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1

EIS-0489: Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and 9: Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR) EIS-0489: Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR) SUMMARY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) will prepare an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas facility in Coos County, Oregon, and to construct and operate a natural gas pipeline project that would cross Klamath, Jackson, Douglas, and Coos Counties, Oregon. DOE, along with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE), U.S. Department of Agriculture (Forest Service), and the U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau

2

EA-1942: Cove Point Liquefaction Project, Lusby, MD | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Cove Point Liquefaction Project, Lusby, MD 2: Cove Point Liquefaction Project, Lusby, MD EA-1942: Cove Point Liquefaction Project, Lusby, MD SUMMARY The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EA, to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to add natural gas liquefaction and exportation capabilities to an existing Cove Point LNG Terminal located on the Chesapeake Bay in Lusby, Maryland. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 28, 2012 EA-1942: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment Cove Point Liquefaction Project, Lusby, MD September 24, 2012 EA-1942: Notice of Intent of to Prepare an Environmental Assessment Cove Point Liquefaction Project, Lusby, MD

3

EIS-0489: Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) will prepare an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas facility in Coos County, Oregon, and to construct and operate a natural gas pipeline project that would cross Klamath, Jackson, Douglas, and Coos Counties, Oregon. DOE, along with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE), U.S. Department of Agriculture (Forest Service), and the U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, and Fish and Wildlife Service), are cooperating agencies.

4

Melissa Jordan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melissa Jordan. Melissa Jordan ... Studies, 2002. Contact. Phone: 301-975- 3410 Email: melissa.jordan@nist.gov Fax: 301-330-2077.

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

5

EIS-0489: Notice of Additional Public Scoping Meetings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR)

6

EIS-0489: Notice of Comment Period Extension and Additional Scoping Meetings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR)

7

CO2 Emissions - Jordan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Jordan Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jordan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jordan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Jordan...

8

Cove Point: A step back into the LNG business  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1978, ships began unloading LNG from Algeria at Cove Point`s berthing facilities 1.25 miles offshore. An underwater pipeline transported the LNG to land, where it was stored in the terminal`s four 140-foot-high cryogenic storage tanks. When the LNG was needed, the terminals 10 vaporizers converted it back to gas for send out via an 87-mile-long, 36-inch-diameter pipeline linking the terminal with interstate pipelines of CNG Transmission Corp. and Columbia Gas Transmission Corp. in Loudon County, Va. But Cove Point handled only about 80 shiploads of LNG before shutting down in December 1980, after a dispute about gas prices between US customers and Algeria. The plant sat dormant until the natural gas industry`s deregulation under Order 636. Deregulation resulted in major pipelines abandoning their sales service, and gas distributors and large customers found it was now their obligation to ensure that they had adequate gas supplies during winter peak-demand periods. Enter Cove Point`s peaking capabilities. They had to add the liquefaction unit and recommission other parts of the plant, but the timing was right. Cove Point`s new liquefaction unit is liquefying about 15 million cubic feet (MMcf) of LNG per day of domestic gas. It chills the gas to {minus}260 degrees Fahrenheit to turn it into a liquid for injection and storage in one of the facility`s double-walled insulated tanks. During its initial injection season, which ends Dec. 15, Cove Point is expected to produce enough LNG to almost fill one tank, which can store up to 1.25 billion cubic feet (Bcf). Were the gas not intended for peak-shaving purposes, it would be enough to supply 14,000 homes for a year. As it is, most of the gas will be returned as pipeline gas, during next January and February`s expected cold snaps, to the utilities and users who supplied it. Cove Point`s initial daily sendout capacity is about 400 MMcf.

Katz, M.G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Jordan Shackelford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jordan Shackelford Electronics, Lighting and Networks Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2000 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2052B (510)...

10

Jordan Woods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jordan Woods Windows and Envelope Materials Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2000 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2052C (510) 486-4931...

11

EIS-0489: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement EIS-0489: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, Oregon) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project...

12

EIS-0489: Notice of Comment Period Extension and Additional Scoping...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meetings EIS-0489: Notice of Comment Period Extension and Additional Scoping Meetings Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project...

13

Simple Jordan conformal superalgebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We classify simple finite Jordan conformal superalgebras and establish preliminary results for the classification of simple finite Jordan pseudoalgebras.

Kac, Victor G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Stephen P. Jordan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stephen Jordan's homepage at NIST in the division of applied and computational mathematics. ... Stephen P. Jordan. I study ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

NIST Global Standards Information Jordan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Regions >; Middle East/North Africa >; Jordan >. World Guide to Standards Resources: JORDAN. ... Export Resource: US Commercial Service Jordan. ...

16

Coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a two-stage liquefaction wherein coal, hydrogen and liquefaction solvent are contacted in a first thermal liquefaction zone, followed by recovery of an essentially ash free liquid and a pumpable stream of insoluble material, which includes 850.degree. F.+ liquid, with the essentially ash free liquid then being further upgraded in a second liquefaction zone, the liquefaction solvent for the first stage includes the pumpable stream of insoluble material from the first liquefaction stage, and 850.degree. F.+ liquid from the second liquefaction stage.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fairlawn, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solvent Systems Catalystic Biomass Liquefaction Investigatereactor Product collection Biomass liquefaction process12-13, 1980 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

NIST Global Standards Information Jordan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Regions >; Middle East/North Africa >; Jordan >; MENA Quality Infrastructure >. Middle ... Meeting. Jun 21 - 22, 2010 ( Amman, JORDAN ). ...

19

Cove Fort Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Geothermal Area Cove Fort Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Cove Fort Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (30) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6,"lon":-112.55,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

20

Cove Fort Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Geothermal Area Cove Fort Geothermal Area (Redirected from Cove Fort Geothermal Area - Vapor) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Cove Fort Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (30) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6,"lon":-112.55,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy Department Authorizes Dominion's Proposed Cove Point Facility to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dominion's Proposed Cove Point Dominion's Proposed Cove Point Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Dominion's Proposed Cove Point Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas September 11, 2013 - 1:11pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department announced today that it has conditionally authorized Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP to export domestically produced liquefied natural gas (LNG) to countries that do not have a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United States from the Cove Point LNG Terminal in Calvert County, Maryland. Dominion Cove Point previously received approval to export LNG from this facility to FTA countries on October 7, 2011. Subject to environmental review and final regulatory approval, the facility is conditionally authorized to export at a rate of

22

Multispectral Imaging At Cove Fort Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Laney, 2005) Cove Fort Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Cove Fort Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geology and Geophysics of Geothermal Systems, Gregory Nash, 2005. Vegetalspectral analysis at Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah was tested as a method of detecting hidden faults in exploration efforts. This effort proved to be successful and resulted in the Following published paper: Nash, G. D., J. N. Moore, and T. Sperry, 2003. "Vegetal-spectral anomaly detection at the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale thermal anomaly, Utah, USA: implications for use in geothermal exploration." Geothermics, v. 32, p.

23

Energy Department Authorizes Dominion's Proposed Cove Point Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department announced today that it has conditionally authorized Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP to export domestically produced liquefied natural gas (LNG) to countries that do...

24

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

25

Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Nash...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown Notes An example, shown in Figure 1, shows results from the classification of big sagebrush (Artimesia tridentata) spectra, acquired over the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale,...

26

Green Cove Springs, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Green Cove Springs, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI...

27

Digital Jordan curve theorems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Efim Khalimsky’s digital Jordan curve theorem states that the complement of a Jordan curve in the digital plane equipped with the Khalimsky topology has exactly two connectivity components. We present a new, short proof of this theorem using induction on the Euclidean length of the curve. We also prove that the theorem holds with another topology on the digital plane but then only for a restricted class of Jordan curves. 1

Christer O. Kiselman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Jordan Matrix Decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which states that an arbitrary square matrix M over an algebraically closed field can be decomposed into the form M = SJS ?1 where S is an invertible matrix and J is a matrix in a Jordan canonical form, i.e. a special type of block diagonal matrix in which each block consists of Jordan blocks (see [13]).

Karol P?k

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Jordan-Algebren  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

onal Lie type. This theorem is proved using the work of E. Zelmanov and of Smirnov on simple Lie algebras with finite gradings. J.A. Anquela Outer inheritance in Jordan systems We show that outer ideals of Jordan algebras, pairs and triple systems inherit nondegeneracy, strong primeness and primitivity. When dealing with pairs and triple systems, our results are based on the use of local algebras and the results on the inheritance of regularity by ample outer ideals of Jordan algebras due to K. McCrimmon [Outer Inheritance in Jordan Algebras, Comm. Algebra (to appear)]. As a corollary, we manage to remove ampleness as a hypothesis when dealing with outer ideals of Jordan algebras. G. Benkart Extended affine Lie algebras The extended affine Lie algebras (EALAs) are natural generalizations of the finitedimensional simple complex Lie algebras and the affine Lie algebras. We survey their recent classification. EALAs are close

An Der Tagung; Mathematisches Forschungsinstitut Oberwolfach; B. Allison; J. A. Anquela

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with a combination of pretreating agents comprising SO.sub.2 and an oxidizing agent. The pretreatment is believed to convert at least a portion of the scale-forming components and particularly calcium, to the corresponding sulfate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment may be accomplished with the combination of pretreating agents either simultaneously by using a mixture comprising SO.sub.2 and an oxidizing agent or sequentially by first treating with SO.sub.2 and then with an oxidizing agent.

Gorbaty, Martin L. (Westfield, NJ); Stone, John B. (Houston, TX); Poddar, Syamal K. (Houston, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

On Jordan's measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Jordan measure, the Jordan curve theorem, as well as the other generic references to Camille Jordan's (1838-1922) achievements highlight that the latter can hardly be reduced to the "great algebraist" whose masterpiece, the Trait\\'e des substitutions et des equations alg\\'ebriques, unfolded the group-theoretical content of \\'Evariste Galois's work. The present paper appeals to the database of the reviews of the Jahrbuch \\"uber die Fortschritte der Mathematik (1868-1942) for providing an overview of Jordan's works. On the one hand, we shall especially investigate the collective dimensions in which Jordan himself inscribed his works (1860-1922). On the other hand, we shall address the issue of the collectives in which Jordan's works have circulated (1860-1940). Moreover, the time-period during which Jordan has been publishing his works, i.e., 1860-1922, provides an opportunity to investigate some collective organizations of knowledge that pre-existed the development of object-oriented disciplines such as gr...

Brechenmacher, Frederic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Half Moon Cove Tidal Project. Feasibility report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed Half Moon Cove Tidal Power Project would be located in a small cove in the northern part of Cobscook Bay in the vicinity of Eastport, Maine. The project would be the first tidal electric power generating plant in the United States of America. The basin impounded by the barrier when full will approximate 1.2 square miles. The average tidal range at Eastport is 18.2 feet. The maximum spring tidal range will be 26.2 feet and the neap tidal range 12.8 feet. The project will be of the single pool-type single effect in which generation takes place on the ebb tide only. Utilizing an average mean tidal range of 18.2 feet the mode of operation enables generation for approximately ten and one-half (10-1/2) hours per day or slightly in excess of five (5) hours per tide. The installed capacity will be 12 MW utilizing 2 to 6 MW units. An axial flow, or Bulb type of turbine was selected for this study.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-11 019 UC-61 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,Catalytic Liquefaction of Biomass,n M, Seth, R. Djafar, G.of California. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION QUARTERLY

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

EIS-0489-NoticeofAdditionalScopingMeetings-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jordan Cove Energy Project LP Docket No. PF12-7-000 Jordan Cove Energy Project LP Docket No. PF12-7-000 Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline LP Docket No. PF12-17-000 NOTICE OF ADDITIONAL PUBLIC SCOPING MEETINGS FOR THE JORDAN COVE LIQUEFACTION AND PACIFIC CONNECTOR PIPELINE PROJECTS (September 21, 2012) On October 9, 10, and 11, 2012, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) Office of Energy Projects staff, in cooperation with representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (Forest Service) and the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management (BLM), will hold three additional public scoping meetings to take comments on Jordan Cove Energy Project LP's (Jordan Cove) proposed liquefaction project in Coos County, Oregon, in Docket No.

35

Powers of Elements in Jordan Loops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Jordan loop is a commutative loop satisfying the Jordan identity $(x^2 y) x = x^2 (y x)$. We establish several identities involving powers in Jordan loops and show that there is no nonassociative Jordan loop of order $9$.

Pula, Kyle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Current Processing Position Company DOE/FE Docket No.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC 11-161-LNG 2 Cameron LNG, LLC 11-162-LNG 3 Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P. 12-32-LNG 4 LNG Development Company, LLC (dba Oregon LNG)...

37

City of Elfin Cove, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elfin Cove, Alaska (Utility Company) Elfin Cove, Alaska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Elfin Cove Place Alaska Utility Id 5721 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.3290/kWh Commercial: $0.5250/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Elfin_Cove,_Alaska_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409550

38

Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Geothermal Field In Utah By Multiple Geophysical Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Geothermal Field In Utah By Multiple Geophysical Imaging Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area is located in the transition zone between the Basin and Range to the west and the Colorado Plateau to the east. We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different

39

Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug...

40

Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Norway (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Norway (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011...

42

Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Algeria (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Algeria (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

43

Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

44

Liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with a combination of pretreating agents comprising SO.sub.2 and an oxidizing agent. It is essential to effective operation that the moisture content of the solid carbonaceous material be within the range from about 10 to about 25 wt %, based on dry solid carbonaceous material, during the pretreatment. The pretreatment is believed to convert at least a portion of the scale-forming components and particularly calcium, to the corresponding sulfate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment may be accomplished with the combination of pretreating agents either simultaneously by using a mixture comprising SO.sub.2 and a gaseous oxidizing agent or sequentially by first treating with SO.sub.2 and then with an oxidizing agent.

Poddar, Syamal K. (Baytown, TX)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Generic and maximal Jordan types  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2007 ... •(G,k) we exhibit a “generic Jordan type” of M. In the very special ... specializes to the non-trivial observation that the Jordan type obtained by.

46

Transfinite partitions of Jordan curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The w-asymmetry induced by transfinite partitions makes it impossible for Jordan curves to have an infinite length.

Antonio Leon

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

47

Quantum Gauss Jordan Elimination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we construct the Quantum Gau\\ss Jordan Elimination (QGJE) Algorithm and estimate the complexity time of computation of Reduced Row Echelon Form (RREF) of an $N\\times N$ matrix using QGJE procedure. The main theorem asserts that QGJE has computation time of order $2^{N/2}$.

Do Ngoc Diep; Do Hoang Giang

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

48

Novikov-Jordan algebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Algebras with identity $(a\\star b)\\star (c\\star d) -(a\\star d)\\star(c\\star b)$ $=(a,b,c)\\star d-(a,d,c)\\star b$ are studied. Novikov algebras under Jordan multiplication and Leibniz dual algebras satisfy this identity. If algebra with such identity has unit, then it is associative and commutative.

A. S. Dzhumadil'daev

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cove Hot Spring Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cove Hot Spring Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cove Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Cove, Oregon Coordinates 45.2965256°, -117.8079872° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

50

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid Fuels from Biomass: "Catalyst Screening and KineticUC-61 (l, RCO osn CDL or BIOMASS CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION ManuCATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS Manu Seth, Roger Djafar,

Seth, Manu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Bilipschitz Homogeneity and Jordan Curves.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We analyze Jordan curves in the plane that are bilipschitz homogeneous with respect to Euclidean distance and/or inner diameter distance. We begin our analysis from… (more)

Freeman, David M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Gauss-Jordan Elimination - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gauss-Jordan Elimination. This example, from the Finite Mathematics & Applied Calculus Resource Page, uses JavaScript to calculate the effect of row ...

53

JORDAN DOMAINS ARE CAT(0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. For a Jordan domain in the plane the length metric space of points connected to an interior point by a curve of finite length is a cat(0) space. With respect to the cone topology, that space plus its boundary at infinity is topologically the same as the original Jordan domain. 1.

Richard L. Bishop

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

NREL: Energy Analysis - Jordan Macknick  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jordan Macknick Jordan Macknick Photo of Jordan Macknick Jordan Macknick is a member of the Energy Forecasting and Modeling Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Energy and Environmental Analyst On staff since September 2009 Phone number: 303-275-3828 E-mail: jordan.macknick@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Renewable energy technological characterizations Database development Policy analysis Primary research interests Interface of energy and water in policy planning Environmental impacts of renewable energy technologies Renewable energy deployment in developing countries Education and background training M.E.Sc. in transboundary natural resource policy, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, New Haven, CT, 2009 B.A. in mathematics and environmental studies, Hamline University,

55

EIS-0489-ScopingExtension-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Jordan Cove Energy Project LP Docket No. PF12-7-000 Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline LP Docket No. PF12-17-000 NOTICE OF EXTENSION OF COMMENT PERIOD AND ADDITIONAL PUBLIC SCOPING MEETINGS FOR THE JORDAN COVE LIQUEFACTION AND PACIFIC CONNECTOR PIPELINE PROJECTS (August 28, 2012) This notice announces the extension of the public scoping process and comment period for Jordan Cove Energy Project LP's (Jordan Cove) proposed liquefaction project in Coos County, Oregon, in Docket No. PF12-7-000, and Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline LP's (Pacific Connector) proposed pipeline project crossing portions of Klamath, Jackson, Douglas, and Coos Counties, Oregon, in Docket No. PF12-17-000. In addition

56

Jordan Isomorphisms and Jordan Derivations of Prime Rings with characteristic 2.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, we describe the Jordan isomorphisms and Jordan derivations on prime rings of characteristic 2. We prove that every Jordan isomorphism of Mn(F),n… (more)

Tsai, Chia-Fang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location.

58

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal

59

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal

60

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Redirected from Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal

62

Sandalfoot Cove, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sandalfoot Cove, Florida: Energy Resources Sandalfoot Cove, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.3392449°, -80.1875461° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.3392449,"lon":-80.1875461,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

63

Shady Cove, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove, Oregon: Energy Resources Cove, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.61179°, -122.818703° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.61179,"lon":-122.818703,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

64

Halibut Cove, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Halibut Cove, Alaska: Energy Resources Halibut Cove, Alaska: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 59.595°, -151.225° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":59.595,"lon":-151.225,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

MHK Projects/Sandy Cove | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sandy Cove Sandy Cove < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.4776,"lon":-63.5408,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

66

MHK Projects/Deadman Cove | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deadman Cove Deadman Cove < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.1359,"lon":-91.5055,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

67

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors add 20 percent to liquefaction plant total installed cost 6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and...

68

Hot Springs Cove Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Cove Geothermal Area Hot Springs Cove Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hot Springs Cove Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.23333333,"lon":-168.35,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

69

La forma canonica di Jordan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Il lavoro riguarda la forma canonica di Jordan. Nella prima parte c'è un breve riepilogo di nozioni fondamentali sull'algebra lineare e nel seguito c'è nel… (more)

Bof, Nicoletta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Energy Conditions in Jordan Frame  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The null energy condition, in its usual form, can appear to be violated by transformations in the conformal frame of the metric. We propose a generalization of the form of the null energy condition to Jordan frame, in which matter is non-minimally coupled, which reduces to the familiar form in Einstein frame. Using our version of the null energy condition, we provide a direct proof of the second law of black hole thermodynamics in Jordan frame.

Saugata Chatterjee; Damien A. Easson; Maulik Parikh

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

71

Lowner's Operator and Spectral Functions in Euclidean Jordan ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 26, 2004 ... Lowner's Operator and Spectral Functions in Euclidean Jordan Algebras ... functions under the framework of Euclidean Jordan algebras.

72

`Mixed' Jordan-Lie Superalgebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An algebra A not encountered in either the usual algebraic varieties or supervarieties is introduced. A is a graded and deformed version of the quaternions, with structure similar to that of a Jordan-Lie superalgebra as defined by Okubo and Kamiya, but it is shown to be neither that of a purely associative Lie superalgebra, nor that of a purely antiassociative Jordan-Lie superalgebra. Rather, it exhibits a novel kind of associativity, here called `ordered graded associativity', that is somewhat `in between' pure associativity and pure antiassociativity. In addition to graded associativity, the generators of A obey graded commutation relations encountered in both the usual Lie superalgebras and in graded Jordan-Lie algebras. They also satisfy new graded Jacobi identities that combine characteristics of the Jacobis obeyed by the generators of ungraded Lie, graded Lie and graded Jordan-Lie algebras. Mainly due to these three features, A is called a `mixed' Jordan-Lie superalgebra. The present paper defines A and compares it with the Jordan-Lie superalgebra defined by Okubo and Kamiya.

Ioannis Raptis

2001-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

73

A Note on the Jordan Canonical Form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A proof of the Jordan canonical form, suitable for a first course in linear algebra, is given. The proof includes the uniqueness of the number and sizes of the Jordan blocks.

Azad, H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Controlled Source Audio MT At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Audio MT At Cove Fort Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Controlled Source Audio MT Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "SP, dipole-dipole resistivity, CSAMT; sufficient electrical data are available. Reservoir model?" References Jim Combs (1 January 2006) Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Controlled_Source_Audio_MT_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Combs_2006)&oldid=598122"

75

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "SP, dipole-dipole resistivity, CSAMT; sufficient electrical data are available. Reservoir model?" References Jim Combs (1 January 2006) Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Combs_2006)&oldid=598123

76

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ground_Gravity_Survey_At_Cove_Fort_Area_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598130" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities

77

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_Survey_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Vapor_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598134"

78

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Warpinski, Et Al., Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598125" Categories: Exploration Activities

79

Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ground_Magnetics_At_Cove_Fort_Area_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598118" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages

80

A simple proof of Jordan normal form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note, a simple proof Jordan normal form and rational form of matrices over a field is given.

Chen, Yuqun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Coal liquefaction quenching process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described an improved coal liquefaction quenching process which prevents the formation of coke with a minimum reduction of thermal efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. In the process, the rapid cooling of the liquid/solid products of the coal liquefaction reaction is performed without the cooling of the associated vapor stream to thereby prevent formation of coke and the occurrence of retrograde reactions. The rapid cooling is achieved by recycling a subcooled portion of the liquid/solid mixture to the lower section of a phase separator that separates the vapor from the liquid/solid products leaving the coal reactor.

Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA); Yeh, Chung-Liang (Bethlehem, PA); Donath, Ernest E. (St. Croix, VI)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a coal liquefaction process using two stages. The first stage liquefies the coal and maximizes the product while the second stage hydrocracks the remainder of the coal liquid to produce solvent.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fair Lawn, NJ); Chen, James M. (Edison, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Algae liquefaction / Hope Baloyi.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The liquefaction of algae for the recovery of bio–oil was studied. Algae oil is a non–edible feedstock and has minimal impact on food security and… (more)

Baloyi, Hope

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

STOICHIOMETRY OF WOOD LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

co 2 By decomposition to (2) - 0 in H cf 0 in wood TABLE VForced Balance - Wood to Char Output - 55 lbs char lbsuc -61 STOICHIOMETRY OF WOOD LIQUEFACTION Hubert G. Davis

Davis, Hubert G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Geology of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) is located on the northwestern margin of the Marysvale volcanic field in southwestern Utah. The geology of the KGRA is dominated by lava flows and ash-flow tuffs of late Oligocene to mid-Miocene age that were deposited on faulted sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic to Mesozoic age. The geothermal system of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA is structurally controlled by normal faults. High-angle faults control fluid flow within the geothermal reservoir, while the gravitational glide blocks provide an impermeable cap for the geothermal system in the central part of the field. Surficial activity occurring to the north and south of the glide blocks is characterized by the evolution of hydrogen sulfide and deposition of native sulphur. Intense acid alteration of the aluvium, resulting from downward migration of sulphuric acid, has left porous siliceous residues that retain many of the original sedimentary structures. Detailed logs of Union Oil Company drill holes Forminco No. 1, Utah State 42-7, and Utah State 31-33 are included.

Moore, J.N.; Samberg, S.M.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Integrated coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for the liquefaction of coal in which coal liquids containing phenols and other oxygenated compounds are produced during the liquefaction step and later hydrogenated, oxygenated compounds are removed from at least part of the coal liquids in the naphtha and gas oil boiling range prior to the hydrogenation step and employed as a feed stream for the manufacture of a synthesis gas or for other purposes.

Effron, Edward (Springfield, NJ)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation  

SciTech Connect

The coal liquefaction process disclosed uses three stages. The first stage is a liquefaction. The second and third stages are hydrogenation stages at different temperatures and in parallel or in series. One stage is within 650.degree.-795.degree. F. and optimizes solvent production. The other stage is within 800.degree.-840.degree. F. and optimizes the C.sub.5 -850.degree. F. product.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fair Lawn, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Liquid (Combs 2006) - Liquid (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "SP, dipole-dipole resistivity, CSAMT; sufficient electrical data are available. Reservoir model?" References Jim Combs (1 January 2006) Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_Survey_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Combs_2006)&oldid=598127"

89

Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area (Nash, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nash, Et Al., 2002) Nash, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes An example, shown in Figure 1, shows results from the classification of big sagebrush (Artimesia tridentata) spectra, acquired over the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah thermal anomaly, in relation to geology References Gregory D. Nash, Christopher Kesler, Michael C. Adam (2002) Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And

90

Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Nash, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nash, Et Al., Nash, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes An example, shown in Figure 1, shows results from the classification of big sagebrush (Artimesia tridentata) spectra, acquired over the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah thermal anomaly, in relation to geology References Gregory D. Nash, Christopher Kesler, Michael C. Adam (2002) Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And Management

91

City of Green Cove Springs, Florida (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida (Utility Company) Florida (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Green Cove Springs Place Florida Utility Id 7593 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location FRCC NERC FRCC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Demand Commercial General Service Non-Demand Commercial Large Service Demand Industrial Master-Metered Industrial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1270/kWh Commercial: $0.1240/kWh Industrial: $0.1100/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

92

Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project

93

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion

94

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Modeling-Computer Simulations At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion

95

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 2002) Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. Drilling of the test well was completed in the fall of 2001 and results are currently being evaluated. The total depth of the well is 598 m with a

96

Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP - FE Dkt. No 11-128-LNG | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP - FE Dkt. No 11-128-LNG Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP - FE Dkt. No 11-128-LNG Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP - FE Dkt. No 11-128-LNG ORDER CONDITIONALLY GRANTING LONG-TERM MULTI-CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS BY VESSEL FROM THE COVE POINT LNG TERMINAL TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS Based on a review of the complete record and for the reasons set forth below, DOE/FE has concluded that the opponents of the DCP Application have not demonstrated that the requested authorization will be inconsistent with the public interest and finds that the exports proposed in this Application are likely to yield net economic benefits to the United States. DOE/FE further finds that DCP's proposed exports on behalf of other entities should be conditionally authorized at a volumetric rate not to exceed the

97

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project

98

Magnetotellurics At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion

99

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Falcon Cove Middle School |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Falcon Cove Middle School Falcon Cove Middle School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Falcon Cove Middle School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Falcon Cove Middle School students from Weston, FL tour the National Mall

100

Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Algeria...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Algeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Algeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

102

Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Total Imports (Dollars...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

103

Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Egypt (Nominal...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Egypt (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Egypt (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

104

Authority, polity, and tenuous elites in Iron Age Edom (Jordan)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Iron Age in southern Jordan (Shef?eld), 47–54. knauf, e.at Tawilan in southern Jordan (Oxford). bienkowski, p.the Iron Age in southern Jordan: A framework. In Bienkowski,

Porter, Benjamin W.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos Abstract We introduce nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs, generalizing the nuclear elements Jordan pairs and show that the trace form Trintroduced in [3] may be extended to the nuclear

106

The Geometry of Jordan Matrix Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We elucidate the geometry of matrix models based on simple formally real Jordan algebras. Such Jordan algebras give rise to a nonassociative geometry that is a generalization of Lorentzian geometry. We emphasize constructions for the exceptional Jordan algebra and the exceptional Jordan C*-algebra and describe the projective spaces related to the exceptional cubic matrix model and the E_6 matrix model. The resulting projective spaces are shown to be exceptional versions of projective twistor space, thus revealing the existence of exceptional twistor string theories that are dual to octonionic matrix models.

Michael Rios

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

107

Optimization Online - Jordan-algebraic aspects of nonconvex ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2004 ... Jordan-algebraic aspects of nonconvex optimization over symmetric ... Abstract: We illustrate the usefulness of Jordan-algebraic technique for ...

108

Fischer-Burmeister Complementarity Function on Euclidean Jordan ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 29, 2007 ... Keywords: Fischer-Burmeister function, Euclidean Jordan algebra, strong ... Abbreviated Title: FB C-function on Euclidean Jordan algebras.

109

Löwner's Operator and Spectral Functions in Euclidean Jordan ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 24, 2004 ... spectral functions under the framework of Euclidean Jordan algebras. ... over any symmetric cone defined in a Euclidean Jordan algebra is ...

110

Jordan - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Jordan, unlike its immediate neighbors, does not possess significant energy resources. As of January 2013, the Oil & Gas Journal estimated Jordan's proved oil ...

111

Jordan-algebraic aspects of nonconvex optimization over symmetric ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We illustrate the usefulness of Jordan algebraic technique for. nonconvex ... Jordan-algebraic technique proved to be very useful for the analysis of convex.

112

Fischer-Burmeister Complementarity Function on Euclidean Jordan ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 12, 2007 ... Keywords: Fischer-Burmeister function, Euclidean Jordan algebra, Lipschitz ... Abbreviated Title: FB C-function on Euclidean Jordan algebras.

113

Jordan-algebraic aspects of optimization:randomization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 29, 2007 ... straints on the (Jordan-algebraic) rank of the solution. ... Jordan-algebraic technique proved to be very useful for the analysis of opti- mization ...

114

TRANSFINITE PARTITIONS OF JORDAN CURVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The ?-asymmetry induced by transfinite partitions makes it impossible for Jordan curves to have an infinite length. 1. ?-asymmetry As we known from the XVIII century, ?-partitions (as we call them nowadays) of finite line segments are only possible if the successive adjacent parts of the ?-partition are of a decreasing length. This inevitable restriction induces a huge asymmetry in the very partition. In fact, whatever be the length of the ?-partitioned line segment and whatever be the ?-partition, all its parts, except a finite number of them, will necessarily lie within an arbitrarily small final segment. For the sake of illustration, consider an ?-partition of a 10 30 light years length segment-the assumed diameter of the universe. Whatever be the ?-partition of this enormous line segment all its infinitely many parts, except a finite number of them, will inevitably lie within a final segment inconceivable less than, for instance, Planck length ( ? 10 ?33 cm). There is no way of performing a more equitable partition if the partition has to be ?-ordered. Thus, ?-partitions are ?-asymmetrical. For the same reason it is impossible to consider two proper points in the real line R separated by an infinite euclidean distance, in spite of the assumed infiniteness of the real line. The above simply unaesthetic consequences of ?-partitions become a little more controversial if the partitioned object is a closed line as a Jordan curve. The objective of the following short discussion is just to examine one of those consequences. Figure 1. A cosmic ?-asymmetry. The ?-order makes it impossible a more equitable distribution of the available space. 1 2 Transfinite partitions of Jordan Curves 2. Transfinite partitions of Jordan Curves Let f(x) be a real valued function whose graph is a Jordan Curve J in the euclidean plane R2. If a and b are any two J’s points, we will write L(a, b) to denote the length of the J’s arc ãb whose endpoints are a and b. That is to say: b ? L(a, b) = 1 + (f(x)?) 2dx (1)

Antonio Leon Sanchez; I. E. S. Francisco; Salinas Salamanca

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A C.sub.5 -900.degree. F. (C.sub.5 -482.degree. C.) liquid yield greater than 50 weight percent MAF feed coal is obtained in a coal liquefaction process wherein a selected combination of higher hydrogen partial pressure, longer slurry residence time and increased recycle ash content of the feed slurry are controlled within defined ranges.

Carr, Norman L. (Allison Park, PA); Moon, William G. (Cheswick, PA); Prudich, Michael E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Method for coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

A process is disclosed for coal liquefaction in which minute particles of coal in intimate contact with a hydrogenation catalyst and hydrogen arc reacted for a very short time at a temperature in excess of 400.degree. C. at a pressure of at least 1500 psi to yield over 50% liquids with a liquid to gaseous hydrocarbon ratio in excess of 8:1.

Wiser, Wendell H. (Kaysville, UT); Oblad, Alex G. (Salt Lake City, UT); Shabtai, Joseph S. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC-61 PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION Larry L.10093 PRETREATMENT OF BIOMASS PRIOR TO LIQUEFACTION Larry L.hydrolytic pretreatment to biomass feedstocks, higher acid

Schaleger, Larry L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

BBSLA – Jordan (031210) English (Global Version 031010) 1 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA – Jordan (031210) English (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION LICENSE AGREEMENT PLEASE READ THIS ...

120

Technology and social process : oscillations in Iron Age copper production and power in Southern Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaeology of Edom, Southern Jordan - Surveys, ExcavationsLandscape Survey, Southern Jordan (pp. 199-226). Oxford:Landscape Survey, Southern Jordan . Oxford: Oxbow Books;

Ben-Yosef, Erez

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Tribes and the Formation of Social Inequality : : a Case Study from Central Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

riots contained via tribal mediation. In Jordan Times.jordantimes.com. Amman, Jordan. Baines, John, and NormanKhirbat Dubab in the Wadi Hasa, Jordan: the Pottery. Levant.

Vincent, Matthew L.

122

Coal Liquefaction desulfurization process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a solvent refined coal liquefaction process, more effective desulfurization of the high boiling point components is effected by first stripping the solvent-coal reacted slurry of lower boiling point components, particularly including hydrogen sulfide and low molecular weight sulfur compounds, and then reacting the slurry with a solid sulfur getter material, such as iron. The sulfur getter compound, with reacted sulfur included, is then removed with other solids in the slurry.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved coal liquefaction process is provided which enables conversion of a coal-oil slurry to a synthetic crude refinable to produce larger yields of gasoline and diesel oil. The process is characterized by a two-step operation applied to the slurry prior to catalytic desulfurization and hydrogenation in which the slurry undergoes partial hydrogenation to crack and hydrogenate asphaltenes and the partially hydrogenated slurry is filtered to remove minerals prior to subsequent catalytic hydrogenation.

Karr, Jr., Clarence (Morgantown, WV)

1977-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

124

Method for coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for coal liquefaction in which minute particles of coal in intimate contact with a hydrogenation catalyst and hydrogen arc reacted for a very short time at a temperature in excess of 400 C at a pressure of at least 1500 psi to yield over 50% liquids with a liquid to gaseous hydrocarbon ratio in excess of 8:1. 1 figures.

Wiser, W.H.; Oblad, A.G.; Shabtai, J.S.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

125

Coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for liquefying a particulate coal feed to produce useful petroleum-like liquid products which comprises contacting; in a series of two or more coal liquefaction zones, or stages, graded with respect to temperature, an admixture of a polar compound; or compounds, a hydrogen donor solvent and particulate coal, the total effluent being passed in each instance from a low temperature zone, or stage to the next succeeding higher temperature zone, or stage, of the series. The temperature within the initial zone, or stage, of the series is maintained about 70.degree. F and 750.degree. F and the temperature within the final zone, or stage, is maintained between about 750.degree. F and 950.degree. F. The residence time within the first zone, or stage, ranges, generally, from about 20 to about 150 minutes and residence time within each of the remaining zones, or stages, of the series ranges, generally, from about 10 minutes to about 70 minutes. Further steps of the process include: separating the product from the liquefaction zone into fractions inclusive of a liquid solvent fraction; hydrotreating said liquid solvent fraction in a hydrogenation zone; and recycling the hydrogenated liquid solvent mixture to said coal liquefaction zones.

Maa, Peter S. (Baytown, TX)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

MULTIPHASE REACTOR MODELING FOR ZINC CHLORIDE CATALYZED COAL LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ix Introduction. A. Coal Liquefaction Overview B.L ZnCl 2-catalyzed Coal Liquefaction . . . . . . . . . • ,Results. . . • . ZnC1 2/MeOH Coal liquefaction Process

Joyce, Peter James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESS ENGINEERING UNIT (PEU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0092 UC-61 ORNIA LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESSLBL~l0092 LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESSof Energy LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESS

Figueroa, Carlos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reflection Survey At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion provides a detailed model of the Cove Fort geothermal region.

129

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects

130

Cove Swimming Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Swimming Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Swimming Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cove Swimming Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cove Swimming Pool Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Cove, Oregon Coordinates 45.2965256°, -117.8079872° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

131

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2) 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. Drilling of the test well was completed in the fall of 2001 and results are currently being evaluated. The total depth of the well is 598 m with a non-equilibrated maximum temperature probably in the range of 157degrees C and a very complicated geologic structure.

132

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Warpinski, Et Al., (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_Survey_At_Cove_Fort_Area_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598126" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here

133

Jordan C*-Algebras and Supergravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is known that black hole charge vectors of N=8 and magic N=2 supergravity in four and five dimensions can be represented as elements of Jordan algebras of degree three over the octonions and split-octonions and their Freudenthal triple systems. We show both such Jordan algebras are contained in the exceptional Jordan C*-algebra and construct its corresponding Freudenthal triple system and single variable extension. The transformation groups for these structures give rise to the complex forms of the U-duality groups for N=8 and magic N=2 supergravities in three, four and five dimensions.

Michael Rios

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

134

Chaotic inflation in Jordan frame supergravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the inflationary scenario with non-minimal coupling in 4D Jordan frame supergravity. We find that there occurs a tachyonic instability along the direction of the accompanying non-inflaton field in generic Jordan frame supergravity models. We propose a higher order correction to the Jordan frame function for solving the tachyonic mass problem and show that the necessary correction can be naturally generated by the heavy thresholds without spoiling the slow-roll conditions. We discuss the implication of the result on the Higgs inflation in NMSSM.

Hyun Min Lee

2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

135

Liquefaction Evaluations at DOE Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LIQUEFACTION EVALUATIONS AT LIQUEFACTION EVALUATIONS AT DOE SITES M. Lewis, M. McHood, R. Williams, B. Gutierrez October 25, 2011 Agenda  Background  Purpose and Objective  Liquefaction Methods  Site Evaluations  Aging  Conclusions 2 Background 3 Liquefaction at DOE Sites Background  Liquefaction evaluations are required at all DOE sites  Methods have evolved over the years, but there is currently only one consensus methodology;  Youd et al., 2001  Two other methods have emerged in the last few years;  Cetin et al., 2004  Idriss & Boulanger, 2008 4 Background  Youd et al., was the result of two workshops (NCEER/NSF) held in the late 1990s, culminating in a NCEER report and a ASCE publication in 2001. The method is widely used.  Cetin et al., was the result of several doctoral

136

BLG theory with generalized Jordan triple systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a generalized Jordan algebra of the second kind to study the recently proposed BLG theory of multiple M2-branes. We find the restriction imposed on the ternary product from its consistency with the BLG theory.

Sudipto Paul Chowdhury; Subir Mukhopadhyay; Koushik Ray

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

137

Contemporary Climate Change in the Jordan Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the climate changes that have occurred in the 40 years since the publication of Jehuda Neumann's classic climatological studies of the energy and water balance of the natural water bodies of the Jordan Valley. The measurements ...

Shabtai Cohen; Gerald Stanhill

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Jordan structures in mathematics and physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to offer an overview of the most important applications of Jordan structures inside mathematics and also to physics, up-dated references being included. For a more detailed treatment of this topic see - especially - the recent book Iordanescu [364w], where sugestions for further developments are given through many open problems, comments and remarks pointed out throughout the text. Nowadays, mathematics becomes more and more nonassociative and my prediction is that in few years nonassociativity will govern mathematics and applied sciences. Keywords: Jordan algebra, Jordan triple system, Jordan pair, JB-, JB*-, JBW-, JBW*-, JH*-algebra, Ricatti equation, Riemann space, symmetric space, R-space, octonion plane, projective plane, Barbilian space, Tzitzeica equation, quantum group, B\\"acklund-Darboux transformation, Hopf algebra, Yang-Baxter equation, KP equation, Sato Grassmann manifold, genetic algebra, random quadratic form.

Radu Iordanescu

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

139

Generalizations of Jordan Algebras and Malcev Algebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce two classes of nonassociative algebras and define the building blocks in the context of the new nonassociative algebras. My generalizations of Jordan Algebras and Malcev Algebras come from Z2algebras which lead to my attention in exploring the curiosity to generalize Lie algebras. The definitions of the generalized Jordan Algebras and the generalized Malcev Algebras are based on two passages. One passage is from associative Z2algebras to generalized Jordan Algebras. The other passage is from alternative Z2-algebras to generalized Malcev Algebras. In this paper, all vector spaces are vector spaces over fields of characteristic not two and three, and all associative algebras have an identity. 1 Generalized Jordan Algebras We begin this section with the following definition. Definition 1.1 Let A = A0 ? A1 (as vector spaces) be an algebra. (i) A is called a Z2-algebra if

Keqin Liu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Jordan algebras and orthogonal polynomials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We illustrate how Jordan algebras can provide a framework for the interpretation of certain classes of orthogonal polynomials. The big -1 Jacobi polynomials are eigenfunctions of a first order operator of Dunkl type. We consider an algebra that has this operator (up to constants) as one of its three generators and whose defining relations are given in terms of anticommutators. It is a special case of the Askey-Wilson algebra AW(3). We show how the structure and recurrence relations of the big -1 Jacobi polynomials are obtained from the representations of this algebra. We also present ladder operators for these polynomials and point out that the big -1 Jacobi polynomials satisfy the Hahn property with respect to a generalized Dunkl operator.

Satoshi Tsujimoto; Luc Vinet; Alexei Zhedanov

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Jordan Algebras and Extremal Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review various properties of the exceptional Euclidean Jordan algebra of degree three. Euclidean Jordan algebras of degree three and their corresponding Freudenthal triple systems were recently shown to be intimately related to extremal black holes in N=2, d=4 homogeneous supergravities. Using a novel type of eigenvalue problem with eigenmatrix solutions, we elucidate the rich matrix geometry underlying the exceptional N=2, d=4 homogeneous supergravity and explore the relations to extremal black holes.

Michael Rios

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

142

Defining quantumness via the Jordan product  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose alternative definitions of classical states and quantumness witnesses by focusing on the algebra of observables of the system. A central role will be assumed by the anticommutator of the observables, namely the Jordan product. This approach turns out to be suitable for generalizations to infinite dimensional systems. We then show that the whole algebra of observables can be generated by three elements by repeated application of the Jordan product.

Paolo Facchi; Leonardo Ferro; Giuseppe Marmo; Saverio Pascazio

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

143

Reduction of Lie--Jordan algebras: Quantum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present a theory of reduction of quantum systems in the presence of symmetries and constraints. The language used is that of Lie--Jordan Banach algebras, which are discussed in some detail together with spectrum properties and the space of states. The reduced Lie--Jordan Banach algebra is characterized together with the Dirac states on the physical algebra of observables.

F. Falceto; L. Ferro; A. Ibort; G. Marmo

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

Coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range. 1 fig.

Wright, C.H.

1986-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

Coal liquefaction process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range.

Wright, Charles H. (Overland Park, KS)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR...

147

Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

Elliott, Douglas C.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

Bioechnology of indirect liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project on biotechnology of indirect liquefaction was focused on conversion of coal derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels using a two-stage, acidogenic and solventogenic, anaerobic bioconversion process. The acidogenic fermentation used a novel and versatile organism, Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, which was fully capable of using CO as the sole carbon and energy source for organic acid production. In extended batch CO fermentations the organism was induced to produce butyrate at the expense of acetate at low pH values. Long-term, steady-state operation was achieved during continuous CO fermentations with this organism, and at low pH values (a pH of 6.0 or less) minor amounts of butanol and ethanol were produced. During continuous, steady-state fermentations of CO with cell recycle, concentrations of mixed acids and alcohols were achieved (approximately 12 g/l and 2 g/l, respectively) which are high enough for efficient conversion in stage two of the indirect liquefaction process. The metabolic pathway to produce 4-carbon alcohols from CO was a novel discovery and is believed to be unique to our CO strain of B. methylotrophicum. In the solventogenic phase, the parent strain ATCC 4259 of Clostridium acetobutylicum was mutagenized using nitrosoguanidine and ethyl methane sulfonate. The E-604 mutant strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum showed improved characteristics as compared to parent strain ATCC 4259 in batch fermentation of carbohydrates.

Datta, R.; Jain, M.K.; Worden, R.M.; Grethlein, A.J.; Soni, B.; Zeikus, J.G.; Grethlein, H.

1990-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction and Compression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Praxair Hydrogen Liquefaction Hydrogen Compression 3 Praxair at a Glance The largest industrial gas company in North and South America Only U.S. Hydrogen Supplier in All Sizes...

150

Two stage liquefaction of coal  

SciTech Connect

A two stage coal liquefaction process and apparatus comprising hydrogen donor solvent extracting, solvent deashing, and catalytic hydrocracking. Preferrably, the catalytic hydrocracking is performed in an ebullating bed hydrocracker.

Neuworth, Martin B. (Chevy Chase, MD)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Jordan-World Bank Climate Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Bank Climate Projects World Bank Climate Projects Jump to: navigation, search Name Jordan-World Bank Climate Projects Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Biomass, Wind Topics Background analysis Country Jordan Western Asia References World Bank project database[1] Contents 1 World Bank Active Climate Projects in Jordan 1.1 Jordan Energy Efficiency 1.2 Promotion of a Wind Power Market 1.3 JO-Amman Landfill Gas Recovery 1.4 Integrated Ecosystems in the Jordan Rift Valley 2 References World Bank Active Climate Projects in Jordan Jordan Energy Efficiency (1M) GEF Medium Sized Program Promotion of a Wind Power Market (6M) Global Environment Project JO-Amman Landfill Gas Recovery (15M) Carbon Offset Integrated Ecosystems in the Jordan Rift Valley (6.15M) Global

152

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Members Convene in Jordan For...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Members Convene in Jordan For Second Steering Group Meeting Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Members Convene in Jordan For Second Steering Group Meeting May 15, 2008 - 12:00pm...

153

Steam pretreatment for coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

Steam pretreatment is the reaction of coal with steam at temperatures well below those usually used for solubilization. The objective of the proposed work is to test the application of steam pretreatment to coal liquefaction. This quarter, a 300 ml stirred autoclave for liquefaction tests were specified and ordered, procedures for extraction tests were reestablished, and the synthesis of four model compounds was completed. Two of these compounds remain to be purified.

Graff, R.A.; Balogh-Nair, V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

New Directions in Gender and Sexuality Studies: Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Rebecca Jordan-Young, and Alondra Nelson Will Be Featured in Winter Quarter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chakravorty Spivak, Rebecca Jordan-Young, and Alondra NelsonUniversity, Rebecca Jordan-Young, Associate Professor ofan embarrassment. Rebecca Jordan-Young Rebecca Jordan-Young

McLean, Lindsey; Johnson, Jane’a

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Jordan - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Country energy information, detailed and overviews. ... Country Analysis Note. Jordan, unlike its immediate neighbors, does not possess significant energy resources.

156

Hom-alternative algebras and Hom-Jordan algebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to introduce Hom-alternative algebras and Hom-Jordan algebras. We discuss some of their properties and provide construction procedures using ordinary alternative algebras or Jordan algebras. Also, we show that a polarization of Hom-associative algebra leads to Hom-Jordan algebra.

Makhlouf, Abdenacer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Un portrait kal\\'eidoscopique du jeune Camille Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper aims to provide an overview of recent researches studies on Camille Jordan's early works (1860-1870). We especially shed new light on the relation between Galois and Jordan by discussing the collective dimensions of Jordan's works and their receptions.

Brechenmacher, Frederic

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Direct coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved multistep liquefaction process for organic carbonaceous mater which produces a virtually completely solvent-soluble carbonaceous liquid product. The solubilized product may be more amenable to further processing than liquid products produced by current methods. In the initial processing step, the finely divided organic carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrocarbonaceous pasting solvent containing from 10% and 100% by weight process-derived phenolic species at a temperature within the range of 300 C to 400 C for typically from 2 minutes to 120 minutes in the presence of a carbon monoxide reductant and an optional hydrogen sulfide reaction promoter in an amount ranging from 0 to 10% by weight of the moisture- and ash-free organic carbonaceous material fed to the system. As a result, hydrogen is generated via the water/gas shift reaction at a rate necessary to prevent condensation reactions. In a second step, the reaction product of the first step is hydrogenated.

Rindt, J.R.; Hetland, M.D.

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

159

CAMERON LIQUEFACTION PROJECT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAMERON LIQUEFACTION PROJECT CAMERON LIQUEFACTION PROJECT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................................... ES-1 PROPOSED ACTION ............................................................................................................... ES-1 PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT ....................................................................................................... ES-3 PROJECT IMPACTS ................................................................................................................ ES-3 ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED ........................................................................................... ES-7 CONCLUSIONS ....................................................................................................................... ES-8

160

Analysis of a supercritical hydrogen liquefaction cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, a supercritical hydrogen liquefaction cycle is proposed and analyzed numerically. If hydrogen is to be used as an energy carrier, the efficiency of liquefaction will become increasingly important. By examining ...

Staats, Wayne Lawrence

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION EFFORTS IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIGURE Modified Lurgi Gasifier with Liquefaction Reactor2 + 2.152 H20 (residue) Gasifier input: Solid residue Oxygen

Ergun, Sabri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Jordan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jordan: Energy Resources Jordan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31,"lon":36,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

163

Six-Dimensional Jordan Supergravity Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of six-dimensional supergravity there is a special class of parent models for five-dimensional theories defined by the four Euclidean simple Jordan algebras of degree 3. We extend this result to include six- dimensional parent models for three infinite families of five-dimensional theories defined by Minkowskian Jordan algebras. Connections of the six-dimensional models to F-theory constructions are constrained by anomaly cancellation conditions and the structure of the six-dimensional theory gauge group.

P. Kouroumalou

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

164

Special identities for quasi-Jordan algebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Semispecial quasi-Jordan algebras (also called Jordan dialgebras) are defined by the polynomial identities $a(bc) = a(cb)$, $(ba)a^2 = (ba^2)a$, and $(b,a^2,c) = 2(b,a,c)a$. These identities are satisfied by the product $ab = a \\dashv b + b \\vdash a$ in an associative dialgebra. We use computer algebra to show that every identity for this product in degree $\\le 7$ is a consequence of the three identities in degree $\\le 4$, but that six new identities exist in degree 8. Some but not all of these new identities are noncommutative preimages of the Glennie identity.

Murray R. Bremner; Luiz A. Peresi

2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

165

On conformal Jordan cells of finite and infinite rank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work concerns in part the construction of conformal Jordan cells of infinite rank and their reductions to conformal Jordan cells of finite rank. It is also discussed how a procedure similar to Lie algebra contractions may reduce a conformal Jordan cell of finite rank to one of lower rank. A conformal Jordan cell of rank one corresponds to a primary field. This offers a picture in which any finite conformal Jordan cell of a given conformal weight may be obtained from a universal covering cell of the same weight but infinite rank.

Jorgen Rasmussen

2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

166

Is there a Jordan geometry underlying quantum physics?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There have been several propositions for a geometric and essentially non-linear formulation of quantum mechanics. From a purely mathematical point of view, the point of view of Jordan algebra theory might give new strength to such approaches: there is a ``Jordan geometry'' belonging to the Jordan part of the algebra of observables, in the same way as Lie groups belong to the Lie part. Both the Lie geometry and the Jordan geometry are well-adapted to describe certain features of quantum theory. We concentrate here on the mathematical description of the Jordan geometry and raise some questions concerning possible relations with foundational issues of quantum theory.

Wolfgang Bertram

2008-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

167

MHK Projects/Half Moon Cove Tidal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Half Moon Cove Tidal Project Half Moon Cove Tidal Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.9062,"lon":-66.99,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

168

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Unit. Final report, September 1977-July 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three exploratory geothermal wells were drilled in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal resource area in southwestern Utah to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the US DOE's geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations which included the drilling of an earlier exploratory well at the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area was also provided. Two of the wells were abandoned before reaching target depth because of severe lost circulation and hole sloughing problems. The two completed holes reached depths of 5221 ft. and 7735 ft., respectively, and a maximum reservoir temperature of 353/sup 0/F at 7320 ft. was measured. The deepest well flow was tested at the rate of 47,000 lbs/h with a wellhead temperature of 200/sup 0/F and pressure of 3 psig. Based upon current economics, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal resource is considered to be sub-commercial for the generation of electrical power. A synopsis is given of the exploratory drilling activities and results containing summary drilling, testing, geologic and geochemical information from four exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Grassmann Variables in Jordan Matrix Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we demonstrate the emergence of Grassmann variables in matrix models based on the exceptional Jordan algebra. The Grassmann algebras are built naturally using the octonion algebra. We argue the appearance of Grassmann variables solidifies the relationship between supersymmetry and triality.

Michael Rios

2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

170

Separation of solids from coal liquefaction products using sonic waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. This project seeks to improve the effectiveness of coal liquefaction by novel application of sonic and ultrasonic energy to separation of solids from coal liquefaction streams.

Slomka, B.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nomads in transition : mortuary archaeology in the lowlands of Edom (Jordan)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use in the Wadi Faynan, Southern Jordan: The Third Season ofUdruh and the Trade Route Through Southern Jordan. ” StudiesHistory and Archaeology of Jordan 3: 173-179. Kindler, A.

Beherec, Marc A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Reduction of Lie-Jordan Banach algebras and quantum states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theory of reduction of Lie-Jordan Banach algebras with respect to either a Jordan ideal or a Lie-Jordan subalgebra is presented. This theory is compared with the standard reduction of C*-algebras of observables of a quantum system in the presence of quantum constraints. It is shown that the later corresponds to the particular instance of the reduction of Lie-Jordan Banach algebras with respect to a Lie-Jordan subalgebra as described in this paper. The space of states of the reduced Lie-Jordan Banach algebras is described in terms of equivalence classes of extensions to the full algebra and their GNS representations are characterized in the same way. A few simple examples are discussed that illustrates some of the main results.

F. Falceto; L. Ferro; A. Ibort; G. Marmo

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

173

SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bed Solids Waste Gasifier," Forest Products Journal, Vol.BASIS IV. SUMMARY APPENDIX A - Gasifier Liquefaction Design1 - Modified Lurgi Gasifier with Liquefaction Reactor 2 -

Figueroa, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

"Jordan's Scalar Stars" and Dark Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we are starting the study of the field equations of relativistic scalar tensor theories in the spherically symmetric gravitational field. In the present article we shall consider as an example only the simplest Jordan-Brans-Dicke (JBD) one. To illustrate the property of the spherically symmetric JBD configuration we exhibit a new representation of the well-known four dimensional solutions. In this model, a suitable segment of Brans solution is chosen for the interior of the object while the outer region consists of a Schwarzschild vacuum. We have constructed "Jordan's scalar stars" model consisting of three parts: a homogeneous inner core with linear equation of state; an envelope of Brans spacetime matching the core and the exterior Schwarzschild spacetime. We have also showed that this toy model can explain the intergalactic effects without the dark matter hypothesis.

S. M. Kozyrev

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

175

Jordan - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil shale resources have the potential to increase Jordan's reserves significantly, but as of early 2013 such resources are not yet commercially viable.

176

Geopolymer Products from Jordan for Sustainability of the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Geopolymer Products from Jordan for Sustainability of the Environment. Author(s), Hani Nicola Khoury, Islam aldabsheh, Faten Slaty, Muayad ...

177

Documenting Deforestation at Sidd al-Ahmar, Petra Region, Jordan .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study documented the decline of the forests of the Petra Region of Jordan, as represented at Sidd al-Ahmar, within the Petra Archaeological Park. Biogeographical… (more)

Addison, Erin Heather

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Jordan-algebraic aspects of optimization:randomization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 7, 2007 ... Abstract: We describe a version of randomization technique within a general framework of Euclidean Jordan algebras. It is shown how to use ...

179

Optimization Online - Jordan-algebraic approach to convexity ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 24, 2005 ... Abstract: We describe a Jordan-algebraic version of results related to convexity of images of quadratic mappings as well as related results on ...

180

The Political Impact of Islamic Banking in Jordan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This dissertation examines Islamic banking in Jordan. It is argued that institutions perceived as culturally authentic may play important political roles in a post-colonial… (more)

Malley, Mohammed Mathew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Jordan isomorphisms of triangular matrix algebras with characteristic 2.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Every Jordan isomorphism of triangular n¡Ñn matrices over F with characteristic 2 is either a isomorphism or a antiisomorphism while n is 2. But it… (more)

Chen, Li-Fang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Optimization Online - Sparse Recovery on Euclidean Jordan Algebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 3, 2013 ... Abstract: We consider the sparse recovery problem on Euclidean Jordan algebra (SREJA), which includes sparse signal recovery and low-rank ...

183

Jordan blocks and Gamow-Jordan eigenfunctions associated to a double pole of the S-matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accidental degeneracy of resonances gives rise to a double pole in the scattering matrix, a double zero in the Jost function and a Jordan chain of length two of generalized Gamow-Jordan eigenfunctions of the radial Schroedinger equation. The generalized Gamow-Jordan eigenfunctions are basis elements of an expansion in bound and resonant energy eigenfunctions plus a continuum of scattering wave functions of complex wave number. In this biorthonormal basis, any operator which is a regular function of the Hamiltonian is represented by a complex matrix which is diagonal except for a Jordan block of rank two. The occurrence of a double pole in the Green's function, as well as the non-exponential time evolution of the Gamow-Jordan generalized eigenfunctions are associated to the Jordan block in the complex energy representation.

E. Hernandez; A. Jauregui; A. Mondragon

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Deliberalization in Jordan the roles of Islamists and U.S.-EU assistance in stalled democratization .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite some political openings in Jordan during the 1980s, the democratization process is presently stalled. What explains the lack of continuous democratization in Jordan while… (more)

Hammerstein, Ralf P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Primal-dual algorithms and infinite-dimensional Jordan algebras of ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 31, 2003 ... Primal-dual algorithms and infinite-dimensional Jordan algebras of finite ... of the technique of finite-dimensional Euclidean Jordan algebras to ...

186

Primal-dual algorithms and infinite-dimensional Jordan algebras of ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clidean Jordan algebras to the case of infinite-dimensional JB-algebras of finite ... Finite-dimensional Euclidean Jordan algebras proved to be very useful for the ...

187

Reduction of Lie-Jordan algebras: Classical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present a unified algebraic framework to discuss the reduction of classical and quantum systems. The underlying algebraic structure is a Lie-Jordan algebra supplemented, in the quantum case, with a Banach structure. We discuss the reduction by symmetries, by constraints as well as the possible, non trivial, combinations of both. We finally introduce a new, general framework to perform the reduction of physical systems in an algebraic setup.

F. Falceto; L. Ferro; A. Ibort; G. Marmo

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

188

Jordan Frame Supergravity and Inflation in NMSSM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a complete explicit N=1, d=4 supergravity action in an arbitrary Jordan frame with non-minimal scalar-curvature coupling of the form $\\Phi(z, \\bar z)\\, R$. The action is derived by suitably gauge-fixing the superconformal action. The theory has a modified Kaehler geometry, and it exhibits a significant dependence on the frame function $\\Phi (z, \\bar z)$ and its derivatives over scalars, in the bosonic as well as in the fermionic part of the action. Under certain simple conditions, the scalar kinetic terms in the Jordan frame have a canonical form. We consider an embedding of the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) gauge theory into supergravity, clarifying the Higgs inflation model recently proposed by Einhorn and Jones. We find that the conditions for canonical kinetic terms are satisfied for the NMSSM scalars in the Jordan frame, which leads to a simple action. However, we find that the gauge singlet field experiences a strong tachyonic instability during inflation in this model. Thus, a modification of the model is required to support the Higgs-type inflation.

Sergio Ferrara; Renata Kallosh; Andrei Linde; Alessio Marrani; Antoine Van Proeyen

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

Market risk analysis of coal liquefaction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study addresses the risks associated with coal liquefaction using a market risk simulation approach. The study can be divided into four phases: (i) identify… (more)

Mei, Huan.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Structural Control of Hydrology, Hydrogeology and Hydrochemistry along the Eastern Escarpment of the Jordan Rift Valley, JORDAN.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The relationship of structural geology and hydrogeological characteristics NW Jordan. Superior 3 phase tectonic model was derived from re-evaluation of structural elements which are strongly… (more)

Sahawneh, Julia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Indirect liquefaction processes. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the technology feasibility of the various coal gasification and indirect liquefaction technologies. Also included is the best-estimate costs for methanol and gasoline using the various technologies with three different coal/feedstocks by critically analyzing publicly available design studies and placing them on a common technical/financial basis. The following conclusion is that methanol from coal is cheaper than gasoline via either the Mobile MTG process or the Fisher/Tropsch process.

McGuckin, J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Identification of National Energy Policies and Energy Access in Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy are natural gas, renewable energy and oil shale. Renewable energy applications in Jordan includes is less than 2% of the total energy mix. Oil shale reserves in Jordan are estimated at 40 billion tons: Potential New and Renewable Energy Resources 1. Oil Shale Geological reserves 40 billion tons 2. Tar Sands

193

Exceptional Lie Algebras, SU(3) and Jordan Pairs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple unifying view of the exceptional Lie algebras is presented. The underlying Jordan pair content and role are exhibited. Each algebra contains three Jordan pairs sharing the same Lie algebra of automorphisms and the same external su(3) symmetry. Eventual physical applications and implications of the theory are outlined.

Piero Truini

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

194

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fOSS fOSS IL ENERGY ) Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC ) Lake Charles Exports, LLC ) Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP ) Carib Energy (USA) LLC ) Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC ) Cameron LNG, LLC ) Gulf Coast LNG Export, LLC ) Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P ) LNG Development Company, LLC (d/b/a Oregon LNG) ) Cheniere Marketing, LLC ) Southern LNG Company, L.L.C. ) Gulf LNG Liquefaction Company, LLC ) CE FLNG, LLC ) Excelerate Liquefaction Sol utions I, LLC ) Golden Pass Products LLC ) ______________________________________ ) PROCEDURAL ORDER BACKGROUND FE Docket No. 10-161-LNG FE Docket No. 11-59-LNG FE Docket No. 11- 128- LNG FE Docket No. 11- 141-LNG FE Docket No. 11- 161- LNG FE Docket No. 11- 162- LNG FE Docket No. 12-05-

195

Jordan-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jordan-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services Jordan-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Jordan-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services Name Jordan-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ), Global Green Growth Knowledge Platform (GGKP), Green Jobs Initiative, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area People and Policy Topics Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Country Jordan Western Asia References UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services[1] Overview "UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services consist of policy advice, technical

196

Jordan-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jordan-DLR Resource Assessments Jordan-DLR Resource Assessments Jump to: navigation, search Name Jordan-DLR Resource Assessments Agency/Company /Organization German Aerospace Center (DLR) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind Topics Background analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type Software/modeling tools, Dataset, Maps Website http://www.dlr.de/en/ Program Start 2007 Program End 2008 Country Jordan Western Asia References DLR Website [1] From 2007-2008 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) developed a collection of solar and wind resource assessments for Tunisia. The key products included maps of existing resource assessments, pre feasibility studies for CSP and wind projects. References ↑ "DLR Website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Jordan-DLR_Resource_Assessments&oldid=328867"

197

Jordan-Clean Technology Fund (CTF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jordan-Clean Technology Fund (CTF) Jordan-Clean Technology Fund (CTF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Jordan-Clean Technology Fund (CTF) Agency/Company /Organization African Development Bank, Asian Development Bank, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Inter-American Development Bank, World Bank Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Geothermal, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Jordan Western Asia References Middle East and North Africa Regional Program (Algeria, Egypt, Jorban, Morroco, Tunisia)-Clean Technology Fund (CTF)[1] Jordan-Clean Technology Fund (CTF) Screenshot Contents 1 Overview 2 Activities 2.1 Middle East and North Africa Regional Program (Algeria, Egypt, Jorban, Morroco, Tunisia)

198

GRADED LIE ALGEBRAS DEFINED BY JORDAN ALGEBRAS AND THEIR REPRESENTATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In this talk we introduce the notion of a generalized representation of a Jordan algebra with unit which has the following properties: 1) Usual representations and Jacobson representations correspond to special cases of generalized representations. 2) Every simple Jordan algebra has infinitely many nonequivalent generalized representations. 3) There is a one-to-one correspondence between irreducible generalized representations of a Jordan algebra A and irreducible representations of a graded Lie algebra L(A) = U?1?U0?U1 corresponding to A (the Lie algebra L(A) coincides with the TKK construction when A has a unit). The latter correspondence allows to use the theory of representations of Lie algebras to study generalized representations of Jordan algebras. In particular, one can classify irreducible generalized representations of semisimple Jordan algebras and also obtain classical results about usual representations and Jacobson representations in a simple way.

Issai Kantor; Gregory Shpiz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hydrogen-donor coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved liquid yields are obtained during the hydrogen-donor solvent liquefaction of coal and similar carbonaceous solids by maintaining a higher concentration of material having hydrogenation catalytic activity in the downstream section of the liquefaction reactor system than in the upstream section of the system.

Wilson, Jr., Edward L. (Baytown, TX); Mitchell, Willard N. (Baytown, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Biddy, M.; Davis, R.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Jordan cells of periodic loop models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordan cells in transfer matrices of finite lattice models are a signature of the logarithmic character of the conformal field theories that appear in their thermodynamical limit. The transfer matrix of periodic loop models, T_N, is an element of the periodic Temperley-Lieb algebra EPTL_N(\\beta, \\alpha), where N is the number of sites on a section of the cylinder, and \\beta = -(q+1/q) = 2 \\cos \\lambda and \\alpha the weights of contractible and non-contractible loops. The thermodynamic limit of T_N is believed to describe a conformal field theory of central charge c=1-6\\lambda^2/(\\pi(\\lambda-\\pi)). The abstract element T_N acts naturally on (a sum of) spaces V_N^d, similar to those upon which the standard modules of the (classical) Temperley-Lieb algebra act. These spaces known as sectors are labeled by the numbers of defects d and depend on a {\\em twist parameter} v that keeps track of the winding of defects around the cylinder. Criteria are given for non-trivial Jordan cells of T_N both between sectors with distinct defect numbers and within a given sector.

Alexi Morin-Duchesne; Yvan Saint-Aubin

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

202

Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle  

SciTech Connect

A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

Weimer, Robert F. (Allentown, PA); Miller, Robert N. (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Multielement geochemistry of three geothermal wells, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical analysis of drill cuttings from three geothermal wells, Utah State 42-7, Utah State 31-33 and Forminco No. 1, in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, Utah, demonstrates that the distributions of different elements are the result of different chemical processes operating throughout the geologic history of the area. Statistical analysis of geochemical-data distributions confirm the presence of several distinct element associations. Of the 36 elements determined on the samples, 12 (V, Mo, Cd, Ag, Au, Sb, Bi, U, Te, Sn, B and Th) were present in concentrations at or below detection levels. Of the remaining 24 elements, only 3 (Ni, Co and Zr) are lognormally distributed. Distributions for the remaining elements are of aggregate populations which represent background, mineralization or other processes.

Christensen, O.D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

ANNUAL REPORT OCTOBER 1, 1979-SEPTEMBER 30, 1980 CHEMISTRY AND MORPHOLOGY OF COAL LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secretary of Fossil Energy, Office of Liquefaction, AdvanceSecretary of Fossil Energy, Office of Liquefaction, Advanc~

Heinemann, Heinz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Radiation Dominated Universe for Jordan-Brans-Dicke Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmology with a standard kinetic term for the scalar field and no mass term has the same radiation dominated solution as standard Einstein cosmology without the cosmological constant. Because of this, the primordial nucleosynthesis (Big - Bang nucleosynthesis) result obtained for standard cosmology remains the same for Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmology. We show that Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmology with a mass term for the scalar field as well as explaining dark energy for the present era, can also explain radiation dominated cosmology for the primordial nucleosynthesis era.

M. Arik; L. Amon Susam

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

206

A Jordan GNS Construction for the Holonomy-Flux *-algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The holonomy-flux *-algebra was recently proposed as an algebra of basic kinematical observables for loop quantum gravity. We show the conventional GNS construction breaks down when the the holonomyflux *-algebra is allowed to be a Jordan algebra of observables. To remedy this, we give a Jordan GNS construction for the holonomy-flux *-algebra that is based on trace. This is accomplished by assuming the holonomy-flux *-algebra is an algebra of observables that is also a Banach algebra, hence a JB algebra. We show the Jordan GNS construction produces a state that is invariant under all inner derivations of the holonomy-flux *-algebra. Implications for the corresponding

Michael Rios

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, a geologic and geophysical case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geological, geochemical and geophysical data are presented for one of the major geothermal systems in the western United States. Regional data indicate major tectonic structures which are still active and provide the conduits for the geothermal system. Detailed geologic mapping has defined major glide blocks of Tertiary volcanics which moved down from the Tushar Mountains and locally act as a leaky cap to portions of the presently known geothermal system. Mapping and geochemical studies indicate three periods of mineralization have affected the area, two of which are unrelated to the present geothermal activity. The geologic relationships demonstrate that the major structures have been opened repeatedly since the Tertiary. Gravity and magnetic data are useful in defining major structures beneath alluvium and basalt cover, and indicate the importance of the Cove Fort-Beaver graben and the Cove Creek fault in localizing the geothermal reservoir. These structures and a high level of microearthquake activity also suggest other target areas within the larger thermal anomaly. Electrical resistivity surveys and thermal gradient holes both contribute to the delineation of the known reservoir. Deep exploration wells which test the reservoir recorded maximum temperatures of 178 C and almost isothermal behavior beginning at 700 to 1000 m and continuing to a depth of 1800 m. Costly drilling, high corrosion rates and low reservoir pressure coupled with the relatively low reservoir temperatures have led to the conclusion that the reservoir is not economic for electric power production at present. Plans are underway to utilize the moderate-temperature fluids for agribusiness, and exploration continues for a deep high-temperature reservoir.

Ross, Howard P.; Moore, Joseph N.; Christensen, Odin D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Coal liquefaction with subsequent bottoms pyrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal liquefaction process wherein heavy bottoms produced in a liquefaction zone are upgraded by coking or a similar pyrolysis step, pyrolysis liquids boiling in excess of about 1000.degree. F. are further reacted with molecular hydrogen in a reaction zone external of the liquefaction zone, the resulting effluent is fractionated to produce one or more distillate fractions and a bottoms fraction, a portion of this bottoms fraction is recycled to the reaction zone, and the remaining portion of the bottoms fraction is recycled to the pyrolysis step.

Walchuk, George P. (Queens, NY)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Members Convene in Jordan For Second  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Members Convene in Jordan For Members Convene in Jordan For Second Steering Group Meeting Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Members Convene in Jordan For Second Steering Group Meeting May 15, 2008 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced continued progress at the conclusion of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership's (GNEP's) second Steering Group meeting. Representatives from twenty-eight countries and three intergovernmental organizations attended the two-day meeting in the Kingdom of Jordan hosted by the Jordanian Atomic Energy Commission. The Steering Group discussed the formation of a third Working Group on the development of grid-appropriate reactors in order to promote the development of advanced, more proliferation-resistant nuclear power

210

A Jordan GNS Construction for the Holonomy-Flux *-algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The holonomy-flux *-algebra was recently proposed as an algebra of basic kinematical observables for loop quantum gravity. We show the conventional GNS construction breaks down when the the holonomy-flux *-algebra is allowed to be a Jordan algebra of observables. To remedy this, we give a Jordan GNS construction for the holonomy-flux *-algebra that is based on trace. This is accomplished by assuming the holonomy-flux *-algebra is an algebra of observables that is also a Banach algebra, hence a JB algebra. We show the Jordan GNS construction produces a state that is invariant under all inner derivations of the holonomy-flux *-algebra. Implications for the corresponding Jordan-Schrodinger equation are also discussed.

Michael Rios

2005-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

211

Exact Vacuum Solutions of Jordan, Brans-Dicke Field Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the static spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the Jordan, Brans-Dicke field equations. The new solutions are obtained by considering a polar Gaussian, isothermal and radial hyperbolic metrics.

Sergey Kozyrev

2005-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

212

Classification of linearly compact simple Jordan and generalized Poisson superalgebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We classify all linearly compact simple Jordan superalgebras over an algebraically closed field of characteristic zero. As a corollary, we deduce the classification of all linearly compact unital simple generalized Poisson superalgebras.

Nicoletta Cantarini; Victor G. Kac; To Ernest; Borisovich Vinberg

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Skiing Whistler with Chris, Jordan and Fraser. - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chris and Jordan on the hike up to Blackcomb Glacier 19 February 2005, 11:36. Top. Left, img001.jpeg.small.jpeg, Right. Bas. 19 February 2005, 11:38. Top.

214

BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION EFFORTS IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coil) Pyrolysis zone j Gasification zone j · Combustion zoneis a reactor for both gasification and liquefaction. The$0 lb = 17~6 lb 13.5 lb Gasification stoichiometry (at 1290°

Ergun, Sabri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Evaluation of liquefaction potential for building code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard approach for the evaluation of the liquefaction susceptibility is based on the estimation of a safety factor between the cyclic shear resistance to liquefaction and the earthquake induced shear stress. Recently, an updated procedure based on shear-wave velocities (V{sub s}) has been proposed which could be more easily applied.These methods have been applied at La Plaja beach of Catania, that experienced liquefaction because of the 1693 earthquake. The detailed geotechnical and V{sub s} information and the realistic ground motion computed for the 1693 event let us compare the two approaches. The successful application of the V{sub s} procedure, slightly modified to fit historical and safety factor information, even if additional field performances are needed, encourages the development of a guide for liquefaction potential analysis, based on well defined V{sub s} profiles to be included in the italian seismic code.

Nunziata, C.; De Nisco, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Univ. Napoli Federico II (Italy); Panza, G. F. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Univ. Trieste (Italy); Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, ESP-SAND Group, Trieste (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION EFFORTS IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

icat ion Preheat zone Biomass liquefaction Tubular reactor (design is shown in Figure 7, C I Biomass ua efaction Fic LBL Process BiOMASS t NON-REVERS lNG CYCLONE CONDENSER (

Ergun, Sabri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Born-Jordan Quantization and the Uncertainty Principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Weyl correspondence and the related Wigner formalism lie at the core of traditional quantum mechanics. We discuss here an alternative quantization scheme, whose idea goes back to Born and Jordan, and which has recently been revived in another context, namely time-frequency analysis. We show that in particular the uncertainty principle does not enjoy full symplectic covariance properties in the Born and Jordan scheme, as opposed to what happens in the Weyl quantization.

Maurice A. de Gosson

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

218

On the definition of quasi-Jordan algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Velasquez and Felipe recently introduced quasi-Jordan algebras based on the product $a \\triangleleft b = \\tfrac12 ( a \\dashv b + b \\vdash a )$ in an associative dialgebra with operations $\\dashv$ and $\\vdash$. We determine the polynomial identities of degree $\\le 4$ satisfied by this product. In addition to right commutativity and the right quasi-Jordan identity, we obtain a new associator-derivation identity.

Murray R. Bremner

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

219

Feeding the periphery : modeling early Bronze Age economies and the cultural landscape of the Faynan District, Southern Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life of Palestine: Israel and Jordan. Ronald, New York.Use in the Wadi Faynan, Southern Jordan: The Third Season ofin the Wadi Faynan, Southern Jordan: The Second Season of

Muniz, Adolfo A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Iron catalyzed coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the solvent refining of coal into a gas product, a liquid product and a normally solid dissolved product. Particulate coal and a unique co-catalyst system are suspended in a coal solvent and processed in a coal liquefaction reactor, preferably an ebullated bed reactor. The co-catalyst system comprises a combination of a stoichiometric excess of iron oxide and pyrite which reduce predominantly to active iron sulfide catalysts in the reaction zone. This catalyst system results in increased catalytic activity with attendant improved coal conversion and enhanced oil product distribution as well as reduced sulfide effluent. Iron oxide is used in a stoichiometric excess of that required to react with sulfur indigenous to the feed coal and that produced during reduction of the pyrite catalyst to iron sulfide.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Why don’t Jordanian Women Graduate? A theoretical look at gendered experiences in Higher Education in Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at gendered experiences in Higher Education in Jordan Carinelook at gendered experiences in Higher Education in Jordanat gendered experiences in Higher Education in Jordan Carine

Allaf, Carine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Why don’t Jordanian Women Graduate? A theoretical look at gendered experiences in Higher Education in Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Higher Education in Jordan Carine Allaf Thinking Gender,look at gendered experiences in Higher Education in Jordanin Higher Education in Jordan Carine Allaf Thinking Gender,

Allaf, Carine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume I contains papers presented at the following sessions: AR-Coal Liquefaction; Gas to Liquids; and Direct Liquefaction. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: Indirect Liquefaction (oxygenated fuels); and Indirect Liquefaction (Fischer-Tropsch technology). Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Investigations into coal coprocessing and coal liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conversion of coal to liquid suitable as feedstock to a petroleum refinery is dependent upon several process variables. These variables include temperature, pressure, coal rank, catalyst type, nature of the feed to the reactor, type of process, etc. Western Research Institute (WRI) has initiated a research program in the area of coal liquefaction to address the impact of some of these variables upon the yield and quality of the coal-derived liquid. The principal goal of this research is to improve the efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. Two different approaches are currently being investigated. These include the coprocessing of a heavy liquid, such as crude oil, and coal using a dispersed catalyst and the direct liquefaction of coal using a supported catalyst. Another important consideration in coal liquefaction is the utilization of hydrogen, including both externally- and internally-supplied hydrogen. Because the incorporation of externally-supplied hydrogen during conversion of this very aromatic fossil fuel to, for example, transportation fuels is very expensive, improved utilization of internally-supplied hydrogen can lead to reducing processing costs. The objectives of this investigation, which is Task 3.3.4, Coal Coprocessing, of the 1991--1992 Annual Research Plan, are: (1) to evaluate coal/oil pretreatment conditions that are expected to improve the liquid yield through more efficient dispersion of an oil-soluble, iron-based catalyst, (2) to characterize the coke deposits on novel, supported catalysts after coal liquefaction experiments and to correlate the carbon skeletal structure parameters of the coke deposit with catalyst performance as measured by coal liquefaction product yield, and (3) to determine the modes of hydrogen utilization during coal liquefaction and coprocessing. Experimental results are discussed in this report.

Guffey, F.D.; Netzel, D.A.; Miknis, F.P.; Thomas, K.P. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Zhang, Tiejun; Haynes, H.W. Jr. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A Potential Cost Effective Liquefaction Mitigation Countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is devoted to illustrate the potential liquefaction mitigation countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation. Firstly the potential liquefaction mitigation method is briefly introduced. Then the numerical model for partially saturated sandy soil is presented. At last the dynamic responses of liquefiable free filed with different water saturation is given. It shows that the induced partial saturation is efficiency for preventing the liquefaction.

Bian Hanbing; Jia Yun; Shahrour, Isam [Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (UMR 8107), Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

227

Study of well logs from Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Union Oil Company drilled four geothermal test wells in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA between 1975 and 1979. A fairly complete suite of well logs were recorded for the three deeper holes, and these data are presented as composite well log plots in this report. The composite well log plots have facilitated the interpretation of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, quartz-monzonite, serpentine, and volcanic lithologies and the identification of numerous fractures. This has been especially helpful because of the extensive lost circulaton zones and poor cuttings recovery. Intraformational flow was identified by a fluid migration-temperature tracer log at depth in CFSU 31-33. Well log crossplots were computed to assist in lithologic identification and the determination of physical properties for specific depth intervals in a given hole. The presence of hydrous minerals sometimes results in neutron porosity somewhat higher than the true nonfracture porosity, which is generally less than 4%. Permeability is clearly controlled by fractures. A maximum well temperature of 178.9/sup 0/C, low flow rates and low probable percent flash indicate these wells are subeconomic for electric generation at present. The well log study has substantially improved our understanding of the reservoir as presently drilled.

Glenn, W.E.; Ross, H.P.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

EIS-0491: Lake Charles Liquefaction Project, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91: Lake Charles Liquefaction Project, Calcasieu Parish, 91: Lake Charles Liquefaction Project, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana EIS-0491: Lake Charles Liquefaction Project, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana SUMMARY The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to expand an existing liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana, by constructing and operating natural gas liquefaction and exportation capabilities. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 28, 2013 EIS-0491: Supplemental Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Liquefaction Project, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana September 25, 2012

229

Two-stage coal liquefaction process  

SciTech Connect

An improved SRC-I two-stage coal liquefaction process which improves the product slate is provided. Substantially all of the net yield of 650.degree.-850.degree. F. heavy distillate from the LC-Finer is combined with the SRC process solvent, substantially all of the net 400.degree.-650.degree. F. middle distillate from the SRC section is combined with the hydrocracker solvent in the LC-Finer, and the initial boiling point of the SRC process solvent is increased sufficiently high to produce a net yield of 650.degree.-850.degree. F. heavy distillate of zero for the two-stage liquefaction process.

Skinner, Ronald W. (Allentown, PA); Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA); Znaimer, Samuel (Vancouver, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction (CMSL)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. has conducted a series of eleven catalytic, multi-stage, liquefaction (CMSL) bench scale runs between February, 1991, and September, 1995. The purpose of these runs was to investigate novel approaches to liquefaction relating to feedstocks, hydrogen source, improved catalysts as well as processing variables, all of which are designed to lower the cost of producing coal-derived liquid products. This report summarizes the technical assessment of these runs, and in particular the evaluation of the economic impact of the results.

Comolli, A.G.; Ganguli, P.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, T.L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Popper, G.A.; Smith, T.; Stalzer, R.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Jordan cells in logarithmic limits of conformal field theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is discussed how a limiting procedure of conformal field theories may result in logarithmic conformal field theories with Jordan cells of arbitrary rank. This extends our work on rank-two Jordan cells. We also consider the limits of certain three-point functions and find that they are compatible with known results. The general construction is illustrated by logarithmic limits of (unitary) minimal models in conformal field theory. Characters of quasi-rational representations are found to emerge as the limits of the associated irreducible Virasoro characters.

Jorgen Rasmussen

2004-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

232

Catalyst for coal liquefaction process  

SciTech Connect

An improved catalyst for a coal liquefaction process; e.g., the H-Coal Process, for converting coal into liquid fuels, and where the conversion is carried out in an ebullated-catalyst-bed reactor wherein the coal contacts catalyst particles and is converted, in addition to liquid fuels, to gas and residual oil which includes preasphaltenes and asphaltenes. The improvement comprises a catalyst selected from the group consisting of the oxides of nickel molybdenum, cobalt molybdenum, cobalt tungsten, and nickel tungsten on a carrier of alumina, silica, or a combination of alumina and silica. The catalyst has a total pore volume of about 0.500 to about 0.900 cc/g and the pore volume comprises micropores, intermediate pores and macropores, the surface of the intermediate pores being sufficiently large to convert the preasphaltenes to asphaltenes and lighter molecules. The conversion of the asphaltenes takes place on the surface of micropores. The macropores are for metal deposition and to prevent catalyst agglomeration. The micropores have diameters between about 50 and about 200 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 50 to about 80% of the pore volume, whereas the intermediate pores have diameters between about 200 and 2000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume, and the macropores have diameters between about 2000 and about 10,000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume. The catalysts are further improved where they contain promoters. Such promoters include the oxides of vanadium, tungsten, copper, iron and barium, tin chloride, tin fluoride and rare earth metals.

Huibers, Derk T. A. (Pennington, NJ); Kang, Chia-Chen C. (Princeton, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Kang, Dohee (Macungie, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Liquefaction of sub-bituminous coal  

SciTech Connect

Sub-bituminous coal is directly liquefied in two stages by use of a liquefaction solvent containing insoluble material as well as 850.degree. F.+ material and 850.degree. F.- material derived from the second stage, and controlled temperature and conversion in the second stage. The process is in hydrogen balance.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fair Lawn, NJ); Chen, James M. (Edison, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Biomass liquefaction efforts in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief summary of the biomass liquefaction research programs in the USA is presented. The facilities is Albany, Oregon and at LBL are described and flowcharts are included. The reactions occuring during these processes are explained. Properties of the oil produced are described. (DC)

Ergun, S.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8 total installed cost #12;6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and downtown data Verified that historical natural gas pipeline cost data

237

Fired heater for coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fired heater for a coal liquefaction process is constructed with a heat transfer tube having U-bends at regular intervals along the length thereof to increase the slug frequency of the multi-phase mixture flowing therethrough to thereby improve the heat transfer efficiency.

Ying, David H. S. (Macungie, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study clearly demonstrated the usefulness of liquid- and solid-state {sup 13}C- and {sup 1}H-NMR for the examination of process-derived materials from direct coal liquefaction. The techniques can provide data not directly obtainable by other methods to examine the saturation of aromatic rings and to determine the modes of hydrogen utilization during coal liquefaction. In addition, these methods can be used to infer the extent of condensation and retrograde reactions occurring in the direct coal liquefaction process. Five NMR techniques were employed. Solid-state {sup 13}C-NMR measurements were made using the Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP/MAS) and Single Pulse (SP) techniques. Solid-state {sup 1}H-NMR measurements were made using the technique of Combined Rotation and Multiple-Pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS). Conventional liquid-state {sup 12}C- and {sup 1}H-NMR techniques were employed as appropriate. Interpretation of the NMR data, once obtained, is relatively straightforward. Combined with other information, such as elemental analyses and process conversion data, the NMR data prove to be a powerful tool for the examination of direct coal liquefaction process-derived material. Further development and more wide-spread application of this analytical method as a process development tool is justified on the basis of these results.

Miknis, F.P. (Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Jordan F. Clark Ira Leifer Libe Washburn Bruce P. Luyendyk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in natural gas bubble plumes: observations from the Coal Oil Point marine hydrocarbon seep field Received: 22 Detailed measurements of bubble composition, dissolved gas concentrations, and plume dynamics wereORIGINAL Jordan F. Clark Ã? Ira Leifer Ã? Libe Washburn Bruce P. Luyendyk Compositional changes

Luyendyk, Bruce

240

Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The theoretical model predicts real oil prices to be one of the main long-run drivers of real output. Using quarterly data between 1979 and 2009 on core macroeconomic variables for Jordan and a number of key foreign variables, we identify two long...

Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Mehdi

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Composite spherically symmetric configurations in Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, a study of the scalar field shells in relativistic spherically symmetric configurations has been performed. We construct the composite solution of Jordan-Brans-Dicke field equation by matching the conformal Brans solutions at each junction surfaces. This approach allows us to associate rigorously with all solutions as a single glued "space", which is a unique differentiable manifold M^4.

S. Kozyrev

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

Euclidean Jordan Algebras, Hidden Actions, and $J$-Kepler Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a {\\em simple Euclidean Jordan algebra}, let $\\mathfrak{co}$ be its conformal algebra, $\\mathscr P$ be the manifold consisting of its semi-positive rank-one elements, $C^\\infty(\\mathscr P)$ be the space of complex-valued smooth functions on $\\mathscr P$. An explicit action of $\\mathfrak{co}$ on $C^\\infty(\\mathscr P)$, referred to as the {\\em hidden action} of $\\mathfrak{co}$ on $\\mathscr P$, is exhibited. This hidden action turns out to be mathematically responsible for the existence of the Kepler problem and its recently-discovered vast generalizations, referred to as $J$-Kepler problems. The $J$-Kepler problems are then reconstructed and re-examined in terms of the unified language of Euclidean Jordan algebras. As a result, for a simple Euclidean Jordan algebra, the minimal representation of its conformal group can be realized either as the Hilbert space of bound states for its $J$-Kepler problem or as $L^2({\\mathscr P}, {1\\over r}\\mathrm{vol})$, where $\\mathrm{vol}$ is the volume form on $\\mathscr P$ and $r$ is the inner product of $x\\in \\mathscr P$ with the identity element of the Jordan algebra.

Guowu Meng

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

243

The Heckmann's wormholes in Jordan-Brans-Dicke gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple Heckmann's vacuum wormhole solution of Jordan-Brans-Dicke gravitation is presented and analysed. It is shown that in contrast with class I Brans solution where the throat radius becomes real when $\\omega < -4/3$ here it becomes positive when $\\omega < -1$.

S. M. Kozyrev

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

244

Composite wormholes in vacuum Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New classes composite vacuum wormhole solutions of Jordan-Brans-Dicke gravitation is presented and analysed. It is shown that such solution holds for both, a bridge between separated Schwarzschild and Brans Universes and for a bridge connecting two Schwarzschild asymptotically flat regions joined by Brans throat. We have also noticed that there are some new possible candidates for wormhole spacetimes.

S. M. Kozyrev; S. V. Sushkov

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

COAL LIQUEFACTION USING ZINC CHLORIDE CATALYST IN AN EXTRACTING SOLVENT MEDIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iv List of Tables . , I. INTRODUCTION e o Coal Chemistry B.Coal Liquefaction c.Coal Liquefaction a D. II. o Experiment Equipment Summary of

Gandhi, Shamim Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

EA-1845: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project, Cameron County, LA | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project, Cameron County, LA 45: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project, Cameron County, LA EA-1845: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project, Cameron County, LA Summary DOE participated as a cooperating agency with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in preparing an EA for the Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with applications submitted by Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC, and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P., to FERC and to DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) seeking authorization to site, construct, and operate liquefaction and export facilities at the existing Sabine Pass LNG Terminal in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. DOE adopted FERC's EA and issued a finding of no significant impact on August 7, 2012. Additional information is available at DOE/FE's Docket 10-111-LNG and

247

EA-1845: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project, Cameron County, LA | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project, Cameron County, LA 45: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project, Cameron County, LA EA-1845: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project, Cameron County, LA Summary DOE participated as a cooperating agency with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in preparing an EA for the Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with applications submitted by Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC, and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P., to FERC and to DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) seeking authorization to site, construct, and operate liquefaction and export facilities at the existing Sabine Pass LNG Terminal in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. DOE adopted FERC's EA and issued a finding of no significant impact on August 7, 2012. Additional information is available at DOE/FE's Docket 10-111-LNG and

248

SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Steam Gasification of Biomass," Department of EnergySteam Gasification of Biomass, 11 April 28, 1978. Liu,Conceptual Commercial Biomass Liquefaction Flow Schematic

Figueroa, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work completed during the fourth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. This work is part of a larger effort to develop a new coal liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing scheme consisting of three main process steps: (1) mile pretreatment of the feed coal to enhance dissolution reactivity and dry the coal, (2) low severity thermal dissolution of the pretreated coal to obtain a very reactive coal-derived residual material amenable to upgrading, and (3) catalytic upgrading of the residual products to distillate liquids.

Miller, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Indirect liquefaction of biomass: A fresh approach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Indirect liquefaction of biomass is accomplished by first gasifying it to produce a synthesis gas consisting of hydrogen and oxides of carbon, which in turn are converted to any one of a number of liquid fuels and/or chemicals by suitable choice of catalyst, synthesis gas composition and reaction conditions. This approach to producing synthetic fuels and chemicals has been extensively investigated where coal is the carbonaceous feed material, but less so for biomass or other feedstocks. It is generally recognized that the gasification to produce the synthesis gas posses one of the major technical and economic challenges to improving this technology. Herein, is reported a different slant on the indirect liquefaction that could lead to improvements in the efficiency and economics of the process.

Cox, J.L.; Tonkovich, A.Y.; Elliott, D.C. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The POC Bench Option Project (PB-Series) is geared to evaluate different novel processing concepts in catalytic direct coal liquefaction and coprocessing of organic wastes such as plastics, heavy resids, waste oils, and ligno-cellulose wastes with coal. The new ideas being explored in this program include using novel dispersed slurry catalysts and combinations of dispersed and supported catalysts (hybrid mode), and coprocessing of coal with waste plastics, low quality resids, waste oils, and ligno-cellulosic wastes, etc. The primary objective of bench run PB-07 was to study the impact of dispersed catalyst composition and loading upon the direct liquefaction performance of a high volatile bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal. The run was carried out for 20 operating days (including the four days used for the production of O-6 bottoms material for West Virginia University), spanning over five process conditions. Results are reported.

Comolli, A.G.; Zhou, P.Z.; Lee, T.L.K.; Hu, J.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fired heater for coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fired heater for a coal liquefaction process is operated under conditions to maximize the slurry slug frequency and thereby improve the heat transfer efficiency. The operating conditions controlled are (1) the pipe diameter and pipe arrangement, (2) the minimum coal/solvent slurry velocity, (3) the maximum gas superficial velocity, and (4) the range of the volumetric flow velocity ratio of gas to coal/solvent slurry.

Ying, David H. S. (Macungie, PA); McDermott, Wayne T. (Allentown, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hydrogen donor solvent coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indigenous hydrocarbon product stream boiling within a range of from about C.sub.1 -700.degree. F., preferably C.sub.1 -400.degree. F., is treated to produce an upgraded hydrocarbon fuel component and a component which can be recycled, with a suitable donor solvent, to a coal liquefaction zone to catalyze the reaction. In accordance therewith, a liquid hydrocarbon fraction with a high end boiling point range up to about 700.degree. F., preferably up to about 400.degree. F., is separated from a coal liquefaction zone effluent, the separated fraction is contacted with an alkaline medium to provide a hydrocarbon phase and an aqueous extract phase, the aqueous phase is neutralized, and contacted with a peroxygen compound to convert indigenous components of the aqueous phase of said hydrocarbon fraction into catalytic components, such that the aqueous stream is suitable for recycle to the coal liquefaction zone. Naturally occurring phenols and alkyl substituted phenols, found in the aqueous phase, are converted, by the addition of hydroxyl constituents to phenols, to dihydroxy benzenes which, as disclosed in copending Application Ser. Nos. 686,813 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,536; 686,814 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,537; 686,827 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,051,012 and 686,828, K. W. Plumlee et al, filed May 17, 1976, are suitable hydrogen transfer catalysts.

Plumlee, Karl W. (Baytown, TX)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Coal liquefaction process with increased naphtha yields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein the solid carbonaceous material is slurried with a suitable solvent and then subjected to liquefaction at elevated temperature and pressure to produce a normally gaseous product, a normally liquid product and a normally solid product. The normally liquid product is further separated into a naphtha boiling range product, a solvent boiling range product and a vacuum gas-oil boiling range product. At least a portion of the solvent boiling-range product and the vacuum gas-oil boiling range product are then combined and passed to a hydrotreater where the mixture is hydrotreated at relatively severe hydrotreating conditions and the liquid product from the hydrotreater then passed to a catalytic cracker. In the catalytic cracker, the hydrotreater effluent is converted partially to a naphtha boiling range product and to a solvent boiling range product. The naphtha boiling range product is added to the naphtha boiling range product from coal liquefaction to thereby significantly increase the production of naphtha boiling range materials. At least a portion of the solvent boiling range product, on the other hand, is separately hydrogenated and used as solvent for the liquefaction. Use of this material as at least a portion of the solvent significantly reduces the amount of saturated materials in said solvent.

Ryan, Daniel F. (Friendswood, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under contract from the DOE , and in association with CONSOL Inc., Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated four principal and several complementary techniques for the analysis of non-distillable direct coal liquefaction materials in support of process development. Field desorption mass spectrometry (FDMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods were examined for potential usefulness as techniques to elucidate the chemical structure of residual (nondistillable) direct coal liquefaction derived materials. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry (SFC/MS) were evaluated for effectiveness in compound-class separation and identification of residual materials. Liquid chromatography (including microcolumn) separation techniques, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and GC/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods were applied to supercritical fluid extracts. The full report authored by the PNL researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal liquefaction materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of CONSOL's contract.

Campbell, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Robins, W.H. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Superconformal M2-branes and generalized Jordan triple systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three-dimensional conformal theories with six supersymmetries and SU(4) R-symmetry describing stacks of M2-branes are here proposed to be related to generalized Jordan triple systems. Writing the four-index structure constants in an appropriate form, the Chern-Simons part of the action immediately suggests a connection to such triple systems. In contrast to the previously considered three-algebras, the additional structure of a generalized Jordan triple system is associated to a graded Lie algebra, which corresponds to an extension of the gauge group. In this note we show that the whole theory with six manifest supersymmetries can be naturally expressed in terms of such a graded Lie algebra. Also the BLG theory with eight supersymmetries is included as a special case.

Bengt E. W. Nilsson; Jakob Palmkvist

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Why Do the Quantum Observables Form a Jordan Operator Algebra?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Jordan algebra structure of the bounded real quantum observables was recognized already in the early days of quantum mechanics. While there are plausible reasons for most parts of this structure, the existence of the distributive nonassociative multiplication operation is hard to justify from a physical or statistical point of view. Considering the non-Boolean extension of classical probabilities, presented in a recent paper, it is shown in this paper that such a multiplication operation can be derived from certain properties of the conditional probabilities and the observables, i.e., from postulates with a clear statistical interpretation. The well-known close relation between Jordan operator algebras and C*-algebras then provides the connection to the quantum-mechanical Hilbert space formalism, thus resulting in a novel axiomatic approach to general quantum mechanics that includes the types II and III von Neumann algebras.

Gerd Niestegge

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

259

Jordan-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jordan-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jordan-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Jordan-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name Jordan-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

260

OSTI News, OSTI's Jordan, Allen cited for centeral roles in Science...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Employees Cited for Central Roles in Science.gov December 23, 2005 Oak Ridge, TN - The Office of Scientific and Technical Information's Sharon Jordan and Valerie Allen were...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Sedentarization and tourism : the case of the Zalabia Bedouin tribe of the southern Jordan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Most of the recent studies on the southern Jordan Bedouins portray the Bedouins as being resistant to change and development. These studies are more descriptive… (more)

Tarawneh, Musa Salim.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The dynamics of information technology investment and the financial performance of the banking sector in Jordan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis studies the fundamental factors that shape and propel financial developments in Jordan - mainly in the specific context of investment in information technology… (more)

Arabyat, Yaser A. A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Irish Representations in the Films of Jim Sheridan and Neil Jordan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores four films from "second wave" directors Jim Sheridan and Neil Jordan: The Crying Game, The Butcher Boy, The Field, and The Boxer.… (more)

Jack, Jeffrey K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

"There is fear of tomorrow": Displaced Iraqi women in Jordan narrate their pasts and futures .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Iraqi women living in Amman, Jordan view the city as a temporary residence, and their lives there are characterized by uncertainty and isolation. Iraqi social… (more)

MacDougall, Susan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Organisational justice on work-related attitudes in selected commercial banks in Jordan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigated the relationship between employees' perceptions of justice and work attitudes in relation to organisational structure in selected commercial banks in Jordan. Both… (more)

Abu-Tayeh, BK

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

New static spheroidal solution in Jordan-Brands-Dicke theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The static spheroidal solutions of Jordan-Brands-Dicke theory (JBD) are studied. We consider the effect of the anisotropic stresses of scalar field on the shape of JBD self-graviting objects. It is shown that scalar fields can have significant effect on the structure and properties of self-graviting objects. In contrast with general relativity in JBD theory there are nonflat static spheroidal solutions.

S. M. Kozyrev

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

267

Brane World Cosmology In Jordan-Brans-Dicke Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the embedding of 3+1 dimensional cosmology in 4+1 dimensional Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory. We show that exponentially growing and power law scale factors are implied. Whereas the 4+1 dimensional scalar field is approximately constant for each, the effective 3+1 dimensional scalar field is constant for exponentially growing scale factor and time dependent for power law scale factor.

M. Arik; D. Ciftci

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

268

Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper extends the long-run growth model of Esfahani et al. (2012a) to a labour exporting country that receives large in‡ows of external income – the sum of remittances, FDI and general government transfers – from major oil exporting economies. The theoretical model predicts real oil prices to be one of the main long-run drivers of real output. Using quarterly data between 1979 and 2009 on core macroeconomic variables for Jordan and a number of key foreign variables, we identify two long-run relationships: an output equation as predicted by theory and an equation linking foreign and domestic in‡ation rates. It is shown that real output in the long run is shaped by (i) oil prices through their impact on external income and in turn on capital accumulation, and (ii) technological transfers through foreign output. The empirical analysis of the paper con…rms the hypothesis that a large share of Jordan’s output volatility can be associated with ‡uctuations in net income received from abroad (arising from oil price shocks). External factors, however, cannot be relied upon to provide similar growth stimuli in the future, and therefore it will be important to diversify the sources of growth in order to achieve a high and sustained level of income.

Kamiar Mohaddes A; Mehdi Raissi B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Jordan frame supergravity and inflation in the NMSSM  

SciTech Connect

We present a complete explicit N=1, d=4 supergravity action in an arbitrary Jordan frame with nonminimal scalar-curvature coupling of the form {Phi}(z,z)R. The action is derived by suitably gauge fixing the superconformal action. The theory has a modified Kaehler geometry, and it exhibits a significant dependence on the frame function {Phi}(z,z) and its derivatives over scalars, in the bosonic as well as in the fermionic part of the action. Under certain simple conditions, the scalar kinetic terms in the Jordan frame have a canonical form. We consider an embedding of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model (NMSSM) gauge theory into supergravity, clarifying the Higgs inflation model recently proposed by Einhorn and Jones. We find that the conditions for canonical kinetic terms are satisfied for the NMSSM scalars in the Jordan frame, which leads to a simple action. However, we find that the gauge singlet field experiences a strong tachyonic instability during inflation in this model. Thus, a modification of the model is required to support the Higgs-type inflation.

Ferrara, Sergio [Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN, CH 1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Marrani, Alessio; Van Proeyen, Antoine [Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Gravity survey of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and the north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summers of 1975 and 1976, a gravity survey was conducted in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. The survey consisted of 671 gravity stations covering an area of about 1300 km{sup 2}, and included two orthogonal gravity profiles traversing the area. The gravity data are presented as a terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 1 mgal and as an isometric three-dimensional gravity anomaly surface. Selected anomaly separation techniques were applied to the hand-digitized gravity data (at 1-km intervals on the Universal Transverse Mercator grid) in both the frequency and space domains, including Fourier decomposition, second vertical derivative, strike-filter, and polynomial fitting analysis, respectively.

Brumbaugh, W.D.; Cook, K.L.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Energy Optimization of Biomass Pyrolysis and Liquefaction System in CFB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass pyrolysis and liquefaction technology needs inert carrier gas and high energy consumption. On the basis of analyzing its energy consumption and the using way of char and off-gas, energy in the pyrolysis and liquefaction system in CFB is optimized ... Keywords: FB biomass pyrolysis energy consumption optimize

Zhang Jun; Teng Wenrui; Wei Xinli

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Natural Gas Liquefaction Process for Small-scale LNG Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the field of natural gas liquefaction, the small-scale natural gas liquefier has been attracting more and more attentions home and abroad, thanks to its small volume, mobile transportation, easy start-up and shut-down, as well as skid-mounted package. ... Keywords: Natural gas, Small-scale, LNG, Liquefaction process

Cao Wensheng

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Prevention of deleterious deposits in a coal liquefaction system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preventing the formation of deleterious coke deposits on the walls of coal liquefaction reactor vessels involves passing hydrogen and a feed slurry comprising feed coal and recycle liquid solvent to a coal liquefaction reaction zone while imparting a critical mixing energy of at least 3500 ergs per cubic centimeter of reaction zone volume per second to the reacting slurry.

Carr, Norman L. (Allison Park, PA); Prudich, Michael E. (Pittsburgh, PA); King, Jr., William E. (Gibsonia, PA); Moon, William G. (Cheswick, PA)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

274

EIS-0487: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas 87: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas EIS-0487: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas SUMMARY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing an EIS, with DOE as a cooperating agency, to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate the Freeport Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefaction Project, which would expand an existing LNG import terminal on Quintana Island in Brazoria County, Texas, to enable the terminal to liquefy and export the LNG. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 25, 2012 EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas

275

Production of Advanced Biofuels via Liquefaction - Hydrothermal Liquefaction Reactor Design: April 5, 2013  

SciTech Connect

This report provides detailed reactor designs and capital costs, and operating cost estimates for the hydrothermal liquefaction reactor system, used for biomass-to-biofuels conversion, under development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Five cases were developed and the costs associated with all cases ranged from $22 MM/year - $47 MM/year.

Knorr, D.; Lukas, J.; Schoen, P.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Solid-state NMR characterization of coal liquefaction products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study clearly demonstrated the usefulness of liquid- and solid-state {sup 13}C- and {sup 1}H-NMR for the examination of process-derived materials from direct coal liquefaction. The techniques can provide data not directly obtainable by other methods to examine the saturation of aromatic rings and to determine the modes of hydrogen utilization during coal liquefaction. In addition, these methods can be used to infer the extent of condensation and retrograde reactions occurring in the direct coal liquefaction process. Five NMR techniques were employed. Solid-state {sup 13}C-NMR measurements were made using the Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP/MAS) and Single Pulse (SP) techniques. Solid-state {sup 1}H-NMR measurements were made using the technique of Combined Rotation and Multiple-Pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS). Conventional liquid-state {sup 12}C- and {sup 1}H-NMR techniques were employed as appropriate. Interpretation of the NMR data, once obtained, is relatively straightforward. Combined with other information, such as elemental analyses and process conversion data, the NMR data prove to be a powerful tool for the examination of direct coal liquefaction process-derived material. Further development and more wide-spread application of this analytical method as a process development tool is justified on the basis of these results.

Miknis, F.P. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Cauchy interlacing theorem in simple Euclidean Jordan algebras and some consequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, based on the min-max theorem of Hirzebruch, we formulate and prove the Cauchy interlacing theorem in simple Euclidean Jordan algebras. As a consequence, we relate the inertias of an element and its principal components and extend some well known matrix theory theorems and inequalities to the setting of simple Euclidean Jordan algebras.

M. Seetharama Gowda A; J. Tao B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hom-Maltsev, Hom-alternative, and Hom-Jordan algebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hom-Maltsev(-admissible) algebras are defined, and it is shown that Hom-alternative algebras are Hom-Maltsev-admissible. With a new definition of a Hom-Jordan algebra, it is shown that Hom-alternative algebras are Hom-Jordan-admissible. Hom-type generalizations of some well-known identities in alternative algebras, including the Moufang identities, are obtained.

Donald Yau

2010-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

279

Coal-tire co-liquefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co-liquefaction of ground coal and tire rubber was studied at 400{degrees}C both with and without catalyst. Two different tire samples were used. In the non-catalytic runs, the conversion of coal increased with the addition of tire and the increase was dependent on tire/coal ratio and hydrogen pressure. Using a ferric sulfide-based catalyst, the coal conversion increased with an increase in the catalyst loading. However, the increase was more pronounced at loadings of around 0.5 wt%. The addition of tire to coal in the catalytic runs was not particularly beneficial, especially, when the tire/coal ratio was above 1.

Sharma, R.K.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Zondlo, J.W.; Liu, Zhenyu; Stiller, A.H. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Process for coal liquefaction using electrodeposited catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the liquefaction of solid hydrocarbonaceous materials is disclosed. Particles of such materials are electroplated with a metal catalyst and are then suspended in a hydrocarbon oil and subjected to hydrogenolysis to liquefy the solid hydrocarbonaceous material. A liquid product oil is separated from residue solid material containing char and the catalyst metal. The catalyst is recovered from the solid material by electrolysis for reuse. A portion of the product oil can be employed as the hydrocarbon oil for suspending additional particles of catalyst coated solid carbonaceous material for hydrogenolysis.

Moore, Raymond H. (Richland, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

General Analysis of Inflation in the Jordan frame Supergravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study various inflation models in the Jordan frame supergravity with a logarithmic Kahler potential. We find that, in a class of inflation models containing an additional singlet in the superpotential, three types of inflation can be realized: the Higgs-type inflation, power-law inflation, and chaotic inflation with/without a running kinetic term. The former two are possible if the holomorphic function dominates over the non-holomorphic one in the frame function, while the chaotic inflation occurs when both are comparable. Interestingly, the fractional-power potential can be realized by the running kinetic term. We also discuss the implication for the Higgs inflation in supergravity.

Kazunori Nakayama; Fuminobu Takahashi

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

282

Brans-Dicke wormholes in the Jordan and Einstein frames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the possibility of static wormhole solutions in the vacuum Brans-Dicke theory both in the original (Jordan) frame and in the conformally rescaled (Einstein) frame. It turns out that, in the former frame, wormholes exist only in a very narrow interval of the coupling parameter, viz., -3/2

K. K. Nandi; B. Bhattacharjee; S. M. K. Alam; J. Evans

2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Brans-Dicke theory: Jordan vs Einstein Frame  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well known that, in contrast to general relativity, there are two conformally related frames, the Jordan frame and the Einstein frame, in which the Brans-Dicke theory, a prototype of generic scalar-tensor theory, can be formulated. There is a long standing debate on the physical equivalence of the formulations in these two different frames. It is shown here that gravitational deflection of light to second order accuracy may observationally distinguish the two versions of the Brans-Dicke theory.

A. Bhadra; K. Sarkar; D. P. Datta; K. K. Nandi

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

284

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of the U.S. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, is to ensure the US a secure energy supply at an affordable price. An integral part of this program was the demonstration of fully developed coal liquefaction processes that could be implemented if market and supply considerations so required, Demonstration of the technology, even if not commercialized, provides a security factor for the country if it is known that the coal to liquid processes are proven and readily available. Direct liquefaction breaks down and rearranges complex hydrocarbon molecules from coal, adds hydrogen, and cracks the large molecules to those in the fuel range, removes hetero-atoms and gives the liquids characteristics comparable to petroleum derived fuels. The current processes being scaled and demonstrated are based on two reactor stages that increase conversion efficiency and improve quality by providing the flexibility to adjust process conditions to accommodate favorable reactions. The first stage conditions promote hydrogenation and some oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen removal. The second stage hydrocracks and speeds the conversion to liquids while removing the remaining sulfur and nitrogen. A third hydrotreatment stage can be used to upgrade the liquids to clean specification fuels.

Alfred G. Comolli; Peizheng Zhou; HTI Staff

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, and liquefaction of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All the products now obtained from oil can be provided by thermal conversion of the solid fuels biomass and coal. As a feedstock, biomass has many advantages over coal and has the potential to supply up to 20% of US energy by the year 2000 and significant amounts of energy for other countries. However, it is imperative that in producing biomass for energy we practice careful land use. Combustion is the simplest method of producing heat from biomass, using either the traditional fixed-bed combustion on a grate or the fluidized-bed and suspended combustion techniques now being developed. Pyrolysis of biomass is a particularly attractive process if all three products - gas, wood tars, and charcoal - can be used. Gasification of biomass with air is perhaps the most flexible and best-developed process for conversion of biomass to fuel today, yielding a low energy gas that can be burned in existing gas/oil boilers or in engines. Oxygen gasification yields a gas with higher energy content that can be used in pipelines or to fire turbines. In addition, this gas can be used for producing methanol, ammonia, or gasoline by indirect liquefaction. Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a gas rich in ethylene that can be used to make alcohols or gasoline. Finally, treatment of biomass with high pressure hydrogen can yield liquid fuels through direct liquefaction.

Reed, T.B.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work completed during the fifth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. Work this quarter focused on analytical characterization of untreated and treated Wyodak subbituminous coal and Illinois {number sign}6 bituminous coal. Mossbauer spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction techniques were used to study the effect of methanol/HCl pretreatment on the composition of each coal's inorganic phase. Results from these studies indicated that calcite is largely removed during pretreatment, but that other mineral species such as pyrite are unaffected. This finding is significant, since calcite removal appears to directly correlate with low severity liquefaction enhancement. Further work will be performed to study this phenomenon in more detail.

Miller, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Novel experimental studies for coal liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two studies related to coal liquefaction were carried out. The major effort in study was to investigate experimentally a novel reaction sequence for conversion of synthesis gas to methanol. The reaction studied in this work takes place in the liquid phase and consists of two reactions occurring in series. In the first, methanol is carbonylated to methyl formate using a homogeneous catalyst and then the formate is hydrogenated to two molecules of methanol using a heterogeneous catalyst. The reactions were studied individually and then concurrently (both reactions taking place in the same slurry reactor). A modeling study of the non-isothermal unsteady state Fischer-Tropsch reaction was carried out. In the second study the use of supercritical water for extraction and conversion of coal and oil shale was investigated. The two primary goals were to study the kinetics and mass transfer differences between conventional and supercritical liquefaction. The kinetic effects were studied by liquefying coal in supercritical toluene. Mass transfer studies were carried out on a model system consisting of naphthalene and supercritical carbon dioxide. 64 refs.

Holder, G.D.; Tierney, J.W.

1989-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study demonstrated the feasibility of using temperature-programmed electron spin resonance (ESR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for the examination of tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. TGA is used to quantitate volatile losses in a temperature-programmed experiment. The TGA data are used to correct the free radical densities obtained by ESR as volatile material is evolved from the samples in the temperature-programmed ESR experiment. The techniques, when employed in tandem, can be used to determine the content and nature of the free radicals in the samples at temperatures approximating those used in the liquefaction process. TGA and ESR experiments were performed in flowing nitrogen and hydrogen, at ambient pressure. No significant difference was observed in the ESR spectra in the different atmospheres, except in the case of low-rank coal-derived resids. The TGA results, however, were systematically different; mass loss in an H[sub 2] atmosphere is consistently higher than that observed in an N[sub 2] atmosphere. It was shown that temperature-programmed ESR, which can pinpoint conditions at which the free radical content is the highest, has potential to be a guide for the appropriate choice of conditions for optimum resid upgrading. Further development of these combined analytical methods as process development tools appears justified based on these results.

Ibrahim, M.M.; Seehra, M.S. (West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Physics)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Bioechnology of indirect liquefaction. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project on biotechnology of indirect liquefaction was focused on conversion of coal derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels using a two-stage, acidogenic and solventogenic, anaerobic bioconversion process. The acidogenic fermentation used a novel and versatile organism, Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, which was fully capable of using CO as the sole carbon and energy source for organic acid production. In extended batch CO fermentations the organism was induced to produce butyrate at the expense of acetate at low pH values. Long-term, steady-state operation was achieved during continuous CO fermentations with this organism, and at low pH values (a pH of 6.0 or less) minor amounts of butanol and ethanol were produced. During continuous, steady-state fermentations of CO with cell recycle, concentrations of mixed acids and alcohols were achieved (approximately 12 g/l and 2 g/l, respectively) which are high enough for efficient conversion in stage two of the indirect liquefaction process. The metabolic pathway to produce 4-carbon alcohols from CO was a novel discovery and is believed to be unique to our CO strain of B. methylotrophicum. In the solventogenic phase, the parent strain ATCC 4259 of Clostridium acetobutylicum was mutagenized using nitrosoguanidine and ethyl methane sulfonate. The E-604 mutant strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum showed improved characteristics as compared to parent strain ATCC 4259 in batch fermentation of carbohydrates.

Datta, R.; Jain, M.K.; Worden, R.M.; Grethlein, A.J.; Soni, B.; Zeikus, J.G.; Grethlein, H.

1990-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Affine Jordan cells, logarithmic correlators, and hamiltonian reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a particular type of logarithmic extension of SL(2,R) Wess-Zumino-Witten models. It is based on the introduction of affine Jordan cells constructed as multiplets of quasi-primary fields organized in indecomposable representations of the Lie algebra sl(2). We solve the simultaneously imposed set of conformal and SL(2,R) Ward identities for two- and three-point chiral blocks. These correlators will in general involve logarithmic terms and may be represented compactly by considering spins with nilpotent parts. The chiral blocks are found to exhibit hierarchical structures revealed by computing derivatives with respect to the spins. We modify the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations to cover affine Jordan cells and show that our chiral blocks satisfy these equations. It is also demonstrated that a simple and well-established prescription for hamiltonian reduction at the level of ordinary correlators extends straightforwardly to the logarithmic correlators as the latter then reduce to the known results for two- and three-point conformal blocks in logarithmic conformal field theory.

Jorgen Rasmussen

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, 4: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas SUMMARY The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas terminal consisting of two floating liquefaction, storage and offloading units and a 29-mile pipeline header system to transport natural gas from existing pipeline systems to the LNG terminal facilities. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 12, 2013 EIS-0494: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

292

Multielement geochemical exploration data for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area, Beaver and Millard counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical exploration data have been acquired for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). This was accomplished by analysis of both whole rock and +3.3 specific gravity concentrate samples from cuttings composites collected from shallow rotary drill holes. Areal distributions are reported for arsenic, mercury, lead and zinc. These are elements indicated by previous studies to be broadly zoned around thermal centers in geothermal systems and thus to be useful for selecting and prioritizing drilling targets. Results from this work suggest that reservoir temperature and/or reservoir to surface permeability, and thus possibly overall potential for a geothermal resource, increase northward beneath the approximately 18 square mile area containing shallow drill holes, possibly to beyond the northern limits of the area. The data provide a basis for development of three principal target models for the geothermal system but do not permit prioritization of these models. It is recommended that geochemical, geological, and temperature gradient surveys be expanded northward from the present survey area to more fully define the area which appears to have the best resource potential and to aid prioritization of the target models.

Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Geothermal investment analysis with site-specific applications to Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis and modeling of investment behavior in the development of hydrothermal electric power facilities are reported. This investment behavior reflects a degree of sensitivity to public policy alternatives concerning taxation and regulation of the resource and its related energy conversion facilities. The objective of the current research is to provide a realistic and theoretically sound means for estimating the impacts of such public policy alternatives. A stochastic simulation model was developed which offers an efficient means for site-specific investment analysis of private sector firms and investors. The results of the first year of work are discussed including the identification, analysis, quantification and modeling of: a decision tree reflecting the sequence of procedures, timing and stochastic elements of hydrothermal resource development projects; investment requirements, expenses and revenues incurred in the exploration, development and utilization of hydrothermal resources for electric power generation; and multiattribute investment decision criteria of the several types of firms in the geothermal industry. An application of the investment model to specific resource sites in the state of Utah is also described. Site specific data for the Known Geothermal Resource Areas of Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale are given together with hypothesized generation capacity growth rates.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Edelstein, R.H.; Blair, P.D.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Liquefaction of Hydrogen and Helium Using Small Coolers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the history of the liquefaction of hydrogen and helium using small coolers. This history dates form the 1960's when two stage GM coolers capable of reaching 7 K were used to liquefy helium and hydrogen by suing an added compressor and J-T circuit. Liquefaction using the added circuit failed to become mainstream because the J-T valve and heat exchanger clogged because of impurities in the gas being liquefied. Liquefaction using a GM cooler without an added J-T circuit proved to be difficult because the first stage was not used to pre-cool the gas coming to the second stage of the cooler. Once the gas being liquefied was pre-cooled using the cooler first stage, improvements in the liquefaction rates were noted. The advent of low temperature pulse tube cooler (down to 2.5 K) permitted one to achieve dramatic improvement is the liquefactions rates for helium. Similar but less dramatic improvements are expected for hydrogen as well. Using the PT-415 cooler, one can expect liquefaction rates of 15 to 20 liters per day for helium or hydrogen provided the heat leak into the cooler and the storage vessel is low. A hydrogen liquefier for MICE is presented at the end of this report.

Green, Michael A.

2006-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

295

Jordan-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Jordan-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Topics Background analysis Website http://www.fs.fed.us/global/to Country Jordan Western Asia References US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation[1] "In Jordan, the Forest Service provides technical support to Bedouin communities on community grassland rehabilitation projects. The focus is on rehabilitating extremely degraded rangelands-unique because it is designed to work without using fences to exclude grazing animals." References ↑ "US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation" Retrieved from

296

Integrated coal cleaning, liquefaction, and gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal is finely ground and cleaned so as to preferentially remove denser ash-containing particles along with some coal. The resulting cleaned coal portion having reduced ash content is then fed to a coal hydrogenation system for the production of desirable hydrocarbon gases and liquid products. The remaining ash-enriched coal portion is gasified to produce a synthesis gas, the ash is removed from the gasifier usually as slag, and the synthesis gas is shift converted with steam and purified to produce the high purity hydrogen needed in the coal hydrogenation system. This overall process increases the utilization of as-mined coal, reduces the problems associated with ash in the liquefaction-hydrogenation system, and permits a desirable simplification of a liquids-solids separation step otherwise required in the coal hydrogenation system.

Chervenak, Michael C. (Pennington, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Process for coal liquefaction in staged dissolvers  

SciTech Connect

There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a pasting oil, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. In accordance with the improved process, the first dissolver is operated at a higher temperature than the second dissolver. This temperature sequence produces improved product selectivity and permits the incorporation of sufficient hydrogen in the solvent for adequate recycle operations.

Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Skinner, Ronald W. (Allentown, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Chemistry and stoichiometry of wood liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The approximate stoichiometry of liquefaction, from data of two PDU runs and a laboratory run is Wood (100 g) + CO (0.1 - 0.4 Mol) ..-->.. CO/sub 2/ (0.5 - 1.0 Mol) + H/sub 2/O (0.4 - 0.8 Mol) + Product (55 - 64 g). Product includes wood oil, water soluble organics and residues. Water is formed by decomposition, carbon dioxide by decomposition and reduction of wood oxygen by CO. Aqueous products include many carboxylic acids plus a roughly equal percentage of non-acids. The wood oil is divided into a neutral fraction and three phenolic fractions of varying molecular weight. Some specific compounds found in water and oil phases are listed.

Davis, H.G.; Kloden, D.J.; Schaleger, L.L.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

ANNUAL REPORT OCTOBER 1, 1979-SEPTEMBER 30, 1980 CHEMISTRY AND MORPHOLOGY OF COAL LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secretary of Fossil Energy, Office of Liquefaction, AdvanceSecretary of Fossil Energy, Office of Liquefaction,Fossil Fuels Division of the U.S. Department of Energy under

Heinemann, Heinz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

OSTIblog Posts by Sharon Jordan | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Sharon Jordan Sharon Jordan Sharon Jordan's picture OSTI Assistant Director, Program Integration STIP Partnership Ensures DOE R&D Results Are Disseminated Sharon Jordan, OSTI Assistant Director, and John Kunze, California Digital Libra Published on Jun 16, 2011 Many posts could be written about the rich history of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), which dates back to 1945 when Colonel K. D. Nichols announced plans for a complete and authoritative scientific record of all research work performed by Manhattan District contractors. However, I want to focus on a specific slice of that history, one that is going strong and is well represented across the DOE complex. I'm referring to DOE's Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP, www.osti.gov/stip).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

U.S. Exports to Jordan of Total Petroleum Products (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Exports to Jordan of Total Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2004: 0: 0: 0: 0: ...

302

Towards improved partnerships in the water sector in the Middle East : A case study of Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on the use of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in the water sector in Jordan, a Middle East pioneer with respect to experimenting with different approaches to delivering water services in both ...

Odeh, Nancy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Latest Documents and Notices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 15, 2012 August 15, 2012 EA-1917: Mitigation Action Plan Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR August 15, 2012 EA-1917: Finding of No Significant Impact Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR August 13, 2012 EIS-0489: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, Oregon) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, Oregon) August 13, 2012 EIS-0488: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Cameron Liquefaction Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana August 10, 2012 EIS-0459: Amended Notice of Intent for a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Hawai'i Clean Energy August 7, 2012 EA-1845: Finding of No Significant Impact Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC Regarding Order Granting Long-Term

304

Jordan-Wigner formalism for classical simulation beyond binary matchgates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The unitary matchgate circuits introduced by Valiant provide an interesting class of quantum circuits that are classically efficiently simulatable. They were shown by Terhal & DiVincenzo and Knill to be related to the physics of non-interacting fermions. The Jordan-Wigner (JW) formalism provides an efficient classical simulation of the latter, which turns out to be equivalent to the restricted case of circuits of binary (2-qubit) matchgates. Valiant's formalism allows further unitary gates: in particular we may include arbitrary 1-qubit gates on the first qubit line at any stage within a binary matchgate circuit. In this note we show how the JW formalism may be extended to provide an efficient classical simulation of such extended circuits, and we show how the simulability also follows from some elementary Lie algebra theory. The essential ingredients have been indicated previously by Knill in a condensed and abstract form, and our purpose is to make these results explicit and transparent.

Richard Jozsa; Akimasa Miyake

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

305

Jordan-Schwinger realizations of three-dimensional polynomial algebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A three-dimensional polynomial algebra of order $m$ is defined by the commutation relations $[P_0, P_\\pm]$ $=$ $\\pm P_\\pm$, $[P_+, P_-]$ $=$ $\\phi^{(m)}(P_0)$ where $\\phi^{(m)}(P_0)$ is an $m$-th order polynomial in $P_0$ with the coefficients being constants or central elements of the algebra. It is shown that two given mutually commuting polynomial algebras of orders $l$ and $m$ can be combined to give two distinct $(l+m+1)$-th order polynomial algebras. This procedure follows from a generalization of the well known Jordan-Schwinger method of construction of $su(2)$ and $su(1,1)$ algebras from two mutually commuting boson algebras.

V. Sunil Kumar; B. A. Bambah; R. Jagannathan

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

306

A class of generalised Jordan-Schwinger maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we introduce a class of generalisations of the Jordan-Schwinger (JS) map which realises the recent proposed generalised sl(2) (G-sl(2)) algebra via two independent Generalised Heisenberg Algebras (GHA). Although the GHA and the G-sl(2) algebra exhibit more general algebraic structures than the Heisenberg and sl(2) algebras, the generalised JS map presents a compact and simple structure wich includes the standard JS map as a particular case. Finally, since in the GHA there is a physical interpretation in terms of composite particles, we will carry out this assertion in a manner that the generalised sl(2) algebra could be related to composite particles with angular momentum.

N M Oliveira-Neto; E M F Curado; M A Rego-Monteiro

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

Quantum toy-model escape to Jordan-block horizon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An an exactly solvable quantum model is found to sample the evolution towards the sudden and complete loss of observability. For the purpose we choose an N-level system. While the time runs from 0 to 1, the process (leading to the collapse) is controlled by a toy-model Hamiltonian H and by a unitary-evolution guaranteeing minimally anisotropic (i.e., unique) Hilbert-space metric. The process of the degeneracy of the real N-plet of energy levels is studied without the usual assumption of adiabaticity. The initial Hamiltonian is diagonal, the initial metric is chosen as identity. Once the system reaches the observability horizon, the metric becomes singular (of rank one) while the end-point Hamiltonian acquires the canonical Jordan-block form (i.e., it loses its diagonalizability). An optimal measure of the distance from the final catastrophe is finally found in a universal, exact formula for the spectrum of the metric.

Miloslav Znojil

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

308

Action with Acceleration II: Euclidean Hamiltonian and Jordan Blocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Euclidean action with acceleration has been analyzed in [1], hereafter cited as reference I, for its Hamiltonian and path integral. In this paper, the state space of the Hamiltonian is analyzed for the case when it is pseudo-Hermitian (equivalent to a Hermitian Hamiltonian), as well as the case when it is inequivalent. The propagator is computed using both creation/destruction operators as well as the path integral. A state space calculation of the propagator shows the crucial role played by the dual state vectors that yields a result impossible to obtain from a Hermitian Hamiltonian acting on a Hilbert space. When it is not pseudo-Hermitian, the Hamiltonian is shown to be a direct sum of Jordan blocks.

Belal E. Baaquie

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Symmetry, Self-Duality and the Jordan Structure of Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I explore several related routes to deriving the Jordan-algebraic structure of finite-dimensional quantum theory from more transparent operational or physical principles, mainly involving ideas about the symmetries of, and the correlations between, probabilistic models. The key tool is the Koecher-Vinberg Theorem, which identifies formally real Jordan algebras with finite-dimensional order-unit spaces having homogeneous, self-dual cones.

Alexander Wilce

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

Jordan Pairs, E6 and U-Duality in Five Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By exploiting the Jordan pair structure of U-duality Lie algebras in D = 3 and the relation to the super-Ehlers symmetry in D = 5, we elucidate the massless multiplet structure of the spectrum of a broad class of D = 5 supergravity theories. Both simple and semi-simple, Euclidean rank-3 Jordan algebras are considered. Theories sharing the same bosonic sector but with different supersymmetrizations are also analyzed.

Sergio Ferrara; Alessio Marrani; Bruno Zumino

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Pascual Jordan's legacy and the ongoing research in quantum field theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pascual Jordan's path-breaking role as the protagonist of quantum field theory (QFT) is recalled and his friendly dispute with Dirac's particle-based relativistic quantum theory is presented as the start of the field-particle conundrum which, though in modified form, persists up to this date. Jordan had an intuitive understanding that the existence of a causal propagation with finite propagation speed in a quantum theory led to radically different physical phenomena than those of QM. The conceptional-mathematical understanding for such an approach began to emerge only 30 years later. The strongest link between Jordan's view of QFT and modern "local quantum physics" is the central role of causal locality as the defining principle of QFT as opposed to the Born localization in QM. The issue of causal localization is also the arena where misunderstandings led to a serious derailment of large part of particle theory e.g. the misinterpretation of an infinite component pointlike field resulting from the quantization of the Nambu-Goto Lagrangian as a spacetime quantum string. The new concept of modular localization, which replaces Jordan's causal locality, is especially important to overcome the imperfections of gauge theories for which Jordan was the first to note nonlocal aspects of physical (not Lagrangian) charged fields. Two interesting subjects in which Jordan was far ahead of his contemporaries will be presented in two separate sections.

Bert Schroer

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Special identities for the pre-Jordan product in the free dendriform algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pre-Jordan algebras were introduced recently in analogy with pre-Lie algebras. A pre-Jordan algebra is a vector space $A$ with a bilinear multiplication $x \\cdot y$ such that the product $x \\circ y = x \\cdot y + y \\cdot x$ endows $A$ with the structure of a Jordan algebra, and the left multiplications $L_\\cdot(x)\\colon y \\mapsto x \\cdot y$ define a representation of this Jordan algebra on $A$. Equivalently, $x \\cdot y$ satisfies these multilinear identities: [see PDF]. The pre-Jordan product $x \\cdot y = x \\succ y + y \\prec x$ in any dendriform algebra also satisfies these identities. We use computational linear algebra based on the representation theory of the symmetric group to show that every identity of degree $\\le 7$ for this product is implied by the identities of degree 4, but that there exist new identities of degree 8 which do not follow from those of lower degree. There is an isomorphism of $S_8$-modules between these new identities and the special identities for the Jordan diproduct in an associative dialgebra.

Murray R. Bremner; Sara Madariaga

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

313

Co-liquefaction of the Elbistan Lignite and Poplar Sawdust. Part I: The Effect of the Liquefaction Parameters  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the liquefaction of Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust, and the co-liquefaction of the Elbistan lignite and the poplar sawdust in an inert atmosphere and in non-catalytic conditions have been examined. Also, the effects of solvent/coal ratio and stirring speed on the total conversion derived as the result of the liquefaction process was attempted to be determined. Based on the results, although the effects of the solvent/coal ratio and the stirring speed on total conversion are similar for both the Elbistan lignite and the poplar sawdust, it was also noted that, under similar conditions, the conversion for the poplar sawdust was higher, as compared to the conversion of the Elbistan lignite. As the result of the liquefaction of Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust under inert atmospheric conditions, the total conversion was increased partially, depending on both solvent/coal ratio and the speed of stirring. However, it was also noted that the total conversion did not change to a significant extent in high solvent/coal ratios and in stirring speed. As the result of the co-liquefaction of the Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust under inert atmospheric conditions, total conversion was increased, based on the solvent/coal ratio. However, as in the case of the liquefaction of Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust, it was noted that the high solvent/coal ratios (i.e., solvent/coal ratios of higher than 2/1) did not have a significant effect on the total conversion that was derived as the result of the co-liquefaction of the Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust.

Karaca, H.; Acar, M.; Yilmaz, M.; Keklik, I. [Inonu University, Malatya (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Protection of Pharmaceutical Patents and Data under TRIPS and US-Jordan FTA: Exploring the Limits of Obligations and Flexibilities: A Study of the Impacts on the Pharmaceutical Sector in Jordan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In 2000, Jordan signed the Agreement on Trade-related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (the TRIPS Agreement) and a free trade agreement with the US (USJFTA).… (more)

Abughanm, Saad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Souvenir of Kyoto's Entertainment: The Shiomi Rakuchu-Rakugaizu Screens in the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art; Shiomi Rakuchu-Rakugaizu Screens in the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines an unstudied pair of eight-paneled Japanese rakuchurakugaizu screens donated by Dr. Robert H. Shiomi to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA).… (more)

Hanson, Heather, 1984-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Treated Wastewater for Irrigated Agriculture in the Jordan Valley - Analysing Water allocation and Willingness to Pay for reused water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Jordan Valley is an important regional supplier of crops where much of the freshwater resources are consumed. A Water Reuse Index shows that there is… (more)

Alfarra, Amani

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Liquefaction process for solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved liquefaction process wherein wall scale and particulate agglomeration during the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates is reduced and/or eliminated by subjecting the solid carbonaceous materials to controlled cyclic cavitation during liquefaction. It is important that the solid carbonaceous material be slurried in a suitable solvent or diluent during liquefaction. The cyclic cavitation may be imparted via pressure cycling, cyclic agitation and the like. When pressure cycling or the like is employed an amplitude equivalent to at least 25 psia is required to effectively remove scale from the liquefaction vessel walls.

Epperly, William R. (Summit, NJ); Deane, Barry C. (East Brunswick, NJ); Brunson, Roy J. (Buffalo Grove, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Donor solvent coal liquefaction with bottoms recycle at elevated pressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein increased naphtha yields are achieved by effecting the liquefaction at a pressure within the range from about 1750 to about 2800 psig in the presence of recycled bottoms and a hydrogen-donor solvent containing at least 0.8 wt % donatable hydrogen. The liquefaction is accomplished at a temperature within the range from about 700.degree. to about 950.degree. F. The coal:bottoms ratio in the feed to liquefaction will be within the range from about 1:1 to about 5:1 and the solvent or diluent to total solids ratio will be at least 1.5:1 and preferably within the range from about 1.6:1 to about 3:1. The yield of naphtha boiling range materials increases as the pressure increases but generally reaches a maximum at a pressure within the range from about 2000 to about 2500 psig.

Bauman, Richard F. (Houston, TX); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX); Anderson, George H. (Houston, TX); Trachte, Ken L. (Baytown, TX); Hsia, Steve J. (Friendswood, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

EIS-0488: Cameron Liquefaction Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

88: Cameron Liquefaction Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana 88: Cameron Liquefaction Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana EIS-0488: Cameron Liquefaction Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana SUMMARY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing an EIS for a proposal to expand an existing liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal to enable it to liquefy and export LNG and to expand an existing pipeline by 21 miles. DOE is a cooperating agency in preparing the EIS. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES To comment on the Draft EIS, use one of the following methods and refer to FERC Dockets CP13-25-000 and CP13-27-000. FERC requests to receive comments

320

Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction (CMSL)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reported herein are the details and the results of laboratory and bench scale experiments that were conducted at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-93PC92147 during the period of October 1, 1992, to December 31, 1995. The program results described herein build on the previous technology base and investigating additional methods to improve the economics of producing transportation fuels from coal. This included purely physical parameters, coal treatment and variation in solvent to coal ratio, the use of syngas to replace part of the hydrogen as the reducing gas, the use of dispersed catalyst in addition to and replacing the supported catalyst, and the co-processing of coal with plastic waste material. The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from direct coal liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. The report includes the results of an economic assessment of the various process strategies that were evaluated during this program. A summary of the technical/economic evaluations is given in Volume I, Section II of this report. The experimental details of the eleven run of the program are given in Volume I, Section III and Volume II of this report. The details of the technical evaluations are given in the Volume III of the report.

Comolli, A.G.; Ganguli, P.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, T.L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Popper, G.; Smith, T.; Stalzer, R.H.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the eleventh Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: (1) The results of a study designed to determine the effects of the conditions employed at the Wilsonville slurry preheater vessel on coal conversion is described. (2) Stable carbon isotope ratios were determined and used to source the carbon of three product samples from Period 49 of UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 37. The results from this coprocessing run agree with the general trends observed in other coprocessing runs that we have studied. (3) Microautoclave tests and chemical analyses were performed to calibrate'' the reactivity of the standard coal used for determining donor solvent quality of process oils in this contract. (4) Several aspects of Wilsonville Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) resid conversion kinetics were investigated; results are presented. Error limits associated with calculations of deactivation rate constants previously reported for Runs 258 and 261 are revised and discussed. A new procedure is described that relates the conversions of 850[degrees]F[sup +] , 1050[degrees]F[sup +], and 850 [times] 1050[degrees]F material. Resid conversions and kinetic constants previously reported for Run 260 were incorrect; corrected data and discussion are found in Appendix I of this report.

Brandes, S.D.; Lancet, M.S.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments for the past year are presented for the following tasks: coliquefaction of coal with waste materials; catalysts for coal liquefaction to clean transportation fuels; fundamental research in coal liquefaction; and in situ analytical techniques for coal liquefaction and coal liquefaction catalysts some of the highlights are: very promising results have been obtained from the liquefaction of plastics, rubber tires, paper and other wastes, and the coliquefaction of wastes with coal; a number of water soluble coal liquefaction catalysts, iron, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum, have been comparatively tested; mossbauer spectroscopy, XAFS spectroscopy, TEM and XPS have been used to characterize a variety of catalysts and other samples from numerous consortium and DOE liquefaction projects and in situ ESR measurements of the free radical density have been conducted at temperatures from 100 to 600{degrees}C and H{sub 2} pressures up to 600 psi.

Huffman, G.P. [ed.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Liquefaction of solid carbonaceous material with catalyst recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the two stage liquefaction of a carbonaceous solid such as coal wherein coal is liquefied in a first stage in the presence of a liquefaction solvent and the first stage effluent is hydrogenated in the presence of a supported hydrogenation catalyst in a second stage, catalyst which has been previously employed in the second stage and comminuted to a particle size distribution equivalent to 100% passing through U.S. 100 Mesh, is passed to the first stage to improve the overall operation.

Gupta, Avinash (Bloomfield, NJ); Greene, Marvin I. (Oradell, NJ)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Method of distributing liquefaction catalysts in solid carbonaceous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of dispersing a liquefaction catalyst within coal or other carbonaceous solids involves providing a suspension in oil of microcapsules containing the catalyst. An aqueous solution of a catalytic metal salt is emulsified in the water-immiscible oil and the resulting minute droplets microencapsulated in polymeric shells by interfacial polycondensation. The catalyst is subsequently blended and dispersed throughout the powdered carbonaceous material to be liquefied. At liquefaction temperatures the polymeric microcapsules are destroyed and the catalyst converted to minute crystallites in intimate contact with the carbonaceous material. 2 tables.

Weller, S.W.

1984-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

325

Observational signatures of Jordan-Brans-Dicke theories of gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the Jordan-Brans-Dicke model (JBD) of gravity, where deviations from General Relativity (GR) are described by a scalar field non-minimally coupled to gravity. The theory is characterized by a constant coupling parameter, $\\omega_{\\rm JBD}$; GR is recovered in the limit $\\omega_{\\rm JBD} \\to \\infty$. In such theories, gravity modifications manifest at early times, so that one cannot rely on the usual approach of looking for inconsistencies in the expansion history and perturbations growth in order to discriminate between JBD and GR. However, we show that a similar technique can be successfully applied to early and late times observables instead. Cosmological parameters inferred extrapolating early-time observations to the present will match those recovered from direct late-time observations only if the correct gravity theory is used. We use the primary CMB, as will be seen by the Planck satellite, as the early-time observable; and forthcoming and planned Supernov{\\ae}, Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations and Weak Lensing experiments as late-time observables. We find that detection of values of $\\omega_{\\rm JBD}$ as large as 500 and 1000 is within reach of the upcoming (2010) and next-generation (2020) experiments, respectively.

Viviana Acquaviva; Licia Verde

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

SHORT CONTACT TIME DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION USING A NOVEL BATCH REACTOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the Direct Coal Liquefaction process at the molecular level. Many approaches have been used to study this process including kinetic studies, study of the liquefaction products, study of the effect of reaction variables, such as temperature, solvent type and composition, the changing nature and composition of the coal during liquefaction, and the distribution in the liquefaction products of the hydrogen consumed. While all these studies have contributed to our growing knowledge of the liquefaction process, an adequate understanding of direct liquefaction still eludes us. This is due to many reasons including: the complexity and variable nature of coal itself and the many different chemical reactions which are occurring simultaneously during direct coal liquefaction. We believe that a study of the liquefaction process at the very early stages will avoid the complexities of secondary reactions associated with free radical high temperature processes that are clearly involved in direct coal liquefaction. This prompted us to devise a reactor system which avoids long heat up and cool-down times associated with previous kinetic studies, and allows kinetic measurements even at as short as the first few seconds of the liquefaction reaction.

Michael T. Klein; William H. Calkins

1997-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

--No Title--  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State, allowing for large interstate electricity transfers. The owners of the Jordan Cove Energy Project at Coos Bay, after getting liquefied natural gas (LNG) import...

328

EIS-0491: Lake Charles Liquefaction Project, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to expand an existing liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana, by constructing and operating natural gas liquefaction and exportation capabilities.

329

Surface Modified Coals for Enhanced Catalyst Dispersion and Liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study is to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on to the coal. During this reporting period, liquefaction experiments were conducted with the raw coal and catalyst loaded samples. Pretreatment of the coal and catalyst-loaded samples were done using the surfactants presented in previous reports. Liquefaction samples were tested using 6.6 g of solvent, 3.3 g coal, 6.9 MPa ambient hydrogen pressure, 425 0 C and 30 minutes. The liquid and solid products were removed from the reactor using tetrahydrofuran (THF). Coal conversions were calculated based on THF and heptane solubility. The results showed that in the absence of a catalyst, 33.8% heptane solubles was obtained with the parent coal compared to 27.8% and 27.3% with the SDS and DDAB surfactants. The presence of molybdenum, as expected, resulted in enhanced heptane solubles with or without surfactants. In the absence of surfactants, 50% heptane solubles was obtained compared to 40-47% with surfactants. Thus, it appears that pretreatment, unexpectedly, had a negative effect on liquefaction activity. It is unclear if the observed differences in results are significant. Clearly, additional experiments are needed before any firm deductions and conclusions can be drawn from the results.

Yaw D. Yeboah

1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

330

Preferred Quantization Rules: Born-Jordan vs. Weyl: the Pseudo-Differential Point of View  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has recently been evidence for replacing the usual Weyl quantization procedure by the older and much less known Born-Jordan rule. In this paper we discuss this quantization procedure in detail and relate it to recent results of Boggiato, De Donno, and Oliaro on the Cohen class. We begin with a discussion of some properties of Shubin's $\\tau$-pseudo-differential calculus, which allows us to show that the Born-Jordan quantization of a symbol $a$ is the average for $\\tau\\in\\lbrack0,1]$ of the $\\tau$-operators with symbol $a$. We study the properties of the Born-Jordan operators, including their symplectic covariance, and give their Weyl symbol.

Maurice de Gosson; Franz Luef

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

331

Status of Jordan Renewable Energy Sector: Problems, Needs and Challenges F. Abdulla, M. Widyan, Z. Al-Ghazawi, S. Kiwan, H. Abu-Qdais, M. Hayajneh, A. Harb, M.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for energy usage, we, as energy #12;group at Jordan University of Science & Technology, are studying howStatus of Jordan Renewable Energy Sector: Problems, Needs and Challenges F. Abdulla, M. Widyan, Z University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110, Jordan INTRODUCTION Jordan imports most of its energy

332

Gravity survey of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and the North Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. Technical report: Volume 77-4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summers of 1975 and 1976, a gravity survey was conducted in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. The survey consisted of 671 gravity stations covering an area of about 1300 km/sup 2/, and included two orthogonal gravity profiles traversing the area. The gravity data are presented as a terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 1 mgal and as an isometric three-dimensional gravity anomaly surface. Selected anomaly separation techniques were applied to the hand-digitized gravity data (at 1-km intervals on the Universal Transverse Mercator grid) in both the frequency and space domains, including Fourier decomposition, second vertical derivative, strike-filter, and polynomial fitting analysis, respectively.

Brumbaugh, W.D.; Cook, K.L.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

COAL LIQUEFACTION USING ZINC CHLORIDE CATALYST IN AN EXTRACTING SOLVENT MEDIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Coal Gasification, Lique- faction, andInternational Symposium on Gasification and Liquefaction,coal, go to a gasification facility for conversion to

Gandhi, Shamim Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Extraction of oil from algae for biofuel production by thermochemical liquefaction / Anro Barnard.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The extraction of oil from microalgae was investigated. The study focused on the hydrothermal liquefaction of the microalgae Microcystis aeruginosa, Cyclotella meneghinia and Nitzschia pusilla.… (more)

Barnard, Anro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

ANNUAL REPORT OCTOBER 1, 1979-SEPTEMBER 30, 1980 CHEMISTRY AND MORPHOLOGY OF COAL LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND MORPHOLOGY OF COAL LIQUEFACTION LA , . . ,:;. ~~Microscope Studies of Coal during Hydrogenation Taskspread evenly over the coal grains of this particular area.

Heinemann, Heinz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

ZINC CHLORIDE CATALYSIS IN COAL AND BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION AT PREPYROLYSIS TEMPERATURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biomass utilization and conversion facilities. ChemicalChemical Structures of Biomass Components Chemical Liquefaction of Wood and l'lood Components Biomass Conversion

Onu, Christopher O.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Economic feasibility study: CFR advanced direct coal liquefaction process. Volume 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary technical and economic data are presented on the CFR Advanced Coal Liquefaction Process. Operating cost estimates and material balances are given.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Study of galactic gamma ray sources with Milagro Jordan A. Goodman for the Milagro Collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of galactic gamma ray sources with Milagro Jordan A. Goodman for the Milagro Collaboration. This factor of ~2 increase in sensitivity (as shown in figure 1) has dramatically changed our view of the high-energy Galactic gamma-ray emission at TeV energies, including the detection of the Cygnus Region at high

California at Santa Cruz, University of

339

An assessment of using oil shale for power production in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the oil shale-for-power-production option in Jordan. Under consideration are 20- and 50-MW demonstration units and a 400-MW, commercial-scale plant with, at the 400-MW scale, a mining operation capable of supplying 7.8 million tonnes per year of shale fuel and also capable of disposal of up to 6.1 million tonnes per year of wetted ash. The plant would be a direct combustion facility, burning crushed oil shale through use of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology. The report emphasizes four areas: (1) the need for power in Jordan, (2) environmental aspects of the proposed oil shale-for-power plant(s), (3) the engineering feasibility of using Jordan's oil shale in circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) boiler, and (4) the economic feasibility of the proposed plant(s). A sensitivity study was conducted to determine the economic feasibility of the proposed plant(s) under different cost assumptions and revenue flows over the plant's lifetime. The sensitivity results are extended to include the major extra-firm benefits of the shale-for-power option: (1) foreign exchange savings from using domestic energy resources, (2) aggregate income effects of using Jordan's indigenous labor force, and (3) a higher level of energy security. 14 figs., 47 tabs.

Hill, L.J.; Holcomb, R.S.; Petrich, C.H.; Roop, R.D.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Linear maps preserving maximal deviation and the Jordan structure of quantum systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the algebraic approach to quantum theory, a quantum observable is given by an element of a Jordan algebra and a state of the system is modelled by a normalized positive functional on the underlying algebra. Maximal deviation of a quantum observable is the largest statistical deviation one can obtain in a particular state of the system. The main result of the paper shows that each linear bijective transformation between JBW algebras preserving maximal deviations is formed by a Jordan isomorphism or a minus Jordan isomorphism perturbed by a linear functional multiple of an identity. It shows that only one numerical statistical characteristic has the power to determine the Jordan algebraic structure completely. As a consequence, we obtain that only very special maps can preserve the diameter of the spectra of elements. Nonlinear maps preserving the pseudometric given by maximal deviation are also described. The results generalize hitherto known theorems on preservers of maximal deviation in the case of self-adjoint parts of von Neumann algebras proved by Molnar.

Hamhalter, Jan [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 2, 166 27 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Jordan Form of (i+j over j) over Z[subscript p  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Jordan Form over field Z[subscript p] of J[superscript p][subscript p]n is diagonal for p > 3 with characteristic polynomial, ?(x) = x[superscript 3] - 1, for p prime, n natural number. These matrices have dimension ...

Strauss, Nicholas

342

A D-dimensional Heckmann-like solution of Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this short letter we present a some rigorous vacuum solutions of the D-dimensional Jordan-Brans-Dicke field equations. In contrast with the well known Brans-Dicke solutions, to the search of static and spherically symmetric space-time we choose the widespread Hilbert coordinates.

S. M. Kozyrev

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

343

Gas Explosion Tests on East Jordan Iron Works Rectangular Composite Secondary Box Covers for Con Edison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an account of continuing research by Con Edison and EPRI to address issues related to manhole events caused by the accumulation of gases in underground structures. It summarizes the results of gas explosion tests performed in June 2008 on rectangular composite vented covers produced by East Jordan Iron Works Company.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

344

An assessment of using oil shale for power production in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the oil shale-for-power-production option in Jordan. Under consideration are 20- and 50-MW demonstration units and a 400-MW, commercial-scale plant with, at the 400-MW scale, a mining operation capable of supplying 7.8 million tonnes per year of shale fuel and also capable of disposal of up to 6.1 million tonnes per year of wetted ash. The plant would be a direct combustion facility, burning crushed oil shale through use of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology. The report emphasizes four areas: (1) the need for power in Jordan, (2) environmental aspects of the proposed oil shale-for-power plant(s), (3) the engineering feasibility of using Jordan's oil shale in circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) boiler, and (4) the economic feasibility of the proposed plant(s). A sensitivity study was conducted to determine the economic feasibility of the proposed plant(s) under different cost assumptions and revenue flows over the plant's lifetime. The sensitivity results are extended to include the major extra-firm benefits of the shale-for-power option: (1) foreign exchange savings from using domestic energy resources, (2) aggregate income effects of using Jordan's indigenous labor force, and (3) a higher level of energy security. 14 figs., 47 tabs.

Hill, L.J.; Holcomb, R.S.; Petrich, C.H.; Roop, R.D.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Optimization of Water Resources Planning for Jordan's Aqaba Special Economic Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we discuss the development of a water resources planning decision support system (DSS) for Jordan's Aqaba Special Economic Zone (ASEZ). Our objectives are to conserve fresh water supplies and minimize overall water production and ... Keywords: capacity expansion, decision support systems, integer programming, networks

Abdelghani A. Elimam; Maurice A. Girgis

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

EIS-0488: Cameron Pipeline Expansion Project and Cameron LNG Liquefaction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

88: Cameron Pipeline Expansion Project and Cameron LNG 88: Cameron Pipeline Expansion Project and Cameron LNG Liquefaction Project, Cameron Parish, LA EIS-0488: Cameron Pipeline Expansion Project and Cameron LNG Liquefaction Project, Cameron Parish, LA SUMMARY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing an EIS, with DOE as a cooperating agency, to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to expand the existing Cameron Pipeline by 21 miles (from Calcasieu to Beauregard Parishes, Louisiana, with modifications in Cameron Parish), and expand an existing liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in Cameron Parish, Louisiana, to enable the terminal to liquefy and export the LNG. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES Comment Period Ends: 03/03/14 DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 10, 2014

347

EIS-0488: Cameron Pipeline Expansion Project and Cameron LNG Liquefaction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Cameron Pipeline Expansion Project and Cameron LNG 8: Cameron Pipeline Expansion Project and Cameron LNG Liquefaction Project, Cameron Parish, LA EIS-0488: Cameron Pipeline Expansion Project and Cameron LNG Liquefaction Project, Cameron Parish, LA SUMMARY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing an EIS, with DOE as a cooperating agency, to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to expand the existing Cameron Pipeline by 21 miles (from Calcasieu to Beauregard Parishes, Louisiana, with modifications in Cameron Parish), and expand an existing liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in Cameron Parish, Louisiana, to enable the terminal to liquefy and export the LNG. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 13, 2012 EIS-0488: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

348

Process for coal liquefaction employing selective coal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved coal liquefaction process is provided whereby coal conversion is improved and yields of pentane soluble liquefaction products are increased. In this process, selected feed coal is pulverized and slurried with a process derived solvent, passed through a preheater and one or more dissolvers in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures, following which solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. The selected feed coals comprise washed coals having a substantial amount of mineral matter, preferably from about 25-75%, by weight, based upon run-of-mine coal, removed with at least 1.0% by weight of pyritic sulfur remaining and exhibiting vitrinite reflectance of less than about 0.70%.

Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Liquefaction of remote sources of natural gas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective was to determine the technical and financial feasibility of liquefying remote reserves of natural gas and transporting the liquefied product to users. The proposed methodology included efforts to (1) identify any prohibitive or limiting laws and/or regulations; (2) identify sufficient unutilized reserves in remote areas to justify further investigation; (3) identify existing portable liquefaction equipment (or an interested manufacturer that could supply the needed equipment) to obtain cost and performance data; (4) determine site preparation, supply and production costs for use in assessing economic feasibility; and (5) identify potential users. The conclusion is that the liquefaction of natural gas in remote areas of Appalachia is not economically feasible as long as an adequate and reliable supply of pipeline gas is perceived to be available for the forseable future and the price per Btu of pipeline gas remains so far below other fuels. 3 tables.

Rogers, D.W.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Control of pyrite addition in coal liquefaction process  

SciTech Connect

Pyrite addition to a coal liquefaction process (22, 26) is controlled (118) in inverse proportion to the calcium content of the feed coal to maximize the C.sub.5 --900.degree. F. (482.degree. C.) liquid yield per unit weight of pyrite added (110). The pyrite addition is controlled in this manner so as to minimize the amount of pyrite used and thus reduce pyrite contribution to the slurry pumping load and disposal problems connected with pyrite produced slag.

Schmid, Bruce K. (Englewood, CO); Junkin, James E. (Englewood, CO)

1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION  

SciTech Connect

Major objectives of the present project are to develop a better understanding of the roles of the catalyst and the liquefaction solvent in the coal liquefaction process. An open question concerning the role of the catalyst is whether intimate contact between the catalyst and the coal particles is important or required. To answer this question, it had been planned to coat an active catalyst with a porous silica coating which was found to retain catalyst activity while preventing actual contact between catalyst and coal. Consultation with people in DuPont who coat catalysts for increasing abrasion resistance have indicated that only portions of the catalyst are coated by their process (spray drying) and that sections of uncoated catalyst remain. For that reason, it was decided to suspend the catalyst in a basket separated from the coal in the reactor. The basket walls were to be permeable to the liquefaction solvent but not to the coal particles. Several such baskets were constructed of stainless steel with holes which would not permit passage of coal particles larger than 30 mesh. Liquefactions run with the coal of greater than 30 mesh size gave normal conversion of coal to liquid in the absence of catalyst in the basket, but substantially increased conversion when Ni/Mo on alumina catalyst was in the basket. While this result is interesting and suggestive of some kind of mass transfer of soluble material occurring between the catalyst and the coal, it does not eliminate the possibility of breakdown of the coal particle into particle sizes permeable to the basket. Indeed, a small amount of fine coal has been found inside the basket. To determine whether fine coal from breakdown of the coal particles is responsible for the conversion, a new basket is being prepared with 0.5{micro}m pore size.

Michael T. Klein

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Development of an extruder-feeder biomass direct liquefaction process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As an abundant, renewable, domestic energy resource, biomass could help the United States reduce its dependence on imported oil. Biomass is the only renewable energy technology capable of addressing the national need for liquid transportation fuels. Thus, there is an incentive to develop economic conversion processes for converting biomass, including wood, into liquid fuels. Through research sponsored by the US DOE's Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program, the University of Arizona has developed a unique biomass direct liquefaction system. The system features a modified single-screw extruder capable of pumping solid slurries containing as high as 60 wt % wood flour in wood oil derived vacuum bottoms at pressures up to 3,000 psi. By comparison, conventional pumping systems are capable of pumping slurries containing only 10--20 wt % wood flour in wood oil under similar conditions. The extruder-feeder has been integrated with a unique reactor to form a system which offers potential for improving high pressure biomass direct liquefaction technology. The extruder-feeder acts simultaneously as both a feed preheater and a pumping device for injecting wood slurries into a 3,000 psi pressure reactor in the biomass liquefaction process. An experimental facility was constructed during 1983--84. Following shakedown operations, wood crude oil was produced by mid-1985. During the period January 1985 through July 1988, a total of 57 experimental continuous biomass liquefaction runs were made using White Birch wood feedstock. Good operability was achieved at slurry feed rates up to 30 lb/hr, reactor pressures from 800 to 3,000 psi and temperatures from 350{degrees}C to 430{degrees}C under conditions covering a range of carbon monoxide feed rates and sodium carbonate catalyst addition. Crude wood oils containing as little as 6--10 wt % residual oxygen were produced. 43 refs., 81 figs., 52 tabs.

White, D.H.; Wolf, D. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Development of an extruder-feeder biomass direct liquefaction process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As an abundant, renewable, domestic energy resource, biomass could help the United States reduce its dependence on imported oil. Biomass is the only renewable energy technology capable of addressing the national need for liquid transportation fuels. Thus, there is an incentive to develop economic conversion processes for converting biomass, including wood, into liquid fuels. Through research sponsored by the US DOE's Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program, the University of Arizona has developed a unique biomass direct liquefaction system. The system features a modified single-screw extruder capable of pumping solid slurries containing as high as 60 wt% wood flour in wood oil derived vacuum bottoms at pressures up to 3000 psi. The extruder-feeder has been integrated with a unique reactor by the University to form a system which offers potential for improving high pressure biomass direct liquefaction technology. The extruder-feeder acts simultaneously as both a feed preheater and a pumping device for injecting wood slurries into a high pressure reactor in the biomass liquefaction process. An experimental facility was constructed and following shakedown operations, wood crude oil was produced by mid-1985. By July 1988, a total of 57 experimental continuous biomass liquefaction runs were made using White Birch wood feedstock. Good operability was achieved at slurry feed rates up to 30 lb/hr, reactor pressures from 800 to 3000 psi and temperatures from 350{degree}C to 430{degree}C under conditions covering a range of carbon monoxide feed rates and sodium carbonate catalyst addition. Crude wood oils containing as little as 6--10 wt% residual oxygen were produced. 38 refs., 82 figs., 26 tabs.

White, D.H.; Wolf, D. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Evaluation of wastewater treatment requirements for thermochemical biomass liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The broad range of processing conditions involved in direct biomass liquefaction lead to a variety of product properties. The aqueous byproduct streams have received limited analyses because priority has been placed on analysis of the complex organic liquid product. The range of organic contaminants carried in the aqueous byproducts directly correlates with the quantity and quality of contaminants in the liquid oil product. The data in the literature gives a general indication of the types and amounts of components expected in biomass liquefaction wastewater; however, the data is insufficient to prepare a general model that predicts the wastewater composition from any given liquefaction process. Such a model would be useful in predicting the amount of water that would be soluble in a given oil and the level of dissolved water at which a second aqueous-rich phase would separate from the oil. Both biological and thermochemical processes have proposed for wastewater treatment, but no treatment process has been tested. Aerobic and anaerobic biological systems as well as oxidative and catalytic reforming thermochemical systems should be considered.

Elliott, D.C.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

SURFACE-MODIFIED COALS FOR ENHANCED CATALYST DISPERSION AND LIQUEFACTION  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of the Department of Energy Sponsored project DE-FGF22-95PC95229 entitled, surface modified coals for enhanced catalyst dispersion and liquefaction. The aims of the study were to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on the coal and to train and educate minority scientists in catalysts and separation science. Illinois No. 6 Coal (DEC-24) was selected for the study. The surfactants investigated included dodecyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB), a cationic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, an anionic surfactant, and Triton x-100, a neutral surfactant. Ammonium molybdate tetrahydrate was used as the molybdenum catalyst precursor. Zeta potential, BET, FTIR, AFM, UV-Vis and luminescence intensity measurements were undertaken to assess the surface properties and the liquefaction activities of the coal. The parent coal had a net negative surface charge over the pH range 2-12. However, in the presence of DDAB the negativity of the surface charge decreased. At higher concentrations of DDAB, a positive surface charge resulted. In contrast to the effect of DDAB, the zeta potential of the coal became more negative than the parent coal in the presence of SDS. Adsorption of Triton reduced the net negative charge density of the coal samples. The measured surface area of the coal surface was about 30 m{sup 2}/g compared to 77m{sup 2}/g after being washed with deionized water. Addition of the surfactants decreased the surface area of the samples. Adsorption of the molybdenum catalyst increased the surface area of the coal sample. The adsorption of molybdenum on the coal was significantly promoted by preadsorption of DDAB and SDS. Molybdenum adsorption showed that, over a wide range of concentrations and pH values, the DDAB treated coal adsorbed a higher amount of molybdenum than the samples treated with SDS. The infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the atomic force microscopy (AFM) also provided evidence that confirmed the adsorption of the surfactants onto the coal surface. The luminescence measurements showed that the coal and solid surfactants luminescence weakly. No statistically significant influence was observed that resulted from the action of the surfactants or surfactant-molybdenum catalyst. Interestingly, the liquefaction results produced data that indicated the use of surfactants did not significantly improve the liquefaction activity of the coal as had initially been hypothesized. The UV-adsorption tests provided evidence that suggest that this may have been due to oversaturation. Detailed discussions of the results and recommendations for future work are provided.

Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Active constraint regions for a natural gas liquefaction process Magnus G. Jacobsena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active constraint regions for a natural gas liquefaction process Magnus G. Jacobsena , Sigurd little attention. this paper addresses optimal operation of a simple natural gas liquefaction process at all times. Keywords: Self-optimizing control, liquefied natural gas, LNG, PRICO, disturbances, optimal

Skogestad, Sigurd

357

Building community in low-income areas : designing a new architectural language for community centers in Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this thesis is to develop a vocabulary of principles to be used in the design of future community centers in Jordan. Community centers provide the stage for bringing members of the community together to meet and ...

Ali, Dalia Osama

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Histoire du théorème de Jordan de la décomposition matricielle (1870-1930). Formes de représentation et méthodes de décomposition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??L'histoire du théorème de Jordan est abordée sous l'angle d'une question d'identité posée sur la période qui sépare la date de 1870 et l'énoncé par… (more)

Brechenmacher, Frederic

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Reexamination of the Jordan Mean Tropical Sounding Based on Awareness of the Saharan Air Layer: Results from 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Jordan mean tropical sounding has provided a benchmark for representing the climatology of the tropical North Atlantic and Caribbean Sea since 1958. However, recent studies of the Saharan air layer (SAL) have suggested that the tropical ...

Jason P. Dunion; Christopher S. Marron

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Liquefaction of calcium-containing subbituminous coals and coals of lower rank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for the treatment of a calcium-containing subbituminous coal and coals of lower rank to form insoluble, thermally stable calcium salts which remain within the solids portions of the residue on liquefaction of the coal, thereby suppressing the formation of scale, made up largely of calcium carbonate which normally forms within the coal liquefaction reactor (i.e., coal liquefaction zone), e.g., on reactor surfaces, lines, auxiliary equipment and the like. An oxide of sulfur, in liquid phase, is contacted with a coal feed sufficient to impregnate the pores of the coal. The impregnated coal, in particulate form, can thereafter be liquefied in a coal liquefaction reactor (reaction zone) at coal liquefaction conditions without significant formation of scale.

Brunson, Roy J. (Baytown, TX)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Abelian subalgebras and the Jordan structure of a von Neumann algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For von Neumann algebras M, N not isomorphic to C^2 and without type I_2 summands, we show that for an order-isomorphism f:AbSub(M)->AbSub(N) between the posets of abelian von Neumann subalgebras of M and N, there is a unique Jordan *-isomorphism g:M->N with the image g[S] equal to f(S) for each abelian von Neumann subalgebra S of M. The converse also holds. This shows the Jordan structure of a von Neumann algebra not isomorphic to C^2 and without type I_2 summands is determined by the poset of its abelian subalgebras, and has implications in recent approaches to foundational issues in quantum mechanics.

Andreas Doering; John Harding

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

362

Generalised Gelfand Spectra of Nonabelian Unital $C^*$-Algebras I: Categorical Aspects, Automorphisms and Jordan Structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To each unital C*-algebra A we associate a presheaf \\Sigma^A, called the spectral presheaf of A, which can be regarded as a generalised Gelfand spectrum. We present some categorical aspects and clarify how much algebraic information about a C*-algebra is contained in its spectral presheaf. A nonabelian unital C*-algebra A that is neither isomorphic to C^2 nor to B(C^2) is determined by its spectral presheaf up to quasi-Jordan isomorphisms. For a particular class of unital C*-algebras, including all von Neumann algebras with no type I_2-summand, the spectral presheaf determines the Jordan structure up to isomorphisms. In a companion paper, we consider time evolution of quantum systems in the Heisenberg picture and the Schr\\"odinger picture in a formulation based on flows on the spectral presheaf.

Andreas Doering

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

363

Complete density perturbations in the Jordan-Fierz-Brans-Dicke theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of scalar-tensor theories we study the evolution of the density contrast for Jordan-Fierz-Brans-Dicke theories in a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker Universe. Calculations are performed in the Einstein Frame with the cosmological background described as Lambda-Cold Dark Matter (Lambda-CDM) and supplemented by a Jordan-Fierz-Brans-Dicke field. By using a completely general procedure valid for all scalar-tensor theories, we obtain the exact fourth-order differential equation for the density contrast evolution in modes of arbitrary size. In the case of sub-Hubble modes, the expression reduces to a simpler but still fourth-order equation that is then compared with the standard (quasistatic) approximation. Differences with respect to the evolution as predicted by the standard Concordance Lambda-CDM model are observed depending on the value of the coupling.

J. A. R. Cembranos; A. de la Cruz Dombriz; L. Olano Garcia

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Abelian subalgebras and the Jordan structure of a von Neumann algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For von Neumann algebras $\\mathcal{M},\\mathcal{N}$ without type $I_2$ summands, we show that for an order-isomorphism $f:AbSub \\mathcal{M}\\to AbSub \\mathcal{N}$ between the posets of abelian von Neumann subalgebras of $\\mathcal{M}$ and $\\mathcal{N}$, there is a unique Jordan *-isomorphism $g:\\mathcal{M}\\to \\mathcal{N}$ with the image $g[\\mathcal{S}]$ equal to $f(\\mathcal{S})$ for each abelian von Neumann-subalgebra $\\mathcal{S}$ of $\\mathcal{M}$. This shows the Jordan structure of a von Neumann algebra without type $I_2$ summand is determined by the poset of its abelian subalgebras, and has implications in recent approaches to foundational issues in quantum mechanics.

John Harding; Andreas Doering

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

365

An Evaluation of the image of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan in the British and Swedish markets and the implications for marketing the country as a tourism destination.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tourism image is critical to the success of any destination, but few image studies to date have focused specifically on either Jordan or the UK… (more)

Harahsheh, Salem Salameh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Modified Born-Jordan Method For Constructing The Commutation Relation Of Coordinate and Momentum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Born-Jordan method for constructing the quantum condition of the Matrix Mechanics is pointed out to be inappropriate in the present work. We modify this method and reconstruct the quantum condition by setting up a new expression for the Bohr quantum condition with the help of the (n,n) elements of the matrix $\\oint\\hat{p}(t){\\rm d}\\hat{x}(t)$.

Ze-Sen Yang

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Cosmological Exact Solution of Complex Jordan-Brans-Dicke Theory and its Phenomenological Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When Brans-Dicke Theory is formulated in terms of the Jordan scalar field \\phi, dark energy is related to the mass of this field. We show that if \\phi is taken to be a complex scalar field then an exact solution of the vacuum equations shows that Friedmann equation possesses a term, proportional to the inverse sixth power of the scale factor, as well as a constant term. Possible interpretations and phenomenological implications of this result are discussed.

Metin Ar?k; Mehmet Cal?k; N. Katirci

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

368

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of work conducted under the DOE Proof-of-Concept Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, from February 1994 through April 1995. The work includes modifications to HRI`s existing 3 ton per day Process Development Unit (PDU) and completion of the second PDU run (POC Run 2) under the Program. The 45-day POC Run 2 demonstrated scale up of the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL Process) for a subbituminous Wyoming Black Thunder Mine coal to produce distillate liquid products at a rate of up to 4 barrels per ton of moisture-ash-free coal. The combined processing of organic hydrocarbon wastes, such as waste plastics and used tire rubber, with coal was also successfully demonstrated during the last nine days of operations of Run POC-02. Prior to the first PDU run (POC-01) in this program, a major effort was made to modify the PDU to improve reliability and to provide the flexibility to operate in several alternative modes. The Kerr McGee Rose-SR{sup SM} unit from Wilsonville, Alabama, was redesigned and installed next to the U.S. Filter installation to allow a comparison of the two solids removal systems. The 45-day CTSL Wyoming Black Thunder Mine coal demonstration run achieved several milestones in the effort to further reduce the cost of liquid fuels from coal. The primary objective of PDU Run POC-02 was to scale-up the CTSL extinction recycle process for subbituminous coal to produce a total distillate product using an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Of major concern was whether calcium-carbon deposits would occur in the system as has happened in other low rank coal conversion processes. An additional objective of major importance was to study the co-liquefaction of plastics with coal and waste tire rubber with coal.

Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Coal liquefaction in an inorganic-organic medium  

SciTech Connect

Improved process for liquefaction of coal by contacting pulverized coal in an inorganic-organic medium solvent system containing a ZnCl.sub.2 catalyst, a polar solvent with the structure RX where X is one of the elements O, N, S or P, and R is hydrogen or a lower hydrocarbon radical; the solvent system can contain a hydrogen donor solvent (and must when RX is water) which is immiscible in the ZnCl.sub.2 and is a hydroaromatic hydrocarbon, selected from tetralin, dihydrophenanthrene, dihydroanthracene or a hydrogenated coal derived hydroaromatic hydrocarbon distillate fraction.

Vermeulen, Theodore (Berkeley, CA); Grens, II, Edward A. (Danville, CA); Holten, Ronald R. (El Cerrito, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Evaluation of wastewater treatment requirements for thermochemical biomass liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass can provide a substantial energy source. Liquids are preferred for use as transportation fuels because of their high energy density and handling ease and safety. Liquid fuel production from biomass can be accomplished by any of several different processes including hydrolysis and fermentation of the carbohydrates to alcohol fuels, thermal gasification and synthesis of alcohol or hydrocarbon fuels, direct extraction of biologically produced hydrocarbons such as seed oils or algae lipids, or direct thermochemical conversion of the biomass to liquids and catalytic upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels. This report discusses direct thermochemical conversion to achieve biomass liquefaction and the requirements for wastewater treatment inherent in such processing. 21 refs.

Elliott, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Einstein-Jordan conundrum and its relation to ongoing foundational research in local quantum physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate the extraordinary modernity of the 1924/25 "Einstein-Jordan fluctuation conundrum", a Gedankenexperiment which led Jordan to his quantization of waves published as a separate section in the famous Born-Heisenberg-Jordan 1926 "Dreim\\"annerarbeit". The thermal nature of energy fluctuations caused by the restriction of the QFT vacuum to a subvolume remained unnoticed mainly because it is not present in QM. In order to understand the analogy with Einstein's fluctuation calculation in a thermal black body system, it is important to expose the mechanism which causes a global vacuum state to become impure on a localized subalgebra of QFT. The present work presents the fascinating history behind this problem which culminated in the more recent perception that "causal localization" leads to thermal manifestations. The most appropriate concept which places this property of QFT into the forefront is "modular localization". These new developments in QFT led to a new access to the existence problem for interacting quantum fields whose solution has remained outside the range of renormalized perturbation theory. It also clarifies open problems about the relation of particles and fields in particular about the incompletely understood crossing property. Last not least it leads to a constructive understanding of integrable versus non-integrable QFTs..

Bert Schroer

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

372

Comparison of Frames: Jordan vs Einstein Frame for a Non-minimal Dark Energy Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a dark energy model where a scalar field non-minimally coupled to gravity plays the role of the dark component. We compare cosmological consequences of this non-minimal coupling of the scalar field and gravity in the spirit of the dark energy paradigm in Jordan and Einstein frames. Some important issues such as phantom divide line crossing, existence of the bouncing solutions and the stability of the solutions are compared in these two frames. We show that while a non-minimally coupled scalar field in the Jordan frame is a suitable dark energy component with capability to realize phantom divide line crossing, its conformal transformation in the Einstein frame has not this capability. The conformal transformation from Jordan frame to Einstein frame transforms the equation of state parameter of the dark energy component to its minimal form with a redefined scalar field and in this case it is impossible to realize a phantom phase with possible crossing of the phantom divide line.

Kourosh Nozari; S. Davood Sadatian

2009-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

373

Detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and vicinity, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed gravity survey (comprising 231 stations over about 900 km/sup 2/) was made in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource area (KGRA) and vicinity, Millard and Beaver counties, Utah to assist in the appraisal of the potential of this area as a geothermal resource. The survey reinforced the results and information obtained in the previous regional gravity surveys comprising 522 stations. The gravity data from about 700 stations were reduced and compiled as a terrain-corrected (out to 20 km) Bouguer gravity anomaly map with 1-mgal contour interval. In August 1975, an aeromagnetic survey was flown over part of the survey area at a constant barometric elevation of 12,000 ft (3660 m). These aeromagnetic data are used to supplement the interpretation of the gravity data. The aeromagnetic field intensity residual anomaly map and the second-order polynomial residual aeromagnetic map (obtained by removing a second-order polynomial surface) are presented with a 20-gamma contour interval. Two north-south profiles and one east-west profile were selected for magnetic interpretative modeling. The two north-south profiles were also stacked and averaged over 6-km-wide strips and modeled. The occurrences of hydrothermal alteration, hot spring deposits, and flowing hot springs coincide with inferred fault zones. No evidence of extensive alteration can be interpreted from the magnetic data.

Cook, K.L.; Serpa, L.F.; Pe, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Liquefaction of calcium-containing subbituminous coals and coals of lower rank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the treatment of a calcium-containing subbituminous coal and coals of lower rank to form insoluble, thermally stable calcium salts which remain within the solids portions of the residue on liquefaction of the coal, thereby suppressing the formation scale, made up largely of calcium carbonate deposits, e.g., vaterite, which normally forms within the coal liquefaction reactor (i.e., coal liquefaction zone), e.g., on reactor surfaces, lines, auxiliary equipment and the like. A solution of a compound or salt characterized by the formula MX, where M is a Group IA metal of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X is an anion which is capable of forming water-insoluble, thermally stable calcium compounds, is maintained in contact with a particulate coal feed sufficient to impregnate said salt or compound into the pores of the coal. On separation of the impregnated particulate coal from the solution, the coal can be liquefied in a coal liquefaction reactor (reaction zone) at coal liquefaction conditions without significant formation of vaterite or other forms of calcium carbonate on reactor surfaces, auxiliary equipment and the like; and the Group IA metal which remains within the liquefaction bottoms catalyzes the reaction when the liquefaction bottoms are subjected to a gasification reaction.

Gorbaty, Martin L. (Sanwood, NJ); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 1, Base program activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstrate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process development, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, and development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this objective, novel analytical methods were evaluated for application to direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL teamed with 24 research groups in the program. Well-defined and characterized samples of coal liquefaction process-derived materials were provided to each group. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

This work is a fundamental study of catalytic pretreatments as a potential preconversion step to low-severity liquefaction. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide the basis for the design of an improved liquefaction process and to facilitate our understanding of those processes that occur when coals are initially dissolved. The main objectives of this project are to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on the subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank and influence of solvent will be examined. We have made significant progress in the following four aspects during this quarterly period: (1) influence of drying and oxidation of coal on the conversion and product distribution in catalytic liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous coal using a dispersed catalyst; (2) spectroscopic characterization of dried and oxidized Wyodak coal and the insoluble residues from catalytic and thermal liquefaction; (3) the structural alteration of low-rank coal in low-severity liquefaction with the emphasis on the oxygen-containing functional groups; and (4) effects of solvents and catalyst dispersion methods in temperature-programmed and non-programmed liquefaction of three low-rank coals.

Song, C.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.; Huang, L.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: FT-IR methods for characterization of coal liquefaction products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to demonstrate the use of two FTIR techniques for the analysis of direct coal liquefaction process-derived materials. The two methods were quantitative FTIR analysis and themogravimetric (TG) analysis with FTIR analysis of evolved products (TG-FTIR). The quantitative FTIR analyses of both whole resids and THF-soluble resids provided quantitation of total hydrogen, aliphatic and aromatic hydrogen, total carbon, total oxygen, hydroxyl and etheric oxygen, and ash contents. The FTIR results were usually in agreement with values derived by other, more conventional methods. However, the accuracies of specific measurements, in comparisons with results from conventional methods, ranged from good to poor. The TG-FTIR method provided approximate analyses of coals and resids. The data provided included the time dependent evolution profiles of the volatile species and the elemental composition of the char. Reproducible data of gaseous species and pyrolysis tar yields for whole resid samples larger than 10 mg were obtainable. The yields and evolution profiles of certain volatiles (tar, CO, and methane) provided structural information on the samples. There were some experimental and interpretational difficulties associated with both techniques. Optimization of the curve-resolving routine for coal-liquefaction samples would improve the quantitative FTIR accuracy. Aerosol formation limited the full application of the TG-FTIR technique with the THF-soluble resid samples. At this time, further development of these analytical methods as process development tools will be required before their use for that purpose can be recommended. The use of FTIR as an on-line analytical technique for coal liquefaction process streams requires demonstration before it can be recommended; however, such a demonstration may be warranted.

Serio, M.A.; Teng, H.; Bassilakis, R.; Solomon, P.R. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Two Stage Liquefaction With Illinois 6 Coal: Volume 3: Run 250  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 250 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run operated in a Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) mode using Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary run objective was demonstration of unit and system operability for bituminous coal in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) mode of operation. In CC-ITSL the products from the thermal (first stage) reactor are sent directly ...

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Subtask 3.9 - Direct Coal Liquefaction Process Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Accelergy Corporation, an advanced fuels developer with technologies exclusively licensed from ExxonMobil, undertook Subtask 3.9 to design, build, and preliminarily operate a bench-scale direct coal liquefaction (DCL) system capable of converting 45 pounds/hour of pulverized, dried coal to a liquid suitable for upgrading to fuels and/or chemicals. Fabrication and installation of the DCL system and an accompanying distillation system for off-line fractionation of raw coal liquids into 1) a naphtha?middle distillate stream for upgrading and 2) a recycle stream was completed in May 2012. Shakedown of the system was initiated in July 2012. In addition to completing fabrication of the DCL system, the project also produced a 500-milliliter sample of jet fuel derived in part from direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal, and submitted the sample to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright? Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, for evaluation. The sample was confirmed by AFRL to be in compliance with all U.S. Air Force-prescribed alternative aviation fuel initial screening criteria.

Aulich, Ted; Sharma, Ramesh

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Indirect thermal liquefaction process for producing liquid fuels from biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A progress report on an indirect liquefaction process to convert biomass type materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels by gasification followed by catalytic liquid fuels synthesis has been presented. A wide variety of feedstocks can be processed through the gasification system to a gas with a heating value of 500 + Btu/SCF. Some feedstocks are more attractive than others with regard to producing a high olefin content. This appears to be related to hydrocarbon content of the material. The H/sub 2//CO ratio can be manipulated over a wide range in the gasification system with steam addition. Some feedstocks require the aid of a water-gas shift catalyst while others appear to exhibit an auto-catalytic effect to achieve the conversion. H/sub 2/S content (beyond the gasification system wet scrubber) is negligible for the feedstocks surveyed. The water gas shift reaction appears to be enhanced with an increase in pyrolysis reactor temperature over the range of 1300 to 1700/sup 0/F. Reactor temperature in the Fischer-Tropsch step is a significant factor with regard to manipulating product composition analysis. The optimum temperature however will probably correspond to maximum conversion to liquid hydrocarbons in the C/sub 5/ - C/sub 17/ range. Continuing research includes integrated system performance assessment, alternative feedstock characterization (through gasification) and factor studies for gasification (e.g., catalyst usage, alternate heat transfer media, steam usage, recycle effects, residence time study) and liquefaction (e.g., improved catalysts, catalyst activity characterization).

Kuester, J.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. [High temperature soaking coal in coal liquids prior to liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

Soaking coal in coal liquids at 300-400[degrees]C (high-tenperature soaking) has been studied for coal dissolution prior to liquefaction in the previous task. Two high-volatile bituminous coals, Illinois No. 6 and Pittsburgh No. 8, were examined in three different coal liquids. The high-temperature soaking was effective to solubilize more than 70 wt% cf these coals. The mechanism of disintegration of coal by the high-temperature soaking was investigated under various soaking conditions. The products was also analyzed with solvent swelling. These results were rationalized that coal is solubilized primarily by physical disintegration. The derived mechanism was consistent with the new concept of coal structure: A significant portion of coal is physically associated, not three-dimensionally cross-linked. Radically-induced scission reactions were proposed to prorate breakage of coal moleculs by the combination of the high-temperature soaking before liquefaction. In this term, the effect of radical initiators were investigated under the conditions of the high-temperature soaking and liquefaction. Illinois No. 6 coal and a coal liquid derived from the same coal were used. The first section reports the effect of radical initiators on coal disintegration, and the second section reports the effect of a radical initiator on coal liquefaction. Radical initiators had a positive effect on disintegration. However, the effect was highly temperature-dependent and had a negative effect on liquefaction at high tenperatures.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: The preliminary evaluation of the kinetics of coal liquefaction distillation resid conversion  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluated the use of a novel laboratory-scale batch reactor, designed by the University of Delaware, to study the kinetics of coal liquefaction resid reactivity. The short time batch reactor (STBR) is capable of conducting reactions at temperatures up to 450{degrees}C and pressures up to 2500 psi at well-defined reaction times from a few seconds to 30 min or longer. Sixty experiments were conducted with the STBR in this project. The products of the resid/tetralin/hydrogen reaction were separated by solubility, and several analytical procedures were used to evaluate the reaction products, including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Changes were monitored in the boiling ranges of the products, as a function of process conditions (time, temperature, and tetralin donor solvent-to-resid ratio), with and without catalysts. Two distillation resid samples were studied; Sample 1 is the resid of the second stage product stream from Wilsonville Run 259 which used Pittsburgh seam coal (Ireland mine) bituminous coal, and Sample 2 is the resid of the same streak from Wilsonville Run 260 which used Wyodak and Anderson (Black Thunder Mine) subbituminous coal. It was determined that the resid reactivity was different for the two samples studied. The results demonstrate that further development of this experimental method is warranted to empirically assess resid reactivity and to provide data for use in the construction of an empirical model of coal conversion in the direct liquefaction process.

Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, He [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Characterization of coal liquefaction resids employing thermogravimetric analysis and electron spin resonance spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study demonstrated the feasibility of using temperature-programmed electron spin resonance (ESR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for the examination of tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. TGA is used to quantitate volatile losses in a temperature-programmed experiment. The TGA data are used to correct the free radical densities obtained by ESR as volatile material is evolved from the samples in the temperature-programmed ESR experiment. The techniques, when employed in tandem, can be used to determine the content and nature of the free radicals in the samples at temperatures approximating those used in the liquefaction process. TGA and ESR experiments were performed in flowing nitrogen and hydrogen, at ambient pressure. No significant difference was observed in the ESR spectra in the different atmospheres, except in the case of low-rank coal-derived resids. The TGA results, however, were systematically different; mass loss in an H{sub 2} atmosphere is consistently higher than that observed in an N{sub 2} atmosphere. It was shown that temperature-programmed ESR, which can pinpoint conditions at which the free radical content is the highest, has potential to be a guide for the appropriate choice of conditions for optimum resid upgrading. Further development of these combined analytical methods as process development tools appears justified based on these results.

Ibrahim, M.M.; Seehra, M.S. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Physics

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II  

SciTech Connect

Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Operation of the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of a hydrotreater launched the development of two-stage liquefaction at the Wilsonville test facility. This and other research undertaken during 1981 accelerated progress toward the production of high-quality, economical coal-derived liquid fuels.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Subtask 3.3 - Feasibility of Direct Coal Liquefaction in the Modern Economic Climate  

SciTech Connect

Coal liquefaction provides an alternative to petroleum for the production of liquid hydrocarbon-based fuels. There are two main processes to liquefy coal: direct coal liquefaction (DCL) and indirect coal liquefaction (ICL). Because ICL has been demonstrated to a greater extent than DCL, ICL may be viewed as the lower-risk option when it comes to building a coal liquefaction facility. However, a closer look, based on conversion efficiencies and economics, is necessary to determine the optimal technology. This report summarizes historical DCL efforts in the United States, describes the technical challenges facing DCL, overviews Shenhua's current DCL project in China, provides a DCL conceptual cost estimate based on a literature review, and compares the carbon dioxide emissions from a DCL facility to those from an ICL facility.

Benjamin Oster; Joshua Strege; Marc Kurz; Anthony Snyder; Melanie Jensen

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

The role of recycle oil in direct coal liquefaction process development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has long been recognized that use of a recycle oil is a convenient and perhaps necessary feature of a practical direct coal liquefaction process. The recycle oil performs a number of important functions. It serves as a vehicle to convey coal into the liquefaction reactor and products from the reactor. It is a medium for mass and heat transfer among the solid, liquid, and gaseous components of the reactor inventory. It can act as a reactant or intermediate in the liquefaction process. Therefore, the nature of the recycle oil can have a determining effect on process configuration and performance, and the characterization of recycle oil composition and chemistry has been the subject of considerable interest. This paper discusses recycle oil characterization and its influence on the industrial development of coal liquefaction technology,

Burke, F.P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Contributions to the analysis and mitigation of liquefaction in loose sand slopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research analyzes the vulnerability of loose granular waterfront fills to liquefaction in seismic events and considers the effectiveness of Pre-fabricated Vertical (PV) drain systems in mitigating potential damage. ...

Vytiniotis, Antonios

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

ZINC CHLORIDE CATALYSIS IN COAL AND BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION AT PREPYROLYSIS TEMPERATURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bodily, Stanford Res Inst. , Coal Chemistry Workshop, 1,News, (Aug. 27, 1979). C2 Coal Processing-Gasification,L.W. Vernon, and E.L. Wilson, Coal Liquefaction by the Exxon

Onu, Christopher O.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Hydrothermal pretreatment to prevent scale during liquefaction of certain solid carbonaceous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by hydrothermal pretreatment. The said pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding carbonate prior to liquefaction. The said pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 1000 to about 4400 psia. Temperature during said pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 500.degree. to about 700.degree. F.

Stone, John B. (Houston, TX); Floyd, Frank M. (Baytown, TX)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-temperature catalytic pretreatment is a promising approach to the development of an improved liquefaction process- This work is a fundamental study on effects of pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. The main objectives of this project are to study the coal structural changes induced by low-temperature catalytic and thermal pretreatments by using spectroscopic techniques; and to clarify the pretreatment-induced changes in reactivity or convertibility of coals in the subsequent liquefaction. This report describes the recent progress of our work. Substantial progress has been made in the spectroscopic characterization of structure and pretreatment-liquefaction reactions of a Montana subbituminous Coal (DECS-9), and thermochemical analysis of three mw and reacted bituminous coals. Temperature programmed liquefaction has been performed on three low-rank coals both in the presence and absence of dispersed molybdenum sulfide catalyst. We also performed a detailed study of the effects of mild thermal pretreatment -- drying in air and in vacuum -- on thermal and catalytic liquefaction of a Wyodak subbituminous coal. Important information on structure and structure transformation during thermal pretreatment and liquefaction reactions of low-rank coals has been derived by applying solid-state CPMAS [sup 13]C NMR and flash pyrolysis-GC-MS (Py-GC-MS) for characterization of the macromolecular network of a Montana subbituminous coal and its residues from temperature-programmed and nonprogrammed liquefaction (TPL and N-PL) at final temperatures ranging from 300 to 425[degree]C in H-donor and non-donor solvents. The results revealed that this coal contains significant quantities of oxygen-bearing structures, corresponding to about 18 O-bound C per 100 C atoms and one O-bound C per every 5 to 6 aromatic C.

Song, C.; Saini, A.K.; Huang, L.; Wenzel, K.; Hou, L.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Two Stage Liquefaction With Illinois 6 Coal: Volume 1: Run 247  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 247 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run operated in a Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) mode using Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary run objective was to obtain performance data for the TSL system and the individual process units with particular emphasis on hydrotreating catalyst performance. Secondary objectives were to demonstrate operability for the system and the respective ...

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Freedom of expression in Jordan: a critical study of themes and issues based on an evaluation of influences on the development of the press and publication laws in Jordan since 1920, with particular emphasis on government pressures and censorship of weekly newspapers between 1989 and 1998.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis considers the major factors that influenced the development of the printed press in Jordan between 1920 and 1998. Amongst the many influences and… (more)

Elananza, Azzam A.H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

On Dark Energy, Weyl Geometry and Brans-Dicke-Jordan Scalar Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review firstly why Weyl’s Geometry, within the context of Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmological models, can account for both the origins and the value of the observed vacuum energy density (dark energy). The source of dark energy is just the dilaton-like Jordan-Brans-Dicke scalar field that is required to implement Weyl invariance of the most simple of all possible actions. A nonvanishing value of the vacuum energy density of the order of 10 ?123 M 4 P lanck is derived in agreement with the experimental observations. Next, a Jordan-Brans-Dicke gravity model within the context of ordinary Riemannian geometry, yields also the observed vacuum energy density (cosmological constant) to very high precision. One finds that the temporal flow of the scalar field ?(t) in ordinary Riemannian geometry, from t = 0 to t = to, has the same numerical effects (as far as the vacuum energy density is concerned) as if there were Weyl scalings from the field configuration ?(t), to the constant field configuration ?o, in Weyl geometry. Hence, Weyl scalings in Weyl geometry can recapture the flow of time which is consistent with Segal’s Conformal Cosmology, in such a fashion that an expanding universe may be visualized as Weyl scalings of a static universe. The main novel result of this work is that one is able to reproduce the observed vacuum energy density to such a degree of precision 10 ?123 M 4 P lanck, while still having a Big-Bang singularity at t = 0 when the vacuum energy density blows up. This temporal flow of the vacuum energy density, from very high values in the past, to very small values today, is not a numerical coincidence but is the signal of an underlying Weyl geometry (conformal invariance) operating in cosmology, combined with the dynamics of a Brans-Dicke-Jordan scalar field.

Carlos Castro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Low-Cost Methane Liquefaction Plant and Vehicle Refueling Station  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is currently negotiating a collaborative effort with Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) that will advance the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a vehicle fuel. We plan to develop and demonstrate a small-scale methane liquefaction plant (production of 5,000 to 10,000 gallons per day) and a low-cost ($150,000) LNG refueling station to supply fuel to LNG-powered transit buses and other heavy-duty vehicles. INEEL will perform the research and development work. PG&E will deploy the new facilities commercially in two demonstration projects, one in northern California, and one in southern California.

B. Wilding; D. Bramwell

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October-December 1978  

SciTech Connect

DOE's program for the conversion of coal to liquid fuels was begun by two of DOE's predecessor agencies: Office of Coal Research (OCR) in 1962, and ERDA. The Bureau of Mines, US Department of the Interior, had started work in the 1930's. Current work is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and noncatalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, especially boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, and gasoline, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquids have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To provide efficient and practical means of utilizing coal resources, DOE is supporting the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. Each of these processes are described briefly.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Upgrading of coal liquefaction feedstock by selective agglomeration  

SciTech Connect

The technical feasibility study of using selective agglomeration (with coal-derived oil) to upgrade Illinois No. 6 coal for a liquefaction feedstock was completed. Effects of coal particle size, slurry pH, oil-to-coal ratio, and operating temperature on mineral matter reduction, clean coal weight recovery, and clean coal moisture content were studied. The addition of coal-derived naphtha or kerosene as conditioners to increase hydrophobicity and recovery of coal was also investigated. Results showed that approximately 70% of the mineral matter could be removed from this coal at a clean coal weight recovery of over 85% by grinding the coal to a mean volume diameter of about 10 microns and properly selecting of the operation variables.

Lai, R.; Sinha, K.; Richardson, A.; Killmeyer, R.; Utz, B.; Hickey, R.; Cillo, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Changes in hydrogen utilization with temperature during direct coal liquefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reliable means of monitoring the major pathways of hydrogen utilization, in contrast to only measuring net hydrogen comsumption, would be very useful for process optimization. The goal of this work was to develop an analytical approach for quantitatively distinguishing hydrogen consumed in hydrogenation from that utilized to stabilize thermolysis fragments. The approach outlined yields a rather detailed description of the net utilization of hydrogen during direct liquefaction, partitioning it into contributions from gas generation, heteroatom removal, hydrogenation, and matrix breakdown. Preliminary results indicate that internal hydrogen reorganization, with little consumption, predominates at low temperatures, with hydrogenation being compensated for by the hydrogen liberated in condensations. As the temperature is increased, bond cleavage reactions and aromatization reactions appear to become more important, and the net hydrogen consumption increases. (3 tables 1 figs., 11 refs.)

Finseth, D.H.; Bockrath, B.C.; Cillo, D.L.; Illig, E.G.; Sprecher, R.F., Retcofsky, H.L.; Lett, R.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Pending Long-Term Applications to Export LNG to Non-FTA Countries - Listed in Order DOE Will Commence Processing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Applications to Export LNG to Non-FTA Countries - Listed in Order DOE Will Commence Processing Long-Term Applications to Export LNG to Non-FTA Countries - Listed in Order DOE Will Commence Processing Order to Be Processed Company DOE/FE Docket No. Date DOE Application Filed FERC Pre-Filing Docket No. Date Applicant Received FERC Approval to Begin Pre-Filing Process 1 Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC 10-161-LNG 12/17/2010 PF11-2 1/5/2011 2 Lake Charles Exports, LLC 11-59-LNG 5/6/2011 PF12-8 4/6/2012 3 Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP 11-128-LNG 10/3/2011 PF12-16 6/26/2012 4 Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC 11-161-LNG 12/19/2011 PF11-2 1/5/2011 5 Cameron LNG, LLC 11-162-LNG 12/21/2011 PF12-13 5/9/2012 6 Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P. 12-32-LNG 3/23/2012 PF12-7 3/6/2012 7 LNG Development Company, LLC (d/b/a Oregon LNG) 12-77-LNG 7/16/2012 PF12-18

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Light-stable-isotope studies of spring and thermal waters from the Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort/Sulphurdale Thermal areas and of clay minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The isotopic compositions of hydrogen and oxygen have been determined for spring waters and thermal fluids from the Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale thermal areas, for clay mineral separates from shallow alteration of the acid-sulfate type in the Roosevelt Hot Springs area, and for spring and well waters from the Goshen Valley area of central Utah. The water analyses in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area confirm the origin of the thermal fluids from meteoric water in the Mineral Range. The water analyses in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale thermal area restrict recharge areas for this system to the upper elevations of the Pavant and/or Tushar Ranges. The low /sup 18/O shift observed in these thermal fluids (+0.7 permil) implies either high water/rock ratios or incomplete isotope exchange or both, and further suggests minimal interaction between the thermal fluid and marble country rock in the system. Hydrogen and oxygen-isotope data for clay mineral separates from shallow alteration zones in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal system suggest that the fluids responsible for the shallow acid-sulfate alteration were in part derived from condensed steam produced by boiling of the deep reservoir fluid. The isotope evidence supports the chemical model proposed by Parry et al. (1980) for origin of the acid-sulfate alteration at Roosevelt Hot Springs. The isotope analyses of spring and well waters from the Goshen Valley area indicate only a general correlation of isotope composition, salinity and chemical temperatures.

Bowman, J.R.; Rohrs, D.T.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Medical waste management in Jordan: A study at the King Hussein Medical Center  

SciTech Connect

As in many other developing countries, the generation of regulated medical waste (RMW) in Jordan has increased significantly over the last few decades. Despite the serious impacts of RMW on humans and the environment, only minor attention has been directed to its proper handling and disposal. This study was conducted in the form of a case study at one of Jordan's leading medical centers, namely, the King Hussein Medical Center (KHMC). Its purpose was to report on the current status of medical waste management at KHMC and propose possible measures to improve it. In general, it was found that the center's administration was reasonably aware of the importance of medical waste management and practiced some of the measures to adequately handle waste generated at the center. However, it was also found that significant voids were present that need to be addressed in the future including efficient segregation, the use of coded and colored bags, better handling and transfer means, and better monitoring and tracking techniques, as well as the need for training and awareness programs for the personnel.

Oweis, Rami [Biomedical Engineering Department, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan)]. E-mail: oweis@just.edu.jo; Al-Widyan, Mohamad [Biosystems Engineering Department, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan)]. E-mail: widyan@just.edu.jo; Al-Limoon, Ohood [Biomedical Engineering Department, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan)]. E-mail: oweis@just.edu.jo

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Gravitational wave astronomy: the definitive test for the "Einstein frame versus Jordan frame" controversy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential realization of a gravitational wave (GW) astronomy in next years is a great challenge for the scientific community. By giving a significant amount of new information, GWs will be a cornerstone for a better understanding of the universe and of the gravitational physics. In this paper the author shows that the GW astronomy will permit to solve a captivating issue of gravitation as it will be the definitive test for the famous "Einstein frame versus Jordan frame" controversy. In fact, we show that the motion of the test masses, i.e. the beam splitter and the mirror in the case of an interferometer, which is due to the scalar component of a GW, is different in the two frames. Thus, if a consistent GW astronomy will be realized, an eventual detection of signals of scalar GWs will permit to discriminate among the two frames. In this way, a direct evidence from observations will solve in an ultimate way the famous and long history of the "Einstein frame versus Jordan frame" controversy.

Christian Corda

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

404

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/8: Cooperative Border Security for Jordan: Assessment and Options  

SciTech Connect

This document is an analysis of options for unilateral and cooperative action to improve the security of Jordan's borders. Sections describe the current political, economic, and social interactions along Jordan's borders. Next, the document discusses border security strategy for cooperation among neighboring countries and the adoption of confidence-building measures. A practical cooperative monitoring system would consist of hardware for early warning, command and control, communications, and transportation. Technical solutions can expand opportunities for the detection and identification of intruders. Sensors (such as seismic, break-wire, pressure-sensing, etc.) can warn border security forces of intrusion and contribute to the identification of the intrusion and help formulate the response. This document describes conceptual options for cooperation, offering three scenarios that relate to three hypothetical levels (low, medium, and high) of cooperation. Potential cooperative efforts under a low cooperation scenario could include information exchanges on military equipment and schedules to prevent misunderstandings and the establishment of protocols for handling emergency situations or unusual circumstances. Measures under a medium cooperation scenario could include establishing joint monitoring groups for better communications, with hot lines and scheduled meetings. The high cooperation scenario describes coordinated responses, joint border patrols, and sharing border intrusion information. Finally, the document lists recommendations for organizational, technical, and operational initiatives that could be applicable to the current situation.

Qojas, M.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art  

SciTech Connect

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, Oregon, houses a remarkable permanent collection of Asian art and antiquities, modern art, and sculpture, and also hosts traveling exhibitions. In the winter and spring of 2011, a series of digital photographs by artist Chris Jordan, titled "Running the Numbers," was exhibited in the Coeta and Donald Barker Special Exhibitions Gallery. These works graphically illustrate waste (energy, money, health, consumer objects, etc.) in contemporary culture. The Bonneville Power Administration and the Eugene Water and Electricity Board provided a set of Cree 12W light-emitting diode (LED) PAR38 replacement lamps (Cree LRP38) for the museum to test for accent lighting in lieu of their standard Sylvania 90W PAR38 130V Narrow Flood lamps (which draw 78.9W at 120V). At the same time, the museum tested LED replacement lamps from three other manufacturers, and chose the Cree lamp as the most versatile and most appropriate color product for this exhibit. The lamps were installed for the opening of the show in January 2011. This report describes the process for the demonstration, the energy and economic results, and results of a survey of the museum staff and gallery visitors on four similar clusters of art lighted separately by four PAR38 lamps.

Miller, Naomi J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A Model Simulation of the Summer Circulation from the Eastern Mediterranean past Lake Kinneret in the Jordan Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is described for the representation and study of air flow from the eastern Mediterranean (on the west side of the model's domain) past Lake Kinneret in the Jordan Valley (about 210 m below MSL) and beyond to the east (on the east side of ...

P. Alpert; A. Cohen; J. Neumann; E. Doron

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Pending LT LNG Export Apps (12-6-13).xlsx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Current Current Processing Position Company DOE/FE Docket No. 1 Cameron LNG, LLC 11-162-LNG 2 Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P. 12-32-LNG 3 LNG Development Company, LLC (d/b/a Oregon LNG) 12-77-LNG 4 Cheniere Marketing, LLC 12-97-LNG 5 Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions I, LLC 12-146-LNG 6 Carib Energy (USA) LLC 11-141-LNG 7 Gulf Coast LNG Export, LLC 12-05-LNG 8 Southern LNG Company, L.L.C. 12-100-LNG 9 Gulf LNG Liquefaction Company, LLC 12-101-LNG 10 CE FLNG, LLC 12-123-LNG 11 Golden Pass Products LLC 12-156-LNG 12 Pangea LNG (North America) Holdings, LLC 12-184-LNG 13 Trunkline LNG Export, LLC 13-04-LNG 14 Freeport-McMoRan Energy LLC 13-26-LNG 15 Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC 13-30-LNG 16 Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC 13-42-LNG 17 Venture Global LNG, LLC 13-69-LNG 18 Eos LNG LLC 13-116-LNG 19 Barca LNG LLC

408

Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1992--December 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reactivity of the THF insoluble fraction of the ashy resid component of Wilsonville recycle oil (WRO) during liquefaction of Black Thunder coal in tetralin was determined at 415{degrees}C and 60 minutes. The liquefaction runs were made by combining this material with Black Thunder coal at the same ratio used in the WRO coal runs. THF conversion and product distribution from liquefaction in tetralin in the presence of the THF insoluble fraction of the ashy resid were similar to results from liquefaction in WRO. THF conversion was greater than loot with an oil yield that was somewhat higher than in WRO. Differences in HC gas yield and H{sub 2} consumption were slight, while conversion and product distribution from liquefaction of Black Thunder coal in tetralin or in the WRO distillate were quite different. In both these solvents the 85--86% THF conversions were less than for runs in which the THF insoluble fraction of the ashy resid was present. This establishes that the THF insoluble fraction of the ashy resid is the reactive fraction of the WRO.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

Improved coal liquefaction was reinvestigated for the current two-stage process on the basis of the associated molecular nature of coal. Since a significant portion of coal molecules are physically associated as pointed in our recent paper, physical dissolution should be considered. The step-wise, high-temperature soaking is a simple and effective method for coal dissolution. Larger dissolution makes liquefaction severity lower. Broad molecular mass distribution in the associated coal was another important factor. The selective reaction of fractions with high molecular weight isolated after the high-temperature soaking makes gas yield lower. Tests using an autoclave by the concept shown in Figure 5 enabled to more oil and 15-20% less gas yields. It is expected that the procedure will result in great cost reduction in coal liquefaction.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Co-conversion of coal/waste plastic mixtures under various pyrolysis and liquefaction conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For strategic and economic reasons the conversion of coal to liquid fuels has been a constant goal of the coal science community. Although the economics of coal liquefaction are primarily governed by the price of crude oil, other factors such as the need for large quantities of hydrogen gas, play an important role. If methods could be found that reduce the amount of hydrogen gas required for liquefaction, considerable benefits would be realized. To explore this possibility the use of waste plastics as materials capable of upgrading coal into liquid fuel products has been investigated. The use of waste plastics for this purpose could become possible because over 30 million tons of synthetic polymer material is produced in the United States every year. In this study, several pyrolysis and liquefaction experiment were performed on an Illinois No. 6 coal and coal/plastic blends.

Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.; Tandon, D.; Blankenship, M. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Section 1 contains a report of the progress by the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research on the following tasks: laboratory support (liquefaction in dewaxed and hydrotreated dewaxed solvent); CO pretreatment (effect of process variables on CO pretreatment, CO-pretreated product characterization, and liquefaction results); and iron based dispersed catalysts (production, characterization and testing of sulfated hematites and reaction model development). Section 2 contains a progress report by CONSOL, Inc. on the following tasks: laboratory support; pretreatment work on dewaxing; pretreatment work on agglomeration; and economic evaluation. Progress by Sandia National Laboratories is reported in Section 3 on the following: laboratory support (TGA methods) and solvent pretreatment (coker tar hydrogenation and coal liquefaction results). Section 4 gives a preliminary technical assessment by LDP Associates on the following: baseline economic assessment; assessment of improved coal conversion; and fluid coking.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature- staged liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The general objectives of this research are (1) to investigate the use of highly dispersed catalysts for the pretreatment of coal by mild hydrogenation, (2) to identify the active forms of the catalysts under reaction conditions and (3) to clarify the mechanisms of catalysis. The ultimate objective is to ascertain if mild catalytic hydrogenation resulting in very limited or no coal solubilization is an advantageous pretreatment for the transformation of coal into transportable fuels. The experimental program will focus upon the development of effective methods of impregnating coal with catalysts, evaluating the conditions under which the catalysts are most active and establishing the relative impact of improved impregnation on conversion and product distributions obtained from coal hydrogenation. Liquefaction experiments of solvent-treated and untreated Blind Canyon (DECS-6) and Texas lignite (DECS-1) have been performed using ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (ATTM) and bis (dicarbonylcyclopentadienyl) iron (CPI) as catalyst precursors using temperature-staged conditions (275{degrees}C, 30 min; 425{degrees}C, 30 min). Solid state {sup 13}C NMR analysis was carried out for each coal and for selected residues. 12 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Opportunities for reducing product costs in indirect liquefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MITRE indirect liquefaction simulation model for the advanced configuration that includes Shell gasification and slurry-phase F-T synthesis was downsized to coincide with the Bechtel/Amoco conceptual plant with a nominal capacity of 50,000 barrels per stream day. Then the kinetic parameters used by Bechtel/Amoco in the slurry F-T model were substituted in the model. This resulted in the same per pass conversion and in the same number of reactors as estimated in the Bechtel basecase. The total capital cost for this plant was estimated to be $2982 million using the MITRE model. This agrees well with the preliminary Bechtel/Amoco capital cost of $2961 million for the same size plant(3). Once the WM simulation of the basecase plant was shown to be in agreement with the Bechtel/Amoco case, the analysis of further potential cost reductions beyond the basecase could be investigated. This analysis only investigated the potential cost reductions that could result from improvements in the F-T area of the conceptual plant. This is the area that is impacted by the research and development underway in the indirect program. The cost impact of the following potential improvements were investigated using the MITRE simulation model: Doubling the baseline catalyst activity; doubling the catalyst loading; and doubling the superficial gas velocity.

Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.; ElSawy, A. [Mitre Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF COAL LIQUEFACTION PROCESS STREAMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the Technical Progress Report for the fifteenth quarter of activities under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC93054. It covers the period January 1 through March 31, 1998. Described in this report are the following activities: (1) CONSOL characterized 41 process stream samples obtained from HTI Run PB-01 (227-90), in which Black Thunder Mine coal, Hondo VTB resid, municipal solid waste (MSW) plastics, and virgin plastics were co-liquefaction feedstocks with all-dispersed Fe and Mo catalysts. (2) A request was made for samples from the Nippon Coal Oil NEDOL pilot plant in Kashima, Japan. (3) Phenols were extracted from two samples of separator overhead oil from HTI Run PB-03 Periods 10A and 10B. The phenols were converted to ethylphenyl ethers, and the ethers were distilled to produce a sample within the diesel fuel boiling range. The ethers were mixed with diesel fuel to make 1%, 5%, 10%, and 20% solutions. The four mixtures and a control sample (0% ether) were tested for diesel fuel properties by Intertek Testing Services, Caleb Brett. (4) Computational studies related to the University of Delaware's resid conversion model were continued on the Hewlett Packard Apollo HP-735 RISC workstation at CONSOL R and D. The Structure Optimization Program and the Structure Once-Through Program were used to generate physicochemical properties and structure models for the 15 coal resid samples which have been under study.

G.A. Robbins; S.D. Brandes; D.J. Pazuchanics; D.G. Nichols; R.A. Winschel

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

SUMMARY REPORT OF THE DOE DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT CAMPAIGN OF THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY  

SciTech Connect

Following the petroleum price and supply disruptions of 1973, the U.S. government began a substantial program to fund the development of alternative fuels. Direct coal liquefaction was one of the potential routes to alternative fuels. The direct coal liquefaction program was funded at substantial levels through 1982, and at much lower levels thereafter. Those processes that were of most interest during this period were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels. By 1999, U.S. government funding for the development of direct coal liquefaction ended. Now that the end of this campaign has arrived, it is appropriate to summarize the process learnings derived from it. This report is a summary of the process learnings derived from the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development campaign of the late twentieth century. The report concentrates on those process development programs that were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels and were largely funded by DOE and its predecessors in response to the petroleum supply and price disruptions of the 1970s. The report is structured as chapters written by different authors on most of the major individual DOE-funded process development programs. The focus of the report is process learnings, as opposed to, say, fundamental coal liquefaction science or equipment design. As detailed in the overview (Chapter 2), DOE's direct coal liquefaction campaign made substantial progress in improving the process yields and the quality of the distillate product. Much of the progress was made after termination by 1983 of the major demonstration programs of the ''first generation'' (SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS) processes.

F.P. Burke; S.D. Brandes; D.C. McCoy; R.A. Winschel; D. Gray; G. Tomlinson

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

MATERIALS PHYSICS AND PROCESSING (MPP) Project Team: J.L. Jordan-Sweet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MATERIALS PHYSICS AND PROCESSING (MPP) MATERIALS PHYSICS AND PROCESSING (MPP) Project Team: J.L. Jordan-Sweet 1 , V. Kiryukhin 2 , C. Lavoie 1 , C.E. Murray 1 , C.S. Nelson 3 , I.C. Noyan 4 1 IBM Research Division, 2 Rutgers University, 3 Brookhaven National Laboratory, 4 Columbia University TECHNIQUES AND CAPABILITIES APPLICATIONS SPECIFIC PROJECTS / ADDITIONAL INFORMATION * High-throughput, real-time, in-situ rapid thermal annealing (RTA) studies of structural changes in thin films, film stacks, and nanopatterned samples: * Phase transformations, texture changes, barrier failure, interfacial roughening, etc. * X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scattering techniques on solids, including thin films, stacks, nanopatterned samples, magnetic and strongly correlated systems, and bulk materials. Capability for

417

Evolution of primordial black holes in Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the evolution of primordial black holes in a generalyzed Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmological model where both the Brans-Dicke scalar field and its coupling to gravity are dynamical functions determined from the evolution equations. The evaporation rate for the black holes changes compared to that in standard cosmology. We show that accretion of radiation can proceed effectively in the radiation dominated era. The black hole lifetime shortens for low initial mass, but increases for high initial mass, and is thus considerably modified compared to the case of standard cosmology. We derive a cut-off value for the initial black hole mass, below which primordial black holes evaporate out in the radiation dominated era, and above which they survive beyond the present era.

A. S. Majumdar; D. Gangopadhyay; L. P. Singh

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

Near-infrared reflectance analysis by Gauss-Jordan linear algebra  

SciTech Connect

Near-infrared reflectance analysis is an analytical technique that uses the near-infrared diffuse reflectance of a sample at several discrete wavelengths to predict the concentration of one or more of the chemical species in that sample. However, because near-infrared bands from solid samples are both abundant and broad, the reflectance at a given wavelength usually contains contributions from several sample components, requiring extensive calculations on overlapped bands. In the present study, these calculations have been performed using an approach similar to that employed in multi-component spectrophotometry, but with Gauss-Jordan linear algebra serving as the computational vehicle. Using this approach, correlations for percent protein in wheat flour and percent benzene in hydrocarbons have been obtained and are evaluated. The advantages of a linear-algebra approach over the common one employing stepwise regression are explored.

Honigs, D.E.; Freelin, J.M.; Hieftje, G.M.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Spherically symmetric Jordan-Brans-Dicke quantum gravity with de Broglie Bohm pilot wave perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain two dimensional analogue of the Jordan-Brans-Dicke (JBD) gravity action described in four dimensional spherically symmetric curved space time metric. There will be two scalar fields, namely, the Brans Dicke (BD) $\\phi$ and scale factor of 2-sphere part of the space time $\\psi.$ There is obtained a suitable duality transformation between $(\\psi,\\phi)$ and $(\\rho,S)$ where $\\rho$ and $S$ are respectively amplitude and phase part of the corresponding de Broglie pilot wave function $\\Psi(\\rho,S)=\\sqrt{\\rho}e^{iS}.$ There is established covariant conservation of mass-energy current density of particles ensemble $J_a=\\rho\\partial_aS,$ in a particular dynamical conformal frame described by $(\\rho,S).$

Hossein Ghaffarnejad

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

420

Two Stage Liquefaction With Illinois 6 Coal: Volume 2: Run 248  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 248 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run began on 8 February 1985 and continued through 5 May 1985. A total of 170 tons of Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal was fed in 1,904 hours of operation. The primary run objectives included the demonstration of unit and system operability for bituminous coal with the low-contact time (LCT) reactor in place at the thermal liquefaction unit (TLU) in both the Double Integrated T...

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Middle East and Central Asia Department Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Working Paper should not be reported as representing the views of the IMF. The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the IMF or IMF policy. Working Papers describe research in progress by the author(s) and are published to elicit comments and to further debate. This paper extends the long-run growth model of Esfahani et al. (2009) to a labor exporting country that receives large inflows of external income—the sum of remittances, FDI and general government transfers—from major oil-exporting economies. The theoretical model predicts real oil prices to be one of the main long-run drivers of real output. Using quarterly data between 1979 and 2009 on core macroeconomic variables for Jordan and a number of key foreign variables, we identify two long-run relationships: an output equation as predicted by theory and an equation linking foreign and domestic inflation rates. It is shown that real output in the long run is shaped by: (i) oil prices through their impact on external income and in turn on capital accumulation, and (ii) technological transfers through foreign output. The empirical analysis of the paper confirms the hypothesis that a large share of Jordan's output volatility can be associated with fluctuations in net income received from abroad. External factors, however, cannot be relied upon to provide similar growth stimuli in the future, and therefore it will be important to diversify the sources of growth in order to achieve a high and sustained level of income.

Prepared Kamiar Mohaddes; Mehdi Raissi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 10120 of 28,905 results. 11 - 10120 of 28,905 results. Download EIS-0489: Notice of Additional Public Scoping Meetings Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR) http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0489-notice-additional-public-scoping-meetings Article Summary of Decisions- October 8, 2012 - October 12, 2012 Decisions were issued on: - Freedom of Information Act Appeal - Personnel Security (10 CFR Part 710) http://energy.gov/oha/articles/summary-decisions-october-8-2012-october-12-2012 Download Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter http://energy.gov/fe/downloads/methane-hydrate-advisory-committee-charter Download Query http://energy.gov/management/downloads/query

423

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 1510 of 26,777 results. 01 - 1510 of 26,777 results. Article DOE Funds 21 Research, Development and Demonstration Projects for up to $78 Million to Promote Enhanced Geothermal Systems RENO, Nev. - Today at the National Geothermal Conference in Reno, Nev., Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy Steve Chalk announced the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) awards under a... http://energy.gov/articles/doe-funds-21-research-development-and-demonstration-projects-78-million-promote-enhanced Download Responses by CPower, Inc. to DOE RFI http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/responses-cpower-inc-doe-rfi Download EIS-0489: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, Oregon) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties,

424

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 3270 of 28,905 results. 61 - 3270 of 28,905 results. Download EIS-0421: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Project, Wasco County, OR and Klickitat County, WA http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0421-epa-notice-availability-final-environmental-impact-statement Download EIS-0489: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, Oregon) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, Oregon) http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0489-notice-intent-prepare-environmental-impact-statement Download Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view

425

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 17400 of 28,905 results. 91 - 17400 of 28,905 results. Download Audit Report: IG-0568 Remote Access To Unclassified Information Systems http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-ig-0568 Download EIS-0489: Notice of Comment Period Extension and Additional Scoping Meetings Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR) http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0489-notice-comment-period-extension-and-additional-scoping-meetings Article DOE's 2012 Facility Rep of the Year Supports EM AIKEN, S.C. - John Barnes, a Savannah River Site (SRS) employee who works in EM's Cold War cleanup program, was recently honored as the 2012 DOE Facility Representative (FR) of the Year. http://energy.gov/em/articles/does-2012-facility-rep-year-supports-em

426

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 7330 of 26,764 results. 21 - 7330 of 26,764 results. Download EIS-0489: Notice of Comment Period Extension and Additional Scoping Meetings Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR) http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0489-notice-comment-period-extension-and-additional-scoping-meetings Download EIS Distribution This DOE guidance presents a series of recommendations related to the EIS distribution process, which includes creating and updating a distribution list, distributing an EIS, and filing an EIS with the EPA. http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-distribution Download EA-1947: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment and Cancellation of an Environmental Impact Statement

427

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Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 6100 of 9,640 results. 91 - 6100 of 9,640 results. Download FIA-12-0040- In the Matter of Idaho Conservation League The Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision granting in part an appeal from a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) determination issued by the Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/fia-12-0040-matter-idaho-conservation-league Download EIS-0489: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, Oregon) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, Oregon) http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0489-notice-intent-prepare-environmental-impact-statement Download EA-1001: Final Environmental Assessment Commercialization of the Mound Plant

428

The Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The investigation of various Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) process configurations was conducted at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility between July 1982 and September 1986. The facility combines three process units. There are the liquefaction unit, either thermal (TLU) or catalytic, for the dissolution of coal, the Critical Solvent Deashing unit (CSD) for the separation of ash and undissolved coal, and a catalytic hydrogenation unit (HTR) for product upgrading and recycle process solvent replenishment. The various TSL process configurations were created by changing the process sequence of these three units and by recycling hydrotreated solvents between the units. This report presents a description of the TSL configurations investigated and an analysis of the operating and performance data from the period of study. Illinois No. 6 Burning Star Mine coal Wyodak Clovis Point Mine coal were processed. Cobalt-molybdenum and disposable iron-oxide catalysts were used to improve coal liquefaction reactions and nickel-molybdenum catalysts were used in the hydrotreater. 28 refs., 31 figs., 13 tabs.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Separating liquid and solid products of liquefaction of coal or like carbonaceous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Slurryform products of coal liquefaction are treated with caustic soda in presence of H.sub.2 O in an inline static mixer and then the treated product is separated into a solids fraction and liquid fractions, including liquid hydrocarbons, by gravity settling preferably effected in a multiplate settling separator with a plurality of settling spacings.

Malek, John M. (P.O. Box 71, Lomita, CA 90717)

1979-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

430

Determination of unconverted HDPE in coal/plastics co-liquefaction stream samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In several coal/plastics liquefaction runs performed by Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI), a substantial amount of incompletely converted high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was present in ash-free recycle resid streams when either the ROSE-SR unit was used in Run POC-2, or the pressure filter unit was used in Runs CMSL-8 and CMSL-9. This indicates that the HDPE is less reactive than coal at the liquefaction conditions used. In these ash-free streams, there is no solid organic or inorganic material arising from the coal, and the incompletely converted HDPE can be recovered by extraction and filtration with tetrahydrofuran (THF) at room temperature. The HDPE (or HDPE-like material, which could also consist of heavy waxes) is THF insoluble. However, in ashy streams, there are both inorganic ({open_quotes}ash{close_quotes}) and organic (unconverted coal) components present from liquefaction of the coal, that interfere with an easy and clean separation of the HDPE from the coal/plastics liquefaction stream sample. Therefore, CONSOL developed an analytical procedure for HDPE in the ashy stream samples based on extraction of HDPE from the sample using hot (150{degrees}C) decalin (decahydronaphthalene), in which the HDPE is soluble. The decalin extraction is both preceded and succeeded by extractions and washes with THF at room temperature, to remove the coal-derived components from the sample.

Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Floating plant for offshore liquefaction, temporary storage and loading of LNG  

SciTech Connect

A floating plant is disclosed for offshore liquefaction, temporary storage and loading of lng, made as a semi-submersible platform with storage tanks for lng arranged in the submerged section of the platform. The storage tanks are independent spherical tanks which are supported inside the submerged section of the platform and completely surrounded thereby.

Kvamsdal, R.

1980-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E. (eds.)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program. Finaltopical report, Bench Run 4 (227-95)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of bench-scale work, Bench Run PB-04, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept-Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. The Bench Run PB-04 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. Bench Run PB-04 had multiple goals. These included the evaluation of the effects of dispersed slurry catalyst system on the performance of direct liquefaction of a subbituminous Wyoming Black Thunder mine coal under extinction recycle (454{degrees}C+ recycle) condition; another goal was to investigate the effects of the combined processing of automobile shredder residue (auto-fluff) with coal and other organic waste materials. PB-04 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. The HTI`s newly modified P/Fe catalyst was very effective for direct liquefaction and coprocessing of Black Thunder mine subbituminous coal with Hondo resid and auto-fluff; during `coal-only` liquefaction mode, over 93% maf coal conversion was obtained with about 90% residuum conversion and as high as 67% light distillate (C{sub 4}-975 F) yield, while during `coprocessing` mode of operation, distillate yields varied between 58 and 69%; the residuum conversions varied between 74 and 89% maf. Overall, it is concluded, based upon the yield data available from PB-04, that auto-effective as MSW plastics in improving coal hydroconversion process performance. Auto-fluff did not increase light distillate yields nor decrease light gas make and chemical hydrogen consumption in coal liquefaction, as was observed to occur with MSW plastics.

Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Probability of Liquefaction for Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) Site, Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the probability of liquefaction (POL) for the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF). The procedure for analysis of a critical layer of interest requires the following basic steps: (1) establish the probability of occurrence (POO) of ranges of 2.5 Hz bedrock motion based on a probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA); (2) define the critical layer that may be susceptible to liquefaction; (3) estimate distributions of cyclic stress ratio (CSR) (i.e., seismic demand) for the critical layer using site-specific soil properties corresponding to the bedrock motions; (4) estimate capacity of the critical layer based on site-specific cone penetration test (CPT) soundings and standard penetration test (SPT) blowcount data; and (5) sum the probability of liquefaction for each range of bedrock motion using empirical data correlating demand and capacity with liquefaction. The soil layer most susceptible to liquefaction is the critical layer. The critical layer is characterized by relatively low blowcount and low fines content and is established from soil layers below the water table. A key component for seismic demand is the establishment of the soil profile and it's uncertainty. The PDCF site is consistent with the 1997 SRS-specific model used to compute the site amplification database. Thus, previously derived site amplification functions reflecting the uncertainty in site properties and stratigraphy can be used to predict distributions of CSR given a specific earthquake magnitude and level of bedrock motion. The previously developed site amplification database reflects uncertainty in site response based on the large database of site shear-wave velocity profiles. Consequently, for each level of bedrock motion (from the PSHA) the site amplification database is used to establish the distribution of the expected CSR (demand) in the critical layer.

Lee, R.C.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

Surface modified coals for enhanced catalyst dispersion and liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the study is to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on to the coal. During this reporting period, zeta potential measurements were conducted to assess the surface charge on the raw, pretreated and catalyzed coal samples. The surface area, transmission spectroscopy and luminescence intensity of the raw coal and pretreated coal samples were also determined to assess the quality of the coal surface. Across a broad range of pH values, the raw coal had an overall negative charge. Coal treated with anionic surfactant SDS maintained an overall net negative surface negative charge. The interaction between the coal and cationic surfactant DDAB caused the opposite effect resulting in a more positive coal surface charge. Although one would have expected little or no effect of the neutral surfactant Triton X-100, there appears to be some difference in the results of the raw coal and the coal treated with Triton X-100. The authors believe that the Triton not only binds to the nonpolar sites but also has a strong affinity for the polar sites through electrostatic bonding and interaction between the hydrophobic tails. The addition of molybdenum to coal pretreated with DDAB caused a reduction in the positive charge of the coal surface probably due to possible ionic interaction between the coal surface, the surfactant and the catalyst. The adsorption isotherm of the coal was characteristic of isotherms for porous samples and the surface area of the coal increased from 30 m{sup 2}/g to 77 m{sup 2}/g when washed with deionized water. This suggests coal washing may be one method of increasing the surface area for surfactant adsorption. Although the transmission measurements provided valuable information about the coal it resulted in little information on the amount of adsorbed Triton. However, the maximum solid-liquid ratio for optimum surfactant loading of Triton X-100 was determined via the UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The luminescence intensity measurements showed that the coal and surfactants luminescence weakly. No statistically significant influence was observed from the actions of the surfactants or surfactant-molybdenum catalyst. Qualitative inspection however, showed that SDS might effectively coat coal surfaces and influence catalyst dispersion. Also, catalysts appeared to be better distributed among coal particles and in finer clusters when DDAB and Triton surfactants were used.

Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

436

Process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein nitrogen is separated from hydrogen via ammonia synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein bottoms residues are upgraded with a process wherein air is employed, the improvement wherein nitrogen buildup in the system is avoided by ammonia synthesis. In a preferred embodiment hydrogen from other portions of the liquefaction process will be combined with hydrogen produced as a result of the bottoms upgrading to increase the H.sub.2 :N.sub.2 ratio in the ammonia reactor.

Stetka, Steven S. (Fleetwood, PA); Nazario, Francisco N. (Parsippany, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... , "Jordan Cove Energy Project, LP",1.2,1.2,Approved,Under DOE Review,,0.9,Proposed "Cameron LNG, LLC",1.7,1.7,Approved,Under DOE Review,, ...

438

Applications Received by DOE/FE to Export Domestically Produced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

year to non-FTA countries. (g) Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P. requested authority to export the equivalent of 1.2 Bcfd of natural gas to FTA countries and 0.8 Bcfd to...

439

Group theoretic, Lie algebraic and Jordan algebraic formulations of the SIC existence problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although symmetric informationally complete positive operator valued measures (SIC-POVMs, or SICs for short) have been constructed in every dimension $\\le 67$, a general existence proof remains elusive. The purpose of this paper is to show that the SIC-existence problem is equivalent to three other, on the face of it quite different problems. We hope that these reformulations of the problem will make it more tractable. We also believe that the fact that SICs have these connections to other areas of mathematics is of some intrinsic interest. Specifically, we reformulate the SIC problem in terms of (1) Lie Groups, (2) Lie Algebras and (3) Jordan Algebras (the second result being a greatly strengthened version of one previously obtained by Appleby, Flammia and Fuchs). The connection between these three reformulations is non-trivial: it is not easy to demonstrate their equivalence directly, without appealing to their common equivalence to SIC existence. In the course of our analysis we obtain a number of other results which may be of some independent interest.

D. M. Appleby; Christopher A. Fuchs; Huangjun Zhu

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

440

Einstein and Jordan frames reconciled: a frame-invariant approach to scalar-tensor cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scalar-Tensor theories of gravity can be formulated in different frames, most notably, the Einstein and the Jordan one. While some debate still persists in the literature on the physical status of the different frames, a frame transformation in Scalar-Tensor theories amounts to a local redefinition of the metric, and then should not affect physical results. We analyze the issue in a cosmological context. In particular, we define all the relevant observables (redshift, distances, cross-sections, ...) in terms of frame-independent quantities. Then, we give a frame-independent formulation of the Boltzmann equation, and outline its use in relevant examples such as particle freeze-out and the evolution of the CMB photon distribution function. Finally, we derive the gravitational equations for the frame-independent quantities at first order in perturbation theory. From a practical point of view, the present approach allows the simultaneous implementation of the good aspects of the two frames in a clear and straightforward way.

R. Catena; M. Pietroni; L. Scarabello

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Group theoretic, Lie algebraic and Jordan algebraic formulations of the SIC existence problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although symmetric informationally complete positive operator valued measures (SIC POVMs, or SICs for short) have been constructed in every dimension up to 67, a general existence proof remains elusive. The purpose of this paper is to show that the SIC existence problem is equivalent to three other, on the face of it quite different problems. We hope that these reformulations of the problem will make it more tractable. We also believe that the fact that SICs have these connections to other areas of mathematics is of some intrinsic interest. Specifically, we reformulate the SIC problem in terms of (1) Lie groups, (2) Lie algebras and (3) Jordan algebras (the second result being a greatly strengthened version of one previously obtained by Appleby, Flammia and Fuchs). The connection between these three reformulations is non-trivial: It is not easy to demonstrate their equivalence directly, without appealing to their common equivalence to SIC existence. In the course of our analysis we obtain a number of other results which may be of some independent interest.

D. M. Appleby; Christopher A. Fuchs; Huangjun Zhu

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

442

Low-temperature geothermal assessment of the Jordan Valley Salt Lake County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two known low-temperature areas (Warm Springs fault and Crystal Hot Springs) are located in the Jordan Valley, but the primary purpose of this report is to locate other low-temperature resources not previously identified. Geothermal reconnaissance techniques utilized in this study include a temperature survey and chemical analysis of wells and springs, and temperature-depth measurements in holes of opportunity. Also, further site specific gravity modelling for the Warm Springs fault geothermal area and initial modelling for the entire valley were also conducted. Areas identified as having potential low-temperature geothermal resources at depth are: (1) the north-central valley area; (2) an east-west portion of the central valley; and (3) a north-south oriented area extending from Draper to Midvale. Each of these areas exhibits ground-water temperatures 20/sup 0/C or greater. Each area has thermal wells with common ion characteristics similar to both Crystal Hot Springs and the Warm Springs fault geothermal systems. Significant concentrations of Sr, Li, B, and F are present in many of these wells.

Klauk, R.H.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Evaluation of coal minerals and metal residues as coal-liquefaction catalysts. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The catalytic activity of various minerals, metallic wastes, and transition metals was investigated in the liquefaction of various coals. The effects of coal type, process variables, coal cleaning, catalyst addition mode, solvent quality, and solvent modification on coal conversion and oil production were also studied. Coal conversion and oil production improved significantly by the addition of pyrite, reduced pyrite, speculite, red mud, flue dust, zinc sulfide, and various transition metal compounds. Impregnation and molecular dispersion of iron gave higher oil production than particulate incorporation of iron. However, the mode of molybdenum addition was inconsequential. Oil production increased considerably both by adding a stoichiometric mixture of iron oxide and pyrite and by simultaneous impregnation of coal with iron and molybdenum. Hydrogenation activity of disposable catalysts decreased sharply in the presence of nitrogen compounds. The removal of heteroatoms from process solvent improved thermal as well as catalytic coal liquefaction. The improvement in oil production was very dramatic with a catalyst.

Garg, D.; Givens, E. N.; Schweighardt, F. K.; Tarrer, A. R.; Guin, J. A.; Curtis, C. W.; Huang, W. J.; Shridharani, K.; Clinton, J. H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships. 3 figs.

Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

445

Determination of soil liquefaction characteristics by large-scale laboratory tests. [Sand  

SciTech Connect

The testing program described in this report was carried out to study the liquefaction behavior of a clean, uniform, medium sand. Horizontal beds of this sand, 42 inches by 90 inches by 4 inches were prepared by pluviation with a special sand spreader, saturated, and tested in a shaking table system designed for this program, which applied a horizontal cyclic shear stress to the specimens. Specimen size was selected to reduce boundary effects as much as possible. Values of pore pressures and shear strains developed during the tests are presented for sand specimens at relative densities of 54, 68, 82, and 90 percent, and the results interpreted to determine the values of the stress ratio causing liquefaction at the various relative densities.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Quarterly technical progress report, June--August 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work completed during the fourth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. This work is part of a larger effort to develop a new coal liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing scheme consisting of three main process steps: (1) mile pretreatment of the feed coal to enhance dissolution reactivity and dry the coal, (2) low severity thermal dissolution of the pretreated coal to obtain a very reactive coal-derived residual material amenable to upgrading, and (3) catalytic upgrading of the residual products to distillate liquids.

Miller, R.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product  

SciTech Connect

The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships.

Anderson, Raymond P. (Overland Park, KS); Schmalzer, David K. (Englewood, CO); Wright, Charles H. (Overland Park, KS)

1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

448

Trace component analysis of process hydrogen streams at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes subcontracted work done by the Radian Corporation to analyze trace components in process hydrogen streams at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The data will be used to help define whether the gas streams to be treated in the hydrogen processing unit in the SRC-I Demonstration Plant will require further treatment to remove trace contaminants that could be explosive under certain conditions. 2 references.

Bronfenbrenner, J.C.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Notice of Intent: Scoping Period Ends 04/05/13The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas terminal consisting of two floating liquefaction, storage and offloading units and a 29-mile pipeline header system to transport natural gas from existing pipeline systems to the LNG terminal facilities.

450

An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields  

SciTech Connect

Changes in coal structure that may occur during coal drying will be measured in order to determine the effects of coal drying on its reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods for coal drying will be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying a relatively economical and efficient method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include conventional thermal drying, microwave drying and chemical drying at low temperature. State-of-the-art solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques using combined rotation and multiple pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) and cross polarization with magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) will be employed: (1) to measures changes in coal structure brought about by the different methods of drying and by low temperature oxidation, and (2) to obtain direct measurements of changes in the aromatic hydrogen-to-carbon ratio of the solid/semisolid material formed or remaining during pretreatment and the initial stages of liquefaction. The objectives for this quarter were to begin coal drying experiments using thermal, microwave, and chemical methods, and to begin coal liquefaction experiments on the dried coals. Three additional coal samples have been acquired. These are a Black Thunder Mine coal acquired from Arco Coal Co, and a Texas subC and Illinois No. 6 hvC acquired from the DOE coal sample bank at Penn State. The samples are listed as DECS-1 and DECS-2, respectively in the PSU sample bank. The ultimate and proximate analyses for all the samples are given in Table 1. Work on each of the subtasks is described in separate paragraphs.

Miknis, F.P.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Seismic analysis of the Par Pond Dam: Study of slope failure and liquefaction. Technical evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

Stability concerns of the Par Pond Dam, an embankment structure in the Savannah River Site complex, resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the state of its integrity. Specifically, excessive seepage through the embankment, slope failure due to an earthquake event as well as liquefaction potential of the embankment and the foundation are addressed and the potential of failure is evaluated. Lastly, remedial benefits of the addition of a berm structure are also assessed.

Simos, N.; Reich, M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. The paper describes activities carried out this quarter. 11 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

EA-1942: Notice of Intent of to Prepare an Environmental Assessment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to add natural gas liquefaction and exportation capabilities to an existing Cove Point LNG Terminal located on the Chesapeake Bay in Lusby, Maryland. EA-1942-FERC-NOI-2012.pdf...

454

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Analysis of coal-derived synthetic crude from HRI CTSL Run CC-15 and HRI Run CMSL-2  

SciTech Connect

Under subcontract from CONSOL Inc. (US DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-89PC89883), IIT Research Institute, National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research applied a suite of petroleum inspection tests to two direct coal liquefactions net product oils produced in two direct coal liquefaction processing runs. Two technical reports, authored by NIPER, are presented here. The following assessment briefly describes the two coal liquefaction runs and highlights the major findings of the project. It generally is concluded that the methods used in these studies can help define the value of liquefaction products and the requirements for further processing. The application of these methods adds substantially to our understanding of the coal liquefaction process and the chemistry of coal-derived materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of this contract.

Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Kim, J.; Shay, J. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Jordan-Schwinger map, 3D harmonic oscillator constants of motion, and classical and quantum parameters characterizing electromagnetic wave polarization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we introduce a generalization of the Jauch and Rohrlich quantum Stokes operators when the arrival direction from the source is unknown {\\it a priori}. We define the generalized Stokes operators as the Jordan-Schwinger map of a triplet of harmonic oscillators with the Gell-Mann and Ne'eman SU(3) symmetry group matrices. We show that the elements of the Jordan-Schwinger map are the constants of motion of the three-dimensional isotropic harmonic oscillator. Also, we show that generalized Stokes Operators together with the Gell-Mann and Ne'eman matrices may be used to expand the polarization density matrix. By taking the expectation value of the Stokes operators in a three-mode coherent state of the electromagnetic field, we obtain the corresponding generalized classical Stokes parameters. Finally, by means of the constants of motion of the classical three-dimensional isotropic harmonic oscillator we describe the geometric properties of the polarization ellipse

R. D. Mota; M. A. Xicotencatl; V. D. Granados

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Coal liquefaction process wherein jet fuel, diesel fuel and/or ASTM No. 2 fuel oil is recovered  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for the liquefaction of coal and similar solid carbonaceous materials wherein a hydrogen donor solvent or diluent derived from the solid carbonaceous material is used to form a slurry of the solid carbonaceous material and wherein the naphthenic components from the solvent or diluent fraction are separated and used as jet fuel components. The extraction increases the relative concentration of hydroaromatic (hydrogen donor) components and as a result reduces the gas yield during liquefaction and decreases hydrogen consumption during said liquefaction. The hydrogenation severity can be controlled to increase the yield of naphthenic components and hence the yield of jet fuel and in a preferred embodiment jet fuel yield is maximized while at the same time maintaining solvent balance.

Bauman, Richard F. (Houston, TX); Ryan, Daniel F. (Friendswood, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Catalytic hydrotreating of biomass liquefaction products to produce hydrocarbon fuels: Interim report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research catalytic hydrotreatment of biomass liquefaction products to a gasoline has been technically demonstrated in a bench-scale continuous processing unit. This report describes the development of the chemistry needed for hydrotreatment of both high pressure and pyrolyzate biomass liquefaction products and outlines the important processing knowledge gained by the research. Catalyst identity is important in hydrotreatment of phenolics. Hydrogenation catalysts such as palladium, copper chromite, cobalt and nickel show activity with nickel being the most active. Major products include benzene, cyclohexane, and cyclohexanone. The hydrotreating catalysts cobalt-molybdenum, nickel-molybdenum and nickel-tungsten exhibit some activity when added to the reactor in the oxide form and show a great specificity for hydrodeoxygenation of phenol without saturation of the benzene product. The sulfide form of these catalysts is much more active than the oxide form and, in the case of the cobalt-molybdenum, much of the specificity for hydrodeoxygenation is retained. Substitution on the phenolic ring has only marginal effects on the hydrotreating reaction. However, the methoxy (OCH/sub 3/) substituent on the phenol ring is thermally unstable relative to other phenolics tested. The pyrolysis products dominate the product distribution when cobalt-molybdenum is used as the hydrotreating catalyst for methoxyphenol. The product from catalytic hydrotreatment of high-pressure biomass liquefaction products confirms the model compounds studies. Catalytic processing at 350 to 400/sup 0/C and 2000 psig with the sulfided cobalt-molybdenum or nickel-molybdenum catalyst produced a gasoline-like product composed of cyclic and aromatic compounds. Oxygen contents in products were in the range of 0 to 0.7 wt % and hydrogen to carbon atomic ratios ranged from 1.5 to 2.0. 46 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.; Baker, E.G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive research continued on catalysts based on novel anion-treated (mainly sulfated) oxides and oxyhydroxides of iron [Fe{sub x}O{sub y}/SO{sub 4}]. In addition, sulfated oxides of tin as well as molybdenum promoted iron oxides were used. Incorporation of small amounts of sulfate, molybdate, or tungstate anions by wet precipitation/impregnation methods was found to increase the surface acidic character of iron oxides; more importantly, it reduced the grain sizes significantly with corresponding increases in specific surface areas. These anion-treated iron and tin oxides were more active for direct coal liquefaction and coal-heavy oil coprocessing than their untreated counterparts. With these catalyst systems, higher conversion levels are obtained as compared to the soluble precursors of iron and molybdenum at the same catalyst metalloading (3500 ppm iron and 50 ppm molybdenum with respect to coal). Sulfated iron oxides and oxyhydroxides were equally active as coal liquefaction catalysts. The sulfate, molybdate, and tungstate anions were found to have similar promotional effects on the properties and activities of iron oxides. One step in the synthesis of anion-treated iron and tin oxides is precipitation as hydroxides using either urea or ammonium hydroxide. The catalysts prepared using urea as a precipitation agent were more reproducible than those using ammonium, hydroxide in terms of activities and properties. These catalysts/catalyst precursors were characterized by several techniques to determine their physical (size and structure related) and chemical (acidity) properties. Sulfated and molybdated iron oxides were found to have grain sizes as small as 10-20 nm. An attempt was made to correlate the physicochemical properties of these catalysts with their activity for coal liquefaction.

Huffman, G.P. [ed.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program: Bench Run 05 (227-97). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results Bench Run PB-05, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept - Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-05 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and included the evaluation of the effect of using dispersed slurry catalyst in direct liquefaction of a high volatile bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal and in combined coprocessing of coal with organic wastes, such as heavy petroleum resid, MSW plastics, and auto-shredder residue. PB-05 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Coprocessing of waste plastics with Illinois No. 6 coal did not result in the improvement observed earlier with a subbituminous coal. In particular, decreases in light gas yield and hydrogen consumption were not observed with Illinois No. 6 coal as they were with Black Thunder Mine coal. The higher thermal severity during PB-05 is a possible reason for this discrepancy, plastics being more sensitive to temperatures (cracking) than either coal or heavy resid. The ASR material was poorer than MSW plastics in terms of increasing conversions and yields. HTI`s new dispersed catalyst formulation, containing phosphorus-promoted iron gel, was highly effective for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal under the reaction conditions employed; over 95% coal conversion was obtained, along with over 85% residuum conversion and over 73% distillate yields.

Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Long-term Environmental and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-term Environmental and Economic Long-term Environmental and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China Background The growth of the economy and the accompanying increase in energy consumption in the People's Republic of China (China) are impacting the world's energy markets and global environment. That impact was seen in rising oil prices prior to the economic collapse of 2008. China plans to move ahead in the use of its coal resources as a source of transportation fuels. It is important that the U.S. have the best possible

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Characteristics of process oils from HTI coal/plastics co-liquefaction runs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to provide timely analytical support to DOE`s liquefaction development effort. Specific objectives of the work reported here are: (1) to determine the fate of the plastics feedstocks, relative to coal-only operation; (2) to determine the conversion of the feedstocks; (3) to determine the product streams to which the feedstocks are converted (bottoms vs. distillate); (4) to determine interactions of feedstocks; (5) to determine how use of plastics feedstocks affect product quality; and (6) to determine to what degree property differences reflect feedstock differences vs. other (process) condition changes, such as unit operations, space velocity, and catalyst age.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Effect of coal rank and process conditions on temperature distribution in a liquefaction reactor  

SciTech Connect

The temperature distribution in a liquefaction reactor in the integrated TSL process is studied. The effects of gas and slurry superficial velocities, process solvent characteristics, reactor length, and catalyst sulfiding agent on the exotherm and temperature difference in the reactor are studied. A substantial temperature difference is observed with subbituminous coal as compared with bituminous coal, at comparable reactor conditions. Some of the factors that are believed to have contributed to the large exotherm and temperature difference in the reactor are slow kinetics and high reaction heat for subbituminous coal conversion and pyrrhotite catalysis.

Nalitham, R.V.; Moniz, M.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Automated apparatus for solvent separation of a coal liquefaction product stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automated apparatus for the solvent separation of a coal liquefaction product stream that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In use of the apparatus, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control means. The mixture in the filter is agitated by means of ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process.

Schweighardt, Frank K. (Upper Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Technical progress report, December 1992--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

This work is a fundamental study of catalytic pretreatments as a potential preconversion step to low-severity liquefaction. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide the basis for the design of an improved liquefaction process and to facilitate our understanding of those processes that occur when coals are initially dissolved. The main objectives of this project are to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on the subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank and influence of solvent will be examined. We have made significant progress in the following four aspects during this quarterly period: (1) influence of drying and oxidation of coal on the conversion and product distribution in catalytic liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous coal using a dispersed catalyst; (2) spectroscopic characterization of dried and oxidized Wyodak coal and the insoluble residues from catalytic and thermal liquefaction; (3) the structural alteration of low-rank coal in low-severity liquefaction with the emphasis on the oxygen-containing functional groups; and (4) effects of solvents and catalyst dispersion methods in temperature-programmed and non-programmed liquefaction of three low-rank coals.

Song, C.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.; Huang, L.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Programmable unknown quantum-state discriminators with multiple copies of program and data: A Jordan basis approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discrimination of any pair of unknown quantum states is performed by devices processing three parts of inputs: copies of the pair of unknown states we want to discriminate are respectively stored in two program systems and copies of data, which is guaranteed to be one of the unknown states, in a third system. We study the efficiency of such programmable devices with the inputs prepared with $n$ and $m$ copies of unknown qubits used as programs and data, respectively. By finding a symmetry in the average inputs, we apply the Jordan basis method to derive their optimal unambiguous discrimination and the minimum-error discrimination schemes. The dependence of the optimal solutions on the a prior probabilities of the mean input states is also demonstrated.

Bing He; János A. Bergou

2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

466

A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. During this reporting period, CONSOL completed analyses of 81 feed and process stream samples from HTI bench Run CMSL-9. HTI liquefaction bench unit Run CMSL-9 (227-87) was operated with all-dispersed catalyst and Black Thunder Mine (Wyodak and Anderson seam) coal, with and without mixed plastics or high density polyethylene (HDPE) as coprocessing feedstocks. The dispersed catalysts used were Molyvan A and HTI`s iron catalyst, a sulfated iron hydroxide. Results are discussed in this report.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1993--June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. In addition, a synergistic effect has been demonstrated, in which solvent blends are more effective for coal swelling than the pure solvents alone. Therefore, it will be necessary to use only low levels of swelling agents and yet promote the impregnation of catalyst precursors. The rate of the impregnation of catalyst precursors into swollen coal increases greatly as the effectiveness of the solvent to swell the coal increases. This effect is also demonstrated by improved catalyst precursor impregnation with increased contact temperature. Laboratory- and bench-scale liquefaction experimentation is underway using swelled and catalyst impregnated coal samples. Higher coal conversions were observed for the SO{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Conversions of swelled coal were highest when Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively, were added to the liquefaction solvent.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Gutterman, C.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Additive effect of waste tire on the hydrogenolysis reaction of coal liquefaction residue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerous amount of waste tire is landfilled or dumped all over the world, which causes environmental problems, such as destruction of natural places and the risk of fires. On the other hand, the coal liquefaction residue (CLR) is produced in 30% yield through the process supporting unit (PSU) of the NEDOL coal liquefaction process. Therefore, the investigation on an effective method for utilization of waste tire and CLR is required. In this study, the simultaneous hydrogenolysis of CLR and pulverized waste tire was carried out by using tetralin. The yields in the simultaneous hydrogenolysis were compared with algebraic sum of the yields of the individual hydrogenolyses of waste tire alone and coal alone. In the simultaneous hydrogenolysis, the synergistic effects to upgrading, such as an increase in the yield of the oil constituent and a decrease in the yield of the asphaltene constituent, occurred because of the stabilization of asphaltenic radicals from CLR with aliphatic radicals from tire. The decrease in asphaltene yield in the simultaneous hydrogenolysis was pronounced with the increase in the tire:CLR ratio because the solvent effects of liquefied tire, such as stabilization of radicals, hydrogen shuttling, and heat transfer, were enhanced. Accordingly, it is estimated that the simultaneous hydrogenolysis of CLR and waste tire is an effective method for processing both materials. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Motoyuki Sugano; Daigorou Onda; Kiyoshi Mashimo [Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Materials and Applied Chemistry, College of Science and Technology

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through a turbo expander creating work output. A compressor is driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream. Additional features and techniques may be integrated with the liquefaction process including a water clean-up cycle and a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) clean-up cycle.

Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID); Raterman, Kevin T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Palmer, Gary L. (Shelley, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Vranicar, John J. (Concord, CA)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

470

Impact of hydrogen partial pressure on coal liquefaction. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was conducted to determine the effects of hydrogen partial pressure on the SRC-I direct coal liquefaction process and SRC-I Demonstration Plant design. A native solvent was produced in quantity and slurried with Kentucky number 9 Mulford coal in a series of coal liquefaction runs under varying hydrogen gas rates, temperatures, residence times, and hydrogen partial pressures. The results showed that hydrogen partial pressure significantly affected product distribution; the magnitude of the effect was comparable to changes in temperature and residence time. Also, the impact of hydrogen partial pressure was enhanced by increases in both temperature and residence time. Operating at low hydrogen partial pressure did not show any apparent advantage; it reduced coal conversion, reduced oil yield, and had a detrimental effect on the yield distribution of other products. An increase in hydrogen partial pressure had the following effects: increased coal conversion; increased conversion of asphaltenes and preasphaltenes to lighter products; significantly increased the oil yield; increased light gas yields; decreased sulfur content in the SRC; increased hydrogen content of the recycle solvent; and increased hydrogen consumption. This study strongly suggests that further studies should be conducted to optimize the effects of hydrogen partial pressure on the process, both within and, preferably, beyond the constraints of the current basic SRC-I design, considering the major impact of this variable on the process. 10 references, 37 figures, 10 tables.

Kang, D.; Hoover, D.S.; Schweighardt, F.K.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Novel experimental studies for coal liquefaction: Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1987 to June 30, 1987  

SciTech Connect

In Task 1 of this project, the use of a slurry reactor for indirect coal liquefaction is being studied. Work is being done using three indirect liquefaction routes involving synthesis gas - the Fisher-Tropsch reaction, the one-step conversion to methanol, and the two-step conversion to methanol via methyl formate. Experimental work and data analysis for the two-step methanol synthesis in a single slurry reactor were continued during the quarter. Experimental work included the effect of the H/sub 2//CO ratio on the simultaneous reactions and measurements of the solubility of hydrogen and CO in methanol and methyl formate. Reaction rates obtained experimentally for the simultaneous system were compared with rates calculated from the individual reactions. The two-step methanol synthesis involves two reactions, and one of the reactants in each reaction is a gas. The carbonylation of methanol requires CO and the hydrogenolysis of methyl formate requires H/sub 2/. The ratio of H/sub 2/ to CO is therefore a very important operating parameter, affecting the relative rates of the two reactions and the total methanol production rate. It may also affect the selectivity of the two reations. Two runs were made, one at a temperature of 121/sup 0/C and the other at 140/sup 0/C. All reaction conditions were constant except for the H/sub 2//CO ratio. The experimental procedure was the same as described previously. 61 refs.

Holder, G.D.; Shah, Y.T.; Tierney, J.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. Some of the contract activities for this quarter are: We completed many of the analyses on the 81 samples received from HTI bench-scale run CMSL-9, in which coal, coal/mixed plastics, and coal/high density polyethylene were fed; Liquid chromatographic separations of the 15 samples in the University of Delaware sample set were completed; and WRI completed CP/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR analyses on the Delaware sample set.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

EA-1942-FERC-NOI-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP Docket No. PF12-16-000 Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP Docket No. PF12-16-000 NOTICE OF INTENT TO PREPARE AN ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PLANNED COVE POINT LIQUEFACTION PROJECT, REQUEST FOR COMMENTS ON ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES, NOTICE OF ON-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW, AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC SCOPING MEETINGS (September 24, 2012) The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) will prepare an environmental assessment (EA) that will discuss the environmental impacts of the Cove Point Liquefaction Project (Project) involving construction and operation of facilities by Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP (Dominion) in Maryland and Virginia. This EA will be used by the Commission in its decision-making process to determine whether the construction and operation of the proposed facilities is in the

474

Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Technical progress report, August 1992--July 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-temperature catalytic pretreatment is a promising approach to the development of an improved liquefaction process- This work is a fundamental study on effects of pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. The main objectives of this project are to study the coal structural changes induced by low-temperature catalytic and thermal pretreatments by using spectroscopic techniques; and to clarify the pretreatment-induced changes in reactivity or convertibility of coals in the subsequent liquefaction. This report describes the recent progress of our work. Substantial progress has been made in the spectroscopic characterization of structure and pretreatment-liquefaction reactions of a Montana subbituminous Coal (DECS-9), and thermochemical analysis of three mw and reacted bituminous coals. Temperature programmed liquefaction has been performed on three low-rank coals both in the presence and absence of dispersed molybdenum sulfide catalyst. We also performed a detailed study of the effects of mild thermal pretreatment -- drying in air and in vacuum -- on thermal and catalytic liquefaction of a Wyodak subbituminous coal. Important information on structure and structure transformation during thermal pretreatment and liquefaction reactions of low-rank coals has been derived by applying solid-state CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR and flash pyrolysis-GC-MS (Py-GC-MS) for characterization of the macromolecular network of a Montana subbituminous coal and its residues from temperature-programmed and nonprogrammed liquefaction (TPL and N-PL) at final temperatures ranging from 300 to 425{degree}C in H-donor and non-donor solvents. The results revealed that this coal contains significant quantities of oxygen-bearing structures, corresponding to about 18 O-bound C per 100 C atoms and one O-bound C per every 5 to 6 aromatic C.

Song, C.; Saini, A.K.; Huang, L.; Wenzel, K.; Hou, L.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Fuel-blending stocks from the hydrotreatment of a distillate formed by direct coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The direct liquefaction of coal in the iron-catalyzed Suplex process was evaluated as a technology complementary to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. A distinguishing feature of the Suplex process, from other direct liquefaction processes, is the use of a combination of light- and heavy-oil fractions as the slurrying solvent. This results in a product slate with a small residue fraction, a distillate/naphtha mass ratio of 6, and a 65.8 mass % yield of liquid fuel product on a dry, ash-free coal basis. The densities of the resulting naphtha (C{sub 5}-200{sup o}C) and distillate (200-400{sup o}C) fractions from the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction were high (0.86 and 1.04 kg/L, respectively). The aromaticity of the distillate fraction was found to be typical of coal liquefaction liquids, at 60-65%, with a Ramsbottom carbon residue content of 0.38 mass %. Hydrotreatment of the distillate fraction under severe conditions (200{sup o}C, 20.3 MPa, and 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1}) with a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst gave a product with a phenol content of {lt}1 ppm, a nitrogen content {lt}200 ppm, and a sulfur content {lt}25 ppm. The temperature was found to be the main factor affecting diesel fraction selectivity when operating at conditions of WHSV = 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1} and PH{sub 2} = 20.3 MPa, with excessively high temperatures (T {gt} 420{sup o}C) leading to a decrease in diesel selectivity. The fuels produced by the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction have properties that make them desirable as blending components, with the diesel fraction having a cetane number of 48 and a density of 0.90 kg/L. The gasoline fraction was found to have a research octane number (RON) of 66 and (N + 2A) value of 100, making it ideal as a feedstock for catalytic reforming and further blending with Fischer-Tropsch liquids. 44 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

Andile B. Mzinyati [Sasol Technology Research and Development, Sasolburg (South Africa). Fischer-Tropsch Refinery Catalysis

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Process for coal liquefaction by separation of entrained gases from slurry exiting staged dissolvers  

SciTech Connect

There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a solvent, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals are separated from the condensed dissolver effluent. In accordance with the improved process, fresh hydrogen is fed to each dissolver and the entrained gas from each dissolver is separated from the slurry phase and removed from the reactor system before the condensed phase is passed to the next dissolver in the series. In accordance with another process, the feeds to the dissolvers are such that the top of each downstream dissolver is used as a gas-liquid separator.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Ying, David H. S. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Catalytic two-stage coal liquefaction process having improved nitrogen removal  

SciTech Connect

A process for catalytic multi-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce high yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquids containing low concentrations of nitogen compounds. First stage catalytic reaction conditions are 700.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1500-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure, with the space velocity maintained in a critical range of 10-40 lb coal/hr ft.sup.3 catalyst settled volume. The first stage catalyst has 0.3-1.2 cc/gm total pore volume with at least 25% of the pore volume in pores having diameters of 200-2000 Angstroms. Second stage reaction conditions are 760.degree.-870.degree. F. temperature with space velocity exceeding that in the first stage reactor, so as to achieve increased hydrogenation yield of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products having at least 75% removal of nitrogen compounds from the coal-derived liquid products.

Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Bimetallic promotion of cooperative hydrogen transfer and heteroatom removal in coal liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ultimate objective of this research has been to uncover novel reagents and experimental conditions for heteroatom removal and hydrogen transfer processes, which would be applicable to the liquefaction of coal under low-severity conditions. To this end, one phase of this research has investigated the cleavage of carbon-heteroatom bonds involving sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen and halogen by subvalent transition-metal complexes. A second phase of the study has assessed the capability of the same transition-metal complexes or of organoaluminum Lewis acids to catalyze the cleavage of carbon-hydrogen bonds in aromatics and hence to promote hydrogen shuttling. Finally, a third phase of our work has uncovered a remarkable synergistic effect of combinations of transition metals with organoaluminum Lewis acids on hydrogen shuttling between aromatics and hydroaromatics. (VC)

Eisch, J.J.

1992-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

479

Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through an expander creating work output. A compressor may be driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates a vapor from the liquid natural gas. A portion of the liquid gas is used for additional cooling. Gas produced within the system may be recompressed for reintroduction into a receiving line or recirculation within the system for further processing.

Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

480

Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through an expander creating work output. A compressor may be driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream.

Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID); Carney, Francis H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "jordan cove liquefaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Apparatus for the liquefaction of a gas and methods relating to same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatuses and methods are provided for producing liquefied gas, such as liquefied natural gas. In one embodiment, a liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream may sequentially pass through a compressor and an expander. The process stream may also pass through a compressor. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. A portion of the liquid gas may be used for additional cooling. Gas produced within the system may be recompressed for reintroduction into a receiving line.

Turner, Terry D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

482

Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Indirect coal liquefaction, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive review of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology, including fixed, fluidized, and bubble column reactors, was undertaken in order to develop an information base before initiating the design of the Fischer-Tropsch indirect liquefaction PDU as a part of the Generic Coal Conversion Facilities to be built at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The pilot plant will include a fixed bed and slurry bubble column reactor for the F-T mode of operation. The review encompasses current status of both these technologies, their key variables, catalyst development, future directions, and potential improvement areas. However, more emphasis has been placed on the slurry bubble column reactor since this route is likely to be the preferred technology for commercialization, offering process advantages and, therefore, better economics than fixed and fluidized bed approaches.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

EDS Coal Liquefaction Process Development. Phase V. Laboratory evaluation of the characteristics of EDS Illinois bottoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report documents work carried out by Combustion Engineering, Inc. under a contract to Exxon Research and Engineering Company to develop a conceptual Hybrid Boiler design fueled by the vacuum distillation residue (vacuum bottoms) derived from Illinois No. 6 coal in the EDS Coal Liquefaction Process. This report was prepared by Combustion Engineering, Inc., and is the first of two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler program. This report covers the results of a laboratory investigation to assess the fuel and ash properties of EDS vacuum bottoms. The results of the laboratory testing reported here were used in conjunction with Combustion Engineering's design experience to predict fuel performance and to develop appropriate boiler design parameters. These boiler design parameters were used to prepare the engineering design study reported in EDS Interim Report FE-2893-113, the second of the two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler Program. 46 figures, 29 tables.

Lao, T C; Levasseur, A A

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis. Quarterly report, January--March 1991  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z