part of the Red Fork sandstones snowing the channel-like trends...

Whiting, Philip Howard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hydrothermal circulation in an anisotropic sedimentary basin: Application to the Okinawa back arc basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors explore the pattern of two-dimensional convection in an highly anisotropical porous medium. This physical situation is relevant to passive margin sedimentary basins consisting of interbedded coarse-grained pervious and shale matrix. They show that permeability anisotropies of the order of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} allow for long convective cells, of aspect ratio greater than 10, but that a combination of this parameter with a slight slope of the order of a few percent of the sedimentary layers is required to stabilize these long cells. As an example, they present the Okinawa basin, an active submarine back arc basin, with a sedimentary thickness of about 2 km and a heat flow profile across this basin, varying from 32 to 232 mWm{sup {minus}2} over a distance of 30 km. It is shown that this heat flow variation is difficult to explain with conductive mechanisms only but is well reproduced by different convective models relying on permeability anisotropy plus slope. Although the insufficient thermal and structural constraints did not allow them to build a unique model, the whole set of possible fits to the heat flow data may restrict the mean hydraulic parameters of the basin. A vertical permeability of a few tens of milidarcy and an anisotropy greater than 100 are required to produce the expected stable and active large-scale circulation. It is suggested in conclusion that this type of circulation might be active in oil- or oil-forming element migration.

Genthon, P.; Rabinowicz, M. (Groupe de Recherches de Geodesie, Spatiale (France)); Foucher, J.P.; Sibuet, J.C. (Inst. Francais de Recherches pour l'Exploitation de la Mer, Plouzane (France))

1990-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

338

Juan E Santos: Publications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonconforming finite element methods for the simulation of waves in viscoelastic ... On the solution of an inverse scattering problem in seismic while-drilling technology. ... Numerical methods in applied science and industry (Torino, 1990).

339

RIFLE TO SAN JUAN  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

i c North we s t Laboratori e s , R i c h l a n d , Wa s h i n g ton . J u l y 1 9 8 1 . Ph i l l i p s , R . D . , et al . E f fe c t s o f El ectri c F i e l d s o n La rge An i...

340

K Basin sludge treatment process description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K East (KE) and K West (KW) fuel storage basins at the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site contain sludge on the floor, in pits, and inside fuel storage canisters. The major sources of the sludge are corrosion of the fuel elements and steel structures in the basin, sand intrusion from outside the buildings, and degradation of the structural concrete that forms the basins. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be treated so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the double-shell waste tanks. The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office accepted a recommendation by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., to chemically treat the sludge. Sludge treatment will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. A truck will transport the resulting slurry to an underground storage tank (most likely tank 241-AW-105). The undissolved solids will be treated to reduce the transuranic (TRU) and content, stabilized in grout, and transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) for disposal. This document describes a process for dissolving the sludge to produce waste streams that meet the TWRS acceptance criteria for disposal to an underground waste tank and the ERDF acceptance criteria for disposal of solid waste. The process described is based on a series of engineering studies and laboratory tests outlined in the testing strategy document (Flament 1998).

Westra, A.G.

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eastern Ivory Coast, off Benin and western Nigeria, and off the Brazilian conjugates of these areas), while large areas were subjected to transform rifting (northern Sierra Leone, southern Liberia, Ghana and the Brazilian conjugates of these areas...). The future Demerara-Guinea marginal plateaus were also progressively subjected to this new rifting event. Stage 2: In Aptian times, the progress of rifting resulted in the creation of small divergent Basins (off northern Liberia, eastern Ivory Coast, Benin...

Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

Heat Flow in the Hungarian Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the basin is deep and the gradient is between 40 and 45 C/km. This geothermal low may be characterized by 1-4-1-6 [jical/cm2 sec except if ... is about 1*5 sec can bo considered as the Western boundary of the Hungarian geothermal anomaly, since heat flow diminishes from that line in the north-west direction to ...

T. BOLDIZSÁR

1964-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

343

A Calibrated Maxey-Eakin Curve for the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin, which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Recharge rates are estimated on the basis that some fraction of annual precipitation will recharge, and that fraction will increase with increasing elevation. This results in a hypothetical curve relating annual groundwater recharge to annual precipitation. Field validation of recharge rates is critical in order to establish credibility to any estimate. This is due to the fact that the Maxey-Eakin model is empirical. An empirical model is derived from practical experience rather than basic theory. Therefore, a validated Maxey-Eakin model in one groundwater basin does not translate to a different one. In the WRD's Maxey-Eakin model, they used a curve calibrated against three locations in western Nevada and applied it to the Fenner Basin. It is of particular importance to note that all three of the WRD's location are west of longitude 116{sup o}W, where annual precipitation is significantly lower. Therefore, The WRD's Maxey-Eakin curve was calibrated to a drier climate, and its application to the Fenner Basin lacks credibility.

Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Coalbed methane exploration in the Lorraine Basin, France  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DuPont Conoco Hydrocarbures has been involved in a Coalbed Methane (CBM) project in France since 1991. Coalbed methane exploration differs noticeably in several aspects from conventional oil and gas exploration. This paper is divided in three parts and discusses some geological, reservoir and drilling considerations relevant to the exploration and appraisal of a coalbed methane prospect. The first part presents geological issues such as data collection and evaluation of its associated value, building expertise to create a geological and geophysical model integrating the work of a multidisciplinary team, and assessing uncertainties of the data interpretation. A short review of the basin activity, geological and tectonic setting, and environment aspects is presented in order to illustrate some CBM exploration issues. The second part describes a comprehensive coalbed methane reservoir data acquisition program incorporating coal sample optical and chemical analyses, gas sample chromatography, canister desorption, fracture density of coal cores, and measurement of in-situ coal permeability and bounding-strata stress. Field practical concerns are then discussed such as on-site and off-site canister desorption, gas sample collection, rapid estimation of gas content, ash content, total bed moisture, and finally well testing alternatives for permeability and rock stress determination. The third part reviews drilling issues such as drilling and coring options for core hole size and casing size, rig site equipment requirements for continuous coring operations, including mud treatment equipment, core handling material and core work stations, alliance of national and foreign drilling contractors to optimize equipment and experience, and finally overview of coring procedures to identify best practices for pending operations. The paper is derived from Conoco`s experience in CBM exploration in the Lorraine Basin, North East of France.

Michaud, B. [DuPont Conoco Hydrocarbures, Paris (France); Briens, F.; Girdler, D.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. One the reservoir-characterization study of both field is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to: (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area; (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments; and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill well will be drilled and cored. Technical progress is summarized for: geophysical characterization; reservoir characterization; outcrop characterization; and producibility problem characterization.

Dutton, S.P.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Short Reversal of the Palaeomagnetic Field about 280 000 Years Ago at Long Valley, California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A reversal of the palaeomagnetic field is recorded in exposed lake sediments at Long Valley and Mono Basin in east-central California. ... reversal is estimated to be several thousand years long and 280 000 years...

Joseph C. Liddicoat; Roy A. Bailey

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Details Activities (9) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: We apply a new method to target potential geothermal resources on the regional scale in the Great Basin by seeking relationships between geologic structures and GPS-geodetic observations of regional tectonic strain. First, we establish a theoretical basis for underst~dingh ow the rate of fracture opening can be related to the directional trend of faults

348

Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (48) Power Plants (8) Projects (15) Techniques (33) The Basin and Range Province in northwestern Nevada and northeastern California is characterized by late Cretaceous - early Cenozoic regional erosion, Oligocene - Miocene volcanism, and subsequent late Miocene extension. Extensional faulting in northwestern Nevada began everywhere at 12 Ma and has continued up to the present. Faulting in the Warner Range in northeastern California can only be constrained to have begun between 14 and 3 Ma, but may represent westward migration of Basin and Range extension during the Pliocene. Compared to the many parts of the Basin and Range in

349

Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The objective of this ongoing project is the development of a representative geochemical database for a comprehensive range of elemental and isotopic parameters (i.e., beyond the typical data suite) for a range of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Development of this database is one of the first steps in understanding the nature of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Of particular importance in the Great Basin is utilizing

350

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of River Protection K Basin Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Emergency Management program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

351

Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Storage: Regulatory and Capacity Implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial-scale injection of CO{sub 2} into saline sedimentary basins will cause large-scale fluid pressurization and migration of native brines, which may affect valuable groundwater resources overlying the deep sequestration reservoirs. In this paper, we discuss how such basin-scale hydrologic impacts can (1) affect regulation of CO{sub 2} storage projects and (2) may reduce current storage capacity estimates. Our assessment arises from a hypothetical future carbon sequestration scenario in the Illinois Basin, which involves twenty individual CO{sub 2} storage projects in a core injection area suitable for long-term storage. Each project is assumed to inject five million tonnes of CO{sub 2} per year for 50 years. A regional-scale three-dimensional simulation model was developed for the Illinois Basin that captures both the local-scale CO{sub 2}-brine flow processes and the large-scale groundwater flow patterns in response to CO{sub 2} storage. The far-field pressure buildup predicted for this selected sequestration scenario suggests that (1) the area that needs to be characterized in a permitting process may comprise a very large region within the basin if reservoir pressurization is considered, and (2) permits cannot be granted on a single-site basis alone because the near- and far-field hydrologic response may be affected by interference between individual sites. Our results also support recent studies in that environmental concerns related to near-field and far-field pressure buildup may be a limiting factor on CO{sub 2} storage capacity. In other words, estimates of storage capacity, if solely based on the effective pore volume available for safe trapping of CO{sub 2}, may have to be revised based on assessments of pressure perturbations and their potential impact on caprock integrity and groundwater resources, respectively. We finally discuss some of the challenges in making reliable predictions of large-scale hydrologic impacts related to CO{sub 2} sequestration projects.

Birkholzer, J.T.; Zhou, Q.

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

352

Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through geologically based field development. This year the project focused on reservoir characterization of the East Ford unit, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey Sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit; it contained an estimated 19.8 million barrels (MMbbl) of original oil in place. Petrophysical characterization of the East Ford unit was accomplished by integrating core and log data and quantifying petrophysical properties from wireline logs. Most methods of petrophysical analysis that had been developed during an earlier study of the Ford Geraldine unit were successfully transferred to the East Ford unit. The approach that was used to interpret water saturation from resistivity logs, however, had to be modified because in some East Ford wells the log-calculated water saturation was too high and inconsistent with observations made during the actual production. Log-porosity to core-porosity transforms and core-porosity to core-permeability transforms were derived from the East Ford reservoir. The petrophysical data were used to map porosity, permeability, net pay, water saturation, mobil-oil saturation, and other reservoir properties.

Dutton, S.P.; Flanders, W.A.; Guzman, J.I.; Zirczy, H.

1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

353

Petroleum exploration of Winnipegosis Formation in north-central North Dakota (Williston basin)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Winnipegosis Formation (Middle Devonian) in north-central Dakota has the greatest potential for large oil reserves in the Williston basin. The Winnipegosis carbonate (50 to 325 ft thick) was deposited in the southeast end of the Elk Point restricted sea. During Winnipegosis deposition, the Williston basin could be divided into two distinct environments: (1) a deep starved basin with accompanying pinnacle reefs separated by interreef, laminated limestone and (2) a surrounding carbonate shelf. Within the carbonate shelf are patch reefs, banks, and tidal flats. Overlying the Winnipegosis carbonate is the Prairie Formation, which has a basal anhydrite (0 to 70 ft thick) and an overlying salt (0 to 650 ft thick). These were deposited in a regressive phase of the Elk Point sea and act as seals for Winnipegosis oil entrapment. Currently, oil production from the Winnipegosis in the Williston basin is from stratigraphic traps and from small structures on the carbonate shelf. The most significant accumulation to date is Temple field, in which 11 wells produce from +/- 20 ft of Winnipegosis dolomite. The pinnacle reef environment has potential for significant oil reserves from 250-ft thick reefs covering 160 ac or less. Two pinnacle reefs have had free-oil recoveries from thin pay zones. The Rainbow/Zama fields in northwest Alberta have an ultimate reserve of more than 1 billion bbl of oil from Keg River reefs, which are correlative and similar to the Winnipegosis reefs in North Dakota. The strong seismic reflection that originates from the Winnipegosis-Prairie evaporite interface provides an excellent means of detecting Winnipegosis reefs. Amplitude of the Winnipegosis reflection is reduced dramatically over the reefs. The resulting dim spot is one criteria used in identifying reefs.

Guy, W.J. Jr.; Braden, K.W.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Catawba Wateree River Basin Advisory Commission

355

Gravity modeling of Cenozoic extensional basins, offshore Vietnam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . 78 . . . 81 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1 Southeast Asian study area location map 2 Major tectonic features of Southeast Asia 3 Mekong basin sediment isopach map . 4 Mekong basin generalized stratigraphy . Page . . . . 1 0 5 Mekong basin... gravity model 2 17 Mekong 2D forward gravity model 3 18 Mekong 2D forward gravity model 4 19 Mekong 2D forward gravity model 5 32 34 . . . 35 . . . 36 Page 20 Schematic 3D forward gravity model of Yinggehai basin sediment . . . 21 3D forward...

Mauri, Steven Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

356

Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Journal Article: Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western United States: 10 Years of Observation with the Global Positioning System Abstract...

357

Oregon Willamette River Basin Mitigation Agreement | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Willamette River Basin Mitigation Agreement Author State of Oregon Recipient Bonneville Power Administration Published Publisher Not Provided, 10222010 DOI Not Provided Check for...

358

Minturn Formation of Eagle basin: an exploration frontier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eagle basin, a predominantly Desmoinesian evaporite basin in northwestern Colorado, contains many targets for oil and gas reserves. Facies patterns of the Minturn Formation of the Eagle basin are strikingly similar to those of the prolific Paradox Formation of the Paradox basin. Both basins and formations also contain lens-shaped carbonate algal-bioherms. These algal-bioherms are particularly attractive reservoirs where they flank halite-basin margins, the areas of optimum dolomitization. The Minturn formation has been subdivided into individual rock packages using subsurface control. Facies maps constructed for individual units indicate the Eagle basin is a series of smaller basins, each having served as a center for halite deposition. Data support a deep-water model for the deposition of halite; however, a sabkhalike environment existed between the halite basins and the normal marine facies. Halite depocenters appear to have been structurally controlled. The Minturn Formation is very thick and may contain multiple prospective zones at any one location. Within the past year, two and possibly three Minturn discoveries have been made in northwestern Colorado.

Dodge, C.J.N.; Bartleson, B.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

360

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

362

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

363

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

Luther, Douglas S.

364

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

365

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

366

The dynamics and physical processes of the Comoros Basin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Includes abstract. The main objective of this thesis was to investigate the circulation in the ComorosBasin using observed and model datasets. These data were used… (more)

Collins, Charine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

368

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

369

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin...

370

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin...

371

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin...

372

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin...

373

Competitive Oxidation of Volatile Fatty Acids by Sulfate- and Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria from an Oil Field in Argentina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Neuquen Basin, western Argentina, had significant activity...SRB). SRB derive energy for growth by coupling...11). Oil fields in Argentina conform to this worldwide...the same carbon and energy source. VFA consists...Neuquen Basin, western Argentina (see Fig. S1 in the...

Aleksandr A. Grigoryan; Sabrina L. Cornish; Brenton Buziak; Shiping Lin; Adriana Cavallaro; Joseph J. Arensdorf; Gerrit Voordouw

2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - austrian molasse basin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

basin Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stuwe a,*, H. Fritz a Summary: The El Mayah molasse basin in the...

375

Late Palaeozoic Basins of the Southern U.S. Continental Interior [Abstract] [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

5 May 1982 research-article Late Palaeozoic Basins of the Southern U.S. Continental Interior [Abstract] [and Discussion] J. F. Dewey W...georef;1985006010 basins economic geology energy sources folds intracratonic basins Paleozoic...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

377

Seismic interpretation, distribution, and basin modelling of natural gas leakage in block 2 of the Orange Basin, offshore South Africa.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Includes abstract. The aims of this study are to: (1) characterize different natural gas leakage features present throughout the basin, and (2) understand the relationship… (more)

Boyd, Donna Louise.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Estimating tectonic history through basin simulation-enhanced seismic inversion: geoinfomatics for sedimentary basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......processes in response to geothermal gradient in much greater...approach not only reduces costs by integrating the basin...terms of temperature, energy, and with the probability...accepting a change in energy given through Boltzmann...proceeded in our choice of geothermal gradients (coarser......

Kush Tandon; Kagan Tuncay; Kyle Hubbard; John Comer; Peter Ortoleva

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r{sup 2}=0.95) and gas content (r{sup 2}=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. [Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r[sup 2]=0.95) and gas content (r[sup 2]=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. (Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

HANFORD K BASINS SLUDGE RETREIVAL & TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper shows how Fluor Hanford and BNG America have combined nuclear plant skills from the US and the UK to devise methods to retrieve and treat the sludge that has accumulated in K Basins at the Hanford site over many years. Retrieving the sludge is the final stage in removing fuel and sludge from the basins to allow them to be decontaminated and decommissioned, thus removing the threat of contamination of the Columbia River. A description is given of sludge retrieval using vacuum lances and specially developed nozzles and pumps into Consolidation Containers within the basins. The special attention that had to be paid to the heat generation and potential criticality issues with the irradiated uranium-containing sludge is described. The processes developed to re-mobilize the sludge from the Consolidation Containers and pump it through flexible and transportable hose-in-hose piping to the treatment facility are explained with particular note made of dealing with the abrasive nature of the sludge. The treatment facility, housed in an existing Hanford building is described, and the uranium-corrosion and grout encapsulation processes explained. The uranium corrosion process is a robust, tempered process very suitable for dealing with a range of differing sludge compositions. The grout process to produce the final waste form is backed by BNG America's 20 years experience of grouting radioactive waste at Sellafield and elsewhere. The use of transportable and re-usable equipment is emphasized and its role noted in avoiding new plant build that itself will require cleanup. The processes and techniques described in the paper are shown to have wide applicability to nuclear cleanup worldwide.

VASQUEZ, D.A.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hydrocarbon accumulation on rifted Continental Margin - examples of oil migration pathways, west African salt basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Examination of the oil fields in the Gabon, Lower Congo, and Cuanza basins allows modeling of oil migration and a more accurate ranking of prospects using geologic risk factors. Oil accumulations in these basins are in strata deposited during Cretaceous rift and drift phases, thus providing a diversity of geologic settings to examine. Oil accumulations in rift deposits are located on large faulted anticlines or in truncated units atop horst features. Many of these oil fields were sourced from adjacent organic shales along short direct migration paths. In Areas where source rock is more remote to fields or to prospective structures, faulting and continuity of reservoir rock are important to the migration of hydrocarbons. Because Aptian salts separate rift-related deposits from those of the drift stage, salt evacuation and faulting of the salt residuum are necessary for oil migration from the pre-salt sequences into the post-salt section. Oil migration within post-salt strata is complicated by the presence of salt walls and faulted carbonate platforms. Hydrocarbon shows in wells drilled throughout this area provide critical data for evaluating hydrocarbon migration pathways. Such evaluation in combination with modeling and mapping of the organic-rich units, maturation, reservoir facies, structural configurations, and seals in existing fields allows assessment of different plays. Based on this information, new play types and prospective structures can be ranked with respect to geologic risk.

Blackwelder, B.W.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Baroclinic tides in an axially symmetric basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energetics Returning to the governing equations (66) through (6&7) and multiplving (66) by phu?, (66) by phv?, and (67) by php?gives the result; phu?? f v?~ ? ~ ~ p S? m=O 0(, = phu?g h?o, c3 T f&hv?g o'j r SH (96) (96) aud ap? 1 a I au? I ~ ah.... Rowe (Head of Department) December 1989 ABSTRACT Baroclinic Tides in an Axially Symmetric Basin. (December 1989) Edward Paul Dever. B. S. , Texas Ag-XI University Chair ol' Advisory Committee: Prof. Robert 0. Reid A. coupled normal mode model...

Dever, Edward Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

384

Driver and Pedestrian Behavior at Uncontrolled Crosswalks in the Tahoe Basin Recreation Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Tahoe Basin Recreation Area Meghan Fehlig Mitman,in the Tahoe Basin Recreation Area Submission Date: Augusttraverses rural and/or recreation areas, the findings from

Mitman, Meghan Fehlig; Cooper, Douglas; DuBose, Brooke

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - active single basin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

basins... ) existed during the Late Oligocene and Miocene when the rift basins of Thailand were active because active... into three main areas and tec- tonic provinces: 1)...

386

The Persian Gulf Basin: Geological history, sedimentary formations, and petroleum potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Persian Gulf Basin is the richest region of the ... Foredeep, which is a member of the Persian Gulf Basin. During the most part of the...

A. I. Konyuhov; B. Maleki

387

Screening model optimization for Panay River Basin planning in the Philippines .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The state of the water resources of the Panay River Basin have motivated studies and initial basin planning to mitigate flood damages, to produce hydroelectricity,… (more)

Millspaugh, John Henry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

E-Print Network 3.0 - african river basin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Adaptation to climate change in international river basins in Africa: a review* Summary: ). There are 60 international river basins within the African...

389

Practice Field Practice Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courts Soccer Field Swimming pool Bandeen Hall Mountain House # 3 # 2 Golf Course Security Patterson Hall.B. Scott Arena Library Centennial Theater Mc Greer Hall Pollack Hall New Johnson Science Building Dewhurst Dining Hall Champlain Regional College # 4 Mackinnon Hall Residence # 6 Memorial House Retired Faculty

390

ADCP-Referenced Geostrophic Circulation in the Bering Sea Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A month-long circumnavigation of the Bering Sea basin in August 1991 was designed to study the basin-scale circulation. For the first time in this region vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements provided an absolute ...

E. D. Cokelet; M. L. Schall; D. M. Dougherty

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hydrocarbons in rift basins: the role of stratigraphy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...succession that causes the shales to reach thermal maturity and generate hydrocarbons. Simple...T. J. 1988 Rift basins of interior Sudan--petroleum exploration and discovery...basins? Is that what we could call the thermal subsidence phase? J. J. Lambiase...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- W - W W W - W Central Appalachian Basin Alabama 26.18 26.10 -0.3% 118.06 22.1% 930 37.4% 100.0% Central Appalachian Basin Delaware 23.73 15.12 -36.3% 88.59 17.1%...

393

Social learning among Congo Basin hunter–gatherers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Kevin N. Laland Social learning among Congo Basin hunter-gatherers Barry S. Hewlett...Central African Republic and Republic of Congo. We have conducted several years of qualitative...daily life and demographic features of Congo Basin hunter-gatherers and farmers...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Congo Basin rainfall climatology: can we believe the climate models?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Asare, Simon Lewis and Philippe Mayaux Congo Basin rainfall climatology: can we believe...rainforests: past, present and future . The Congo Basin is one of three key convective regions...rainfall products and climate models. Congo rainfall|climatology|moisture flux...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Microbial Biomass and Activity Distribution in an Anoxic, Hypersaline Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the northern Gulf of Mexico with anoxic conditions...the northern Gulf of Mexico with anoxic conditions...basin in the Gulf of Mexico. The Orca Basin, as...Table 1 is a result of geothermal heat brought into the...sulfate-reducing as well as sulfide-oxidizing...

Paul A. LaRock; Ray D. Lauer; John R. Schwarz; Kathleen K. Watanabe; Denis A. Wiesenburg

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

THE HISTORICAL YOLO BASIN What parts make the whole?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE HISTORICAL YOLO BASIN LANDSCAPE What parts make the whole? Alison Whipple San Francisco Estuary The spatial and temporal variability of the Delta reflected fluvial-tidal interaction #12;YOLO BASIN NORTHEAST prevalent at the north end and along Miner Slough..." - Mellin 1918 North End Liberty Island Yolo By Pass

397

Relationship Between Heat Flows and Geological Structures in the Sichuan Basin, P.R. China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on an extensive data collection and analysis, this research has provided reliable representations of the features of the geothermal fields, their heat flow, and relationships with geological structures in the Sichuan Basin. The isotherms below a depth of 1,000 m show high values in the Central Uplift and the Southwest Uplift, and low values in the Northwest and Southeast Depressions. These features probably indicate undulation of crystalline basement and structural depression. At depths greater than 3,000 m, the isotherms tend to become simpler and regionalized. The mean heat flow in the basin is 69.1 mW/m{sup 2}. In the Central Uplift, the Northwest Depression and the East of the basin, heat-flow values range from 58.6 to 71.2 mW/m{sup 2}, with a mean value of 66.1 mWE/m{sup 2}. In the south and southwest, it varies from 76.6 to 100.5 mW/m{sup 2}, with a mean value of 86.2 mW/m{sup 2}. High heat-flow values occur within the uplift of the crystalline basement in the southwest Sichuan, and the heat flow decreases from the south, through the central area, to the northwest.

Zeng, Y.; Yu, H.; Wang, X.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

California basin study (CaBS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies of geochemical recycling processes in the upper water column in the Southern California Bight focused on the seasonal cycle. Inspection of satellite sea surface color images as well as information from studies in other areas suggest that the cycling processes have significant variability on time scales of hours and days. To allow our seasonal studies to be examined in the context of the higher frequency variability, an interdisciplinary mooring was maintained near the midpoint of Santa Monica basin (known as station 305) from January to July, 1990. The Hickey group had the primary responsibility of deploying and recovering the mooring. The mooring consisted of a vector measuring wind recorder mounted above a toroidal buoy, below which were suspended two current/temperature recorders, a trnasmissometer, and two PAR sensors. The PAR sensors, which provide an estimate of phytoplankton growth rates, were deployed as part of the Trees proposal. At two additional nearby moorings, sediment traps were deployed at selected depths throughout the water column by Landry and by Soutar. To allow some investigation of lateral advection of material, current meters were deployed at the same depths as several of the sediment traps both at this site and also at the site farther along the basin axis. The data from these experiments have not yet been processed. 6 refs., 10 figs.

Hickey, B.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Resource Challenges Water Resource Challenges From Energy Production Major Types of Power Generation in SRB - Total 15,300 Megawatts - 37.5% 4.0% 12.0% 15.5% 31.0% Nuclear Coal Natural Gas Hydroelectric Other Marcellus Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin The Basin: * 27,510-square-mile watershed * Comprises 43 percent of the Chesapeake Bay watershed * 4.2 million population * 60 percent forested * 32,000+ miles of waterways The Susquehanna River: * 444 miles, largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay * Supplies 18 million gallons a minute to the Bay Susquehanna River Basin Geographic Location of Marcellus Shale within Susq. River Basin 72% of Basin (20,000 Sq. Miles) Underlain by Marcellus Shale Approximate Amount of Natural Gas in Marcellus Shale * U.S. currently produces approx. 30 trillion

400

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basin and Cold Vacuum K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 August 2012 Review of Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operations The purpose of this independent oversight review by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) was to observe the operations associated with processing a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) of "found fuel" (small quantities of spent fuel discovered during cleanup of the reactor burial grounds) at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The found fuel MCO was transported from the K West Basin on the Hanford

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 August 2012 Review of Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operations The purpose of this independent oversight review by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) was to observe the operations associated with processing a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) of "found fuel" (small quantities of spent fuel discovered during cleanup of the reactor burial grounds) at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The found fuel MCO was transported from the K West Basin on the Hanford

402

Numerical Modeling of Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Numerical Modeling of Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal Systems Abstract A suite of models utilizing a range of bulkrock permeabilities were developed to analyze thetransient behavior of basin and range extensionalgeothermal systems, and particularly, the evolution ofthe system temperature with time. Each modelconsists of two mountain ranges (~1 km relief fromthe valley floor) separated by a thick sequence (about4 km) of clastic sediments derived from the adjacentranges, and a relatively permeable, high angle faultthat functions as a conduit for subsurface fluids. Thisgeometry is typical of Basin and Range extensionalsystems.We

403

EA-1173: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplemental  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon 3: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplemental Program (Preliminary), Oregon EA-1173: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplemental Program (Preliminary), Oregon SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund a program designed to prevent the extinction and begin the recovery of spring Chinook salmon stocks in the Grande Ronde River Basin in the Upper Grande Ronde River, Lostine River, and Catherine Creek in Northeastern Oregon. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 18, 2003 EA-1173-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program

404

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract N/A Authors Elaine J. Bell, Lawrence T. Larson and Russell W. Juncal Published U.S. Department of Energy, 1980 Report Number GLO2386 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation Elaine J. Bell,Lawrence T. Larson,Russell W. Juncal. 1980. Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province,

405

Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBCGE) has been funded by DOE since March 2002 to conduct geothermal resource exploration and assessment in the Great Basin. In that time, those efforts have led to significant advances in understanding the regional and local conditions necessary for the formation of geothermal systems. Accomplishments include the development of GPS-based crustal strain rate measurements as a geothermal exploration tool, development of new methods of detecting geothermal features with remotely sensed imagery, and the detection of

406

Corrosion of aluminum alloys in a reactor disassembly basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document discusses storage of aluminum clad fuel and target tubes of the Mark 22 assembly takes place in the concrete-lined, light-water-filled, disassembly basins located within each reactor area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A corrosion test program has been conducted in the K-Reactor disassembly basin to assess the storage performance of the assemblies and other aluminum clad components in the current basin environment. Aluminum clad alloys cut from the ends of actual fuel and target tubes were originally placed in the disassembly water basin in December 1991. After time intervals varying from 45--182 days, the components were removed from the basin, photographed, and evaluated metallographically for corrosion performance. Results indicated that pitting of the 8001 aluminum fuel clad alloy exceeded the 30-mil (0.076 cm) cladding thickness within the 45-day exposure period. Pitting of the 1100 aluminum target clad alloy exceeded the 30-mil (0.076 cm) clad thickness in 107--182 days exposure. The existing basin water chemistry is within limits established during early site operations. Impurities such as Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} are controlled to the parts per million level and basin water conductivity is currently 170--190 {mu}mho/cm. The test program has demonstrated that the basin water is aggressive to the aluminum components at these levels. Other storage basins at SRS and around the US have successfully stored aluminum components for greater than ten years without pitting corrosion. These basins have impurity levels controlled to the parts per billion level (1000X lower) and conductivity less than 1.0 {mu}mho/cm.

Howell, J.P.; Zapp, P.E.; Nelson, D.Z.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Basin configuration and depositional trends in the Mission Canyon and Ratcliffe beds, U.S. portion of the Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction of Mission Canyon and Ratcliffe depositional trends utilizing shoreline models and anhydrite edge maps shows a significant change in basin configuration associated with regional sea level changes. Sea level highstand, which began during deposition of the Scallion member of the Lodgepole Formation, was punctuated by two lowstand events. The first occurred during deposition of the MC-2 anhydrite (Tilston). During this lowstand event, the width of the carbonate basin decreased significantly. With sea level rise, a broad basin formed with carbonate and evaporate ramp deposition (Lands, Wayne, Glenburn and Mohall members). The top of the Mohall contains evidence of the second lowstand event. This event introduced quartz sand detritus into the basin (Kisbey Sandstone). Because of sea level lowstand, Sherwood and younger Mission Canyon beds were deposited during highstand in a narrower carbonate basin. Funneling of marine currents and tides in this basin created higher energy shoreline and shoal deposits than those commonly found in older Mission Canyon sediments. The top of the Mission Canyon (Rival) was capped by a deepening event or transgression which enlarged the basin and created broad Ratcliffe ramp systems similar to those that existed during Glenburn and Mohall deposition. By utilizing sequence stratigraphy and mapping shoreline trends and basin configuration, reservoir and trap geometries are identified, and exploration success is improved.

Hendricks, M.L. [Hendricks and Associates, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Description of the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Technical Report is to provide background information about the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES). This study, which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program, was conducted from 16 November 2010 through 21 March 2012 at a field site in northeastern Oregon. The primary goal of the study was to provide profiles of wind speed and wind direction over the depth of the boundary layer in an operating wind farm located in an area of complex terrain. Measurements from propeller and vane anemometers mounted on a 62 m tall tower, Doppler Sodar, and Radar Wind Profiler were combined into a single data product to provide the best estimate of the winds above the site during the first part of CBWES. An additional goal of the study was to provide measurements of Turbulence Kinetic Energy (TKE) near the surface. To address this specific goal, sonic anemometers were mounted at two heights on the 62 m tower on 23 April 2011. Prior to the deployment of the sonic anemometers on the tall tower, a single sonic anemometer was deployed on a short tower 3.1 m tall that was located just to the south of the radar wind profiler. Data from the radar wind profiler, as well as the wind profile data product are available from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Data Archive (http://www.arm.gov/data/campaigns). Data from the sonic anemometers are available from the authors.

Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Nelson, Danny A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Geologic Analysis of Priority Basins for Exploration and Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been a substantial decline in both exploratory drilling and seismic field crew activity in the United States over the last 10 years, due primarily to the declining price of oil. To reverse this trend and to preserve the entrepreneurial independent operator, the U.S. DOE is attempting to encourage hydrocarbon exploration activities in some of the under exploited regions of the United States. This goal is being accomplished by conducting broad regional reviews of potentially prospective areas within the lower 48 states. Data are being collected on selected areas, and studies are being done on a regional scale generally unavailable to the smaller independent. The results of this work will be made available to the public to encourage the undertaking of operations in areas which have been overlooked until this project. Fifteen criteria have been developed for the selection of study areas. Eight regions have been identified where regional geologic analysis will be performed. This report discusses preliminary findings concerning the geology, early tectonic history, structure and potential unconventional source rocks for the Black Mesa basin and South Central states region, the two highest priority study areas.

Carroll, H.B.; Reeves, T.K.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

Integrated Synthesis of the Permian Basin: Data and Models for Recovering Existing and Undiscovered Oil Resources from the Largest Oil-Bearing Basin in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large volumes of oil and gas remain in the mature basins of North America. This is nowhere more true than in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico. A critical barrier to recovery of this vast remaining resource, however, is information. Access to accurate geological data and analyses of the controls of hydrocarbon distribution is the key to the knowledge base as well as the incentives needed by oil and gas companies. The goals of this project were to collect, analyze, synthesize, and deliver to industry and the public fundamental information and data on the geology of oil and gas systems in the Permian Basin. This was accomplished in two ways. First we gathered all available data, organized it, and placed it on the web for ready access. Data include core analysis data, lists of pertinent published reports, lists of available cores, type logs, and selected PowerPoint presentations. We also created interpretive data such as type logs, geological cross sections, and geological maps and placed them in a geospatially-registered framework in ARC/GIS. Second, we created new written syntheses of selected reservoir plays in the Permian basin. Although only 8 plays were targeted for detailed analysis in the project proposal to DOE, 14 were completed. These include Ellenburger, Simpson, Montoya, Fusselman, Wristen, Thirtyone, Mississippian, Morrow, Atoka, Strawn, Canyon/Cisco, Wolfcamp, Artesia Group, and Delaware Mountain Group. These fully illustrated reports include critical summaries of published literature integrated with new unpublished research conducted during the project. As such these reports provide the most up-to-date analysis of the geological controls on reservoir development available. All reports are available for download on the project website and are also included in this final report. As stated in our proposal, technology transfer is perhaps the most important component of the project. In addition to providing direct access to data and reports through the web, we published 29 papers dealing with aspects of Permian Basin and Fort Worth Basin Paleozoic geology, and gave 35 oral and poster presentations at professional society meetings, and 116 oral and poster presentations at 10 project workshops, field trips, and short courses. These events were attended by hundreds of scientists and engineers representing dozens of oil and gas companies. This project and the data and interpretations that have resulted from it will serve industry, academic, and public needs for decades to come. It will be especially valuable to oil and gas companies in helping to better identify opportunities for development and exploration and reducing risk. The website will be continually added to and updated as additional data and information become available making it a long term source of key information for all interested in better understanding the Permian Basin.

John Jackson; Katherine Jackson

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. Quarterly report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work in conjunction with Marathon Oil Company in the Oregon Basin field utilizing Formation MicroImager and Formation MicroScanner logs has been completed. Tensleep outcrops on the western side of the Bighorn Basin are not of the quality necessary to do detailed study of stratification. This made the use of borehole imaging logs, in which stratification can be recognized, particularly attractive for the western side of the Bighorn Basin. The borehole imaging logs were used to determine the dip angle and dip direction of stratification as well as to distinguish different lithologies. It is also possible to recognize erosional bounding surfaces and classify them according to a process-oriented hierarchy. Foreset and bounding surface orientation data was utilized to create bedform reconstructions in order to simulate the distribution of flow-units bounded by erosional surfaces. The bedform reconstructions indicate that the bedforms on the western side of the basin are somewhat different from those on the eastern side of the Bighorn Basin. A report has been submitted to Marathon Oil Company, the principal cost-share subcontractor. Marine dolomitic units initially identified and correlated in the Bighorn Basin have been correlated into the Wind River Basin. Gross and net sand maps have been produced for the entire upper Tensleep in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins, as well as for each of the eolian units identified in the study. These maps indicate an overall thickening of the Tensleep to the west and south. This thickening is a result of both greater subsidence to the west and south and greater differential erosion to the north and east. An article documenting the North Oregon Basin field study will appear in the Gulf Coast Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists Foundation Conference volume entitled {open_quotes}Stratigraphic Analysis Utilizing Advanced Geophysical, Wireline and Borehole Technology for Petroleum Exploration and Production{close_quotes}.

Dunn, T.L.

1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Reserve Class Gas Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. Unnamed fields and fields generically named "wildcat" were renamed to a concatenate of their basin and state of occurrence,

413

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Reserve Class Liquids Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. Unnamed fields and fields generically named "wildcat" were renamed to a concatenate of their basin and state of occurrence,

414

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. Unnamed fields and fields generically named "wildcat" were renamed to a concatenate of their basin and state of occurrence,

415

Microsoft Word - MRCSP Appalachian Basin 2008 FactSheet _09-08_-2.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R.E. Burger Site 1 September 2008 R.E. Burger Site 1 September 2008 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42589 DOE/NETL Project Manager: Lynn Brickett, Lynn.Brickett@NETL.DOE.GOV Submitted by Battelle September 2008 Appalachian Basin Geologic Test at R.E. Burger Power Plant Principal Investigator Dave Ball, Battelle (614-424-4901; balld@battelle.org) Test Location FirstEnergy R.E. Burger Plant, Shadyside, Ohio Amount and Source of CO 2 1,000-3,000 metric tons Source = commercial source FirstEnergy Ohio Geological Survey (Ohio Department of Natural Resources) Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Summary of Field Test Site and Operations:

416

Crosswell seismic waveguide phenomenology of reservoir sands & shales at offsets >600 m, Liaohe Oil Field, NE China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......employed to lower the cost of hydrocarbon production monitoring (de Waal...2001. Development Production (Special Section...continuity logging for oil and gas field applications...from the Antrim Shale gas play, Michigan Basin......

P. C. Leary; W. Ayres; W. J. Yang; X. F. Chang

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

DOE West Coast Basin program, California Basin Study: Progress report 4, (July 1986-June 1987)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of our research is to understand the transport pathways and mass balances of selected metabolically active and inactive chemical species in the Santa Monica/San Pedro Basins. One focus is to examine the role of zooplankton and micronekton in the cycling and remineralization of chemical materials in the Southern California Bight, with particular reference to C, N and certain radionuclides and trace metals. A second focus is to examine these same radionuclides and trace metals in other reservoirs besides the zooplankton (i.e., in seawater, sediment trap material and bottom sediments). Knowledge of the rates, routes and reservoirs of these nuclides and metals should lead to a cogent model for these elements in Santa Monica/San Pedro Basins. 28 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Small, L.F.; Huh, Chih-An

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 109.7 Beam(m) 73.2 Depth(m) 6.1 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features 10.7m deep x 15.2m wide trench along length of tank; the Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin is spanned lengthwise by a 114.6m bridge supported on a rail system that permits the bridge to traverse one-half the width of the basin and to rotate through angles up to 45 degrees from the longitudinal centerline of the basin, ship models can be towed in head or following seas at any angle from 0 to 90 degrees, tracks attached to the bottom of the bridge support the towing carriage, bridge width is constant 6.1m.

419

Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The geohistory of the North Louisiana Salt Basin is comparable to the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin with the major difference being the elevated heat flow the strata in the North Louisiana Salt Basin experienced in the Cretaceous due primarily to reactivation of upward movement, igneous activity, and erosion associated with the Monroe and Sabine Uplifts. Potential undiscovered reservoirs in the North Louisiana Salt Basin are Triassic Eagle Mills sandstone and deeply buried Upper Jurassic sandstone and limestone. Potential underdeveloped reservoirs include Lower Cretaceous sandstone and limestone and Upper Cretaceous sandstone.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

420

square-mile Black Warrior Basin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

will inject CO will inject CO 2 into a coalbed methane (CBM) well in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, to assess the capability of mature CBM reservoirs to receive and adsorb large volumes of CO 2 . Injection began at the test site on June 15; the site was selected because it is representative of the 23,000- square-mile Black Warrior Basin located in northwestern Alabama and northeastern Mississippi. It is estimated that this area has the potential to store in the range of 1.1 to 2.3 Gigatons of CO 2 , which is approximately the amount that Alabama's coal-fired power plants emit in two decades. The targeted coal seams range from 940 to 1,800 feet deep and are one to six feet thick. Approximately 240 tons of CO 2 will be injected over a 45- to 60-day period. More information

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Petroleum systems of the Southwest Caspian Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southwest Caspian Basin, located in offshore Azerbaijan, contains significant accumulations of oil and gas in Upper Tertiary siliciclastic sediments. The central basin contains up to 25 km of sediments. The relatively low geothermal gradients and low degree of compaction from rapid burial provide favorable conditions or the retention of hydrocarbons at relatively great depths. A variety of structural styles occur, ranging from anticlinal folds to monoclines, with various degrees of reverse faulting and brecciation. Molecular characterization of selected oil samples indicate most of the oils have been sourced form the same or similar facies; a Tertiary Type II, slightly calcareous, marine clastic facies. Insufficient organic-rich rocks are available for a reliable oil-source correlation. Examination of oil molecular characteristics, oil-oil correlations, molecular characteristics of key stratigraphic horizons, paleofacies maps, maturation, and potential migration pathways suggest the oil was not syngenetic but most likely sourced from deeper Oligo-Miocene or older marine shales. Compositional data for a single offshore gas sample suggest the gas is a mixture of low maturity Type III and biogenic. A multi-stage model of hydrocarbon emplacement for evolving structural traps has been postulated. The first phase of emplacement occurred in the Middle Pliocene when tectonic movement and significant subsidence initiated early trap/reservoir formation, migration, and hydrocarbon generation. Late Quaternary tectonic activity lead to the replenishment of older depleted traps, additional hydrocarbons for enhanced traps, and charging of new traps. In addition, late tectonic activity caused extensive redistribution of hydrocarbon accumulations, degassing due to breached faults, and destruction of selected oil pools.

Abrams, M.A.; Narimanov, A.A. [State Oil Company of Azerbaijan, Baku (Azerbaijan)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Control technology assessment of hazardous-waste-disposal operations in chemicals manufacturing: in-depth survey report of San Juan Cement Company, Dorado, Puerto Rico, November 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A visit was made to the San Juan Cement Company, Dorado, Puerto Rico to evaluate control methods for a storage and delivery system for hazardous wastes used in a demonstration project as a supplemental fuel for cofiring a cement kiln. Analysis of the material during the visit revealed the presence of methylene chloride, carbon-tetrachloride, chloroform, acetone, hexane, ethanol, and ethyl acetate. Steel storage tanks were placed on an impermeable concrete slab surrounded by a sealed retaining wall. Steel piping with all welded joints carried the waste fuels from storage tanks to the kiln, where fuels were injected through a specially fabricated burner. Vapor emissions were suppressed by venting the displaced vapor through a recycle line. Exhaust gases from the kiln passed through a bag house type dust collector, and were vented to the atmosphere through a single stack. Half-mask air-purifying respirators were used when in the hazardous-waste storage/delivery area. Neoprene gloves were used when performing tasks with potential skin contact. Hard hats, safety glasses, and safety boots were all worn. The author concludes that the control methods used seemed effective in suppressing vapor emissions.

Crandall, M.S.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

EIS-0477: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, New Mexico and La Plata County, Colorado The Bureau of Land Management announced its intent to prepare an EIS that evaluates...

424

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Caribbean Basin: A prime market for renewables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Countries in the Caribbean basin have high energy prices and need additional electrical generating capacity. Renewable energy and independent power sources could help meet that need. The Caribbean Basin and the Pacific Rim appear to offer the best total market opportunities considering government energy policies, prices of energy, and consumer attitudes on renewable energy applications. The Caribbean Basin was selected for an industry project opportunity review. This area was selected due to its proximity, renewable resource base, need for energy and growth, and potential for private and multidevelopment bank funding of projects. 3 figs.

Sklar, S.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Regional aquifers and petroleum in Williston Basin region of US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At least five major aquifers underlie the northern Great Plains of the US, which includes parts of the Williston basin in Montana and North Dakota. These aquifers form a hydrologic system that extends more than 960 km from recharge areas in the Rocky Mountains to discharge areas in eastern North Dakota and the Canadian Provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. The regional flow system in the aquifers has had a major effect on the chemical composition of ground water within the Williston basin. Hydrodynamic forces may contribute to the accumulation of petroleum within the basin.

Downey, J.S.; Busby, J.F.; Dinwiddie, G.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

Ernest A. Mancini

2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

428

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool (NDP) is southeast New Mexico is one of the nine projects selected in 1995 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for participation in the Class III Reservoir Field Demonstration Program. The goals of the DOE cost-shared Class Program are to: (1) extend economic production, (2) increase ultimate recovery, and (3) broaden information exchange and technology application. Reservoirs in the Class III Program are focused on slope-basin and deep-basin clastic depositional types.

Murphy, Mark B.

2000-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

429

BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring mainly during the Late Cretaceous.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

430

Area balance and strain in coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama has established a correspondence between productivity and structural position, but the reasons for this correspondence remain uncertain. In Cedar Cove field, for example, exceptionally productive wells are concentrated in a rollover anticline, whereas in Oak Grove field, exceptionally productive wells are aligned along a synclinal axis. This suggests that factors controlling gas production are a derivative of the structural geometry, and not the geometry by itself. Natural fractures and a low state of in-situ stress facilitate depressurization of coalbed reservoirs by dewatering, and hence, desorption and production of coalbed gas. Our hypothesis is that the abundance and openness of natural fractures in the Black Warrior basin are a direct expression of the layer-parallel strain dictated by map-scale structural geometry. Area balancing techniques can be used to quantify requisite strain, which is the homogeneous layer-parallel strain required for local area balance, and can also be used to constrain and verify structural cross sections. Application of area balancing techniques to extensional structures in the Black Warrior basin indicates that coalbed gas is produced from thin-skinned structures detached within the coal-bearing Pottsville Formation. Within reservoir intervals, requisite strain values are as high as 10 percent and increase downward toward the basal detachment. Mapping structure and production indicates that some productivity sweet spots correlate with enhanced bed curvature. Whereas requisite strain is the homogeneous strain calculated for discrete bed segments, curvature affects the distribution of strain within those segments. Recognizing this, our research is now focused on integrating area balancing techniques with curvature analysis to explain production patterns in coalbed methane reservoirs.

Pashin, J.C. [Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Groshong, R.H., Jr. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

DeFrees Small Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Small Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 15.0 Beam(m) 0.8 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 30 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Computer controlled hydraulic paddle, arbitrary wave shape possible Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 1:10 sloping glass with dissipative horsehair covering if needed

432

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mark Coolbaugh, Richard Zehner, Corne Kreemer, David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa-

433

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors David D. Blackwell, Mark Leidig, Richard P. Smith, Stuart D. Johnson and Kenneth W. Wisian Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno, NV; 2002/09/22 Published Geothermal Resources Council, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation David D. Blackwell,Mark Leidig,Richard P. Smith,Stuart D. Johnson,Kenneth

434

Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western United States: 10 Years of Observation with the Global Positioning System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western United States: 10 Years of Observation with the Global Positioning System Abstract [1] We have estimated patterns and rates of crustal movement across 800 km of the Basin and Range at ∼39° north latitude with Global Positioning System surveys in 1992, 1996, 1998, and 2002. The total rate of motion tangent to the small circle around the Pacific-North America pole of rotation is 10.4 ± 1.0 mm/yr, and motion normal to this small circle is 3.9 ± 0.9 mm/yr compared to the east end of our network. On the Colorado

435

Atlantic Basin Refining Dynamics from U.S. Perspective  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

“This presentation focuses on the current refining situation in the Atlantic Basin, “This presentation focuses on the current refining situation in the Atlantic Basin, Page 1 including some discussion on how we got here, and on drivers that will influence the next 5 years. I will focus on three topics today that are critical to the petroleum product dynamics of Page 2 the Atlantic Basin over the next several years. The first is product demand growth - something that has been affected both by the recession and legislation. Next I will cover the supply situation for gasoline and distillates in the Atlantic Basin, since Europe and the U.S. are closely entwined in these markets. Last, we will visit the outlook for those drivers affecting profitability - an area of large uncertainty. I will begin today with a short discussion of important underlying long-term trends in U.S.

436

Magnetotellurics At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Northern Basin & Range Region Magnetotellurics At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then

437

Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism in Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism in Northwestern Nevada Abstract Some of the earliest volcanic rocks attributed to the Yellowstone hotspot erupted from the McDermitt caldera and related volcanic centers in northwestern Nevada at 17-15 Ma. At that time, extensional faulting was ongoing to the south in central Nevada, leading some to suggest that the nascent hotspot caused or facilitated middle Miocene Basin and Range extension. Regional geologic relationships indicate that the total magnitude of extension in northwestern Nevada is low compared to the amount

438

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Regional Assessment of Exploration Potential for Geothermal Systems in The Great Basin Using a Geographic Information System (GIS) - Part II, Coolbaugh, Zehner, Raines, Shevenell, Minor, Sawatzky and Oppliger. The objective is to generate new exploration targets for both conventional and EGS capable geothermal systems by analyzing regional data in a GIS. Digital geothermal data will be made available to industry and researchers on a web site. Relationships among the data will be explored using spatial

439

Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid Temperatures of 150°C to 200°C Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid Temperatures of 150°C to 200°C Abstract Six geothermal reservoirs with fluid temperatures over 200°C and ten geothermal systems with measured fluid temperatures of 150-200°C have been discovered in the northern Basin and Range Province of the USA. A comparison of these high and moderate temperature systems shows considerable overlap in geographical distribution, geology, and physical properties. Our ability to distinguish between moderate and high temperature systems using fluid chemistry has been limited by often

440

File:Denver Basin.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basin.pdf Basin.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Denver Basin.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 625 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 11:00, 4 March 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 11:00, 4 March 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (625 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage There are no pages that link to this file. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=File:Denver_Basin.pdf&oldid=5897

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "juan basin fields" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 76.2 Beam(m) 15.2 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Special Physical Features Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control sys

442

FRASER BASIN LANDFILL INVENTORY DOE FRAP 1997-19  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-term sustainability of the Fraser River Basin. Inventories of point and non-point sources of pollution from both's WASTE database, Federal Indian Band Landfill investigations, and BC Environment's Municipal Landfill

443

Error Analysis of Satellite Precipitation Products in Mountainous Basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate quantitative precipitation estimation over mountainous basins is of great importance because of their susceptibility to hazards such as flash floods, shallow landslides, and debris flows, triggered by heavy precipitation events (HPEs). In ...

Yiwen Mei; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou; Efthymios I. Nikolopoulos; Marco Borga

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Mercury in the sediments of the Pallanza Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Pallanza Basin of Lago Maggiore, Italy, in 1970 have been analysed for mercury, using flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The concentration of mercury in the Maggiore sediments proved to be ...

V. DAMIANI; R. L. THOMAS

1974-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

445

Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission was established as a bi-state commission composed of members from the Commonwealth of Virginia and the State of North Carolina. The purpose of the...

446

Regional And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pathways Abstract Fluids from the western margin of the Basin and Range have helium isotope ratios as high as 6-7 Ra, indicating a strong mantle melt influence and consistent...

447

Hydrologic and Institutional Water Availability in the Brazos River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been constructed to facilitate management of the water resources of the various river basins of the state. Effective control and utilization of the water resource supplied by a stream/reservoir system requires an understanding of the amount of water...

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Bergman, Carla E.; Carriere, Patrick E.; Walls, W. Brian

448

Negotiating nature : expertise and environment in the Klamath River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Negotiating Nature" explores resource management in action and the intertwined roles of law and science in environmental conflicts in the Upper Klamath River Basin in southern Oregon. I follow disputes over the management ...

Buchanan, Nicholas Seong Chul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Oil shale and coal in intermontane basins of Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mae Tip intermontane basin contains Cenozoic oil shales in beds up to 1 m (3.3 ft) thick interbedded with coal and mudstone. The oil shales contain lamosite-type alginite, and give a maximum oil yield of 122 L/MT (29.3 gal/ton). The beds are laterally continuous for at least 1.5 km (1.0 mi), but pass into mudstones toward the basin margin. The oil shales originated when peat swamps close to a steep basin margin were flooded by shallow lakes, allowing algae to replace rooted vegetation. This distinctive oil shale-coal assemblage is known from many small intermontane basins in Thailand, where locally high geothermal gradients suggest potential for hydrocarbons.

Gibling, M.R.; Srisuk, S.; Ukakimaphan, Y.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

HYDROCLIMATIC ASPECTS OF THE 2011 ASSINIBOINE RIVER BASIN FLOOD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the spring and early summer of 2011, the Assiniboine River Basin in Canada experienced an extreme flood that was unprecedented in terms of duration and severity. The flood had significant socioeconomic impacts and caused over one billion ...

Julian Brimelow; Kit Szeto; Barrie Bonsal; John Hanesiak; Bohdan Kochtubajda; Fraser Evans; Ronald Stewart

451

Intensification of Geostrophic Currents in the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuous sampling of upper-ocean hydrographic data in the Canada Basin from various sources spanning from 2003 through 2011 provides an unprecedented opportunity to observe changes occurring in a major feature of the Arctic Ocean. In a 112-km-...

Miles G. McPhee

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17-acre basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project was safely completed at a...

453

Kuznetsk Basin coking coal: Reserves and technological value  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reserves of Kuznetsk Basin coking coal are analyzed, in terms of rank composition and scope for coke production. The technological value of the coal is evaluated by the OOO VNITs Ugol...

V. P. Ivanov; V. Yu. Sushkov; A. A. Torgunakov; S. A. Pantykin

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Micropaleontology and biostratigraphy of the coastal basins of West Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book is intended to meet the need for a single volume on descriptive micropaleontology of West African microfauna assemblage which is different from that of the Boreal, Mediterranean, Pacific and Atlantic regions. The contents include: Preface. Introduction. Systematics: West African foraminifera species: Systematic classification and description. Glossary for the foraminifera. Selected references for the foraminifera. The ostracoda: Systematic classification and description. Glossary for the ostracoda. Selected references for the ostracoda. Stratigraphic Sequences of the West African Coastal Basins: General review. Angola-Cuanza basin. Congo. Gabon. Cameroun-Douala basin. Nigeria. Togo-Benin basin. Ghana. Ivory Coast. Senegal. Appendix: Brief classification of foraminifera. Paleo-ecology of the foraminifera. Testing of samples. Collection of samples. Preparation of samples. Preparation of thin sections. Storage of microfossils. Methods of examination. Index.

Kogbe, C.A.; Mehes, K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Hydropower development in the lower Mekong basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Hydropower development in the lower Mekong basin: alternative approaches to deal hydropower generation and potentially irreversible negative impacts on the ecosystems that provide hydropower generation and potentially irreversible negative impacts on the ecosystems that provide

Vermont, University of

456

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

457

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

458

Hydrocarbons in rift basins: the role of stratigraphy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...versus shallow-water environments...A (1999) Hydrocarbons in rift basins...Facies and hydrocarbon potential The...availability of water. This can either...form seals for hydrocarbons. The shallow-water environ- ments...

1999-01-01T23:59