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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Indoor Air Quality Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... CONTAM has been used at NIST to study the indoor air quality impacts of HVAC systems in single-family residential buildings, ventilation in large ...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Workshop on indoor air quality research needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Indoor air radon  

SciTech Connect

This review concerns primarily the health effects that result from indoor air exposure to radon gas and its progeny. Radon enters homes mainly from the soil through cracks in the foundation and other holes to the geologic deposits beneath these structures. Once inside the home the gas decays (half-life 3.8 d) and the ionized atoms adsorb to dust particles and are inhaled. These particles lodge in the lung and can cause lung cancer. The introduction to this review gives some background properties of radon and its progeny that are important to understanding this public health problem as well as a discussion of the units used to describe its concentrations. The data describing the health effects of inhaled radon and its progeny come both from epidemiological and animal studies. The estimates of risk from these two data bases are consistent within a factor of two. The epidemiological studies are primarily for hard rock miners, although some data exist for environmental exposures. The most complete studies are those of the US, Canadian, and Czechoslovakian uranium miners. Although all studies have some deficiencies, those of major importance include uranium miners in Saskatchewan, Canada, Swedish iron miners, and Newfoundland fluorspar miners. These six studies provide varying degrees of detail in the form of dose-response curves. Other epidemiological studies that do not provide quantitative dose-response information, but are useful in describing the health effects, include coal, iron ore and tin miners in the UK, iron ore miners in the Grangesburg and Kiruna, Sweden, metal miners in the US, Navajo uranium miners in the US, Norwegian niobian and magnitite miners, South African gold and uranium miners, French uranium miners, zinc-lead miners in Sweden and a variety of small studies of environmental exposure. An analysis of the epidemiological studies reveals a variety of interpretation problem areas.172 references.

Cothern, C.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Manual on indoor air quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference manual was prepared to assist electric utilities in helping homeowners, builders, and new home buyers to understand a broad range of issues related to indoor air quality. The manual is directed to technically knowledgeable persons employed by utility companies - the customer service or marketing representative, applications engineer, or technician - who may not have specific expertise in indoor air quality issues. In addition to providing monitoring and control techniques, the manual summarizes the link between pollutant concentrations, air exchange, and energy conservation and describes the characteristics and health effects of selected pollutants. Where technical information is too lengthy or complex for inclusion in this volume, reference sources are given. Information for this manual was gathered from technical studies, manufacturers' information, and other materials from professional societies, institutes, and associations. The aim has been to provide objective technical and descriptive information that can be used by utility personnel to make informed decisions about indoor air quality issues.

Diamond, R.C.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Indoor Air Quality and Volatile Organic Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The unit was sized to comply with the outdoor air requirements in ASHRAE Standard 62.2 Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

6

Residential Indoor Air Background Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil vapor intrusion, the migration of volatile chemicals from contaminated soil or groundwater into overlying buildings, has become one of the primary exposure pathways of concern for state and federal environmental agencies regulating contaminated sites in the USA. Regulators are requesting comprehensive evaluation of the subsurface vapor-to-indoor air pathway for currently occupied buildings, areas which may be developed in the future, and closed sites for which this pathway was not previously evaluat...

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

University of Colorado Indoor Air Quality Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image Courtesy of Ohio Image Courtesy of Ohio State University INDOOR AIR QUALITY Design Goals Design Goals Design Goals Design Goals Integrate technologically and economically innovative, low-energy strategies Minimize occupant distraction User-friendly controls Minimize pollutant sources Bio Bio Bio Bio- - - -S S S S ( ( ( (h h h h) ) ) ) ip ip ip ip indoor air quality features indoor air quality features indoor air quality features indoor air quality features Mechanical Systems Energy Recovery Ventilator Exhaust Fans Heating And Cooling Systems Passive Ventilation Low VOC materials Each of these features is described in more detail below. Mechanical Systems Energy Recovery Ventilator Knowing that our home has a tight envelope, due to our Bio-SIP construction, we needed to use mechanical ventilation to ensure suitable indoor air

8

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Title Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3048E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Iain S. Walker Journal HVAC & Research Journal Keywords air distribution, indoor air quality, mechanical ventilation, mixing, other, resave, residential ventilation, ventilation effectiveness Abstract Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing already, but that new, high-performance homes may require additional mixing. Also our results suggest that some differentiation should be made in policies and standards for systems that provide continuous exhaust, thereby reducing relative dose for occupants overall

9

Indoor Air Quality & Ventilation Group Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation Group Staff. Staff Listing. Dr. Andrew K. Persily, Leader, Supervisory Mechanical Engineer, 301-975-6418. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

Zone based indoor mobile air pollution monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollution is one of the main problems that humans are suffering from. Moreover air pollution is one of the hardest to escape. Although human spend most of their time indoor, most of the previous pollution monitoring studies focused on outdoor air monitoring. ... Keywords: indoor pollution, mobile sensing, nfc

Noura Alhakbani, Eiman Kanjo

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Title Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters...

12

Environmental Protection Agency Indoor Air Quality Tools for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection Agency Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Webinar Environmental Protection Agency Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Webinar December 9, 2013 1:00PM...

13

InAir: sharing indoor air quality measurements and visualizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes inAir, a tool for sharing measurements and visualizations of indoor air quality within one's social network. Poor indoor air quality is difficult for humans to detect through sight and smell alone and can contribute to the development ... Keywords: air quality, domestic technology, environment, health, iphone, persuasive technology, sensors, sustainability

Sunyoung Kim; Eric Paulos

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Indoor Air Quality Observations in Public Schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigations of indoor air qmlity or indoor environment problems were accomplished in seven different Texas schools. The schools were located in hot and humid climates. Comfort and mildew were the most frequent complaints. In all cases, the air-conditioning system maintenance and operation was a primary factor in the problem cause and solution. The significance of problems investigated cculd have been minimized had the symptoms been addressed when they were reported the first time. Preventive maintenance and better housekeeping of air-conditioning systems in Texas schools will improve the indoor environment. Schools are encouraged to be more aggressive in preventive maintenance and plan for indoor air quality and energy efficiency in school air-conditioning retrofits.

McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Research review: Indoor air quality control techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Techniques for controlling the concentration of radon, formaldehyde, and combustion products in the indoor air are reviewed. The most effective techniques, which are generally based on limiting or reducing indoor pollutant source strengths, can decrease indoor pollutant concentrations by a factor of 3 to 10. Unless the initial ventilation rate is unusually low, it is difficult to reduce indoor pollutant concentrations more than approximately 50% by increasing the ventilation rate of an entire building. However, the efficiency of indoor pollutant control by ventilation can be enhanced through the use of local exhaust ventilation near concentrated sources of pollutants, by minimizing short circuiting of air from supply to exhaust when pollutant sources are dispersed and, in some situations, by promoting a displacement flow of air and pollutants toward the exhaust. Active air cleaning is also examined briefly. Filtration and electrostatic air cleaning for removal of particles from the indoor air are the most practical and effective currently available techniques of air cleaning. 49 refs., 7 figs.

Fisk, W.J.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

x A Emission Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion. PaperInternational) on Combustion, Tokyo (August, 1974). Chang,fll , J I ___F J "J LBL-S9lS COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR

Hollowell, C.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound air cleaning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound air cleaning using activated carbon fiber media with nightly regeneration Title Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound...

18

Indoor air quality environmental information handbook: radon  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has a long-standing interest in investigating the impact of energy conservation measures on indoor air quality. The Office of Environmental Analysis has prepared this handbook in an effort to bring together available information on the impact of radon and its decay products on residential indoor air quality and on human health. The handbook is designed to enhance the understanding of the current state-of-knowledge regarding indoor radon for both homeowners and technical persons with an interest in indoor air quality issues. It provides the technical reader with a comprehensive review and reference source on the sources of radon and its transport mechanisms; reported indoor concentrations; building, and meteorological effects on radon concentration; models for predicting indoor concentrations; health effects and standards; and control technologies. The major questions and concerns of homeowners regarding the issue of indoor radon are addressed in a separate section entitled Radon in the Home: A Primer for Homeowners. This section also provides a starting point for readers desiring a general overview of the subject.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

A Survey: Indoor Air Quality in Schools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 A Survey: Indoor Air Quality in Schools We recently undertook a survey and critical review of the published literature on indoor air quality (IAQ), ventilation, and IAQ- and building-related health problems in schools, particularly those in the state of California. The survey's objectives included identifying the most commonly reported building-related health symptoms involving schools, and assembling and evaluating existing measurement data on key indoor air pollutants most likely to be related to these symptoms. The review also summarizes existing measurements of ventilation rates in schools and information on the causes of IAQ and health problems in schools. Most of the literature we reviewed (more than 450 articles and reports) dealt with complaint or problem schools. Among the papers were

20

Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moving air for comfort. ASHRAE Journal, May, Arens, E. ,17-22, Copenhagen. . ASHRAE Standard 55- 2010. ThermalSensations of Sedentary Man, ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 80 (

Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Indoor air pollution: a new concern  

SciTech Connect

Radon, asbestos, and formaldehyde are emerging as major health hazards because home-winterization efforts are trapping toxic agents indoors. Other pollution sources, such as tobacco smoke and unvented heating units, also lower indoor air quality. Radon decay products present in the structural materials of well-insulated homes are linked to lung-cancer deaths. Exposure to asbestos fibers has been identified as a problem in many school buildings, while physical discomfort caused by urea-formaldehyde foam insulation has affected the health of many homeowners. The Environmental Protection Agency is collecting and disseminating information to help local officials and homeowners understand the risks and is urging building auditors to inform clients about indoor air pollution. (DCK)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Project: Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Energy Buildings Project. Summary: NIST is developing tools and metrics to both ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

23

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of Residential HVAC Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR 5559 Indoor Air Quality Impacts of Residential HVAC Systems Phase 11.AReport: Baseline and Preliminary Simulations ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

24

Indoor air and human health: major indoor air pollutants and their health implications  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a collection of abstracts of papers presented at the Indoor Air and Human Health symposium. Session titles include: Radon, Microorganisms, Passive Cigarette Smoke, Combustion Products, Organics, and Panel and Audience Discussion.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

inAir: Measuring and Visualizing Indoor Air Quality Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, air quality, domestic computing, health ACM Classification Keywords H.m. Information interfacesinAir: Measuring and Visualizing Indoor Air Quality Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos Human}@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT Good indoor air quality is a vital part of human health. Poor indoor air quality can contribute

Paulos, Eric

27

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Title Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6114E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Erin L. Hult Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 72 Start Page 41 Pagination 41-49 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords Buffering capacity, formaldehyde, moisture Abstract A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

28

Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 01...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR checklists now satisfies the following Indoor airPLUS requirements: * Finish all masonry and concrete walls (e.g., poured concrete, concrete masonry, insulated concrete...

29

Indoor air quality and the emissions of VOCs from interior ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How to Cite. Tshudy, J. A. (1995), Indoor air quality and the emissions of VOCs from interior products. J Vinyl Addit Technol, 1: 155–158. doi: ...

30

Residential HVAC Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential HVAC && Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2) Tav Commins #12;Contact Information · Energy construction, Additions /Alterations · Nonresidential and Residential #12;Residential HVAC && Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2) ·HVAC EfficiencyHVAC Efficiency ·Quality Installation (HERS Measures) S li b HERS R t

31

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 2366 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS P Zhao1,2 , JA Siegel1, Austin, Texas 78758, USA ABSTRACT HVAC filters have a significant influence on indoor air quality% for Filter #2 at a face velocity of 0.81 cm/s. The potential for HVAC filters to affect ozone concentrations

Siegel, Jeffrey

32

Comparison of dust from HVAC filters, indoor surfaces, and indoor air Federico Noris*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of dust from HVAC filters, indoor surfaces, and indoor air Federico Noris* , Kerry A and Environmental Engineering * Corresponding email: Fedenoris@mail.utexas.edu SUMMARY HVAC filters are long heavy metal (Pb, Cd and As) concentrations. HVAC filter microbial concentrations appear to be consistent

Siegel, Jeffrey

33

Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Indoor Air Quality Primer for HVAC System Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are major energy users in commercial and institutional buildings. Increased ventilation for acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ), besides increasing energy use, may result in unacceptably high indoor humidity, particularly in humid climates and/or applications requiring high ventilation rates. This report analyzes how increased ventilation affects the dehumidification capabilities of air conditioning systems in three applications -- offices, retail...

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

35

TEAMS: Indoor Air Quality (IAR) Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District (“CFBISD”) found the need to reduce air quality concerns and complaints, and find an effective and efficient method to reduce the rising cost of utilities. An Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) program was required to embrace the two needs with the overall objective to educate all—teachers, administrators, various departments, and students. The educational outreach program chosen is TEAMS, which is the IAQ program designed to attain these goals. The CFBISD prides itself in acting quickly to resolve IAQ issues. Our belief is problems defined and recognized, create trust, and enable the District to maximize potential for performance improvements via reduced concerns by staff. We’ve had our IAQ program in place since April of 2002. Recognizing the need to expand the program in depth and breadth, we designed TEAMS. We were able to do this by assistance from Mike Miller and the EPA, who gave the District six “Tools for Schools” test kits (TfS Kit). The information from these kits gave us a guideline to build TEAMS to meet our objectives of reaching a larger audience with additional material, and adding to the goals of TEAMS increased efficiency, reduced cost, and educated consumers.

Melton, V.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutants from Indoor Combustion Sources: I. Field Measure-Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion, paper presented atInternational) on Combustion, August, 1974, Tokyo, Japan. 8

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Cornell University Indoor Air Quality Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

construction, and testing. The HVL is a large, interior space, previously used for plasma research. By building the house and storing materials indoors, we greatly reduced the...

38

IAQ in Hospitals - Better Health through Indoor Air Quality Awareness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quality air is fundamental to people's health and well-being. Indoor air quality is an important issue from both a social and economic point of view. Continual advances in medicine and technology necessitate constant reevaluation of the air-conditioning needs of hospital and medical facilities. The application of air conditioning to health facilities presents many problems not encountered in the usual comfort air conditioning design. Hospital air conditioning assumes a more important role than just the promotion of comfort. Studies show that patients in controlled environment generally have more rapid physical improvement than do those in uncontrolled environment. Air quality at hospitals needs special precautions during design and maintenance stage to prevent infections from spreading. 50% of all illnesses are either caused by, or aggravated by, polluted indoor air. The main objective of this paper is to critically review and summarize the available information about IAQ particularly in health care industries. Symptoms of poor IAQ in a building, contaminants causing poor IAQ, features of HVAC systems for a hospital for better IAQ are briefly discussed in this paper. Strategies to improve indoor air quality in hospitals and the current international research to improve indoor air quality are reported in this paper. Based on the extensive interactions with different stake holders of a hospital it is concluded that maintenance of proper indoor quality in a hospital needs meticulous team work among the various members of the hospital at various stages .

Al-Rajhi, S.; Ramaswamy, M.; Al-Jahwari, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Energy Crossroads: Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Suggest a Listing Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre (AIVC) The AIVC fulfills its objectives by providing a range of services and facilities which include: Information, Technical Analysis, Technical Interchange, and Coordination. American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) The ACGIH offers high quality technical publications and learning opportunities. Americlean Services Corp. (ASC) ASC is a certified SBA 8(a) engineering/consulting firm specializing in HVAC contamination detection, abatement, and monitoring. In addition to highly professional ductwork cleaning and HVAC cleaning services, ASC offers a wide range of other engineering/ consulting/ management services

40

HVAC System Design Strategies to Address Indoor Air Quality Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes strategies that can be employed in the design and operation of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems to address the ASHRAE Standard 62 "Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality" requirements. The report examines a wide variety of approaches to meeting the standard and their impact on energy consumption, occupant comfort, and other factors.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Investigative Tools and Techniques for Indoor Air Quality Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor air quality problems are diverse and often complex. Adverse indoor air quality problems can exist which create symptomatic conditions for building occupants. Often, the exact cause, or causes, of the substandard indoor air quality are unknown. Therefore, an investigative approach must usually be taken to identify the source(s) of the air quality problem, and if present, air contaminant concentrations. As the general public becomes more aware of the problems associated with poor indoor air quality conditions, an associated increase in air quality evaluation requests can be expected. This paper discusses some of the various investigative tools and techniques that can be utilized to identify air quality contaminants when performing an indoor air quality evaluation. These investigative tools and techniques can be used to develop a site specific list of possible contaminants and their sources, and can then be used to determine which contaminants are, in fact, present in adverse concentrations. Some of the investigative tools and techniques to be discussed in this paper include the following: visual inspections and site observations, information searches, review of building construction, review of ventilation systems, interviews, low and high volume sampling pumps, flow and oxygen meters, portable photoionization and flame ionization detectors (PID & FID), various types of vapor detector tubes, and gas chromatograph/mass spectrophotometer (GC/MS) analysis. This paper will be an introductory overview of the above listed investigative tools and techniques. The paper's attempt is to acquaint the reader with these investigative tools and techniques, and how they can assist the reader in an air quality evaluation.

Kennedy, S. R.; Quinn, C. B.; Henderson, J. E.; Vickery, R. G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Max H. Sherman and Erin L. Hult Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 In Press as Sherman, M.H., Hult, E.L. 2013. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL-6114E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

43

Participant evaluation results for two indoor air quality studies  

SciTech Connect

After two surveys for indoor air pollutants (radon and other chemicals) the homeowners were surveyed for their reactions. The results of these participant evaluation surveys, assuming that the participants that responded to the survey were representative, indicate that homeowners will accept a significant level of monitoring activity as part of an indoor air quality field study. Those participants completing surveys overwhelmingly enjoyed being in the studies and would do it again. We believe that the emphasis placed on positive homeowner interactions and efforts made to inform participants throughout our studies were positive factors in this result. There was no substantial differences noted in the responses between the 70-house study, which included a homeowner compensation payment of $100, and the 300-house study, which did not include a compensation payment. These results provide encouragement to conduct future complex, multipollutant indoor air quality studies when they are scientifically sound and cost effective.

Hawthorne, A.R.; Dudney, C.S.; Cohen, M.A.; Spengler, J.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Indoor air quality measurements in energy efficient buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Efficient Buildings Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has designed and fabricated a mobile laboratory for research and development studies of ventilation requirements and energy utilization in residential and commercial buildings. The Energy Efficient Buildings (EEB) Mobile Laboratory is used in studies of indoor air quality in buildings before and after energy conservation retrofits and in new buildings incorporating energy efficient designs. Indoor air quality measurements have been conducted in residential buildings and work in progress includes indoor air quality monitoring in schools, hospitals, and energy efficient residential buildings. The monitoring program includes measurement of CO, CO/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, NO, NO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, infiltration rate (tracer gas technique), and aerosol size distribution on a continuous basis. Total and respirable-fraction particulate samples are collected on membrane filter media for analysis by x-ray fluorescence (XRFA), photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA), proton activation analysis (PAA), combustion, and wet-chemistry techniques for the determination of particulate elemental composition (S, N, C, etc.) and ionic species such as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, and NH/sub 4//sup +/. Results of the initial phases of this program indicate that the concentrations of some gaseous and respirable particulate air pollutants in specific indoor environments exceed those levels commonly found in the outdoor urban air environment.

Hollowell, C.D.; Berk, J.V.; Traynor, G.W.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Indoor Air Quality in New Energy-Efficient Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Indoor Air Quality in New Energy-Efficient Houses Figure 1: Measurements of total volatile organic compounds in five new houses in Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Florida and median concentration in U.S. EPA study. In 1993, the Indoor Environment Program began investigating indoor air quality in new energy-efficient houses. Five new houses have been included in the study, all in the eastern U.S. Two had nearly identical floor plans and were part of a demonstration project near Pittsburgh, PA; one was built conventionally, while the other incorporated a number of energy-efficient features. The conventional house was studied for one year following construction, and the energy-efficient house was sampled on three occasions over a two-year period. The other three demonstration houses were in

46

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development Max H. Sherman, Erin L. Hult * Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R3083, Berkeley, CA 94720-8133, USA h i g h l i g h t s < A lumped parameter model is applied to describe emission and storage buffering of contaminants. < Model is used to assess impact of ventilation on indoor formaldehyde exposure. < Observations of depletion of stored contaminants can be described by model. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 7 February 2013 Accepted 11 February 2013 Keywords: Buffering capacity Formaldehyde Moisture a b s t r a c t A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde

47

Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 01) EPA 402/K-13/001, February 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Indoor airPLUS CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS VERSION 1 (REV. 01) www.epa.gov/indoorairplus Contents About the Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications ................................................................................................................. i What's New in Version 1 (Rev. 01)? ........................................................................................................................................... i Eligibility and Verification Requirements ................................................................................................................................... i Terms Used in This Document ..................................................................................................................................................

48

Ventilation Controller for Improved Indoor Air Quality  

Iain Walker and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have developed a dynamic control system for whole-house ventilation fans that provides maximal air quality while reducing by 18-44% the energy spent on ventilation. The system, the Residential Integrated ...

49

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Title Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Price, Phillip N., Arman Shehabi, Wanyu R. Chan, and Ashok J. Gadgil Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

50

Optimal Indoor Air Temperature Considering Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort in the Shanghai Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor air temperature is the most important control parameter in air conditioning systems. It not only impacts the thermal comfort of occupants, but also also greatly affects the energy consumption in air conditioning systems. The lower the indoor air temperature is in summer or the higher the indoor temperature is in winter, the more energy the air conditioning system will consume. For the sake of energy conservation, the indoor air should be set as high as possible in summer and as low as possible in winter. Meanwhile, indoor thermal comfort should be considered. This paper will establish the optimal indoor air temperature for an air-conditioning system aiming at both energy savings and thermal comfort in the Shanghai area, based on the PMV equation and extensive field investigation.

Yao, Y.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.; Liu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

52

Energy Saving System to Remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from Indoor Air  

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have developed a catalyst and deployment devices to improve indoor air quality and reduce ventilation energy needs.

53

Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Mechanical Ventilation Exhaust Fans Air-to-Air Heatexpected from exhaust fan A-I Infiltration contribution toIndoor Air Quality -- Exhaust Fan Mitigation" Final Report

Grimsrud, David T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

MAQS: a personalized mobile sensing system for indoor air quality monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most people spend more than 90% of their time indoors; indoor air quality (IAQ) influences human health, safety, productivity, and comfort. This paper describes MAQS, a personalized mobile sensing system for IAQ monitoring. In contrast with existing ... Keywords: air quality sensing, location based service, smartphone

Yifei Jiang; Kun Li; Lei Tian; Ricardo Piedrahita; Xiang Yun; Omkar Mansata; Qin Lv; Robert P. Dick; Michael Hannigan; Li Shang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Guide to Energy-Efficient Ventilation Methods for Acceptable Levels of Indoor Air Quality Levels in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor air quality is important in commercial buildings to maintain employee health, well-being, and productivity and avoid employer liability. The most common method to improve indoor air quality in commercial buildings is to use outside ventilation air for dilution of the inside air. Unfortunately, the conditioning of outdoor ventilation air may result in increased energy use for cooling, dehumidification, and heating; and humid outdoor ventilation air also can degrade indoor air quality. Some commerci...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

56

Energy Efficient Ventilation for Maintaining Indoor Air Quality in Large Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper was presented at the 3rd International Conference on Cold Climate Heating, Ventilating and Air-conditioning, Sapporo, Japan, November 2000 C. Y. Shaw Rsum Institute for Research in Construction, National Research Council Canada Achieving good indoor air quality in large residential and commercial buildings continues to be a top priority for owners, designers, building managers and occupants alike. Large buildings present a greater challenge in this regard than do smaller buildings and houses. The challenge is greater today because there are many new materials, furnishings, products and processes used in these buildings that are potential sources of air contaminants. There are three strategies for achieving acceptable indoor air quality: ventilation (dilution), source control and air cleaning/filtration. Of the three, the most frequently used strategy, and in most cases the only one available to building operators, is ventilation. Ventilation is the process of supplying outdoor air to an enclosed space and removing stale air from this space. It can control the indoor air quality by both diluting the indoor air with less contaminated outdoor air and removing the indoor contaminants with the exhaust air. Ventilation costs money because the outdoor air needs to be heated in winter and cooled in summer. To conserve energy, care must be taken to maximize the efficiency of the ventilation system. In this regard, a number of factors come into play

C. Y. Shaw; C. Y. Shaw Résumé

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Indoor air quality issues related to the acquisition of conservation in commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of indoor air in commercial buildings is dependent on the complex interaction between sources of indoor pollutants, environmental factors within buildings such as temperature and humidity, the removal of air pollutants by air-cleaning devices, and the removal and dilution of pollutants from outside air. To the extent that energy conservation measures (ECMs) may affect a number of these factors, the relationship between ECMs and indoor air quality is difficult to predict. Energy conservation measures may affect pollutant levels in other ways. Conservation measures, such as caulking and insulation, may introduce sources of indoor pollutants. Measures that reduce mechanical ventilation may allow pollutants to build up inside structures. Finally, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may provide surface areas for the growth of biogenic agents, or may encourage the dissemination of pollutants throughout a building. Information about indoor air quality and ventilation in both new and existing commercial buildings is summarized in this report. Sick building syndrome and specific pollutants are discussed, as are broader issues such as ventilation, general mitigation techniques, and the interaction between energy conservation activities and indoor air quality. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this review to aid the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) in its assessment of potential environmental effects resulting from conservation activities in commercial buildings. 76 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

Baechler, M.C.; Hadley, D.L.; Marseille, T.J.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation & Cross-Media Transfer Speaker(s): David Olson Date: April 19, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

60

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Title Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51758 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Start Page Chapter Abstract Basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Reference Handbook for Site-Specific Assessment of Subsurface Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface vapor intrusion is only one of several possible sources for volatile and semi-volatile chemicals in indoor air. This report provides guidance on the site-specific assessment of the significance of subsurface vapor intrusion into indoor air. Topics covered include theoretical considerations, sampling and analysis considerations, recommended strategies and procedures, interpretive tools, mitigation measures, and suggestions for future research. This document reflects a comprehensive understandin...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

62

DRAFT 12-5-10 To be submitted to Indoor Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficient Indoor VOC Air Cleaning with Activated Carbon Fiber (ACF) Filters Meera A. Sidheswaran 1 , Hugo Destaillats 1,2, , Douglas P. Sullivan 1 , Sebastian Cohn 1 , and William J. Fisk 1 1 Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 Arizona State University School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment Phoenix, AZ April 2011 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL-5176E 2 Energy Efficient Indoor VOC Air Cleaning with

63

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

64

Effect of a Radiant Panel Cooling System on Indoor Air Quality of a Conditioned Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the effect of a radiant cooling panel system on an indoor air quality (IAQ) of a conditioned space. In this study, ceiling radiant cooling panel, mechanical ventilation with fan coil unit (FCU) and 100% fresh air are used. Temperature sensors are located at different locations inside the conditioned space in order to sense dry bulb temperatures, relative humidity to compare it with standard ASHRAE comfort values. The present investigation indicates that the radiant cooling system not only improves the indoor air quality but also reduces the building energy consumption in the conditioned space.

Mohamed, E.; Abdalla, K. N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comfort in warm conditions. ASHRAE Trans 84 (2): 263 – 277.Moving air for comfort. ASHRAE Journal: 18-29. [9] Zhang,control, and occupant comfort. ASHRAE Trans 110:17–35. [11

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

EVALUATION OF THE INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROCEDURE FOR USE IN RETAIL BUILDINGS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Procedure for Use in Retail Buildings Spencer M. Dutton, Wanyu R. Chan, Mark J. Mendell, Marcella Barrios, Srinandini Parthasarathy, Meera Sidheswaran, Douglas P. Sullivan, Katerina Eliseeva, William J. Fisk Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 February 1, 2013 The research reported here was supported by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program, Energy-Related Environmental Research Program, award number 500-09-049.The study was additionally supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

67

An indoor air perception method to detect fungi growth in flats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Located in the northwest coast of Spain, A Coruna has a mild climate where humidity is relatively high throughout most of the year, due to the effect of the Atlantic Ocean winds. This high relative humidity is related with mould exposure and allergy ... Keywords: Acceptability, Flats, Fungi, Indoor air, Water-damage

José A. Orosa; Armando C. Oliveira

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Airborne Particulate Matter in HVAC Systems and its Influence on Indoor Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper first reviews the mechanisms governing movement of PMs in HVAC systems. Then, the basic equations governing PM deposition in ducts are introduced and investigations on airborne PMs distribution in HVAC systems are reviewed. The influence of PMs on indoor air quality and effectiveness of corresponding controlling measures is discussed extensively in the paper. Finally, recommendations for further research are given.

Fu, Z.; Li, N.; Wang, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

Engelmann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Evaluating Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) as Modifying Factor in Designing Public School Buildings in Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The most fundamental goal in the design of educational facilities is to provide an environment that encourages learning achievement for students and teachers. Poor indoor air quality (IAQ) can negatively affect student health, comfort and performance that will eventually produce unacceptable learning environment. Poor IAQ can decrease a person's ability to perform specific mental tasks requiring concentration, calculation and memory. Therefore, schools should be designed, built and maintained in away to minimize and control the source of pollution. Around 29% of Jordanians occupy school buildings each day. A specific prototype building design was applied in the different locations of the country. This prototype could be appropriate for one location but it is not for the entire country that has diversity in climatic and environmental conditions The purpose of this research paper was to evaluate the indoor air quality in public school buildings in urban and rural area, through investigations of the causes and its effects on student health, comfort, and performance. Achieving healthy indoor air quality is a multifaceted a problem which can be arrived at by a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to the design, construction and operation of the school building. Results indicate that the prototype system used was not appropriate as healthy school design, and it did not take into consideration the indoor environmental factors as crucial issue in designing school buildings.

Ali, H. H.; Al-Momani, H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59293 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks.

73

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks

74

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor air pollution from biomass fuels and respiratoryTuberculosis and Indoor Biomass and Kerosene Use in Nepal: AR.D. Retherford, and K.R. Smith, Biomass cooking fuels and

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY SUPPORTING HEALTH AND  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY SUPPORTING HEALTH AND COMFORT IN HIGHLY ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS Pawel Wargocki 1* , Max Sherman 2 , Willem de Gids 3 , Peter Wouters 4 , Francis Allard 5 , Remi Carrie 6 , Paolo Carrer 7 , and Stylianos Kephalopolous 8 1 International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, DTU Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark 2 Residential Building Systems Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA 3 VentGuide, the Netherlands 4 Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre, Belgium 5 University of La Rochelle, France 6 International Network for Information on Ventilation, Belgium 7 The University of Milan, Italy 8 Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Italy ABSTRACT Research topics that need to be addressed so that the future highly energy efficient buildings do not compromise

76

Automatic monitoring of selected indoor air parameters at three apartment complexes  

SciTech Connect

The impact of three different ventilation systems on the temperature and humidity of three similar apartment complexes is investigated in this study. Each complex has six apartments. The ventilation systems are: natural ventilation, mechanical exhaust ventilation, and mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation. The computer controlled data collection system measures the ventilation rate, relative humidity, indoor air temperature, wind speed, wind direction, outdoor temperature, and humidity. The air change rate depends mainly on the habits of the tenants. The mean air change rate of the houses was between 0.1 to 0.8 ac/h. Great daily variation of the air exchange was observed in the data. Negative correlation between relative humidity and ventilation was very significant in 27 out of 47 cases. Only two cases had very significant positive correlation between ventilation and humidity. Mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation have the greatest variation in ventilation/relative humidity relations.

Savolainen, T.; Raunemaa, T (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland)); Wellman, K. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, Helsinki (Finland))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Total human exposure and indoor air quality: an automated bibliography (BLIS) with summary abstracts. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bibliographic Literature Information System (BLIS) is a computerized data base with brief abstracts that comprehensively reviews literature on total human exposure to environmental pollution. Unpublished draft reports are listed, as well as final reports of the U.S. Government and other countries, reports by governmental research contractors, journal articles, and other contributions. The bibliography covers publications on exposure models, new field data, and newly emerging research methodologies. Although the bibliography covers the entire field of human-exposure methodology, emphasis is on those field studies measuring all the concentrations to which people may be exposed, including indoors, outdoors, or in-transit. Versions of the data base are available on floppy diskettes that can be accessed on MS-DOS computers with two-floppy-disk or hard-disk systems.

Shackelford, J.M.; Ott, W.R.; Wallace, L.A.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluation of Indoor Air Quality Parameters and Airborne Fungal Spore Concentrations by Season and Type of HVAC System in a School Building.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An indoor air quality survey has been conducted in a school building. Samples were collected inone room in each wing and each level on a… (more)

McLeod, Jeffrey D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A triple hot-wire system for indoor air flow measurements  

SciTech Connect

The application of a home made, triple hot-wire system in indoor air flow measurements is presented. Both the anemometer and sensor have been developed at Athens University with the aim to provide a reliable, research tool of reasonable cost, simple construction, and satisfactory performance. All three velocity components above a threshold of 10 cm s{sup {minus}1} can be measured. The system is also equipped with two thermometers for measuring the mean and fluctuating air temperature and for providing a means of temperature compensation of the hot wires` signal. After evaluation of the system in the laboratory, it was used in the measurement of the velocity profile of flows driven by the temperature difference between two internal zones. The implied accuracy of the method allows for its integration with measurements of air volume exchange rates between internal zones, as estimated by tracer gas techniques.

Papadopoulos, K.H.; Soilemes, A.T.; Helmis, C.G.; Santamouris, M.; Dascalaki, E. [Univ. of Athens (Greece); Asimakopoulos, D.N. [Univ. of Athens (Greece)]|[National Observatory of Athens (Greece). Inst. of Meteorology and Physics of the Atmospheric Environment; Argiriou, A. [National Observatory of Athens (Greece). Inst. of Meteorology and Physics of the Atmospheric Environment

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Geographical, spatial, and temporal distributions of multiple indoor air pollutants in four Chinese provinces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure to indoor air pollution from household energy use depends on fuel, stove, housing characteristics, and stove use behavior. Three important indoor air pollutants - respirable particles (RPM), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) were monitored for a total of 457 household-days in four poor provinces in China (Gansu, 129 household-days; Guizhou, 127 household-days; Inner Mongolia, 65 household-days; and Shaanxi, 136 household-days), in two time intervals during the heating season to investigate spatial and temporal patterns of pollution. The two provinces where biomass is the primary fuel (Inner Mongolia and Gansu) had the highest RPM concentrations (719 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in the single cooking/living/bedroom in Inner Mongolia in December and 351-661 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in different rooms and months in Gansu); lower RPM concentration were observed in the primarily coal-burning provinces of Guizhou and Shaanxi (202-352 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and 187-361 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in different rooms and months in Guizhou and Shaanxi, respectively). Inner Mongolia and Gansu also had higher CO concentrations. Among the two primarily coal-burning provinces, Guizhou had lower concentrations of CO than Shaanxi. In the two coal-burning provinces, SO{sub 2} concentrations were substantially higher in Shaanxi than in Guizhou. Relative concentrations in different rooms and provinces indicate that in the northern provinces heating is an important source of exposure to indoor pollutants from energy use. Day-to-day variability of concentrations within individual households, although substantial, was smaller than variation across households. The implications of the findings for designing environmental health interventions in each province are discussed. 21 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Yinlong Jin; Zheng Zhou; Gongli He [and others] [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing (China). National Institute for Environmental Health and Related Product Safety

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Air levels and mutagenicity of PM-10 in an indoor ice arena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report here their results from a preliminary study to evaluate a methodology for surveying air quality by measuring concentrations of PM-10 and the corresponding concentrations of mutagenic activity. The PM-10 was collected, during several hockey games at an ice arena using an Indoor Air Sampling Impactor (IASI) developed by Marple et al. During the course of the study, smoking restrictions were imposed in the stadium and the impact of these restrictions on PM-10 levels was also evaluated. The mutagenic activities of solvent extracts of the PM-10 were determined using the microsuspension modification of the Samonella typhimurium/microsome test. Mutagenic activity has often been used as a rough index of exposure to potential carcinogens and mutagens and to help define their sources.

Georghiou, P.E.; Blagden, P.A. (Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. Johns (Canada)); Snow, D.A.; Winsor, L. (Geortec Ltd., St. Johns, Newfoundland (Canada)); Williams, D.T. (Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality  

SciTech Connect

In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10{sup {minus}7}, 10{sup {minus}5}, and 10{sup {minus}5} respectively. To understand how internal surface area influences the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet, a model of ozone diffusion into and reaction with internal carpet components was developed. This was then used to predict apparent reaction probabilities for carpet. He combines this with a modified model of turbulent mass transfer developed by Liu, et al. to predict deposition rates and indoor ozone concentrations. The model predicts that carpet should have an equivalent reaction probability of about 10{sup {minus}5}, matching laboratory measurements of the reaction probability. For both carpet and duct materials, surfaces become progressively quenched (aging), losing the ability to react or otherwise take up ozone. He evaluated the functional form of aging and find that the reaction probability follows a power function with respect to the cumulative uptake of ozone. To understand ozone aging of surfaces, he developed several mathematical descriptions of aging based on two different mechanisms. The observed functional form of aging is mimicked by a model which describes ozone diffusion with internal reaction in a solid. He shows that the fleecy nature of carpet materials in combination with the model of ozone diffusion below a fiber surface and internal reaction may explain the functional form and the magnitude of power function parameters observed due to ozone interactions with carpet. The ozone induced aldehyde emissions, measured from duct materials, were combined with an indoor air quality model to show that concentrations of aldehydes indoors may approach odorous levels. He shows that ducts are unlikely to be a significant sink for ozone due to the low reaction probability in combination with the short residence time of air in ducts.

Morrison, Glenn C.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The role of the US Department of Energy in indoor air quality and building ventilation policy development  

SciTech Connect

Building ventilation consumes about 5.8 exajoules of energy each year in the US The annual cost of this energy, used for commercial building fans (1.6 exajoules) and the heating and cooling of outside air (4.2 exajoules), is about $US 33 billion per year. Energy conservation measures that reduce heating and cooling season ventilation rates 15 to 35% in commercial and residential buildings can result in a national savings of about 0.6 to 1.5 exajoules ($US 3-8 billion) per year assuming no reduction of commercial building fan energy use. The most significant adverse environmental impact of reduced ventilation and infiltration is the potential degradation of the buildings indoor air quality. Potential benefits to the US from the implementation of sound indoor air quality and building ventilation reduction policies include reduced building-sector energy consumption; reduced indoor, outdoor, and global air pollution; reduced product costs; reduced worker absenteeism; reduced health care costs; reduced litigation; increased worker well-being and productivity; and increased product quality and competitiveness.

Traynor, G.W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Talbott, J.M.; Moses, D.O. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Energy Efficient Indoor VOC Air Cleaning with Activated Carbon Fiber (ACF) Filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compound by activated carbon fiber. Carbon 2004, 42(14):of an activated carbon fiber cloth adsorber. Journal ofindoor VOCs – activated carbon fibers. Proceedings of IAQ’

Sidheswaran, Meera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Windsor Conference - Air Conditioning and the Low CarbonA. , Thomas, PC (2010). Air conditioning, comfort and energyAmerica's Romance with Air- Conditioning. Washington, D.C.

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Indoor Environment Program. 1992 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports progress during the year 1992 in the Indoor Environment Program in the Energy and Environment Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Studies in the following areas are reported: energy performance and ventilation in buildings; physical and chemical characterization of indoor air pollutants; indoor radon; indoor air quality; exposure to indoor air pollutants and risk analysis. Pollutants of particular interest include: radon; volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions including environmental tobacco smoke, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides.

Daisey, J.M.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tighter homes and the air sealing of existing homes.Tightening or air sealing of homes to reduce outdoor airhealth hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amounts of insulation and air sealing materials, which mayand (2) the impact of air sealing on radon exposure and itsstrategy, as well as house air sealing and duct sealing will

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

considerations. A heat exchanger will be installed in anAir Heat Exchangers . 14 Subcontractair-to- air heat exchangers; additional subcontract

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Title Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6373E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Noris, Federico, Gary Adamkiewicz, William W. Delp, Toshifumi Hotchi, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael Spears, Kimberly Vermeer, and William J. Fisk Journal Building Environment Volume 68 Pagination 170-178 Date Published 10/2013 Keywords Apartments; Energy; Indoor environmental quality; Retrofit; Selection Abstract Sixteen apartments serving low-income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Retrofit measures varied among apartments and included, among others, envelope sealing, installation of continuous mechanical ventilation systems, upgrading bathroom fans and range hoods, attic insulation, replacement of heating and cooling systems, and adding wall-mounted particle air cleaners. IEQ parameters were measured, generally for two one-week periods before and after the retrofits. The measurements indicate an overall improvement in IEQ conditions after the retrofits. Comfort conditions, bathroom humidity, and concentrations of carbon dioxide, acetaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and particles generally improved. Formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide levels decreased in the building with the highest concentrations, were unchanged in a second building, and increased in a third building. IEQ parameters other than particles improved more in apartments with continuous mechanical ventilation systems installed. In general, but not consistently, larger percent increases in air exchange rates were associated with larger percent decreases in indoor levels of the pollutants that primarily come from indoor sources.

93

A survey and critical review of the literature on indoor air quality, ventilation and health symptoms in schools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A survey and critical review were undertaken of existing published literature and reports on indoor air quality (IAQ), ventilation, and IAQ- and building-related health problems in schools, including California schools. Over 450 relevant publications were obtained and reviewed, including papers published in the archival peer-reviewed scientific literature, proceedings of scientific meetings, government reports, 77 NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation Reports (HHER) and 70 reports on investigations of problem schools in California. Most of the reviewed literature was for complaint or problem schools. The types of health symptoms reported in schools were very similar to those defined as sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, although this may be due, at least in part, to the type of health symptom questionnaires used. Some of the symptoms, e.g., wheezing, are indicative of asthma. In the studies in which complaint and noncomplaint buildings or areas were compared, complaint buildings generally had higher rates of health symptoms.

Daisey, J.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Angell, W.J. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Case Study 12 - Airflow and Indoor Air Quality Models of DOE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Air Quality Models of DOE Reference Commercial Buildings. ... are intended to simultaneously reduce building energy consumption while maintaining ...

95

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resin wood products, smoking, electric heating, air exchangeand wood burning fireplaces, and denatured alcohol heaters. All natural gas primary heating

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Indoor Environmental Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

office interior, people talking, computational fluid dynamics image office interior, people talking, computational fluid dynamics image Indoor Environmental Quality EETD conducts a broad program of research, technology development, and dissemination activities directed toward improving the health, comfort, and energy efficiency of the indoor environment. EETD researchers conduct a broad program of research and development with the goals of: reducing the energy used for thermally conditioning and distributing ventilation air in buildings improving indoor air quality (IAQ), thermal comfort and the health and productivity of building occupants understanding human exposures to environmental pollutants found in indoor and outdoor air improving the scientific understanding of factors and processes affecting air quality developing sound science to inform public policy on the most

97

Reducing indoor residential exposures to outdoor pollutants  

SciTech Connect

The basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks.

Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Title Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hering, Susanne V., Melissa M. Lunden, Marc L. Fischer, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Tracy L. Thatcher, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 41 Pagination 639-654 Abstract Time-resolved fine particle concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were examined to assess the appropriateness of using regional data and calculated air exchange rates to model indoor concentrations of particles from outdoor sources. The data set includes simultaneous, sub-hourly aerosol composition measurements at three locations: a regional monitoring site in Fresno, California, inside of an unoccupied residence in Clovis, California, located 6 km northeast of the regional site, and immediately outside of this same residence. Indoor concentrations of PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were modeled using varying sets of inputs to determine the influence of three factors on model accuracy: the constraints of the simplified indoor-outdoor model, measured versus modeled air exchange rates, and local versus regional outdoor measurements.

99

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

country’s building sector is responsible for 46.7% of China’s total energy consumption and heating and air-conditioning

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Predictive clothing insulation model based on outdoor air and indoor operative temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE. (2010) ANSI/ASHRAE 55-2010: Thermal environmentaland Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta. ASHRAE. (1981) ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55-1981: Thermal environmental

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Parametric Evaluation of an Innovative Ultra-Violet PhotocatalyticOxidation (UVPCO) Air Cleaning Technology for Indoor Applications  

SciTech Connect

An innovative Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaning technology employing a semitransparent catalyst coated on a semitransparent polymer substrate was evaluated to determine its effectiveness for treating mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) representative of indoor environments at low, indoor-relevant concentration levels. The experimental UVPCO contained four 30 by 30-cm honeycomb monoliths irradiated with nine UVA lamps arranged in three banks. A parametric evaluation of the effects of monolith thickness, air flow rate through the device, UV power, and reactant concentrations in inlet air was conducted for the purpose of suggesting design improvements. The UVPCO was challenged with three mixtures of VOCs. A synthetic office mixture contained 27 VOCs commonly measured in office buildings. A building product mixture was created by combining sources including painted wallboard, composite wood products, carpet systems, and vinyl flooring. The third mixture contained formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Steady state concentrations were produced in a classroom laboratory or a 20-m{sup 3} chamber. Air was drawn through the UVPCO, and single-pass conversion efficiencies were measured from replicate samples collected upstream and downstream of the reactor. Thirteen experiments were conducted in total. In this UVPCO employing a semitransparent monolith design, an increase in monolith thickness is expected to result in general increases in both reaction efficiencies and absolute reaction rates for VOCs oxidized by photocatalysis. The thickness of individual monolith panels was varied between 1.2 and 5 cm (5 to 20 cm total thickness) in experiments with the office mixture. VOC reaction efficiencies and rates increased with monolith thickness. However, the analysis of the relationship was confounded by high reaction efficiencies in all configurations for a number of compounds. These reaction efficiencies approached or exceeded 90% for alcohols, glycol ethers, and other individual compounds including d-limonene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. This result implies a reaction efficiency of about 30% per irradiated monolith face, which is in agreement with the maximum efficiency for the system predicted with a simulation model. In these and other experiments, the performance of the system for highly reactive VOCs appeared to be limited by mass transport of reactants to the catalyst surface rather than by photocatalytic activity. Increasing the air flow rate through the UVPCO device decreases the residence time of the air in the monoliths and improves mass transfer to the catalyst surface. The effect of gas velocity was examined in four pairs of experiments in which the air flow rate was varied from approximately 175 m{sup 3}/h to either 300 or 600 m{sup 3}/h. Increased gas velocity caused a decrease in reaction efficiency for nearly all reactive VOCs. For all of the more reactive VOCs, the decrease in performance was less, and often substantially less, than predicted based solely on residence time, again likely due to mass transfer limitations at the low flow rate. The results demonstrate that the UVPCO is capable of achieving high conversion efficiencies for reactive VOCs at air flow rates above the base experimental rate of 175 m{sup 3}/h. The effect of UV power was examined in a series of experiments with the building product mixture in which the number of lamps was varied between nine and three. For the most reactive VOCs in the mixture, the effects of UV power were surprisingly small. Thus, even with only one lamp in each section, there appears to be sufficient photocatalytic activity to decompose most of the mass of reactive VOCs that reach the catalyst surface. For some less reactive VOCs, the trend of decreasing efficiency with decreasing UV intensity was in general agreement with simulation model predictions.

Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Evaluation of Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) forIndoor Air Applications: Conversion of Volatile Organic Compounds at LowPart-per-Billion Concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Efficient removal of indoor generated airborne particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in office buildings and other large buildings may allow for a reduction in outdoor air supply rates with concomitant energy savings while still maintaining acceptable indoor air quality in these buildings. Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners have the potential to achieve the necessary reductions in indoor VOC concentrations at relatively low cost. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted with a scaled, prototype UVPCO device designed for use in a duct system. The experimental UVPCO contained two 30 by 30-cm honeycomb monoliths coated with titanium dioxide and 3% by weight tungsten oxide. The monoliths were irradiated with 12 UVC lamps arranged in four banks. The UVPCO was challenged with four mixtures of VOCs typical of mixtures encountered in indoor air. A synthetic office mixture contained 27 VOCs commonly measured in office buildings. A cleaning product mixture contained three cleaning products with high market shares. A building product mixture was created by combining sources including painted wallboard, composite wood products, carpet systems, and vinyl flooring. A fourth mixture contained formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Steady-state concentrations were produced in a classroom laboratory or a 20-m{sup 3} environmental chamber. Air was drawn through the UVPCO, and single pass conversion efficiencies were measured from replicate air samples collected upstream and downstream of the reactor section. Concentrations of the mixtures were manipulated, with concentrations of individual VOCs mostly maintained below 10 ppb. Device flow rates were varied between 165 and 580 m{sup 3}/h. Production of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, formic acid, and acetic acid as reaction products was investigated. Conversion efficiency data were generated for 48 individual VOCs or groups of closely related compounds. Alcohols and glycol ethers were the most reactive chemical classes with conversion efficiencies often near or above 70% at the low flow rate and near 40% at the high flow rate. Ketones and terpene hydrocarbons were somewhat less reactive. The relative VOC conversion rates are generally favorable for treatment of indoor air since many contemporary products used in buildings employ oxygenated solvents. A commercial UVPCO device likely would be installed in the supply air stream of a building and operated to treat both outdoor and recirculated air. Assuming a recirculation rate comparable to three times the normal outdoor air supply rate, simple mass-balance modeling suggests that a device with similar characteristics to the study unit has sufficient conversion efficiencies for most VOCs to compensate for a 50% reduction in outdoor air supply without substantially impacting indoor VOC concentrations. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, formic acid, and acetic acid were produced in these experiments as reaction byproducts. No other significant byproducts were observed. A coupled steady-state mass balance model is presented and applied to VOC data from a study of a single office building. For the operating assumptions described above, the model estimated a three-fold increase in indoor formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations. The outcome of this limited assessment suggests that evaluation of the potential effects of the operation of a UVPCO device on indoor concentrations of these contaminants is warranted. Other suggested studies include determining VOC conversion efficiencies in actual buildings and evaluating changes in VOC conversion efficiency as monoliths age with long-term operation.

Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Moya, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Gosselin, J.R. and Chen, Q. 2008. "A dual airflow window for indoor air quality improvement and energy conservation in buildings," HVAC&R Research, 14(3), 359-372.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy conservation in buildings," HVAC&R Research, 14(3), 359-372. A Dual Airflow Window for Indoor Air. For commercial buildings IAQ can be regulated by the HVAC system that mixes fresh outdoor air with return air

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

105

Field Evaluation of Nanofilm Detectors for Measuring Acidic Particles in Indoor and Outdoor Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

independent and unbiased research organization to provide high quality, impartial, and relevant science on the health effects of emissions from motor vehicles, fuels, and other environmental sources. All results are provided to industry and government sponsors, other key decisionmakers, the scientific community, and the public. HEI funds research on all major pollutants, including air toxics, diesel exhaust, nitrogen oxides, ozone, and particulate matter. The Institute periodically engages in special review and evaluation of key questions in science that are highly relevant to the regulatory process. To date, HEI has supported more than 220 projects at institutions in North America, Europe, and Asia and has published over 160 Research Reports and Special Reports. Typically, HEI receives half of its core funds from the US Environmental Protection Agency and half from 28

E F F E Cts; Beverly S Cohen; Maire Sa Heikkinen; Yair Hazi; Hai Gao; Paul Peters

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Indoor Humidity Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Humidity Tools Indoor Humidity Tools Indoor Humidity Tools logo. Integrated computer program intended to assist in diagnosing and solving problems of indoor air humidity and dryness. Indoor Humidity Tools is comprised of two sections: - Calculations provide humidity calculations. - Reference provides background information on humidity in convenient lookup formats, such as recommended indoor humidity levels for different types of spaces, against which calculations may be compared. Keywords indoor air humidity, dryness, condensation Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required No special expertise required. Users first released in July 1997. Audience engineers, industrial hygienists and safety professionals, architects, building scientists, contractors, government air quality specialists, and

107

United States Office of Radiation and EPA 402-B-00-001 Environmental Protection Indoor Air August 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--Florida Institute of Phosphate Research. Microbiology and Radiochemistry of Phosphogypsum. Publ. No. 05., and Burnett, W. Radiochemistry of Florida Phosphogypsum. Journal of Environmental Radioactivity 32 (1996) no

108

INDOOR AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building materials (used i n construction, furnishings, and insulation),cooling buildings, we have been increasing insulation andBuilding Construction C o n c r e t e , Stone Particleboard Insulation

Hollowell, C.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fans Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .expected from heat exchangers Ventilation expected fromventilation supplied by heat exchanger and exhaust flow. .

Grimsrud, David T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Simplified methodology for indoor environment designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current design of the building indoor environment uses averaged single parameters such as air velocity, air temperature or contaminant concentration. This approach gives only general information about thermal comfort and ...

Srebric, Jelena, 1970-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study ...

Hospodsky, Denina

112

Experimental Evaluation of Indoor Air Distribution in High-Performance Residential Buildings: Part I. General Descriptions and Qualification Tests  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this project is to experimentally characterize an air distribution system in heating mode during a period of recovery from setback. The specific air distribution system under evaluation incorporates a high sidewall supply-air register/diffuser and a near-floor wall return air grille directly below. With this arrangement, the highest temperature difference between the supply air and the room can occur during the recovery period and create a favorable condition for stratification. The experimental approach will provide realistic input data and results for verification of computational fluid dynamics modeling.

Jalalzadeh, A. A.; Hancock, E.; Powell, D.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Dehumidification and simultaneous removal of selected pollutants from indoor air by a desiccant wheel using a 1M type desiccant  

SciTech Connect

Solid-desiccant dehumidifiers are increasingly becoming an integral part of desiccant based air-conditioning systems because of their effective handling of latent heat loads compared to conventional vapor compression units. In these units, either a silica gel or a molecular sieve is used for dehumidification of air. Both of them have the capability to co-adsorb various chemical pollutants during dehumidification of air. However, the shape of the isotherm for water vapor on these materials is not favorable for desiccant cooling applications. A mixture (1M desiccant) containing a silica gel, a molecular sieve, and a hydrophobic molecular sieve that was coated on an aluminum foil was studied for its capability for simultaneous removal of moisture and some selected pollutants from air. Experimental data were obtained in a fixed bed adsorber that simulated the operation of a rotary desiccant wheel. Air to be dehumidified and cleaned and the hot regeneration air were cycled in a specific time interval through this bed. The shape of the water isotherm on 1M desiccant was found to be in between that of silica gel and molecular sieve 13{times}, but its uptake capacity was significantly lower than that of either silica gel or molecular sieve. A flow rate of about 100 L/min that provided a face velocity of about 132 cm/s was used in the adsorption step. The flow rate during regeneration was about 50 L/min. The temperature of the inlet air was about 23 C and its relative humidity was varied between 20% and 80%. The concentrations of pollutants were as follows; carbon dioxide: 1050 and 2300 ppm; toluene: 32 ppm; 1,1,1-trichloroethane: 172 ppm, and formaldehyde: 0.35 ppm. A complete breakthrough of all the pollutants was observed during an adsorption cycle.

Popescu, M.; Ghosh, T.K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

ARM - Journal Articles 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2006 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Kogan Large-eddy simulation of air parcels in stratocumulus clouds: Time scales and spatial variability (Citation) Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences ARM Duchon Broadband albedo observations in the Southern Great Plains (Citation) Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology ARM

117

Find Journals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Journals Journals Find Journals The public can search our journal collection via the Library Catalog. Questions? 667-5809 Email e-Journals Search electronic journals by title: Go Starts with Contains Exact For Advanced Search, Subject search, and more, use the Find e-Journals search tool. Looking for articles? Try our Articles/Databases page. Print Journals Search for print journals in the Library Catalog: Journal in Catalog Click on the JOURNAL link under "Location/Call number" to see what years/volumes the Library owns. Journals are shelved alphabetically on the lower level (downstairs map). Want an article scanned? Use our Request Form. PDF Troubleshooting See Adobe Reader's Support page General steps If possible, download PDF file and open in your PDF viewer software

118

Lipids Journal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipids is a peer-reviewed scientific journal containing original research articles, methods papers and review articles. Lipids Journal Publications aocs articles book books cdrom cdroms detergents echapters fats inform international journal journa

119

Indoor Sampler Siting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Sampler Siting Indoor Sampler Siting Title Indoor Sampler Siting Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2009 Authors Sohn, Michael D., and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 11th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms Conference Location Busan, Korea Abstract Contaminant releases in or near a building can lead to significant human exposures unless prompt response is taken. U.S. Federal and local agencies are implementing programs to place air-monitoring samplers in buildings to quickly detect biological agents. We describe a probabilistic algorithm for siting samplers in order to detect accidental or intentional releases of biological material. The algorithm maximizes the probability of detecting a release from among a suite of realistic scenarios. The scenarios may differ in any unknown, for example the release size or location, weather, mode of building operation, etc. The algorithm also can optimize sampler placement in the face of modeling uncertainties, for example the airflow leakage characteristics of the building, and the detection capabilities of the samplers. In anillustrative example, we apply the algorithm to a hypothetical 24-room commercial building, finding optimal networks for a variety of assumed sampler types and performance characteristics. We also discuss extensions of this work for detecting ambient pollutants in buildings, and for understanding building-wide airflow, pollutant dispersion, and exposures

120

Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy Title Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-63480 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Brett C. Singer, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 3177-3181 ISBN Number 1352-2310 Keywords acid-base, cellulose, gypsum, nicotine, pyridine, sorption, surface materials Abstract Molecular associations of pyridine with cellulose and gypsum, surrogates for common indoor surface materials, were studied using an attenuated total reflection (ATR)-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometric method. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the molecular interactions of amines with well-characterized materials that affect their partitioning between indoor air and surfaces. The experimental results suggest the presence of at least two sorptive states for volatile and semivolatile amines, attributed to the chemisorbed species and to a more labile surface state (i.e., physisorbed pyridine). Both exhibited spectroscopic signatures corresponding to aromatic C-H stretching modes (2950-3100 cm-1) in the studied spectral region. Chemisorbed pyridine could be identified by the presence of additional IR signals in the N-H and O-H stretching region of the spectrum (2900-3600 cm-1). During desorption under a stream of N2, surface enrichment in the chemisorbed species was evidenced by a slower reduction of the absorbance of the broad band at 2900-3600 cm-1 in relation to the total pyridine absorbance change. This spectroscopic evidence for acid-base interactions between amines and surfaces is consistent with the desorption behavior observed in previous work for nicotine from model surfaces.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Pollutant Dispersion in a Large Indoor Space Part 2 -- Computational Fluid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollutant Dispersion in a Large Indoor Space Part 2 -- Computational Fluid Pollutant Dispersion in a Large Indoor Space Part 2 -- Computational Fluid Dyamics (CF) Predictions and Comparisons with a Model Experiment for Isothermal Flow Title Pollutant Dispersion in a Large Indoor Space Part 2 -- Computational Fluid Dyamics (CF) Predictions and Comparisons with a Model Experiment for Isothermal Flow Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2004 Authors Finlayson, Elizabeth U., Ashok J. Gadgil, Tracy L. Thatcher, and Richard G. Sextro Journal Indoor Air Volume 14 Start Page Chapter Pagination 272-283 Abstract This paper reports on an investigation of the adequacy of Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), using a standard Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) model, for predicting dispersion of neutrally buoyant gas in a large indoor space. We used CFD to predict pollutant (dye) concentration profiles in a water filled scale model of an atrium with a continuous pollutant source. Predictions from the RANS formulation are comparable to an ensemble average of independent identical experiments. Model results were compared to pollutant concentration data in a horizontal plane from experiments in a scale model atrium. Predictions were made for steady-state (fully developed) and transient (developing) pollutant concentrations. Agreement between CFD predictions and ensemble averaged experimental measurements is quantified using the ratios of CFD-predicted and experimentally measured dye concentration at a large number of points in the measurement plane. Agreement is considered good if these ratios fall between 0.5 and 2.0 at all points in the plane. The standard k-epsilon two equation turbulence model obtains this level of agreement and predicts pollutant arrival time to the measurement plane within a few seconds. These results suggest that this modeling approach is adequate for predicting isothermal pollutant transport in a large room with simple geometry

122

Measurements of Indoor Pollutant Emissions From EPA Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of wood consumed starting with the load before the ... for the rate of wood consumption during each ... Indoor Air for Health and Energy Conservation. ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

123

Indoor unit for electric heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

124

ARM - Journal Articles 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2004 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Jakob Use of cloud radar observations for model evaluation: A probabilistic approach (Citation) Journal of Geophysical Research ARM Schultz Snowbands during the cold-air outbreak of 23 January 2003. (Citation) Monthly Weather Review ARM

125

Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Title Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-58785 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Melissa M. Lunden, Brett C. Singer, Beverly K. Coleman, Alfred T. Hodgson, Charles J. Weschler, and William W. Nazaroff Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 4421-4428 Abstract Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 × 105 molecules cm-3 were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1 - 25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products

126

Indoor Environment Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Environment Group Indoor Environment Group The Indoor Environment Group performs research that aims to maintain healthy and productive indoor environments while buildings are made more energy efficient. We study the links between indoor environmental quality, building ventilation, building energy efficiency and occupants' health, performance and comfort. We undertake experiments in laboratory and field settings and employ modeling to characterize indoor environmental conditions and evaluate the fate, transport and chemical transformations of indoor pollutants. We elucidate pathways of pollutant exposure, evaluate and develop energy efficient means of controlling indoor environmental quality, and provide input for related guidelines and standards. Contacts William Fisk WJFisk@lbl.gov (510) 486-5910

127

Indoor environment program. 1994 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

Daisey, J.M.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Indoor environment program - 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

Daisey, J.M.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Numerical Analysis of a Cold Air Distribution System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold air distribution systems may reduce the operating energy consumption of air-conditioned air supply system and improve the outside air volume percentages and indoor air quality. However, indoor temperature patterns and velocity field are easily non-uniform so that residents usually feel uncomfortable. The distribution of indoor airflow by cold air distribution is researched in this paper. We study indoor air distribution under different low temperature air supply conditions by numerical simulation. The simulated results agree well with the experiments.

Zhu, L.; Li, R.; Yuan, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Health Hazards in Indoor Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Energy Technologies Division  Lawrence Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division OctoberLow Energy and Sustainable Ventilation Technologies for

Logue, Jennifer M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Texas Indoor Air Quality Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

product; all paint used within the interior of the house is zero-VOC paint; and the Texas mesquite floors are finished with natural oils and wax. The tightly sealed joints...

132

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive Nuclear Weapons Journal The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue...

133

SC e-journals, Science (General/Popular)  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science (General/Popular) Science (General/Popular) Aestimatio: Critical Reviews in the History of Science - OAJ Air, Soil and Water Research - OAJ Analyst Astronomy and Astrophysics Review, The Australian Journal of Emerging Technologies and Society - OAJ Bioelectromagnetics Biotechnology & Bioengineering Cancer Prevention Journals Portal Cancer Prevention Research Cancer Reviews Online Catalysis Today College of the Bahamas Research Journal - OAJ Columbia Undergraduate Science Journal - OAJ Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics Economist, De Electricity Journal, The Endeavour Eurasia Journal of Mathematics, Science & Technology Education - OAJ EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking - OAJ European Food Research and Technology A European Physical Journal C Fibreculture Journal - OAJ

134

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms A Single-Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell without an Air Cathode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment with electricity production. Electricity generation with simultaneous nitrate reduction in a single-chamber MFC without air cathode was studied, using glucose (1 mM) as the carbon source and nitrate (1 mM) as the final electron acceptor employed by Bacillus subtilis under anaerobic conditions. Increasing current as a function of decreased nitrate concentration and an increase in biomass were observed with a maximum current of 0.4 mA obtained at an external resistance (Rext) of 1 K? without a platinum catalyst of air cathode. A decreased current with complete nitrate reduction, with further recovery of the current immediately after nitrate addition, indicated the dependence of B. subtilis on nitrate as an electron acceptor to efficiently produce electricity. A power density of 0.0019 mW/cm 2 was achieved at an Rext of 220 ?. Cyclic voltammograms (CV) showed direct electron transfer with the involvement of mediators in the MFC. The low coulombic efficiency (CE)

Vanita Roshan Nimje; Chien-cheng Chen; Hau-ren Chen; Chien-yen Chen; Min-jen Tseng; Kai-chien Cheng; Ruey-chyuan Shih; Young-fo Chang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks A. E. Xhafa, P. Sonthikorn, and O in indoor wireless net- works (IWN) that use heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts.e., new call blocking and handover dropping probabilities, of an IWN that uses HVAC ducts are up to 6

Stancil, Daniel D.

137

Achieving Healthy Indoor Environments via Improved Understanding of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achieving Healthy Indoor Environments via Improved Understanding of Achieving Healthy Indoor Environments via Improved Understanding of Surface-associated Chemical and Biological Processes Speaker(s): Ellison M. Carter Date: February 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3075 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Diane Douglas Indoor air pollution in the workplace, public buildings, and residential dwellings has the potential to adversely impact human health. Within these diverse indoor environments, chemical and biological processes that occur at surfaces and interfaces strongly influence the fate, transport, and generation of indoor pollutants. A molecular-level understanding of the physical and chemical properties and processes characteristic of indoor surfaces is key to developing resilient building materials that strengthen building integrity and safeguard human health by reducing human exposure to

138

California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality Project: Predicted Relocatable Classroom Indoor Air Quality due to Low-Emitting Interior Materials and Enhanced Ventilation Title California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality Project: Predicted Relocatable Classroom Indoor Air Quality due to Low-Emitting Interior Materials and Enhanced Ventilation Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2001 Authors Apte, Michael G., William J. Fisk, Alfred T. Hodgson, Marion L. Russell, and Derek G. Shendell Conference Name Proceedings of the 11th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Exposure Analysis, Charleston, SC Date Published November 4-8, 20 Publisher International Society for Exposure Analysis, Boston, MA

139

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Title Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6196E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Satish, Usha, Mark J. Mendell, Krishnamurthy Shekhar, Toshifumi Hotchi, Douglas P. Sullivan, Siegfried Streufert, and William J. Fisk Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 120 Issue 12 Pagination 1671-1677 Date Published 09/20/2012 Keywords carbon dioxide, cognition, Decision Making, human performance, indoor environmental quality, ventilation Abstract Background - Associations of higher indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations with impaired

140

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air pollution from biomass combustion and acute respiratorycountries where biomass and kerosene combustion is common.to smoke from biomass fuel combustion increases the severity

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Air Conditioning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

environment. An air conditioner uses a cold indoor coil called the evaporator. The condenser, a hot outdoor coil, releases the collected heat outside. The evaporator and...

142

Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality improvements when retrofitting apartments Title Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality improvements when retrofitting apartments Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6147E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Noris, Federico, William W. Delp, Kimberly Vermeer, Gary Adamkiewicz, Brett C. Singer, and William J. Fisk Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 61 Pagination 378-386 Date Published 06/2013 Keywords apartments, buildings, costs, energy, indoor environmental quality, Protocol, retrofits, Selection Abstract The current focus on building energy retrofit provides an opportunity to simultaneously improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Toward this end, we developed a protocol for selecting packages of retrofits that both save energy and improve IEQ in apartments. The protocol specifies the methodology for selecting retrofits from a candidate list while addressing expected energy savings, IEQ impacts, and costs in an integrated manner. Interviews, inspections and measurements are specified to collect the needed input information. The protocol was applied to 17 apartments in three buildings in two different climates within California. Diagnostic measurements and surveys conducted before and after retrofit implementation indicate enhanced apartment performance.

143

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Respiratory Health Speaker(s): Mark Mendell Date: February 23, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Most research into the effects of residential indoor air exposures on asthma and allergies has focused on exposures to biologic allergens, moisture and mold, endotoxin, or combustion byproducts. A growing body of research suggests that chemical emissions from common indoor materials and finishes have adverse effects, including increased risk of asthma, allergies, and pulmonary infections. The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring, carpet, paint, and plastics. This presentation presents a brief review of studies

144

5 Questions for Indoor Environment Group's William Fisk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Questions for Indoor Environment Group's William Fisk 5 Questions for Indoor Environment Group's William Fisk William Fisk January 2014 Quantifying the Economic Implications of Indoor Air on Energy Efficiency, Performance, and Health William Fisk is a senior scientist, mechanical engineer, and leader of the Indoor Environment Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). During his 33 years at the lab, he has researched the interrelated issues of building energy performance, ventilation, indoor environmental quality (IEQ), and occupant health and performance. His research focuses primarily on energy efficient methods of maintaining and improving ventilation and IEQ in buildings and on quantifying the impacts of building ventilation and IEQ on health and performance. He is a fellow of ASHRAE, a member of the

145

Immunochemical approach to indoor aeroallergen quantitation with a new volumetric air sampler: studies with mite, roach, cat, mouse, and guinea pig antigens  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new high-volume air sampler for determining antigen concentrations in homes and illustrate its use for quantitating airborne house dust mite, cat, cockroach, mouse, and guinea pig antigens. The concentration of house dust-mite antigen was similar from houses in Rochester, Minn. and tenement apartments in Harlem, N. Y., but cockroach and mouse urinary proteins were present only in Harlem. The amount of cat or guinea pig antigen varied as expected with the number of pets in the home. In calm air the airborne concentration of mite and cat antigen was similar throughout the house but increased greatly in a bedroom when bedding was changed. In calm air most of the cat and mite antigens were associated with respirable particles less than 5 microns mean aerodynamic mass diameter, but in air sampled after the bedding was changed, more cat antigen was found in particles greater than 5 microns. The apparatus and technique described can provide objective data concerning the magnitude and the relative distribution and duration of suspended particles of defined sizes, which contain allergen activity.

Swanson, M.C.; Agarwal, M.K.; Reed, C.E.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Low frequency indoor radiolocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis concerns the application of electromagnetic wave propagation to the problem of indoor radiolocation. Determining the location of people and objects relative to their environment is crucial for asset tracking, ...

Reynolds, Matthew S. (Matthew Stephen), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attached garages have been identified as important sources of indoor residential air pollution. However, the literature lacks information on how the proximity of cars to the living area affects indoor concentrations of gasoline-related compounds, and the origin of these pollutants. We analyzed data from the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study and evaluated 114 residences with cars in an attached garage, detached garage or carport, or without cars. Results indicate that homes with cars in attached garages were affected the most. Concentrations in homes with cars in detached garages and residences without cars were similar. The contribution from gasoline-related sources to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to be dominated by car exhaust, or a combination of tailpipe and gasoline vapor emissions. Residing in a home with an attached garage could lead to benzene exposures ten times higher than exposures from commuting in heavy traffic.

Corsi, Dr. Richard [University of Texas, Austin; Morandi, Dr. Maria [University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston; Siegel, Dr. Jeffrey [University of Texas, Austin; Hun, Diana E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

SC e-journals Sitemap  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Sitemap Home Page Open Access Journals (OAJ) Web of Science Science Accelerator Browse Journals Alphabetically Journals by Publisher Journals by Subject Search Search by...

149

American Journal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American American Journal of Science JUNE 2007 GENERALIZATION OF GAS HYDRATE DISTRIBUTION AND SATURATION IN MARINE SEDIMENTS BY SCALING OF THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROCESSES GAURAV BHATNAGAR*, WALTER G. CHAPMAN*, GERALD R. DICKENS**, BRANDON DUGAN**, and GEORGE J. HIRASAKI* † ABSTRACT. Gas hydrates dominated by methane naturally occur in deep marine sediment along continental margins. These compounds form in pore space between the seafloor and a sub-bottom depth where appropriate stability conditions prevail. However, the amount and distribution of gas hydrate within this zone, and free gas below, can vary significantly at different locations. To understand this variability, we develop a one-dimensional numerical model that simulates the accumulation of gas hydrates in marine sediments due to upward and downward fluxes of methane over time. The model contains rigorous

150

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Lorenzetti, David M., Astrid H. Kristoffersen, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Indoor Air Pagination 7 Keywords recirculating ventilation, tracer decay rate Abstract Tracer gas measurements are used to estimate the flow rate of fresh air into a room or building. These methods commonly account for the decay of tracer gas concentration as the result of ventilation air supply and infiltration, using a well-mixed model of the space. Some researchers also have considered the effect of leakage in the ventilation ductwork. This paper considers the effect of recirculation through ventilation ducts on the calculated fresh air supply rate. Transport delay in the ducts can significantly alter the time evolution of tracer concentration, and hence alter the estimated air change rate.

151

High indoor radon variations and the thermal behavior of eskers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in houses built on the Pispala esker in the city of Tampere were taken. The objective was to find connections between indoor radon concentrations, esker topography, and meteorological factors. The results show that not only the permeable soil but also subterranean air-flows in the esker strongly affect the indoor radon concentrations. The difference in temperature between the soil air inside the esker and the outdoor air compels the subterranean air to stream between the upper and lower esker areas. In winter, the radon concentrations are amplified in the upper esker areas where air flows out from the esker. In summer, concentrations are amplified in certain slope zones. In addition, wind direction affects the soil air and indoor radon concentrations when hitting the slopes at right angles. Winter-summer concentration ratios are typically in the range of 3-20 in areas with amplified winter concentration, and 0.1-0.5 in areas with amplified summer concentrations. A combination of winter and summer measurements provides the best basis for making mitigation decisions. On eskers special attention must be paid to building technology because of radon. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Arvela, H.; Voutilainen, A.; Honkamaa, T.; Rosenberg, A. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Title Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3650E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Thomas E. McKone, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Journal Indoor Air Volume 21 Start Page 92 Issue 2 Pagination 92-109 Date Published 04/2011 Keywords resave Abstract Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants were representative of concentrations in residences in the United States. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for 5 activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants are identified as contaminants of concern for chronic health effects in a large fraction of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on robustness of reported concentration data and fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3- butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM2.5. Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM2.5, formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO2.

153

Gas ranges: latest indoor pollution target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although a National Research Council study claims that unvented gas cooking and heating appliance are probably responsible for a large portions of the nitrogen dioxide exposures in the population, the data base for gas-stove emissions is actually too limited to be conclusive. The problem of indoor pollution more likely rests with the increased airtightness of houses rather than with gas combustion. In the last 5 years, the normal air flow in new houses has been reduced 80% through new insulation and building techniques designed to lower heating and cooling costs. Other elements contributing to indoor pollution are much more hazardous than gas combustion products: radon gas from the soil, formaldehyde for insulation and construction materials, and toxic chemicals from household aerosols and solvents.

O'Sullivan, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

NERSC Journal Cover Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CEN-Cover.png CEN-Cover.png Graphene Moves Toward Applications November 21, 2011 | Author(s): Donghai Mei, et al. | Category: Chemistry | URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl203332e Download Image: CEN-Cover.png | png | 986 KB Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode. See also http://pubs.acs.org/NanoLett (2011) 11, 5071-5078 SotirisCoverJPCBLarge.jpg Computational Investigation of the First Solvation Shell Structure of Interfacial and Bulk Aqueous Chloride and Iodide Ions November 14, 2008 | Author(s): Collin D. Wick, and Sotiris S. Xantheas | Source: The Journal of Physical Chemistry B | Category: Chemistry | URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp806782r Download Image: SotirisCoverJPCBLarge.jpg | jpg | 1.1 MB 2009, Vol. 113 (13), pp. 4141-4146 ACSCatalysis2013Mei.png

155

A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences Title A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5267E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Phillip N. Price, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 120 Start Page 216 Pagination 216-222 Date Published 11/2011 Keywords air toxics, criteria pollutants, DALYs, exposure, impact assessment, indoor air pollutants, indoor air quality Abstract Background: Indoor air pollutants (IAPs) cause multiple health impacts. Prioritizing mitigation options that differentially impact individual pollutants and comparing IAPs to other environmental health hazards requires a common metric of harm. Objectives: The objective was to demonstrate a methodology to quantify and compare health impacts from IAPs. The methodology is needed to assess population health impacts of large-scale initiatives - including energy efficiency upgrades and ventilation standards - that affect indoor air quality (IAQ). Methods: Available disease incidence and disease impact models for specific pollutant-disease combinations were synthesized with data on measured concentrations to estimate the chronic heath impact, in Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), due to inhalation of a subset of IAPs in U.S. residences. Model results were compared to independent estimates of DALYs lost due to disease. Results: PM2.5, acrolein, and formaldehyde accounted for the vast majority of DALY losses caused by IAPs considered in this analysis, with impacts on par or greater than estimates for secondhand tobacco smoke and radon. Confidence intervals of DALYs lost derived from epidemiology-based response functions are tighter than those derived from toxicology-based, inter-species extrapolations. Statistics on disease incidence in the US indicate that the upper-bound confidence interval for aggregate IAP harm is implausibly high. Conclusions: The demonstrated approach may be used to assess regional and national initiatives that impact IAQ at the population level. Cumulative health impacts from inhalation in U.S. residences of the IAPs assessed in this study are estimated at 400-1100 DALYs annually per 100,000 people.

156

Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors July 25, 2013 - 11:20am Addthis Blinds are a great option for cooling your home in the summer. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nycshooter Blinds are a great option for cooling your home in the summer. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nycshooter Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy How can I participate? Instead of turning on the air conditioning, consider window treatments and fans to cool down your home. If your internal thermostat is melting like the rest of the U.S. right now, you probably could use some fanning, ice, or air conditioning. With that in mind, we are providing a rundown of the cheapest ways to keep your home

157

Condition Controlling and Monitoring of Indoor Swimming Pools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VTT has executed a lot of research work concerning the usage, functionality and refurbishment of indoor swimming pools and spas lately. This work includes for instance detailed condition surveys, energy audits, cost analysis and maintenance planning tools. The prevailing conditions make special demands for planning, constructing, repairing and maintaining the indoor swimming pools. Main topics are usually connected with shortening of the service lives of the building parts and technical installations and the indoor air quality. Also the yearly running costs can be remarkable high. VTT has created the technical risk map for indoor swimming pool repairs. This risk map presents the most significant factors that must be taken into account in order to repair facilities successfully. Due to optimizing the operation and maintenance VTT has developed operation and maintenance manual software that is specially targeted for indoor swimming facilities. This paper presents the technical risk map, the condition survey procedure, the energy saving methods and the maintenance record book for indoor swimming facilities to secure the success of a refurbishment project.

Nissinen, K.; Kauppinen, T.; Hekkanen, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies  

SciTech Connect

This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing...

160

CONTAM Applications - Indoor Air Quality Analysis and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of a CONTAM source isolation problem is the analysis of radon ... the pressure differences associated with different ventilation scenarios, stack and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Pollution/Indoor Air Quality Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... More than 95% of the seabirds breeding in the continental United States nest at colonies in the Bering and Chukchi seas and Gulf of Alaska. ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

162

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

foam insulation, and radon from building gas context of withbuilding envelope to reduce exfiltration and infiltration, improving insulation,

Hollowell, C.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Evaluation of Passive Monitors for Measuring Indoor Radon and Formaldehyde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive monitors for indoor air pollutants can furnish a cost-effective alternative to larger, more sophisticated, active monitors. In this study, three passive radon monitors provided sufficient accuracy and precision to support their use in utility measurement programs. However, the marginal performance of a passive formaldehyde monitor indicated the need for a vigorous quality assurance program to quantify its performance.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

This is an Accepted Article that has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication in the Indoor Air, but has yet to undergo copy-editing and proof correction. Please cite this article as an "Accepted  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to better lighting options (hurricane or pressure lamps and lighting using grid or off-grid electricity) can Distributions and Indoor Concentrations from Kerosene and Diesel Lamps J. Apple 1 , R. Vicente 1 , A. Yarberry 1, and Jenny Tracy for collecting data in Kenya in 2008 and 2009. We thank Art Rosenfeld and the Blum Center

Jacobson, Arne

165

SC e-journals, Bioinformatics  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Bioinformatics Bioinformatics ACS Synthetic Biology Annual Review of Biochemistry Annual Review of Biophysics Annual Review of Genetics Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics Biochemistry BioEssays Bioinspiration & Biomimetics Biophysical Journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics Biotechnology Advances Cell Current Opinion in Structural Biology DNA Repair Engineering in Life Sciences Extremophiles Febs Letters Functional & Integrative Genomics Information Visualization Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering Journal of Biotechnology Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Journal of Human Genetics Journal of Mathematical Biology Journal of Molecular Biology Journal of Molecular Evolution Journal of Molecular Histology Journal of Molecular Modeling Journal of Proteomics & Bioinformatics - OAJ

166

The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment  

SciTech Connect

The indoor atmosphere is an ecological unit that impacts on public health. To investigate the composition of organisms in this space, we applied culture-independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air of two densely populated urban buildings, from which we analyzed 80 megabases genomic DNA sequence and 6000 16S rDNA clones. The air microbiota is primarily bacteria, including potential opportunistic pathogens commonly isolated from human-inhabited environments such as hospitals, but none of the data contain matches to virulent pathogens or bioterror agents. Comparison of air samples with each other and nearby environments suggested that the indoor air microbes are not random transients from surrounding outdoor environments, but rather originate from indoor niches. Sequence annotation by gene function revealed specific adaptive capabilities enriched in the air environment, including genes potentially involved in resistance to desiccation and oxidative damage. This baseline index of air microbiota will be valuable for improving designs of surveillance for natural or man-made release of virulent pathogens.

Tringe, Susannah; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xuguo; Yu, Yiting; Lee, Wah Heng; Yap, Jennifer; Yao, Fei; Suan, Sim Tiow; Ing, Seah Keng; Haynes, Matthew; Rohwer, Forest; Wei, Chia Lin; Tan, Patrick; Bristow, James; Rubin, Edward M.; Ruan, Yijun

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

167

FM-based indoor localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major challenge for accurate fingerprint-based indoor localization is the design of robust and discriminative wireless signatures. Even though WiFi RSSI signatures are widely available indoors, they vary significantly over time and are susceptible ... Keywords: fingerprinting, fm, localization, mobile systems, wireless

Yin Chen; Dimitrios Lymberopoulos; Jie Liu; Bodhi Priyantha

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

ARM - Journal Articles 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govPublicationsJournal Articles 2013 govPublicationsJournal Articles 2013 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2013 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Kafle Micropulse lidar-derived aerosol optical depth climatology at ARM sites worldwide (Citation) Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres ARM

169

SC e-journals, Nuclear  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Nuclear Nuclear Annals of Nuclear Energy Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science Atomic Data & Nuclear Data Tables Atomic Energy BMC Medical Physics - OAJ Cancer Prevention Journals Portal Cancer Prevention Research Cancer Reviews Online Dose Response Energy & Environmental Science Energy Policy EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing - OAJ EURASIP Journal on Bioinformatics and Systems Biology - OAJ EURASIP Journal on Embedded Systems (2006 forward) - OAJ Fuel Fusion Engineering and Design Fusion Nuclear Society Health Physics IETE Journal of Research - OAJ International Journal of Cancer International Journal of Low Radiation International Journal of Microwave Science and Technology - OAJ International Journal of Radiation Biology Journal of Cancer Eqidemiology - OAJ

170

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Title Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5553E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Mile Lubliner, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Journal 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings The Climate for efficiency is now Date Published 08/2010 Abstract In recent years, great strides have been made in reducing air leakage in residential and to a lesser extent small commercial forced air duct systems. Several authorities have introduced low leakage limits for thermal distribution systems; for example, the State of California Energy Code for Buildings gives credit for systems that leak less than 6% of the total air flow at 25 Pa.

171

Improving Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems Title Improving Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2005 Authors Apte, Michael G., Michael Spears, Chi-Ming Lai, and Derek G. Shendell Conference Name Proceedings of Sustainable Buildings 2005 Conference Pagination 1432-1437 Conference Location Tokyo, Japan, September 27-29, 2005 Abstract The factory-built relocatable classroom (RC) is a dominant force in the school facility construction industry in the United States (U.S.) and elsewhere. It is estimated that there are approximately 650,000 RCs currently occupied in the U.S., housing about 16 million students. RCs receive public attention due to complaints about poor indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Both measured data and anecdotal evidence in California have suggested excessive acoustical noise from heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment as a central factor leading to degraded IEQ. In the U.S., RCs are typically equipped with unitary exterior wall-mount HVAC systems, and interior acoustical noise due to structural and airborne transmission can reach levels of about 58dB(A) with compressor cycling, under unoccupied conditions. Due to these noise levels teachers often simply choose to turn off the HVAC, leading to inadequate ventilation, as well as poor thermal conditioning, and thus to poor indoor air quality. Elevated levels of carbon dioxide and volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde are common. We discuss the acoustic component of our efforts to develop and test energy efficient HVAC systems that address the ventilation, controls, and acoustic requirements necessary to ensure high quality indoor environments in RCs

172

CHAMPS-Multizone-A Combined Heat, Air, Moisture and Pollutant Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHAMPS-Multizone-A Combined Heat, Air, Moisture and Pollutant Simulation CHAMPS-Multizone-A Combined Heat, Air, Moisture and Pollutant Simulation Environment for Whole-building Performance Analysis Title CHAMPS-Multizone-A Combined Heat, Air, Moisture and Pollutant Simulation Environment for Whole-building Performance Analysis Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Zhang, J. S., Wei Feng, John Grunewald, Andreas Nicolai, and Carey Zhang Journal HVAC&R Research Volume 18 Issue 1-2 Abstract A computer simulation tool, named "CHAMPS-Multizone" is introduced in this paper for analyzing bothenergy and IAQ performance of buildings. The simulation model accounts for the dynamic effects ofoutdoor climate conditions (solar radiation, wind speed and direction, and contaminant concentrations),building materials and envelope system design, multizone air and contaminant flows in buildings,internal heat and pollutant sources, and operation of the building HVAC systems on the buildingperformance. It enables combined analysis of building energy efficiency and indoor air quality. Themodel also has the ability to input building geometry data and HVAC system operation relatedinformation from software such as SketchUp and DesignBuilder via IDF file format. A "bridge" to accessstatic and dynamic building data stored in a "virtual building" database is also developed, allowingconvenient input of initial and boundary conditions for the simulation, and for comparisons between thepredicted and measured results. This paper summarizes the mathematical models, adoptedassumptions, methods of implementation, and verification and validation results. The needs andchallenges for further development are also discussed

173

Transpired Air Collectors - Ventilation Preheating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many commercial and industrial buildings have high ventilation rates. Although all that fresh air is great for indoor air quality, heating it can be very expensive. This short (2-page) fact sheet describes a technology available to use solar energy to preheat ventilation air and dramatically reduce utility bills.

Christensen, C.

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

Recent Refereed Journal Articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Journal Articles Recent Journal Articles Recent Refereed Journal Articles Print Monday, 16 August 2010 17:38 General Information Refereed journal articles before 2010 will be posted in an archive. Articles may also be searched by beamline, author, journal, or year. View Journal Covers showcasing ALS science. All staff and users are reminded that when submitting any article based on work conducted in whole or in part at the ALS, must include the following acknowledgment statement: The Advanced Light Source is supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Report Publications, Awards, Talks here . 2010 Refereed Publications Al-Khatatbeh, Y., Y. Lee, and B. Kiefer, "Phase relations and hardness trends of ZrO2 phases at high pressure ," Phys. Rev. B 81(21), 214102 (2010). 12.2.2

175

SC e-journals, Environment  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Environment Environment Acta hydrochimica et hydrobiologica Agricultural & Forest Meteorology Air, Soil and Water Research - OAJ American Journal of Environmental Sciences - OAJ Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Annual Review of Environment and Resources Annual Review of Plant Biology Applied and Environmental Microbiology Applied and Environmental Soil Science - OAJ Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Aquatic Ecology Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics - OAJ Atmospheric Environment BioControl Biogeochemistry Biogeosciences - OAJ Biomass & Bioenergy Bioprocess and Biosystems Engineering Bioresource Technology Biotechnology Advances BMC Ecology - OAJ Bulletin of Engineering Geology and the Environment

176

ARM - Journal Articles 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mode (Citation) Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology ARM Xia Validation of Noah-simulated soil temperature in the North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2...

177

ARM - Journal Articles 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of sources and formation processes of atmospheric sulfate by sulfur isotope and scanning electron microscope measurements (Citation) Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres...

178

ARM - Journal Articles 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Citation) The Open Atmospheric Science Journal ARM Turner Validating mixed-phase cloud optical depth retrieved from infrared observations with high spectral resolution...

179

ARM - Journal Articles 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Populations (Citation) Journal of Applied Meteorology ARM Zamora The Accuracy of Solar Irradiance Calculations Used in Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction (Citation)...

180

Better Indoor Climate With Less Energy: European Energy Performance of Building Directive (EPBD)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The European Commission's Action Plan on Energy Efficiency (2000) indicated the need for specific measures in the building sector. In response, the European Commission (EC) published the proposed Directive on the Energy Performance of Buildings (EPBD) in May 2001. The European Parliament and Council accepted the text, and it was published in the EU Official Journal in January 2003, at which time the Directive became a European Law. The objective of the EPBD is to promote the improvement of the energy performance of buildings, taking into account outdoor climatic and local conditions, as well as indoor climate requirements. The main objective is to achieve better indoor climate with less energy.

Magyar, Z.; Leitner, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

indoor | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

indoor indoor Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building comfort design improve incentive indoor message sms text Yes 60% (3 votes) No 0% (0 votes) Maybe if I had an incentive 20% (1 vote) Maybe if my reply is confidential and anonymous 0% (0 votes) Maybe if the data will be used to improve building design 20% (1 vote) Total votes: 5 Buildings account for roughly 40% of all U.S. energy use (70% of all electricity): residential buildings account for 22% of all U.S. energy use and commercial buildings account for 18% of all U.S. energy use[i]. There is an unanswered need for information about buildings in use and how building design affects building occupant comfort, productivity, and, by

182

The Journals Acoustical Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics Journal of Atmospheric Measurement Science and Technology Monthly Weather Review Natural Hazards Review Natural History Nature Nature Water Resources Research Weather Forecasting More Information For more information, contact: Yvonne

Colorado at Boulder, University of

183

SC e-journals  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SC e-journals SC e-journals Home Browse ABOUT/FAQ HELP Desktop access to journals of interest to the Office of Science Search Options Web of Science® Search citations for a wide range of peer-reviewed journals, includes cited reference searching and author identification tools. Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports Publisher Search Options* Many publishers provide search capabilities, including: American Chemical Society American Physical Society National Academy of Sciences *(results may include non-subscribed titles) Spotlight Neutron Diffraction Observations of Interstitial Protons in Dense Ice ORNL neutrons paint an altogether new picture of ice ORNL neutrons paint an altogether new picture of ice Image: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron diffraction observations of interstitial protons in dense ice

184

ARM - Journal Articles 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2007 Author Article Title Journal Funded By McFarlane Optical properties of shallow tropical cumuli derived from ARM ground-based remote sensing (Citation) Geophysical Research Letters ARM Mattioli Analysis of Radiosonde and ground-based remotely sensed PWV data from the 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment (Citation) Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology ARM

185

ARM - Journal Articles 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2003 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Dong Arctic stratus cloud properties and radiative forcing at the ARM NSA site (Citation) J. Climate ARM Zurovac-Jevtic Development and test of a cirrus parameterization scheme using NCAR CCM3 (Citation) Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences ARM

186

Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores in California: predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial rooftop constant-air-volume direct expansion (DX) cooling units, with natural gas heat. Independent compressor/condenser

Apte, Michael G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Indirect health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments  

SciTech Connect

A review of the health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments suggests that relative humidity can affect the incidence of respiratory infections and allergies. Experimental studies on airborne-transmitted infectious bacteria and viruses have shown that the survival or infectivity of these organisms is minimized by exposure to relative humidities between 40 and 70%. Nine epidemiological studies examined the relationship between the number of respiratory infections or absenteeism and the relative humidity of the office, residence, or school. The incidence of absenteeism or respiratory infections was found to be lower among people working or living in environments with mid-range versus low or high relative humidities. The indoor size of allergenic mite and fungal populations is directly dependent upon the relative humidity. Mite populations are minimized when the relative humidity is below 50% and reach a maximum size at 80% relative humidity. Most species of fungi cannot grow unless the relative humidity exceeds 60%. Relative humidity also affects the rate of offgassing of formaldehyde from indoor building materials, the rate of formation of acids and salts from sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and the rate of formation of ozone. The influence of relative humidity on the abundance of allergens, pathogens, and noxious chemicals suggests that indoor relative humidity levels should be considered as a factor of indoor air quality. The majority of adverse health effects caused by relative humidity would be minimized by maintaining indoor levels between 40 and 60%. This would require humidification during winter in areas with cold winter climates. Humidification should preferably use evaporative or steam humidifiers, as cool mist humidifiers can disseminate aerosols contaminated with allergens.

Arundel, A.V.; Sterling, E.M.; Biggin, J.H.; Sterling, T.D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Indoor Scene Recognition Through Object Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scene recognition is a highly valuable perceptual ability for an indoor mobile robot, however, current approaches for scene recognition present a significant drop in performance for the case of indoor scenes. We believe ...

Espinace, P.

189

ARM - Journal Articles 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 09 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2009 Author Article Title Journal Funded By de Gouw Emission and chemistry of organic carbon in the gas and aerosol phase at a sub-urban site near Mexico City in March 2006 during the MILAGRO study (Citation) Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics ARM

190

EMSL: Publications - Journal Covers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Journal Cover Gallery Journal Cover Gallery Here are a few of the scientific journal covers that feature outstanding research done at EMSL. Where available, additional information is hyperlinked from the date above the cover. 2013 April 2013 [Enlarge Image] Microscopy and Microanalysis January 2013 [Enlarge Image] Molecular BioSystems January 2013 [Enlarge Image] Molecular BioSystems 2012 May 2012 [Enlarge Image] Chemical Science March 7 2012 [Enlarge Image] Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics February 28 2012 [Enlarge Image] Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics February 21 2012 [Enlarge Image] Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 2011 December 15, 2011 [Enlarge Image] Analytical Chemistry September 14, 2011 [Enlarge Image] The Journal of American Chemical Society July 20, 2011 [Enlarge Image]

191

ARM - Journal Articles 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2002 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Smith A Simple Model of Cirrus Horizontal Inhomogeneity and Cloud Fraction (Citation) Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc. ARM Jensen Radiative impacts of anvil outflow during the Maritime Continent Thunderstorm Experiment (Citation) J. of Appl. Meteor. ARM

192

2011 Signature Journal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Signature Journal is an annual newsletter product of the EPRI PQ Knowledge program (PS1D). This issue includes the following articles: Proactive Power Quality: The SCE&G Model Lightning Arrester Application and Performance Assessment High School Football Lighting

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Journal of Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Journal of Research n ~~ .f>4nC f 4 4Th ede a>x ?v'2S';1,- ~~~ volume 90 Number 6 November-December Special ...

2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

194

ARM - Journal Articles 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2011 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Torn Seasonal and inter-annual variability in δ13C of net ecosystem carbon exchanges from 2002-2009 in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (Citation) Tellus ARM Lin Parameterization of riming intensity and its impact on ice fall speed using ARM data (Citation) Monthly Weather Review ARM

195

AOCS Journals; JAOCS, JSD and Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subscription rates JAOCS, JSD and Lipids AOCS Journals; JAOCS, JSD and Lipids Journals aocs articles detergents fats jaocs journal journals jsd magazine methods oils papers published scientific subscribe subscription surfactants Journals aocs art

196

Assessment of Advanced Air Purification Technologies: Filtration and Hybrid Systems for Residential and Commercial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor air contaminants, such as microorganisms, allergens, environmental tobacco smoke, and volatile organic compounds, can cause health- and productivity-related problems for the occupants of the indoor space. Children, elderly adults, and people with deficient immune systems are especially likely to be affected by contaminated air. There are three primary measures to control indoor air contamination. The first is to eliminate the contaminant source. The second is to control ventilation within the spac...

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

197

Coupled urban wind flow and indoor natural ventilation modelling on a high-resolution grid: A case study for the Amsterdam ArenA stadium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind flow in urban environments is an important factor governing the dispersion of heat and pollutants from streets, squares and buildings. This paper presents a coupled CFD modelling approach for urban wind flow and indoor natural ventilation. A specific ... Keywords: Air exchange rate, Air quality, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Cross-ventilation, Full-scale measurements, Grid generation technique, Integrated model, Model validation and solution verification, Numerical simulation, Outdoor and indoor air flow, Sports stadium

T. van Hooff; B. Blocken

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Modeling Air-Pollution Damages from Fossil Fuel Use in Urban...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

important indoor pollution sources. We have taken one such model, prepared by the World Bank, and modified it to incorporate damages estimates from human exposure to air...

199

Dynamic modeling and global optimal operation of multizone variable air volume HVAC systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy conservation and indoor environment concerns have motivated extensive research on various aspects of control of Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) and building systems. The… (more)

Zheng, Guo Rong

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Title Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5517-5528 Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated indoors was conducted in a call center office building. The building, with two floors and a floor area of 4,600 m2, was located in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA. Ventilation rates were manipulated with the building's four air handling units (AHUs). VOC concentrations in the AHU returns were measured on seven days during a 13-week period. VOC emission factors were determined for individual zones on days when they were operating at near steady-state conditions. The emission factor data were subjected to principal component (PC) analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds. Potential sources of the PC vectors were ascribed based on information from the literature supporting the associations. Two vectors with high loadings of compounds including formaldehyde, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3- pentanediol monoisobutyrate, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (d5 siloxane), and isoprene likely identified occupant-related sources. One vector likely represented emissions from building materials. Another vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. The relationships between indoor minus outdoor VOC concentrations and ventilation rate were qualitatively examined for eight VOCs. Of these, acetaldehyde and hexanal, which were likely associated with material sources, and d5 siloxane exhibited general trends of higher concentrations at lower ventilation rates. For other compounds, the operation of the building and variations in pollutant generation and removal rates apparently combined to obscure the inverse relationship between VOC concentrations and ventilation. This result emphasizes the importance of utilizing source control measures, in addition to adequate ventilation, to limit concentrations of VOCs of concern in office buildings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Indoor environmental quality and ventilation in U.S. office buildings: A view of current issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the current focus on indoor environmental quality and ventilation in US office buildings is a response to sick building syndrome and occupant complaints about building-related health symptoms, poor indoor air quality, and thermal discomfort. The authors know that serious ``sick-building`` problems occur in a significant number of US office buildings and that a significant proportion of the occupants in many normal (non-sick) buildings report building-related health symptoms. Concerns about the health effects of environmental tobacco smoke have also focused attention on the indoor environment. The major responses of industry and governments, underway at the present time, are to restrict smoking in offices, to attempt to reduce the emissions of indoor pollutants, and to improve the operation of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Better air filtration, improved HVAC commissioning and maintenance, and increased provisions for individual control of HVAC are some of the improvements in HVAC that are currently being, evaluated. In the future, the potential for improved productivity and reduced airborne transmission of infectious disease may become the major driving force for improved indoor environments.

Fisk, W.J.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Signature Journal 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Signature Journal is EPRI's premier power quality publication with each electronic issue focusing on a specific industry or power quality challenge. This issue includes the following articles: Serving the "Silicon Dragon" in Taiwan Flywheel Installation and Demonstration Using Transfer Coefficients for Flicker Planning Studies at Southern Company Signature is a newsletter product of the EPRI PQ Knowledge program (PS1D).

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

203

EPRI PQ Signature Journal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Signature Journal is an annual newsletter product of the EPRI PQ Knowledge program (PS1D). This issue includes the following articles: Implementing Permanent Site Monitors for Power Quality Open-Delta and Open-Wye Utility Supplies to Adjustable-Speed Drives and Inverter-Based Technologies IEEE P1668: A New Voltage-Sag Characterization and Testing Standard

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

Journal Of Research Past Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Journal of Research of the National Bureau of Standards, Section B: Mathematics and Mathematical Physics, 1959-1967. ...

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

205

MetTrans Journal Home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metallurgical and Materials Transactions Home Page ... MET. TRANS. HOME Journal descriptions and information [MORE]; SUBMIT A PAPER Review author ...

206

Journal of Electronic Materials Home Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Physics A: Materials Science and Processing; Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics; International Journal of Fracture; International Journal of ...

207

Indoor to Outdoor Channel Measurements & Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... delay dispersion statistics for outdoor-indoor average PDPs (all values in ns). Band RMS Delay Spread Delay Window 90% Energy Delay Interval ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, ventilating, and cooling classrooms in California consume substantial electrical energy. Indoor air quality (IAQ) in classrooms affects student health and performance. In addition to airborne pollutants that are emitted directly by indoor sources and those generated outdoors, secondary pollutants can be formed indoors by chemical reaction of ozone with other chemicals and materials. Filters are used in nearly all classroom heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems to maintain energy-efficient HVAC performance and improve indoor air quality; however, recent evidence indicates that ozone reactions with filters may, in fact, be a source of secondary pollutants. This project quantitatively evaluated ozone deposition in HVAC filters and byproduct formation, and provided a preliminary assessment of the extent to which filter systems are degrading indoor air quality. The preliminary information obtained will contribute to the design of subsequent research efforts and the identification of energy efficient solutions that improve indoor air quality in classrooms and the health and performance of students.

Hodgson, Al; Destaillats, Hugo; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Fisk, William J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

ARM - Journal Articles 2013 - 2014  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govPublicationsJournal Articles 2013 - 2014 govPublicationsJournal Articles 2013 - 2014 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2013 - 2014 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Kafle Micropulse lidar-derived aerosol optical depth climatology at ARM sites worldwide (Citation) Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres ARM

210

EPRI Journal, Spring 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Journal is the flagship publication of the Electric Power Research Institute. The Spring 2013 issue (3002000916) includes a cover story on customer resilience, as well as features on CoSeq™ sequestration resin for accelerating cleanup of nuclear power plant coolant, TERESA and fine particles in the real world, mitigating the effects of cycling on environmental control equipment, and opportunities presented by a smarter grid and its growing data streams.

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

211

Indoor environment quality and energy retrofits in low-income...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor environment quality and energy retrofits in low-income apartments: retrofit selection protocol Title Indoor environment quality and energy retrofits in low-income...

212

Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report Title Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2004 Authors...

213

Rapid Data Assimilation in the Indoor Environment: Theory and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rapid Data Assimilation in the Indoor Environment: Theory and Examples from Real-Time Interpretation of Indoor Plumes of Airborne Chemical Title Rapid Data Assimilation in the...

214

Rapid Data Assimilation in the Indoor Environment: theory and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rapid Data Assimilation in the Indoor Environment: theory and examples from real-time interpretation of indoor plumes of airborne chemicals Title Rapid Data Assimilation in the...

215

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Indoor Humidity Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools Listed Alphabetically Tools by Platform Tools by Country Related Links Indoor Humidity Tools Indoor Humidity Tools logo. Integrated computer program intended to assist in...

216

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Indoor Humidity Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Related Links Indoor Humidity Tools Indoor Humidity Tools logo. Integrated computer program intended to assist in...

217

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Indoor Humidity Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools by Platform PC Mac UNIX Internet Tools by Country Related Links Indoor Humidity Tools Indoor Humidity Tools logo. Integrated computer program intended to assist in...

218

Active and passive methods for indoor formaldehyde elimination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and passive methods for indoor formaldehyde elimination Title Active and passive methods for indoor formaldehyde elimination Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication...

219

Influence of indoor transport and mixing times scales on the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Influence of indoor transport and mixing times scales on the performance of sensor systems for characterizing contaminant releases Title Influence of indoor transport and mixing...

220

Modeling indoor exposures to VOCs and SVOCs as ventilation rates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling indoor exposures to VOCs and SVOCs as ventilation rates vary Title Modeling indoor exposures to VOCs and SVOCs as ventilation rates vary Publication Type Conference Paper...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin Title Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin...

222

Analysis of a Dedicated Outdoor Air System and Low Temperature Supply Air Conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the principles and the characteristics of a dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) and low temperature supply air system. DOAS is offered based on the demands of indoor air quality and the low temperature supply air system is offered based on the demands of saving energy. The two systems are very similar, which is analyzed in this paper. Using actual engineering, we compute the air flow rate, cold load and energy consumption in detail, and provide some good conclusions.

Guang, L.; Li, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Journal of Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with bi- distilled water was placed in an insulated bath con- trolled by a circulation thermostat. ... Air weighings were double-substitution weighings, ...

2003-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Exploring indoor white spaces in metropolises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a promising vision to utilize white spaces, i.e., vacant VHF and UHF TV channels, to satisfy skyrocketing wireless data demand in both outdoor and indoor scenarios. While most prior works have focused on exploring outdoor white spaces, the indoor ... Keywords: TV white spaces, clustering algorithms, sensor placement

Xuhang Ying, Jincheng Zhang, Lichao Yan, Guanglin Zhang, Minghua Chen, Ranveer Chandra

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Dynamic Model of the Indoor Channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new approach to modeling the radio channel experienced by transceivers moving in an indoor environment. For modeling the time-varying impulse response (IR) a randomly time-varying power-delay profile (PDP) is used, which ... Keywords: channel measurements, indoor channel modeling, ray clustering, time-varying PDP, wide band model

Jesper Ødum Nielsen; Valentine Afanassiev; Jørgen Bach Andersen

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

UWB channel measurements for accurate indoor localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, indoor localization has attracted considerable attention. More importantly, indoor channel measurements and models are very essential to accurate characterization of the ranging error for military applications. This paper provides the results ... Keywords: channel measurement, geolocation, path loss, ranging, ultra-wideband

Bardia Alavi; Nayef Alsindi; Kaveh Pahlavan

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Indoor Thermal Comfort, an Evolutionary Biology Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As is becoming increasingly clear, the human species evolvedin the East African savannah. Details of the precise evolutionary chainremain unresolved however it appears that the process lasted severalmillion years, culminating with the emergence of modern Homo sapiensroughly 200,000 years ago. Following that final evolutionary developmentmodern Homo sapiens relatively quickly populated the entire world.Clearly modern Homo sapiens is a successful, resourceful and adaptablespecies. In the developed societies, modern humans live an existence farremoved from our evolutionary ancestors. As we have learned over the lastcentury, this "new" lifestyle can often result in unintendedconsequences. Clearly, our modern access to food, shelter, transportationand healthcare has resulted in greatly expanded expected lifespan butthis new lifestyle can also result in the emergence of different kinds ofdiseases and health problems. The environment in modern buildings haslittle resemblance to the environment of the savannah. We strive tocreate environments with little temperature, air movement and lightvariation. Building occupants often express great dissatisfaction withthese modern created environments and a significant fraction even developsomething akin to allergies to specific buildings (sick buildingsyndrome). Are the indoor environments we are creating fundamentallyunhealthy -- when examined from an evolutionary perspective?

Stoops, John L.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Characterizing the source of radon indoors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Average indoor radon concentrations range over more than two orders of magnitude, largely because of variability in the rate at which radon enters from building materials, soil, and water supplies. Determining the indoor source magnitude requires knowledge of the generation of radon in source materials, its movement within materials by diffusion and convection, and the means of its entry into buildings. This paper reviews the state of understanding of indoor radon sources and transport. Our understanding of generation rates in and movement through building materials is relatively complete and indicates that, except for materials with unusually high radionuclide contents, these sources can account for observed indoor radon concentrations only at the low end of the range observed. Our understanding of how radon enters buildings from surrounding soil is poorer, however recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that soil may be the predominant source in many cases where the indoor radon concentration is high. 73 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

Nero, A.V.; Nazaroff, W.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Saving energy and improving IAQ through application of advanced air cleaning technologies  

SciTech Connect

In the future, we may be able use air cleaning systems and reduce rates of ventilation (i.e., reduce rates of outdoor air supply) to save energy, with indoor air quality (IAQ) remaining constant or even improved. The opportunity is greatest for commercial buildings because they usually have a narrower range of indoor pollutant sources than homes. This article describes the types of air cleaning systems that will be needed in commercial buildings.

Fisk, W.J; Destaillats, H.; Sidheswaran, M.A.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

SC e-journals, Medicine  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Medicine Medicine ACM Transactions on Applied Perception (TAP) ACS Synthetic Biology Acta Biotheoretica Acta Neurochirurgica Acta Neuropathologica Administration and Policy in Mental Health American Journal of Hematology American Journal of Industrial Medicine American Journal of Infection Control American Journal of Medical Genetics Amino Acids Anatomical Record, The Angiogenesis Annals of Biomedical Engineering Annals of Hematology Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology Annual Review of Clinical Psychology Annual Review of Genetics Annual Review of Immunology Annual Review of Medicine Annual Review of Microbiology Annual Review of Neuroscience Annual Review of Nutrition Annual Review of Pathology: Mechanisms of Disease Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology

231

Journal of Energy & Environmental Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

anced Resources International, Inc. Hugh D. Guthrie U.S. Depa rtment of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Journal Papers-Modeling 87 Engineering Feasibility of CO 2...

232

Generating semantic-based trajectories for indoor moving objects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel method to generate semantic-based trajectories for indoor moving objects. Indoor moving objects management has been a research focus in recent years. In order to get the trajectory data of indoor moving objects, we have to ... Keywords: indoor space, moving objects, simulation, trajectory data

Huaishuai Wang; Peiquan Jin; Lei Zhao; Lanlan Zhang; Lihua Yue

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Review: A survey of active and passive indoor localisation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years the need for indoor localisation has increased. Earlier systems have been deployed in order to demonstrate that indoor localisation can be done. Many researchers are referring to location estimation as a crucial component in numerous ... Keywords: Indoor active localisation, Indoor passive localisation, Location estimation techniques

Gabriel Deak; Kevin Curran; Joan Condell

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Indoor measurements of environmental tobacco smoke  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor measurements of environmental tobacco smoke Indoor measurements of environmental tobacco smoke Title Indoor measurements of environmental tobacco smoke Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2004 Authors Apte, Michael G., Lara A. Gundel, S. Katharine Hammond, Raymond L. Dod, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael D. Sohn, Douglas P. Sullivan, Gee-Minn Chang, and Richard G. Sextro Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The objective of this research project was to improve the basis for estimating environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposures in a variety of indoor environments. The research utilized experiments conducted in both laboratory and 'real-world' buildings to 1) study the transport of ETS species from room to room, 2) examine the viability of using various chemical markers as tracers for ETS, and 3) to evaluate to what extent re-emission of ETS components from indoor surfaces might add to the ETS exposure estimates. A three-room environmental chamber was used to examine multi-zone transport and behavior of ETS and its tracers. One room (simulating a smoker's living room) was extensively conditioned with ETS, while a corridor and a second room (simulating a child's bedroom) remained smoking-free. A series of 5 sets of replicate experiments were conducted under different door opening and flow configurations: sealed, leaky, slightly ajar, wide open, and under forced air-flow conditions. When the doors between the rooms were slightly ajar the particles dispersed into the other rooms, eventually reaching the same concentration. The particle size distribution took the same form in each room, although the total numbers of particles in each room depended on the door configurations. The particle number size distribution moved towards somewhat larger particles as the ETS aged. We also successfully modeled the inter-room transport of ETS particles from first principles - using size fractionated particle emission factors, predicted deposition rates, and thermal temperature gradient driven inter-room flows, This validation improved our understanding of bulk inter-room ETS particle transport. Four chemical tracers were examined: ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM), fluorescent particulate matter (FPM), nicotine and solanesol. Both (UVPM) and (FPM) traced the transport of ETS particles into the non-smoking areas. Nicotine, on the other hand, quickly adsorbed on unconditioned surfaces so that nicotine concentrations in these rooms remained very low, even during smoking episodes. These findings suggest that using nicotine as a tracer of ETS particle concentrations may yield misleading concentration and/or exposure estimates. The results of the solanesol analyses were compromised, apparently by exposure to light during collection (lights in the chambers were always on during the experiments). This may mean that the use of solanesol as a tracer is impractical in 'real-world' conditions. In the final phase of the project we conducted measurements of ETS particles and tracers in three residences occupied by smokers who had joined a smoking cessation program. As a pilot study, its objective was to improve our understanding of how ETS aerosols are transported in a small number of homes (and thus, whether limiting smoking to certain areas has an effect on ETS exposures in other parts of the building). As with the chamber studies, we examined whether measurements of various chemical tracers, such as nicotine, solanesol, FPM and UVPM, could be used to accurately predict ETS concentrations and potential exposures in 'real-world' settings, as has been suggested by several authors. The ultimate goal of these efforts, and a future larger multiple house study, is to improve the basis for estimating ETS exposures to the general public. Because we only studied three houses no firm conclusions can be developed from our data. However, the results for the ETS tracers are essentially the same as those for the chamber experiments. The use of nicotine was problematic as a marker for ETS exposure. In the smoking areas of the homes, nicotine appeared to be a suitable indicator; however in the non-smoking regions, nicotine behavior was very inconsistent. The other tracers, UVPM and FPM, provided a better basis for estimating ETS exposures in the 'real world'. The use of solanesol was compromised - as it had been in the chamber experiments.

235

Journal of Researh  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the cell is dried without water marks by directing a particle-free flow of air ... so that the average in eq (7) covers the full size distribu- tion regardless of ...

2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

236

journal Environmental Health Perspectives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners A simulation Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners A simulation based assessment for Southern California journal Environmental Health Perspectives year month abstract p Background Residential natural gas cooking burners NGCBs can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting p p Objective Quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes p p Methods A mass balance model was applied to estimate time dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the exposure concentrations experienced by individual occupants The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide NO2 carbon monoxide CO and formaldehyde HCHO concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample

237

journal Solid State Ionics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structural and transport properties of Nafion in hydrobromic Structural and transport properties of Nafion in hydrobromic acid solutions journal Solid State Ionics year month abstract p Proton exchange membranes are key solid state ion carriers in many relevant energy technologies including flow batteries fuel cells and solar fuel generators In many of these systems the membranes are in contact with electrolyte solutions In this paper we focus on the impact of different HBr a flow battery and exemplary acid electrolyte external concentrations on the conductivity of Nafion a perfluorosulfonic acid membrane that is commonly used in many energy related applications The peak and then decrease in conductivity is correlated with measured changes in the water and HBr content within the membrane In addition small angle x ray scattering is used to probe the nanostructure to

238

INPA Journal Club  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Location and Directions Location and Directions The Institute is located in the Building 50 complex. The Administrative office is in Building 50, room 5005 and the Institute Common Room (meeting area, seminar room, lounge, etc.) is in room 50-5026. Most of the scientists associated with INPA are located in the Building 50 complex near the Common Room. The Institute may be reached by: Email: inpa.lbl.gov Telephone (510) 486-5074, (510) 486-4384 Fascimile (510) 486-6738 Post: MS 50R5008 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 The Administrative Office is staffed by Cathy Thompson, Anytra Henderson and Tami Blackwell Directions for INPA Journal Club Speakers To LBNL by Car: Route I-80 to LBNL Leave the freeway at the University Avenue exit Take University Ave. east to Oxford Street (over a mile).

239

JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY, Jan.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jan. Jan. 2009, p. 20-22 Vol. 191, No. 1 0021-9193/09/$08.00ϩ0 doi:10.1128/JB.01491-08 Copyright © 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. GUEST COMMENTARY It Is Computation Time for Bacteriology! ᰔ Igor B. Zhulin* Computer Science & Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37886, and Department of Microbiology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 Biology is an experimental science. In contrast to other nat- ural sciences, physics, and chemistry, it has a very minor com- putational component. In order to support this statement with some data, I looked up 100 papers in the area of molecular and cellular biology published in 2008 in the journal Science and found that only 3 of them were purely computational. Another 15 were experimental papers with a significant computational component that was employed

240

NERSC Journal Cover Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NatureCoverLarge.png NatureCoverLarge.png High-quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator using plasma-channel guiding September 30, 2004 | Author(s): C. G. R. Geddes, Cs. Toth, J. van Tilborg, E. Esarey, C. B. Schroeder, D. Bruhwiler, C. Nieter, J. Cary & W. P. Leemans | Source: Nature | Category: Fusion Energy | URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature02900 Download Image: NatureCoverLarge.png | png | 2.7 MB 30 September 2004, Vol. 431, pp. 541-544 PhysTodayCoverLarge.png Integrated Simulation of Fusion Plasmas February 1, 2005 | Author(s): Donald B. Batchelor | Source: Physics Today | Category: Fusion Energy | URL: http://ptonline.aip.org/journals/doc/PHTOAD-ft/vol_58/iss_2/35_1.shtml Download Image: PhysTodayCoverLarge.png | png | 329 KB February 2005, Vol. 58 (2), pp. 35-40

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

BAdvanced adiabatic compressed air energy storage for the article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. Converse: Seasonal Energy Storage in a Renewable Energy S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The large-scale generation of electrical wind energy is planned in many countries, but the intermittent nature of its supply, and variations in load profile indicate a strong requirement for energy storage to deliver the energy when needed. Whilst pumped hydro storage, batteries and fuel cells have some advantages, only compressed air energy storage (“CAES”) has the storage capacity of pumped hydro, but with lower cost and less geographic restrictions. Existing diabatic CAES plant lose heat energy from the cycle during compression, and which must be re-generated before the compressed air is expanded in a modified gas turbine. Adiabatic CAES, on the other hand, uses a separate thermal energy store during the compression part of the cycle. During the generation part of the cycle the thermal energy store is used to reheat the air, which is then expanded through a sliding pressure air turbine. This storage technology offers significant improvements in cycle efficiency and, as no fuel is used, it generates no CO2. This paper describes the work of 19 partners within the “AA-CAES ” Project (Advanced Adiabatic – Compressed Air Energy

Chris Bullough; Christoph Gatzen; Christoph Jakiel; Martin Koller; Andreas Nowi; Stefan Zunft; Alstom Power; Technology Centre; Leicester Le Lh

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Colorimetric Detection of Formaldehyde: A Sensor for Air Quality Measurements and a Pollution-Warning Kit for Homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of new chemical sensors for the detection of formaldehyde, a ubiquitous and carcinogenic indoor air pollutant is described. These sensors are based on the use of nanoporous matrices acting as sponge to trap the targeted pollutant and ... Keywords: Formaldehyde, colorimetric detection, chemical sensor, indoor air, nanoporous matrices, sol-gel

S. Mariano; W. Wang; G. Brunelle; Y. Bigay; T. H. Tran-Thi

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Indoor robot gardening: design and implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the architecture and implementation of a distributed autonomous gardening system with applications in urban/indoor precision agriculture. The garden is a mesh network of robots and plants. The gardening ...

Correll, Nikolaus

244

Energy Efficiency and Improved Indoor Environmental Quality:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Improved Indoor Environmental Quality: No-Regrets Climate Change Insurance for the Insurance Industry Speaker(s): Evan Mills Date: December 19, 1996 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148...

245

Green Money Journal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Money Journal Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Money Journal Place Santa Fe, New Mexico Zip 87504 Sector Renewable Energy Product Online magazine covering the financial...

246

SC e-journals, Renewable Energy  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Renewable Energy Agricultural & Forest Meteorology Biomass & Bioenergy BioEnergy Research Electricity Journal, The Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy Process Biochemistry...

247

Evaluation of Energy-Efficiency Standards for Room Air Conditioners...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-Efficiency Standards for Room Air Conditioners in the US Title Evaluation of Energy-Efficiency Standards for Room Air Conditioners in the US Publication Type Journal Article...

248

BNL Biology Department - Journal club  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seminars Journal Club September 2012 Not Scheduled February 2013 4 11 18 25 Zhijie Sun Inga Hebbelmann Holiday XiaohongYu October 2012 1 8 15 22 29 Not Scheduled Not Scheduled...

249

WORLD TRADE CENTER INDOOR DUST TEST AND CLEAN PROGRAM PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: This Test and Clean Program plan is the result of ongoing efforts to monitor the current environmental conditions for residents and workers impacted by the collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) towers. In March 2004, EPA convened an expert technical review panel to provide individual guidance and assistance to the Agency in its use of available exposure and health surveillance databases and registries to characterize any remaining exposures and risks, identify unmet public health needs, and to individually recommend steps to further minimize the risks associated with the aftermath of the WTC attack. The WTC Expert Technical Review Panel (WTC Panel) members met periodically in open meetings to interact with EPA and the public about plans to monitor for the presence of WTC dust in indoor environments and to individually suggest additional measures that could be undertaken by EPA and others to evaluate the dispersion of the plume and the geographic extent of environmental impact from the collapse of the WTC towers. The WTC Panel members were charged, in part, with reviewing data from post-cleaning verification sampling to be done by EPA in the residential areas included in EPA Region 2's 2002-3 Indoor Air Residential Assistance Program to verify that recontamination has not

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

LOWER MANHATTAN INDOOR DUST TEST AND CLEAN PROGRAM PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: This Test and Clean Program plan is the result of ongoing efforts to respond to concerns of residents and workers impacted by the collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) towers. In March 2004, EPA convened an expert technical review panel to provide individual guidance and assistance to the Agency in its use of available exposure and health surveillance databases and registries to characterize any remaining exposures and risks, identify unmet public health needs, and individually recommend steps to further minimize the risks associated with the aftermath of the WTC attack. The WTC Expert Technical Review Panel (WTC Panel) members met periodically in open meetings to interact with EPA and the public about plans to monitor for the presence of WTC dust in indoor environments and to individually suggest additional measures that could be undertaken by EPA and others to evaluate the dispersion of the plume and the geographic extent of environmental impact from the collapse of the WTC towers. The WTC Panel members were charged, in part, with reviewing data from post-cleaning verification sampling to be done by EPA in the residential areas included in EPA Region 2's 2002-2003 Indoor Air Residential Assistance Program to verify that recontamination has not

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measured Airflows in a Multifamily Building," AirflowPerformance of Building Envelopes, Components, and Systems,APARTMENTS AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Price, P.N. ; Shehabi,

Price, P.N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Airflow and Indoor Air Quality Models and Preliminary ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... B Detailed calculated contaminant concentration predictions ..... ... nation's energy consumption, a number ... The American Society of ...

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009. ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals, Ventilation andleakage. The ASHRAE Handbook of fundamentals (ASHRAE 2009),

Sherman, Max H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tight home having zone space conditioning (i.e. , no centralbecause of the zone space conditioning. One solution for

Sherman, Max H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy  Commission: California Energy Commission  CREL: was supported by the California Energy Commission PublicPrepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest

Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Elusive Ultrafine Indoor Air Contaminants Yield to NIST ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 100 nanometers) discharged by tools, appliances and other ... particles about four times smaller than in ... the fan off, these very small particles collide ...

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

257

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Homes Max H. Sherman, Ph.D. Fellow ASHRAE Iain S. Walker, Ph.D. P.E. Member ASHRAE Energy Performance

258

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sherman, Ph.D. Fellow ASHRAE Iain S. Walker, Ph.D. P.E. Member ASHRAE Energy Performance of Buildings

259

Spot Ventilation: Source Control to Improve Indoor Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to employ spot ventilation in the home for comfort and safety.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

New Tool Debuts for Measuring Indoor Air Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... they prepared two batches of their sample material—thin films of polymethyl pentane, a plastic used in gas-permeable packaging, saturated with ...

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Simulations of Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation Impacts of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... lighting load from ASHRAE Standard 90.1 (ANSI/ASHRAE ... with a nonzero base ventilation rate, such ... and C-T24, will help to temper such exposure. ...

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

262

INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stone Wallboard Paint Insulation Building Contents Heatingbuilding envelopes to reduce leakage and inf"ltration rates, improving insulation,

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

SC e-journals About/FAQ  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

About/FAQ SC e-journals provides the Office of Science (SC) management and staff electronic access to key peer-reviewed scientific journals. Currently, over 1,600 journals may be accessed via the SC e-journals website. Available titles have been identified by SC Programs as being of specific interest or are made available via Departmental consortium arrangements when possible. The journal collection includes titles of broad interest to the Department as well as subject-specific titles. Journal subscriptions are generally renewed and the SC e-journals collection updated on an annual basis. SC e-journals is developed and maintained by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. Q. Who can access SC e-journals? A. SC e-journals is an Office of Science service. Copyrighted

264

Impact of the humidity pump on indoor environments. Final report, August 1989-November 1990  

SciTech Connect

The impact of the humidity pump, (a newly developed, gas-fired, liquid desiccant, make-up air conditioning unit) on the indoor air environment of two office buildings was investigated during a two month field program. The study generated a data base and gained insights on indoor air quality (IAQ), comfort, and ventilation parameters of each building operating under routine conditions. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of the humidity pump on (1) indoor pollution concentration levels; (2) comfort parameters as perceived by occupants of and visitors to each building; and (3) building ventilation (energy) parameters. Each objective was attained by testing the null hypothesis (Operation of the humidity pump has no impact.) The null hypothesis was tested on occupant exposure levels. Consequently, it was rejected only if the humidity pump affects potential factors that may alter significantly pollutant concentrations, comfort levels, and ventilation rates. Operation of the humidity pump affects levels of volatile organic compounds and microbiological conditions. The humidity pump did not affect comfort and ventilation parameters.

Moschandreas, D.J.; Relwani, S.M.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Optimal Outside Air Control for Air Handling Units with Humidity Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most air handling units (AHUs) in commercial buildings have the (air) economizer cycle to use outside air for free cooling under certain outside air conditions. Ideally the economizer cycle is enabled if outside air enthalpy is less than return air enthalpy. During the economizer cycle, outside air flow is modulated to seek mixed air temperature at a supply air temperature set point. Since the outside air may be dry during the economizer cycle, humidification is required for AHUs with humidity control. As a result, the economizer cycle saves cooling energy but requires excessive steam for humidification. Therefore the economizer cycle may not be economical. An optimal outside air control method is developed to minimize the total cost of mechanical cooling and steam humidification. The impacts of chilled water price, steam price, and space minimum humidity set point are analyzed. Finally the optimal outside air control zones are presented on a psychrometric chart under differential energy price ratios and minimum indoor humidity set points.

Wang, G.; Liu, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Impact of Energy Recovery on Window Air-conditioner Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental energy recovering air-conditioner can produce fresh air exchange heat with exhaust air in the heat exchanger, which has no additional moving parts. The EER of the experimental air-conditioner (EAC) is increased by 17.4~37.3 percent over that of an ordinary window type air-conditioner (OAC), which is very significant for energy efficiency. On the other hand, the fresh air proportion of the EAC is increased by ~20 percent over that of the OAC, and the indoor noise of the EAC is decreased by ~3.8 dB. Therefore, indoor environment quality can be greatly improved with the EAC.

Luo, Q.; Tang, C.; Liao, K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Public policy model for the indoor radon problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is developed that predicts the shift in distributions of indoor radon concentrations and potential risk reduction resulting from a program of homeowner sampling and remediation in a region. Indoor radon concentrations for a region are represented ...

M. J. Small; C. A. Peters

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

A novel positioning system for accurate tracking in indoor environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precise positioning is crucial to many applications involving autonomous robots in indoor environments. Current solutions to the indoor localization problem are either both highly unreliable and inaccurate (like GPS based ...

Linga, Srujan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Journal of Environmental Management] (  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Thief Process is a cost-effective variation to activated carbon injection (ACI) for removal of mercury from flue gas. In this scheme, partially combusted coal from the furnace of a pulverized coal power generation plant is extracted by a lance and then re-injected into the ductwork downstream of the air preheater. Recent results on a 500-lb/h pilot-scale combustion facility show similar removals of mercury for both the Thief Process and ACI. The tests conducted to date at laboratory, bench, and pilot-scales demonstrate that the Thief sorbents exhibit capacities for mercury from flue gas streams that are comparable to those exhibited by commercially available activated carbons. A patent for the process was issued in February 2003. The Thief sorbents are cheaper than commercially-available activated carbons; exhibit excellent capacities for mercury; and the overall process holds great potential for reducing the cost of mercury removal

Evan J. Granite; Mark C. Freeman; Richard A. Hargis; William J. O’dowd; W. Pennline

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for a residential research house in Clovis, California Title Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for a residential research house in Clovis, California Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2002 Authors Fischer, Marc L., Melissa M. Lunden, Tracy L. Thatcher, David Littlejohn, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Susanne V. Hering, Richard G. Sextro, and Nancy J. Brown Abstract The prevalence of relocatable classrooms (RCs) at schools is rising due to federal and state initiatives to reduce K-3 class size, and limited capital resources. Concerns regarding inadequate ventilation and indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in RCs have been raised. Adequate ventilation is an important link between improved IEQ and energy efficiency for schools. Since students and teachers spend the majority of a 7-8 hour school day inside classrooms, indoor contaminant concentrations are assumed to drive personal school-day exposures. We conducted a demonstration project in new relocatable classrooms (RCs) during the 2001-02 school year to address these issues. Four new 24' x 40' (960 ft2) RCs were constructed and sited in pairs at an elementary school campus in each of two participant school districts (SD) in Northern California. Each RC was equipped with two heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, one per module. The two HVAC systems were a standard heat pump with intermittent 25-50% outdoor air ventilation and an energy-efficient advanced system, based on indirect-direct evaporative cooling with an integrated natural gas-fired hydronic heating loop and improved particle filtration, providing continuous 100% outdoor air ventilation at = 15 ft3 min-1 occupant-1. Alternate carpets, wall panels, and ceiling panels were installed in two classrooms -- one in each pair -- based on the results of a laboratory study of VOC emissions from standard and alternate materials. Numerous IEQ and outdoor air quality and meteorological parameters were measured either continuously over the school year or as integrated school day samples during the fall cooling and winter heating seasons. Details of the RC designs, the field monitoring methodology including handling, storage, transport and management of chemical samples and data, and analyses to be conducted are presented

271

Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency in new relocatable classrooms in Northern California Title Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency in new relocatable classrooms in Northern California Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-51101 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Shendell, Derek G., Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, William J. Fisk, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Seung-Min Lee, Douglas P. Sullivan, Michael G. Apte, and Leo I. Rainer Abstract The prevalence of relocatable classrooms (RCs) at schools is rising due to federal and state initiatives to reduce K-3 class size, and limited capital resources. Concerns regarding inadequate ventilation and indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in RCs have been raised. Adequate ventilation is an important link between improved IEQ and energy efficiency for schools. Since students and teachers spend the majority of a 7-8 hour school day inside classrooms, indoor contaminant concentrations are assumed to drive personal school-day exposures. We conducted a demonstration project in new relocatable classrooms (RCs) during the 2001-02 school year to address these issues. Four new 24' x 40' (960 ft2) RCs were constructed and sited in pairs at an elementary school campus in each of two participant school districts (SD) in Northern California. Each RC was equipped with two heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, one per module. The two HVAC systems were a standard heat pump with intermittent 25-50% outdoor air ventilation and an energy-efficient advanced system, based on indirect-direct evaporative cooling with an integrated natural gas-fired hydronic heating loop and improved particle filtration, providing continuous 100% outdoor air ventilation at = 15 ft3 min-1 occupant-1. Alternate carpets, wall panels, and ceiling panels were installed in two classrooms - one in each pair - based on the results of a laboratory study of VOC emissions from standard and alternate materials. Numerous IEQ and outdoor air quality and meteorological parameters were measured either continuously over the school year or as integrated school day samples during the fall cooling and winter heating seasons. Details of the RC designs, the field monitoring methodology including handling, storage, transport and management of chemical samples and data, and analyses to be conducted are presented

272

SC e-journals, Engineering  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Engineering Engineering ACM Transactions on Design Automation of Electronic Systems (TODAES) ACM Transactions on Embedded Computing Systems (TECS) ACS Nano Acta Mechanica Acta Mechanica Sinica Adsorption Advanced Engineering Materials Advanced Powder Technology Advanced Robotics Advances in Computational Mathematics Advances In Engineering Software Advances in Materials Science and Engineering - OAJ Advances in Mathematical Engineering - OAJ Advances in Optics and Photonics AlChE Journal Algorithmica American Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences - OAJ Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing Annals of Nuclear Energy Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics Annual Review of Materials Research Applicable Algebra in Engineering, Communication and Computing Applied Composite Materials

273

Operation of Energy Efficient Residential Buildings Under Indoor Environmental Quality Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to the influence of Indoor Environmental Quality, [IEQ] requirements associated with occupation regimes on the criterion of energy demand s for HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning) central systems that were constructed for student hostels as a residential building in Cairo, Egypt. The paper focuses on the effects of occupation rate profiles with IEQ thermal parameters; (those are air dry-bulb temperatures, relative humidity, fresh air requirements, and local air velocities), on yearly energy demands. It is applied on, in-service, real project as a case study "10-Stories Hostel of 6000 m2 built-up area" that is utilized by Non-Local students as a transferred Egyptian citizens [ EC ] from different governorates. It was concluded that. during energy simulation, occupation rate schedules and operation profiles for each source of heat inside space shall simulate the reality. These profiles and schedules should be added to the local energy code as a guideline for designers. Although in this case study results from simulation task reach the real bills, but sometimes, with multi-use apartments there is another required schedule for the Pre-Action days. Those days before holidays and feasts on which the air conditioning system shall operate in a certain procedure for cleaning or scavenging. Another important issue is the effect of Effective Temperatures [ET] (Temperature for constant thermal sensations) that could implement to reduce the cooling capacity by increasing the room temperature against indoor relative humidity for the same comfort sensation. These two concepts will save 17% to 22% of the project total energy demand, In addition to introducing new design criteria for acceptable indoor conditions in the new rural developed zones in Egypt and similar regions.

Medhat, A. A.; Khalil, E. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Air Sealing Your Home | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Sealing Your Home Air Sealing Your Home Air Sealing Your Home November 26, 2013 - 6:22pm Addthis Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. What does this mean for me? Save money and energy by air sealing your house. Caulking and weatherstripping are simple, effective ways of sealing air leaks in your home. Reducing the amount of air that leaks in and out of your home is a cost-effective way to cut heating and cooling costs, improve durability, increase comfort, and create a healthier indoor environment. Caulking and weatherstripping are two simple and effective air-sealing techniques that offer quick returns on investment, often one year or less. Caulk is

275

Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres  

SciTech Connect

This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the [sup 218]Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of [center dot]OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO[sub 2] ethylene, and H[sub 2]S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H[sub 2]O and NH[sub 3] in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of [sup 218]Po[sub x][sup +] in O[sub 2] at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited [sup 210]Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

Hopke, P.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Total Building Air Management: When Dehumidification Counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry trends toward stringent indoor air quality codes, spearheaded by ASHRAE 62-89: Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality, present four challenges to the building industry in hot and humid climates: 1. Infusion of large quantities of make-up air to code based on zone requirements 2. Maintenance of tight wet bulb and dry bulb temperature tolerances within zones based on use 3. Energy management and cost containment 4. Control of mold and mildew and the damage they cause Historically, total air management of sensible and latent heat, filtration and zone pressure was brought about through the implementation of non-integrated, composite systems. Composite systems typically are built up of multi-vendor equipment each of which perform specific, independent functions in the total control of the indoor air environment. Composite systems have a high up-front cost, are difficult to maintain and are costly to operate. Today, emerging technologies allow the implementation of fully integrated system for total building air management. These systems provide a single-vendor solution that is cost effective to purchase, maintain and operate. Operating saving of 23% and ROIs of 2.3 years have been shown. Equipment specification is no longer based primarily on total building load. Maximum benefits of these dynamic systems are realized when systems are designed with a total operating strategy in mind. This strategy takes into consideration every factor of building air management including: 1. Control of sensible heat 2. Balance management of heat rejection 3. Latent heat management 4. Control of process hot water 5. Indoor air quality management 6. Containment of energy consumption 7. Load shedding

Chilton, R. L.; White, C. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

HVAC Technology Report: A Review of Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Technology and Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many of us, roughly 95 percent of our time is spent indoors. To enable humans to spend this much time inside, mechanical equipment is necessary to provide space conditioning to control the temperature (heating and cooling), ventilation, humidity, and indoor air quality. This report introduces the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry to EPRI member utility employees. The document describes the most common technologies and applications and provides an overview of industry statisti...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

New Journal of Physics Publishes Quantum Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST Quantum Cryptography Highlighted in New Journal of Physics. Recent research has shown that the security of a key ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

279

IMMI Journal: Board of Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin. Bradford Cowles Pratt & Whitney, Dennis Dimiduk Air Force Research Laboratory. Steve Engelstad Lockheed Martin Aeronautics, David Furrer

280

ASHRAE and residential ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conditioning Engineers. 2001. ASHRAE, “Indoor Air QualityABOUT/IAQ_papr01.htm ASHRAE. “Standard 62.2-2003:Ventilation Requirements. ” ASHRAE Journal, pp. 51- 55, June

Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SC e-journals, Open Access Journals by Publisher  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Open Access Journals by Publisher Open Access Journals by Publisher ABM, ABC, ABPol, SBCC, SBCr, SBMM, SBPMat AcademicDirect Academy & Industry Research Collaboration Center (AIRCC) Albert Einstein Institute Alexandru Ioan Cuza University Publishing House American Physical Society Ashdin Publishing Asian Network for Scientific Information Association for Development through Science and Education Atlantis Press Australian Centre of Emerging Technologies and Society Beilstein-Institut BioChem Press BioMed Central Brazilian Society of Chemical Engineering Brazilian Society of Mechanical Sciences Brazilian Society of Plant Breeding Canadian Center of Science and Education College of the Bahamas, The Columbia University Libraries Copernicus GmbH CSA Editura Universităţii din Oradea EduRad Publishing

282

Air-Conditioning Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air-Conditioning Basics Air-Conditioning Basics Air-Conditioning Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Air conditioning is one of the most common ways to cool homes and buildings. How Air Conditioners Work Air conditioners employ the same operating principles and basic components as refrigerators. Refrigerators use energy (usually electricity) to transfer heat from the cool interior of the refrigerator to the relatively warm surroundings; likewise, an air conditioner uses energy to transfer heat from the interior space to the relatively warm outside environment. An air conditioner uses a cold indoor coil called the evaporator. The condenser, a hot outdoor coil, releases the collected heat outside. The evaporator and condenser coils are serpentine tubing surrounded by aluminum fins. This tubing is usually made of copper.

283

An overview of solar assisted air-conditioning system application in small office buildings in Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many regions of the world especially tropical weather in Malaysia, the demand for cooling of indoor air is growing due to increasing comfort expectations and increasing cooling loads. Air-conditioning, the most common cooling mechanism for providing ... Keywords: Malaysian climatic conditions, absorption chiller, evacuated tube solar collector, high energy consumption, peak load demand, solar assisted air conditioning system, solar energy

Lim Chin Haw; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Yusof Sulaiman

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Detailed Field Evaluation of a Cold Air Distribution System: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When following report recommendations, the system investigated in this study would provide significant energy consumption savings over conventional 55 degrees F supply air systems. Reduced duct size requirements, moreover, promise greater system design flexibility without sacrificing space comfort conditions or indoor air quality. Demonstrating the viability of cold air distribution systems, the report includes suggestions for improving system performance and overall efficiency.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Optimizing journal bearing bit performance  

SciTech Connect

This article explains that continuous progress in the field of rock bit technology has produced many new designs and improved features in the tri-cone rock bits used today. Much of the research and advancements have centered around journal bearing systems, seals and lubricants leading to greatly extended bearing life. These improved bearing systems, incorporated into both tooth and insert-type bits, have not only increased the effective life of a rock bit, but have also allowed greater energy levels to be applied. This, in turn, has allowed for higher rates of penetration and lower costs per foot of hole drilled. Continuous improvements in journal bearing bits allowing them to run longer and harder have required similar advancements to be made in cutting structures. In tooth bit designs, these improvements have been basically limited to the areas of gauge protection and to application of hardfacing materials.

Moerbe, O.E.; Evans, W.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Ubiquitous Indoor Localization and Worldwide Automatic Construction of Floor Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although GPS has been considered a ubiquitous outdoor localization technology, we are still far from a similar technology for indoor environments. While a number of technologies have been proposed for indoor localization, they are isolated efforts that are way from a true ubiquitous localization system. A ubiquitous indoor positioning system is envisioned to be deployed on a large scale worldwide, with minimum overhead, to work with heterogeneous devices, and to allow users to roam seamlessly from indoor to outdoor environments. Such a system will enable a wide set of applications including worldwide seamless direction finding between indoor locations, enhancing first responders' safety by providing anywhere localization and floor plans, and providing a richer environment for location-aware social networking applications. We describe an architecture for the ubiquitous indoor positioning system (IPS) and the challenges that have to be addressed to materialize it. We then focus on the feasibility of automating ...

Youssef, Moustafa; Elkhouly, Reem; Lotfy, Amal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Estimating Environmental Exposures to Indoor Contaminants using Residential-Dust Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indoor combustion sources, including cigarette smoke, wood-combustion and there are a variety of indoor PAH sources including cigarette smoke, wood-combustion. Humans are exposed to PAHs from a variety of indoor sources including cigarette smoke, wood-

Whitehead, Todd Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Title Improving Ventilation and Saving...

289

Quality in Relation to Indoor Climate & Energy Efficiency: An...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quality in Relation to Indoor Climate & Energy Efficiency: An Analysis of Trends, Achievements & Remaining Challenges Speaker(s): Peter Wouters Date: July 6, 2001 - 12:00pm...

290

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring,...

291

Development of a Dedicated 100 Percent Ventilation Air Heat Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of using dedicated 100 percent ventilation makeup air conditioning units to meet indoor air quality standards is attractive because of the inherent advantages. However, it is challenging to design and build direct expansion unitary equipment for this purpose. EPRI teamed with ClimateMaster to develop and test a prototype of a vapor compression heat pump to advance the state of the art in such equipment. The prototype unit provides deep dehumidification and cooling of ventilation air in the su...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

292

Journal of Research Volume 43  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Volume dilatometry, p. 145 Bekkedahl, Norman http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/jres ... nozzles with hydrocarbons and with air, p. 449 Shafer, MR; Bovey, HL ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

293

Journal of Research Volume 96  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... CO 2 /air in compressed gas mixtures, p ... Program report - The Advanced Technology Program: A ... Cv) for saturated and compressed liquid and vapor ...

2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

294

Journal of Research Volume 111  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Optimization Models for Scheduling of Jobs, p. 103 SH Sathish Indika and ... of the NIST and BIPM Standards for Air Kerma in Medium-Energy X-Rays ...

2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

e Journal of Politics and International A airs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environmental impact, and likely lower cost than mining and surface processing. A " 1'111111' 'III' few shale resources an economically viable alternative for petroleum © 20 I0 American Chemical Society #12 shale ,I, pyrolysis, making the process more efficient and economical. Understanding coke II

296

Indoor Conditions Study and Impact on the Energy Consumption for a Large Commercial Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is focused on the analysis of indoor conditions for a new commercial building that will be constructed in an East-European country. Based on the initial HVAC design parameters the surface of the building was divided in thermal zones that were studied using dynamic simulations. The article provides interesting insights of the building indoor conditions (summer/winter comfort), humidity, air temperature, mean operative temperature and energy consumption using hourly climate data. A dynamic variation of the PMV (Predicted Mean Vote Index) was obtained for different thermal zones of the building (retails stores, mall circulation, corridors) and in most of the cases the acceptable values of plus/minus 0.5 are exceeded. Among the most important energy efficiency measures it is mentioned a decrease of the heating set point temperature, increase of the walls and roof thermal resistance and the use of a heat recovery on the ventilation system. In this work it is demonstrated how simple measures can enhance the indoor conditions and reduce the energy consumption for this kind of construction.

Catalina, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Air Sealing Your Home | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your Home Your Home Air Sealing Your Home November 26, 2013 - 6:22pm Addthis Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. What does this mean for me? Save money and energy by air sealing your house. Caulking and weatherstripping are simple, effective ways of sealing air leaks in your home. Reducing the amount of air that leaks in and out of your home is a cost-effective way to cut heating and cooling costs, improve durability, increase comfort, and create a healthier indoor environment. Caulking and weatherstripping are two simple and effective air-sealing techniques that offer quick returns on investment, often one year or less. Caulk is

298

Journal  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Occupational Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 3: 671-683 ISSN: 1545-9624 print / 1545-9632 online Copyright c 2006 JOEH, LLC DOI: 10.1080/15459620601009201 Developing a Health and Safety Plan for Hazardous Field Work in Remote Areas Michael Gochfeld, 1,2,3 Conrad D. Volz, 2,4 Joanna Burger, 2,3,5 Stephen Jewett, 2,6 Charles W. Powers, 1,2,3,7 and Barry Friedlander 1,2 1 Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey 2 Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Piscataway, New Jersey 3 Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Piscataway, New Jersey 4 University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 5 Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 6 Institute for Marine Science, University of Alaska-Fairbanks,

299

Journal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Society Reductive Degradation of Organic Compounds Using Microbial Nanotechnology Ashley Johnson, a,d Giorvanni Merilis, a,e Jason Hastings, b, M. Elizabeth...

300

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL-203E LBNL-203E Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Appendix Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman*, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang 4 April 2008 A-1 Tables Table A-1. Thermal Comfort Results - May 2005, September 2005, November 2005 Room 13 - 9/19/2005 AM/PM Time Period Operative T and RH Acceptable (% of time) Operative T and RH, and Air Velocity acceptable (% of time) Average Indoor Air T (°C) Average Indoor Air RH (%) AM AM1 66.7 0.0 21.3 67.1 PM PM1 40.0 0.0 24.9 46.8 Room 13 - 5/16/2005 AM AM1 0.0 0.0 21.1 0.4 PM PM1 0.0 0.0 20.8 55.5 Room 13 - 12/1/2005 AM AM1 0.0% 0.0% 17.8 38.5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SC e-journals, Physics  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Physics Physics ACS Nano Acta Materialia Adsorption Advanced Composite Materials Advances in Condensed Matter Physics - OAJ Advances in Acoustics and Vibration - OAJ Advances in High Energy Physics - OAJ Advances in Materials Science and Engineering - OAJ Advances in Mathematical Physics - OAJ Advances in Optical Technologies - OAJ Advances in Optics and Photonics Advances in Tribology - OAJ American Journal of Physics, The Annalen der Physik Annales Henri Poincare Annals of Global Analysis and Geometry Annals of Nuclear Energy Annals of Physics Annual Review of Biophysics Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science Annual Review of Physical Chemistry Applied Optics Applied Physics A Applied Physics Letters Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback

302

SC e-journals, Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Chemistry Chemistry Accounts of Chemical Research Accreditation and Quality Assurance ACS Chemical Biology ACS Nano Acta Biotheoretica Acta Materialia Acta Neuropathologica Adsorption Advanced Engineering Materials Advances in Physical Chemistry - OAJ AlChE Journal Amino Acids Analyst Analytica Chimica Acta Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry Analytical Biochemistry Analytical Chemistry Analytical Sciences - OAJ Angewandte Chemie - International Edition Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry Annual Review of Biochemistry Annual Review of Biophysics Annual Review of Materials Research Annual Review of Physical Chemistry Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Applied Geochemistry Applied Radiation and Isotopes Applied Surface Science Applied Thermal Engineering Aquatic Geochemistry

303

Effect of Return Air Leakage on Air Conditioner Performance in Hot/Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of return air leakage from hot/humid attic spaces on the performance of a residential air conditioner. Tests were conducted in psychrometric facilities where temperatures and humidities could be controlled closely. Return air leakage from hot attic spaces was simulated by assuming adiabatic mixing of the indoor air at normal conditions with the attic air at high temperatures. Effective capacity and Energy Efficiency Ratio both decreased with increased return air leakage. However, power consumption was relatively constant for all variables except outdoor temperature, which meant that for the same power consumption, the unit delivered much lower performance when there was return air leakage. The increase in sensible heat ratio (SHR) with increasing leakage showed one of the most detrimental effects of return air leakage on performance.

O'Neal, D. L.; Rodriguez, A.; Davis, M.; Kondepudi, S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Preconditioning Outside Air: Cooling Loads from Building Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC equipment manufacturers, specifiers and end users interacting in the marketplace today are only beginning to address the series of issues promulgated by the increased outside air requirements in ASHRAE Standard 62- 1989, "Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality", that has cascaded into building codes over the early to mid 1990's. There has been a twofold to fourfold increase in outside air requirements for many commercial building applications, compared to the 1981 version of the standard. To mitigate or nullify these additional weather loads, outdoor air preconditioning technologies are being promoted in combination with conventional HVAC operations downstream as a means to deliver the required fresh air and control humidity indoors. Preconditioning is the term applied for taking outside air to the indoor air setpoint (dry bulb temperature and relative humidity). The large humidity loads from outside air can now be readily recognized and quantified at cooling design point conditions using the extreme humidity ratios/dew points presented in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals Chapter 26 "Climatic Design Information". This paper presents an annual index called the Ventilation Load Index (VLI), recently developed by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) that measures the magnitude of latent (and sensible) loads for preconditioning outside air to indoor space conditions over the come of an entire year. The VLI has units of ton-hrs/scfm of outside air. The loads are generated using new weather data binning software called ~BinMaker, also from GRI, that organizes the 239 city, 8760 hour by hour, TMY2 weather data into user selected bidtables. The VLI provides a simple methodology for accessing the cooling load impact of increased ventilation air volumes and a potential basis for defining a "humid" climate location.

Kosar, D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

SC e-journals by Subject -- Astronomy  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Astronomy Astronomy Advances in Geosciences - OAJ Advances in Astronomy - OAJ Annalen der Physik Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics Astronomy and Astrophysics Review, The Astrophysics Astrophysics and Space Science Astrophysics and Space Sciences Transactions (ASTRA) - OAJ Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics - OAJ Atmospheric Environment Boundary-Layer Meteorology Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy Chaos Communicating Astronomy with the Public Journal - OAJ Contributions to Plasma Physics Cosmic Research Crystal Research and Technology Earth & Planetary Science Letters Earth, Moon, and Planets European Journal of Physics European Physical Journal C Experimental Astronomy Fortschritte der Physik Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta Global Biogeochemical Cycles Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics

306

JOM: The Member Journal of TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The JOM Technical Emphasis Calendar establishes the topics that the journal will cover in the upcoming months. If you are interested in submitting a paper for ...

307

Journal of Research Board of Editors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Journal of Research of NIST. Board of Editors. Robert A. Dragoset, Chief Editor. Jeffrey W. Bullard, Materials and Construction Research Division, EL ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2007 Daily Journals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decathlon Director, Richard King, and his wife, Melissa. Richard King, Solar Decathlon organizer, keeps a daily journal during the 2007 Solar Decathlon. Solar Decathlon 2007 Daily...

309

Journal of Electronic Materials Home Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JEM Home Page. The Journal of Electronic Materials reports on the science and technology of electronic materials while examining new applications for ...

310

Advanced support vector machines for 802.11 indoor location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the proliferation of ubiquitous computing services, locating a device in indoor scenarios has received special attention during recent years. A variety of algorithms are based on Wi-Fi measurements of the received signal strength and estimate ... Keywords: Autocorrelation kernel, Complex support vector machines, Fingerprinting, IEEE 802.11, Indoor location, Support vector machines

Carlos Figuera; José Luis Rojo-Álvarez; Mark Wilby; Inmaculada Mora-Jiménez; Antonio J. Caamaño

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy  

SciTech Connect

Approximately ten percent of the energy consumed in U.S. commercial buildings is used by HVAC systems to condition outdoor ventilation air. Reducing ventilation rates would be a simple and broadly-applicable energy retrofit option, if practical counter measures were available that maintained acceptable concentrations of indoor-generated air pollutants. The two general categories of countermeasures are: 1) indoor pollutant source control, and 2) air cleaning. Although pollutant source control should be used to the degree possible, source control is complicated by the large number and changing nature of indoor pollutant sources. Particle air cleaning is already routinely applied in commercial buildings. Previous calculations indicate that particle filtration consumes only 10percent to 25percent of the energy that would otherwise be required to achieve an equivalent amount of particle removal with ventilation. If cost-effective air cleaning technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also available, outdoor air ventilation rates could be reduced substantially and broadly in the commercial building stock to save energy. The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel VOC air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. The minimum required VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50percent reduction in ventilation rate for air cleaning systems installed in the HVAC supply airstream is modest (generally 20percent or less).

Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

312

On the impact of Gold Open Access journals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gold Open Access (=Open Access publishing) is for many the preferred route to achieve unrestricted and immediate access to research output. However, true Gold Open Access journals are still outnumbered by traditional journals. Moreover availability of ... Keywords: Directory of Open Access journals (DOAJ), Gold Open Access, Impact analysis, Impact evolution, Journal citation reports (JCR), Journal impact factor, Open Access publishing, SJR, SNIP, Ulrichsweb

Christian Gumpenberger; María-Antonia Ovalle-Perandones; Juan Gorraiz

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Reducing indoor residential exposures to outdoor pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management techniques (air sealing and balancing supply andair-tightening techniques (e.g. , caulking and sealing

Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

International Journal of Systems Biology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

|| Bioinfo Publications || 57 || Bioinfo Publications || 57 International Journal of Systems Biology ISSN: 0975-2900 & E-ISSN: 0975-9204, Volume 4, Issue 1, 2013, pp.-57-72. Available online at http://www.bioinfopublication.org/jouarchive.php?opt=&jouid=BPJ0000252 IWATA M. 1 , SHIRAISHI F. 1 AND VOIT E.O. 2 * 1 Section of Bio-process design, Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-10-1, Hakozaki, Higashi-Ku, Fukuoka 820-8581, Japan. 2 The Wallace H. Coulter, Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, 313 Ferst Drive, Suite 4103, Atlanta, GA 30332-0535, U.S.A. *Corresponding Author: Email- eberhard.voit@bme.gatech.edu Received: August 05, 2013; Accepted: September 03, 2013

315

Knowledge-Based Multi-Criteria Optimization to Support Indoor Positioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Potsdam, Germany Abstract Indoor position estimation constitutes a central task in home-based

Schaub, Torsten

316

Laboratory Testing of the Heating Capacity of Air-Source Heat Pumps at Low Outdoor Temperature Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-source heat pump systems offer an alternative to the common heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) configuration of single split unitary air conditioners with gas heating. In simple terms, heat pumps are traditional air conditioning units with the added capability of running in reverse as required by the building load. Thus, where the traditional air conditioning unit has an indoor evaporator to remove heat from the space and an outdoor condenser to reject heat to the ambient environment, ...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

317

Indoor radon and decay products: Concentrations, causes, and control strategies  

SciTech Connect

This report is another in the on going technical report series that addresses various aspects of the DOE Radon Research Program. It provides an overview of what is known about the behavior of radon and its decay products in the indoor environment and examines the manner in which several important classes of factors -- structural, geological, and meteorological -- affect indoor radon concentrations. Information on US indoor radon concentrations, currently available monitoring methods and novel radon control strategies are also explored. 238 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs.

Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Air quality in tightly sealed and passive homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Indoor air quality has attracted increasing attention during the past few yars. Pollutants generated from combustion, building materials, and human activities may reach significant levels in the indoor environment to produce adverse health effects. This report deals with the classes of pollutants and their sources, and the significance of reported levels, possible health effects, and control strategies in relation to tightly sealed and passive solar construction techniques. In tightly sealed homes, residential air-to-air heat exchangers, whose design and performance are discussed, offer one method of improving air quality at reasonable cost. It is recommended that further research be implemented to identify hazardous concentrations of pollutants and set standards to minimize health impacts in the search for new energy innovations.

Scott, L.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Advanced Indoor Module Light-Soaking Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of the accelerated, indoor light-soaking test station is presented in this paper, along with data obtained for six modules that underwent exposure. The station comprises a climate-controlled chamber equipped with a solar simulator that allows 1-sun light intensity exposure. Concurrently, we monitor the electrical characteristics of multiple PV modules and exercise active control over their electrical bias using programmable electronic loads, interfaced to a data acquisition system that acquires power-tracking and current-voltage data. This capability allows us to the test different bias conditions and to cyclically alternate between them. Additionally, we can vary the light intensity and module temperatures to garner realistic temperature coefficients of module performance. Data obtained on cadmium telluride (CdTe) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) modules are presented.

del Cueto, J. A.; Osterwald, C.; Pruett, J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Available Technologies: Ventilation Controller for Improved Indoor ...  

Iain Walker and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have developed a dynamic control system for whole-house ventilation fans that provides maximal air quality while reducing ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Rooftop Unitary Air Conditioner with Integral Dedicated Outdoor Air System  

SciTech Connect

Energy use of rooftop and other unitary air-conditioners in commercial applications accounts for about 1 quad (10{sup 15} Btu) of primary energy use annually in the U.S. [Reference 7]. The realization that this cooling equipment accounts for the majority of commercial building cooled floorspace and the majority also of commercial building energy use has spurred development of improved-efficiency equipment as well as development of stricter standards addressing efficiency levels. Another key market driver affecting design of rooftop air-conditioning equipment has been concern regarding comfort and the control of humidity. Trends for increases in outdoor air ventilation rates in certain applications, and the increasing concern about indoor air quality problems associated with humidity levels and moisture in buildings points to a need for improved dehumidification capability in air-conditioning equipment of all types. In many cases addressing this issue exacerbates energy efficiency, and vice versa. The integrated dedicated outdoor air system configuration developed in this project addresses both energy and comfort/humidity issues.

Tiax Llc

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

NREL: Performance and Reliability R&D - Indoor Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Testing Indoor Testing Photo of a distant summer view of SERF, FTLB, and OTF/array field. Our indoor testing and R&D equipment can be found in several laboratories across the permanent NREL site, including the Outdoor Test Facility (OTF), the Field Test Laboratory Building (FTLB), and the Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF). We use an assortment of indoor equipment to test modules and systems under simulated and accelerated conditions, as well as to perform module packaging R&D. Our equipment is housed in several laboratories in buildings across NREL: High-Bay Accelerated Testing Laboratory (OTF) Failure Analysis (OTF) Data Acquisition and Calibration (OTF) Optical Mechanical Characterization Laboratory (FTLB/153-01) Thin-Film Deposition and Sample Preparation Laboratory (FTLB/158-02)

323

Indoor Environment and Energy Consumption of Urban Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Environment and Energy Consumption of Urban Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: September 18, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In China, the...

324

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: December 16, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The first part of this...

325

Indoor Surface Chemistry: Ozone Reaction with Nicotine Sorbed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Surface Chemistry: Ozone Reaction with Nicotine Sorbed to Model Materials Speaker(s): Hugo Destaillats Date: May 19, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 During this seminar,...

326

Indoor CO2 and Communicable Disease Transmission in Offices and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor CO2 and Communicable Disease Transmission in Offices and Non-Industrial Environments Speaker(s): Don Milton Date: October 16, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

327

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment Speaker(s): Teshome Edae Jiru Date: October 12, 2009 - 12:12pm Location: 90-3122 Computer simulation is...

328

Moving air for comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Energy Center, 14pp. ASHRAE Journal, May 2009, pp 8 –Transactions 95(1), pp 269-280. ASHRAE Journal, May 2009, ppcomfort prediction tool. ” ASHRAE Journal, September, 39-42.

Arens, Edward; Turner, Stephen; Zhang, Hui; Paliaga, Gwelen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

SC e-journals Help page  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Help Help Table of Contents General User Information Access Technical Requirements Desktop Shortcut Archived Journal Issues Open Access Journals Spotlight Spotlight Archive Alerts E-mailing Search Results Need Help With Searching? 'Web of Science' Search General Search Tips General User Information Access: Access to this site is available only through work stations and remote computers connected to the internet via the Office of Science (SC) Lan. Subscription journals accessible via this site are governed by license agreements and may be used by SC Staff whose duty stations are located at DOE Headquarters. SC e-journals 3.0: The Office of Science staff is now provided the latest technology in search and retrieval with the new Federated Search provided with this upgrade. Search results are more likely to meet individual user

330

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Journal's Special Issue...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Journal's Special Issue Highlights New Frontier of X-ray Lasers By Glenn Roberts Jr. September 9, 2013 A special issue of a physics publication highlights the contributions of...

331

The China Journal January 2011 Issue 65  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_________________________________________________________ The China Journal January 2011 Issue 65 Revolution Conflict in Nanjing 1 Anita Chan, Strikes in China's Export Industries in Comparative Perspective 27 Christian Göbel, Uneven Policy Implementation in Rural China 53 Teresa Kuan, "The Heart Says One

Botea, Adi

332

The China Journal July 2011 Issue 66  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_________________________________________________________ The China Journal July 2011 Issue 66 ____________________________________________________________ Frederick C. Teiwes and Warren Sun, China's New Economic Policy under Hua Guofeng: Party Consensus and Party in China 77 Ka-ming Wu, Tradition Revival with Socialist Characteristics: Propaganda Storytelling Turned

Botea, Adi

333

REVIEW OF AIR FLOW MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

9747 9747 Review of Airflow Measurement Techniques Jennifer McWilliams Energy Performance of Buildings Group Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 December 1, 2002 Abstract Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: "Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?" This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and

334

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Title Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 2 Pagination 168-173 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of VOCs generated indoors was conducted in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated in the building's four air handling units (AHUs). Concentrations of VOCs in the AHU returns were measured on 7 days during a 13- week period. Indoor minus outdoor concentrations and emission factors were calculated. The emission factor data was subjected to principal component analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds based on source type. One vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. Another vector identified occupant sources. Direct relationships between ventilation rate and concentrations were not observed for most of the abundant VOCs. This result emphasizes the importance of source control measures for limiting VOC concentrations in buildings

335

International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy  

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Journal of Energy Economics and Policy Journal of Energy Economics and Policy Vol. 3, No. 1, 2013, pp.60-74 ISSN: 2146-4553 www.econjournals.com 60 Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs Benjamin D. Leibowicz Management Science and Engineering Department, Stanford University, United States. Email: bleibowicz@stanford.edu Maria Roumpani Management Science and Engineering Department,

336

New and Underutilized Technology: Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner New and Underutilized Technology: Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner October 4, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for liquid desiccant air conditioners (LDACs) within the Federal sector. Benefits Liquid desiccant air conditioners deeply dry air using natural gas, solar energy, waste heat, bio-fuel, or other fossil fuels to drive the system. By providing mostly latent cooling, the LDAC controls indoor humidity without overcooling and reheating. This unit is supplemented by an electric chiller or DX air conditioner that sensibly cools the building's recirculation air. The liquid desiccant is a concentrated salt solution that directly absorbs moisture. Application LDACs are applicable in hospital, office, prison, school, and service

337

J u l y , 1 9 9 7 A S H R A E J o u r n a l 19 The following article was published in ASHRAE Journal, July1997. Copyright 1997 American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J u l y , 1 9 9 7 A S H R A E J o u r n a l 19 The following article was published in ASHRAE/or distributed electronically or in paper form without permission of ASHRAE. A S H RAE JOURNAL Most traditional By Gary S. Settles, Ph.D. Member ASHRAE he patterns of airflow are central to almost everything associated

Settles, Gary S.

338

CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates and Air  

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CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates and Air CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates and Air Temperature Speaker(s): Henry Willem Date: July 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Max Sherman (THIS SEMINAR TO BE RESCHEDULED.) Sustainability of the built-environment must be achieved in parallel with the sustenance of occupants' health and comfort. Actions to conserve energy and resources require much forethought and careful consideration due to possible consequences on the human aspects. Thus, many extensive works in the recent decades have focused on identifying the associations between indoor environment and human responses. Results have shown moderate to strong implications of thermal and indoor air quality factors on the prevalence and intensity of sick

339

Solar Warming Submitted to Avalanche.ca Journal Feb. 2008 Can solar warming contribute to dry slab avalanches?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Warming Submitted to Avalanche.ca Journal Feb. 2008 Can solar warming contribute to dry slab, when signs of warming, such as relatively warm air temperatures, strong solar radiation, and moist by a skier on a steep south-west facing aspect. Solar warming may have contributed to this release. (photo

Jamieson, Bruce

340

United States Office of Air and Radiation EPA 402-R-04-002C Environmental Protection Agency July 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Office of Air and Radiation EPA 402-R-04-002C Environmental Protection Agency July Interagency Agreement No. DW89937220-01-7 Project Officer Ronald G. Wilhelm Office of Radiation and Indoor Air result in significant errors when used to predict the impacts of contaminant migration or site

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Air-Source Heat Pump Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air-Source Heat Pump Basics Air-Source Heat Pump Basics Air-Source Heat Pump Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:03am Addthis Air-source heat pumps transfer heat between the inside of a building and the outside air. How Air-Source Heat Pumps Work This diagram of a split-system heat pump heating cycle shows refrigerant circulating through a closed loop that passes through the wall of a house. Inside the house the refrigerant winds through indoor coils, with a fan blowing across them, and outside the house is another fan and another set of coils, the outdoor coils. A compressor is between the coils on one half of the loop, and an expansion valve is between the coils on the other half. The diagram is explained in the caption. In heating mode, an air-source heat pump evaporates a refrigerant in the outdoor coil; as the liquid evaporates it pulls

342

Socioeconomic and Outdoor Meteorological Determinants of Indoor Temperature and Humidity in New York City Dwellings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous mechanisms link outdoor weather and climate conditions to human health. It is likely that many health conditions are more directly affected by indoor rather than outdoor conditions. Yet, the relationship between indoor temperature and ...

J. D. Tamerius; M. S. Perzanowski; L. M. Acosta; J. S. Jacobson; I. F. Goldstein; J. W. Quinn; A. G. Rundle; J. Shaman

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish Decision Making Performance Title Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish Decision Making...

344

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Title Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of...

345

ARIEL: automatic wi-fi based room fingerprinting for indoor localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

People spend the majority of their time indoors, and human indoor activities are strongly correlated with the rooms they are in. Room localization, which identifies the room a person or mobile phone is in, provides a powerful tool for characterizing ...

Yifei Jiang; Xin Pan; Kun Li; Qin Lv; Robert P. Dick; Michael Hannigan; Li Shang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Journal of Public Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Journal of Public Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Journal of Public Transportation Agency/Company /Organization: National Center for Transit Research Focus Area: Public Transit & Infrastructure Topics: Policy Impacts Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.nctr.usf.edu/jpt/pdf/JPT13-1.pdf This document have like principal topics: Evaluating the Congestion Relief Impacts of Public Transport in Monetary Terms, The Operating Characteristics of Intercity Public Van Service in Lampung, Indonesia,

347

Fuel Cell Demonstration at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Journal article reporting on the 250-kW fuel cell combined heat and power plant located at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Cape Code in Bourne, Massachusetts.

Halverson, Mark A.; Chvala, William D.; Herrera, Shawn

2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

SC e-journals, Biology/Genetics  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Biology/Genetics Biology/Genetics ACM Transactions on Applied Perception (TAP) ACS Chemical Biology ACS Synthetic Biology Acta Biotheoretica Acta Neuropathologica Advances in Bioinformatics - OAJ Advances in Health Sciences Education Agriculture and Human Values Agroforestry Systems American Journal of Agricultural and Biological Science - OAJ American Journal of Medical Genetics Amino Acids Analyst Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry Analytical Biochemistry Anatomical Record, The Anatomy and Embryology Angiogenesis Animal Biology Animal Cognition Annals of The ICRP Annual Review of Biochemistry Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering Annual Review of Biophysics Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology Annual Review of Entomology Annual Review of Genetics Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics

349

SC e-journals, Earth Sciences  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Earth Sciences Earth Sciences Acta hydrochimica et hydrobiologica Advances in Geosciences - OAJ Aerobiologia Agricultural & Forest Meteorology Agronomy Journal American Journal of Science, The Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences Applied and Environmental Soil Science - OAJ Applied Geochemistry Applied Radiation and Isotopes Aquatic Geochemistry Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics - OAJ Atmospheric Environment BioEnergy Research Biogeochemistry Biogeosciences - OAJ Biology and Fertility of Soils Boundary-Layer Meteorology Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology, The Bulletin of Engineering Geology and the Environment Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America Bulletin of Volcanology

350

SC e-journals by Publisher  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

journals Search by Publisher journals Search by Publisher American Association for Cancer Research American Association for the Advancement of Science American Association of Physics Teachers American Ceramic Society American Chemical Society American Geophysical Union American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) American Institute of Physics American Meteorological Society American Physical Society American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) American Society for Microbiology American Society of Agronomy American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) American Society of Plant Biologists, The Annual Reviews Association for Computing Machinery AVS Science and Technology Society Biology Reports Limited BioMed Central Biophysical Society, The Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists

351

Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address 591 Ala Moana Blvd. Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96813 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.300314°, -157.864542° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.300314,"lon":-157.864542,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

352

Improved Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Improved Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments Recently completed analyses suggest that improving buildings and indoor environments could reduce health-care costs and sick leave and increase worker performance, resulting in an estimated productivity gain of $30 to $150 billion annually. The research literature provides strong evidence that characteristics of buildings and their indoor environments influence the prevalence of several adverse health effects. These include communicable respiratory disease (e.g., common colds and influenza), allergy and asthma symptoms, and acute sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms such as headaches, and irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, and skin. For example, in six studies, the number of respiratory illnesses in building occupants varied by a factor of 1.2 to

353

Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve indoor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve indoor Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve indoor environment: How to validate comfort and energy reduction Speaker(s): Wouter Borsboom Date: December 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 TNO is a research institute which is active in the energy saving and indoor environment. We like to present our research, our goals and discuss the challenges and the opportunities for cooperation. Therefore we like to give a presentation about the following topic and we are also interested in a presentation of LBL and UC Berkeley. An important topic in the building industry is near zero energy buildings. Most countries in Europe implemented programs to advance this goal in one way or another. In near-zero energy buildings, the interaction between building and systems

354

Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Monitor & Why » What We Monitor & Why » Air Quality Air Quality To preserve our existing wilderness-area air quality, LANL implements a conscientious program of air monitoring. April 12, 2012 Real-time data monitoring for particulate matter An air monitoring field team member tests one of LANL's tapered element oscillating microbalance samplers, which collects real-time particulate matter data. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email LANL monitors air quality 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Why we monitor air LANL monitors many different pathways in order to assess their impact on workers, the public, animals, and plants. We monitor the air around the Laboratory to ensure our operations are not affecting the air of nearby

355

Commercial Building Indoor Environmental Quality Evaluation: Methods and Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

humidity, incident solar radiation, air speed over intervalsrelative humidity, incident solar radiation, air speed) withincident Intermediate solar radiation, air speed over

Heinzerling, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Colorado Springs School District 11 - Achieving Healthy Indoor Learning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado Springs School District 11 - Achieving Healthy Indoor Colorado Springs School District 11 - Achieving Healthy Indoor Learning Environments Through Energy Efficiency Upgrades Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition

357

Ga Air Compressor, Ga Air Compressor Products, Ga Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ga Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Ga Air Compressor Products from Global Ga Air Compressor Suppliers and Ga Air Compressor ...

358

Study of the Influence of Air Supply Temperature on Air Distribution in the Run-through Large Space Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The article introduces the concept and features of run-through large space. By using CFD technology, the paper simulates a velocity field and temperature field in the important air conditioned zone of China's science and technology museum (new museum) under winter operating conditions. At the same time, the indoor air flow regulations are summarized according to the simulation results. On the above basis, a new solution for airflow control of the connection in a run-through large space is put forward. The conclusion of this paper will offer guidance and reference for the air conditioning design of homogeneous architecture.

Tian, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, M.; He, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

LE JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Short Communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2307 LE JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Short Communication Cold fusion in a dense electron gas R. Balian, J in metallic palladiun are required in order to bring the cold fusion rate to an observable value. 'Ibme 50 N are known to yield observable rates for "cold fusion" in ddp-molecules [1-3]. One may also notice

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

360

Special Glial Journal Club Seminar "Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Special Glial Journal Club Seminar "Energy Supply to the CNS" Clare Howarth Department Howarth - Energy supply to the CNS I will consider three aspects of the energetic design of the brain: (1 and therapy. (2) How the blood supplies to particular brain regions are matched to the estimated energy

Newman, Eric A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

JOURNAL TOOLS Get New Content Alerts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Karel Vytras, Kurt Kalcher, Alain Walcarius, Joseph Wang Advanced > Saved Searches > SEARCH RESOURCES ABOUT US LOGIN REMEMBER ME Enter e-mail address Enter password In this journal #12;Carbon Paste] Electroanalysis 2010, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 223­228 ABOUT US HELP CONTACT US AGENTS ADVERTISERS MEDIA PRIVACY TERMS

Aksay, Ilhan A.

362

NETL Publications - Journal of Energy and Environmental Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2002 Full Issue PDF-19MB PDF Linked Version PDF-411KB (See NOTE Below) Journal of Energy and Environmental Research - Vol. 2 No. 1 IN THIS ISSUE: Journal Papers, Geologic...

363

Rejection Rates for Journals Publishing in the Atmospheric Sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of 63 journals publishing peer-reviewed articles on atmospheric science were collected from online information and through a survey e-mailed to the journals. The rate that submitted manuscripts were rejected for publication (...

David M. Schultz

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

technical report and journal articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: This project seeks to improve the application of noble gas isotope studies to multiphase fluid processes in the Earth's crust by (1) identifying the important noble gas carrier phases in sediments to address the processes that have led to the observed enrichment and depletion patterns in sedimentary rocks and fluids, (2) examine the mechanisms by which such noble gas patterns are acquired, trapped and subsequently released to mobile crustal fluids, and (3) evaluate the time and length scales for the transport of noble gas components, such as radiogenic 4He, through the continental crust.. Project Description: Sedimentary rocks and oil field gases typically are enriched in heavy noble gases: Xe/Ar ratios of ~10-10,000 times the ratio in air have been observed that cannot be explained by adsorption hypotheses. Laboratory experiments designed to isolate sedimentary phases for noble gas analysis are conducted to identify the carrier phase(s). It has been observed that radiogenic 4He accumulates in confined aquifer waters at rates that exceed the rate of local production and approaching the whole crustal production rate. A literature evaluation of 4He, 3He crustal fluxes is being conducted to evaluate crustal scale mass transport in terms of the rate, mechanisms, temporal and spatial variability and the role played by tectonic processes. Results: The laboratory study has concentrated on noble gas abundances in a variety of sedimentary silica samples. We have found that, in general, samples of inorganic silica have noble gas abundances that are consistent with occlusion of air-saturated water in fluid inclusions and lack requisite enrichment/depletion factors needed to explain the noble gas inventory in oil field fluids. However, numerous replicate analyses of noble gases extracted from silica spicules from live sponges (Calyxnicaeensis) show significantly enriched Ar, Kr, and Xe concentrations ([iNg]sample/[iNg]asw > 1), but with very little if any mass dependence in the acquisition and trapping of Ar, Kr and Xe. Noble gases in silica samples from the (diatomaceous) Monterey Formation (Elk Hills oil field, CA) and an Atlantic box core were found to be somewhat depleted with respect to the sponge spicule, fractionated in a fashion favoring the heavy noble gases, and approach the compositions that have been observed in bulk deep sea sediments. We suspect that the differences in noble gas absolute and relative abundances between the sponge spicule samples and the more evolved diatomaceous samples are related to either (1) fundamental differences in the biologically controlled mineralization or (2) postdepositional effects related to the progressive crystallization of amorphous silica (e.g. opal-A) to more ordered structures. Laboratory cultured diatoms and box core sea sediment samples collected as a function of depth within the sediment column have been processed for analysis of the silica phases to address these questions. Through a statistical evaluation using a global data base covering many geologic environments, we have determined that the log normal mean of the radiogenic 4He flux across the Earthâ??s continental crust is 4.18 x 1010 4He atoms m-2 s-1. Furthermore, it was found that the range of the continental 4He degassing flux increases with decreasing time and space scales. The statistics can be interpreted as reflecting natural variability and suggest that the mechanisms transporting the crustal helium degassing flux contain a high degree of both spatial and temporal variability. This estimate of the log normal mean of the continental degassing flux of 4He is approximately equivalent to the radiogenic production rate for 4He in the whole crust. Large scale vertical mass transport in continental crust is estimated as scaled values of the order 10-5 cm2s-1 for helium (over 2Byr and 40km vertically) vs. 10-2 cm2s-1 for heat. This rate of mass transport requires not only release of He from the solid phase via diffusion, fracturing or comminution; but also an enhanced rate of mass transport facili

Thomas Torgersen and others

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

365

RAPOSI: rapidly installable positioning system for indoor environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RAPOSI is a radio-signal-strength based positioning system for indoor environments. Independent self-localization as well as centralized tracking of light-weight mobile devices is enabled. By omitting typically required a-priori scene analysis, set-up ...

Florian Schreiner; Holger Ziemek

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Diagnostic Process All plants grown indoors in containers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

existing light. Bulbs of different light Caring for Plants in the Home Lynn Ellen Doxon, former Extension temperatures more closely resemble the tropics than local outdoor temperatures. Light Needs Even among plants that naturally grow in the shade, light needs vary. There are four basic light categories for indoor plants grown

Castillo, Steven P.

367

The solution of smart home indoor positioning based on wifi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LAN gradually to the wireless technology in the direction of multi-play development in the multi-play in the process of rapid development, driven by a wide range of applications for a variety of wireless technologies, WIFI is one of them. WiFi the most ... Keywords: WiFi, indoor positioning, smart home

Songjuan Zhang; Lilei Qi

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Directional Handoff using Geomagnetic Sensor in Indoor WLANs Sangyup Han  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Directional Handoff using Geomagnetic Sensor in Indoor WLANs Sangyup Han , Myungchul Kim , Ben Lee a geomagnetic sensor (or a digital compass) embedded in mobile devices. The proposed scheme predicts; Directional handoff; Geomagnetic sensor; Digital compass; AP Table I. INTRODUCTION With the popularity

Lee, Ben

369

An adaptive location estimator using tracking algorithms for indoor WLANs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents adaptive algorithms for estimating the location of a mobile terminal (MT) based on radio propagation modeling (RPM), Kalman filtering (KF), and radio-frequency identification (RFID) assisting for indoor wireless local area networks ... Keywords: Calibration, Kalman filtering, Location estimation, Neural network, Radio-frequency identification, Tracking, Wireless local area network

Yih-Shyh Chiou; Chin-Liang Wang; Sheng-Cheng Yeh

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1992--March 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of {center_dot}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2} ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}Po{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited {sup 210}Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

Hopke, P.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Title Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3383E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords air flow measurement, air leakage, blower power measurement, blowers, energy performance of buildings group, forced air systems, furnaces, indoor environment department, other, public interest energy research (pier) program, residential hvac Abstract This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit - indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called "ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823 "Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

372

Rating of Mixed Split Residential Air Conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A methodology is presented for rating the performance of mixed, split residential air conditioners. The method accounts for the impact on system performance of the indoor evaporator, expansion device and fan; three major components that are likely to be substituted for the matched components in a mixed system. The method allows calculation of capacity at 95°F rating point and seasonal energy efficiency ratio, SEER, without performing laboratory test of the complete system. Limitations of the procedure, present work, and anticipated improvements are also discussed.

Domanski, P. A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Revised fact sheet describes the transpired solar collector that was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

374

SC e-journals by Publisher  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Spotlight Archive Spotlight Archive December 2012 Measuring Table-Top Accelerators' State-of-the-Art Beams Image credit: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Measuring Table-Top Accelerators' State-of-the-Art Beams Long-range Persistenceof FemtosecondModulations onblur=Laser-Plasma-Accelerated ElectronBeams, Journal of the Physical Review Letters, Oct 24, 2012 July 2012 More Efficient Organic Solar Cells Image credit: Argonne National Laboratory More Efficient Organic Solar Cells Effects of Additives on the Morphology of Solution Phase Aggregates Formed by Active Layer Components of High-Efficiency Organic Solar Cells, Journal of the American Chemical Society, Nov 29, 2011 February 2012 New Territory for Materials Scientists Image credit: ORNL New Territory for Materials Scientists

375

ScienceDirect JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ontine at wtYw.sciencedlrect.com ontine at wtYw.sciencedlrect.com ^-- 9 e* + - . , * * ScienceDirect JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY Journal o f Environmental Radioactivity 91 (2006) 27-40 www.elsevier.co~nAocate/jenvrad Radionuclides in marine macroalgae from Amchitka and Kiska Islands in the Aleutians: establishing a baseline for future biomonitoring Joanna Burger Michael Gochfeld C-d, David S . Kosson b7e, Charles W. Powers b-d*e7 Stephen Jewett b*f, Barry Friedlander b7d, Heloise Chenelot b=f7 Conrad D. Volz b-8, Christian Jeitner a-b Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 6 0 4 Allison R o a d . Piscataway, N.I 0 8 8 5 4 - 8 0 8 2 , USA Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Piscataway. N.I 0 8 8 5 4 . USA Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSZ), Piscataway, NJ 0

376

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2009 Daily Journals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Richard King next to a deck and planter boxes. Decathlete Way and the U.S. Capitol are in the background. Richard King next to a deck and planter boxes. Decathlete Way and the U.S. Capitol are in the background. Solar Decathlon Director Richard King takes a break from the competition along Decathlete Way. Solar Decathlon 2009 Daily Journals The daily journals highlighted the events of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2009. Each day, Richard King, Solar Decathlon director, covered the latest on the teams, their standings, and the events going on in the solar village. October 19, 2009 I personally believe one of the greatest discoveries in the field of energy from the 20th century is our ability to generate electricity from sunlight using photovoltaic solar cells. Read more. October 17, 2009 Solar Decathlon 2009 was intriguing and suspenseful to the very end. None

377

A multi-objective evolutionary algorithm for an effective tuning of fuzzy logic controllers in heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the use of multi-objective evolutionary algorithms to develop smartly tuned fuzzy logic controllers dedicated to the control of heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems, energy performance, stability and indoor comfort ... Keywords: Fuzzy logic controllers, Genetic tuning, HVAC systems, Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems, Linguistic 2-tuples representation, Multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, Rule selection

María José Gacto; Rafael Alcalá; Francisco Herrera

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson,; Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang; Apte, Michael; Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

379

Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) Investigation for Residential and Small Commercial Air-Source Heat Pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities frequently use the seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) in air conditioning–based incentive programs to categorize energy efficiency and to quantify financial value. For residential and small commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps, SEER is determined by the procedures outlined in ANSI/AHRI Standard 210/240. Within Standard 210/240, SEER is calculated based on laboratory test results and equations that follow specific assumptions regarding indoor temperature, ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

380

Air Leakage of U.S. Homes: Model Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air tightness is an important property of building envelopes. It is a key factor in determining infiltration and related wall-performance properties such as indoor air quality, maintainability and moisture balance. Air leakage in U.S. houses consumes roughly 1/3 of the HVAC energy but provides most of the ventilation used to control IAQ. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been gathering residential air leakage data from many sources and now has a database of more than 100,000 raw measurements. This paper uses a model developed from that database in conjunction with US Census Bureau data for estimating air leakage as a function of location throughout the US.

Sherman, Max H.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Air-Source Heat Pump Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source Heat Pump Basics Source Heat Pump Basics Air-Source Heat Pump Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:03am Addthis Air-source heat pumps transfer heat between the inside of a building and the outside air. How Air-Source Heat Pumps Work This diagram of a split-system heat pump heating cycle shows refrigerant circulating through a closed loop that passes through the wall of a house. Inside the house the refrigerant winds through indoor coils, with a fan blowing across them, and outside the house is another fan and another set of coils, the outdoor coils. A compressor is between the coils on one half of the loop, and an expansion valve is between the coils on the other half. The diagram is explained in the caption. In heating mode, an air-source heat pump evaporates a refrigerant in the outdoor coil; as the liquid evaporates it pulls

382

Journal of Research Volume 73C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... optical technique for observation and analysis of high-intensity electric fields, p. 5 ... measurements of air cavity temperature in a passenger car tire, p ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

383

Relationships between {sup 222}Rn dissolved in ground water supplies and indoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations in some Colorado front range houses  

SciTech Connect

Indoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations were measured in 37 houses with alpha track detectors placed in water-use rooms near water sources (bathrooms, laundry rooms, and kitchens) and in non-water-use living rooms, dining rooms, and bedrooms away from water sources. Results show that relative contributions of {sup 222}Rn to indoor air from water use are insignificant when soil-gas concentrations are high but become increasingly important as the ratio of {sup 222}Rn-in-water:{sup 222}Rn-in-soil gas increases. High soil-gas {sup 222}Rn concentrations may mask {sup 222}Rn contributions from water even when waterborne {sup 222}Rn concentrations are as high as 750 kBq m{sup {minus}3}. Ground water in Precambrian Pikes Peak granite averages 340 kBq m{sup {minus}3} {sup 222}Rn, vs. 170 kBq m{sup {minus}3} in Precambrian migmatite, but average {sup 222}Rn concentrations in soil gas are also lower in migmatite. Because the ratio of {sup 222}Rn-in-water:{sup 222}Rn-in-soil gas may be consistently higher for houses in migmatite than in Pikes Peak granite, indoor air in houses built on migmatite have a greater relative contribution from water use even though average {sup 222}Rn concentrations in the water are lower. Continuous monitoring of {sup 222}Rn concentrations in air on 15-min intervals also indicates that additions to indoor concentrations from water use are significant and measurable only when soil-gas concentrations are low and concentrations in water are high. When soil-gas concentrations were mitigated to less than 150 Bq m{sup {minus}3} in one house, water contributed 20-40% of the annual indoor {sup 222}Rn concentration in the laundry room ({sup 222}Rn concentration in water of 670 kBq m{sup {minus}3}). Conversely, when the mitigation system is inactive, diurnal fluctuations and other variations in the soil-gas {sup 222}Rn contribution swamp the variability due to water use in the house. 9 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

Folger, P.F. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Wanty, R.B. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Poeter, E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Nyberg, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment Speaker(s): Teshome Edae Jiru Date: October 12, 2009 - 12:12pm Location: 90-3122 Computer simulation is based on mathematical models developed mostly from theoretical science and helps for studying and prediction of the behavior of engineered systems. The advantages of computer simulation are the ease of varying the desired parameters to investigate various possible design scenarios, explore new theories, and design new experiments to test these theories. It also provides detailed information and serves as a powerful alternative to experimental science and observation when phenomena are not observable or when measurements are impractical or too expensive. This seminar presents the different types of mechanistic modeling approaches

385

Air humidity requirements for human comfort  

SciTech Connect

Upper humidity limits for the comfort zone determined from two recently presented models for predicting discomfort due to skin humidity and insufficient respiratory cooling are proposed. The proposed limits are compared with the maximum permissible humidity level prescribed in existing standards for the thermal indoor environment. The skin humidity model predicts discomfort as a function of the relative humidity of the skin, which is determined by existing models for human heat and moisture transfer based on environmental parameters, clothing characteristics, and activity level. The respiratory model predicts discomfort as a function of the driving forces for heat loss from the respiratory tract, namely, the temperature and humidity of the surrounding air. An upper humidity limit based on a relative skin humidity of 0.54, corresponding to 20% dissatisfied, results in a maximum permissible humidity level near 100% RH. The requirements for respiratory comfort are much more stringent and result in lower permissible indoor air humidities. Compared with the upper humidity limit specified in existing thermal comfort standards, e.g., ASHRAE Addendum 55a, the humidity limit based on skin humidity was less restrictive and the humidity limit based on respiratory comfort was far more restrictive.

Toftum, J.; Fanger, P.O.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Examining Potential Demographic Trends in the Opinions of Undergraduate Journalism Professors Concerning the Topic of Technological and Traditional Journalism Skills and Theories.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examined demographics and characteristics of journalism professors and administrators to find potential trends in opinion of the importance of technologically based journalism skills… (more)

Riley, Jeffrey K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume I, 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is our first volume of the Undergraduate Journal. It is an approbation of the impressive research performed by summer interns under the guidance of their dedicated mentors. The full-length publications were chosen from a pool of submissions that were reviewed by many of the excellent scientists at our National Laboratories. Most of these students will pursue careers in science, engineering and technology and, hopefully, some of this talent will remain with our labs. We have also included about 125 abstracts that survived the review process. These were submitted from all of our participating National Laboratories.

Faletra, P.; Beavis, W.; Franz, K.; Musick, C.; Walbridge, S.E.; Myron, H.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Forced Air Systems in High Performance Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FORCED AIR SYSTEMS IN FORCED AIR SYSTEMS IN HIGH PERFORMANCE HOMES Iain Walker (LBNL) Building America Meeting 2013 What are the issues? 1. Sizing  When is too small too small? 2. Distribution  Can we get good mixing at low flow? 3. Performance  Humidity Control  Part load efficiency  Blowers & thermal losses Sizing  Part-load - not an issue with modern equipment  Careful about predicted loads - a small error becomes a big problem for tightly sized systems  Too Low Capacity = not robust  Extreme vs. design days  Change in occupancy  Party mode  Recovery from setback Sizing  Conventional wisdom - a good envelope = easy to predict and not sensitive to indoor conditions  But..... Heating and cooling become discretionary - large variability depending on occupants

389

Journal of Energy & Environmental Research, Volume 1, No. 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fauth U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Journal Papers, Capture and Separation 19 Adsorption and Desorption of CO 2 on Solid Sorbents Ranjani...

390

Most Cited Papers, Journal of Building Performance Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Most Cited Papers, Journal of Building Performance Simulation September 18, 2013 Michael Wetter The Department of Energy-funded scientific paper "Co-simulation of building energy...

391

TMS and Springer Launch New and Innovative Open Access Journal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 16, 2011... 2011 Conference & Exhibition (MS&T'11) in Columbus, Ohio, The journal will begin publishing in early 2012. Under the Open Access model, ...

392

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH of the National Bureau of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. JOURNAL OF RESEARCH of the National Bureau of Standards Vol. 87, No. 3, May-June 1982 Contents Page ...

2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

Health Physics journal features U.S. radiological response to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics journal features U.S. radiological response to Fukushima accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

394

Citations to Journal Articles from Energy Frontier Research Centers...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Citations to Journal Articles from Energy Frontier Research Centers Now Available on OSTI's SciTech Connect Energy Frontier Research Centers map displaying 46 EFRCs in 35 states...

395

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH of the National Bureau of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. JOURNAL OF RESEARCH of the National Bureau of Standards Vol. 87, No. 4, July-August 1982 Contents Page ...

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

JOM: The Member Journal of TMS - About JOM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What Does JOM Mean? ... commonplace, and with the journal frequently covering composites, plastics, and other materials, a name change was clearly in order.

397

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating, given the higher cost per KWh for electricity, aaverage cost of electrical energy per kilowatt-hour (kWh) is

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

DESIGN OF A MOBILE LABORATORY FOR VENTILATION STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A.C. power connection Electrical power system circuit layoutuse AC power whenever electrical power is connected to theXBL 784-744 Figure 7: Electrical power system circuit layout

Berk, James V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

DESIGN OF A MOBILE LABORATORY FOR VENTILATION STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use AC power whenever electrical power is connected to theXBL 784-744 Figure 7: Electrical power system circuit layoutand non-regulated electrical AC power. diagram of the

Berk, James V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar water heating system (may be combined with storage water heater)Solar energy was incorporated into nine of the home heating systems, being paired with tankless water heaters,

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

votes, thermal preferences and cooling preferences. Thefor cooling and thermal preferences Cooling exposure Coolingterms of thermal sensation, heating preferences and cooling

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climate zone showed almost 90% thermal acceptabil- ity within the operative temperature ranges prescribed in the ASHRAE

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

induction heating elements. Gas usage was more prevalent forsubstantially during gas range usage. Formaldehyde exceededrange hood usage were similar in gas and electric homes. Gas

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conservation initiatives including a recent Federal Regula- tion for Voluntary Labelling of Energy Ef?ciency Levels in Commercial, Public and Service Buildings [

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Brazil's hot humid climate zone. Building and Environmentin moderate thermal climate zones. Building and EnvironmentBrazil's hot humid climate zone. Building and Environment,

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inorganic pollutants: carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide,odor perception, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfurkeywords; pollution, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, energy

Young, Rodger A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Procedure for Use in Retail...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(IAQ). The first primary goal of this study was to determine, in a set of California retail stores, the adequacy of Title 24 VRs and observed current measured VRs in providing...

408

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's...

409

Comparing zonal and CFD models of air flows in large indoor spaces to experimental data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Office of Non-proliferation and National Security,Chemical and Biological Non-proliferation Program of the

Mora, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gender, acclimation state, the opportunity to adjust clothing and physical disability on requirements for thermal comfort. Energy

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Indoor Air Quality Program California State University, Fullerton has adopted a policy to protect employees and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, however in the case of natural gas leakage or unusual chemical/solvent odor, using detection equipment may and are but not limited to: inspection, communication, and correction. II. Authority California Code of Regulations, Title 8 sections 332.2, 332.3, 3203, 3362, 5141 through 5143, 5155, and 14301. This regulation provides

de Lijser, Peter

412

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency initiatives The energy matrix in Brazil is basedin a more sustainable energy matrix are essential for a

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

DRAFT 11/09/2010 PLEASE DO NOT CITE OR QUOTE Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/ozonegen.html This cell is intentionally blank. Identify evidence of mice, squirrels and other rodents; termites are replaced, add a heat trap to the hot water line of new set-up. ·· If replacing combustion equipment as part CPSC Document #466 This cell is intentionally blank. VENTED APPLIANCES (continued) UNVENTED APPLIANCES

414

DESIGN OF A MOBILE LABORATORY FOR VENTILATION STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The units are operable from 220 volt single phase power, thelift gate is operable from a 12 volt DC battery. To keep thewas installed which converts 115 volts AC to 12 volts DC and

Berk, James V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy retrofit industry will receive more ample training on ventilation requirements and will become more adept at selling these technologies to homeowners.

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Effects of room furnishings and air speed on particle deposition rates indoors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

^ of the National Nuclear Security Administration under U.S.of the National Nuclear Security Administration under U.S.

Thatcher, Tracy L.; Lai, Alvin C.K.; Moreno-Jackson, Rosa; Sextro, Richard G.; Nazaroff, William W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is heavily weighted towards hydroelectricity, accounting forof rain to drive hydroelectricity generation) and inadequatelack of rain for the hydroelectricity based system) and poor

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

DESIGN OF A MOBILE LABORATORY FOR VENTILATION STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and covered with 1" thick plywood. This floor was covered inoff with a 3/4" piece of plywood hinged at the bottom to beby a vertical 3/4 11 plywood slab hinged at the bottom to

Berk, James V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

DESIGN OF A MOBILE LABORATORY FOR VENTILATION STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vertical. covered with 1" thick plywood. padded anti-staticoff with a 3/4" piece of plywood hinged at the bottom to beThe by a vertical 3/4" plywood slab hinged box is vented by

Berk, James V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Volatile organic chemical emissions from structural insulated panel (SIP) materials and implications for indoor air quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fiberboard, hardboard and plywood are the predominantliterature for OSB and for plywood, a composite wood productthe predominant southern pine plywood, as it typically is

Hodgson, Alfred T.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mater- ials -- particle board, plywood and urea-formaldehydeformaldehyde foam insulation, plywood, and particle board.method) is 78% on average. Plywood constructed with urea-

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

THE IMPACT OF REDUCED VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from particle- board, plywood, urea formaldehyde foammaterials, particleboard, plywood, textiles, adhesives,

Berk, James V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uc/item/25x5j8w6 G. OVEN AND STOVE USED FOR HEATING G.1heating elements. Gas usage was more prevalent for cooktops than for ovens,

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Dynamic predictive clothing insulation models based on outdoor air and indoor operative temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

preference. Final Report ASHRAE RP-884 1997. [10] FarawayArid Climate. Final Report ASHRAE RP-921 1998. Schiavon S,buildenv.2012.08.024 [14] ANSI/ASHRAE. ANSI/ASHRAE 55-1992:

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Energy Efficient Indoor VOC Air Cleaning with Activated Carbon Fiber (ACF) Filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effectiveness ratio for ACF filter fiber system with10.1016/j.buildenv.2011.07.002 N v-ACF N r , X r,i fanX 0,i X r,i (ppb) ACF Filter Unit S r,i VOC source Catalyst

Sidheswaran, Meera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

after the exposure and water intake were recorded every 30rate were recorded. Water intake was also registered basedrate where recorded. Water intake was also registered based

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

many hospitals for energy audits and for energy-conserving1980, will include an energy audit, modifications to theannotated bibliography of energy audit source materials will

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lower on induction electric cooktops, compared with either gas or resistance electric models. Kitchen exhaust fan usage

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Predictive clothing insulation model based on outdoor air and indoor operative temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012) Predictive clothing insulation model based on outdoorPredictive clothing insulation model based on outdoor airpredictive models of clothing insulation have been developed

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Dynamic predictive clothing insulation models based on outdoor air and indoor operative temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predictive clothing insulation models based on outdoor airrange of the clothing insulation calculated for eachbuilding). Figure 8 Clothing insulation versus dress code [

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

IMPACT OF REDUCED INFILTRATION AND VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in building materials such as insulation, particleboard,Particleboard Insulation Adhesives Paint Building Contentsfoam insulation, and radon from various building materials -

Hollowell, Craig D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Dynamic predictive clothing insulation models based on outdoor air and indoor operative temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clothing Insulation Models on Building Energy Use, HVACinsulation for mechanically conditioned buildings andclothing insulation calculated for each building). Figure 8

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cook top ventilation in passive House/LEED home. (2010).Berkeley National Lab. Passive House Institute U.S. (2011).What is a passive house? Retrieved 11/23, 2012, from http://

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Volatile N-nitrosamines in Environment Tobacco Smoke: Sampling, Analysis, Smission Factors, and Indoor Air Exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Division: Sacramento, CA, 1991. Ruhl, C. ; Adams,Research Division: Sacramento, CA, 1994. 24) Burton, H. R. ;of Health Services: Sacramento, CA, 14) Chortyk, O.T. ;

Mahanama, K.R.R.; Daisey, J.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Dual Path HVAC System Demonstration in School: Leveraging Thermal Energy Storage and Cold Air Distribution to Enhance System Perform ance in a Florida Elementary School  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports on a novel dual-path, low-temperature air distribution system demonstrated in a Florida elementary school. This system addresses high humidity levels and indoor air quality problems normally found in schools due to their large ventilation requirements, especially in humid climates. The dual-path system is also integrated with synergistic use of thermal energy storage and low-temperature air distribution, reduced energy use, and initial cost. The field data confirmed that the system ...

2002-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

436

West Virginia University 1 Perley Isaac Reed School of Journalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

West Virginia University 1 Perley Isaac Reed School of Journalism Degrees Offered · Master the school has state-of-the-art electronic reporting and editing systems as well as modern broadcast news, broadcasting, advertising, public relations, or related fields. Master of Science in Journalism Program

Mohaghegh, Shahab

437

Natural Language Engineering http://journals.cambridge.org/NLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Language Engineering http://journals.cambridge.org/NLE Additional services for Natural1351324912000101 Request Permissions : Click here Downloaded from http://journals.cambridge.org/NLE, IP address: 79 as anchors that delimit the search space. We use a large monolingual corpus to rank and filter

Wintner, Shuly

438

Natural Language Engineering http://journals.cambridge.org/NLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Language Engineering http://journals.cambridge.org/NLE Additional services for Natural Permissions : Click here Downloaded from http://journals.cambridge.org/NLE, IP address: 79.181.48.102 on 29-processing steps for a variety of natural language processing applications, from search and information extraction

Wintner, Shuly

439

IFRF Combustion Journal Article Number 200303, July 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IFRF Combustion Journal Article Number 200303, July 2003 ISSN 1562-479X Waste Incineration European-mail: klaus.goerner@uni-essen.den URL: http://www.luat.uni-essen.de #12;IFRF Combustion Journal - 2 - Goerner the lower calorific value of normal municipal waste increased with the consequence of increasing combustion

Columbia University

440

Changing paradigm in journals based current awareness services in libraries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current awareness services have been an important service provided by libraries and information centres. With the advent of electronic journals and databases, the current awareness services provided by libraries and information centres are undergoing ... Keywords: Current awareness services, electronic journals, marketing

G. Mahesh; Dinesh Kumar Gupta

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Dehumidification and cooling loads from ventilation air  

SciTech Connect

The importance of controlling humidity in buildings is cause for concern, in part, because of indoor air quality problems associated with excess moisture in air-conditioning systems. But more universally, the need for ventilation air has forced HVAC equipment (originally optimized for high efficiency in removing sensible heat loads) to remove high moisture loads. To assist cooling equipment and meet the challenge of larger ventilation loads, several technologies have succeeded in commercial buildings. Newer technologies such as subcool/reheat and heat pipe reheat show promise. These increase latent capacity of cooling-based systems by reducing their sensible capacity. Also, desiccant wheels have traditionally provided deeper-drying capacity by using thermal energy in place of electrical power to remove the latent load. Regardless of what mix of technologies is best for a particular application, there is a need for a more effective way of thinking about the cooling loads created by ventilation air. It is clear from the literature that all-too-frequently, HVAC systems do not perform well unless the ventilation air loads have been effectively addressed at the original design stage. This article proposes an engineering shorthand, an annual load index for ventilation air. This index will aid in the complex process of improving the ability of HVAC systems to deal efficiently with the amount of fresh air the industry has deemed useful for maintaining comfort in buildings. Examination of typical behavior of weather shows that latent loads usually exceed sensible loads in ventilation air by at least 3:1 and often as much as 8:1. A designer can use the engineering shorthand indexes presented to quickly assess the importance of this fact for a given system design. To size those components after they are selected, the designer can refer to Chapter 24 of the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals, which includes separate values for peak moisture and peak temperature.

Harriman, L.G. III [Mason-Grant, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Plager, D. [Quantitative Decision Support, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Kosar, D. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

443

Impact of clustering in indoor MIMO propagation using a hybrid channel model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The clustering of propagating signals in indoor environments can influence the performance of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems that employ multiple-element antennas at the transmitter and receiver. In order to clarify the effect of clustering ... Keywords: MIMO, Ricean K factor, angle sensitivity, channel efficiency, indoor propagation, ray tracing, signal clusters

Zhongwei Tang; Ananda Sanagavarapu Mohan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Poster: INPRESS: indoor climate prediction and evaluation system for energy efficiency using sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern buildings include an indoor climate control system, installed and operated to maintain a comfortable environment for the building occupants. However, these climate control systems consume a significant amount of energy due to an inefficient control ... Keywords: energy efficiency, indoor climate, sensor network

Jae Yoon Chong; Jinwook Baek; Sukun Kim

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Matchstick: A Room-to-Room Thermal Model for Predicting Indoor Temperature from Wireless Sensor Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matchstick: A Room-to-Room Thermal Model for Predicting Indoor Temperature from Wireless Sensor present a room-to-room thermal model used to accurately predict temperatures in residential buildings. We that our model can predict future indoor temperature trends with a 90th percentile aggregate error between

Hazas, Mike

446

Influence of local geology on the concentration of indoor radon in Maryland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 58,000 indoor radon measurements are available for homes in Maryland. A comparative study between compilations of activated-charcoal and alpha-track measurements of indoor radon in zip-code-size geographic areas indicated that both of these methods are useful and are equally able to estimate regional indoor radon. Indoor radon measurements compiled according to zip code areas can be used to create state-size radon hazard maps. In Maryland the area with the highest indoor radon (mostly composed of zip code areas that average over 8 pCi/L) is the western half of the Piedmont Province and the eastern side of the Coastal Plain Province. The eastern half of the Piedmont and the eastern half of the Valley and Ridge mostly have intermediate and high indoor radon levels (4--8 and >8 pCi/L). The Blue Ridge, western side of the Valley and Ridge, and Plateau Province each has relatively few zip code areas, but the data suggest a range from low to high indoor radon levels. The western side of the Coastal Plain has the lowest indoor radon (most of the zip code areas average less than 4 pCi/L).

Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A Coupled Airflow-and-Energy Simulation Program for Indoor Thermal Environment Studies (RP-927)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Jelena Srebric* Qingyan Chen; Ph.D. Leon R. Glicksman; Ph.D. ASHRAE Student Member ASHRAE Member ASHRAE for thermal comfort (ASHRAE 1992). In an indoor space with radiative, convective, and hybrid heating-and-energy simulation program for indoor thermal environment studies," ASHRAE Transactions, 106(1), 465-476. #12

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

448

Landmarke: an ad hoc deployable ubicomp infrastructure to support indoor navigation of firefighters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor navigation plays a central role for the safety of firefighters. The circumstances in which a firefighting intervention occurs represent a rather complex challenge for the design of supporting technology. In this paper, we present the results of ... Keywords: Ad hoc deployment, Firefighting, Human---computer interaction, Indoor navigation, Mobile ad hoc network, Navigation, Orientation, Sensor networks, Ubiquitous computing, Wearable computing

Leonardo Ramirez; Tobias Dyrks; Jan Gerwinski; Matthias Betz; Markus Scholz; Volker Wulf

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Optical antenna design for indoor optical wireless communication systems: Research Articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper, the design of the non-imaging totally internally reflecting concentrator family denominated optical antennas (OAs) is discussed, and its use for indoor optical wireless communication systems is explained. The lenses presented here ... Keywords: antenna, communications, indoor, infrared, optical, wireless

R. Ramirez-Iniguez; R. J. Green

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Headio: zero-configured heading acquisition for indoor mobile devices through multimodal context sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heading information becomes widely used in ubiquitous computing applications for mobile devices. Digital magnetometers, also known as geomagnetic field sensors, provide absolute device headings relative to the earth's magnetic north. However, magnetometer ... Keywords: ceiling pictures, digital compass, geolocation, heading, indoor locationing, indoor navigation, mobile sensing, orientation, perspective transformation, task scheduling

Zheng Sun, Shijia Pan, Yu-Chi Su, Pei Zhang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Carbon monoxide in indoor ice skating rinks: Evaluation of absorption by adult hockey players  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We evaluated alveolar carbon monoxide (CO) levels of 122 male, adult hockey players active in recreational leagues of the Quebec City region (Canada), before and after 10 weekly 90-minute games in 10 different rinks. We also determined exposure by quantifying the average CO level in the rink during the games. Other variables documented included age, pulmonary function, aerobic capacity, and smoking status. Environmental concentrations varied from 1.6 to 131.5 parts per million (ppm). We examined the absorption/exposure relationship using a simple linear regression model. In low CO exposure levels, physical exercise lowered the alveolar CO concentration. However, we noted that for each 10 ppm of CO in the ambient air, the players had adsorbed enough CO to raise their carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels by 1 percent. This relationship was true both for smokers and non-smokers. We suggest that an average environmental concentration of 20 ppm of CO for the duration of a hockey game (90 minutes) should be reference limit not to be exceeded in indoor skating rinks.

Levesque, B.; Dewailly, E.; Lavoie, R.; Prud'Homme, D.; Allaire, S. (Centre hospitalier de l'Universite Laval, Quebec City (Canada))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Journal of CHEMICAL Health& Safety, 11-12/2006 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Journal of CHEMICAL Health& Safety, 11-122006 Journal of CHEMICAL Health& Safety, 11-122006 Elsivier journal for those subjects doi:10.1016j.jchas.2006.02.003 More Documents &...

453

Microsoft PowerPoint - Book and Journal Forms_v2_wButton.ppt...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Book and Journal Formsv2wButton.ppt Microsoft PowerPoint - Book and Journal Formsv2wButton.ppt Microsoft PowerPoint - Book and Journal Formsv2wButton.ppt More Documents &...

454

International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 5 (2011) 10551064 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 5 (2011) 1055­1064 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control journal homepage: www option in the portfolio of mitigation actions for stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas

Prevost, Jean-Herve

455

Estimation of Channel Impulse Response Using Modified Ceiling Bounce Model in Non-Directed Indoor Optical Wireless Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a modification to the traditional Ceiling bounce model is proposed for use with non-directed indoor optical wireless systems which takes into account the transceiver separation distances as well as their actual positions while computing ... Keywords: Diffuse indoor optical systems, Indoor channel impulse response, Modified Ceiling bounce model

K. Smitha; Arumugam Sivabalan; Joseph John

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: December 16, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The first part of this talk will deal with the project on Energy Consumption and Indoor Environment Problems of Residential Buildings in China, organized by the Architectural Institute of Japan. Prof. Yoshino will discuss the results of project elements, including: 1) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 2) Compilation of weather data for building design based on observed data in China, 3) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 4) Estimation and verification of the effects of various

457

Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. Most US homes have central HVAC systems, which tend to mix the air thus the indoor conditions between zones. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of exposure depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper will report on field measurements using a unique multi-tracer measurement system that has the capacity to measure not only the flow of outdoor air to each zone, but zone-to-zone transport. The paper will derive seven different metrics for the evaluation of air distribution. Measured data from two homes with different levels of natural infiltration will be used to evaluate these metrics for three different ASHRAE Standard 62.2 compliant ventilation systems. Such information can be used to determine the effectiveness of different systems so that appropriate adjustments can be made in residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. [FTA 2006] U.S. Non-Rail Vehicle Market ViabilityWelding BART’s Aluminum Rail Transit Cars, Welding JournalAutomobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air Mikhail

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Using LED Lighting for Ubiquitous Indoor Wireless Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Wireless networking is currently dominated by radio frequency (RF) techniques. However, the soon-to-be ubiquity of LED-based lighting motivated by significant energy savings provides an opportunistic deployment of widespread free-space optical (FSO) communications. LEDbased network transceivers have a variety of competitive advantages over RF including high bandwidth density, security, energy consumption, and aesthetics. They also use a highly reusable unregulated part of the spectrum (visible light). In this paper we describe results from a pilot project to demonstrate the viability of an optical free-space visible light transceiver as a basis for indoor wireless networking. Inexpensive, commercial, off-the shelf LEDs and photodiodes we used to construct two prototypes; a simplex channel as expected as a component of an asymmetric/hybrid RF-FSO system, and a full-duplex channel demonstrating the ability to isolate multiple channels. On— off keying (OOK) was applied without observable flicker in the target modulation ranges. Results indicate the viability of creating inexpensive FSO transceivers that might be embedded in commercial lighting products to support ceiling-to-floor distances of approximately 3m. Index Terms—Wireless networking, indoor communications, free-space optical communications, visible light LED, modulation, OOK, FSO. 1 I.

T. D. C. Little; P. Dib; K. Shah; N. Barraford; B. Gallagher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Supercomputers: Super-polluters? Datacenters Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes: · Free Cooling - Free cooling is the use of outside air- or water-side cooling via cooling towers and $112.7 million. These values are for the IT equipment only, i.e. excluding cooling. 1 Wehner, M, L--would not be unusual for a contemporary supercomputing facility. Meanwhile, rising cooling demand is driving the up

Lee, Jason R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Air Distribution Systems and Cross-Infection Risk in the Hospital Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Distribution Systems and Cross-Infection Risk in the Hospital Sector Air Distribution Systems and Cross-Infection Risk in the Hospital Sector Speaker(s): Peter V. Nielsen Date: November 28, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Rongxin Yin We protect ourselves from airborne cross-infection in the indoor environment by supplying fresh air to the room by natural or mechanical ventilation. The air is distributed in the room according to different principles as e.g. mixing ventilation, downward ventilation, displacement ventilation, etc. A large amount of air is supplied to the room to ensure dilution of airborne infection. The talk discusses both the macroenvironment and the microenvironment. The macroenvironment is the conditions created by the air distribution system, and the microenvironment is the conditions created by the local flow around persons in combination

462

Khounsary Named Associate Editor of ASME Journal of Heat Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Science with the APS Superconducting Undulator New Science with the APS Superconducting Undulator Young of XSD Named Associate Editor of New Journal "Structural Dynamics" The Daguerreotype and the X-ray: A Deep Look Questions Rise about Seeding For Ocean C02 Sequestration X-ray Method Shows How Frog Embryos Could Help Thwart Disease APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Khounsary Named Associate Editor of ASME Journal of Heat Transfer October 22, 2013 Bookmark and Share Ali Khounsary Ali Khounsary of the APS Engineering Support Division has been appointed as an Associate Editor of the ASME Journal of Heat Transfer. The Journal of Heat Transfer, in publication since 1879, "disseminates information of permanent interest in the areas of heat and mass transfer.

463

Online Journal for E&P Geoscientists | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Online Journal for E&P Geoscientists Citation AAPG Data PagesSearch and...

464

Toward an interactive article: integrating journals and biological databases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. New entities and ambiguities are discovered and resolved by a database curator through a manual quality control (QC) step, along with help from authors via a web form that is provided to them by the journal. New entities discovered through...

Rangarajan, Arun; Schedl, Tim; Yook, Karen; Chan, Juancarlos; Haenel, Stephen; Otis, Lolly; Faelten, Sharon; DePellegrin-Connelly, Tracey; Isaacson, Ruth; Skrzypek, Marek S; Cherry, J M; Sternberg, Paul W; Muller, Hans-Michael

2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

465

Journal Sources | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

journal literature in disciplines relevant to the DOE R&D mission: U.S. Department of Energy Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science (DOE PAGES) - DOE PAGES provides web access...

466

AGU: Journal of Geophysical Research geomagnetic ionosphere currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGU: Journal of Geophysical Research Keywords geomagnetic ionosphere currents Index Terms Ionosphere: Polar cap ionosphere Ionosphere: Current systems Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism: Rapid time variations Space Weather: Impacts on technological systems Space Weather: Geomagnetically induced currents

Michigan, University of

467

Publication Trends in American Meteorological Society Technical Journals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some statistical measures of growth of American Meteorological Society technical journals have been compiled. A general upward trend in total number of articles, pages, and an increase (nearly doubling during the past 20 years) in the average ...

Richard H. Johnson; Wayne H. Schubert

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Optimal Terminal Box Control for Single Duct Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Terminal boxes maintain room temperature by modulating supply air temperature and airflow in building HVAC systems. Terminal boxes with conventional control sequences often supply inadequate airflow to a conditioned space, resulting in occupant discomfort, or provide excessive airflow that wastes significant reheat energy. In this study, an optimal terminal box airflow control sequence was developed to improve indoor ventilation and reduce energy consumption. The developed control sequence was applied in an office building air conditioning system. Improvements in indoor thermal comfort and energy reduction were verified through measurement. The results show that the optimal control sequence can stably maintain thermal environment, satisfy comfort standards and reduce energy consumption compared to the conventional control sequence.

Cho, Y.; Vondal, J.; Wang, G.; Liu, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Search of medical literature for indoor carbon monoxide exposure  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a literature search on carbon monoxide. The search was limited to the medical and toxicological databases at the National Library of Medicine (MEDLARS). The databases searched were Medline, Toxline and TOXNET. Searches were performed using a variety of strategies. Combinations of the following keywords were used: carbon, monoxide, accidental, residential, occult, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, heating, furnace, and indoor. The literature was searched from 1966 to the present. Over 1000 references were identified and summarized using the following abbreviations: The major findings of the search are: (1) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide exposures result in a large number of symptoms affecting the brain, kidneys, respiratory system, retina, and motor functions. (2) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings have been misdiagnosed on many occasions. (3) Very few systematic investigations have been made into the frequency and consequences of carbon monoxide poisonings.

Brennan, T.; Ivanovich, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Directory of selected tropical forestry journals and newsletters  

SciTech Connect

Heightened public and professional interest in tropical forestry has led in recent years to a large increase in the volume of information produced on the subject. The directory catalogues and describes 473 tropical forestry periodicals, ranging from scientific journals to informal newsletters. Entries are arranged alphabetically and provide information on each journals focus, audience, language, frequency of publication, availability, and cost, as well as address, and telephone, fax, and telex number. Includes subject, geographic, and language indexes.

Haugen, C.; Durst, P.B.; Freed, E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Indoor Environmental Quality Benefits of Apartment Energy Retrofits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley National Laboratory; 2011. 18 ASHRAE. Chapter 9 Thermal comfort. 2009 ASHRAE handbook - fundamentals. Atlanta: American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air...

472

Energy and indoor environmental quality in relocatable classrooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the IDEC include continuous outside air ventilation at ?7.5 L s-1 per person, 70% less cooling energy and efficient particle filtration. Measurements include: carbon dioxide,...

473

Preventing Indoor Environment-Related Symptom Complaints in Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation, maintenance, or management)? • Why do youScheduled maintenance of outdoor air system Management ofmaintenance, repair, replacement, housekeeping) Behavioral/organizational (management

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Toward alternative metrics of journal impact: a comparison of download and citation data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We generated networks of journal relationships from citation and download data, and determined journal impact rankings from these networks using a set of social network centrality metrics. The resulting journal impact rankings were compared to the ISI ... Keywords: digital libraries, impact metrics, journal impact ranking, social network analysis, usage analysis

Johan Bollen; Herbert Van de Sompel; Joan A. Smith; Rick Luce

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Toward alternative metrics of journal impact: A comparison of download and citation data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We generated networks of journal relationships from citation and download data, and determined journal impact rankings from these networks using a set of social network centrality metrics. The resulting journal impact rankings were compared to the ISI ... Keywords: Digital libraries, Impact metrics, Journal impact ranking, Social network analysis, Usage analysis

Johan Bollen; Herbert Van de Sompel; Joan A. Smith; Rick Luce

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Microsoft PowerPoint - Book and Journal Forms_v2_wButton.ppt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Library Journal Article Request Form for an Inter-Library Loan Requestor: Name*: Organization Code*: Phone*: ...

477

Air Pollution (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for monitoring air pollution, methods for permit applications, emission limitations for pollutants and air quality standards.

478

Coupling of a multizone airflow simulation program with computational fluid dynamics for indoor environmental analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current design of building indoor environment comprises macroscopIC approaches, such as CONT AM multizone airflow analysis tool, and microscopic approaches that apply Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Each has certain ...

Gao, Yang, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

A web-based POE tool for measuring indoor environmental quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Windsor 2004 A Web-based POE Tool for Measuring IndoorBerkeley, has developed a Web-based survey that can quicklypiece of successful POEs. Web-based surveys can quickly and

Zagreus, Leah; Huizenga, Charlie; Arens, Edward

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

A Markov model for dynamic behavior of ToA-based ranging in indoor localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of undetected direct path (UDP) conditions causes occurrence of unexpected large random ranging errors which pose a serious challenge to precise indoor localization using time of arrival (ToA). Therefore, analysis of the behavior of the ...

Mohammad Heidari; Kaveh Pahlavan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "journal indoor air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Accurate simulation of 802.11 indoor links: a “bursty” channel model based on real measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel channel model to be used for simulating indoor wireless propagation environments. An extensive measurement campaign was carried out to assess the performance of different transport protocols over 802.11 links. This enabled us to better ...

Ramón Agüero; Marta García-Arranz; Luis Muñoz

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Review of air flow measurement techniques  

SciTech Connect

Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

McWilliams, Jennifer

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

CFD Simulation and Analysis of the Combined Evaporative Cooling and Radiant Ceiling Air-conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to such disadvantages as large air duct and high energy consumption of the current all- outdoor air evaporative cooling systems used in the dry region of Northwest China, as well as the superiority of the ceiling cooling system in improving thermal comfort and saving energy, a combined system is presented in this paper. It combines an evaporative cooling system with ceiling cooling, in which the evaporative cooling system handles the entire latent load and one part of the sensible loads, and the ceiling cooling system deals with the other part of sensible loads in the air-conditioned zone, so that the condensation on radiant panels and the insufficiency of cooling capacity can be avoided. The cooling water at 18? used in the cooling coils of ceiling cooling system can be ground water, tap water or the cooled water from cooling towers in the summer. This new air-conditioning system and existing all- outdoor air evaporative cooling system are applied to a project in the city of Lanzhou. Energy consumption analysis of the building is carried out using the energy consumption code. Velocity and temperature distribution in the air-conditioned zone is computed using CFD. According to the results, the energy consumption and indoor human thermal comfort of both systems are then compared. It is concluded that the new system occupies less building space, reduces energy consumption, improves indoor human thermal comfort and saves initial investment.

Xiang, H.; Yinming, L.; Junmei, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for airborne fine particles (PM2.5) are based on the mass of PM2.5 measured at outdoor monitoring stations; however, most people spend the majority of their time indoors. In order to fully understand the relationship between ambient PM2.5 and human health effects, it is important to define how ambient PM2.5 concentrations and compositions compare to those actually breathed by humans during normal daily activities. The objective of SCAMP is to measure the concentrations of PM2.5 and other potential air pollutants at ambient monitoring stations in and around Steubenville, OH, and relate them to the pollutant concentrations in air that is actually breathed by people living in the area. Steubenville was chosen by DOE for this study because of the ability to integrate its results with those of the UORVP, and also because Steubenville was one of the six cities where correlations between ambient PM2.5 mass and adverse health effects had been noted. These correlations had been cited by EPA as one of the primary justifications for its 1997 ambient PM2.5 standards. Complete characterization of the relationships between ambient PM2.5 and human exposure, including the chemical components of PM2.5 at various locations, will provide a comprehensive database for use in subsequent epidemiological studies, long-range transport studies, and State Implementation Program development. CONSOL Energy is the primary performer of SCAMP, and will provide the necessary coordination and data integration between the various components of the study.

485

Influence of Air Conditioner Operation on Electricity Use and Peak Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity demand due to occupant controlled room air conditioners in a large mater-metered apartment building is analyzed. Hourly data on the electric demand of the building and of individual air conditioners are used in analyses of annual and time-of-day peaks. Effects of occupant schedules and behavior are examined. We conclude that room air conditioners cause a sharp annual peak demand because occupants have strongly varying thresholds with respect to toleration of high indoor temperatures. However, time-or-day peaking is smoothed by air conditioning in this building due to significant off-peak operation of air conditioners by some occupants. If occupants were billed directly for electricity, off-peak use would probably diminish making the peaks more pronounced and exacerbating the utility company's load management problems. Future studies of this type in individually metered apartment buildings are recommended.

McGarity, A. E.; Feuermann, D.; Kempton, W.; Norford, L. K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ventilation requires energy to transport and condition the incoming air. The energy consumption for ventilation in residential buildings depends on the ventilation rate required to maintain an acceptable indoor air quality. Historically, U.S. residential buildings relied on natural infiltration to provide sufficient ventilation, but as homes get tighter, designed ventilation systems are more frequently required particularly for new energy efficient homes and retrofitted homes. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 is used to specify the minimum ventilation rate required in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however, alternative methods may be used to provide the required ventilation when their air quality equivalency has been proven. One appealing method is the use of passive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings and are often used in ventilation regulations in other countries. Passive stacks are appealing because they require no fans or electrical supply (which could lead to lower cost) and do not require maintenance (thus being more robust and reliable). The downside to passive stacks is that there is little control of ventilation air flow rates because they rely on stack and wind effects that depend on local time-varying weather. In this study we looked at how passive stacks might be used in different California climates and investigated control methods that can be used to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The results showed that passive stacks can be used to provide acceptable indoor air quality per ASHRAE 62.2 with the potential to save energy provided that they are sized appropriately and flow controllers are used to limit over-ventilation.

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Deshusses and Webster Volume 50 November 2000 Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 1947  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, these costs are removed and GAC usage or natural gas costs are added to the numbers of Table 6. For direct as environmental regulation is becoming increasingly stringent in the United States. The technique uses the ability types of gas-phase bioreactors can be distinguished. Biofilters are reactors in which a humid polluted

488

Deshusses, Johnson, and Leson Volume 49 August 1999 Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 973  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- able medium and a mixture of wood chips and compost. Both were exposed to varying mixtures of ethyl (medium B) mixed from compost and polystyrene spheres (Bioton). Calcium carbonate (lime- stone) for p , comparable to values reported for other, compost-based, biofilter systems.7 Consistent with previously

489

Analysis of the Energy-Saving Potential of a Three-Rotary Wheel Fresh Air-Handling Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To evaluate the energy-saving potential of a proposed three-rotary wheel fresh air-handling unit (TRWFAHU), it is numerically simulated with weather data of Changsha by using a mathematical model. Compared with a conventional fresh air-handling unit, TRWFAHU can save 10.2% of primary energy and greatly decrease the energy consumption of chiller. If waste heat is available for regenerating the desiccant, the system can achieve greater energy savings. It is feasible to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) by increasing ventilation while without increasing energy consumption.

Hao, X.; Zhang, G.; Zou, S.; Liu, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Evaluating Indoor Location Tracking Systems in a Nuclear Facility: Experimentation with Different Techniques in an Industrial Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document details how different kinds of indoor geolocalization systems perform when used in nuclear power plants and similar complex industrial environments.BackgroundIndoor location tracking systems can help to ensure worker safety. Over the past several years, indoor geolocalization capabilities have improved, and several technology options now exist. However, these new technologies have to be carefully evaluated in an industrial setting in order for ...

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

491

RADON AND ALDEHYDE CONCENTRATIONS IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Changes per Hour * Heat exchanger on timing cycle: 0.8 Aphases: Phase A when the heat exchanger was generally notand Phase B when a heat exchanger was operating. As

Moschandreas, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Metal-Air Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z