National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for journal indoor air

  1. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model developmen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air...

  2. Fresh air indoors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kull, K.

    1988-09-01

    This article describes and compares ventilation systems for the control of indoor air pollution in residential housing. These include: local exhaust fans, whole-house fans, central exhaust with wall ports, and heat-recovery central ventilation (HRV). HRV's have a higher initial cost than the other systems but they are the only ones that save energy. Homeowners are given guidelines for choosing the system best suited for their homes in terms of efficiency and payback period.

  3. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

  4. Manual on indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, R.C.; Grimsrud, D.T.

    1983-12-01

    This reference manual was prepared to assist electric utilities in helping homeowners, builders, and new home buyers to understand a broad range of issues related to indoor air quality. The manual is directed to technically knowledgeable persons employed by utility companies - the customer service or marketing representative, applications engineer, or technician - who may not have specific expertise in indoor air quality issues. In addition to providing monitoring and control techniques, the manual summarizes the link between pollutant concentrations, air exchange, and energy conservation and describes the characteristics and health effects of selected pollutants. Where technical information is too lengthy or complex for inclusion in this volume, reference sources are given. Information for this manual was gathered from technical studies, manufacturers' information, and other materials from professional societies, institutes, and associations. The aim has been to provide objective technical and descriptive information that can be used by utility personnel to make informed decisions about indoor air quality issues.

  5. Energy Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved Air Flow Control in Residential Retrofit Energy Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved Air Flow ...

  6. ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for School Building Upgrades ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for School...

  7. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013, ...

  8. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

  9. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 01) EPA 402/K-13/001, February 2013 iap_rev1.pdf (970.38 KB) More Documents & Publications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02)

  10. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  11. JV Task 86 - Identifying the Source of Benzene in Indoor Air Using Different Compound Classes from TO-15 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven B. Hawthorne

    2007-04-15

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) data that had already been collected using EPA method TO-15 at four different sites under regulatory scrutiny (a school, strip mall, apartment complex, and business/residential neighborhood) were evaluated to determine whether the source of indoor air benzene was outdoor air or vapor intrusion from contaminated soil. Both the use of tracer organics characteristic of different sources and principal component statistical analysis demonstrated that the source of indoor air at virtually all indoor sampling locations was a result of outdoor air, and not contaminated soil in and near the indoor air-sampling locations. These results show that proposed remediation activities to remove benzene-contaminated soil are highly unlikely to reduce indoor air benzene concentrations. A manuscript describing these results is presently being prepared for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

  12. Indoor air quality & airborne disease control in healthcare facilities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; MEDICAL ESTABLISHMENTS; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS; DISEASES; THERMAL COMFORT; SPACE HVAC SYSTEMS Word ...

  13. Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Destaillats, H.; Apte, M.G.; Destaillats,, Hugo; Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

    2008-10-01

    Heating, ventilating, and cooling classrooms in California consume substantial electrical energy. Indoor air quality (IAQ) in classrooms affects studenthealth and performance. In addition to airborne pollutants that are emitted directly by indoor sources and those generated outdoors, secondary pollutants can be formed indoors by chemical reaction of ozone with other chemicals and materials. Filters are used in nearly all classroom heating, ventilation and air?conditioning (HVAC) systems to maintain energy-efficient HVAC performance and improve indoor air quality; however, recent evidence indicates that ozone reactions with filters may, in fact, be a source of secondary pollutants. This project quantitatively evaluated ozone deposition in HVAC filters and byproduct formation, and provided a preliminary assessment of the extent towhich filter systems are degrading indoor air quality. The preliminary information obtained will contribute to the design of subsequent research efforts and the identification of energy efficient solutions that improve indoor air quality in classrooms and the health and performance of students.

  14. Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

  15. An Innovative Reactor Technology to Improve Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempel, Jane

    2013-03-30

    As residential buildings achieve tighter envelopes in order to minimize energy used for space heating and cooling, accumulation of indoor air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), becomes a major concern causing poor air quality and increased health risks. Current VOC removal methods include sorbents, ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO), and increased ventilation, but these methods do not capture or destroy all VOCs or are prohibitively expensive to implement. TIAX's objective in this program was to develop a new VOC removal technology for residential buildings. This novel air purification technology is based on an innovative reactor and light source design along with UVPCO properties of the chosen catalyst to purify indoor air and enhance indoor air quality (IAQ). During the program we designed, fabricated and tested a prototype air purifier to demonstrate its feasibility and effectiveness. We also measured kinetics of VOC destruction on photocatalysts, providing deep insight into reactor design.

  16. DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indoor airPLUS qualification, a prerequisite for Zero Energy Ready Homes, offers an important platform to improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) in high-performance homes. A critical aspect of...

  17. Indoor airPLUS Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist Indoor airPLUS Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist The Rev. 01 checklist has been modified to reflect only the additional Indoor airPLUS requirements and their corresponding section numbers that must be met after completing the ENERGY STAR checklists. iap_verification_checklist_rev_1.pdf (261.75 KB) More Documents & Publications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev.

  18. Exposure to formaldehyde in indoor air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gammage, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Trends in formaldehyde concentrations to which residents are exposed are reviewed, as are the means for assessing these exposures. Concentrations as high as a few ppm encountered in manufactured housing during the 1970s were eliminated after the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 1984 ruling came into effect. The pressed-wood product industry, and its trade organizations, have made concerted efforts to comply with the ruling. Moreover, they have imposed additional voluntary product standards upon themselves intended to be applicable to a range of pressed-wood products wider than that defined in the HUD standard. Quarterly product testing on arbitrarily selected products shows a general lowering of emission rates with only a few percent of products now being above the HUD level. Measurement of ambient indoor levels of formaldehyde has been largely replaced by testing to assure conformance to product standards. The lower-emitting products on the market, if used in mobile home construction and furnishing, will expectantly produce formaldehyde levels not exceeding 0.1 ppm, except under conditions of unusually high temperature and humidity. Recent studies implicate household dust as a significant carrier of bound formaldehyde. In a few instances, old urea-formaldehyde cavity wall insulation has become friable and particles have blown into living areas. Future health assessments might need to consider this additional pathway of potential exposure.

  19. Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain I.

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing

  20. Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  1. Indoor air quality study of forty east Tennessee homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Hingerty, B.E.; Schuresko, D.D.; Parzyck, D.C.; Womack, D.R.; Morris, S.A.; Westley, R.R.; White, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    Over a one-year period, measurements of indoor air pollutants (CO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, formaldehyde, volatile organics, particulates, and radon) were made in 40 homes in East Tennessee. The houses were of various ages with different types of insulation and heating. Over one-half of the houses exceeded the ASHRAE indoor ceiling guideline of 0.1 ppM for formaldehyde on at least one occasion. Over the duration of the study, older houses averaged 0.04 ppM of formaldehyde while houses less than 5 years old averaged 0.08 ppM (P < 0.01). The highest concentration of formaldehyde measured was 0.4 ppM in a new home. Diurnal and seasonal fluctuations in levels of formaldehyde in some homes were as much as twofold and tenfold, respectively. The highest levels of formaldehyde were usually recorded during summer months. The concentration in indoor air of various organics was at least tenfold higher than in outdoor air. Carbon monoxide and nitrgen oxides were usually <2 and <0.02 ppM, respectively, except when gas stoves or kerosene space heaters were operating, or when a car was running in the garage. In 30% of the houses, the annual indoor guideline for radon, 4 pCi/L, was exceeded. The mean radon level in houses built on the ridgelines was 4.4 pCi/L, while houses located in the valleys had a mean level of 1.7 pCi/L (P < 0.01). The factor having the most impact on infiltration was operation of the central duct fan of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system. The mean rate of air exchange increased from 0.39 to 0.74 h/sup -1/ when the duct fan was operated (measurements prior to December 1982). This report presents the study design and implementation, describes the monitoring protocols, and provides a complete set of the data collected during the project. 25 references, 29 figures, 42 tables.

  2. EIS-0127: New Energy-Efficient Homes Programs, Assessing Indoor Air Quality Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration developed this EIS to explore whether different building techniques will control indoor air quality and still maintain cost-effective energy savings.

  3. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, Armin; Bergey, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  4. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  5. Method, system and apparatus for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartenstein, Steven D.; Tremblay, Paul L.; Fryer, Michael O.; Hohorst, Frederick A.

    2004-03-23

    A system, method and apparatus is provided for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air. A sensor array senses an air sample from the indoor air and analyzes the air sample to obtain signatures representative of contaminants in the air sample. When the level or type of contaminant poses a threat or hazard to the occupants, the present invention takes corrective actions which may include introducing additional fresh air. The corrective actions taken are intended to promote overall health of personnel, prevent personnel from being overexposed to hazardous contaminants and minimize the cost of operating the HVAC system. The identification of the contaminants is performed by comparing the signatures provided by the sensor array with a database of known signatures. Upon identification, the system takes corrective actions based on the level of contaminant present. The present invention is capable of learning the identity of previously unknown contaminants, which increases its ability to identify contaminants in the future. Indoor air quality is assured by monitoring the contaminants not only in the indoor air, but also in the outdoor air and the air which is to be recirculated. The present invention is easily adaptable to new and existing HVAC systems. In sum, the present invention is able to monitor and adjust the quality of indoor air in real time by sensing the level and type of contaminants present in indoor air, outdoor and recirculated air, providing an intelligent decision about the quality of the air, and minimizing the cost of operating an HVAC system.

  6. Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Less, Brennan; Walker, Iain

    2014-06-01

    Because airtightening is a significant part of Deep Energy Retrofits (DERs), concerns about ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) have emerged. To investigate this, ventilation and IAQ were assessed in 17 non-smoking California Deep Energy Retrofit homes. Inspections and surveys were used to assess household activities and ventilation systems. Pollutant sampling performed in 12 homes included six-day passive samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde and air exchange rate (AER); time-resolved data loggers were used to measure particle counts. Half of the homes provided continuous mechanical ventilation. Despite these homes being twice as airtight (3.0 and 7.6 ACH50, respectively), their median AER was indistinguishable from naturally vented homes (0.36 versus 0.37 hr--1). Numerous problems were found with ventilation systems; however, pollutant levels did not reach levels of concern in most homes. Ambient NO2 standards were exceeded in some gas cooking homes that used legacy ranges with standing pilots, and in Passive House-style homes without range hoods exhausted to outside. Cooking exhaust systems were installed and used inconsistently. The majority of homes reported using low-emitting materials, and formaldehyde levels were approximately half those in conventional new CA homes (19.7 versus 36 ?g/m3), with emissions rates nearly 40percent less (12.3 versus 20.6 ?g/m2/hr.). Presence of air filtration systems led to lower indoor particle number concentrations (PN>0.5: 8.80E+06 PN/m3 versus 2.99E+06; PN>2.5: 5.46E+0.5 PN/m3 versus 2.59E+05). The results indicate that DERs can provide adequate ventilation and IAQ, and that DERs should prioritize source control, particle filtration and well-designed local exhaust systems, while still providing adequate continuous ventilation.

  7. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  8. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model developmen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building...

  9. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a 50% reduction in building energy consumption. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings (890.97 KB) More Documents & ...

  10. DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS (Text Version)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Below is the text version of the webinar, DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS, presented in August 2014. Watch the presentation.

  11. Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-12-21

    Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

  12. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigg, Scott; Cautley, Dan; Francisco, Paul; Hawkins, Beth A; Brennan, Terry M

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  13. Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Englemann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  14. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

  15. Technology Solutions Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Rudd and D. Bergey

    2015-08-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs.

  16. United States Office of Radiation and EP A Environmental Protection Indoor Air August 1997

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    EP A Environmental Protection Indoor Air August 1997 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA-402-R-97-015 GEPA Offsite Environmental RECEIVED Monitoring Report , , , , , , 0 . S T I Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1996 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Governrnent. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied,

  17. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High-Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Less, Brennan; Mullen, Nasim; Singer, Brett; Walker, Iain

    2015-07-01

    Today’s high performance green homes are reaching previously unheard of levels of airtightness and are using new materials, technologies and strategies, whose impacts on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) cannot be fully anticipated from prior studies. This research study used pollutant measurements, home inspections, diagnostic testing and occupant surveys to assess IAQ in 24 new or deeply retrofitted homes designed to be high performance green buildings in California.

  18. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Using Indoor Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L.

    2014-04-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  19. Building America Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts, Tyler, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    ?Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy.

  20. Technology Solutions Case Study: Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-05-01

    This case study describes how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  1. Results of a forty-home indoor-air-pollutant monitoring study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Womack, D.R.; Morris, S.A.; Westley, R.R.; White, D.A.; Gupta, K.C.

    1983-01-01

    A study was conducted in 40 homes in the areas of Oak Ridge and west Knoxville, Tennessee. Concentrations of CO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, particulates, formaldehyde, and radon, as well as selected volatile organic compounds, were quantified. In addition, information was collected on air exchange rates, meteorological conditions, and structural and consumer products. This paper summarizes some of the results and provides specific examples of increased indoor concentrations of pollutants due to the operation of a kerosene space heater, a gas range, and a wood/coal stove. Results showed formaldehyde levels frequently exceeded 0.1 ppM; were highest in newer homes; and fluctuate diurnally and seasonally. Radon levels frequently exceeded 3 pCi/L and correlated strongly with house location. Organic pollutant levels were at least an order of magnitude higher indoors than outdoors. Combustion sources (especially unvented) significantly increased levels of CO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, and particulates. Air exchange rates were increased nearly two-fold by operation of the HVAC central air circulation fan.

  2. Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

    2013-05-13

    Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

  3. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) indoor air quality in office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallingford, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 356 indoor-air-quality health-hazard evaluations were completed by NIOSH from 1971 through December of 1985. Most of these studies concerned government and private office buildings where there were worker complaints. Worker complaints resulted from contamination from inside the building (19% of the cases), contamination from outside (11 percent), contamination from the building fabric (4%), biological contamination (5%), inadequate ventilation (50%), and unknown causes (11%). Health complaints addressed by investigative efforts included eye irritation, dry throat, headache, fatigue, sinus congestion, skin irritation, shortness of breath, cough, dizziness, and nausea.

  4. Causes of Indoor Air Quality Problems in Schools: Summary of Scientific Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayer, C.W.

    2001-02-22

    In the modern urban setting, most individuals spend about 80% of their time indoors and are therefore exposed to the indoor environment to a much greater extent than to the outdoors (Lebowitz 1992). Concomitant with this increased habitation in urban buildings, there have been numerous reports of adverse health effects related to indoor air quality (IAQ) (sick buildings). Most of these buildings were built in the last two decades and were constructed to be energy-efficient. The quality of air in the indoor environment can be altered by a number of factors: release of volatile compounds from furnishings, floor and wall coverings, and other finishing materials or machinery; inadequate ventilation; poor temperature and humidity control; re-entrainment of outdoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs); and the contamination of the indoor environment by microbes (particularly fungi). Armstrong Laboratory (1992) found that the three most frequent causes of IAQ are (1) inadequate design and/or maintenance of the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, (2) a shortage of fresh air, and (3) lack of humidity control. A similar study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH 1989) recognized inadequate ventilation as the most frequent source of IAQ problems in the work environment (52% of the time). Poor IAQ due to microbial contamination can be the result of the complex interactions of physical, chemical, and biological factors. Harmful fungal populations, once established in the HVAC system or occupied space of a modern building, may episodically produce or intensify what is known as sick building syndrome (SBS) (Cummings and Withers 1998). Indeed, SBS caused by fungi may be more enduring and recalcitrant to treatment than SBS from multiple chemical exposures (Andrae 1988). An understanding of the microbial ecology of the indoor environment is crucial to ultimately resolving many IAQ problems. The incidence of SBS related to multiple

  5. Journal

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Amchitka had been a large military base; remaining hazards ... Air) 3.00 Diving Equipment (specificiations, ... The nearest airport was at Adak, a distance of 280 km. ...

  6. Energy Code Enforcement Training Manual : Covering the Washington State Energy Code and the Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington State Energy Code Program

    1992-05-01

    This manual is designed to provide building department personnel with specific inspection and plan review skills and information on provisions of the 1991 edition of the Washington State Energy Code (WSEC). It also provides information on provisions of the new stand-alone Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (VIAQ) Code.The intent of the WSEC is to reduce the amount of energy used by requiring energy-efficient construction. Such conservation reduces energy requirements, and, as a result, reduces the use of finite resources, such as gas or oil. Lowering energy demand helps everyone by keeping electricity costs down. (It is less expensive to use existing electrical capacity efficiently than it is to develop new and additional capacity needed to heat or cool inefficient buildings.) The new VIAQ Code (effective July, 1991) is a natural companion to the energy code. Whether energy-efficient or not, an homes have potential indoor air quality problems. Studies have shown that indoor air is often more polluted than outdoor air. The VIAQ Code provides a means of exchanging stale air for fresh, without compromising energy savings, by setting standards for a controlled ventilation system. It also offers requirements meant to prevent indoor air pollution from building products or radon.

  7. Hydroxide Anion at the Air-Water Interface (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Hydroxide Anion at the Air-Water Interface Here we use first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, in which the forces are obtained "on the fly" from electronic...

  8. Effect of residential air-to-air heat and moisture exchangers on indoor humidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barringer, C.G.; McGugan, C.A. )

    1989-01-01

    A project was undertaken to develop guidelines for the selection of residential heat and moisture recovery ventilation systems (HRVs) in order to maintain an acceptable indoor humidity for various climatic conditions. These guidelines were developed from reviews on ventilation requirements, HRV performance specifications, and from computer modeling. Space conditions within three house/occupancy models for several types of HRV were simulated for three climatic conditions (Lake Charles, LA; Seattle, WA; and Winnipeg, MB) in order to determine the impact of the HRVs on indoor relative humidity and space-conditioning loads. Results show that when reduction of cooling cost is the main consideration, exchangers with moisture recovery are preferable to sensible HRVs. For reduction of heating costs, moisture recovery should be done for ventilation rates greater than about 15 L/s and average winter temperatures less than about (minus) 10{degrees}C if internal moisture generation rates are low. For houses with higher ventilation rates and colder average winter temperatures, exchangers with moisture recovery should be used.

  9. The ORNL Indoor Air Quality Study: Re-cap, Context, and Assessment on Radon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward; Rose, Erin M.; Ternes, Mark P.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the retrospective evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program that was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an assessment of the impacts of weatherization on indoor air quality (IAQ) was conducted. This assessment included nearly 500 treatment and control homes across the country. Homes were monitored for carbon monoxide, radon, formaldehyde, temperature and humidity pre- and post-weatherization. This report focuses on the topic of radon and addresses issues not thoroughly discussed in the original IAQ report. The size, scope and rigor of the radon component of the IAQ study are compared to previous studies that assessed the impacts of weatherization on indoor radon levels. It is found that the ORNL study is by far the most extensive study conducted to date, though the ORNL results are consistent with the findings of the other studies. However, the study does have limitations related to its reliance on short-term measurements of radon and inability to attribute changes in radon levels in homes post-weatherization to specific weatherization measures individually or in combination.

  10. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Combustion Safety Using Appliances for Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this case study, the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit team provides guidance on how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings.

  11. Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in the ZEBRAlliance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hun, D.; Jackson, M.; Shrestha, S.

    2013-09-01

    High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. In this project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in research houses located in Oak Ridge, TN, that were less than 2 years old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built, unoccupied, and unfurnished. The team identified air pollutants of concern in the test homes that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern from initial air sampling surveys. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74°F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused minimal to modest increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

  12. Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air Partners: American Gas Association www.aga.org Center of Energy and Environment www.mncee.org Building Performance Institute www.bpi.org NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org/PARR Building Components: Gas Appliances Application: Retrofit Single Family Year Tested: 2013 Applicable Climate

  13. Indoor Chemical Exposures: Humans' Non-respiratory Interactions with Room Air

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Charles Weschler

    2010-09-01

    March 18, 2010 Berkeley Lab Environmental Energy Technology Division distinguished lecture: The marked difference in pollutant concentrations between an occupied and un-occupied room are only partially explained by human bio-effluents. Humans alter levels of ozone and related oxidants such as nitrate and hydroxyl radicals in the rooms they inhabit; in effect, they change the oxidative capacity of room air. Ozone-initiated reactions on exposed skin, hair and clothing generate products, including potentially irritating chemicals whose concentrations are much higher in the occupant's breathing zone than in the core of the room. Charles J. Weschler is a Professor at the School of Public Health, the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School & Rutgers University (New Jersey). He is also a Visiting Professor at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU, Lyngby, Denmark).

  14. Using a Ventilation Controller to Optimize Residential Passive Ventilation For Energy and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain

    2014-08-01

    One way to reduce the energy impact of providing residential ventilation is to use passive and hybrid systems. However, these passive and hybrid (sometimes called mixed-mode) systems must still meet chronic and acute health standards for ventilation. This study uses a computer simulation approach to examine the energy and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of passive and hybrid ventilation systems, in 16 California climate zones. Both uncontrolled and flow controlled passive stacks are assessed. A new hybrid ventilation system is outlined that uses an intelligent ventilation controller to minimise energy use, while ensuring chronic and acute IAQ standards are met. ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 – the United States standard for residential ventilation - is used as the chronic standard, and exposure limits for PM2.5, formaldehyde and NO2 are used as the acute standards.The results show that controlled passive ventilation and hybrid ventilation can be used in homes to provide equivalent IAQ to continuous mechanical ventilation, for less use of energy.

  15. Indoor Chemical Exposures: Humans' Non-respiratory Interactions with Room Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Weschler

    2010-03-29

    March 18, 2010 Berkeley Lab Environmental Energy Technology Division distinguished lecture: The marked difference in pollutant concentrations between an occupied and un-occupied room are only partially explained by human bio-effluents. Humans alter levels of ozone and related oxidants such as nitrate and hydroxyl radicals in the rooms they inhabit; in effect, they change the oxidative capacity of room air. Ozone-initiated reactions on exposed skin, hair and clothing generate products, including potentially irritating chemicals whose concentrations are much higher in the occupant's breathing zone than in the core of the room. Charles J. Weschler is a Professor at the School of Public Health, the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School & Rutgers University (New Jersey). He is also a Visiting Professor at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU, Lyngby, Denmark).

  16. Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in High-Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hun, Diana E; Jackson, Mark C; Shrestha, Som S

    2014-01-01

    High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. We attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in a research house located in Oak Ridge, TN, that was 20 months old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built (i.e., natural ventilation rate ~0.02 h-1), unoccupied, and unfurnished. We identified air pollutants of concern in the test home that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern among the contaminants that were sampled in the initial survey because it was the only compound that showed concentrations that were greater than the recommended exposure levels. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74 F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

  17. A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Apte, Joshua S.

    2010-04-27

    The Paharpur Business Centre and Software Technology Incubator Park (PBC) is a 7 story, 50,400 ft{sup 2} office building located near Nehru Place in New Delhi India. The occupancy of the building at full normal operations is about 500 people. The building management philosophy embodies innovation in energy efficiency while providing full service and a comfortable, safe, healthy environment to the occupants. Provision of excellent Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is an expressed goal of the facility, and the management has gone to great lengths to achieve it. This is particularly challenging in New Delhi, where ambient urban pollution levels rank among the worst on the planet. The approach to provide good IAQ in the building includes a range of technical elements: air washing and filtration of ventilation intake air from rooftop air handler, the use of an enclosed rooftop greenhouse with a high density of potted plants as a bio-filtration system, dedicated secondary HVAC/air handling units on each floor with re-circulating high efficiency filtration and UVC treatment of the heat exchanger coils, additional potted plants for bio-filtration on each floor, and a final exhaust via the restrooms located at each floor. The conditioned building exhaust air is passed through an energy recovery wheel and chemisorbent cartridge, transferring some heat to the incoming air to increase the HVAC energy efficiency. The management uses 'green' cleaning products exclusively in the building. Flooring is a combination of stone, tile and 'zero VOC' carpeting. Wood trim and finish appears to be primarily of solid sawn materials, with very little evidence of composite wood products. Furniture is likewise in large proportion constructed from solid wood materials. The overall impression is that of a very clean and well-kept facility. Surfaces are polished to a high sheen, probably with wax products. There was an odor of urinal cake in the restrooms. Smoking is not allowed in the building. The

  18. Indoor air quality in 24 California residences designed as high-performance homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Less, Brennan; Mullen, Nasim; Singer, Brett; Walker, Iain

    2015-01-01

    Today’s high performance green homes are reaching previously unheard of levels of airtightness and are using new materials, technologies and strategies, whose impacts on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) cannot be fully anticipated from prior studies. This research study used pollutant measurements, home inspections, diagnostic testing and occupant surveys to assess IAQ in 24 new or deeply retrofitted homes designed to be high performance green buildings in California. Although the mechanically vented homes were six times as airtight as non-mechanically ventilated homes (medians of 1.1 and 6.1 ACH50, n=11 and n=8, respectively), their use of mechanical ventilation systems and possibly window operation meant their median air exchange rates were almost the same (0.30 versus 0.32 hr-1, n=8 and n=8, respectively). Pollutant levels were also similar in vented and unvented homes. In addition, these similarities were achieved despite numerous observed faults in complex mechanical ventilation systems. More rigorous commissioning is still recommended. Cooking exhaust systems were used inconsistently and several suffered from design flaws. Failure to follow best practices led to IAQ problems in some cases. Ambient nitrogen dioxide standards were exceeded or nearly so in four homes that either used gas ranges with standing pilots, or in Passive House-style homes that used gas cooking burners without venting range hoods. Homes without active particle filtration had particle count concentrations approximately double those in homes with enhanced filtration. The majority of homes reported using low-emitting materials; consistent with this, formaldehyde levels were approximately half those in conventional, new CA homes built before 2008. Emissions of ultrafine particles (with diameters <100 nm) were dramatically lower on induction electric cooktops, compared with either gas or resistance electric models. These results indicate that high performance homes can achieve

  19. Indoor air pollution from portable kerosene-fired space heaters. [Effects of wick height and fuel consumption rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traynor, G.W.; Apte, M.G.; Dillworth, J.F.; Grimsrud, D.T.

    1983-02-01

    Indoor use of unvented combustion appliances is known to cause an increase in indoor air pollutant levels. Laboratory tests were conducted on radiant and convective portable kerosene-fired space heaters to identify the pollutants they emit and to determine their emission rates. Laboratory-derived CO and NO/sub 2/ emission rates from unvented portable kerosense-fired space heaters are summarized and the effect of wick height and fuel consumption rate on CO and NO/sub 2/ emissions is given. Pollutant concentration profiles resulting from the use of kerosene heaters in a 27m/sup 3/ environmental chamber and a 240m/sup 3/ house are presented. When such heaters are operated for one hour in a 27m/sup 3/ chamber with 0.4 air changes per hour, the resultant CO/sub 2/ concentrations are well above the U.S. occupational standard, and NO/sub 2/ concentrations are well above California's short-term outdoor standard. Further data on parameters such as heater usage patterns and air exchange rates are needed to determine the actual pollutant exposure that kerosene heater users experience.

  20. Results of the California Healthy Homes Indoor Air Quality Study of 2011-2013: Impact of natural gas appliances on air pollutant concentrations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mullen, Nasim A.; Li, Jina; Russell, Marion L.; Spears, Michael; Less, Brennan D.; Singer, Brett C.

    2015-03-17

    This study was conducted to assess the current impact of natural gas appliances on air quality in California homes. Data were collected via telephone interviews and measurements inside and outside of 352 homes. Passive samplers measured time-resolved CO and time-integrated NOX, NO2, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde over ~6d periods in November 2011 - April 2012 and October 2012 - March 2013. The fraction of indoor NOX and NO2 attributable to indoor sources was estimated. NOX, NO2 and highest 1-h CO were higher in homes that cooked with gas and increased with amount of gas cooking. NOX and NO2 were higher inmore » homes with cooktop pilot burners, relative to gas cooking without pilots. Homes with a pilot burner on a floor or wall furnace had higher kitchen and bedroom NOX and NO2 compared to homes without a furnace pilot. When scaled to account for varying home size and mixing volume, indoor-attributed bedroom and kitchen NOX and kitchen NO2 were not higher in homes with wall or floor furnace pilot burners, though bedroom NO2 was higher. In homes that cooked 4 h or more with gas, self-reported use of kitchen exhaust was associated with lower NOX, NO2 and highest 1-h CO. Gas appliances were not associated with higher concentrations of formaldehyde or acetaldehyde.« less

  1. Computed tomography and optical remote sensing: Development for the study of indoor air pollutant transport and dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drescher, A.C.

    1995-06-01

    This thesis investigates the mixing and dispersion of indoor air pollutants under a variety of conditions using standard experimental methods. It also extensively tests and improves a novel technique for measuring contaminant concentrations that has the potential for more rapid, non-intrusive measurements with higher spatial resolution than previously possible. Experiments conducted in a sealed room support the hypothesis that the mixing time of an instantaneously released tracer gas is inversely proportional to the cube root of the mechanical power transferred to the room air. One table-top and several room-scale experiments are performed to test the concept of employing optical remote sensing (ORS) and computed tomography (CT) to measure steady-state gas concentrations in a horizontal plane. Various remote sensing instruments, scanning geometries and reconstruction algorithms are employed. Reconstructed concentration distributions based on existing iterative CT techniques contain a high degree of unrealistic spatial variability and do not agree well with simultaneously gathered point-sample data.

  2. SC e-journals, Environment

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Zone Journal Virtual Journal of Biomedical Optics Waste Management Water, Air, and Soil Pollution Water, Air, and Soil Pollution: Focus Water Alternatives - OAJ Water Research ...

  3. Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L.; Moya, J.

    1999-07-01

    Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

  4. Preliminary results of a forty-home indoor air pollutant monitoring study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Womack, D.R.; Morris, S.A.; Westley, R.R.; Gupta, K.C.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed study of the pollutants found in forty homes in the Oak Ridge/Knoxville, Tennessee, area is being conducted. Formaldehyde measurements were made on a twice-per-month schedule using passive permeation monitors with a sampling period of 24 hours. In addition to the formaldehyde measurements, other pollutants, including volatile organics, particulates, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide, were measured during a one-day visit to each house. Radon levels were measured during a one-day visit to each house. Randon levels were measured by an active monitor located in the house for a period of one week. Air infiltration rates and meteorological data were also recorded. Pollutant levels were generally below any applicable guidelines with the exception of radon and formaldehyde which were elevated in some of the houses. Results of the first phase of the monitoring study are presented.

  5. A scoping study on the costs of indoor air quality illnesses:an insurance loss reduction perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allan; Vine, Edward L.

    1998-08-31

    The incidence of commercial buildings with poor indoor air quality (IAQ), and the frequency of litigation over the effects of poor IAQ is increasing. If so, these increases have ramifications for insurance carriers, which pay for many of the costs of health care and general commercial liability. However, little is known about the actual costs to insurance companies from poor IAQ in buildings. This paper reports on the results of a literature search of buildings-related, business and legal databases, and interviews with insurance and risk management representatives aimed at finding information on the direct costs to the insurance industry of poor building IAQ, as well as the costs of litigation. The literature search and discussions with insurance and risk management professionals reported in this paper turned up little specific information about the costs of IAQ-related problems to insurance companies. However, those discussions and certain articles in the insurance industry press indicate that there is a strong awareness and growing concern over the "silent crisis" of IAQ and its potential to cause large industry losses, and that a few companies are taking steps to address this issue. The source of these losses include both direct costs to insurers from paying health insurance and professional liability claims, as weIl as the cost of litigation. In spite of the lack of data on how IAQ-related health problems affect their business, the insurance industry has taken the anecdotal evidence about their reality seriously enough to alter their policies in ways that have lessened their exposure. We conclude by briefly discussing four activities that need to be addressed in the near future: (1) quantifying IAQ-related insurance costs by sector, (2) educating the insurance industry about the importance of IAQ issues, (3) examining IAQ impacts on the insurance industry in the residential sector, and (4) evaluating the relationship between IAQ improvements and their impact on

  6. Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Chamness, Michele A.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Singer, Brett C.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-10-20

    To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAP’s low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low

  7. Building America Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts, Tyler, Texas (Fact Sheet), Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts Tyler, Texas PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Ventilation Effectiveness Location: Tyler, TX Partners: University of Texas, TxAIRE, uttyler.edu/txaire/houses/ Building Science Corporation, buildingscience.com Building Component: Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC), whole-building dilution ventilation Application: New and retrofit; single-family and multifamily Year Tested: 2012 Climate Zones: All PERFORMANCE

  8. Indoor Environment Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Because humans spend an average of 85% to 90% of their time indoors, energy usage by the buildings sector can have a significant impact on human comfort, health and productivity. To advance energy conservation technologies while maintaining indoor air quality, research in the Indoor Environment Program (IEP) is directed toward understanding relations between building energy (usage and technologies), indoor air quality, and human health, comfort and productivity. The IEP addresses the issue of optimizing the health, comfort and productivity of a building's occupants while maintaining the building's energy efficiency. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants with indoor sources, reduced ventilation may produce undesirable effects on indoor air quality and on the health, comfort, and productivity of a building's occupants. This issue is an important theme for the research of other research groups and projects within IEP.

  9. Indoor Environment Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Because humans spend an average of 85% to 90% of their time indoors, energy usage by the buildings sector can have a significant impact on human comfort, health and productivity. To advance energy conservation technologies while maintaining indoor air quality, research in the Indoor Environment Program (IEP) is directed toward understanding relations between building energy (usage and technologies), indoor air quality, and human health, comfort and productivity. The IEP addresses the issue of optimizing the health, comfort and productivity of a building`s occupants while maintaining the building`s energy efficiency. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants with indoor sources, reduced ventilation may produce undesirable effects on indoor air quality and on the health, comfort, and productivity of a building`s occupants. This issue is an important theme for the research of other research groups and projects within IEP.

  10. Pending indoor air quality and radon abatement legislation. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Regulation of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session on S. 656 and S. 657, May 25, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This hearing on pending indoor air quality and radon abatement legislation includes testimony from individuals and representatives of the following groups: Business Council on Indoor Air; American Lung Association; Consumer Federation of America; Radiation Protection Programs, NJ; School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University; AFL-CIO; EPA; National Parent Teacher Association. Additional material includes statements from: American Lung Assoc.; Alliance for Radon Reduction; Alliance to Save Energy; American Industrial Hygiene Assoc.; Bowser Morner, Inc.; Building Owners and Managers Assoc. International; Chemical Specialties Manufacturers Assoc.; Council for American Private Education; National Assoc. of Home Builders; National Assoc. of Realtors; National School Boards Assoc.; Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Assoc.

  11. Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low to Moderate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low to Moderate CO2 ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC) Country of Publication: United States ...

  12. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California. Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Apte, Mike G.

    2010-10-31

    This report considers the question of whether the California Energy Commission should incorporate the ASHRAE 62.1 ventilation standard into the Title 24 ventilation rate (VR) standards, thus allowing buildings to follow the Indoor Air Quality Procedure. This, in contrast to the current prescriptive standard, allows the option of using ventilation rate as one of several strategies, which might include source reduction and air cleaning, to meet specified targets of indoor air concentrations and occupant acceptability. The research findings reviewed in this report suggest that a revised approach to a ventilation standard for commercial buildings is necessary, because the current prescriptive ASHRAE 62.1 Ventilation Rate Procedure (VRP) apparently does not provide occupants with either sufficiently acceptable or sufficiently healthprotective air quality. One possible solution would be a dramatic increase in the minimum ventilation rates (VRs) prescribed by a VRP. This solution, however, is not feasible for at least three reasons: the current need to reduce energy use rather than increase it further, the problem of polluted outdoor air in many cities, and the apparent limited ability of increasing VRs to reduce all indoor airborne contaminants of concern (per Hodgson (2003)). Any feasible solution is thus likely to include methods of pollutant reduction other than increased outdoor air ventilation; e.g., source reduction or air cleaning. The alternative 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure (IAQP) offers multiple possible benefits in this direction over the VRP, but seems too limited by insufficient specifications and inadequate available data to provide adequate protection for occupants. Ventilation system designers rarely choose to use it, finding it too arbitrary and requiring use of much non-engineering judgment and information that is not readily available. This report suggests strategies to revise the current ASHRAE IAQP to reduce its current limitations. These

  13. Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

    2006-07-31

    This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

  14. SC e-journals, Earth Sciences

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Archaeobotany Visual Geosciences Virtual Journal of Biomedical Optics Water, Air, and Soil Pollution Water, Air, and Soil Pollution: Focus Water Alternatives - OAJ Water ...

  15. Participant Assisted Data Collection Methods in the California Healthy Homes Indoor Air Quality Study of 2011-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullen, Nasim A.; Li, Jina; Singer, Brett C.

    2013-08-01

    From November 2011 to March 2013, air quality was measured over 6-day periods in 324 residences across California using a mail-out strategy. All interactions with study participants, from recruitment, to data collection, to communication of results, were conducted with remote communication methods including conventional mail, electronic mail, telephone and text messaging. Potential participants were reached primarily by sharing study information with community groups and organizations that directed interested individuals to complete an online screening survey. Pollutant concentrations were measured with sampling equipment that was mailed to participants' homes with deployment instructions. Residence and household characteristics and activity data were collected via two phone surveys and an activity log. A comparison of responses to survey questions completed online versus over the phone indicated that a substantial fraction of participants (roughly 20%) required a researcher's assistance to respond to basic questions about appliance characteristics. Using the printed instructions and telephone assistance from researchers, roughly 90% of participants successfully deployed and returned sampling materials accurately and on schedule. The mail-out strategy employed in this study was found to be a cost-effective means for collecting residential air quality data.

  16. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

    1984-05-22

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

  17. Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores in California. Predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Mendell, Mark J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Dutton, Spencer M.; Berkeley, Pam M.; Spears, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Through mass-balance modeling of various ventilation scenarios that might satisfy the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Procedure, we estimate indoor concentrations of contaminants of concern (COCs) in California “big box” stores, compare estimates to available thresholds, and for selected scenarios estimate differences in energy consumption. Findings are intended to inform decisions on adding performance-based approaches to ventilation rate (VR) standards for commercial buildings. Using multi-zone mass-balance models and available contaminant source rates, we estimated concentrations of 34 COCs for multiple ventilation scenarios: VRmin (0.04 cfm/ft2 ), VRmax (0.24 cfm/ft2 ), and VRmid (0.14 cfm/ft2 ). We compared COC concentrations with available health, olfactory, and irritant thresholds. We estimated building energy consumption at different VRs using a previously developed EnergyPlus model. VRmax did control all contaminants adequately, but VRmin did not, and VRmid did so only marginally. Air cleaning and local ventilation near strong sources both showed promise. Higher VRs increased indoor concentrations of outdoor air pollutants. Lowering VRs in big box stores in California from VRmax to VRmid would reduce total energy use by an estimated 6.6% and energy costs by 2.5%. Reducing the required VRs in California’s big box stores could reduce energy use and costs, but poses challenges for health and comfort of occupants. Source removal, air cleaning, and local ventilation may be needed at reduced VRs, and even at current recommended VRs. Also, alternative ventilation strategies taking climate and season into account in ventilation schedules may provide greater energy cost savings than constant ventilation rates, while improving IAQ.

  18. Indoor environment program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daisey, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  19. Indoor environment program - 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daisey, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  20. Providing better indoor environmental quality brings economicbenefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Seppanen, Olli

    2007-06-01

    This paper summarizes the current scientific evidence that improved indoor environmental quality can improve work performance and health. The review indicates that work and school work performance is affected by indoor temperature and ventilation rate. Pollutant source removal can sometimes improve work performance. Based on formal statistical analyses of existing research results, quantitative relationships are provided for the linkages of work performance with indoor temperature and outdoor air ventilation rate. The review also indicates that improved health and related financial savings are obtainable from reduced indoor tobacco smoking, prevention and remediation of building dampness, and increased ventilation. Example cost-benefit analyses indicate that many measures to improve indoor temperature control and increase ventilation rates will be highly cost effective, with benefit-cost ratios as high as 80 and annual economic benefits as high as $700 per person.

  1. Investigation of key parameters influencing the efficient photocatalytic oxidation of indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quici, Natalia; Kibanova, Daria; Vera, Maria Laura; Choi, Hyeok; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Litter, Marta I.; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Destaillats, Hugo

    2008-06-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation of indoor VOCs has the potential to eliminate pollutants from indoor environments, thus effectively improving and/or maintaining indoor air quality while reducing ventilation energy costs. Design and operation of UV photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners requires optimization of various parameters to achieve highest pollutant removal efficiencies while avoiding the formation of harmful secondary byproducts and maximizing catalyst lifetime.

  2. SC e-journals by Publisher

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and Archaeobotany Veterinary Research Communications Virchows Archiv Virtual Reality Virus Genes Visual Computer, The Visual Geosciences VLDB Journal, The Water, Air, and Soil ...

  3. Nuclear Weapons Journal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Weapons Journal Nuclear Weapons Journal The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue 2, 2009 ...

  4. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert; Lackey, Robert S.; Fagan, Jr., Thomas J.; Veyo, Stephen E.; Humphrey, Joseph R.

    1984-01-01

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module 10, an air mover module 12, and a resistance heat package module 14, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor 36 in a space adjacent the heat exchanger 28, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown in FIGS. 4-7 to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations.

  5. Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low to Moderate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low to Moderate CO2 ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  6. Journal Covers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Covers Journal Covers Ambient pressure XPS and IRRAS investigation of ethanol steam reforming on nickel-ceria catalysts Print Monday, 15 August 2016 17:11 Ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (AP-IRRAS) have been used to elucidate the active sites and mechanistic steps associated with the ethanol steam reforming reaction (ESR) over Ni-CeO2(111) model catalysts. Article link. Quantitative Microstructural Imaging by

  7. Central Air Conditioning | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Air supply and return ducts come from indoors through the home's exterior wall or roof to connect with the packaged air conditioner, which is usually located outdoors....

  8. Air Conditioning | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An air conditioner cools your home with a cold indoor coil called the evaporator. The condenser, a hot outdoor coil, releases the collected heat outside. The evaporator and ...

  9. SC e-journals, Mathematics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Mathematics Journal of Computational Chemistry Journal of Computational Electronics ... Biology Journal of Mathematical Chemistry Journal of Mathematical Fluid Mechanics ...

  10. Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corsi, Dr. Richard; Morandi, Dr. Maria; Siegel, Dr. Jeffrey; Hun, Diana E

    2011-01-01

    Attached garages have been identified as important sources of indoor residential air pollution. However, the literature lacks information on how the proximity of cars to the living area affects indoor concentrations of gasoline-related compounds, and the origin of these pollutants. We analyzed data from the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study and evaluated 114 residences with cars in an attached garage, detached garage or carport, or without cars. Results indicate that homes with cars in attached garages were affected the most. Concentrations in homes with cars in detached garages and residences without cars were similar. The contribution from gasoline-related sources to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to be dominated by car exhaust, or a combination of tailpipe and gasoline vapor emissions. Residing in a home with an attached garage could lead to benzene exposures ten times higher than exposures from commuting in heavy traffic.

  11. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials Citation Details ... and urban vegetation (trees, grass, shrubs) on the meteorology and air quality of a city. ...

  12. SC e-journals Sitemap

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sitemap Home Page Open Access Journals (OAJ) Web of Science Science Accelerator Browse Journals Alphabetically Journals by Publisher Journals by Subject Search Search by ...

  13. Journal bearing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menke, John R.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-05-11

    1. An improved journal bearing comprising in combination a non-rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a first bearing surface, a rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a confronting second bearing surface having a plurality of bearing elements, a source of lubricant adjacent said bearing elements for supplying lubricant thereto, each bearing element consisting of a pair of elongated relatively shallowly depressed surfaces lying in a cylindrical surface co-axial with the non-depressed surface and diverging from one another in the direction of rotation and obliquely arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of said rotatable member to cause a flow of lubricant longitudinally along said depressed surfaces from their distal ends toward their proximal ends as said bearing members are rotated relative to one another, each depressed surface subtending a radial angle of less than 360.degree., and means for rotating said rotatable bearing member to cause the lubricant to flow across and along said depressed surfaces, the flow of lubricant being impeded by the non-depressed portions of said second bearing surface to cause an increase in the lubricant pressure.

  14. ARM - Journal Articles 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Articles Conference Documents Program ... convective systems (Citation) Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology ARM ... Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters Yes ...

  15. Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

  16. SC e-journals

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SC e-journals Home Browse ABOUTFAQ HELP Desktop access to journals of interest to the Office of Science Search Options Web of Science Search citations for a wide range of ...

  17. Nuclear Scission and Quantum Localization (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 1100809 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 107; Journal Issue: 13; Journal ...

  18. HYDROLYTIC TENDENCIES OF FERRIC CHELATES (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 1963-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 4702598 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry; Journal Volume: 67; Journal ...

  19. The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xuguo; Yu, Yiting; Lee, Wah Heng; Yap, Jennifer; Yao, Fei; Suan, Sim Tiow; Ing, Seah Keng; Haynes, Matthew; Rohwer, Forest; Wei, Chia Lin; Tan, Patrick; Bristow, James; Rubin, Edward M.; Ruan, Yijun

    2008-02-12

    The indoor atmosphere is an ecological unit that impacts on public health. To investigate the composition of organisms in this space, we applied culture-independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air of two densely populated urban buildings, from which we analyzed 80 megabases genomic DNA sequence and 6000 16S rDNA clones. The air microbiota is primarily bacteria, including potential opportunistic pathogens commonly isolated from human-inhabited environments such as hospitals, but none of the data contain matches to virulent pathogens or bioterror agents. Comparison of air samples with each other and nearby environments suggested that the indoor air microbes are not random transients from surrounding outdoor environments, but rather originate from indoor niches. Sequence annotation by gene function revealed specific adaptive capabilities enriched in the air environment, including genes potentially involved in resistance to desiccation and oxidative damage. This baseline index of air microbiota will be valuable for improving designs of surveillance for natural or man-made release of virulent pathogens.

  20. Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors July 25, 2013 - 11:20am Addthis Blinds are a great option for cooling your home in the summer. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nycshooter Blinds are a great option for cooling your home in the summer. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nycshooter Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy How can I participate? Instead of turning on the air

  1. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

  2. ARM - Journal Articles 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govPublicationsJournal Articles 2016 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents & Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2016 112 2015 210 2014 188 2013 201 2012 176 2011 186 2010 198 2009 216 2008 176 2007 151 2006

  3. ARM - Journal Articles 2004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    over the western Arctic Ocean region (Citation) Journal of Climate ARM d'Entremont Analysis of Geostationary Satellite Imagery Using a Temporal-Differencing Technique (Citation)...

  4. ARM - Journal Articles 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Articles Conference Documents Program ... in Modeling Earth Systems Yes ARM ASR Zhou ... Technology Yes ASR China Morphology and mixing state of aged soot particles at a remote ...

  5. SC e-journals

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Options Web of Science Search citations for a wide range of peer-reviewed journals, includes cited reference searching and author identification tools. Web of Knowledge ...

  6. indoor | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributor 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building...

  7. Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect (Journal Article) | DOE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 116; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007 Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC), ...

  8. Symmetry constraints on the elastoresistivity tensor (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 92; Journal Issue: 23; ...

  9. Determination of Hydromagnetic Equilibria (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 1961-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 4029677 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physics of Fluids (New York); Journal Volume: 4; Journal ...

  10. An optically accessible pyrolysis microreactor (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2016-01-15 OSTI Identifier: 22482827 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 87; Journal ...

  11. Crystal structure determination of Efavirenz (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2015-12-23 OSTI Identifier: 22494487 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1700; Journal ...

  12. Parallel ptychographic reconstruction (Journal Article) | DOE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 1222306 GrantContract Number: FC02-06ER25777 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Optics Express Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 22; Journal ...

  13. Optical diffraction properties of multimicrogratings (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2015-02-27 OSTI Identifier: 1222281 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Applied Optics Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 54; Journal Issue: 7; ...

  14. Entanglement purification with double selection (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2009-10-15 OSTI Identifier: 21316361 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 80; Journal Issue: 4; ...

  15. Directional Antineutrino Detection (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: ER-41850; SC00012567 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 114; Journal ...

  16. Sneutrino chaotic inflation and landscape (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: AC02-05CH11231 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physics Letters. Section B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 738; Journal Issue: C; ...

  17. Effective Lagrangian for Nonrelativistic Systems (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 1180179 GrantContract Number: AC03-76SF00098 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physical Review X Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 4; Journal ...

  18. Magnetic microbes: Bacterial magnetite biomineralization (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 46; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1084-9521 Publisher: Elsevier Research Org: Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) ...

  19. Complexation of Polyoxometalates with Cyclodextrins (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2015-08-26 OSTI Identifier: 1178853 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: J. Am. Chem. Soc.; Journal Volume: 137; Journal Issue: (12) ; ...

  20. Atypical Glycolysis in Clostridium thermocellum (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Applied and Environmental Microbiology; Journal Volume: 79; Journal Issue: 9 Research Org: BioEnergy Science Center ...

  1. Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Cover Stories Journal Cover Stories Here are papers authored by NERSC users that were featured on the cover of the scientific journal in which they were published. You can sort according to any of the headings below. Sort by: Default | Name | Date (low-high) | Date (high-low) | Source | Category apl 108 14 cover Gallium vacancy complexes as a cause of Shockley-Read-Hall recombination in IIInitride light emitters April 4, 2016 | Author(s): C. E. Dreyer, A. Alkauskas, J. L. Lyons, J. S.

  2. SC e-journals, Engineering

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Engineering Science Chemical Science Chemistry of Materials Chinese Optics Letters ... Robotic Systems Journal of Solid State Chemistry Journal of The American Ceramic Society ...

  3. Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air Conditioning Loads for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air Conditioning Loads for Demand Response Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air...

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Sealed Air-Return Plenum Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-08-01

    In this project, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers greatly improved indoor air quality and HVAC performance by replacing an old, leaky air handler with a new air handler with an air-sealed return plenum with filter; they also sealed the ducts, and added a fresh air intake.

  5. Validation of a zero-equation turbulence model for complex indoor airflow simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srebric, J.; Chen, Q.; Glicksman, L.R.

    1999-07-01

    The design of an indoor environment requires a tool that can quickly predict the three-dimensional distributions of air velocity, temperature, and contaminant concentrations in the room on a desktop computer. This investigation has tested a zero-equation turbulence model for the prediction of the indoor environment in an office with displacement ventilation, with a heater and infiltration and with forced convection and a partition wall. The computed air velocity and temperature distributions agree well with the measured data. The computing time for each case is less than seven minutes on a PC Pentium II, 350 MHz.

  6. Indoor Environmental Quality Benefits of Apartment Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noris, Federico; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Delp, William W.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Russell, Marion; Singer, Brett C.; Spears, Michael; Vermeer, Kimberly; Fisk, William J.

    2013-06-01

    Sixteen apartments serving low-income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Retrofit measures varied among apartments and included, among others, envelope sealing, installation of continuous mechanical ventilation systems, upgrading bathroom fans and range hoods, attic insulation, replacement of heating and cooling systems, and adding wall-mounted particle air cleaners. IEQ parameters were measured, generally for two one-week periods before and after the retrofits. The measurements indicate an overall improvement in IEQ conditions after the retrofits. Comfort conditions, bathroom humidity, and concentrations of carbon dioxide, acetaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and particles generally improved. Formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide levels decreased in the building with the highest concentrations, were unchanged in a second building, and increased in a third building. IEQ parameters other than particles improved more in apartments with continuous mechanical ventilation systems installed. In general, but not consistently, larger percent increases in air exchange rates were associated with larger percent decreases in indoor levels of the pollutants that primarily come from indoor sources.

  7. I/O values for determination of the origin of some indoor organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otson, R.; Zhu, J.

    1997-12-31

    To reduce human health risks resulting from exposure to toxic chemicals, it is important to determine the origin of such substances. The ratio (I/O) of indoor to outdoor concentrations of selected airborne vapor phase organic compounds (VPOC) was used to estimate the contribution of indoor sources to levels of the compounds in the air of 44 homes selected randomly in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Average I/O values for all of the homes were greater 1.5 for 10 of the 20 detected target compounds, and it could be concluded that indoor VPOC sources had a greater impact on indoor air quality than outdoor air in these instances. A significant finding, which aptly demonstrates the importance of indoor sources and pollution, was the overall I/O value of 5.2 for the 44 representative GTA homes. Possible indoor sources for most of the 10 compounds could be identified, based on information collected by means of a questionnaire, as well as from the scientific literature. However, possible sources for some compounds could not be determined as readily, probably because of the presence of multiple sources, and sources which had not been previously noted, such as foods and beverages. The sensitivity of I/O values to various factors (e.g., source strength, air exchange rates, precision of measurements, unanticipated sources), and the reliability of determining the origin of pollutants by use of I/O values alone were examined, with some examples. If used judiciously, the I/O value can be a useful tool for IAQ investigations.

  8. Resonant flavor oscillations in electroweak baryogenesis (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2011-09-09 OSTI Identifier: 1100738 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 84; ...

  9. Perturbed recombination from dark matter annihilation (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2013-05-23 OSTI Identifier: 1102738 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 87; ...

  10. Quantum nanophotonics in diamond [Invited] (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 1244148 GrantContract Number: SC0012704 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Journal of the Optical Society of America B Additional Journal ...

  11. Exploring intertwined orders in cuprate superconductors (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Volume: 460; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0921-4526 Publisher: Elsevier Research Org: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)...

  12. Foreword (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Volume: 944; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0375-9474 Publisher: Elsevier Research Org: Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States) Sponsoring Org:...

  13. Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of High Energy Physics (Online); Journal Volume: 1401 Publisher: Springer Berlin Research Org: Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator ...

  14. Renormalization group functional equations (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2011-03-16 OSTI Identifier: 1100055 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 83; ...

  15. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic ... OSTI Identifier: 22462118 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: ...

  16. Renormalization group functional equations (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2011-03-15 OSTI Identifier: 21537581 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 83; ...

  17. Numerical simulation of solar heat absorption within indoor space by means of composite grid method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omori, Toshiaki; Murakami, Shuzo; Kato, Shinsuke

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the method for numerical simulation of solar radiation entering indoor spaces through fenestration. The proposed method can systematically deal with the interception of sunlight by buildings in the outdoor space and obstacles in the indoor space by tracing a large number of particles directed toward the sun. Configuration factors from the fenestration to the sky are also three-dimensionally treated by accounting for outdoor geometries. Distribution of the solar heat absorption in the indoor space is calculated by assuming radiation equilibrium. After the solar heat absorption analysis is carried out, heat transfer analysis in the space is conducted taking account of longwave radiation, convective heat transfer, thermal conduction, and cooling/heating by air conditioning. Then, the indoor thermal environment is evaluated using the resulting temperature distribution of air and indoor surfaces. To evaluate the applicability of these procedures, the thermal environment in a model hall with large glass windows and an overhang is predicted. The analyzed hall is assumed to be located near a tall building.

  18. ARM - Mission Summary Journal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mission Summary Journal Related Links CLASIC Home AAF Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Post-Campaign CLASIC/CHAPS Special Session at AGU Annual Meeting, December 15-19 CLASIC Workshop, March 26-27 Data Sets Deployment Resources Measurement Platforms PNNL WRF-CuP Forecast Cloud Physics Lidar MODIS Airborne Simulator Data Mesonet Monitoring ARM Data Plots Experiment Planning CLASIC Proposal Abstract Science Questions Science and Implementation Plan (pdf) Measurement Platforms (pdf) CLASIC-Land

  19. Poroelastic modeling of fracture-seismic wave interaction (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: International Journal of the Japanese Committee for Rock Mechanics; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 2; Related ...

  20. LITHIUM ABUNDANCES OF EXTREMELY METAL-POOR TURNOFF STARS (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Publication Date: 2009-06-20 OSTI Identifier: 21307719 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 698; Journal Issue: 2; ...

  1. Ultra-high-efficiency metamaterial polarizer (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 1222355 GrantContract Number: EE0005959 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Optica Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ...

  2. THERMAL PROCESSES GOVERNING HOT-JUPITER RADII (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2013-07-20 OSTI Identifier: 22121845 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 772; Journal Issue: 1; ...

  3. Geometrical evaluation of star products (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2000-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 20216851 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Mathematical Physics; Journal Volume: 41; Journal ...

  4. Neutrino physics (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2000-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 20217751 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: American Journal of Physics; Journal Volume: 68; Journal ...

  5. Spin caloritronics in graphene (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2015-06-14 OSTI Identifier: 22412915 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 117; Journal ...

  6. Sub-millikelvin stabilization of a closed cycle cryocooler (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748 Publisher: American Institute of ...

  7. Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address: 591...

  8. Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting Campaign for Commercial Buildings Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting Campaign for Commercial Buildings May ...

  9. Energy Impacts of Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Impacts of Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits of Apartments in California Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy Impacts of Energy and Indoor ...

  10. Parallel heuristics for scalable community detection (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 47; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2016-05-17 16:28:54; Journal ID: ISSN 0167-8191 Publisher: Elsevier ...

  11. Air Sealing: A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners Volume 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2010-04-12

    This guide provides information to contractors and homeowners to identify ways to seal unwanted air leaks in homes, while ensuring healthy levels of ventilation and avoiding indoor air pollution.

  12. Saving energy and improving IAQ through application of advanced air cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, W.J; Destaillats, H.; Sidheswaran, M.A.

    2011-03-01

    In the future, we may be able use air cleaning systems and reduce rates of ventilation (i.e., reduce rates of outdoor air supply) to save energy, with indoor air quality (IAQ) remaining constant or even improved. The opportunity is greatest for commercial buildings because they usually have a narrower range of indoor pollutant sources than homes. This article describes the types of air cleaning systems that will be needed in commercial buildings.

  13. SC e-journals, Medicine

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Trends in Microbiology Veterinary Research Communications Virchows Archiv Virology Virtual Journal of Biomedical Optics Virus Genes X-Ray Spectrometry Zeitschrift fr Kardiologie

  14. SC e-journals, Chemistry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Acta Glass and Ceramics Global Biogeochemical Cycles Green Chemistry Helvetica Chimica Acta High Energy Chemistry High Temperature Hyle: International Journal for ...

  15. Building America Best Practices Series, Vol. 10- Retrofit Techniques & Technologies: Air Sealing, A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This guide provides information to contractors and homeowners to identify ways to seal unwanted air leaks in homes, while ensuring healthy levels of ventilation and avoiding indoor air pollution.

  16. Cold air systems: Sleeping giant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCracken, C.D. )

    1994-04-01

    This article describes how cold air systems help owners increase the profits from their buildings by reducing electric costs and improving indoor air quality through lower relative humidity levels. Cold air distribution involves energy savings, cost savings, space savings, greater comfort, cleaner air, thermal storage, tighter ducting, coil redesign, lower relative humidities, retrofitting, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). It opens a door for architects, engineers, owners, builders, environmentalists, retrofitters, designers, occupants, and manufacturers. Three things have held up cold air's usage: multiple fan-powered boxes that ate up the energy savings of primary fans. Cold air room diffusers that provided inadequate comfort. Condensation from ducts, boxes, and diffusers. Such problems have been largely eliminated through research and development by utilities and manufacturers. New cold air diffusers no longer need fan powered boxes. It has also been found that condensation is not a concern so long as the ducts are located in air conditioned space, such as drop ceilings or central risers, where relative humidity falls quickly during morning startup.

  17. Asymmetric twin Dark Matter (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2015-11-09 OSTI Identifier: 22458403 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal ...

  18. Trapping penguins with entangled B mesons (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: FG02-96ER40989 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physics Letters. Section B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 754; Journal Issue: C;...

  19. Stop-catalyzed baryogenesis beyond the MSSM (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 1226507 GrantContract Number: SC0011095 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 92; Journal Issue: ...

  20. Dynamic trapping near a quantum critical point (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: DEFG02-01ER-40676 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 91; Journal Issue: 5; ...

  1. Production of photons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: AC02-05CH11231; SC0012704 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review C Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 93; Journal ...

  2. GROUP THEORETICAL STUDY OF LEPTONIC PROCESSES (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 1965-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 4641809 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Canadian Journal of Physics (Canada); Journal Volume: Vol: 43; ...

  3. Review: laser ignition for aerospace propulsion (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2212-540X Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Country unknown...

  4. Ab initio study of neutron drops with chiral Hamiltonians (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 739; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0370-2693 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Netherlands ...

  5. How likely are constituent quanta to initiate inflation? (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 749; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0370-2693 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Netherlands ...

  6. A cyclic universe approach to fine tuning (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 757; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0370-2693 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Netherlands ...

  7. Biosensor-based engineering of biosynthetic pathways (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: DEFG02-02ER63445 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Current Opinion in Biotechnology Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: C; ...

  8. Structural insights into [mu]-opioid receptor activation (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Nature; Journal Volume: ... Language: ENGLISH Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Journal Articles DOI: 10.1038nature...

  9. Elastoconductivity as a probe of broken mirror symmetries (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 92; Journal Issue: 3; ...

  10. Large N (=3) neutrinos and random matrix theory (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of High Energy Physics (Online); Journal Volume: 2012; Journal Issue: 12 Publisher: Springer Berlin Research Org: SLAC National Accelerator ...

  11. Electronic confinement in modulation doped quantum dots (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 22262637 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 104; Journal Issue: 15; Other Information: (c) ...

  12. Spin-Hall-assisted magnetic random access memory (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 22257135 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 104; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: (c) ...

  13. Phase sensitive Raman process with correlated seeds (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 22395739 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: (c) ...

  14. Optical Third-Harmonic Generation in Graphene (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2013-06-10 OSTI Identifier: 1102835 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physical Review X Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 2; ...

  15. Metallic quantum critical points with finite BCS couplings (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 92; Journal Issue: 20; ...

  16. Fly-scan ptychography (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Identifier: 1201502 GrantContract Number: AC02-98CH10886 Type: Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Scientific Reports Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 5; Journal...

  17. Casimir forces of metallic microstructures into cavities (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: ERC02-EXEL; AC02-07CH11358; 32081 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 92; Journal...

  18. Virtual photon fragmentation functions (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 40277406 DOE Contract Number: FG02-87ER40731 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review D; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: ...

  19. Antiferromagnetic spin Seebeck effect. (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 1245591 DOE Contract Number: AC02-06CH11357 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 116; Journal ...

  20. The Enriched Xenon Observatory (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2009-12-17 OSTI Identifier: 21325784 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1182; Journal ...

  1. Dirac neutrino dark matter (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2008-01-15 OSTI Identifier: 22137754 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal ...

  2. High intensity neutrino beams (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2015-07-15 OSTI Identifier: 22490655 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1666; Journal ...

  3. Quark Forces from Hadronic Spectroscopy (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2009-04-17 OSTI Identifier: 21180376 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 102; Journal Issue: ...

  4. Slavnov-Taylor identities for primordial perturbations (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2014-02-01 OSTI Identifier: 22369781 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal ...

  5. Engineering allostery (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: FG02-02ER63445 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Trends in Genetics Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 12; ...

  6. Charged Pion Photoproduction (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2009-12-17 OSTI Identifier: 21325764 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1182; Journal ...

  7. Soft Collinear Effective Theory (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2006-07-11 OSTI Identifier: 20875872 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 842; Journal ...

  8. Pulse energy measurement at the SXR instrument (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2015-04-14 OSTI Identifier: 1188715 Type: Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Journal of Synchrotron Radiation (Online) Additional Journal Information: Journal ...

  9. Low background techniques in CANDLES (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2015-08-17 OSTI Identifier: 22488722 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1672; Journal ...

  10. Directional Antineutrino Detection (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: ER-41850; SC00012567 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 114; Journal ...

  11. Plans for Future Megawatt Facilities (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2005-06-08 OSTI Identifier: 20722740 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 773; Journal ...

  12. Statistical Mechanics of Prion Diseases (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2001-07-30 OSTI Identifier: 40277303 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: ...

  13. Defining chaos (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2015-09-15 OSTI Identifier: 22482320 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Chaos (Woodbury, N. Y.); Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: ...

  14. Form factor dark matter (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2010-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 22272953 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal ...

  15. Axion dark matter: strings and their cores (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2016-01-04 OSTI Identifier: 22458446 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal ...

  16. Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: AC02-06CH11357 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 116; Journal ...

  17. Connecting physical resonant amplitudes and lattice QCD (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 757; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0370-2693 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Netherlands ...

  18. Optical diffractionn properties of multi-microgratings (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 1185603 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Applied Optics; Journal Volume: 54; Journal...

  19. Constraining ALP-photon coupling using galaxy clusters (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2016-01-21 OSTI Identifier: 22458429 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal ...

  20. Ultra-high-efficiency metamaterial polarizer (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 2334-2536 Publisher: Optical Society of America Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: ...

  1. Uncertainty quantification in kinematic wave models (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): PNNL-SA-84180 KJ0401000 DOE Contract Number: AC05-76RL01830 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Computational Physics, ...

  2. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  3. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore » measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is

  4. Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The results indicate that DERs can provide adequate ventilation and IAQ, and that DERs should prioritize source control, particle filtration and well-designed local exhaust systems...

  5. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High...

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    (United States) Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC); USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B) Country of...

  6. SC e-journals, Materials Science

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    OAJ Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Chemistry of Materials Chinese Optics Letters ... Waste Management Journal of Materials Chemistry Journal of Materials Processing ...

  7. SC e-journals, Renewable Energy

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    Renewable Energy Agricultural & Forest Meteorology Biomass & Bioenergy BioEnergy Research Electricity Journal, The Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy Process Biochemistry ...

  8. COVARIANT STATISTICAL TREATMENT OF ANTIPROTON ANNIHILATION (Journal...

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    Publication Date: 1963-06-16 OSTI Identifier: 4627450 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Nuovo Cimento (Italy) Divided into Nuovo Cimento A and Nuovo ...

  9. Green Money Journal | Open Energy Information

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    Money Journal Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Money Journal Place: Santa Fe, New Mexico Zip: 87504 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Online magazine covering the financial...

  10. The Exiguobacterium genus: biodiversity and biogeography (Journal...

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    Journal Article: The Exiguobacterium genus: biodiversity and biogeography Citation Details ... DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: ...

  11. ACM TOMS replicated computational results initiative (Journal...

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    Journal Article: ACM TOMS replicated computational results initiative Citation Details ... OSTI Identifier: 1235340 Report Number(s): SAND--2015-20790J Journal ID: ISSN 0098-3500; ...

  12. Geographical Applications of Remote Sensing (Journal Article...

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    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Geographical Applications of Remote ... DOE Contract Number: AC05-76RL01830 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: ...

  13. Space propulsion: The antimatter advantage (Journal Article)...

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    Journal Article: Space propulsion: The antimatter advantage Citation Details In-Document ... Publication Date: 1993-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 5657366 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  14. Observational constraints on exponential gravity (Journal Article...

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    Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 82; ... Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email ...

  15. Journal Cover Stories

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    CEN-Cover.png Graphene Moves Toward Applications November 21, 2011 | Author(s): Donghai Mei, et al. | Category: Chemistry | URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl203332e Download Image: CEN-Cover.png | png | 986 KB Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode. See also http://pubs.acs.org/NanoLett (2011) 11, 5071-5078 SotirisCoverJPCBLarge.jpg Computational Investigation of the First Solvation Shell Structure of Interfacial and Bulk Aqueous Chloride and Iodide Ions November 14,

  16. Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards (Journal...

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    Ventilation Standards The purpose of ventilation is to dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant could be exposed to. It can be provided by mechanical or natural...

  17. Air Traffic Operations | GE Global Research

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    Your Home Air Sealing Your Home Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. Reducing the amount of air that leaks in and out of your home is a cost-effective way to cut heating and cooling costs, improve durability, increase comfort, and create a healthier indoor environment. Caulking and weatherstripping are two simple and effective air-sealing

  18. Air Sealing Your Home | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Your Home Air Sealing Your Home Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. Reducing the amount of air that leaks in and out of your home is a cost-effective way to cut heating and cooling costs, improve durability, increase comfort, and create a healthier indoor environment. Caulking and weatherstripping are two simple and effective air-sealing

  19. Climate change and health: Indoor heat exposure in vulnerable populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White-Newsome, Jalonne L.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Jolliet, Olivier; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Parker, Edith A.; Timothy Dvonch, J.; O'Neill, Marie S.

    2012-01-15

    Introduction: Climate change is increasing the frequency of heat waves and hot weather in many urban environments. Older people are more vulnerable to heat exposure but spend most of their time indoors. Few published studies have addressed indoor heat exposure in residences occupied by an elderly population. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between outdoor and indoor temperatures in homes occupied by the elderly and determine other predictors of indoor temperature. Materials and methods: We collected hourly indoor temperature measurements of 30 different homes; outdoor temperature, dewpoint temperature, and solar radiation data during summer 2009 in Detroit, MI. We used mixed linear regression to model indoor temperatures' responsiveness to weather, housing and environmental characteristics, and evaluated our ability to predict indoor heat exposures based on outdoor conditions. Results: Average maximum indoor temperature for all locations was 34.85 Degree-Sign C, 13.8 Degree-Sign C higher than average maximum outdoor temperature. Indoor temperatures of single family homes constructed of vinyl paneling or wood siding were more sensitive than brick homes to outdoor temperature changes and internal heat gains. Outdoor temperature, solar radiation, and dewpoint temperature predicted 38% of the variability of indoor temperatures. Conclusions: Indoor exposures to heat in Detroit exceed the comfort range among elderly occupants, and can be predicted using outdoor temperatures, characteristics of the housing stock and surroundings to improve heat exposure assessment for epidemiological investigations. Weatherizing homes and modifying home surroundings could mitigate indoor heat exposure among the elderly.

  20. Indoor nitrogen dioxide in five Chattangooga, Tennessee public housing developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkhurst, W.J.; Harper, J.P. ); Spengler, J.D.; Fraumeni, L.P.; Majahad, A.M. ); Cropp, J.W. )

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes an indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sampling study conducted during January through March of 1987 in five Chattanooga public housing developments. The origins of this study date to the summer of 1983 when the Piney Woods Community Organization (a citizens action group) expressed concern about toxic industrial air pollution and the effects it might have on their community. In response to these concerns, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (Bureau) requested assistance from the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) in conducting a community health survey and assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in conducting a community air quality measurement program. The TDHE community health study did not find any significant differences between the mortality statistics for the Piney Woods community and a demographically similar control group. However, a health survey revealed that Piney Woods residents did not have a statistically significant higher self-reported prevalence of cough, wheezing, phlegm, breathlessness, colds, and respiratory illness.

  1. Journal Articles | The Ames Laboratory

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    Journal Articles Journal of Forensic Sciences Bommarito, C., Sturdevant, A. and D. Szymanski. 2007. Analysis of Forensic Soil Samples via HPLC and IC. Volume 52 (1), pp. 24-30. PDF Langenburg, G. 2009. Testing for Potential Contextual Bias Effects During the Verification Stage of the ACE-V Methodology When Conducting Fingerprint Comparisons. Volume 54 (3), pp. 571-582. PDF Baerncopf, J.M, McGuffin, V.L., and R. Waddell Smith. 2010. Effect of Gas Chromatography Temperature Program on the

  2. Quark-gluon correlations and Color Polarizabilities (Journal...

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    Resource Relation: Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 870; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: CIPAN2006: 9. conference on intersections of particle and nuclear ...

  3. How wide is the transition to deconfinement? (Journal Article...

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    Publication Date: 2011-02-18 OSTI Identifier: 1099879 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 83; ...

  4. Four top quarks in extensions of the standard model (Journal...

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    Publication Date: 2012-03-26 OSTI Identifier: 1098578 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 85; ...

  5. Missing energy signatures of dark matter at the LHC (Journal...

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    Publication Date: 2012-03-30 OSTI Identifier: 1098622 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 85; ...

  6. New Window on Primordial Non-Gaussianity (Journal Article) |...

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    Publication Date: 2012-07-13 OSTI Identifier: 1102905 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: ...

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    Publication Date: 2011-12-02 OSTI Identifier: 1098343 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review C Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 84; ...

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    Publication Date: 2013-04-17 OSTI Identifier: 1102092 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 87; ...

  9. Origin of Tokamak Density Limit Scalings (Journal Article) |...

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    Publication Date: 2012-04-20 OSTI Identifier: 1098776 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: ...

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    Publication Date: 1952-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 4376080 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Progress Theoret. Phys. (Japan); Journal Volume: Vol: 7; Other ...

  11. Selecting fuel storage tanks (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

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    Publication Date: 1993-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 5907888 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Public Works; (United States); Journal Volume: 124:8 Country ...

  12. Rooftop radiators for bank power systems (Journal Article) |...

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    Authors: Kane, J. Publication Date: 1995-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 41641 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Diesel and Gas Turbine Worldwide; Journal ...

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    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Polymer; Journal Volume: 72 Publisher: Elsevier Research Org: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY ...

  14. Lifetime blinking in nonblinking nanocrystal quantum dots (Journal...

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    DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Nature Communications; Journal Volume: 3; Related Information: CASP partners ...

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    DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review Letters, vol. 101, na, October 17, 2008, pp. 165703; Journal ...

  16. Taming Serendipity (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

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  17. Quantized beam shifts in graphene (Journal Article) | SciTech...

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    Publication Date: 2016-02-22 OSTI Identifier: 1238697 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 93; ...

  18. A bouquet for Bush (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

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    Publication Date: 1993-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 7084756 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists; (United States); Journal ...

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  20. Cosmology at the frontier of neutrino physics (Journal Article...

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  1. Rhenium volatilization in waste glasses (Journal Article) | SciTech...

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    Journal Article: Rhenium volatilization in waste glasses Citation Details In-Document ... OSTI Identifier: 1252517 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Journal of ...

  2. Detector systems for future HEP experiments (Journal Article...

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    OSTI Identifier: 1161586 DOE Contract Number: AC07-05ID14517 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Applied Physics Reviews; Journal Volume: 1; Related ...

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  6. Precision muon physics (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

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    GrantContract Number: FG02-97ER41020 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: ...

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    Publication Date: 1981-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 5801875 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: J. Geophys. Res.; (United States); Journal Volume: 86:A8 ...

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    di Pisa (Italy) Publication Date: 2015-04-10 OSTI Identifier: 22391348 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume:...

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    Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007 Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English ...

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