Sample records for joseph hatchery program

  1. EIS-0384: Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's approach and associated impacts of a comprehensive management program for summer/fall Chinook salmon in the Okanogan subbasin and the Columbia River between the confluence of the Okanogan River and Chief Joseph Dam including construction, operation, and maintenance of a hatchery and acclimation ponds.

  2. HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN Hatchery Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN (HGMP) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency-Arriving Summer/Fall Chinook 97 Table B.5 Tribal Incidental Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 98 Upper Columbia River

  3. HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN Hatchery Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN (HGMP) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 44 Upper Columbia River Steelhead Table 4. Tribal & Recreational Incidental Take Thresholds 45 for Unmarked Spring Chinook Table 5. Estimated Carrying Capacity of Natural

  4. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho).

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

  5. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Redding, Jeremy (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2004, twenty-seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Traps on Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery intercepted one and four adults, respectively. Additionally, one adult sockeye salmon was collected at the East Fork Salmon River weir, 18 were seined from below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir, one adult sockeye salmon was observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir but not captured, and two adult sockeye salmon were observed in Little Redfish Lake but not captured. Fish were captured/collected between July 24 and September 14, 2004. The captured/collected adult sockeye salmon (12 females and 12 males) originated from a variety of release strategies and were transferred to Eagle Fish Hatchery on September 14, 2004 and later incorporated into hatchery spawn matrices. Nine anadromous females, 102 captive females from brood year 2001, and one captive female from brood year 2000 broodstock groups were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2004. Spawn pairings produced approximately 140,823 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 72.8%. Eyed-eggs (49,134), presmolts (130,716), smolts (96), and adults (241) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 2004. Reintroduction strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and five unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (Oxbow Fish Hatchery) facilities. Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2004 spawning design.

  6. Appendix 50 Creston National Fish Hatchery: Hatchery and Genetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to take individuals from wild stocks. 1.9) List of program "Performance Standards." 1. Provide predictable VERSION (HGMP-RF) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency/Operator: Watershed and Region: Date Submitted: Date Last Updated: Hatchery Program: Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Mitigation

  7. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2001 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2001, 26 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Basin. Twenty-three of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Three of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on October 12, 2001). Nine anadromous adults were incorporated into the captive broodstock program spawning design in 2001. The remaining adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Two sockeye salmon females from the anadromous group and 152 females from the brood year 1998 captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2001. Spawn pairings produced approximately 118,121 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 42.0%. Presmolts (106,166), smolts (13,915), and adults (79) were planted or released into Stanley Basin waters in 2001. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery). Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2001 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  8. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. n 2002, 22 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Fifteen of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Seven of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on September 30, 2002). All adult returns were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Sixty-six females from brood year 1999 and 28 females from brood year 2000 captive broodstock groups were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2002. Spawn pairings produced approximately 65,838 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 55.1%. Presmolts (140,410), smolts (38,672), and adults (190) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 2002. Reintroduction strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and three unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery). Three of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2002 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  9. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Dan J,; Heindel, Jeff A.; Kline, Paul A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 1999 are presented in this report. In 1999, seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley and were captured at the adult weir located on the upper Salmon River. Four anadromous adults were incorporated in the captive broodstock program spawning design for year 1999. The remaining three adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. All seven adults were adipose and left ventral fin-clipped, indicating hatchery origin. One sockeye salmon female from the anadromous group and 81 females from the captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1999. Spawn pairings produced approximately 63,147 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed-stage of development averaging 38.97%. Eyed-eggs (20,311), presmolts (40,271), smolts (9,718), and adults (21) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 1999. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, upper Salmon River (below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir), Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and three production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1999 spawning design and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  10. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Paul A.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Willard, Catherine (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 1997 are presented in this report. One hundred twenty-six female sockeye salmon from one captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1997. Successful spawn pairings produced approximately 148,781 eyed-eggs with a cumulative mean survival to eyed-egg rate of 57.3%. Approximately 361,600 sockeye salmon were released to Sawtooth basin waters in 1997. Reintroduction strategies included eyed-eggs (brood year 1997), presmolts (brood year 1996), and prespawn adults for volitional spawning (brood year 1994). Release locations included Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1997 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  11. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program : Hatchery Element : Annual Progress Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000 are presented in this report.

  12. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  13. August 1993 INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 1993 INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM OPERATION PLANS FOR ANADROMOUS FISH PRODUCTION.S. Department of Energy, as part of BPA's program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected as follows: Shelldrake, Tom, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Hatcheries, Integrated Hatchery Operations Team

  14. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

  15. EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EIS that will assess potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho to construct and operate a hatchery for spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Salmon River subbasin and Yellowstone cutthroat trout in the Upper Snake River subbasin on Fort Hall Reservation.

  16. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Umatilla County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

  17. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

  18. Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, Duane D. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement of Work Report (SOW), which includes sub-categories Work Element (WE), and within the WE the Milestone Titles.

  19. Superconducting Magnets Research for a Viable US Fusion Program Joseph V. Minervini and Miklos Porkolab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconducting Magnets Research for a Viable US Fusion Program Joseph V rely on superconducting magnets for efficient and reliable production of these magnetic fields. Superconducting magnet technology is a powerful knob

  20. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be of sufficient quality and quantity to meet specific monitoring and evaluation goals and objectives outlines in the 2002 statement of work (SOW).

  1. Superconducting Magnets Research for a Viable US Fusion Program Joseph V. Minervini1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In the meantime, the world's most experienced and prodigious magnet scientists and engineers have retired or leftSuperconducting Magnets Research for a Viable US Fusion Program Joseph V. Minervini1 , Leslie Bromberg1 , Peter J. Lee2 , David C. Larbalestier2 , Introduction Magnet systems

  2. Hatchery Evaluation Report / Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Teams (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Montgomery

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Fall Chinook). The audit is being conducted as a requirement of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) ``Strategy for Salmon`` and the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Under the audit, the hatcheries are evaluated against policies and related performance measures developed by the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT). IHOT is a multi-agency group established by the NPPC to direct the development of new basinwide standards for managing and operating fish hatcheries. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  3. Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

  4. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

  5. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

    2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

  6. Puget Sound Hatcheries Draft EIS S-1 July 2014 Draft Environmental Impact Statement on Two Joint State and Tribal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puget Sound Hatcheries Draft EIS S-1 July 2014 Draft Environmental Impact Statement on Two Joint State and Tribal Resource Management Plans for Puget Sound Salmon and Steelhead Hatchery Programs Introduction Salmon and steelhead have been produced in Puget Sound hatcheries since the late 1800s

  7. Joseph Hughes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Joseph Hughes is a Project Officer with the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  8. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Montgomery

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  9. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan, Technical Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashe, Becky L.; Concannon, Kathleen; Johnson, David B.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spring chinook salmon populations in the Imnaha and Grande Ronde rivers are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are at high risk of extirpation. The Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, are co-managers of conservation/restoration programs for Imnaha and Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon that use hatchery supplementation and conventional and captive broodstock techniques. The immediate goal of these programs is to prevent extirpation and provide the potential for restoration once factors limiting production are addressed. These programs redirect production occurring under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) from mitigation to conservation and restoration. Both the Imnaha and Grande Ronde conservation/restoration programs are described in ESA Section 10 permit applications and the co-managers refer to the fish production from these programs as the Currently Permitted Program (CPP). Recently, co-managers have determined that it is impossible to produce the CPP at Lookingglass Hatchery, the LSRCP facility intended for production, and that without additional facilities, production must be cut from these conservation programs. Development of new facilities for these programs through the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program is considered a new production initiative by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and requires a master plan. The master plan provides the NPPC, program proponents and others with the information they need to make sound decisions about whether the proposed facilities to restore salmon populations should move forward to design. This master plan describes alternatives considered to meet the facility needs of the CPP so the conservation program can be fully implemented. Co-managers considered three alternatives: modify Lookingglass Hatchery; use existing facilities elsewhere in the Basin; and use new facilities in conjunct ion with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. Each alternative was evaluated based on criteria developed for rearing fish for a conservation program. After this review, the Nez Perce Tribe determined the only alternative that meets the needs of the program is the alternative to use new facilities in conjunction with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. This is the Proposed Alternative. The Proposed Alternative would require: Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Imnaha River and modifications of the existing Gumboot facility to accommodate the Imnaha component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Lostine River to accommodate the Lostine component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; and Modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery to accommodate the Upper Grande Ronde and Catherine Creek components of the Lookingglass Hatchery production. After an extensive screening process of potential sites, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes the Marks Ranch site on the Imnaha River and the Lundquist site on the Lostine River for new facilities. Conceptual design and cost estimates of the proposed facilities are contained in this master plan. The proposed facilities on the Imnaha and Lostine rivers would be managed in conjunction with the existing adult collection and juvenile acclimation/release facilities. Because this master plan has evolved into an endeavor undertaken primarily by the Nez Perce Tribe, the focus of the document is on actions within the Imnaha and Lostine watersheds where the Nez Perce Tribe have specific co-management responsibilities. Nevertheless, modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery could make it possible to provide a quality rearing environment for the remainder of the CPP. The Nez Perce Tribe will assist co-managers in further evaluating facility needs and providing other components of the NPPC master planning process to develop a solution for the entire CPP. Although the fish production for the conservation programs is already authorized and not at issue in this master pla

  10. Microsoft Word - CX-ChiefJosephPHspacers_WEB.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Corinn Castro Program Manager - TELM-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Replace spacer dampers along the Chief Joseph PH-Chief Joseph No. 6...

  11. Physiological Assessment of Wild and Hatchery Juvenile Salmonids : Final Report, 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Donald A.; Beckman, Brian R.; Dickhoff, Walton W.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally held that hatchery-reared salmonids are of inferior quality and have lower smolt-to-adult survival compared to naturally-reared salmon. The overall objectives of the work performed under this contract were the following: (1) Characterize the physiology and development of naturally rearing juvenile salmonids to: (2) Allow for the design of effective rearing programs for producing wild-like smolts in supplementation and production hatchery programs. (3) Examine the relationship between growth rate and size on the physiology and migratory performance of fish reared in hatchery programs. (4) Examine the interaction of rearing temperature and feed rate on the growth and smoltification of salmon for use in producing a more wild-like smolt in hatchery programs.

  12. anadromous salmonid hatcheries: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydraulic Engineer 2 INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM OPERATION PLANS FOR ANADROMOUS FISH Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants Websites Summary: INTEGRATED HATCHERY...

  13. Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  14. Lynch Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, M.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  15. Joseph Metzger

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as Ready for(SC)Joint GenomeJonJoseph Metzger About

  16. Joseph Metzger

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as Ready for(SC)Joint GenomeJonJoseph Metzger

  17. Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Policies and Procedures for Columbia Basin Anadromous Salmonid Hatcheries, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (Northwest Power Planning Council, Portland, OR)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines regional policies and procedures for hatchery operations in the Columbia River Basin. The purpose of these policies is to provide regional guidelines by which all anadromous fish hatcheries will be operated. These policies will be adopted by the fisheries co-managers, and will provide guidance to operate hatcheries in an efficient and biologically sound manner. The hatchery policies presented in this manual are not intended to establish production priorities. Rather, the intent is to guide hatchery operations once production numbers are established. Hatchery operations discussed in this report include broodstock collection, spawning, incubation of eggs, fish rearing and feeding, fish release, equipment maintenance and operations, and personnel training. Decisions regarding production priorities must be provided by fishery managers through a comprehensive plan that addresses both natural and hatchery fish production. The Integrated Hatchery Operations Team is a multi-agency group called for by the Northwest Power Planning Council. This team was directed to develop new basinwide policies for managing and operating all existing and future anadromous fish hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. The parties pledge to confer with each other and to use their authorities and resources to accomplish these mutually acceptable hatchery practices.

  18. Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Joseph...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Joseph Mondloch Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Joseph Mondloch Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Joseph Mondloch poster presentation....

  19. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

  20. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

  1. PACIFIC SALMON Hatchery Propagation and Its Role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and shop, cold storage and food preparation, and the hatching building. The waste-water channel back AND WILDLIFE SERVICE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR #12;Abstract Population growth and industrial in The hatchery building 42 Troughs 42 Food preparation 44 Food storage 45 Rearing ponds 46 Trapping adult salmon

  2. HARD CLAM HYBRIDS FOR FLORIDAAQUACULTURE: HATCHERY CULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    . Larvae culture was performed in 400L tanks using standard hard clam hatchery protocols: water changed daily, fed once daily at 50-100K cells T- ISO/mL, salinity 30 ppt, temp 24-28oC (Fig 2a). Setting T-ISO and the diatom Chaetoceros sp. and water changed every other day. Tissue (gill, mantle, and

  3. Joseph M. Juran Team Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardeman, Stephen B.

    Joseph M. Juran I E 361 Fall 2002 Team Members: Dragui Nestorovic Gonzalo Rodriguez Monica Kroh Jaroslav Sebek #12;Introduction Joseph M. Juran has led a life of success and accomplishments. Using his. Background Joseph M. Juran was born in Brailia, Romania, during December of 1904. When Joseph was five years

  4. Hatchery Evaluation Report/Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead : an Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Montgomery.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of tall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  5. Hatchery Evaluation Report/Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Spring Chinook : an Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Montgomery.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Spring Chinook). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead. and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  6. Joseph J. Krol

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Joseph J. Krol, Rear Admiral, United States Navy (Retired), is the Associate Administrator for NNSA's Office of Emergency Operations. In this role, he is the director of the Office of Emergency...

  7. SAFS-UW-1001 Abundance of Adult Hatchery and Wild

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    SAFS-UW-1001 July 2010 Abundance of Adult Hatchery and Wild Salmon by Region of the North Pacific Moore Foundation #12;Hatchery and Wild Salmon Abundance Page ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 1 Approaches to estimating wild salmon spawner abundances......................................... 1

  8. Microsoft Word - XX 13 Colville Tribe to celebrate opening of Chief Joseph Hatchery - EDITSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data Show Filtration8, 2011HanfordWoody463 13

  9. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairgrieve, William; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colville Tribal Hatchery produced 62,335 pounds of trout during the contract period, however, only 46,092 pounds were liberated to lakes and streams. The remaining production will be carried over to 2004 to be planted as larger fish into reservation waters for the lakes opener. New raceways were completed in November and brought on line in the spring. These raceways currently hold the redband rainbow brood stock and will be spawned in 2004. Efforts are continuing to capture redbands from other streams in coordination with the monitoring and evaluation program. Creel was expanded by hiring a second creel clerk to give better coverage of reservation waters by reducing travel time. Marking continues on all fish planted from CTH and refinements continue to be made. The first tag retention study has been completed and the second study is now underway to determine long term tag recognition. Lakes continue to be surveyed to complete the baseline analysis of all reservation lakes and will be completed in 2004.

  10. Natural Reproductive Success and Demographic Effects of Hatchery-Origin Steelhead in Abernathy Creek, Washington : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Abernathy Fish Technology Center

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many hatchery programs for steelhead pose genetic or ecological risks to natural populations because those programs release or outplant fish from non-native stocks. The goal of many steelhead programs has been to simply provide 'fishing opportunities' with little consideration given to conservation concerns. For example, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has widely propagated and outplanted one stock of winter-run steelhead (Chambers Creek stock) and one stock of summer-run steelhead (Skamania stock) throughout western Washington. Biologists and managers now recognize potential negative effects can occur when non-native hatchery fish interact biologically with native populations. Not only do non-native stocks pose genetic and ecological risks to naturally spawning populations, but non-native fish stray as returning adults at a much higher rate than do native fish (Quinn 1993). Biologists and managers also recognize the need to (a) maintain the genetic resources associated with naturally spawning populations and (b) restore or recover natural populations wherever possible. As a consequence, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the NOAA Fisheries have been recommending a general policy that discourages the use of non-native hatchery stocks and encourages development of native broodstocks. There are two primary motivations for these recommendations: (1) reduce or minimize potential negative biological effects resulting from genetic or ecological interactions between hatchery-origin and native-origin fish and (2) use native broodstocks as genetic repositories to potentially assist with recovery of naturally spawning populations. A major motivation for the captive-rearing work described in this report resulted from NOAA's 1998 Biological Opinion on Artificial Propagation in the Columbia River Basin. In that biological opinion (BO), NOAA concluded that non-native hatchery stocks of steelhead jeopardize the continued existence of U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed, naturally spawning populations in the Columbia River Basin. As a consequence of that BO, NOAA recommended - as a reasonable and prudent alternative (RPA) - that federal and state agencies phase out non-native broodstocks of steelhead and replace them with native broodstocks. However, NOAA provided no guidance on how to achieve that RPA. The development of native broodstocks of hatchery steelhead can potentially pose unacceptable biological risks to naturally spawning populations, particularly those that are already listed as threatened or endangered under the ESA. The traditional method of initiating new hatchery broodstocks of anadromous salmonid fishes is by trapping adults during their upstream, spawning migration. However, removing natural-origin adults from ESA listed populations may not be biologically acceptable because such activities may further depress those populations via 'broodstock mining'. In addition, trapping adult steelhead may be logistically unfeasible in many subbasins due to high water flows in the spring, when steelhead are moving upstream to spawn, that will often 'blow out' temporary weirs. Additional risks associated with trapping adults include genetic founder effects and difficulties meeting minimum, genetic effective number of breeders without 'mining' the wild population to potential extinction. As a result, alternative methods for developing native broodstocks are highly desired. One alternative for developing native broodstocks, particularly when the collection of adults is logistically unfeasible or biologically unacceptable, is captive rearing of natural-origin juveniles to sexual maturity. In this approach, pre-smolt juveniles are collected from the stream or watershed for which a native broodstock is desired, and those juveniles are raised to sexual maturity in a hatchery. Those hatchery-reared adults then become the broodstock source for gametes and initial progeny releases. Such a captive rearing program offers many genetic advantages over traditional adult-trapping programs for developing native

  11. Joseph Vance Building, The

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Seattle, WA In 2006, the Rose Smart Growth Investment Fund acquired the historic Joseph Vance Building with the purpose of transforming it into "the leading green and historic class B" building in the marketplace. The terra cotta Vance Building was constructed in 1929 and has 14 floors - 13 floors of offices over ground-floor retail with a basement for mechanical equipment and storage. In 2009 the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) awarded the Vance Building LEED for Existing Buildings (EB) Gold certification.

  12. ISAB Artificial Production Review Report 3 Recommendations for the Design of Hatchery Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...................................................................................................2 Monitoring for Type 1 Information - Details of Fish Culture Practices Inside the Hatchery......................................................................................................................3 Monitoring Type 2 Information - Survival and Contribution to Harvest of Hatchery Fish after.........................................................................................................6 Monitoring Type 3 Information - The Effects of Released Hatchery Fish on the Ecosystem

  13. Wenatchee Subbasin Plan Hatchery Information for Subbasin Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the final salmon and steelhead 4(d) rule (July 10, 2000; 65 FR 42422) as a mechanism for addressing the take take permits. Completed HGMPs may also be used for regional fish production and management planning that enhance depressed stocks of wild anadromous salmonids through hatchery supplementation, reduction

  14. Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT tag was recorded along with a measurement of length, a determination of sex, and a scale sample. The returns to the hatchery rack were adjusted for any sport and tribal harvest to provide an estimate of total return to the hatchery. Adult and jack return data from return years 1997 through 1999 are covered in this status report. Only the returns from the 1996 migration year are complete. A very low overall average of 0.136% survival rate from Lower Granite Dam and back to Lower Granite Dam was estimated for the 1996 migrants. The outcome expected for the 1997 migrants is much better. With one year of returns still to come, the overall average Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite Dam survival rate is 0.666%, with the McCall Hatchery and Imnaha Hatchery fish already producing return rates in excess of 1%. With 635 returning adults (plus jacks) from the 1997 migration year detected at Lower Granite Dam to date, and one additional year of returns to come, there will be a large sample size for statistically testing differences in transportation versus in- river survival rates next year. From the conduct of this study over a series of years, in addition to obtaining estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates, we should be able to investigate what factors may be causing differences in survival rates among the various hatchery stocks used in this study.

  15. Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluff, Stanley

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No Annual Production Goals were achieved for the year. The Kalispel Hatchery experienced two episodes of brood fish mortality. The first due to a standpipe malfunction and the second attributed to gas bubble disease caused by elevated Total Dissolved Gases (TDG's) in the reservoir. To date, the hatchery has 29 brood fish in the raceway and ready to spawn. If all things go well this spring, hatchery operations should be well underway next year.

  16. Kalispel Resident Fish Project- Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalispel Tribe, Department of Natural Resources

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1996, construction activities commenced on a largemouth bass hatchery located on the Kalispel Indian Reservation. The major construction activities were complete as of October 1997. Of the six objectives identified in the 1997 Annual Operating Plan two objectives were fully achieved: the assembly of the life support system, and the preparation of the hatchery Operations and Maintenance Manual. The remaining four objectives were not fully achieved due to the hatchery not being completed before the spawning season (spring).

  17. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Progam; Thyroid-Induced Chemical Imprinting in Early Life Stages and Assessment of Smoltification in Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1993 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Galloway, Heather; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, two hatcheries were built to provide a kokanee salmon and rainbow trout fishery for Lake Roosevelt as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead caused by construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Sherman Creek Hatchery, located on a tributary of Lake Roosevelt to provide an egg collection and imprinting site, is small with limited rearing capability. The second hatchery was located on the Spokane Indian Reservation because of a spring water source that supplied cold, pure water for incubating and rearing eggs.`The Spokane Tribal Hatchery thus serves as the production facility. Fish reared there are released into Sherman Creek and other tributary streams as 7-9 month old fry. However, to date, returns of adult fish to release sites has been poor. If hatchery reared kokanee imprint to the hatchery water at egg or swim up stages before 3 months of age, they may not be imprinting as 7-9 month old fry at the time of stocking. In addition, if these fish undergo a smolt phase in the reservoir when they are 1.5 years old, they could migrate below Grand Coulee Dam and out of the Lake Roosevelt system. In the present investigation, which is part of the Lake Roosevelt monitoring program to assess hatchery effectiveness, kokanee salmon were tested to determine if they experienced thyroxine-induced chemical imprinting and smoltification similar to anadromous salmonids. Determination of the critical period for olfactory imprinting was determined by exposing kokanee to different synthetic chemicals (morpholine or phenethyl alcohol) at different life stages, and then measuring the ability to discriminate the chemicals as sexually mature adults. Whole body thyroxine content and blood plasma thyroxine concentration was measured to determine if peak thyroid activity coincided with imprinting or other morphological, physiological or behavioral transitions associated with smoltification.

  18. Appendix 80 HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and extent of involvement in the program: Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, US Bureau of Reclamation the improvements (a private trout farm) on land owned by the US Forest Service, $57,000 for a gravity water routing (MFWP), BPA and US Bureau of Reclamation (BoR) Prior to assuming the special use permit, BPA funded

  19. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the second in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2003. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2002) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. Each chapter of this report deals with monitoring phenotypic and demographic traits of Yakima River basin spring chinook comparing hatchery and wild returns in 2002; the second year of adult hatchery returns. The first chapter deals specifically with adult traits of American River, Naches basin (excluding the American River), and upper Yakima River spring chinook, excluding gametes. The second chapter examines the gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish. In the third chapter, we describe work begun initially in 2002 to characterize and compare redds of naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River.

  20. Reed-Joseph International Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is offering field downloadable GPS/VHF logging collars and Solar Powered GPS/VHF backpack loggers for birds of battery powered and solar powered PTTs in a wide range of sizes, exclusively for birds. We will startReed-Joseph International Company 55 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE IN BIRD AND WILDLIFE CONTROL THE U

  1. Homodyne scanning holography Joseph Rosen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Homodyne scanning holography Joseph Rosen* Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ben developed a modified version of a scanning holography microscope in which the Fresnel Zone Plates (FZP) are created by a homodyne rather than a heterodyne interferometer. Therefore, during the scanning

  2. EIS-0424: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartment ofStatement | DepartmentFinal

  3. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Umatilla

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartmentDepartment ofDepartment488:PatricioStatement |

  4. EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartmentDepartmentStatement | Department of Energy

  5. Some trends in hatchery effects So e t e ds atc e y e ects Northwest Fisheries Science Center,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Societal interactions ­ Take money and effort away from habitat problemsproblems ­ Overharvest of wild stocks ­ May stocks and depend on hatchery productionon hatchery production · Conservation benefits S l i

  6. APPARATUS AND METHODS EMPLOYED AT THE MARINE FISH HATCHERY AT FLODEVIG, NORWAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPARATUS AND METHODS EMPLOYED AT THE MARINE FISH HATCHERY AT FLODEVIG, NORWAY By G. M. Dannevig AND METHODS EMPLOYED AT THE MARINE FISH HATCHERY AT FLODEVIG, NORWAY. ~ By G. M. DANNEVIG, Director Fliidevig is situated on the seacoast near Arendal, Norway. The principal parts are a main building, having on the lower

  7. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance Annual Report, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenema, David

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kalispel Tribal hatchery successfully spawned largemouth bass broodfish in spring 2002. Approximately 150,000 eggs were produced and hatched. These fry were started on brine shrimp for a period of ten days. At this time, the fry needed more abundance food supply. Cannibalism started and the hatchery staff transferred the remaining fry to the river in hopes that some fish would survive.

  8. A comparison of prey capture kinematics in hatchery and wild Micropterus salmoides floridanus: effects of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Philip J.

    .e. hatchery Florida largemouth bass feeding on pelleted foods and wild indi- viduals capturing live fish prey largemouth bass compare to those of hatchery fish feeding on novel live prey? (3) How long does it take largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides floridanus captured live prey with very rapid movements and large

  9. Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after their release, representing a residualization rate of 12.8% (21 of 164). Snorkeling revealed considerable overlap of habitat use (in space and time) by residual hatchery steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss in the South Santiam River. Results from our study (and others) also indicated that hatchery steelhead juveniles typically dominate interactions with naturally produced O. mykiss juveniles. The overlap in space and time, combined with the competitive advantage that residual hatchery steelhead appear to have over naturally produced O. mykiss, increases the potential for negative ecological interactions that could have population-level effects on the wild winter steelhead population of the South Santiam River.

  10. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Joseph M Farley

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Joseph M Farley" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  11. Joseph R. Yanek- Biography

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Joe has over 40 years experience in the leadership of government, nuclear and military operations, including 30 years of senior management experience in the development and execution of programs, projects and operations supporting nuclear, nuclear safety, environmental safety & health, and regulatory functions in line, division and corporate assignments.

  12. Mauro F. Guilln is the Director of the Joseph H. Lauder Institute at Penn, a research-and-teaching program on management and international relations. He holds the Dr. Felix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    Mauro F. Guillén is the Director of the Joseph H. Lauder Institute at Penn, a research- and Review, Annual Review of Sociology, European Sociological Review, and Social Forces. Area Studies: East, The Manufacturer, New York Newsday, New York Times, Investor's Business Daily, International Herald Tribune

  13. Automated Purge Valve Joseph Edward Farrell, III.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III. Bachelor of Science Marine Engineering the undersigned committee hereby approve the attached thesis Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III.D. Department Head Department of Marine and Environmental Systems #12;iii Abstract Title: Automated Purge Valve

  14. Joseph Chen | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joseph Chen Previous Next List Joseph J. Chen Ph.D Student, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley Email: joseph.chen at...

  15. Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluff, Stanley

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October of 1997, The construction of the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was complete. No spawning activity was recorded for the spring of 1998. On June 14, 1999 the first spawn at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was successful. A total of seven nests were fertilized that produced approximately 144,000 fry. The second spawn occurred on July 13, 1999 and a total of six nests were fertilized producing approximately 98,0000 fry. The total amount of largemouth bass fry produced at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was 242,000.

  16. New Snake River sockeye hatchery to produce up to 1 million smolts...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    later, the plight of Lonesome Larry is becoming a distant memory as the Springfield Fish Hatchery opened Sept. 6 in Idaho. More than 140 people gathered to watch the dedication...

  17. EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho’s construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort.

  18. Stability Index of Interaction forms Joseph Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Stability Index of Interaction forms Joseph Abdou December 15, 2008 Abstract An interaction form, 106-112 boulevard de l'H^opital 75647 Paris Cedex 13 - France; email: abdou@univ-paris1.fr 1 halshs

  19. Joseph A. McBrearty- Biography

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Joseph McBrearty joined the Office of Science in August 2010 immediately upon retiring from a 30-year career in the U.S. Navy, where he specialized in nuclear propulsion and nuclear weapons systems, training, control and safety.

  20. Functional HDLs: A Historical Overview Joseph Cordina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Gordon J.

    Computing Building University of Malta, Malta joseph.cordina@um.edu.mt Gordon J. Pace Dept. of Computer Science and A.I. New Computing Building University of Malta, Malta gordon.pace@um.edu.mt ABSTRACT When

  1. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouwes, Nick (EcoLogical Research, Providence, UT); Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise ID); Schaller, Howard (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office, Vancouver, WA)

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. A ''D'' equal to one indicates that there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage, while a ''D'' less than one indicates that transported smolts die at a greater rate after release, than smolts that have migrated through the hydrosystem. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatcheries; (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program; (5) evaluate growth patterns of transported and in-river migrating smolts, and of upriver and downriver stocks. Primary CSS focus in this report for the 1997-1999 migration years included hatchery chinook tasks for objectives 1, 4 and 5.

  2. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second chapter deals specifically with identification of putative populations of wild spring chinook in the Yakima River basin based on differences in quantitative and genetic traits. The third chapter is a progress report on gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish spawned in 2004 including some comparisons with Little Naches River fish. In the fourth chapter, we present a progress report on comparisons naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River and in an experimental spawning channel at CESRF in 2004. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development. Chapters One and Two will be submitted for peer reviewed publication. Chapters Three and Four should be considered preliminary and additional fieldwork and/or analysis are in progress related to these topics. Readers are cautioned that any preliminary conclusions are subject to future revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  3. We have only listed Oklahoma Hatcheries as they appear in the National Poultry Improvement Plan. For a listing of hatcheries in your state, contact your state USDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    We have only listed Oklahoma Hatcheries as they appear in the National Poultry Improvement Plan by the Department of Animal Science, Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources or Oklahoma State University. If you are an Oklahoma Resident you can obtain a copy by contacting: Mr. Ralph Duncan Animal

  4. Biographical Sketch Joseph R. Wilson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ' dredging program and is the author of the 1988 O&M dredging regulation as well as numerous other policies program monitor for the Aquatic Nuisance Research Program, Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program, Dredging Operations Technical Support Program and Water Operations Technical Support Program. Mr

  5. aim program office: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Websites Summary: Archives and History Office Program Review Committee 1999 Report SLAC Archives and History Office Review Committee were: R. Joseph Anderson,...

  6. EA-1988: NFSC (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) Earthen Drainage Channel, Burley Creek Hatchery, Port Orchard, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center proposal to construct an earthen drainage channel at its Burley Creek Hatchery in Kitsap County, Washington. The project would facilitate increased discharge of treated effluent from the hatchery facility into the adjacent Burley Creek. BPA’s proposal is to fund the project. The project website is http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Burley_Creek/.

  7. Joseph Tang | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin HERO MarinersJointJoseph Tang Joseph Tang

  8. ISAB 2001-3 Hatchery Surplus Letter -Page 1 Independent Scientific Advisory Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ISAB 2001-3 Hatchery Surplus Letter - Page 1 Independent Scientific Advisory Board Portland, Oregon 97204 ISAB@nwppc.org April 16, 2001 Dr. Usha Varanasi Science Director Northwest Fisheries Surplus Review Dear Dr. Varanasi: This letter is the ISAB's response to your January 29, 2001 request

  9. Diet-induced phenotypic plasticity in the skull morphology of hatchery-reared Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Philip J.

    for many fish species, Florida largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides flor- idanus (LeSeuer), reared, was retarded at this size. Post-release, the skulls of hatchery fish converged towards those of wild bass bass, Micropterus salmoides floridanus Un resumen en espan~ol se incluye detra´s del texto principal de

  10. New Paths to Retirement Joseph F. Quinn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    -war early retirement trend -- the fact that older men were leaving the labor force earlier and earlierNew Paths to Retirement April 1998 Joseph F. Quinn Department of Economics Boston College Chestnut will be presented at the Pension Research Council conference on "Forecasting Retirement Needs and Retirement Wealth

  11. Digital spatially incoherent Fresnel holography Joseph Rosen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Digital spatially incoherent Fresnel holography Joseph Rosen* Department of Biology, Integrated, such that the result is a complex-valued Fresnel hologram. When this hologram is reconstructed in the computer, the 3D types of holograms,1,3­9 including Fourier1,4 and Fresnel holograms.5,6 The process of beam interfering

  12. assessment chief joseph: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Care Systems, Martinez, California 3School of Psychology Robertson, Lynn 27 Joseph M. Juran Team Members Mathematics Websites Summary: old his father left Romania and came to...

  13. ORISE: Postdoc Research Experiences - Dr. Joseph Ranalli

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627Homeland Security Summer InternshipAngelaJoseph Ranalli

  14. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

    1988-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

  15. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2000 and returned in 2003. Another goal of CSS was to help resolve uncertainty concerning marking, handling and bypass effects associated with control fish used in National Marine Fisheries Service's (NMFS) transportation research and evaluation. Significant concern had been raised that the designated control groups, which were collected, marked and released at dams, did not experience the same conditions as the in-river migrants which were not collected and bypassed under existing management, and that the estimated ratios of SARs of transported fish to SARs of control fish may be biased (Mundy et al. 1994). Instead of marking at the dams, as traditionally done for NMFS transportation evaluations, CSS began marking sufficient numbers of fish at the hatcheries and defining in-river groups from the detection histories at the dams (e.g., total

  16. Contrasting survival strategies of hatchery and wild red drum: implications for stock enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jessica Louise

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Marshall Kirk O. Winemiller James L. Pinckney Gregory W. Stunz Head of Department, Thomas E. Lacher May 2008 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences iii ABSTRACT Contrasting Survival Strategies of Hatchery and Wild Red Drum... of the Rooker Lab. Many thanks to my committee members, Dr. Christopher Marshall, Dr. Kirk Winemiller, Dr. James Pinckney, and Dr. Gregory Stunz, for their insight and suggestions which greatly improved the content and quality of my dissertation research...

  17. PhD thesis proposal GDFSUEZ University Joseph Fourier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 PhD thesis proposal GDFSUEZ University Joseph Fourier Thesis title Mineralization, University Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (http://isterre.fr) Advisors: François Renard (Prof. University J. Fourier ­ Grenoble I) and German Montes Hernandez (CNRS scientistHDR) GDFSUEZ researchers Background

  18. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2002 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2003-2004 Biennial Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer Chinook (hereafter, Chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of Chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams Chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River Chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well as comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer Chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer Chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer Chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer Chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2002 and their respective adult returns through 2004.

  19. Kenya International Radio Observatory Joseph Otieno Malo, University of Nairobi,Joseph Otieno Malo, University of Nairobi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenya International Radio Observatory (KIRO) Joseph Otieno Malo, University of Nairobi,Joseph Otieno Malo, University of Nairobi, KenyaKenya Bo Thide, Uppsala University, SwedenBo Thide, Uppsala.environmental, and communications research. Located in northern Kenya, on the geomagnetic equator,Located in northern Kenya

  20. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Joseph M Farley

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame MonthtotalJoseph M

  1. Joseph Salvo | Inventors | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as Ready for(SC)Joint GenomeJonJoseph MetzgerSalvo

  2. Joseph Vinciquerra | Inventors | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as Ready for(SC)Joint GenomeJonJoseph

  3. Patty O'Toole July 20, 2007 Program Implementation Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patty O'Toole July 20, 2007 Program Implementation Manager Northwest Power and Conservation Council 200755700-What was Old is New Again: Evaluate Traditional Gears for Selective Harvest Dear Ms. O'Toole defensibility, and adaptive management of hatchery programs. Tools to determine outcomes of proposed actions

  4. The Structure of Unstable Power Joseph M. Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The Structure of Unstable Power Systems Joseph M. Abdou May 13, 2009 Abstract. A power system de l'H^opital 75647 Paris Cedex 13 - France; email: abdou@univ-paris1.fr 1 halshs-00389181,version1

  5. JOSEPH A. LEDVINA 202 Goddard Ave Mobile: (702) 2814610

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orrock, John

    Conducted herpetofauna markrecapture project on the DOE Savannah River Site, monitoring reptile and answered questions · Graded exams, quizzes, worksheets, and lab reports #12; JOSEPH A. LEDVINA rattlesnakes for subsequent dietary analysis Lake Mead National Recreation Area Student Conservation

  6. VBI-0045- In the Matter of Joseph P. Carson

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 14, 2000, Joseph P. Carson (Carson) filed a “Whistleblower Reprisal Complaint per section 3164 of the NNSA Authorization Act for FY 2000.” Carson is employed by the Department of Energy ...

  7. Joseph Rigby Chairman, President and CEO Pepco Holdings, Inc...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Joseph Rigby and I am theChairman, President and CEO for Pepco Holdings, Inc. (PHI), an electric utility delivering power to about 2 million customers in the Mid-Atlantic region,...

  8. ORIGINAL RESEARCH Chung-Horng Lung Joseph E. Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung, Chung-Horng

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH Chung-Horng Lung Æ Joseph E. Urban Gerald T. Mackulak Analogy-based domain problem that shares significant aspects with the past problem and C.-H. Lung (&) Department of Systems

  9. Ground-water temperature fluctuations at Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberlander, P.L.; Myers, D.A.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The well field serving the Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery has experienced reduced water temperatures following continued, periodic withdrawal of large volumes of water. In January 1985, the well field temperature was 49/sup 0/F, which is less than the optimal 52/sup 0/F for raising salmon and steelhead trout. The aquifer supplying the hatchery is in hydraulic and thermal connection with the Snake River and a flooded embayment of the Palouse River. Ground-water temperatures in the well field cycle on an annual basis in response to changes in surface water temperature and pumping rate. Numerical simulation of the well field, using a simplified mixing cell model, demonstrates the coupling of well field hydraulics and aquifer thermal response. Alternative pumping schedules indicate that it is feasible to adjust ground-water pumping to effectively store heat in the aquifer during the summer months when surface water temperatures are elevated. Sensitivity analysis of this model indicated that the primary controls of the system's thermal response are the volume of the aquifer assumed to contribute to the well field and temperature of the overlying surface water body.

  10. STATIC ANALYSIS FOR RUBY IN THE PRESENCE OF GRADUAL TYPING MICHAEL JOSEPH EDGAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATIC ANALYSIS FOR RUBY IN THE PRESENCE OF GRADUAL TYPING MICHAEL JOSEPH EDGAR Department Advisor i #12;STATIC ANALYSIS FOR RUBY IN THE PRESENCE OF GRADUAL TYPING by MICHAEL JOSEPH EDGAR THESIS

  11. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatchery Operating Under Hatchery Reform Principles From Day 1. Representatives from the Colville was built with hatchery reform as a central tenet, as a way to address conservation and harvest for both the following abstract. Chief Joseph Hatchery: A New Hatchery Operating Under Hatchery Reform Principles From

  12. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project; Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2002 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $3,036,014. Bonneville Power Administration identifies them as follows; (1) Part I--Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and $2,682,635 which includes--Equipment costs of $1,807,105. (2) Part II--Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-35-04, Contract No. 4035, $352,379 for Clearwater Coho Restoration Master Plan development Based on NPPC authorization for construction and operation of NPTH, the annual contracts were negotiated for the amounts shown above under (1) and (2). Construction contracts were handled by BPA until all facilities are completed and accepted.

  13. Design, construction and initiation of operation, of a crawfish hatchery at the Aquacultural Research Center, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Gary

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND INITIATION OF OPERATION, OF A CRAWFISH HATCHERY AT THE A(UACULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, TEXAS AAM UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS A PROFESSIONAL PAPER BY GARY ARNOLD Submitted to the College of Agriculture 'of Texas A..., and initial operation of such a hatchery facility was determined to be an appropriate project for a Master of Agriculture degree candidate's professional internship. Such an internship project was started on February 15, 1986, by Gary Arnold. Design...

  14. August 23, 2002 Coded Wire Tag Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : "First, let us acknowledge that this is a huge program that annual conducts a large number of activities that are essential to the Basin, and the data provided has been widely utilized over many years. However and the Columbia River basin, as well as the various escapements to hatcheries and spawning grounds. Based

  15. Saint Joseph's University Institute for Environmental Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCann, Michael; Springer, Clint

    2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Task A: Examination of the physiological, morphological, and reproductive responses of Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) cultivars identified as potential biofuel producing cultivars as well as naturally-occurring varieties of switchgrass to projected changes in climate for the central portion of the United States. This project was a multi-year project set in a field site located at the Konza Prairie Biological Station near Manhattan, KS USA. The major objective of the study was to understand the physiological and growth responses of the important biofuel grass species, Panicum virgatum (switch grass) to simulated changes in precipitation expected for the Central Plains region of the United States. Population level adaptation to broad-scale regional climates or within-population variation in genome size of this genetically and phenotypically diverse C4 grass species may influence the responses to future precipitation variability associated with climate change. Therefore, we investigated switchgrass responses to water variability between natural populations collected across latitudinal gradient and populations. P. virgatum plants from natural populations originating from Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas received frequent, small precipitation events (“ambient’) or infrequent, large precipitation events (‘altered”) to simulate contrasting rainfall variability expected from this region. We measured leaf-level physiology, aboveground biomass varied significantly by population origin but did not differ by genome size. Our results suggest that trait variation in P. virgatum is primarily attributed to population-level adaptation across latitudinal gradient, not genome size, and that neither population-level adaptation nor genome size may be important predictors of P. virgatum responses to future climatic conditions. Based solely on the data presented here, the most important consideration when deciding what varieties of switchgrass to cultivate for biofuel feedstocks under future climate scenarios is local adaptation and not necessarily genome size as has been hypothesized in the literature. Task B: Installation of an extensive green roof system on the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University for research, research-training and educational outreach activities. An experimental green roof system was designed and installed by an outside contractor (Roofmeadows) on the roof of the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University. The roof system includes four test plots, each with a different drainage system, instrumentation to monitor storm water retention, roof deck temperature, heat flux into and out of the building, rain fall, wind speed and direction, relative humidity and heat emission from the roof system. The vegetative roof was planted with 26 species of plants, distributed throughout the roof area, to assess species/variety growth and coverage characteristics, both in terms of the different drain layer systems, and in terms of the different exposures along the north to south axis of the building. Analysis of the drain layer performance, in terms of storm water retention, shows that the aggregate (stone) drainage layer system performed the best, with the moisture management mat system second, and the geotextile drain layer and reservoir sheet layer systems coming in last. This information is of value in the planning and design of vegetative roof systems since the different types of drainage layer systems have different installation costs and different weights. The different drainage layer systems also seem to be having an impact on plant growth and spread with the test plot with the reservoir sheet layer actually having the poorest plant coverage and plant spread of all areas of the roof studied. Plant growth performance analysis is ongoing, but significant differences have been observed in the third growing season ('13) along the north to south axis, with most species doing better towards the northern end of the roof (in terms of percent ground coverage and plant spread and reproduction). Interestingly, plant growth in all f

  16. Saint Joseph's University Institute for Environmental Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCann, Michael P.; Springer, Clint J.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Task A: Examination of the physiological, morphological, and reproductive responses of Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) cultivars identified as potential biofuel producing cultivars as well as naturally-occurring varieties of switchgrass to projected changes in climate for the central portion of the United States. This project was a multi-year project set in a field site located at the Konza Prairie Biological Station near Manhattan, KS USA. The major objective of the study was to understand the physiological and growth responses of the important biofuel grass species, Panicum virgatum (switch grass) to simulated changes in precipitation expected for the Central Plains region of the United States. Population level adaptation to broad-scale regional climates or within-population variation in genome size of this genetically and phenotypically diverse C4 grass species may influence the responses to future precipitation variability associated with climate change. Therefore, we investigated switchgrass responses to water variability between natural populations collected across latitudinal gradient and populations. P. virgatum plants from natural populations originating from Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas received frequent, small precipitation events (“ambient’) or infrequent, large precipitation events (‘altered”) to simulate contrasting rainfall variability expected from this region. We measured leaf-level physiology, aboveground biomass varied significantly by population origin but did not differ by genome size. Our results suggest that trait variation in P. virgatum is primarily attributed to population-level adaptation across latitudinal gradient, not genome size, and that neither population-level adaptation nor genome size may be important predictors of P. virgatum responses to future climatic conditions. Based solely on the data presented here, the most important consideration when deciding what varieties of switchgrass to cultivate for biofuel feedstocks under future climate scenarios is local adaptation and not necessarily genome size as has been hypothesized in the literature. Task B: Installation of an extensive green roof system on the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University for research, research-training and educational outreach activities. An experimental green roof system was designed and installed by an outside contractor (Roofmeadows) on the roof of the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University. The roof system includes four test plots, each with a different drainage system, instrumentation to monitor storm water retention, roof deck temperature, heat flux into and out of the building, rain fall, wind speed and direction, relative humidity and heat emission from the roof system. The vegetative roof was planted with 26 species of plants, distributed throughout the roof area, to assess species/variety growth and coverage characteristics, both in terms of the different drain layer systems, and in terms of the different exposures along the north to south axis of the building. Analysis of the drain layer performance, in terms of storm water retention, shows that the aggregate (stone) drainage layer system performed the best, with the moisture management mat system second, and the geotextile drain layer and reservoir sheet layer systems coming in last. This information is of value in the planning and design of vegetative roof systems since the different types of drainage layer systems have different installation costs and different weights. The different drainage layer systems also seem to be having an impact on plant growth and spread with the test plot with the reservoir sheet layer actually having the poorest plant coverage and plant spread of all areas of the roof studied. Plant growth performance analysis is ongoing, but significant differences have been observed in the third growing season ('13) along the north to south axis, with most species doing better towards the northern end of the roof (in terms of percent ground coverage and plant spread and reproduction). Interestingly, plant growth in all f

  17. Saint Joseph's University Institute for Environmental Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCann, Micahel P.; Springer, Clint J.

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Task A: Examination of the physiological, morphological, and reproductive responses of Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) cultivars identified as potential biofuel producing cultivars as well as naturally-occurring varieties of switchgrass to projected changes in climate for the central portion of the United States. This project was a multi-year project set in a field site located at the Konza Prairie Biological Station near Manhattan, KS USA. The major objective of the study was to understand the physiological and growth responses of the important biofuel grass species, Panicum virgatum (switch grass) to simulated changes in precipitation expected for the Central Plains region of the United States. Population level adaptation to broad-scale regional climates or within-population variation in genome size of this genetically and phenotypically diverse C4 grass species may influence the responses to future precipitation variability associated with climate change. Therefore, we investigated switchgrass responses to water variability between natural populations collected across latitudinal gradient and populations. P. virgatum plants from natural populations originating from Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas received frequent, small precipitation events (“ambient’) or infrequent, large precipitation events (‘altered”) to simulate contrasting rainfall variability expected from this region. We measured leaf-level physiology, aboveground biomass varied significantly by population origin but did not differ by genome size. Our results suggest that trait variation in P. virgatum is primarily attributed to population-level adaptation across latitudinal gradient, not genome size, and that neither population-level adaptation nor genome size may be important predictors of P. virgatum responses to future climatic conditions. Based solely on the data presented here, the most important consideration when deciding what varieties of switchgrass to cultivate for biofuel feedstocks under future climate scenarios is local adaptation and not necessarily genome size as has been hypothesized in the literature. Task B: Installation of an extensive green roof system on the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University for research, research-training and educational outreach activities. An experimental green roof system was designed and installed by an outside contractor (Roofmeadows) on the roof of the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University. The roof system includes four test plots, each with a different drainage system, instrumentation to monitor storm water retention, roof deck temperature, heat flux into and out of the building, rain fall, wind speed and direction, relative humidity and heat emission from the roof system. The vegetative roof was planted with 26 species of plants, distributed throughout the roof area, to assess species/variety growth and coverage characteristics, both in terms of the different drain layer systems, and in terms of the different exposures along the north to south axis of the building. Analysis of the drain layer performance, in terms of storm water retention, shows that the aggregate (stone) drainage layer system performed the best, with the moisture management mat system second, and the geotextile drain layer and reservoir sheet layer systems coming in last. This information is of value in the planning and design of vegetative roof systems since the different types of drainage layer systems have different installation costs and different weights. The different drainage layer systems also seem to be having an impact on plant growth and spread with the test plot with the reservoir sheet layer actually having the poorest plant coverage and plant spread of all areas of the roof studied. Plant growth performance analysis is ongoing, but significant differences have been observed in the third growing season ('13) along the north to south axis, with most species doing better towards the northern end of the roof (in terms of percent ground coverage and plant spread and reproduction). Interestingly, plant growth in all f

  18. Saint Joseph's University Institute for Environmental Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCann, Michael P; Springer, Clint

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Task A: Examination of the physiological, morphological, and reproductive responses of Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) cultivars identified as potential biofuel producing cultivars as well as naturally-occurring varieties of switchgrass to projected changes in climate for the central portion of the United States. This project was a multi-year project set in a field site located at the Konza Prairie Biological Station near Manhattan, KS USA. At the field site we planted switchgrass collected from regions in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. After a year of establishment we implemented a set of two-year water treatments that examined the responses in physiology, growth and development of switchgrass to predicted changes in precipitation amount for the central United States. After this experiment was completed we performed a second set of experiments that examined the responses of switchgrass physiology, growth, and development to changes in precipitation frequency. We also included in this analysis how genome size of individuals influenced their responses to precipitation frequency changes. Generally, we found switchgrass to be unresponsive to realistic predictions of precipitation changes for the Central Plains of the United States. These studies have provided significant insight into how this important grassland species will respond to future climate change from both an ecological and applied biological perspective. Finally, we provided insight into the mechanism through which this species changes in the face of altered water availability by not supporting the hypothesis that the control of switchgrass responses to changes in precipitation is altered by genome size. Task B: Installation of an extensive green roof system on the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University for research, research-training and educational outreach activities. An experimental green roof system was designed and installed by an outside contractor (Roofmeadows) on the roof of the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University. The roof system includes four test plots, each with a different drainage system, instrumentation to monitor storm water retention, roof deck temperature, heat flux into and out of the building, rain fall, wind speed and direction, relative humidity and heat emission from the roof system. The vegetative roof was planted with 26 species of plants, distributed throughout the roof area, to assess species/variety growth and coverage characteristics, both in terms of the different drain layer systems, and in terms of the different exposures along the north to south axis of the building. Analysis of the drain layer performance, in terms of storm water retention, shows that the aggregate (stone) drainage layer system performed the best, with the moisture management mat system second, and the geotextile drain layer and reservoir sheet layer systems coming in last. Plant growth performance analysis is ongoing, but significant differences have been observed in the third growing season ('13) along the north to south axis, with most species doing better towards the northern end of the roof (in terms of percent ground coverage and plant spread and reproduction). Interestingly, plant growth in all four of the test plots was reduced relative to the lower areas of the roof (the lower area was ca. 2 inches lower than the test plots, due to the space needed for sensors under the plots. The lower roof area uses an aggregate drain layer comparable to that in the third test plot), even when accounting for the north to south differences. The reasons for these differences are not clear and studies are underway to examine the impact of wind scour, drainage rates, temperature, and other factors. Task C: Education and community outreach efforts by the IES involving conferences at SJU, presentations by faculty and students off campus, and educational signage. The Institute for Environmental Stewardship hosted three storm water management workshops on the SJU campus in Philadelphia, in collaboration with the Lower Merion Conservancy, a not-for-profit organizati

  19. EIGENVALUES AND THE SMITH NORMAL FORM Joseph J. Rushanan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushanan, Joe J.

    EIGENVALUES AND THE SMITH NORMAL FORM Joseph J. Rushanan The MITRE Corporation, M/S E025, Bedford, MA 01730 Abstract. Results are shown that compare the Smith Normal Form (SNF) over the integers and its Smith Normal Form (SNF) over the integers. Our goals are more general than those results

  20. Looking into Higher Dimensions: Research with Joseph McMoneagle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Ronald

    by nuclear reactors can travel as far as 25 light- years in solid lead before being deflected. Another at nuclear distances, and see into higher dimensions. To "calibrate" McMoneagle, I asked him three things (in, if not the best: Joseph McMoneagle. [Joe has published four interesting and informative books on remote viewing

  1. Officers and Editors for 2011 JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galán, Pedro

    Officers and Editors for 2011 President JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III Zoo Atlanta Atlanta, GA 30315, USA) Smithsonian Institution, USA TIFFANY DOAN (2014 R) Central Connecticut State Univ., USA PATRICK GREGORY (2012 PATERSON (2012 R) Williams Baptist College, USA JENNIFER PRAMUK (2014 Cons) Woodland Park Zoo, USA CAROL

  2. Joseph and Rosemary Bittorf Industrial and Systems Engineering Scholarship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Joseph and Rosemary Bittorf Industrial and Systems Engineering Scholarship The purpose of the Fund be a declared major in Industrial and Systems Engineering. Candidates must be in good standing in Industrial and Systems Engineering in the College of Engineering and Engineering Technology for the academic

  3. Has the Early Retirement Trend Reversed? Joseph F. Quinn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Has the Early Retirement Trend Reversed? Joseph F. Quinn Department of Economics Boston College: figures 2.1 and 2.2; tables 2A.1 and 2A.2) has argued persuasively that this early retirement trend began.7 25.8 20.9 14.7 Age Source: Burkhauser and Quinn (1997: table 1), updated #12;3 The early retirement

  4. TITANIUM--1998 79.1 By Joseph Gambogi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TITANIUM--1998 79.1 TITANIUM By Joseph Gambogi Domestic survey data and tables were prepared, international data coordinator. Titanium occurs primarily in the minerals anatase, brookite, ilmenite, leucoxene economic importance. As a metal, titanium is well known for corrosion resistance and for its high strength

  5. TITANIUM--2000 80.1 By Joseph Gambogi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TITANIUM--2000 80.1 TITANIUM By Joseph Gambogi Domestic survey data and tables were prepared, international data coordinator. In 2000, the titanium industry was engaged in a high level of mineral underway in the mineral and titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment industries. In the titanium metal industry

  6. TITANIUM--1999 79.1 By Joseph Gambogi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TITANIUM--1999 79.1 TITANIUM By Joseph Gambogi Domestic survey data and tables were prepared, international data coordinator. Titanium is present in most rocks and soil and is the ninth most abundant element in the Earth's crust. In nature, titanium is not found in its metallic form but occurs in many

  7. TITANIUM--2001 79.1 By Joseph Gambogi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TITANIUM--2001 79.1 TITANIUM By Joseph Gambogi Domestic survey data and tables were prepared, international data coordinator. Titanium is a metallic element that occurs in many minerals, such as anatase, and rutile have significant economic importance. In general, titanium metal alloys are corrosion resistant

  8. The Nonlinear Downstream Development of Baroclinic Instability Joseph Pedlosky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedlosky, Joseph

    The Nonlinear Downstream Development of Baroclinic Instability Joseph Pedlosky Woods Hole The downstream development in both space and time of baroclinic instability is studied in a nonlinear channel as a conceptual model for the development of fluctuations in currents like the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio downstream

  9. Adiabatic Charge Pumping in Open Quantum Systems JOSEPH E. AVRON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avron, Joseph

    Adiabatic Charge Pumping in Open Quantum Systems JOSEPH E. AVRON Technion ALEXANDER ELGART Courant pumps con- nected to a number of external leads. It is proven that under the rather general assumption on the Hamiltonian describing the system, in the adiabatic limit, the current through the pump is given by a formula

  10. Predation, Enrichment, and Phytoplankton Community Structure Michael Lynch; Joseph Shapiro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Michael

    Predation, Enrichment, and Phytoplankton Community Structure Michael Lynch; Joseph Shapiro@jstor.org. http://www.jstor.org Thu Aug 30 11:57:16 2007 #12;Predation, enrichment, and phytoplankton community and enrichment to the Pleasant Pond phytoplankton community was examined through a series of enclosure

  11. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVI : Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the University of Washington developed a new statistical model to analyze the combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged salmon migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine), has been used to estimate survival and transportation effects on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin from 1996 to 2003. Those results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on both a systemwide basis, incorporating all transport dams analyzed, and a dam-specific basis. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 5,000 tagged smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few tagged hatchery steelhead were transported in these years, no transportation effects are estimated for steelhead. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.71% with a standard error (SE) of 0.18% for spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2003, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. For summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin, the estimates of annual SAR averaged 1.15% (SE=0.31%). Only for the release years 1999 and 2000 did the Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for hatchery steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.45% (SE=0.11%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2003. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2003), it was estimated that on average approximately 86% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook, and 74% for steelhead, occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the systemwide T/I are weighted averages of the dam-specific T/I ratios for each transport dam (with {ge} 5,000 tagged fish transported), weighted by the probabilities of being transported at each dam. The systemwide T/I compares the observed SAR under the existing transportation system with the expected SAR if the transportation system had not been operated. Estimates of 1.0 indicate that the systemwide transportation program has no effect on SAR, while estimates > 1.0 indicate that the transportation program increases SAR. Excluding the 2001 release group, the geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.15 (SE=0.03) for release years 1997 through 2003. The geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.28 (SE=0.13) for release years 1997 through 2000 and 2003. Estimates were much higher for the 2001 release groups. These estimates reflect transportation from Lower Granite and/or Little Goose for most release years, depending on the number of tagged smolts actually transported at each dam during each release year. Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of post-Bonneville survival to Lower Granite Dam of transported fish to that of nontransported ('inriver') fish. Excluding the 2001 release year, the geometric mean of the D estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin

  12. Isolation of Adult Hippocampal Neural Progenitors Joseph Peltier, Brandi K. Ormerod, and David V. Schaffer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, David V.

    57 Chapter 4 Isolation of Adult Hippocampal Neural Progenitors Joseph Peltier, Brandi K. Ormerod, LLC 2010 #12;58 Peltier, Ormerod, and Schaffer astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, or more AHNPCs

  13. 10 CFR 850, Request for Information- Docket Number: HS-RM-10-CBDPP- Joseph Herndon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commenter: Joseph Herndon 10 CFR 850 - Request for Information Docket Number: HS-RM-10-CBDPP Comment Close Date: 2/22/2011

  14. Study of Disease and Physiology in the 1979 Homing Study Hatchery Stocks: A Supplement to "Imprinting Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing", 1979 by Slatick, Gilbreath, and Walch.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novotny, Anthony J.; Zaugg, Waldo S.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), under contract to the Bonneville Power Administration, is conducting research on imprinting salmon and steelhead for homing (Slatick et al. 1979, 1980; Novotny and Zaugg 1979). The studies were begun with little background knowledge of the effects of disease or certain physiological functions on imprinting and homing in salmonids. Consequently, work aimed at filling this void was begun by the authors in 1978 (Novotny and Zaugg 1979) and continued in 1979. In 1979, we examined random samples of normal populations of homing test fish at the hatcheries to determine the physiological readiness to migrate and adapt to seawater and general fish health. At the Manchester Marine Experimental Station, Manchester, Washington, we determined the survival of samples of the test fish maintained in marine net-pens after release from the hatcheries. Hatcheries and stocks sampled are listed in Table 1.

  15. What We See in the Aurora By Joseph A. Shaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    What We See in the Aurora By Joseph A. Shaw #12;O p t i c s & P h o t o n i c s N e w s / N o v e m b e r 1 9 9 9 21 O f all nature's optical splendors, the aurora may be the most spectacular. The aurora captures audiences like few other natural phenomena because of its relative rarity in populous

  16. Updated 2-14 Joseph D. Ludovici

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Environment), where he guided Navy and Marine Corps installation and environmental policies related Executive Service in January 2007 when he was selected as the Assistant Director of the Joint Guam Program Operations Support contract, planning for homeporting three submarines in Guam, recovery from several

  17. Joseph S. Levy Research Scientist Associate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    ://people.oregonstate.edu/~levyjos/index.html http://www.ig.utexas.edu/people/staff/jlevy/ Education Postdoc College of Earth, Ocean, & Atmospheric Change in Garwood Valley: Monitoring Buried Glacier Melt and Exploring `Péwé's Lost Lake' (NSF Office Valley, Antarctica. (NSF Office of Polar Programs Antarctic Earth science Division. Award ANT-1142184 PI

  18. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

  19. Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, William P.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

  20. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River resulted in the complete extirpation of the anadromous fishery upstream of these structures. Today, this area is totally dependent upon resident fish resources to support local fisheries. The resident fishing is enhanced by an extensive stocking program for target species in the existing fishery, including kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). The kokanee fishery in Lake Roosevelt has not been meeting the return goals set by fisheries managers despite the stocking program. Investigations of physical and biological factors that could affect the kokanee population found predation and entrainment had a significant impact on the fish population. In 1999 and 2000, walleye (Sander vitreum) consumed between 15% and 9%, respectively, of the hatchery kokanee within 41 days of their release, while results from a study in the late 1990s estimated that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam could account for up to 30% of the total mortality of the stocked fish. To address the entrainment loss, the Bonneville Power Administration commissioned a study to determine if fish would avoid areas illuminated by strobe lights in the forebay of the third powerplant. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). From 2002 through 2004, six strobe lights were suspended in the center of the opening to the third powerplant forebay during summer months. Results from those studies indicated that fish appeared to be attracted to the illuminated area but only at night and when flow conditions within the third powerplant forebay were minimal. However, small but consistent results from these studies indicated that under high flow conditions, fish might be avoiding the lights. The 2005 study was designed to examine whether, under high flow conditions near the penstock openings, fish would avoid the lighted regions. Four omnidirectional strobe lights were deployed on the one trash rack directly in front of one turbine penstock. Seven splitbeam transducers were deployed to monitor fish approaching three penstock openings either from in front of the trash racks or moving down the dam behind the trash racks. Four key results emerged from the 2005 study. The results provide insight into the current level of entrainment and how fish respond to strobe lights under high flow conditions. First, very few fish were detected inside the trash racks. Of the more than 3,200 targets identified by the data processing, less than 100 were detected inside the trash racks. Only 23 fish were found inside the trash racks behind the strobe lights. Of those 21 fish, 13 were detected when the lights were on. Most of the fish detected behind the trash racks were above the turbine penstock but were headed downward. No fish were detected at night when minimal flows occurred between midnight and 4:00 a.m. Second, significantly more fish (P < 0.001) were detected in front of the trash racks when the lights were on at night. On a count-per-hour basis, the difference between lights off and lights on was apparent in the early morning hours at depths between 25 m and 50 m from the transducers. The lights were approximately 34 m below the splitbeam transducers, and fish detected at night with lights on were found at a median depth of approximately 35 m, compared to a median depth of from 20.6 to 23.5 m when the lights were off. The differences in depth between lights on and off at night were also significant (P < 0.001). Additionally, the increase in fish occurred only in front of the trash rack where the strobe lights were mounted; there was no increase in the number of detections by the transducers aimed away from the lights. Third, fish clearly manifested a behavioral response to the strobe lights during the day. When the lights were on, fish detected by three of the four transducers generally were swimming north, parallel to the face of the dam. Howeve

  1. Joseph Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa: Energy Resources Jump to:Jolly,Jonestown,Joseph Hot

  2. Joseph Hezir Confirmed as Chief Financial Officer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas » MethaneJohnson Controls EnergyJoinChina,Joseph Hezir

  3. Annual Coded Wire Program Missing Production Groups, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, S.M. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Vancouver, WA (United States). Columbia River Fisheries Program Office

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the ``Missing Production Groups``. Production fish released by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980`s are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. The objectives of the ``Missing Production Groups`` program are: to estimate the total survival of each production group, to estimate the contribution of each production group to various fisheries, and to prepare an annual report for all USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern.

  4. Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) - Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs : Annual Report For Fiscal Year, October 2007 – September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerstenberger, Ryan [Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation

    2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report describes work performed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) portion of the Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project (HRPP) during the 2008 fiscal year. A total of 64,736 hatchery winter steelhead, 12,108 hatchery summer steelhead, and 68,426 hatchery spring Chinook salmon smolts were acclimated and released in the Hood River basin during the spring. The HRPP exceeded program goals for a release of and 50,000 winter steelhead but fell short of the steelhead release goals of 30,000 summer steelhead and 75,000 spring Chinook in 2008. Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) tags were implanted in 6,652 hatchery winter steelhead, and 1,196 hatchery summer steelhead, to compare migratory attributes and survival rates of hatchery fish released into the Hood River. Water temperatures were recorded at six locations within the Hood River subbasin to monitor for compliance with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality water quality standards. A preseason spring Chinook salmon adult run forecast was generated, which predicted an abundant return adequate to meet escapement goal and brood stock needs. As a result the tribal and sport fisheries were opened. A tribal creel was conducted from May 22 to July 18 during which an estimated 172 spring Chinook were harvested. One hundred sixteen Spring Chinook salmon redds were observed and 72 carcasses were inspected on 19.4 miles of spawning grounds throughout the Hood River Basin during 2008. Annual salvage operations were completed in two irrigation canals resulting in the liberation of 1,641 fish back to the Hood River.

  5. Inverse Compton scattering from plasma mirror experiment Hai-En Tsai, Joseph Shaw, Xiaoming Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shvets, Gennady

    Inverse Compton scattering from plasma mirror experiment Hai-En Tsai, Joseph Shaw, Xiaoming Wang 1 experiment, we tried to generate inverse Compton x-ray by reflecting driving pulse from plasma mirrors

  6. Art versus politics: Mike Gold, Joseph Freeman, and literary radicalism in the 1920s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starr, Clinton Robert

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the 1920s, when there was little support for left wing writers from either the Communist Party or the broader intellectual community, literary intellectuals Mike Gold and Joseph Freeman attempted to use their writing to further the revolutionary...

  7. Dennis Iannicca, Alan Hylton, and Joseph Ishac Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Lloyd

    Standard Drive Hanover, MD 21076­1320 #12;Dennis Iannicca, Alan Hylton, and Joseph Ishac Glenn Research for Aerospace Information 7115 Standard Drive Hanover, MD 21076­1320 National Technical Information Service 5301

  8. Nanoindentation of Silicate Low-K Dielectric Thin Films Joseph B. Vella1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Nanoindentation of Silicate Low-K Dielectric Thin Films Joseph B. Vella1 , Alex A. Volinsky1, Minneapolis, MN. ABSTRACT The capabilities of nanoindentation to characterize low-k organo silicate glass (OSG

  9. Rituals of Charity and Abundance: Sicilian St. Joseph's Tables and Feeding the Poor in Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Giudice, Luisa

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Holy Family’s Flight into Egypt, along with an “immigrantHoly Family’s Flight into Egypt (Joseph as migrant) — allfamily should flee into Egypt, coupled with the subsequent

  10. Best Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    . Develop educational materials related to aquatic plant identification and their specific managementBest Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E vegetation management with the ultimate goal of producing the best management practices protocol in Iowa

  11. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crossley, Brian (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA); Lockwood, Jr., Neil W. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, commonly known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (blocked area). The three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the blocked area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information housed in a central location will allow managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP (NWPPC program measure 10.8B.26) is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the blocked area and the Columbia Basin blocked area management plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of blocked area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the blocked area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. The use of common collection and analytical tools is essential to the process of streamlining joint management decisions. In 1999 and 2000 the project began to address some of the identified data gaps, throughout the blocked area, with a variety of newly developed sampling projects, as well as, continuing with ongoing data collection of established projects.

  12. A review of "Shifting Contexts: Reinterpreting Samson Agonistes" by Joseph Wittreich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William B. Hunter

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of which are sketched very impressively in this important volume. Joseph Wittreich. Shifting Contexts: Reinterpreting Samson Agonistes. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 2002. xxxii + 352 pp.+ 5 illus. $60.00. Review by WILLIAM B. HUNTER... Skulsky (1995), John Shawcross, and Derek Wood (both 2001), plus collections of essays edited by George Maclean (1995) and by Mark Kelley and Joseph Wittreich (2002). Earlier books on Samson by Mary Ann Radzinowicz (1978) and Wittreich (1986) won...

  13. Andrew Marvell's "Upon Appleton House" and Joseph Mazzeo's poetic of correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eva Jane

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANDREW MARVELL'S "UPON APPLETON HOUSE" AND JOSEPH MAZZEO'S POETIC OF CORRESPONDENCE A Thesis by EVA JANE JOHNSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF ARTS December 1978 Major Subject: English ANDREW MARVELL'S "UPON APPLETON HOUSE AND JOSEPH MAZZEOsS POETIC OF CORRESPONDENCE A Thesis by EVA JANE JOHNSON Approved as to style and content by: (Chair n of Commrttee Head of Departmen (Member...

  14. Monitoring the Reproductive Success of Naturally Spawning Hatchery and Natural Spring Chinook Salmon in the Wenatchee River, 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Michael J.; Williamson, Kevin S. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated differences in the statistical power to assign parentage between an artificially propagated and wild salmon population. The propagated fish were derived from the wild population, and are used to supplement its abundance. Levels of genetic variation were similar between the propagated and wild groups at 11 microsatellite loci, and exclusion probabilities were >0.999999 for both groups. The ability to unambiguously identify a pair of parents for each sampled progeny was much lower than expected, however. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of cases the most likely pair of parents were the true parents was lower for propagated parents than for wild parents. There was a clear relationship between parentage assignment ability and the degree of linkage disequilibrium, the estimated effective number of breeders that produced the parents, and the size of the largest family within the potential parents. If a stringent threshold for parentage assignment was used, estimates of relative fitness were biased downward for the propagated fish. The bias appeared to be largely eliminated by either fractionally assigning progeny among parents in proportion to their likelihood of parentage, or by assigning progeny to the most likely set of parents without using a statistical threshold. We used a DNA-based parentage analysis to measure the relative reproductive success of hatchery- and natural-origin spring Chinook salmon in the natural environment. Both male and female hatchery-origin fish produced far fewer juvenile progeny per parent when spawning naturally than did natural origin fish. Differences in age structure, spawning location, weight and run timing were responsible for some of the difference in fitness. Male size and age had a large influence on fitness, with larger and older males producing more offspring than smaller or younger individuals. Female size had a significant effect on fitness, but the effect was much smaller than the effect of size on male fitness. For both sexes, run time had a smaller but still significant effect on fitness, with earlier returning fish favored. Spawning location within the river had a significant effect on fitness for both males and females, and for females explained most of the reduced fitness observed for hatchery fish in this population. While differences have been reported in the relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced salmonids Oncorhynchus spp., factors explaining the differences are often confounded. We examined the spawning site habitat and redd structure variables of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha of known size that spawned in two tributaries of the Wenatchee River. We controlled for variability in spawning habitat by limiting our analysis to redds found within four selected reaches. No difference in the instantaneous spawner density or location of the redd in the stream channel was detected between reaches. Within each reach, no difference in the fork length or weight of hatchery and naturally produced fish was detected. While most variables differed between reaches, we found no difference in redd characteristics within a reach between hatchery and naturally produced females. Correlation analysis of fish size and redd characteristics found several weak but significant relationships suggesting larger fish contract larger redds in deeper water. Spawner density was inversely related to several redd structure variables suggesting redd size may decrease as spawner density increases. Results should be considered preliminary until samples size and statistical power goals are reached in future years. Trends in relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Wenatchee Basins suggest females that spawn in the upper reaches of the tributaries produced a great number of offspring compared to females that spawn in the lower reaches of the tributaries. To better understand this trend, redd microhabitat data was collected from spring Chinook sa

  15. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program : Missing Production Groups, 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the ''Missing Production Groups''. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980's are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. The objectives of the ''Missing Production Groups'' program are: (1) to estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) to estimate the contribution of each production group to various fisheries, and (3) to prepare an annual report for all USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. It can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened or endangered stocks. In order to meet these objectives, a minimum of one marked group of fish is necessary for each production release. The level of marking varies according to location, species, and age at release. In general, 50,000 fish are marked with a coded-wire tag (CWT) to represent each production release group at hatcheries below John Day Dam. Between 120,000 and 200,000 fish are marked for groups at hatcheries above John Day Dam. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC.

  16. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Missing Production Groups, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the ''Missing Production Groups''. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980's are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. The objectives of the ''Missing Production Groups'' program are: (1) to estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) to estimate the contribution of each production group to various fisheries, and (3) to prepare an annual report for all USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. In order to meet these objectives, a minimum of one marked group of fish is necessary for each production release. The level of marking varies according to location, species, and age at release. In general, 50,000 fish are marked with a coded-wire tag (CWT) to represent each production release group at hatcheries below John Day Dam. More than 100,000 fish per group are usually marked at hatcheries above John Day Dam. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC.

  17. Fish Research Project, Oregon : Evaluation of the Success of Supplementing Imnaha River Steelhead with Hatchery Reared Smolts: Phase One : Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Richard W.; Whitesel, Timothy A.; Jonasson, Brian C.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two streams in the Imnaha River subbasin (Camp Creek and Little Sheep Creek) and eight streams in the Grande Ronde River subbasin (Catherine, Deer, Five Points, Fly, Indian, Lookingglass, Meadow, and Sheep creeks) were selected as study streams to evaluate the success and impacts of steelhead supplementation in northeast Oregon. The habitat of the study streams was inventoried to compare streams and to evaluate whether habitat might influence the performance parameters we will measure in the study. The mean fecundity of hatchery and natural steelhead 1-salts returning to Little Sheep Creek fish facility in 1990 and 1991 ranged from 3,550 to 4,663 eggs/female; the mean fecundity of hatchery and natural steelhead 2-salts ranged from 5,020 to 5,879 eggs/female. Variation in length explained 57% of the variation in fecundity of natural steelhead, but only 41% to 51% of the variation in fecundity of hatchery steelhead. Adult steelhead males had an average spermatocrit of 43.9% at spawning. We were also able to stain sperm cells so that viable cells could be distinguished from dead cells. Large, red disc tags may be the most useful for observing adults on the spawning grounds. The density of wild, juvenile steelhead ranged from 0 fish/l00{sup 2} to 35.1 (age-0) and 14.0 (age-1) fish/l00m{sup 2}. Evidence provided from the National Marine Fisheries Service suggests that hatchery and wild fish within a subbasin are genetically similar. The long-term experimental design is presented as a component of this report.

  18. Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids : Phase 1, Examination of Fish at Lookingglass Hatchery in 1996 : Addendum to Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groberg, Warren J.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This information is an addendum to the report 'Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids, Phase 1: Examination of Fish at Lower Granite Dam, July 2, 1996' by Ralph Elston because there may be relevant observations included here. The author of this document participated in the examinations at Lower Granite Dam described in that report. Because of Endangered Species Act issues, the Rapid River stock of spring chinook salmon reared at Lookingglass Hatchery on the Grande Ronde River in northeastern Oregon are annually being captured as returning adults at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River and trucked to Lookingglass. During the peak migration period they are held in an adult holding facility at Lower Granite for as long as 72 hours and then transported by truck to Lookingglass for holding in an adult pond for spawning. In 1996 a total of 572 adults were transported from Lower Granite Dam between May 3 and August 6. Two-hundred eighty-one of these were later transported from Lookingglass to Wallowa Hatchery for artificial spawning and the remaining 291 were held for spawning at Lookingglass. On May 21, 24, 30 and June 2, 1996 hatchery personnel identified a total of 32 off-loaded fish with lesions on the dorsal area of the head they described as having the appearance of blisters (Robert Lund personal communication). By date these are shown in Table 1 (fish with similar lesions were also observed on May 27 but the number of these was not recorded). Such lesions were not observed on fish offloaded on any other dates. On May 24, 1996 hatchery personnel took photographs of fish with these lesions but do to light-meter problems the photographs did not turn out. On June 28, 1996 personnel of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Fish Pathology laboratory in La Grande were notified by James Lauman, ODFW Northeast Region supervisor, of discussions and concerns of head burn on returning adult chinook while he was on a visitation to Lower Granite Dam. That led to subsequent investigations at Lower Granite Dam (Ralph Elston 1996) and Lookingglass Hatchery. The results of the Lookingglass investigations are reported here.

  19. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispell Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); O'Connor, Dick (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of seven streams and four lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2000. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in southern Pend Oreille County, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2001. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  20. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  1. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  2. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA)

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  3. A broken material approach to modeling oil sand under dynamic load Tim Grain Joseph, Ph.D., P.Eng.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Tim Grain

    by Joseph (2003), providing a unique material behaviour relationship, allows the compounding problem and early structural damage via fatigue failure mechanisms. The root cause has been identified by Joseph process to production measurement and structural component life. For the most part this work has

  4. Superconducting Magnets Research for a Viable US Fusion Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    refrigeration efficiency and nuclear heating handling. http://magnet.fsu.edu/~lee/plot/plot.htm HTS Range LTSSuperconducting Magnets Research for a Viable US Fusion Program Joseph V. Minervini, Leslie Gaithersburg Marriott Washingtonian Center #12;Magnet Technology Enables Magnetic Confinement Fusion · Magnets

  5. External Fellowships American Psychological Association (APA) Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) Research Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Program: http://www.sreb.org/page/1074/doctoral_scholars.html February American Statistical Association.aera.net/grantsprogram/res_training/diss_grants/DGFly.html American Statistical Association: Mary G. and Joseph Natrella Scholarship: httpExternal Fellowships January American Psychological Association (APA) Minority Fellowship Program

  6. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News,Program Direction and Analysis DeputyStructure

  7. OE's SGIG Program Featured in International Publication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An article in the March 2012 issue of the quarterly publication Metering International focuses on DOE's Smart Grid Investment Grant program, highlighting how the program is improving the reliability and resiliency of the US electric grid. The article examines the need to protect the grid and the benefits of modernization, including reduced demand, increased capacity, and faster recovery. OE's Debbie Haught, who oversees the SGIG program, and Joseph Palladino, who leads the analysis of the program, authored the piece. Metering International provides information on trends and developments in the industry.

  8. Instrument effects in polarized infrared images Joseph A. Shaw, MEMBER SPIE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Instrument effects in polarized infrared images Joseph A. Shaw, MEMBER SPIE NOAA Environmental and fric- tional heating of the polarizer mount. Our model shows that the two surfaces of a wire uncertainties less than 1%. Subject terms: infrared polarization; thermal imaging; remote sensing. Optica

  9. Fractal laser glints from the ocean surface Joseph A. Shaw and James H. Churnside

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Fractal laser glints from the ocean surface Joseph A. Shaw and James H. Churnside National Oceanic of laser glint counts from the ocean surface exhibit fractal behavior. Glint-count histogram widths do not follow Gaussian statistics, and histogram shapes are approximately log normal. Fractal dimen- sions

  10. Noisy Processing and the Distillation of Private States Joseph M. Renes1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noisy Processing and the Distillation of Private States Joseph M. Renes1 and Graeme Smith2 1 general private state is distilled. Besides a more general target state, the usual entanglement distillation tools are employed (in par- ticular, Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS)-like codes), with the crucial

  11. Radio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    . Introduction 1.1. TGF Theory Overview [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bright bursts of gamma raysRadio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1 and Steven A. Cummer2 Received frequency (RF) emissions by terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) is developed. These radio emissions, which

  12. Kelliher. Joseph' To: "Karen_Y._Knutson@ovp.eop.gov%internet

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Subject: renewablesalternative fuels aS5jbw.dat 35ASC571 12986 DOE016-3350 CharlesM.Smith@o To: Juleanna-R.Glover@ovp.eop.gov, Joseph.Kelliher@HQ.DOE.gov, vp.eop.gov...

  13. Are Peasants Risk-Averse Decision joseph henrich and richard mcelreath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McElreath, Richard

    actually results from ra- tional cost benefit analysis in which individuals make risk-averse decisions views of risk-averse decision making may not be the best theoretical tools for understanding "peasant172 Reports Are Peasants Risk-Averse Decision Makers?1 joseph henrich and richard mcelreath

  14. Dr. Joseph A. Shaw Electrical & Computer Engineering Dept., Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Dr. Joseph A. Shaw Electrical & Computer Engineering Dept., Montana State University, Bozeman, MT M.S. Electrical Engineering University of Utah 1987 B.S. Electrical Engineering University of Alaska Experience: 2008 ­ present Professor ­ Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE) Department, Montana State

  15. Best Management Practices for Hybrid Striped Bass Culture Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    in from Kansas on May 15 while sunshine bass were shipped in from Keo-Fish Farms, AR two days later. FryBest Management Practices for Hybrid Striped Bass Culture Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris Goals and Objectives: o Perform literature search on extensively-reared hybrid striped bass (HSB

  16. Transition Metal Dimer Internuclear Distances from Measured Force Constants Joseph L. Jules and John R. Lombardi*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    Transition Metal Dimer Internuclear Distances from Measured Force Constants Joseph L. Jules distances, have been extended to the transition metal dimers to test which one gives the most accurate fit's and Guggenheimer's for the transition metal dimers. Although Pauling's rule gives the best results, the remarkable

  17. Telos: Enabling Ultra-Low Power Wireless Research Joseph Polastre, Robert Szewczyk, and David Culler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culler, David E.

    Telos: Enabling Ultra-Low Power Wireless Research Joseph Polastre, Robert Szewczyk, and David,szewczyk,culler}@cs.berkeley.edu Abstract-- We present Telos, an ultra low power wireless sensor module ("mote") for research and 128kB of flash), extensive sensor interfaces (8 analog lines, several digital IO Fig. 1. Telos ultra-low

  18. 2005 Joseph Sussman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 WHERE TRANSPORTATION IS GOING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    of Technology 7 C L I O S System TRANSPORTING SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL Large-scale in · Geographic extent of Technology 8 C L I O S System TRANSPORTING SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL Transportation interconnected with: · Energy© 2005 Joseph Sussman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 WHERE TRANSPORTATION IS GOING

  19. The Joseph Bittorf Memorial Expendable Scholarship Fund in Industrial and Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    The Joseph Bittorf Memorial Expendable Scholarship Fund in Industrial and Systems Engineering), with preference given to a sophomore-level student, majoring in Industrial and Systems Engineering at Northern in Industrial and Systems Engineering. Candidates must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.8 on a 4.0 grade

  20. The Joseph Bittorf Memorial Expendable Scholarship Fund in Industrial and Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    The Joseph Bittorf Memorial Expendable Scholarship Fund in Industrial and Systems Engineering 2012), with preference given to a sophomore-level student, majoring in Industrial and Systems Engineering at Northern be a declared major in Industrial and Systems Engineering. Candidates must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2

  1. Terahertz spectroscopy of intrinsic biomarkers for non-melanoma skin Cecil S. Joseph1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Terahertz spectroscopy of intrinsic biomarkers for non-melanoma skin cancer. Cecil S. Joseph1 of human cancers. The aim of this study was to identify intrinsic biomarkers for non-melanoma skin cancer wave terahertz imaging, skin cancer imaging 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Non-melanoma

  2. The Challenge of Greening Energy Systems1 Alain Joseph and Larry Hughes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    in the implementation of biomass, wind, and solar energy. Price and implementation challenges in the renewables sector of rising world energy prices and the potential `peaking' of liquid and gaseous fossil-fuel suppliesERG2006/11 The Challenge of Greening Energy Systems1 Alain Joseph and Larry Hughes Energy Research

  3. Circles Minimize most Knot Energies Aaron Abrams, Jason Cantarella, 1 and Joseph H. Fu, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantarella, Jason

    Circles Minimize most Knot Energies Aaron Abrams, Jason Cantarella, 1 and Joseph H. Fu, 2 Department of Mathematics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 Abstract We define a new class of knot energies (known as renormalization energies) and prove that a broad class of these energies

  4. Fourier Series Just before 1800, the French mathematician/physicist/engineer Jean Baptiste Joseph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olver, Peter

    Chapter 12 Fourier Series Just before 1800, the French mathematician/physicist/engineer Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier made an astonishing discovery. As a result of his investigations into the partial dif- ferential equations modeling vibration and heat propagation in bodies, Fourier was led to claim

  5. Graphene Materials and Their Use in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Joseph D. Roy-Mayhew,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    Graphene Materials and Their Use in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Joseph D. Roy-Mayhew, and Ilhan A Applications in Other Types of Solar Cells U 7. Conclusions and Outlook U Author Information V Corresponding Author V Notes V Biographies V Acknowledgments V Abbreviations V References W 1. INTRODUCTION Dye-sensitized

  6. Graphene Materials and Their Use in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Joseph D. Roy-Mayhew,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    Graphene Materials and Their Use in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Joseph D. Roy-Mayhew, and Ilhan A References 6345 1. INTRODUCTION Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have taken up broad interest. Graphene Applications in Other Types of Solar Cells 6343 7. Conclusions and Outlook 6343 Author Information

  7. Peristaltic pumping and irreversibility of a Stokesian viscoelastic fluid Joseph Teran,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelley, Michael

    Peristaltic pumping and irreversibility of a Stokesian viscoelastic fluid Joseph Teran,1 Lisa Fauci, USA Received 28 January 2008; accepted 1 July 2008; published online 28 July 2008 Peristaltic pumping in the esophagus, intestine, oviduct, and ureter. While peristaltic pumping of a Newtonian fluid is well understood

  8. Universit Joseph Fourier Master 2 Recherche -Systmes et Logiciels Gestion de ressources dans les services Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pous, Damien

    Université Joseph Fourier Master 2 Recherche - Systèmes et Logiciels Gestion de ressources dans machines devient donc un réel problème, et on a désormais besoin de solutions de gestion de ressources pour-même suivis de serveurs de base de données. Les approches actuelles de gestion de ressources dans les services

  9. Minimum-Energy Topology Control Algorithms in Ad Hoc Joseph Y. Halpern Li (Erran) Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpern, Joseph Y.

    for an extended period of time. In order to accomplish this without a renewable energy source, energy conservationMinimum-Energy Topology Control Algorithms in Ad Hoc Networks1 Joseph Y. Halpern Li (Erran) Li Dept Holmdel, NJ 07733 halpern@cs.cornell.edu erranlli@dnrc.bell-labs.com August 7, 2004 1 Based on "Minimum-Energy

  10. Cavitation and the state of stress in a flowing liquid Daniel D. Joseph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Daniel D.

    Cavitation and the state of stress in a flowing liquid Daniel D. Joseph University of Minnesota The problem of the inception of cavitation is formulated in terms of a compar- ison of the breaking strength or cavitation threshold at each point of a liquid sam- ple with the principal stresses there. A criterion

  11. Cavitation and the state of stress in a flowing liquid Daniel D. Joseph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Daniel D.

    Cavitation and the state of stress in a flowing liquid Daniel D. Joseph University of Minnesota The problem of the inception of cavitation is formulated in terms of a compar­ ison of the breaking strength or cavitation threshold at each point of a liquid sam­ ple with the principal stresses there. A criterion

  12. MINORITY OPINION APPENDIX E FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM E-1 December 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as accelerated diversion screening, hatchery reforms, harvest restrictions and surface collectors are entirely

  13. Onsite Backup Generation and Interruption Insurance for Electricity Distribution Author(s): Joseph A. Doucet and Shmuel S. Oren

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Onsite Backup Generation and Interruption Insurance for Electricity Distribution Author(s): Joseph customerownedonsitebackupdecisionswillpre-emptthe utility'splan to mitigatecompensationpaymentsbyprovidingonsitebackup generation access to The Energy Journal. http://www.jstor.org #12;Onsite Backup Generation and Interruption

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Andrew Roach, Chris Forrest, Jedaiah van Dijk, Jessica Herman, Joseph Kim, Ricky Sangha,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Andrew Roach, Chris ( Ricky Sangha ( )Svyatoslav Korshunov ( Joseph Kim ( Andrew Roach ( #12;ii Rainwater Harvesting System

  15. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

  16. Updated 1-12 Joseph B. Marshall, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / Comptroller in June 2006. In this position, he serves as the chief financial executive for Navy Medicine transactions for all of Navy's medical activities. He also leads the planning, programming, and budgeting process throughout Navy Medicine, interfacing directly with both Navy and Office of the Secretary

  17. Joseph M. Groves | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin HERO MarinersJoint Trade-22,JorgeJoseph M.

  18. Joseph M. Hendrie, 1970 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin HERO MarinersJoint Trade-22,JorgeJoseph

  19. Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 4 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroder, S.L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Watson, B.D. (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September of 2003, twenty-nine hatchery and twenty-eight wild spring chinook adults were placed into the observation stream located at the Cle Elum Supplementation Research Facility. In, addition 20 precocious males, 7 hatchery and 13 wild, were simultaneously released into the structure. As in previous years, the fish had small amounts of fin material removed prior to being introduced into the stream so that microsatellite DNA based pedigree analyses could be performed on their subsequent progeny. The entire 127 m long by 7.9 m wide stream was made available to this group of fish. Continuous behavioral observations were made while the females prepared nests and spawned. Moreover, standard measurements of adult longevity, spawning participation, water velocity, redd sizes, gravel composition, water temperature and flow were taken. Fry produced from these fish started to emigrate from the stream in early January 2004. They were trapped and sub-sampled for later microsatellite DNA analyses. In mid May of 2004 fry emergence from the channel was complete and residual fish were captured by seine and electro-fishing so that the entire juvenile population could be proportionately sampled. Audiotape records of the behavior of wild and hatchery adults spawning in the observation stream in 2001 were transcribed into continuous ethograms. Courting, agonistic, and location data were extracted from these chronological records and analyzed to characterize the reproductive behavior of both hatchery and wild fish. In addition, a ''gold standard'' pedigree analysis was completed on the fry originating from the adults placed into the observation stream in 2001. Behavioral and morphological data collected on hatchery and wild males were linked to the results of the pedigree analysis to ascertain what factors affected their reproductive success (RS) or capacity to produce fry. Individual RS values were calculated for each male placed into the observation stream and the coefficient of variation calculated from these values was greater than 100%. To determine what might be responsible for this degree of variation we examined the relative importance of a variety of physical and behavioral traits. Relative body size, for example, was found not be an important predictor of reproductive success. Instead, the capacity to court females and dominate sexual rivals was directly associated with male RS. However, males that had low dominance scores were also successful at producing offspring. These individuals utilized alternative behavioral strategies to gain close proximity to females and were successful in their attempts to fertilize eggs. Observations made on the color patterns of males showed dominance was closely linked with the possession of an overall black or dark brown color pattern. In addition, we discovered that males that had multiple mates achieved higher RS values than those who spawned with fewer females. The approach we are taking to compare the reproductive competency of hatchery and wild fish is to first determine the factors that are strongly linked to reproductive behavior and then assess whether significant differences occur in the expression of these traits based on the fish origin. Transcriptions of audiotapes are continuing and a second gold standard pedigree analyses on the fry produced from adults placed into the observation stream in 2002 is nearing completion. Future work will be directed at discovering the factors that affect female RS values. In the fall of 2004 we will again liberate hatchery and wild fish simultaneously into the entire observation stream to continue our efforts to objectively determine if differences in RS are caused by fish origin.

  20. Annual Stock Assessment - CWT [Coded Wire Tag program] (USFWS), Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the 'Missing Production Groups'. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980s are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. This program is now referred to as 'Annual Stock Assessment - CWT'. The objectives of the 'Annual Stock Assessment' program are to: (1) estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) estimate the contribution of each production group to fisheries, and (3) prepare an annual report for USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC. This report has been prepared annually starting with the report labeled 'Annual Report 1994'. Although the current report has the title 'Annual Report 2007', it was written in fall of 2008 using data available from RMIS that same year, and submitted as final in January 2009. The main objective of the report is to evaluate survival of groups which have been tagged under this ongoing project.

  1. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

  2. Heavyweight Applications of Lightweight User Models UM 2001 Invited Talk Copyright 2001 Joseph A. Konstan July 16, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Heavyweight Applications of Lightweight User Models UM 2001 Invited Talk Copyright 2001 Joseph A. Konstan July 16, 2001 UM 2001 1 Heavyweight Applications of Lightweight User Models Collaborative@cs.umn.edu http://www.grouplens.org UM 2001 2 Where We're Going · So much with so little ­ the power

  3. Modeling Foamy Oil Flow in Porous Media D.D. Joseph, A.M. Kamp, R. Bai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Daniel D.

    Modeling Foamy Oil Flow in Porous Media D.D. Joseph½, A.M. Kamp¾, R. Bai½ ½Univ. of Minnesota, Dept, PO Box 76343, Caracas 1070-A, Venezuela October 2001 Abstract Certain heavy oils which foam under so- lution gas drive. These oils not only stabilize foam, but also stabilize dis- persion of gas

  4. Isotopic Tracer Studies of Propane Reactions on H-ZSM5 Zeolite Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique Iglesia*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Isotopic Tracer Studies of Propane Reactions on H-ZSM5 Zeolite Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique unlabeled products from mixtures of propene and propane-2-13C reactants. Aromatic products of propane-2-13C-Parmer) that allowed differential reactor operation (propane reactions were

  5. Non-oxidative reactions of propane on Zn/Na-ZSM5 Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique Iglesia*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Non-oxidative reactions of propane on Zn/Na-ZSM5 Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique Iglesia* Department rates during propane conversion at 773 K on Zn/Na-ZSM5 are about ten times higher than on Zn/H-ZSM5 catalysts with similar Zn content. The total rate of propane conversion is also higher on Zn/Na-ZSM5

  6. Synthesis of Polyfluorenes with Pendant Silylcarboranes Yoan C. Simon, Joseph J. Peterson, Christine Mangold, Kenneth R. Carter,* and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Synthesis of Polyfluorenes with Pendant Silylcarboranes Yoan C. Simon, Joseph J. Peterson ReceiVed NoVember 3, 2008 ABSTRACT: The synthesis of a novel silylcarborane-containing fluorene monomer-workers on pyrroles and thiophene has underlined the advantage of introducing carboranes as a way to reinforce

  7. By Joseph M. Gambogi Titanium (Ti) is a lightweight metal well Springs, FL; E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 TITANIUM By Joseph M. Gambogi Titanium (Ti) is a lightweight metal well Springs, FL; E. I. du mineral strength-to-weight ratio. Titanium comprises sands deposits; and P. W. Gillibrand Co., Simi about, rutile, and producer of natural rutile. Kerr-McGee sphene. Although titanium is best known for its

  8. Structure and Dynamics of Acetonitrile Confined in a Silica Nanopore Liwen Cheng, Joseph A. Morrone, and B. J. Berne*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berne, Bruce J.

    Structure and Dynamics of Acetonitrile Confined in a Silica Nanopore Liwen Cheng, Joseph A. Morrone York 10027, United States ABSTRACT: Acetonitrile confined in silica nanopores with surfaces of varying. It is found that acetonitrile orders into bilayer like structures near the surface, in agreement with prior

  9. Data Detection for Two-Dimensional ISI Channels Joseph A. O'Sullivan, Naveen Singla, Yunxiang Wu, Ronald S. Indeck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, Joseph A.

    1 Data Detection for Two-Dimensional ISI Channels Joseph A. O'Sullivan, Naveen Singla, Yunxiang Wu-mail:{jao, singla, ywu, rsi}@ee.wustl.edu Introduction Two-dimensional (2-D) inter symbol interference (ISI) arises-D ISI channels. The motivation for considering 2-D recording is two fold; firstly, as 1-D recording

  10. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the `Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to Inform Columbia River Basin Hatchery Operations and the Funding of Mitchell Act Hatchery Programs (Columbia Basin Hatchery EIS).' The Hatchery EIS is now nearing completion about the EIS process and drafts. The lead presenter from NOAA will be Rob Jones, Hatcheries and Inland

  11. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a 3-day block throughout the study period. Hydroacoustic technology was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The hydroacoustic system in 2003 comprised seven splitbeam transducers arrayed in front of the strobe lights, two multibeam transducers behind the lights, and a mobile splitbeam system. The seven splitbeam transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. These transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on an aluminum frame floating upstream of the barge and looked vertically downward. The multibeam transducers monitored the distribution of fish directly behind and to both sides of the lights, while the mobile splitbeam system looked at the distribution of fish within the third powerplant forebay. To augment the hydroacoustic data, additional studies were conducted. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the third powerplant forebay were measured, and acoustically tagged juvenile kokanee were released upstream of the strobe lights and tracked within the forebay and downstream of the dam. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on kokanee and rainbow trout focused on the number of fish detected in each of the areas covered by one of the downlooking transducers, the timing of fish arrivals after the status of the strobe lights changed, fish swimming effort (detected velocity minus flow velocity), and fish swimming direction. Water velocity measurements were used to determine fish swimming effort. The tracking of tagged kokanee provided data on fish movements into and out of the third powerplant forebay, including entrainment.

  12. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or upstream. Fish were also swimming faster and straighter when the lights were on compared to off. (3) The behavioral results were most pronounced for medium- and large-sized fish at night. Medium-sized fish, based on acoustic target strength, were similar to the size of kokanee and rainbow trout released upstream of Grand Coulee Dam. Based on this study and general review of strobe lights, the researchers recommend several modifications and enhancements to the follow-on study in 2002. The recommendations include: (1) modifying the study design to include only the 24-hr on/off treatments, and controlling the discharge at the third powerplant, so it can be included as a design variable; and (2) providing additional data by beginning the study earlier (mid-May) to better capture the kokanee population, deploying an additional splitbeam transducer to sample the region close to the lights, and increasing the number of lights to provide better definition of the lit and unlit region.

  13. GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SELF STUDY GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE COLLEGE OF LIBERALARTS TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY March 2007 #12;SELF STUDY GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT........................................................................................ 4 Brief History of Degree Programs and the Department

  14. VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Jennifer EI Butler, Mary A. EI Kabat, Gale E. EI Raghuveer, Tejasvi EI Slater-Thompson, Nancy S. EI Anderson, Sue A. EM Govans, Desiree EM Payer, Joseph G. EM Pope, Leisa...

  15. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook and Juvenile-to-Adult PIT-tag Retention; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the first in an anticipated series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2001 and March 31, 2002. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons.

  16. Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt-to-adult (SAR) survival rate guidelines. The observed low SAR was due to precocity, straying, and incidence of BKD in the spring Chinook program; which ultimately led to the program's inability to achieve the subbasin's overly optimistic biological fish objectives. The summer steelhead hatchery program was not providing the fishery or population benefits anticipated and will be discontinued. The winter steelhead program was performing as planned and no changes are foreseen. This updated Master Plan addresses the several proposed changes to the existing HRPP, which are described.

  17. Investigation of high temperature gaseous species by Knudsen cell mass spectrometry above the condensed systems Au-Ge-Cu and Au-Si / by Joseph Edward Kingcade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kingcade, Joseph Edward

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Chemistry INVESTIGATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GASEOUS SPECIES BY KNUDSEN CELL MASS SPECTROMETRY ABOVE THE CONDENSED SYSTEMS Au-Ge-Cu AND Au-Si A Thesis by Joseph Edward Kingcade Jr. Approved as to style and content by: ( Chairman of omittee ) ( Head... of Department ) /& I) au~ ( Member ) ( Member ) May 1 978 ABS TRAC T Investigation of High Temperature Gaseous Species by Knudsen Cell Mass Spectrometry Above the Condensed Systems Au-Ge-Cu and Au-Si. ( May 1978 ) Joseph Edward Kingcade Jr. , B. Sc...

  18. LSRCP Response to ISRP Snake River Fall Chinook Program Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M & E needs necessary to obtain an ESA section 10 permit to operate Lyons Ferry Hatchery. LSRCP assumes that the Section 10 permit will be consistent with the Snake River Fall Chinook Recovery Plan when Plans (HGMPs) and received ESA Section 10 Permit coverage. 2. Evaluate hatchery/wild salmon interactions

  19. Nox2 redox signaling maintains essential cell populations in the Bryan C Dickinson1, Joseph Peltier2, Daniel Stone2, David V Schaffer2, and Christopher J

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, David V.

    Nox2 redox signaling maintains essential cell populations in the brain Bryan C Dickinson1, Joseph Peltier2, Daniel Stone2, David V Schaffer2, and Christopher J Chang1,3 1Department of Chemistry indicator for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), we show that adult hippocampal stem/progenitor cells (AHPs) generate

  20. Jimmy Krozel is with Metron Aviation, Inc., Herndon, VA. Changkil Lee and Joseph S.B. Mitchell are with Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Joseph S.B.

    [Federal Aviation Administration, 2003]) lists weather as the leading cause (65% to 75%) of delays greater inclement weather, throughput is adversely affected. The Aviation Capacity Enhancement Plan (FAA ACE Plan. Jimmy Krozel is with Metron Aviation, Inc., Herndon, VA. Changkil Lee and Joseph S.B. Mitchell

  1. AN ABSTRACT OF THE THESIS OF Joseph M. Skitka for the degree of Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering presented on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Sourabh V.

    of a Cartesian-Grid-Based Solver for an Oscillatory Boundary Layer over a Rough Wall by Joseph M. Skitka Boundary Layer over a Rough Wall Abstract approved: Sourabh V. Apte Predominant models for predicting rates of sediment transport face acute shortcomings when applied to coastal boundary layers [58]. This is due

  2. By Joseph Gambogi Titanium comprises about 0.62% of the Earth's crust and At yearend, only 267 metric tons of rutile were left in the NDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 TITANIUM By Joseph Gambogi Titanium comprises about 0.62% of the Earth's crust and At yearend, ilmenite, as uncommitted inventory. None of the titanium sponge in the leucoxene, perovskite, rutile, and sphene. Elemental titanium, NDS was authorized for disposal. The NDS inventory of Ti, is a lightweight

  3. Distributed ITS Control and the Oklahoma Virtual TMC Basel H. Kilani, Ekasit Vorakitolan, Joseph P. Havlicek, Monte P. Tull, and Alan R. Stevenson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Havlicek, Joebob

    Distributed ITS Control and the Oklahoma Virtual TMC Basel H. Kilani, Ekasit Vorakitolan, Joseph P responses. Early in the development of the Oklahoma statewide ITS, it became clear that the costs associated of congestion in the USA in 2005 This work was supported in part by grants from the Oklahoma Depart- ment

  4. Handey: A Robot System that Recognizes, Plans, and Manipulates Tomas Lozano-PCrez,Joseph L. Jones, Emmanuel Mazer-, Patrick A. O'Donnell, W. Eric L. Grimson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Perez, Tomas

    Handey: A Robot System that Recognizes, Plans, and Manipulates Tomas Lozano-PCrez,Joseph L. Jones, France. Abstract. We describe a robot system capable of locating a part in an unstructured pile of the part to be manipulated, the robot arm, and any other fixed objects in the environment. In addition

  5. Federal Energy Management Program Report Template

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SRA International, Inc. Joseph McCabe SRA International, Inc. Andrew Truitt SRA International, Inc. Joshua Moore Stion Corporation David Kavulak SunPower Denis de Ceuster...

  6. Euclid Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming Compiling and linking programs on Euclid. Compiling Codes How to compile and link MPI codes on Euclid. Read More Using the ACML Math Library How to...

  7. Student Internship Programs Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Student Internship Programs Program Description The objective of the Laboratory's student internship programs is to provide students with opportunities for meaningful hands- on...

  8. BulletinVol. 66 -No. 26 August 3, 2012 JosephRubinoD0040712

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    recognition by leading scien- tists for singular contributions to physics, and election to its leadership that will benefit humanity. Aronson will work closely with the APS as it issues research journals, conducts scientific meetings, and maintains aggressive international education, and outreach programs. See APS VP

  9. Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes Program Career: Descripton College School;Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes Program Career: Descripton College School/ College 1

  10. Draft Environmental ImpactDraft Environmental Impact Statement to InformStatement to InformStatement to InformStatement to Inform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HatcheryHatchery ProgramsPrograms (AKA Th Mit h ll A t EIS)(AKA Th Mit h ll A t EIS)(AKA: The Mitchell Act EIS)(AKA: The Mitchell Act EIS) Purpose of the EISPurpose of the EIS Develop a NMFS policy direction of individual Columbia River basin hatchery programs under the Endangered Species Act #12;The EIS

  11. Sponsored Program Resources SPONSORED PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Sponsored Program Resources - 1 - SPONSORED PROGRAMS Sponsored programs are research, instruction for sponsored programs is provided through an agreement between the sponsor and Syracuse University are being achieved and funds properly used Sponsored programs are managed by the Office of Sponsored

  12. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experience, is a unique educational program designed to introduce students in geophysics and related fields to "hands on" geophysical exploration and research. The program...

  13. Program Administration

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume describes program administration that establishes and maintains effective organizational management and control of the emergency management program. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  14. Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    162 Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee Walter Whitfield Isle, Chair (English) Katherine Bennett Ensor (Statistics) Mark R. Wiesner (Civil and Environmental Engineering) Donald Ostdiek (Architecture) The Environmental Programs Committee coordinates courses and curricula on environmental topics

  15. Accessible programming using program synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Rishabh

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New computing platforms have greatly increased the demand for programmers, but learning to program remains a big challenge. Program synthesis techniques have the potential to revolutionize programming by making it more ...

  16. OkanoganRiver Summer/FallChinookSalmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN (HGMP) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency/Operator: Watershed B.5 Tribal Incidental Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 98 Upper Columbia River Steelhead Table B.6

  17. Advances in SiGe HBT BiCMOS Technology A. Joseph, L. Lanzerotti, X. Liu, D. Sheridan, J. Johnson, Q. Liu, J. Dunn, J.-S. Rieh*, and D. Harame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieh, Jae-Sung

    Advances in SiGe HBT BiCMOS Technology A. Joseph, L. Lanzerotti, X. Liu, D. Sheridan, J. Johnson, Q Email: josepha@us.ibm.com, Phone: 802-769-469 Abstract -- Silicon Germanium (SiGe) Heterojunction marketplace by offering a cost competitive solution for myriad of products. SiGe BiCMOS technologies currently

  18. Yakima Hatchery Experimental Design : Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busack, Craig; Knudsen, Curtis; Marshall, Anne

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report details the results and status of Washington Department of Fisheries' (WDF) pre-facility monitoring, research, and evaluation efforts, through May 1991, designed to support the development of an Experimental Design Plan (EDP) for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), previously termed the Yakima/Klickitat Production Project (YKPP or Y/KPP). This pre- facility work has been guided by planning efforts of various research and quality control teams of the project that are annually captured as revisions to the experimental design and pre-facility work plans. The current objective are as follows: to develop genetic monitoring and evaluation approach for the Y/KPP; to evaluate stock identification monitoring tools, approaches, and opportunities available to meet specific objectives of the experimental plan; and to evaluate adult and juvenile enumeration and sampling/collection capabilities in the Y/KPP necessary to measure experimental response variables.

  19. 2008 Academic Program Review Graduate Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 Academic Program Review of Graduate Programs November 2008 Texas A&M University College ........................................................................................................12 III. Graduate Program.....................................................................................................14 B. Educational Programs

  20. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Approach, for Determining the Effects of Hatchery Reforms on Extinction Risk and Recovery ................................................................................................................................. 2 Proposal 10: A Tool for Evaluating Risks and Benefits of Reform Actions in Hatchery Programs (WDFW)................................................................................................................................3 Proposal 13: Analytical Approach for Determination of Effects of Hatchery Reform on Extinction

  1. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Approach, for Determining the Effects of Hatchery Reforms on Extinction Risk and Recovery ................................................................................................................................. 2 Proposal 10: A Tool for Evaluating Risks and Benefits of Reform Actions in Hatchery Programs (WDFW)................................................................................................................................2 Proposal 13: Analytical Approach for Determination of Effects of Hatchery Reform on Extinction

  2. Bridge Funding Program 2013 Recipients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    , Biological Sciences The impacts of dispersal and clonal diversity on the stability of environmentally forced and Computer Engineering Sonic Infrared Imaging Non-destructive Evaluation of Advanced Composite Materials Sandra Jacobson and Joseph Jacobson, Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences Etiology and Prevention

  3. Tucannon River Spring Chinook Salmon Captive Broodstock Program, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallinat, Michael; Varney, Michelle

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the objectives, tasks, and accomplishments of the Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program during 2002. The WDFW initiated a captive broodstock program in 1997. The overall goal of the Tucannon River captive broodstock program is for the short-term, and eventually long-term, rebuilding of the Tucannon River spring chinook salmon run, with the hope that natural production will sustain itself. The project goal is to rear captive salmon selected from the supplementation program to adults, spawn them, rear their progeny, and release approximately 150,000 smolts annually into the Tucannon River between 2003-2007. These smolt releases, in combination with the current hatchery supplementation program (132,000 smolts) and wild production, are expected to produce 600-700 returning adult spring chinook to the Tucannon River each year from 2005-2010. The captive broodstock program collected fish from five (1997-2001) brood years (BY). As of January 1, 2003, WDFW has approximately 11 BY 1998, 194 BY 1999, 314 BY 2000, 447 BY 2001, and 300 BY 2002 (for extra males) fish on hand at LFH. The 2002 eggtake from the 1997 brood year (Age 5) was 13,176 eggs from 10 ripe females. Egg survival was 22%. Mean fecundity based on the 5 fully spawned females was 1,803 eggs/female. The 2002 eggtake from the 1998 brood year (Age 4) was 143,709 eggs from 93 ripe females. Egg survival was 29%. Mean fecundity based on the 81 fully spawned females was 1,650 eggs/female. The 2002 eggtake from the 1999 brood year (Age 3) was 19,659 eggs from 18 ripe females. Egg survival was 55%. Mean fecundity based on the 18 fully spawned fish was 1,092 eggs/female. The total 2002 eggtake from the captive brood program was 176,544 eggs. A total of 120,833 dead eggs (68%) were removed with 55,711 live eggs remaining for the program. As of May 1, 2003 we had 46,417 BY 2002 captive brood progeny on hand A total of 20,592 excess BY 01 fish were marked as parr (AD/CWT) and released during May 2002 into the Tucannon River (rkm 40-45). This allowed us to stay within our maximum allowed number (150,000) of smolts released. On August 20, 97 (21 1998 BY and 76 1999 BY) adult captive broodstock were determined to be in excess of eggtake goals and were outplanted into the Tucannon River at Panjab Bridge (rkm 74.5). Released fish were tagged with Monel jaw tags and radio transmitters were inserted into ten females for tracking and monitoring. Due to the low frequency of natural spawning by released fish, high mortality due to predation and illegal harvest, and high egg mortality in the hatchery during 2002, priority will be to release excess progeny as parr to stay within smolt release goals rather than release excess captive broodstock as adults. During April 2003, WDFW volitionally released 140,396 BY 2001 captive broodstock progeny smolts from Curl Lake Acclimation Pond into the Tucannon River. These fish were marked with agency-only wire tags and no fin clips in order to differentiate them from the supplementation fish (CWT/Right Red VIE/No Finclip). A total of 1,007 captive brood progeny smolts were PIT tagged to compare their outmigration with smolts from the supplementation program (1,010 tagged). Monitoring their survival and future releases to adult returns, along with future natural production levels, will determine the success or failure of this captive broodstock program.

  4. Counterintelligence Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes Counterintelligence Program requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels: DOE 5670.3.

  5. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Description Discover E (Engineering) is an evening of interesting, interactive and fun engineering, science, math, and technology demonstrations for K-12 students and their...

  6. Programming Stage

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses plans for the acquisition and installation of operating environment hardware and software and design of a training program.

  7. Counterintelligence Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish the policies, procedures, and specific responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Counterintelligence (CI) Program. This directive does not cancel any other directive.

  8. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MATHCOUNTS is a national enrichment, coaching and competition program that promotes middle school mathematic achievement. The mission of MATHCOUNTS is to increase enthusiasm for...

  9. Community Leadership Certificate Program Program Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Community Leadership Certificate Program Program Overview The undergraduate Community Leadership Certificate Program is an interdisciplinary program where students from any major can explore leadership in community engagement and leadership. The program is based on a social justice model of leadership

  10. STATEMENT OF JOSEPH ROMM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and how U.S. companies are increasingly using the explosive growth in information and energy technology

  11. Rice, Bryan Joseph

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-RayReview/Verify3 The (4)He(gamma,dd)

  12. Solar Thermal Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This program is not currently accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future financing programs.

  13. ARRA Program Summary: Energy Smart Jobs Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARRA Program Summary: Energy Smart Jobs Program Statewide Program (Initially targeting urban 30,000 buildings surveyed, approximately 5,000 will be retrofitted, yielding approximately $40

  14. Machinist Pipeline/Apprentice Program Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Machinist PipelineApprentice Program Program Description The Machinist Pipeline Program was created by the Prototype Fabrication Division to fill a critical need for skilled...

  15. Programming models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, David J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Pherson, Allen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thorp, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barrett, Richard [SNL; Clay, Robert [SNL; De Supinski, Bronis [LLNL; Dube, Evi [LLNL; Heroux, Mike [SNL; Janssen, Curtis [SNL; Langer, Steve [LLNL; Laros, Jim [SNL

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A programming model is a set of software technologies that support the expression of algorithms and provide applications with an abstract representation of the capabilities of the underlying hardware architecture. The primary goals are productivity, portability and performance.

  16. SECO Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevino, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this web page address! ASSISTANCE AND FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES Energy Efficiency Technical Assistance Energy Efficiency Grants Renewable Energy Technology Grants Alternative Fuel Grants The LoanSTAR Revolving Loan Program Energy Efficiency... maximum of $50,000 per grant ? Funded on a reimbursement basis Renewable Energy Technology Grants ? Fort Worth ISD ? South Sills High School ? 5KW Wind Turbine Alternative Fuel Grants ? Grant program to convert city/county and ISD vehicle...

  17. Program Year 2008 State Energy Program Formula

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP), SEP Program Guidance Fiscal Year 2008, Program Year 2008, energy efficiency and renewable energy programs in the states, DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  18. CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM 2010 ANNUAL REPORT WITH STATISTICAL DATA FROM 2009 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS MEDICAL CENTER #12;2 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2 #12;3 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 3 UIMC CANCER PROGRAM CHANGING MULTIDISCIPLINARY CARE. FOR GOOD. #12;4 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT

  19. STEP Program Benchmark Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Program Benchmark Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  20. Maryland Efficiency Program Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maryland Efficiency Program Options, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  1. Program Summaries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35Information &Program PlanningProgram

  2. Proposed New Program: Planning New Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Proposed New Program: Planning New Programs Planning Program As outlined in the attached document, the Human Geography group is bringing forward a proposal for a new undergraduate program in Planning. The Curriculum Committee has discussed this program both last year, and in our Friday the 13th

  3. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Program Administrator Description

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Program Administrator Business Models, Program Administrator Description.

  4. Program Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers how to go about developing a human reliability program. In particular, it touches on conceptual thinking, raising awareness in an organization, the actions that go into developing a plan. It emphasizes evaluating all positions, eliminating positions from the pool due to mitigating factors, and keeping the process transparent. It lists components of the process and objectives in process development. It also touches on the role of leadership and the necessity for audit.

  5. Summer School Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summer School Programs Summer School Programs Focused technical enrichment programs. Contact Leader Francis J. Alexander (505) 665-4518 Email Deputy Carolyn Connor (505) 665-9891...

  6. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jay Nathwani Acting Program Manager Geothermal Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy The Geothermal Technologies Program Overview May 18 2010 Energy...

  7. Existing Facilities Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The NYSERDA Existing Facilities program merges the former Peak Load Reduction and Enhanced Commercial and Industrial Performance programs. The new program offers a broad array of different...

  8. EIS-0500: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0500: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer,...

  9. URBAN LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTAL PROGRAM APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    URBAN LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTAL PROGRAM APPLICATION as part of your Graduate College application to the Urban Leadership Program/Supervisor: #12;Part 3: LEADERSHIP EXPERIENCES: Identify any educational leadership experiences

  10. Solar Energy Incentives Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The deadline for the most recent solicitation under this program has now passed. The program is currently closed, pending revisions to the program guidelines. Please see the program web site...

  11. HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM date ­ November 23, 2004 · Contract end date ­ March 31, 2006 #12;Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania · Objectives ­ Capture

  12. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  13. Program Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prev next >Presentations Program Presentations

  14. Science Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomeland Science Stockpile2015HighlightsSciencePrograms

  15. Volunteer Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEureka Analytics and VisualizationVolunteer

  16. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriorityPetroleumNotActivities |Program

  17. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriorityPetroleumNotActivities |Program

  18. Program Managers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News,Program Direction and Analysis Deputy Director

  19. SCIENCE Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobs Running jobsS2.Tour"Program early

  20. Resource Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0 Resource Program

  1. Educational Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscoveringESnet UpdateEarthTroubleProgram

  2. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy management, and conservation strategies * Green building technologies * Building codes Program Design and Implementation * Policy and program development * Coordinating...

  3. Actuarial Sciences Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Purdue Actuarial Science Program is an interdisciplinary program offered jointly by the Department of Mathematics and Department of Statistics.

  4. Renewable Energy Grant Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: This program is no longer accepting applications. See the program web site for information regarding future solicitations. '''''

  5. SUNY Programs: Australia and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    SUNY Programs: Australia and New Zealand Semester, Academic Year and Short Term #12;1 Table of Contents How to Use this Booklet 1 Choosing a Program in Australia and New Zealand 2 Exchange vs. Study Abroad 3 Programs Outside Sydney and Melbourne 4 Programs in Melbourne 10 Programs in Sydney 12 Programs

  6. Proceedings of the 5. DOE review of laboratory programs for women

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fifth DOE Review of Laboratory Programs for Women was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, May 6--8, 1996, and was co-sponsored by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The 1996 Review was organized as a Professional Workshop, that is, there were Invited Talks, plus Oral and Poster Presentations from the participants. These sessions were organized around the Focus Topics selected for the Review. The Focus Topics were: school-lab programs, college programs, positive image of women, cultural audits, employee development, employee mentoring, networking, dependent care, and alternate work schedules. On Monday evening, Toni Joseph gave an informal talk to the participants. She stressed the importance of submitting the Action Items for the respective facilities, and assured them that they would be looked at by the Office of Energy Research. On Tuesday morning, the DOE Points-of-Contact (POC) presented an overview of the past Reviews to give some background on the present DOE Review, and discussed plans for the future. The Review concluded with Focus Sessions, one for each Focus Topic. Each of these sessions was charged with producing a report on the session topic. The Focus Group Reports are included in the Proceedings, along with abstracts to the invited talks, oral presentations and poster presentations.

  7. Proactive Management of Materials Degradation - A Review of Principles and Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Taylor, Theodore T.

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has undertaken a program to lay the technical foundation for defining proactive actions so that future degradation of materials in light water reactors (LWRs) is limited and, thereby, does not diminish either the integrity of important LWR components or the safety of operating plants. This technical letter report was prepared by staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the NRC Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) program and relies heavily on work that was completed by Dr. Joseph Muscara and documented in NUREG/CR-6923. This report concisely explains the basic principles of PMMD and its relationship to prognostics, provides a review of programs related to PMMD being conducted worldwide, and provides an assessment of the technical gaps in PMMD and prognostics that need to be addressed. This technical letter report is timely because the majority of the U.S. reactor fleet is applying for license renewal, and many plants are also applying for increases in power rating. Both of these changes could increase the likelihood of materials degradation and underline, therefore, the interest in proactive management in the future.

  8. International Programs and Services International Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    International Programs and Services _______________ 1.5 Page 1 International Programs and Services OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS Offices in Laurel Hall (970) 491-5917 www.international.colostate.edu James A. Cooney, Vice Provost for International Affairs The Office of International Programs acts

  9. International Programs and Services International Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    International Programs and Services International Programs and Services OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS Offices in Laurel Hall (970) 491-5917 international.colostate.edu James A. Cooney, Vice Provost for International Affairs The Office of International Programs acts as a catalyst for ideas that bring about

  10. Signature Program/Landmark Research Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Signature Program/Landmark Research Programs for the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences November 20, 2008 #12;SIGNATURE PROGRAM PROPOSAL: CARDIOVASCULAR SCIENCES/DEBAKEY INSTITUTE in Figure 1 to identify the participants in the cardiovascular science program and the central role

  11. Graduate Programs Auburn University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forestry Graduate Programs Auburn University Auburn University, Alabama 368495414 Programs://www.forestry.auburn.edu/graduate/ University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, California 947203114 Program: Forestry http://espm.berkeley.edu/gradprograms/grad_programs_mf.html Clemson University Clemson, South Carolina 29634 Program: Forest Resources http

  12. Postdoctoral Mentoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Postdoctoral Mentoring Program Procedures, Guidelines and Resources As one of the largest Mentoring Program Procedures, Guidelines and Resources Overview of the Mentoring Program: As one-wide postdoc mentoring program was implemented to help us fulfill this goal. The Mentoring Program's chief

  13. Program Management for Large Scale Engineering Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oehmen, Josef

    The goal of this whitepaper is to summarize the LAI research that applies to program management. The context of most of the research discussed in this whitepaper are large-scale engineering programs, particularly in the ...

  14. RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Committee Draft Guidebook Third Edition.D. Commissioner Associate Member Kate Zocchetti Project Manager Tony Gonçalves Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Panama Bartholomy Deputy Director Efficiency and Renewable Energy Division Melissa Jones Executive

  15. RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Staff Draft Guidebook Third Edition COMMISSION Kate Zocchetti Project Manager Tony Gonçalves Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Valerie Hall Deputy Director Efficiency and Renewable Energy Division Melissa Jones Executive Director The California

  16. RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Final Committee Draft Guidebook Third Edition.D. Commissioner Associate Member Kate Zocchetti Project Manager Tony Gonçalves Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Panama Bartholomy Deputy Director Efficiency and Renewable Energy Division Melissa Jones Executive

  17. Environmental Certificate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Environmental Management Certificate Program Accelerate Your Career Environmentaland Facilities of excellence. Environmental Management Certificate Program Compliance with regulatory requirements, remediation Irvine Extension's Certificate Program in Environmental Manage- ment prepares professionals at every

  18. Program Analyst (Recent Graduate)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is being filled under the Department of Energy's Recent Graduate Program. The Recent Graduate Program is a 1 year developmental program designed to promote careers in Federal Service...

  19. Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Land Management (BLM), and numerous county and local governments. The surveys have also involvedColorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan A Vision for Building Comprehensive Wetland Information for the State of Colorado Planning Years 2011­2015 #12;Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland

  20. Technology Innovation Program | Partnerships | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Program SHARE Technology Innovation Program The Technology Innovation Program (TIP) is a 1-year program designed to accelerate selected technologies to commercial...

  1. Approximating semidefinite packing programs ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we define semidefinite packing programs and describe an ... Semidefinite packing programs arise in many applications such as semidefinite.

  2. INL Small Business Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Business Program The Idaho National Laboratory Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Small Business Program is a fundamental component of the Supply Chain Management organization....

  3. Hydrogen Program Overview

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to the DOE Hydrogen Program. It describes the program mission and answers the question: “Why Hydrogen?”

  4. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JGI Fungal Genomics Program Igor V. Grigoriev 1 Lawrenceof California. JGI Fungal Genomics Program Contact: IgorJGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi,

  5. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    View Supports functional genomics, user data deposition andJGI Fungal Genomics Program Igor V. Grigoriev 1 DOE Jointof California. JGI Fungal Genomics Program Contact: Igor

  6. Fungal Genomics Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strains Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of xyloseFungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev 1 * (complex communities Fungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev

  7. Surety Bond Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Surety Bond Program, a program of the Maryland Small Business Development Financing Authority, assists eligible small businesses in obtaining bid, performance or payment bonds necessary to...

  8. Alternative Fuel Transportation Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets "Alternative Fuel Transportation Program" Dana O'Hara, DOE Ted Sears, NREL Vehicle Technologies Program June 20,...

  9. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Designing Effective Residential Retrofit Programs eere.energy.gov The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii DOE Technical Assistance Program Quality Assurance for Residential...

  10. Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Science of Signatures-Past Programs Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email Professional Staff Assistant Jutta Kayser (505) 663-5649 Email...

  11. Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 2000: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 2000-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John; Hill, Robert

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon trapping, broodstock selection, and spawning was first implemented in 1998, did not occur in 1999, and was resumed in 2000. A total of 152 salmon were trapped in Johnson Creek in 2000, of which 73 (25 males, 16 females, and 32 jacks) fish were transported to Idaho Fish and Game=s South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility for artificial propagation purposes. The remaining 79 (29 males, 16 females, and 24 jacks) fish were released above the weir to spawn naturally. A total of 65,060 green eggs were taken from 16 female salmon and transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for incubation and rearing. Egg counts indicated an average eye-up rate of 86.0% for 55,971 eyed eggs. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,066 eggs per female. Juvenile fish were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery through November 2001. These fish were transferred to outdoor rearing facilities in December 2001 where they remained until release in March 2002. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags. In addition 9,987 were also PIT tagged. Hand counts provided by marking crews were used to amend the number of juvenile salmon released from the original egg count. A total of 57,392 smolts were released into a temporary acclimation channel in Johnson Creek on March 18, 19, 20, 2002. These fish were held in this facility until a fish screen was removed on March 22, 2002 and the fish were allowed to emigrate.

  12. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Evaluation of Limiting Factors for Stocked Kokanee and Rainbow Trout in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hatchery supplementation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka and rainbow trout O. mykiss has been the primary mitigation provided by Bonneville Power Administration for loss of anadromous fish to the waters above Grand Coulee Dam (GCD). The hatchery program for rainbow trout has consistently met management goals and provided a substantial contribution to the fishery; however, spawner returns and creel survey results for kokanee have been below management goals. Our objective was to identify factors that limit limnetic fish production in Lake Roosevelt by evaluating abiotic conditions, food limitations, piscivory, and entrainment. Dissolved oxygen concentration was adequate throughout most of the year; however, levels dropped to near 6 mg/L in late July. For kokanee, warm water temperatures during mid-late summer limited their nocturnal distribution to 80-100 m in the lower section of the reservoir. Kokanee spawner length was consistently several centimeters longer than in other Pacific Northwest systems, and the relative weights of rainbow trout and large kokanee were comparable to national averages. Large bodied daphnia (> 1.7 mm) were present in the zooplankton community during all seasons indicating that top down effects were not limiting secondary productivity. Walleye Stizostedion vitreum were the primary piscivore of salmonids in 1998 and 1999. Burbot Lota lota smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui, and northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis preyed on salmonids to a lesser degree. Age 3 and 4 walleye were responsible for the majority (65%) of the total walleye consumption of salmonids. Bioenergetics modeling indicated that reservoir wide consumption by walleye could account for a 31-39% loss of stocked kokanee but only 6-12% of rainbow trout. Size at release was the primary reason for differential mortality rates due to predation. Entrainment ranged from 2% to 16% of the monthly abundance estimates of limnetic fish, and could account for 30% of total mortality of limnetic fishes, depending on the contribution of littoral zone fishes. Inflow to GCD forebay showed the strongest negative relationship with entrainment whereas reservoir elevation and fish vertical distribution had no direct relationship with entrainment. Our results indicate that kokanee and rainbow trout in Lake Roosevelt were limited by top down impacts including predation and entrainment, whereas bottom up effects and abiotic conditions were not limiting.

  13. DRAFT: Biological and Implementation Indicators (June 10, 2008) Indicator Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonneville Dam (1938- present) Abundance of adult fish in the Council's program. Number of salmon, steelhead, lamprey, resident fish, ... ESUs Trends in abundance and productivity for each ESU, especially listed ESUs and for each listed ESU Harvest of hatchery fish in the Council's Program Number by species and by hatchery

  14. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models Guide, October 27, 2011.

  15. Fishery Biology Graduate Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishery Biology Graduate Programs University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 997750820 Program/degrees/index.html University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721 Program: Fisheries Conservation and Management http://ag.arizona.edu/srnr/academicprograms/wildlifefisheries/gradstudiesFisheries.html Auburn University Auburn, Alabama 368490001 Programs: Aquaculture, Aquatic Ecology, Fishery Management

  16. SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...................................................................................................10 Lockout/Tag-Out Program: IODP-USIO Policy Modification

  17. OSHWPP model programs guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Descriptions of model occupational health and safety programs implemented at DOE facilities are presented.

  18. DOE Mentoring Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Learning and Workforce Development coordinates this mentoring program for DOE Federal Employees.

  19. Talking the Higgs Boson with Dr. Joseph Incandela: Third Lecture in the DOE Science Speaker Series (includes opening remarks from Dr. Bill Brinkman and introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Incandela, Joseph (Spokesperon for the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at Large Hadron Collider) [Spokesperon for the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at Large Hadron Collider

    2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In July of 2012, scientists leading two different research teams, working independently of each other, announced that they had almost certain proof of the long-sought Higgs boson. Though Cern did not call the discovery "official", many physicists conceded the evidence was now so compelling they had surely found the missing particle. The formal confirmation will come over the next few months of further investigation. The experiments are taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and this third lecture in the DOE Science Speaker Series is given by one of those announcing scientists in July. He is Dr. Joseph Incandela, the current spokesperson for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment at CERN. He was heavily involved in the search for the top quark at Fermi and is from the University of California, Santa Barbara. The title he gives his presentation is "Searching for the genetic code of our universe: Discovery at the LHC."

  20. Technology Commercialization Program 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

  1. NREL: Biomass Research - Joseph Shekiro

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deacetylation and Mechanical (Disc) Refining Process for the Conversion of Renewable Biomass to Lower Cost Sugars." Biotechnology for Biofuels (7:7). Shekiro, J. ; Kuhn, E.M.;...

  2. Kelliher, Joseph From: Anderson. Margot

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AndrewD.Lundquist@ovp.eop.gov%intemet; KarenY.Knutson@ovp.eop.gov%inlemet; Charles M. Smith@ovp.eop.gov%intemet; Charles D.McGrathJr(ovp.eop.gov%intemet; Robert C....

  3. Nathaniel Joseph Fisch Professional Interests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Professional Responsibilities 2001 -- Co-founder, General Plasma Technologies LLC 1998 Chair, Division; and statistical inference and pattern recognition. University Education MIT Department of Electrical Engineering for driving electric currents. Fellow of NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts (2003) Bronze Medal, United

  4. Joseph Brodsky TO A TYRANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Givental, Alexander

    windows will be draped with curtains, Not a prison lattice ­ and this is certain! We'll come early home on the dresses sprout. Are you short of cash? We'll help you out. We will build a vessel from glass and metal and see Mona Lisa. For, when tanks are filled, and we start to count on the cabin's wall where the maps we

  5. David Joseph Corr Contact Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    (1-2), pp 109-121. Corr DJ, Juenger MCG, Monteiro PJM, Bastacky J (2004), "Investigating Entrained Air Voids-Window Generalized Method of Cells," ACI Materials Journal, 100(2), pp 156-164. Corr DJ, Monteiro PJM, Bastacky J and Concrete Research, 33(10), pp 1531-1537. Corr DJ, Monteiro PJM, Bastacky J (2002), "Microscopic

  6. Kelliher, Joseph From: Anderson, Margot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3WASTE-TO-ENERGY:

  7. Joseph Millworks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | WindInformation

  8. Joseph Ralbovsky | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEtheInspection15Department of Energy JoinJonathan

  9. Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest Total Annual Average Cost of BPA Fish & Wildlife Actions1/ 226 5 24 41 8 310 137 750 1/ FY 2012 White Sturgeon. These actions may include such things as dredging, restoration of channel complexity

  10. Bulk Storage Program Compliance Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Bulk Storage Program Compliance Written Program Cornell University 5/8/2013 #12;Bulk Storage.......................................................... 5 4.2.2 Aboveground Petroleum Storage Tanks­ University activities/operations designed to prevent releases of oil from Aboveground Petroleum Storage Tanks (ASTs) required to comply with following

  11. Dietetic Internship Program Structure of the Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Dietetic Internship Program Structure of the Program The UNLV Dietetic Internship (DI Internship are designed to provide well-trained dietetics professionals for the growing Southern Nevada Overview The goal of the Community Component of the Dietetic Internship is to provide the intern

  12. Science Policy Fellowship Program About the Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    Science Policy Fellowship Program About the Program This two-year fellowship at the IDA Science recipients to gain science and technology policy experience. Policy research will focus on areas research for leaders in the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the Executive Office

  13. State Energy Program Formula Grant Guidance Program Year 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    STATE ENERGY PROGRAM FORMULA GRANT GUIDANCE PROGRAM YEAR 2007 STATE ENERGY PROGRAM NOTICE 07-01 EFFECTIVE DATE: April 3, 2007 PURPOSE To establish grant guidance and management...

  14. Notes From the Chair 2 Re-thinking Hatcheries: 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation Comes On Strong 8 Paper Mill Saves $1 Million Through 9 Energy Efficiency Council Decisions 11 an all-time record for energy savings in 2007. It's good news for the Northwest and highlights the importance of evalu- ating where the next round of savings may be found. As the Council begins developing its

  15. TESTS OF HATCHERY FOODS FOR BLUEBACK SALMON 1944-48

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    0000000000009000000000000000000000000000 L- ^J Potential Production Diets .............................. 29 The Effect of Cold Storage

  16. Marine growth of Columbia River hatchery Chinook salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Release Date Fish Released (millions) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 51 42 31 25 46 40 Weight(g) WestCSp Will

  17. Fish Bulletin 164. Trout and Salmon Culture (Hatchery Methods)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leitritz, Earl; Lewis, Robert C

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of air through hoses and carborundum stones. As the airplaneair through hoses and carborundum stones to each can of

  18. PIT Tag Elimination from Management Questions Hatchery .............................................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................1 Habitat................................................2 Hydro Tag Type ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? (2013-3-4)_FTF_PIT_Elimination 2 #12;Hydro 5A hydro passage performance Hydro passage conditions adult passage standards and targets Conditions of in

  19. Coded Wire Tag Elimination from Management Questions Hatchery .............................................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................1 Habitat................................................2 Hydro No current technologies(2013-1-4)_FTF_CWT_Elimination 2 #12;Hydro 5A Age one recruitment for sturgeon 3A Fish in draft tubes and in fishways Salmon and steelhead juvenile and adult hydro passage performance Hydro

  20. Coded Wire Tag Elimination from Management Questions Hatchery .............................................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................1 Habitat................................................2 Hydro Tag Type ? ? ? ? ? (2013-3-4)_FTF_CWT_Elimination 2 #12;Hydro 5A Age one recruitment for sturgeon 3A tubes and in fishways Salmon and steelhead juvenile and adult hydro passage performance Hydro passage

  1. Genetic Mark Elimination from Management Questions Hatchery .............................................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................1 Habitat................................................2 Hydro Genetic Acoustic CWT No current technologies(2013-1-4)_FTF_Genetic_Elimination 2 #12;Hydro 5A Age one hydro passage performance Hydro passage conditions adult passage standards and targets Conditions of in

  2. TESTS OF HATCHERY FOODS FOR BLUEBACK SALMON 1951

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    >eooeoooooooooeooeoo XX 1"63, U*^ V XSCGrS^JTLG&X L/OnX'rOX ·oooaaeoooeop^^ooooooooooooooooooeoeeoe XX Air-Lift Dried at the Leavenworth Laboratory to develop adequate diets for the artificial propagation of salmon

  3. Fish Bulletin 164. Trout and Salmon Culture (Hatchery Methods)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leitritz, Earl; Lewis, Robert C

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the crowder frame. Note the wiper blades on each side of thewalls and on the bottom with wiper blades that clean the al-feed to two troughs. (Note wiper blade inside the pans).

  4. INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM OPERATION PLANS FOR ANADROMOUS FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Production Advisory Committee PNFHPC: Pacific Northwest Fish Health Protection Committee PP&L: Paafic Power

  5. advance hatchery reform: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Private Insurance Market Renewable Energy Websites Summary: SUMMARY s national health care reform efforts go forward, it is instructive to review states' experience INTRODUCTION...

  6. Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Wind Farm Jump to:Oregon: Energy

  7. Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to:Pennsylvania: EnergyHopkinsville,WindEnergy Information

  8. Belmont Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions IncBayBelmont County, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to:Open Energy

  9. Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio: Energy ResourcesMaryland: EnergyCityElectric|

  10. Generic programming in Scala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N'guessan, Olayinka

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Generic programming is a programming methodology that aims at producing reusable code, defined independently of the data types on which it is operating. To achieve this goal, that particular code must rely on a set of requirements known as concepts...

  11. MMEECCHHAANNIICCAALL ENGINEERING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    for admission to the Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering in the Mechanical Engineering ProgramMMEECCHHAANNIICCAALL ENGINEERING PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS To be eligible Fundamentals of Engineering* 3 Engineering Graphics* 3 Electives 6 Total: 60 NOTE: Electives may include

  12. Ordinals and Interactive Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, Peter

    have much to contribute to the theory of programming. This has indeed turned out to be the case. Various technologies developed in proof theory are now widely used in computer science for formulating and investigating programming languages and logics...

  13. Y-12 Apprentice Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an enviable placement rate of 100 percent. Until recently, another training program series, the Y-12 Apprentice Program, had not been provided at Y-12 for several years. Until...

  14. Parallel programming with PCN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and C that allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. In includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underly PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous FTP from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs.anl.gov (c.f. Appendix A).

  15. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management at UVM 1 #12;Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT What is Enterprise Risk Management? Enterprise risk management governance, and accountability · Facilitates effective management of the uncertainty and associated risks

  16. Worker Training Program (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Worker Training Program is a business incentive program to support the retraining and upgrading of Nebraska’s current workforce. The amount of grant funding available quarterly is distributed...

  17. SREC Procurement Program (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: The SREC procurement program will accept applications from March 25 to April 12, 2013. The summary below is intended to reflect the 2013 program as described in the [http://depsc...

  18. Operational Demonstration Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program is currently closed. Applications were due in February 2012. Additional funding rounds have not yet been announced. Check the program web site for the latest available information.

  19. HAZARDOUS WASTE [Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    HAZARDOUS WASTE MANUAL [Written Program] Cornell University [10/7/13 #12;Hazardous Waste Program................................................... 8 3.0 MINIMIZING HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATION.........................................................10 4.0 HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATOR REQUIREMENTS.....................................................10

  20. Commonwealth Hydropower Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This program reopened March 15, 2013. There is $1,200,000 available for Round 5; applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until funding is exhausted. See the program web site for...

  1. COMPUTER SCIENCE SAMPLE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    COMPUTER SCIENCE SAMPLE PROGRAM (First Math Course MATH 198) This sample program suggests one way CS 181: Foundations of Computer Science II CS 180: Foundations of Computer Science I CS 191

  2. Sandia's Biofuels Program

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

  3. Sandia's Biofuels Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

  4. Acquisition Fellows Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Fellows Program (AFP)- is a program designed to recruit, acquire, develop and retain 1102 series contract specialist. Fellows are recruited, hired, selected and funded by their sponsoring DOE/NNSA office.

  5. Protective Force Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, Protective Force Program, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Does not cancel other directives.

  6. Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs Better Buildings Residential...

  7. Geothermal materials program: strategy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following topics are discussed: program goal and objectives, program organization, and program status. Current program projects are described. (MHR)

  8. Sustainable Energy Management Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanner, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable Energy Management Programs Steve Hanner Allen ISD/TEMA . ESL-KT-14-11-45 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Starting an Energy Management Program • Recognize need, Elicit District Commitment... • Appoint Energy Manager • Analyze Existing Conditions • Develop Plan • Implement and Monitor Program ESL-KT-14-11-45 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Sustainable Programs Feature – District Commitment...

  9. Symmetries in Integer Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bödi, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion of symmetry is defined in the context of Linear and Integer Programming. Symmetric integer programs are studied from a group theoretical viewpoint. We investigate the structure of integer solutions of integer programs and show that any integer program on n variables having an alternating group A_n as a group of symmetries can be solved in linear time in the number of variables.

  10. Departmental Directives Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order is the primary directive for administering the Department's directives Program. Cancels: DOE O 251.1A

  11. Independent Oversight Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The order prescribes the requirements and responsibilities for the DOE Independent Oversight Program. Cancels DOE O 470.2B.

  12. Physics Illinois Undergraduate Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    , and business. In order to support the diverse career goals of our students, we have infused our programs

  13. SUNY Programs: Experiential Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    SUNY Programs: Experiential Learning Internships Volunteer & Service-Learning Field Work quite broad, although the offerings are more limited than the programs in the general section. Teaching the programs with experiential learning opportunities offered by SUNY campuses. These listings give just

  14. ARRA FUNDED ENERGY PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lower energy costs and fossil fuel energy use. Increasing arra funds with private and public sector. The Clean Energy Business Financing loan program is designed to leverage even more private sector funds programs (such as Clean Energy Business and Municipal Financing programs) when developing the federal

  15. Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish responsibilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program, and to establish program planning and management requirements for the S&S Program. Cancels DOE O 470.4A, DOE M 470.4-1, Chg. 2, and DOE O 142.1.

  16. Model Fire Protection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To facilitate conformance with its fire safety directives and the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program, DOE has developed a number of "model" program documents. These include a comprehensive model fire protection program, model fire hazards analyses and assessments, fire protection system inspection and testing procedures, and related material.

  17. Priorities and Allocations Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes responsibilities for administration of the DOE and NNSA priorities and allocations program for industrial products, materials, and services and requirements for maintaining a system for procurement of industrial products, materials, and services programs that promote the national defense and programs that are determined by DOE to maximize domestic energy supplies. Cancels DOE O 5560.1A.

  18. ACADEMIC PROGRAM PROCEDURE MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    1 ACADEMIC PROGRAM REVIEW PROCEDURE MANUAL 2014-2015 Office of the Senior Vice President Tucson, AZ 85721 #12;2 ACADEMIC PROGRAM REVIEW MANAGEMENT TEAM Web Site for Academic Program Review http Educational Policy Studies & Practice Spanish and Portuguese Electrical & Computer Engineering Teaching

  19. Multidimensional Model Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    #12;Multidimensional Model Programming SQL Server 2012 Books Online Summary: Analysis Services provides several APIs that you can use to program against an Analysis Services instance this information to choose the programming interface that best meets the requirements of a particular project

  20. BCB Graduate Program Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    Fall 2014 BCB Graduate Program Introduction Bioinformatics and Computational Biology www and Computational Biology #12;Program Overview One of the first Bioinformatics Ph.D. programs in the US With about-major professor (each in a different discipline) Bioinformatics and Computational Biology #12;Major Research

  1. Utility Partnerships Program Overview (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program overview brochure for the Utility Partnerships Program within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP).

  2. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Non-Metallic Materials Meeting Washington, DC Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager...

  3. Arnold Schwarzenegger INTEGRATED FORECAST AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor INTEGRATED FORECAST AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT (INFORM) FOR NORTHERN: California Energy Commission Energy-Related Environmental Research Joseph O' Hagan Contract Manager Joseph O' Hagan Project Manager Kelly Birkinshaw Program Area Manager ENERGY-RELATED ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH Martha

  4. Utility Green Pricing Programs: A Statistical Analysis of Program Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Olson, S.; Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes actual utility green pricing program data to provide further insight into which program features might help maximize both customer participation in green pricing programs and the amount of renewable energy purchased by customers in those programs.

  5. State Energy Program Program Year 2014 Administrative and Legal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center State Energy Program (SEP) Program Year 2014 Formula Awards SEP-ALRD-2014 CFDA Number: 81.041, State Energy Program Issue Date: 3192014 SEP Program Year Ending...

  6. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009 is to provide an updated status of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCT). These demonstrations have been performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2009 provides: (1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation’s energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation’s most abundant energy resource—coal; (2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and (3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, along with fact sheets for projects that are active, recently completed, or recently discontinued.

  7. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

  8. Clean coal technology programs: program update 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2006 is to provide an updated status of the DOE commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCTs). These demonstrations are performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2006 provides 1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation's energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation's most abundant energy resource - coal; 2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and 3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, with fact sheets for demonstration projects that are active, recently completed, withdrawn or ended, including status as of June 30 2006. 4 apps.

  9. Demand Response: Load Management Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs...

  10. Job Training Assistance Programs (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Job Training Assistance Programs in Tennessee are a combination of three programs: The FastTrack Job Training Assistance Program (FJTAP), The Tennessee Job Skills Program (TJS), and The Job...

  11. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Natural Resources Program, Environmental Program, Wildlife and Fisheries Program, the Forestry Program, and the Conservation Enforcement Program. There would also be a Tribal Court...

  12. Water-Efficiency Program Prioritization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation outlines water-efficiency program requirements and priorities as presented to Federal agencies by the Federal Energy Management Program.

  13. ORISE: Radiological program assessment services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental monitoring programs Operational environments Decontamination and decommissioning projects Compliance assessments Radiological release programs ORISE is actively...

  14. Reformulations in Mathematical Programming: Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leo Liberti

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 3, 2008 ... ... is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  15. LSUHSC NO Leadership Program Director, Augusto Ochoa, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D: Project 8 Yan Cui, PhD: COBRE Graduate Mentor Internal Advisory Committee Joseph Moerschbaecher, III: Jonna Ellis Promising Junior Investigators Project 2: Jovanny Zabaleta, PhD Project 3: Paulo Rodriguez, PhD Project 4: Timothy Foster, PhD Project 5: John Schieffelin, MD Tulane University Project 6

  16. SUNY Programs: The United Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    SUNY Programs: The United Kingdom & Ireland Semester, Academic Year and Short Term #12;1 Table of Contents How to Use This Booklet 1 Choosing a Program in the UK and Ireland 2 Exchange versus Study Abroad 3 Semester & Academic Year Programs 4 Programs in London 4 Programs outside of London 7 Programs

  17. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes training and certification requirements and career development programs under the Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program for DOE and NNSA acquisition workforce. The acquisition workforce includes contracting, purchasing, personal property management, program management, Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives. The ACD Program implements the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 129231, Federal Procurement Reform, dated 10-13-1994. This order cancels DOE O 361.1, Acquisition Career Development Program, dated 11-10-99, AND Acquisition Letter 2003-05, Personal Property Management Career Development, Training, and Certification Program, dated 9-10-03. Cancels DOE O 361.1 Chg 2. Canceled by DOE O 361.1B.

  18. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of the recreational visits to the region. An increase in popularity has placed Lake Roosevelt fifth amongst the most visited State and Federal parks in Washington. Increased use of the reservoir prompted amplified efforts to enhance the Native American subsistence fishery and the resident sport fishery in 1984 with hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and kokanee salmon (O. nerka). This was followed by the formation of the Spokane Tribal Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project (LRMP) in 1988 and later by formation of the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project in 1991. The Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project began in July 1991 as part of the BPA, Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers System Operation Review process. This process sought to develop an operational scenario for the federal Columbia River hydropower system to maximize the in-reservoir fisheries with minimal impacts to all other stakeholders in the management of the Columbia River. The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program (LRMP) is the result of a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 forming the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (LRMP), which continues the work historically completed under the separate projects. The LRMP has two main goals. The first is to develop a biological model for Lake Roosevelt that will predict in-reservoir biological responses to a range of water management operational scenarios, and to develop fisheries and reservoir management strategies accordingly. The model will allow identification of lake operations that minimize impacts on lake biota while addressing the needs of other interests (e.g. flood control, hydropower generation, irrigation, and downstream resident and anadromous fisheries). Major components of the model will include: (1) quantification of entrainment and other impacts to phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification

  19. Voluntary Protection Program- Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) promotes safety and health excellence through cooperative efforts among labor, management, and government at the Department of Energy (DOE) contractor sites. DOE has also formed partnerships with other Federal agencies and the private sector for both advancing and sharing its Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) experiences and preparing for program challenges in the next century. The safety and health of contractor and federal employees are a high priority for the Department.

  20. Site Support Program Plan Infrastructure Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fiscal Year 1996 Infrastructure Program Site Support Program Plan addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition. The Hanford Site`s infrastructure has served the Site for nearly 50 years during defense materials production. Now with the challenges of the new environmental cleanup mission, Hanford`s infrastructure must meet current and future mission needs in a constrained budget environment, while complying with more stringent environmental, safety, and health regulations. The infrastructure requires upgrading, streamlining, and enhancement in order to successfully support the site mission of cleaning up the Site, research and development, and economic transition.

  1. Credit Enhancement Program (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Credit Enhancement Program is a means by which the Oklahoma Finance Authority provides guarantees for small companies, manufacturing facilities and communities in need of funds for expansion...

  2. Records Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for implementing and maintaining a cost-effective records management program throughout the Department of Energy.

  3. Records Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for establishing and maintaining a program for the efficient and economical management of records and information assets.

  4. Parallel programming with PCN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and Cthat allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. It includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underlie PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous ftp from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs. ani.gov (cf. Appendix A). This version of this document describes PCN version 2.0, a major revision of the PCN programming system. It supersedes earlier versions of this report.

  5. Green Communities Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The Green Communities Grant Program is not currently accepting applications. The application deadline to receive a Green Communities designation was October 17, 2014. For designated...

  6. Capital Access Program (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Capital Access Program provides loan guarantees to small businesses seeking access to commercial credit. Premiums paid by the borrower and matched by Vermont Economic Development Authority fund...

  7. Leadership Excellence Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environmental Management (EM) recognizes that leadership enhancement is vital to the program and commits to the development and strengthening of leadership skills for all employees...

  8. Laser programs highlights 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides highlights of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` laser programs. Laser uses and technology assessment and utilization are provided.

  9. RCx Program and UESC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the RCx Program and UESC and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

  10. Acquisition Career Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The order defines requirements and responsibilities for training, certification, and career development programs for the DOE acquisition workforce. Cancels DOE O 361.1A.

  11. Management Control Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy Management Control Program. Cancels DOE O 413.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.1B.

  12. Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

  13. Aspiring Leader Program........................

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of GS-11 through GS-13. The program requires that participants attend four one-week residential sessions. Developmental Assignments: Developing the self as well as others is...

  14. Radiological Assistance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and responsibilities for its Radiological Assistance Program. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  15. Pipeline Operations Program (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pipeline Operations Program regulates the construction, acquisition, abandonment and interconnection of natural gas pipelines, as well as, the transportation and use of natural gas supplies.

  16. Acquisition Career Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Management Program. Cancels DOE O 361.1B.

  17. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravois, Melanie

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev. 032 ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev.Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev. 0

  18. Weatherization Assistance Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Intergovernmental Program n Decreases electricity generation and resulting pollution-This improves local air quality and reduces adverse health effects, particularly...

  19. EMS Programs Manual

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Environmental Management System Programs Manual (LMS/POL/S04388-3.0) is obsolete and has been removed from the LM website.

  20. Renewable Energy Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2009, the District Department of the Environment (DDOE) introduced the Renewable Energy Incentive Program (REIP), a rebate for solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. In April 2012, solar...

  1. DSW REC Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Credits for DSW Hydro Power Projects The DSW Regional Office is proposing a program to make Renewable Energy Credits (RECS) from the Boulder Canyon andor...

  2. Brownfield Redevelopment Program (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brownfield Redevelopment Program provides financial incentives for the redevelopment of commercial/industrial sites that are contaminated with hazardous substances and have been abandoned or...

  3. Brownfield Assistance Program (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Brownfield Assistance Program, administrated by the Delaware Economic Development Office (DEDO) and funded from Delaware Strategic Fund, provides matching grants to owners and developers to...

  4. Retro-Commissioning Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Focus on Energy offers financial incentives to eligible business customers to retro-commission buildings to optimize performance. The program provides incentives for building efficiency studies...

  5. CEE Winter Program Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) is hosting their Winter Program Meeting, a two-day conference held in Long Beach, California.

  6. Methane Digester Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Established in 1998, the Minnesota Dept. of Agriculture Methane Digester Loan Program helps livestock producers install on-farm anaerobic digesters used for the production of electricity by...

  7. Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Keystone HELP Energy Efficiency Loan Program is designed to help homeowners improve energy efficiency with special financing for high-efficiency heating, air conditioning, insulation, windows,...

  8. DOE Hydrogen Program Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen Program A Prospectus for Biological H 2 Production The Hydrogen Economy The hydrogen economy pertains to a world fundamentally different from the one we now know. Hydrogen...

  9. Joyce Berry Heritage Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12/12/12 DEAN Joyce Berry CO Natural Heritage Program David Anderson CO Coop Fish & Wildlife Res Moore Assistant to the Dean Mary Dolce #12;

  10. New Homes Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Trust's New Homes Program offers builders cash incentives for energy efficient measures included in new homes, where the measures exceed the building code. Lighting upgrades, whole home...

  11. Undergraduate Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection Process Undergraduate Program Selection Process Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich...

  12. Copositive Programming – a Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Copositive Programming – a Survey. Mirjam Dür ... The purpose of this survey is to introduce the ...... Methods of Operations Research 62(1990): 45–52.

  13. Using 3D Acoustic Telemetry to Assess the Response of Resident Salmonids to Strobe Lights in Lake Roosevelt, Washington; Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Feasibility Study, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Russlee; Farley, M.; Hansen, Gabriel

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1995, the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was established to mitigate the loss of anadromous fish due to the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams. The objectives of the Chief Joseph Enhancement Project are to determine the status of resident kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams and to enhance kokanee and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations. Studies conducted at Grand Coulee Dam documented substantial entrainment of kokanee through turbines at the third powerhouse. In response to finding high entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam, the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) recommended investigating the use of strobe lights to repel fish from the forebay of the third powerhouse. Therefore, our study focused on the third powerhouse and how strobe lights affected fish behavior in this area. The primary objective of our study was to assess the behavioral response of kokanee and rainbow trout to strobe lights using 3D acoustic telemetry, which yields explicit spatial locations of fish in three dimensions. Our secondary objectives were to (1) use a 3D acoustic system to mobile track tagged fish in the forebay and upriver of Grand Coulee Dam and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting fish using a hydrophone mounted in the tailrace of the third powerhouse. Within the fixed hydrophone array located in the third powerhouse cul-de-sac, we detected 50 kokanee and 30 rainbow trout, accounting for 47% and 45% respectively, of the fish released. Kokanee had a median residence time of 0.20 h and rainbow trout had a median residence time of 1.07 h. We detected more kokanee in the array at night compared to the day, and we detected more rainbow trout during the day compared to the night. In general, kokanee and rainbow trout approached along the eastern shore and the relative frequency of kokanee and rainbow trout detections was highest along the eastern shoreline of the 3D array. However, because we released fish near the eastern shore, this approach pattern may have resulted from our release location. A high percentage of rainbow trout (60%) approached within 35 m of the eastern shore, while fewer kokanee (40%) approached within 35 m of the eastern shore and were more evenly distributed across the entrance to the third powerhouse cul-de-sac area. During each of the strobe light treatments there were very few fish detected within 25 m of the strobe lights. The spatial distribution of fish detections showed relatively few tagged fish swam through the center of the array where the strobe lights were located. We detected 11 kokanee and 12 rainbow trout within 25 m of the strobe lights, accounting for 10% and 18% respectively, of the fish released. Both species exhibited very short residence times within 25 m of the strobe lights No attraction or repulsion behavior was observed within 25 m of the strobe lights. Directional vectors of both kokanee and rainbow trout indicate that both species passed the strobe lights by moving in a downstream direction and slightly towards the third powerhouse. We statistically analyzed fish behavior during treatments using a randomization to compare the mean distance fish were detected from the strobe lights. We compared treatments separately for day and night and with the data constrained to three distances from the strobe light (< 85m, < 50 m, and < 25 m). For kokanee, the only significant randomization test (of 10 tests) occurred with kokanee during the day for the 3-On treatment constrained to within 85 m of the strobe lights, where kokanee were significantly further away from the strobe lights than during the Off treatment (randomization test, P < 0.004, Table 1.5). However, one other test had a low P-value (P = 0.064) where kokanee were closer to the lights during the 3-On treatment at night within 85 m of the strobe lights compared to the Off treatment. For rainbow trout, none of the 11 tests were significant, but one test had a low P-value (P = 0.04), and fish were further away from the strobe lights during

  14. Technology Innovation Program 2010ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Innovation Program 2010ANNUAL REPORT 2010ANNUAL REPORT Technology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology

  15. Master's Fellowship Program The Master's Fellowship Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an annual salary (issued biweekly during school term). · Regular employee benefits (except vacation accrual » Begin working at Sandia for a minimum of two months prior to entering the graduate program » Ability) To apply, go to: sandia.gov/careers keyword search: MFP i LEARN MORE HERE Sandia National Laboratories

  16. Export Compliance Certificate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Export Compliance Certificate Program Accelerate Your Career BusinessandManagement extension.uci.edu/export bearing the UC seal signifies a well- known, uncompromising standard of academic excellence. #12;Export Compliance Certificate Program The importance of understanding export controls and how to develop

  17. November 2001 Program Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-44789 November 2001 Program Description A PC Program WINDOW 5.0 User Manual For Analyzing November 2001 WINDOW 5.0 User Manual Robin Mitchell, Christian Kohler, and Dariush Arasteh Windows, California Dragan Curcija Carli, Inc Amherst, Massachusetts November 2001 © Regents of the University

  18. Information Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes an Information Security Program for the protection and control of classified and sensitive information. Extended until 5-11-06 by DOE N 251.63, dated 5-11-05. DOE O 471.2A, Information Security Program, dated 3/27/1997, extended by DOE N 251.57, dated 4/28/2004. Cancels: DOE O 471.2

  19. Business Analyst Certificate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Business Analyst Certificate Program BusinessandManagement extension.uci.edu/ba #12;Business Analyst Certificate Program Business Analysts Capture Requirements to Build What the Customer Wants. The Business Analyst serves as the key liaison between the client, stakeholders, and the solutions team

  20. International Programs in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Programs in Agriculture MessagefromtheDirector­ Staying Ahead of Globalization and more prosperous place for all. Fortunately, Purdue International Programs in Agriculture (IPIA) has natural disasters caution us to remember the power of nature. The United Nations Food and Agriculture

  1. Sloppy Programming Greg Little

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Center Introduction When a user enters a query into a web search engine, they do not expect it to return a syntax error. Imagine a user searching for "End User Programing" and getting an error like: Unexpected token "Programing". Not only do users not expect to see such an error, but they expect the search

  2. New Technology Demonstration Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Technology Demonstration Program Technical Brief FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Tom for saving energy in refrigerated walk-in coolers, and to evaluate the potential for this technology in Federal facilities. The focus of this study was on a single manufacturer of the technology, Nevada Energy

  3. Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Program Ecampus Advising Guide Revised 08/24/12 20122013 #12;Page 2 of 29 | Rev. 08/24/12 Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Program: A Hands reach these objectives, Oregon State University's Environmental Sciences Bachelor of Sciences degree

  4. MAIER STUDENT LEADERSHIP PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    MAIER STUDENT LEADERSHIP PROGRAM For more information, visit www.schulich.ucalgary.ca The Schulich Engineer combines technical strength with leadership and creativity in community and professional roles. The Maier Student Leadership Program is a unique, powerful and timely means of preparing students

  5. Information Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Security Program and set forth policies, procedures and responsibilities for the protection and control of classified and sensitive information. The Information Security Program is a system of elements which serve to deter collection activities, This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 471.2 of 9-28-1995.

  6. Personnel Security Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    provides detailed requirements and procedures to supplement DOE O 472.1B, PERSONNEL SECURITY ACTIVITIES, which establishes the overall objectives, requirements, and responsibilities for implementation and operation of the Personnel Security Program and the Personnel Security Assurance Program in the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Cancels DOE M 472.1-1

  7. Multiprocessor programming environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.B.; Fornaro, R.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Programming tools and techniques have been well developed for traditional uniprocessor computer systems. The focus of this research project is on the development of a programming environment for a high speed real time heterogeneous multiprocessor system, with special emphasis on languages and compilers. The new tools and techniques will allow a smooth transition for programmers with experience only on single processor systems.

  8. NASA Academy Program Descriptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z. Jane

    NASA Academy Program Descriptions October 2010 #12;NASA Academy Program Descriptions 2011 October 11, 2010 1/5 NASA Academy at ARC, GRC, GSFC, and MSFC Websites: Ames: http://academy.arc.nasa.gov Glenn: http://academy.grc.nasa.gov Goddard: http://academy.gsfc.nasa.gov Marshall: http://academy

  9. Programmed cell death

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  10. Architecture 1997 Undergraduate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    Architecture 1997 Undergraduate Program Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: UARC RQ = Requirement Program: 00001 LN = Line Plan: SubPlan: RG 609 ARCHITECTURE REQUIREMENTS Effective FA97/1060 (09/03/1997) RQ 1608 Art Requirement Effective FA97/1060 (09/03/1997) LN 0010 Art Requirement RQ 1609 English

  11. Space Shuttle Program Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    1 Space Shuttle Program Status John Casper Associate Manager Space Shuttle Program September 13, 2010 NAC Space Operations Committee #12;2 Operations #12;3 Flown Manifest March 2009 ­ May 2010 #12, 2010 · 132nd Space Shuttle mission · 32nd Flight of Atlantis (120,650,907 statute miles) · 294 Total

  12. NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for and receive production incentives, referred to as supplemental energy payments (SEPs), from the New RenewableCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK APRIL 2006 CEC-300 Director Heather Raitt Technical Director Renewable Energy Program Drake Johnson Office Manager Renewable

  13. Insider Threat Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish responsibilities and requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Insider Threat Program (ITP) to deter, detect, and mitigate insider threat actions by Federal and contractor employees in accordance with the requirements of Executive Order 13587, the National Insider Threat Policy and Minimum Standards for Executive Branch Insider Threat Programs and other government-wide and DOE requirements. Does not cancel other directives.

  14. Protective Force Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, PROTECTIVE FORCE PROGRAM, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Change 1 revised pages in Chapters IV and VI on 12/20/2001.

  15. Program summary for the Civilian Reactor Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Civilian Reactor Development Program document has the prime purpose of summarizing the technical programs supported by the FY 1983 budget request. This section provides a statement of the overall program objectives and a general program overview. Section II presents the technical programs in a format intended to show logical technical interrelationships, and does not necessarily follow the structure of the formal budget presentation. Section III presents the technical organization and management structure of the program.

  16. Summer Enrollment Blue=Old Program, Red=New Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Summer Enrollment Blue=Old Program, Red=New Program 1559 14181358 1304 1166 1245 0 200 400 600 800;Summer Sections Offered Blue=Old Program, Red=New Program 142 135 160158 180 200 0 50 100 150 200 250 Generated Blue=Old Program, Red=New Program 5643 5983.5 5463 4953 5985.5 6961 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000

  17. 147 SDSU Curriculum Guide 2010 Certificate Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    147 SDSU Curriculum Guide 2010 Certificate Programs Types of Certificate Programs General Guidelines for All Certificate Programs Academic Certificate Programs Professional Certificate programs Cosponsored Certificate Programs Other Certificates #12;148 SDSU Curriculum Guide 2010 University Guidelines

  18. Final report ASTC Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smithson, T.

    1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific goals of the ASTC program were: to pilot and administer a year round program to engage and support ethnic minority and women students to enter the pre-college teaching profession; and to develop the ASTC program across California on all twenty CSU campuses. The initial goal of piloting a year round program to engage and support ethnic or underrepresented science students to enter the teaching profession was put in place at CSUS in the Fall of 1993, with the recruitment of students to enter the program in the Spring of 1993. Three students were selected to enter the program, one male Latino, one female Latina and one Caucasian female. The areas of study of these students was respectively biology, physics and geology. All of the students were within two years or less of completing their degree requirements. During the first semester of the program the authors worked on the portion of the model dealing with student participation in the schools with a mentor teacher. The idea being the students would spend a minimum of six hours a week in the classroom of the mentor teacher working with them and their students. In addition the students were assigned to a faculty mentor within their discipline, a person whom they could go to for help and support in their academic efforts. The report discusses what was learned.

  19. Performance assurance program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, B.H.

    1997-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    B and W Protec, Inc. (BWP) is responsible for implementing the Performance Assurance Program for the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) in accordance with DOE Order 470.1, Safeguards and Security Program (DOE 1995a). The Performance Assurance Program applies to safeguards and security (SAS) systems and their essential components (equipment, hardware, administrative procedures, Protective Force personnel, and other personnel) in direct support of Category I and H special nuclear material (SNM) protection. Performance assurance includes several Hanford Site activities that conduct performance, acceptance, operability, effectiveness, and validation tests. These activities encompass areas of training, exercises, quality assurance, conduct of operations, total quality management, self assessment, classified matter protection and control, emergency preparedness, and corrective actions tracking and trending. The objective of the Performance Assurance Program is to capture the critical data of the tests, training, etc., in a cost-effective, manageable program that reflects the overall effectiveness of the program while minimizing operational impacts. To aid in achieving this objective, BWP will coordinate the Performance Assurance Program for Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) and serve as the central point for data collection.

  20. SEP Program Notice 10-008D: Guidance for State Energy Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D: Guidance for State Energy Program Grantees on Financing Programs SEP Program Notice 10-008D: Guidance for State Energy Program Grantees on Financing Programs This document...

  1. SEP Program Notice 10-008B - Guidance for State Energy Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B - Guidance for State Energy Program Grantees on Financing Programs SEP Program Notice 10-008B - Guidance for State Energy Program Grantees on Financing Programs This document...

  2. State Energy Program Formula Grant Guidance Program Year 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document provides instructions to the states for program year 2007 about how they should administer their DOE grants provided through the State Energy Program.

  3. aerosol program program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "appear" to execute atomically at transaction Hall, Mary W. 496 Kevin Shelley NPM Program Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Program Mike Ballweg UWEX Sheboygan Co....

  4. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Peer Exchange Call: Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    23, 2013 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Peer Exchange Call: Program Sustainability Mastermind Session on Combining Energy Efficiency and Health Services, featuring Host: Tim...

  5. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  6. Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. (National Marine Fisheries Service)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Accomplishments detailed in this report and those since the last project review period (FY 2003) are listed below by major objective. Objective 1: (i) Developed tools for monitoring the spawning success of captively reared Chinook salmon that can now be used for evaluating the reintroduction success of ESA-listed captive broodstocks in their natal habitats. (ii) Developed an automated temperature controlled rearing system to test the effects of seawater rearing temperature on reproductive success of Chinook salmon. Objective 2: (i) Determined that Columbia River sockeye salmon imprint at multiple developmental stages and the length of exposure to home water is important for successful imprinting. These results can be utilized for developing successful reintroduction strategies to minimize straying by ESA-listed sockeye salmon. (ii) Developed behavioral and physiological assays for imprinting in sockeye salmon. Objective 3: (i) Developed growth regime to reduce age-two male maturation in spring Chinook salmon, (ii) described reproductive cycle of returning hatchery Snake River spring Chinook salmon relative to captive broodstock, and (iii) found delays in egg development in captive broodstock prior to entry to fresh water. (iv) Determined that loss of Redfish Lake sockeye embryos prior to hatch is largely due to lack of egg fertilization rather than embryonic mortality. Objective 4 : (i) Demonstrated safety and efficacy limits against bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in fall Chinook of attenuated R. salmoninarum vaccine and commercial vaccine Renogen, (ii) improved prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of compound vaccine against BKD in fall Chinook and (iii) testing of broodstock antibiotic treatment in combination with compound vaccine against BKD. Objective 5: (i) Determined that close inbreeding in Chinook salmon led to substantial reductions in marine survival; progeny of half siblings survived at 90% the rate of noninbred fish and progeny of full siblings survived at only 15% the rate of noninbred fish. (ii) For two broods, 2002 and 2003, we established a breeding design involving 30 half- and 120 full-sib families of Chinook salmon to test the generality of these results.

  7. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2005-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menski, Fred

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

  8. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross, Doug (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

  9. Extension Program Council's Executive Board.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Mary G.; Richardson, Burl B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~IB-134'-! II"I~ I~? Extension Program Council's Executive Board Mary G. Marshall and Burl B. Richardson Extension Program Development Specialists The Extension Program Council works with Extension agents to plan, implement, evaluate...

  10. DTE Energy- Solar Currents Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Although the program web site above links to the residential section of DTE Energy's web page, the program itself is not limited to residential customers. Other customers that meet the program...

  11. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Computer Engineering Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Junfeng

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Computer Engineering Program The Fu Foundation School of Engineering Zukowski (caz@columbia.edu) Acting Chair, Computer Engineering Program #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Computer interdepartmental major within Engineering School #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Computer Engineering Program The Fu

  12. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94105 SGP-TR- 61 GEOTHERMAL APPENDIX A: PARTICIPANTS IN THE STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM '81/'82 . 60 APPENDIX B: PAPERS PRESENTED through September 30, 1982. The Stanford Geothermal Program conducts interdisciplinary research

  13. COMMISSION GUIDEBOOK RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMISSION GUIDEBOOK RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Fourth Edition Manager Renewable Energy Office G. William Pennington Acting Deputy Director Efficiency and Renewable of how the Energy Commission's Renewable Energy Program is administered and outlines terms

  14. Program Review Updates and Briefings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    You can learn more about the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Program by reading its program review updates and program briefings. These updates and briefings feature...

  15. February 2000 Advanced Technology Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Standards and Technology (NIST) is a cost-sharing program designed to partner the federal governmentFebruary 2000 Advanced Technology Program Information Infrastructure for Healthcare Focused Program: A Brief History ADADVANCEDANCED TECHNOLOGY PRTECHNOLOGY PROGRAMOGRAM NISTIR 6477 National Institute

  16. Deere & Company Energy Management Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, D. F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the Deere & Company Energy Management Program is discussed. A review is made of seven key elements which have contributed to the success of the program. Installed projects and established programs are identified and discussed...

  17. Administering Nonprofit Energy Efficiency Programs | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Administering Nonprofit Energy Efficiency Programs Administering Nonprofit Energy Efficiency Programs Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Peer Exchange Call: Administering...

  18. Building Technologies Program | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Technologies Program SHARE Building Technologies Program The Building Technologies Program Office administratively facilitates the integration of ORNL research across...

  19. Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program Capacity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Enhance Program Capacity Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call Series: Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program...

  20. Complementary State Policies for Energy Efficiency Programs ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for Energy Efficiency Programs Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call: Complementary State Policies for Energy Efficiency Programs,...

  1. Commercial Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: This program is not currently accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future financing programs. '''''...

  2. Information Technology Tools for Multifamily Building Programs...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Information Technology Tools for Multifamily Building Programs Information Technology Tools for Multifamily Building Programs Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multifamily ...

  3. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM System Maintenance Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM More...

  4. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PROGRAM SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM Training Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM More Documents & Publications Quality Assurance Checklist...

  5. Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Policies & Programs Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs Distributed generation...

  6. DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Development DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs Senior Executive Service Candidate Development Program (SESCDP): This...

  7. Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Better Buildings Residential Program Solution...

  8. State Energy Program Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Energy Program Operations Manual is a reference tool for the states and the program officials at the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs and Regional Support Offices as well as State Energy Offices. The Manual contains information needed to apply for and administer the State Energy Program, including program history, application rules and requirements, and program administration and monitoring requirements.

  9. Program Objectives | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Program Objectives Program Objectives Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) Program Objectives Support the U.S. scientific...

  10. Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Start Date: Oct '04 Program End date: Oct '10 Percent Complete: 80% 2 Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program- Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit...

  11. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Non-Utility Program Administrator Business Model Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Non-Utility Program Administrator Business Model Non-utility program...

  12. ARRA Proposed Award: Energy Technology Assistance Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARRA Proposed Award: Energy Technology Assistance Program Statewide Program ­ covering Greater. Highlights: Energy Technology Assistance Program (ETAP) is a statewide program that will focus on providing

  13. Totally Unimodular Multistage Stochastic Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 23, 2014 ... tistage stochastic programs whose extensive-form constraint ... We consider a class of multistage stochastic programs (MSP) whose extensive-.

  14. Program Assignments | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Headquarters Purchase Card Program Headquarters Contract Closeout Headquarters Data Mining Programs Strategic Sourcing Internal QA Audits Contract Administration-COR Audits...

  15. Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program regulates coastal activities, permits required, discharges to coastal waters and siting, construction and operation of energy facilities. ADEM's Coastal Program rules include the...

  16. Illinois Coal Development Program (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Coal Development Program seeks to advance promising clean coal technologies beyond research and towards commercialization. The program provides a 50/50 match with private industry...

  17. Unitil- Residential Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Unitil offers New Hampshire residential customers a number of programs to encourage more energy efficient homes. The Energy Star Appliance Program provides rebates for clothes washers, air...

  18. Technology Assistance Program | Partnerships | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assistance Program SHARE Technology Assistance Program Electronics Research Assistance is available for small business licensees of ORNL technologies to leverage ORNL's expertise...

  19. Wind and Geothermal Incentives Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This program has been temporarily closed pending the development and approval of updated guidelines. The summary below describes the program as it existed prior to the suspension.

  20. PSNH- Municipal Smart Start Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Public Service of New Hampshire (PSNH), an electric utility, offers the Smart Start Program to Municipal customers. This program assists municipalities in reducing energy consumption and electric...