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Sample records for joint genome institute

  1. 11th Annual Energy Department Joint Genome Institute Genomics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11th Annual Energy Department Joint Genome Institute Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting 11th Annual Energy Department Joint Genome Institute Genomics of Energy & Environment ...

  2. Joint Genome Institute's Automation Approach and History

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Simon

    2006-07-05

    Department of Energy/Joint Genome Institute (DOE/JGI) collaborates with DOE national laboratories and community users, to advance genome science in support of the DOE missions of clean bio-energy, carbon cycling, and bioremediation.

  3. Microbial Genomics Data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    As of March 2008, The Joint Genome Institute has released 296 Prokaryotic microbial sites, with 216 in finished status.

  4. Introduction to Using NERSC for the Joint Genome Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Introduction to Using NERSC for the Joint Genome Institute May 2, 2011 jgi logo sm NERSC Training Event 1:00-5:00 p.m. PDT May 2, 2011 Joint Genome Institute, 2800 Mitchell...

  5. Joint Genome Institute Progress Report 2002-2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, David

    2005-10-03

    Progress report covering activities at the DOE-Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek, California for the period 2002-2005.

  6. A Taste of Algal Genomes from the Joint Genome Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-06-17

    Algae play profound roles in aquatic food chains and the carbon cycle, can impose health and economic costs through toxic blooms, provide models for the study of symbiosis, photosynthesis, and eukaryotic evolution, and are candidate sources for bio-fuels; all of these research areas are part of the mission of DOE's Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To date JGI has sequenced, assembled, annotated, and released to the public the genomes of 18 species and strains of algae, sampling almost all of the major clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. With more algal genomes currently undergoing analysis, JGI continues its commitment to driving forward basic and applied algal science. Among these ongoing projects are the pan-genome of the dominant coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, the interrelationships between the 4 genomes in the nucleomorph-containing Bigelowiella natans and Guillardia theta, and the search for symbiosis genes of lichens.

  7. DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, David

    2009-03-12

    While initially a virtual institute, the driving force behind the creation of the DOE Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek, California in the Fall of 1999 was the Department of Energy's commitment to sequencing the human genome. With the publication in 2004 of a trio of manuscripts describing the finished 'DOE Human Chromosomes', the Institute successfully completed its human genome mission. In the time between the creation of the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) and completion of the Human Genome Project, sequencing and its role in biology spread to fields extending far beyond what could be imagined when the Human Genome Project first began. Accordingly, the targets of the DOE JGI's sequencing activities changed, moving from a single human genome to the genomes of large numbers of microbes, plants, and other organisms, and the community of users of DOE JGI data similarly expanded and diversified. Transitioning into operating as a user facility, the DOE JGI modeled itself after other DOE user facilities, such as synchrotron light sources and supercomputer facilities, empowering the science of large numbers of investigators working in areas of relevance to energy and the environment. The JGI's approach to being a user facility is based on the concept that by focusing state-of-the-art sequencing and analysis capabilities on the best peer-reviewed ideas drawn from a broad community of scientists, the DOE JGI will effectively encourage creative approaches to DOE mission areas and produce important science. This clearly has occurred, only partially reflected in the fact that the DOE JGI has played a major role in more than 45 papers published in just the past three years alone in Nature and Science. The involvement of a large and engaged community of users working on important problems has helped maximize the impact of JGI science. A seismic technological change is presently underway at the JGI. The Sanger capillary-based sequencing process that

  8. 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute (Program Document) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Program Document: 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute In October 2012, we introduced a 10-Year Strategic Vision [http://bit.ly/JGI-Vision] for the Institute. A central focus of this Strategic Vision is to bridge the gap between sequenced genomes and an understanding of biological functions at the organism and ecosystem level. This involves the continued massive-scale

  9. Microbial Genomics Data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    genomes from three domains of life, access the JGI FTP directories to download data files, browse for specific collaborating scientists and institutions, use the Tree of Life navigation tool, or choose a genome and go directly to a website specific to that one genome. All of the individual sites include direct access to download sequence files, BLAST, search, view and navigate the genomic annotations. As of March 2008, The Joint Genome Institute has released 296 Prokaryotic microbial sites, with 216 in finished status.

  10. Introduction to Using NERSC for the Joint Genome Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Introduction to Using NERSC for the Joint Genome Institute May 2, 2011 jgi logo sm NERSC Training Event 1:00-5:00 p.m. PDT May 2, 2011 Joint Genome Institute, 2800 Mitchell Drive, Walnut Creek, CA Introduction to Using NERSC Richard Gerber, NERSC User Services Group Shane Canon, NERSC Technology Integration Group This half-day training will enable new users from the Joint Genome Institute to get connected and running jobs at NERSC. We will cover NERSC computational and storage systems,

  11. Rooted in Wonder: Joint Genome Institute Study Reveals Amazing World

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Underfoot | Department of Energy Rooted in Wonder: Joint Genome Institute Study Reveals Amazing World Underfoot Rooted in Wonder: Joint Genome Institute Study Reveals Amazing World Underfoot August 13, 2012 - 2:33pm Addthis By developing a better understanding of the microbes that affect the growth of other plants (crops like corn or wheat) researchers may be able to improve their growth -- or provide better care for them in times of drought. By developing a better understanding of the

  12. 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    In October 2012, we introduced a 10-Year Strategic Vision [http://bit.ly/JGI-Vision] for the Institute. A central focus of this Strategic Vision is to bridge the gap between sequenced genomes and an understanding of biological functions at the organism and ecosystem level. This involves the continued massive-scale generation of sequence data, complemented by orthogonal new capabilities to functionally annotate these large sequence data sets. Our Strategic Vision lays out a path to guide our decisions and ensure that the evolving set of experimental and computational capabilities available to DOE JGI users will continue to enable groundbreaking science.

  13. Today, DOE's Joint Genome Institute (a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 612011 6.2 Decoding the Human Genome Scientists are close to completing the genetic blueprint for a human being, thanks in large part to Office of Science funding. DOE was the ...

  14. 11th Annual DOE Joint Genome Institute Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 11th Annual DOE Joint Genome Institute Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting will be held March 21–25, 2016 in Walnut Creek, California. The meeting will gather together experts and researchers working in energy and environmental genomics and synthetic biology, and it will have a special focus on the work done at the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Bioenergy Technologies Office Technology Manager Daniel Fishman will be in attendance.

  15. 11th Annual Energy Department Joint Genome Institute Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 11th Annual DOE Joint Genome Institute Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting will be held March 21–25, 2016 in Walnut Creek, California. The meeting will gather together experts and researchers working in energy and environmental genomics and synthetic biology, and it will have a special focus on the work done at the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Bioenergy Technologies Office Technology Manager Daniel Fishman will be in attendance.

  16. Eukaryotic Genomics Data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The JGI makes high-quality genome sequencing data freely available to the greater scientific community through its web portal. Having played a significant role in the federally funded Human Genome Project -- generating the complete sequences of Chromosomes 5, 16, and 19--the JGI has now moved on to contributing in other critical areas of genomics research. While NIH-funded genome sequencing activities continue to emphasize human biomedical targets and applications, the JGI has since shifted its focus to the non-human components of the biosphere, particularly those relevant to the science mission of the Department of Energy. With efficiencies of scale established at the PGF, and capacity now exceeding three billion bases generated on a monthly basis, the JGI has tackled scores of additional genomes. These include more than 60 microbial genomes and many important multicellular organisms and communities of microbes. In partnership with other federal institutions and universities, the JGI is in the process of sequencing a frog (Xenopus tropicalis), a green alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii), a diatom (Thalassiosira pseudonana) , the cottonwood tree (Populus trichocarpa), and a host of agriculturally important plants and plant pathogens. Microorganisms, for example those that thrive under extreme conditions such as high acidity, radiation, and metal contamination, are of particular interest to the DOE and JGI. Investigations by JGI and its partners are shedding light on the cellular machinery of microbes and how they can be harnessed to clean up contaminated soil or water, capture carbon from the atmosphere, and produce potentially important sources of energy such as hydrogen and methane. [Excerpt from the JGI page "Who We Are" at http://www.jgi.doe.gov/whoweare/whoweare.html] From the JGI webportal users can choose Eukaryotic genomes from a photo list, access the JGI FTP directories to download data files, use the Tree of Life navigation tool, or choose a genome and go

  17. Eukaryotic Genomics Data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    From the JGI webportal users can choose Eukaryotic genomes from a photo list, access the JGI FTP directories to download data files, use the Tree of Life navigation tool, or choose a genome and go directly to a website specific to that one genome. The individual sites include direct access to download sequence files, BLAST, search, view and navigate the genomic annotations.

  18. DOE Joint Genome Institute | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    DOE Joint Genome Institute Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Genomic Science DOE Bioenergy Research Centers Bioimaging Technology DOE Joint Genome Institute Structural Biology Radiochemistry & Imaging Instrumentation Radiobiology: Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Human Subjects Protection Program Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link

  19. The genome portal of the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute: 2014 updates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordberg, Henrik; Cantor, Michael; Dushekyo, Serge; Hua, Susan; Poliakov, Alexander; Shabalov, Igor; Smirnova, Tatyana; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Dubchak, Inna

    2013-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a national user facility, serves the diverse scientific community by providing integrated high-throughput sequencing and computational analysis to enable system-based scientific approaches in support of DOE missions related to clean energy generation and environmental characterization. The JGI Genome Portal (http://genome.jgi.doe.gov) provides unified access to all JGI genomic databases and analytical tools. The JGI maintains extensive data management systems and specialized analytical capabilities to manage and interpret complex genomic data. A user can search, download and explore multiple data sets available for all DOE JGI sequencing projects including their status, assemblies and annotations of sequenced genomes. Here we describe major updates of the Genome Portal in the past 2 years with a specific emphasis on efficient handling of the rapidly growing amount of diverse genomic data accumulated in JGI.

  20. Joint Genome Institute (JGI) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities User Facilities Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM) Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Community Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy

  1. 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute None 59 BASIC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bit.lyJGI-Vision for the Institute. A central focus of this Strategic Vision is to bridge the gap between sequenced genomes and an understanding of biological functions at the...

  2. Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) System from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The integrated microbial genomes (IMG) system is a data management, analysis and annotation platform for all publicly available genomes. IMG contains both draft and complete JGI microbial genomes integrated with all other publicly available genomes from all three domains of life, together with a large number of plasmids and viruses. IMG provides tools and viewers for analyzing and annotating genomes, genes and functions, individually or in a comparative context. Since its first release in 2005, IMG's data content and analytical capabilities have been constantly expanded through quarterly releases. IMG is provided by the DOE-Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and is available from http://img.jgi.doe.gov. [Abstract from The integrated microbial genomes (IMG) system in 2007: data content and analysis tool extensions; Victor M. Markowitz, Ernest Szeto, Krishna Palaniappan, Yuri Grechkin, Ken Chu, I-Min A. Chen, Inna Dubchak, Iain Anderson, Athanasios Lykidis, Konstantinos Mavromatis, Natalia N. Ivanova and Nikos C. Kyrpides; Nucleic Acids Research, 2008, Vol. 36. (Database Issue) See also the companion system, Integrated Microbial Genomes with Microbiome Samples.

  3. 2012 U.S. Department of Energy: Joint Genome Institute: Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, David

    2013-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) is to serve the diverse scientific community as a user facility, enabling the application of large-scale genomics and analysis of plants, microbes, and communities of microbes to address the DOE mission goals in bioenergy and the environment. The DOE JGI's sequencing efforts fall under the Eukaryote Super Program, which includes the Plant and Fungal Genomics Programs; and the Prokaryote Super Program, which includes the Microbial Genomics and Metagenomics Programs. In 2012, several projects made news for their contributions to energy and environment research.

  4. Illumina Production Sequencing at the DOE Joint Genome Institute - Workflow and Optimizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarver, Angela; Fern, Alison; Diego, Matthew San; Kennedy, Megan; Zane, Matthew; Daum, Christopher; Hack, Christopher; Tang, Eric; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Roberts, Simon; Alexandre, Melanie; Harmon-Smith, Miranda; Lucas, Susan

    2010-06-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute?s (JGI) Production Sequencing group is committed to the generation of high-quality genomic DNA sequence to support the DOE mission areas of renewable energy generation, global carbon management, and environmental characterization and clean-up. Within the JGI?s Production Sequencing group, the Illumina Genome Analyzer pipeline has been established as one of three sequencing platforms, along with Roche/454 and ABI/Sanger. Optimization of the Illumina pipeline has been ongoing with the aim of continual process improvement of the laboratory workflow. These process improvement projects are being led by the JGI?s Process Optimization, Sequencing Technologies, Instrumentation& Engineering, and the New Technology Production groups. Primary focus has been on improving the procedural ergonomics and the technicians? operating environment, reducing manually intensive technician operations with different tools, reducing associated production costs, and improving the overall process and generated sequence quality. The U.S. DOE JGI was established in 1997 in Walnut Creek, CA, to unite the expertise and resources of five national laboratories? Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest ? along with HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology. JGI is operated by the University of California for the U.S. DOE.

  5. The Genome Portal of the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordberg, Henrik; Cantor, Michael; Dushekyo, Serge; Hua, Susan; Poliakov, Alexander; Smirnova, Tatyana; Dubchak, Inna

    2014-03-14

    The JGI Genome Portal (http://genome.jgi.doe.gov) provides unified access to all JGI genomic databases and analytical tools. A user can search, download and explore multiple data sets available for all DOE JGI sequencing projects including their status, assemblies and annotations of sequenced genomes. Genome Portal in the past 2 years was significantly updated, with a specific emphasis on efficient handling of the rapidly growing amount of diverse genomic data accumulated in JGI. A critical aspect of handling big data in genomics is the development of visualization and analysis tools that allow scientists to derive meaning from what are otherwise terrabases of inert sequence. An interactive visualization tool developed in the group allows us to explore contigs resulting from a single metagenome assembly. Implemented with modern web technologies that take advantage of the power of the computer's graphical processing unit (gpu), the tool allows the user to easily navigate over a 100,000 data points in multiple dimensions, among many biologically meaningful parameters of a dataset such as relative abundance, contig length, and G+C content.

  6. Robotic Enrichment Processing of Roche 454 Titanium Emlusion PCR at the DOE Joint Genome Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Matthew; Wilson, Steven; Bauer, Diane; Miller, Don; Duffy-Wei, Kecia; Hammon, Nancy; Lucas, Susan; Pollard, Martin; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2010-05-28

    Enrichment of emulsion PCR product is the most laborious and pipette-intensive step in the 454 Titanium process, posing the biggest obstacle for production-oriented scale up. The Joint Genome Institute has developed a pair of custom-made robots based on the Microlab Star liquid handling deck manufactured by Hamilton to mediate the complexity and ergonomic demands of the 454 enrichment process. The robot includes a custom built centrifuge, magnetic deck positions, as well as heating and cooling elements. At present processing eight emulsion cup samples in a single 2.5 hour run, these robots are capable of processing up to 24 emulsion cup samples. Sample emulsions are broken using the standard 454 breaking process and transferred from a pair of 50ml conical tubes to a single 2ml tube and loaded on the robot. The robot performs the enrichment protocol and produces beads in 2ml tubes ready for counting. The robot follows the Roche 454 enrichment protocol with slight exceptions to the manner in which it resuspends beads via pipette mixing rather than vortexing and a set number of null bead removal washes. The robotic process is broken down in similar discrete steps: First Melt and Neutralization, Enrichment Primer Annealing, Enrichment Bead Incubation, Null Bead Removal, Second Melt and Neutralization and Sequencing Primer Annealing. Data indicating our improvements in enrichment efficiency and total number of bases per run will also be shown.

  7. Illumina GA IIx& HiSeq 2000 Production Sequenccing and QC Analysis Pipelines at the DOE Joint Genome Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daum, Christopher; Zane, Matthew; Han, James; Kennedy, Megan; San Diego, Matthew; Copeland, Alex; Li, Mingkun; Lucas, Susan

    2011-01-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute's (JGI) Production Sequencing group is committed to the generation of high-quality genomic DNA sequence to support the mission areas of renewable energy generation, global carbon management, and environmental characterization and clean-up. Within the JGI's Production Sequencing group, a robust Illumina Genome Analyzer and HiSeq pipeline has been established. Optimization of the sesequencer pipelines has been ongoing with the aim of continual process improvement of the laboratory workflow, reducing operational costs and project cycle times to increases ample throughput, and improving the overall quality of the sequence generated. A sequence QC analysis pipeline has been implemented to automatically generate read and assembly level quality metrics. The foremost of these optimization projects, along with sequencing and operational strategies, throughput numbers, and sequencing quality results will be presented.

  8. DOE Joint Genome Institute: A DOE Office of Science User Facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute About Us Phone Book Contact Us Search Our Science Our DOE Mission Areas DOE Bioenergy Research Centers Science Programs Science Highlights Scientists at JGI Our Projects...

  9. Joint BioEnergy Institute (Other) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    JOINT BIOENERGY INSTITUTE; JBEI; GENOMICS; SYSTEMS BIOLOGY; SUGAR; FUEL SYNTHESIS; SWITCH GRASS Word Cloud More Like This Multimedia File size NAView Multimedia View Multimedia

  10. Joint Genome Institute (JGI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data (Rumen HiSeq dataset). Investigators: Edward Rubin, Victor Markowitz, Shane Canon, Jeremy Brand, (LBNL) More Information: See the JGI web site Last edited: 2012-04-12...

  11. Joint BioEnergy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keasling, Jay; Simmons, Blake; Tartaglino, Virginia; Baidoo, Edward; Kothari, Ankita

    2015-06-15

    The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center dedicated to developing advanced biofuels—liquid fuels derived from the solar energy stored in plant biomass that can replace gasoline, diesel and jet fuels.

  12. "Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results Pave the Way for ... Combustion Research Facility Joint BioEnergy Institute Research Engineering and ...

  13. Joint Global Change Research Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    solutions. Joint Institute staff bring decades of experience and expertise to bear in science, technology, economics, and policy. "The Joint Global Change Research Institute...

  14. The institutional needs of joint implementation projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watt, E.; Sathaye, J.; Buen, O. de; Masera, O.; Gelil, I.A.; Ravindranath, N.H.; Zhou, D.; Li, J.; Intarapravich, D.

    1995-10-21

    In this paper, the authors discuss options for developing institutions for joint implementation (JI) projects. They focus on the tasks which are unique to JI projects or require additional institutional needs--accepting the project by the host and investor countries and assessing the project`s greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction or sequestration--and they suggest the types of institutions that would enhance their performance. The evaluation is based on four sets of governmental and international criteria for JI projects, the experiences of ten pilot JI projects, and the perspectives of seven collaborating authors from China, Egypt, India, Mexico, and Thailand, who interviewed relevant government and non-government staff involved in JI issue assessment in their countries. After examining the roles for potential JI institutions, they present early findings arguing for a decentralized national JI structure, which includes: (1) national governmental panels providing host country acceptance of proposed JI projects; (2) project parties providing the assessment data on the GHG reduction or sequestration for the projects; (3) technical experts calculating these GHG flows; (4) certified verification teams checking the GHG calculations; and (5) members of an international JI Secretariat training and certifying the assessors, as well as resolving challenges to the verifications. 86 refs.

  15. Joint Institute for Nanoscience Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.; Campbell, Charles

    2005-02-01

    Due to the inherently interdisciplinary nature of nanoscience and nanotechnology, research in this arena is often significantly enhanced through creative cooperative activities. The Joint Institute for Nanoscience (JIN) is a venture of the University of Washington (UW) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to encourage and enhance high impact and high quality nanoscience and nanotechnology research that leverages the strengths and capabilities of both institutions, and to facilitate education in these areas. This report summarizes JIN award activities that took place during fiscal year 2004 and provides a historical list of JIN awardees, their resulting publications, and JIN-related meetings. Major portions of the JIN efforts and resources are dedicated to funding graduate students and postdoctoral research associates to perform research in collaborations jointly directed by PNNL staff scientists and UW professors. JIN fellowships are awarded on the basis of applications that include research proposals. They have been very successful in expanding collaborations between PNNL and UW, which have led to many excellent joint publications and presentations and enhanced the competitiveness of both institutions for external grant funding. JIN-based interactions are playing a significant role in creating new research directions and reshaping existing research programs at both the UW and PNNL. The JIN also co-sponsors workshops on Nanoscale Science and Technology, four of which have been held in Seattle and one in Richland. In addition to involving PNNL staff in various UW nanoscience courses and seminars, a National Science Foundation grant, Development of UW-PNL Collaborative Curriculums in Nano-Science and Technology, has allowed the development of three intensive short courses that are taught by UW faculty, PNNL staff, and faculty from other institutions, including Washington State University, the University of Idaho, Stanford University, and the University of

  16. Joint Institute for Nanoscience Annual Report 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.; Campbell, Charles

    2004-02-01

    The Joint Institute for Nanoscience (JIN) is a cooperative venture of the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to encourage and enhance high-impact and high-quality nanoscience and nanotechnology of all types. This first annual report for the JIN summarizes activities beginning in 2001 and ending at the close of fiscal year 2003 and therefore represents somewhat less than two years of activities. Major portions of the JIN resources are dedicated to funding graduate students and postdoctoral research associates to perform research in collaborations jointly directed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff scientists and University of Washington (UW) professors. These fellowships were awarded on the basis of applications that included research proposals. JIN co-sponsors an annual Nanoscale Science and Technology Workshop held in Seattle. In addition to involving PNNL staff in various UW nanoscience courses and seminars, a National Science Foundation grant Development of UW-PNL Collaborative Curriculums in Nano-Science and Technology has allowed the development of three intensive short courses that are taught by UW faculty, PNNL staff, and faculty from other institutions, including Washington State University, the University of Idaho, Stanford University, and the University of Alaska. The initial JIN agreement recognized that expansion of cooperation beyond UW and PNNL would be highly valuable. Starting in early 2003, efforts were initiated to form a regional communication link called the Northwest Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Network (N₄). In concept, N₄ is a tool to encourage communication and help identify regional resources and nanoscience and technology activities.

  17. Computing and Computational Sciences Directorate - Joint Institute for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Sciences Joint Institute for Computational Sciences To help realize the full potential of new-generation computers for advancing scientific discovery, the University of Tennessee (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have created the Joint Institute for Computational Sciences (JICS). JICS combines the experience and expertise in theoretical and computational science and engineering, computer science, and mathematics in these two institutions and focuses these skills on

  18. Joint BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured on the Cover...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured on the Cover of ACS Chemical Biology - Sandia ... Combustion Research Facility Joint BioEnergy Institute Research Engineering and ...

  19. Final Technical Report of Institute for Environmental Genomics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Project Title: Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology Contract Number: DE-FG02-07ER64383 PI: Jizhong Zhou, Professor and Director, Institute for Environmental ...

  20. Genomics at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Johar

    2010-06-02

    Johar Ali of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research discusses genomics and next-gen applications at the OICR on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  1. Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Speeding Up the Process of Gene Discovery Engineered Enzyme Accelerates DNA Sequencing Putting a Virus to Practical Use DOE Joint Genome Institute The Human Genome Project: ...

  2. DOE JGI Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing, part 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miranda Harmon-Smith

    2010-09-01

    A Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) video production describing the Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing process at the US Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  3. DOE JGI Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing, part 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miranda Harmon-Smith

    2010-09-01

    A Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) video production describing the Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing process at the US Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  4. DOE JGI Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing, part 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miranda Harmon-Smith

    2010-09-01

    A Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) video production describing the Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing process at the US Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  5. Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model

  6. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    plant roots is a ubiquitous mutualism that plays key roles in plant nutrition, soil health, and carbon cycling. The symbiosis evolved repeatedly and independently as multiple...

  7. Rooted in Wonder: Joint Genome Institute Study Reveals Amazing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    microbes that affect the growth of other plants (crops like corn or wheat) researchers ... microbes that affect the growth of other plants (crops like corn or wheat) researchers ...

  8. 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute (Program Document...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Cyanobacteria: A phylum of bacteria that obtain their energy through photosynthesis, and named for the color of the bacteria. Although often called blue-green algae, that name is a ...

  10. The Future of Microbial Genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos [Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute

    2010-06-02

    Nikos Kyrpides, head of the Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses current challenges in the field of microbial genomics on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  11. Fueling Future with Algal Genomics (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    carbon cycle, and are prominent candidates for biofuel production. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is leading the world in algal genome sequencing...

  12. The Electrolyte Genome Project - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrolyte Genome Project Traditional chemistry relies on intuition and experience to select a few materials that might work well for new electrolytes. The Electrolyte Genome streamlines this process by evaluating thousands of materials by simulation on the computer and choosing the most promising few for synthesis in the laboratory. Download Electrolyte Genome

  13. Materials Project and Electrolyte Genome - Joint Center for Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Materials Project and Electrolyte Genome The Materials Project and Electrolyte Genome are computer modeling tools designed to accelerate the discovery process before testing in the laboratory. Developing beyond-lithium-ion batteries requires the discovery of new working ions, cathodes, anodes, and electrolytes. The Materials Project and the Electrolyte Genome use high-throughput computer modeling to: identify new candidates for battery materials, predict their performance, and

  14. Assembling Complex Plant Genomes | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Scientists from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) teamed with other researchers to develop and test the POPSEQ approach on the barley genome. The plant ...

  15. Realizing the Electrolyte Genome - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 18, 2014, Research Highlights Realizing the Electrolyte Genome In silico screening and design of novel electrolyte compounds Research Details JCESR is building a highly sophisticated infrastructure for high-throughput evaluation of molecular properties. This involves coupling ab initio DFT methods with rapid classic molecular dynamics, calculations of redox potentials, and solvation structure while more detailed reactivity studies are carried out. Candidates that meet performance metrics

  16. "Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results Pave

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Way for Closed-Loop Biofuel Refineries Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results Pave the Way for Closed-Loop Biofuel Refineries - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure

  17. Critical Materials Institute uses the Materials Genome approach to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Critical Materials Institute Gains Ten Industrial and Research Affiliates Critical Materials Institute Gains Ten Industrial and Research Affiliates April 12, 2016 - 10:32am Addthis News release from the Ames Laboratory, April 11, 2016. The Critical Materials Institute, a U.S. Department of Energy Innovation Hub led by the Ames Laboratory, has gained ten new affiliates to its research program, seeking ways to eliminate and reduce reliance on rare-earth metals and other

  18. A Taste of Algal Genomes from the Joint Genome Institute (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Algae play profound roles in aquatic food chains and the carbon cycle, can impose health and economic costs through toxic blooms, provide models for the study of symbiosis,...

  19. A Taste of Algal Genomes from the Joint Genome Institute Kuo...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Algae play profound roles in aquatic food chains and the carbon cycle, can impose health and economic costs through toxic blooms, provide models for the study of symbiosis,...

  20. Too Small to Fail A Joint Initiative of the Clinton Foundation and The Opportunity Institute

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Too Small to Fail A Joint Initiative of the Clinton Foundation and The Opportunity Institute Increase awareness and spark positive change in parents and communities to boost early brain and language development in children ages 0-5. *For parents and young children, make small moments big. *For communities, empower people and places to make these moments happen more often. Goals Research: A Strong Base 0 10 20 30 40 50 0 12 24 36 48 Millions of Words Number of Words Addressed High Income Middle

  1. Matthew Mumpower University of Notre Dame / Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    r-process and nuclear masses near closed shells Matthew Mumpower University of Notre Dame / Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Thursday May 15 th 2014 ATLAS User Meeting The r-Process "rapid" neutron capture (as compared to beta decay) Far from stable isotopes → nuclides participating are short lived → little to no experimental data e.g. Uranium Z=92, N=146 → need lots of neutrons Neutron Capture / Photo-dissociation Beta Decay Nuclear Data The Nuclear Chart Number of

  2. Fueling Future with Algal Genomics Grigoriev, Igor 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    play profound roles in the carbon cycle, and are prominent candidates for biofuel production. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is leading the world...

  3. Phytozome Comparative Plant Genomics Portal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodstein, David; Batra, Sajeev; Carlson, Joseph; Hayes, Richard; Phillips, Jeremy; Shu, Shengqiang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    The Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Institute is a genomics user facility supporting DOE mission science in the areas of Bioenergy, Carbon Cycling, and Biogeochemistry. The Plant Program at the JGI applies genomic, analytical, computational and informatics platforms and methods to: 1. Understand and accelerate the improvement (domestication) of bioenergy crops 2. Characterize and moderate plant response to climate change 3. Use comparative genomics to identify constrained elements and infer gene function 4. Build high quality genomic resource platforms of JGI Plant Flagship genomes for functional and experimental work 5. Expand functional genomic resources for Plant Flagship genomes

  4. A Conversation with Blake Simmons, Vice President, Deconstruction Division, and Jon Magnuson, Director, Fungal Biotechnology Group, Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Blake A.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2013-05-03

    An interview of myself and Blake Simmons conducted by Vicki Glaser, Executive Editor of Industrial Biotechnology. The subject of the interview was the relatively new PNNL led Fungal Biotechnology Group within the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI).

  5. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-03-14

    Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

  6. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  7. Experimental plan for investigating building-earth heat transfer at the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1980-11-01

    An experimental plan is presented for investigating heat transfer between below-grade portions of building envelopes and the surrounding soil. Included is a detailing of data to be collected at an earth-sheltered structure (Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research Building) to be constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The attributes of the required data collection instrumentation are defined and a program to assure the accuracy of the collected data is discussed. The experimental plan is intended to be used as a guide to selection, installation, and maintenance of instrumentation as well as in data collection and verification.

  8. Joint BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured on the Cover of ACS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research The JASPER gas gun at the Nevada National Security Site is used to fire a projectile at a plutonium target. The shock wave produced by the impact passes through the plutonium, and diagnostic equipment measures the properties of the shocked plutonium. Shock physics experiments such as this are critical to maintaining the safety and security of the nation's stockpile in the absence of underground nuclear

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - Microbial Genome and Metagenome Analysis Case Study (NERSC Workshop - May 7-8, 2009).ppt [Compatibility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microbial Genome & Metagenome Analysis: Computational Challenges Natalia N. Ivanova * Nikos C. Kyrpides * Victor M. Markowitz ** * Genome Biology Program, Joint Genome Institute ** Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Microbial genome & metagenome analysis General aims Understand microbial life Apply to agriculture, bioremediation, biofuels, human health Specific aims include Specific aims include Predict biochemistry & physiology of organisms based on genome sequence Explain known

  10. Genomic Science | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Genomic Science Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Genomic Science DOE Bioenergy Research Centers Bioimaging Technology DOE Joint Genome Institute Structural Biology Radiochemistry & Imaging Instrumentation Radiobiology: Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Human Subjects Protection Program Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Facilities

  11. Mapping the Topology of the Human Genome

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping the Topology of the Human Genome Mapping the Topology of the Human Genome Print Monday, 11 July 2016 00:00 Department of Energy facilities such as the Joint Genome Institute provide us with DNA sequences for entire genomes, most famously the human genome. However, a DNA sequence alone isn't sufficient to determine how a gene will function in a cell, or if indeed it will be functional at all. We also need to know the spatial 3D arrangement of the genome in the nucleus. A single strand of

  12. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  13. Genomic Advances to Improve Biomass for Biofuels (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rokhsar, Daniel

    2011-04-28

    Lawrence Berkeley National Lab bioscientist Daniel Rokhsar discusses genomic advances to improve biomass for biofuels. He presented his talk Feb. 11, 2008 in Berkeley, California as part of Berkeley Lab's community lecture series. Rokhsar works with the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and Berkeley Lab's Genomics Division.

  14. A GSC Global Genome Census (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos [DOE JGI

    2011-04-29

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Nikos Kyrpides of the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses the notion of a global genome census at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  15. Institute for Advanced Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    working on joint NMC proposals. Participation in the projects must not negatively impact partner institutions. Funding for joint projects should be through partner...

  16. Improving biofuel feedstocks by modifying xylan biosynthesis (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, Jane

    2013-03-01

    Jane Lau of the Joint BioEnergy Institute on "Improving biofuel feedstocks by modifying xylan biosynthesis" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  17. Algal Functional Annotation Tool from the DOE-UCLA Institute for Genomics and Proteomics

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lopez, David

    The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a bioinformatics resource to visualize pathway maps, identify enriched biological terms, or convert gene identifiers to elucidate biological function in silico. These types of analysis have been catered to support lists of gene identifiers, such as those coming from transcriptome gene expression analysis. By analyzing the functional annotation of an interesting set of genes, common biological motifs may be elucidated and a first-pass analysis can point further research in the right direction. Currently, the following databases have been parsed, processed, and added to the tool: 1( Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Pathways Database, 2) MetaCyc Encyclopedia of Metabolic Pathways, 3) Panther Pathways Database, 4) Reactome Pathways Database, 5) Gene Ontology, 6) MapMan Ontology, 7) KOG (Eukaryotic Clusters of Orthologous Groups), 5)Pfam, 6) InterPro.

  18. DEVELOPMENT, INSTALLATION AND OPERATION OF THE MPC&A OPERATIONS MONITORING (MOM) SYSTEM AT THE JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH (JINR) DUBNA, RUSSIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kartashov,V.V.; Pratt,W.; Romanov, Y.A.; Samoilov, V.N.; Shestakov, B.A.; Duncan, C.; Brownell, L.; Carbonaro, J.; White, R.M.; Coffing, J.A.

    2009-07-12

    The Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Operations Monitoring (MOM) systems handling at the International Intergovernmental Organization - Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) is described in this paper. Category I nuclear material (plutonium and uranium) is used in JINR research reactors, facilities and for scientific and research activities. A monitoring system (MOM) was installed at JINR in April 2003. The system design was based on a vulnerability analysis, which took into account the specifics of the Institute. The design and installation of the MOM system was a collaborative effort between JINR, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Financial support was provided by DOE through BNL. The installed MOM system provides facility management with additional assurance that operations involving nuclear material (NM) are correctly followed by the facility personnel. The MOM system also provides additional confidence that the MPC&A systems continue to perform effectively.

  19. Genomics Dan Rokhsar, DOE JGI/LBNL & UC Berkeley NERSC User Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Genomics Dan Rokhsar, DOE JGI/LBNL & UC Berkeley NERSC User Meeting 4 February 2014 Computing for Genomics * The DOE Joint Genome Institute - Who we are, what we do, and why * Two computational problems in genomics - "Assembling" genomes from "shotgun" sequence - "Annotating" "metagenomic" data 2 DOE JGI- A Genomics User Facility * In 1997, as part of the ramp-up for the human genome project, the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research

  20. Defining Genome Project Standards in a New Era of Sequencing (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chain, Patrick [DOE JGI

    2011-04-28

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego.

  1. Opening Remarks from the Joint Genome Institute and Argonne Lab High Performance Computing Workshop (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rubin, Eddy

    2011-06-03

    DOE JGI Director Eddy Rubin gives opening remarks at the JGI/Argonne High Performance Computing (HPC) Workshop on January 25, 2010.

  2. Opening Remarks from the Joint Genome Institute and Argonne Lab High Performance Computing Workshop (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, Eddy

    2010-01-25

    DOE JGI Director Eddy Rubin gives opening remarks at the JGI/Argonne High Performance Computing (HPC) Workshop on January 25, 2010.

  3. Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI: Program Overview and Program Informatics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah [DOE JGI

    2013-01-22

    Susannah Tringe of the DOE Joint Genome Institute talks about the Program Overview and Program Informatics at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

  4. Genome Analyses and Supplement Data from the International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    The sequencing of the first tree genome, that of Populus, was a project initiated by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOEs Office of Science. The International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC) was formed to help develop and guide post-sequence activities. The IPGC website, hosted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides draft sequence data as it is made available from DOE Joint Genome Institute, genome analyses for Populus, lists of related publications and resources, and the science plan. The data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ipgc/ssr_resource.htm.

  5. Genome Analyses and Supplement Data from the International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    The sequencing of the first tree genome, that of Populus, was a project initiated by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE’s Office of Science. The International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC) was formed to help develop and guide post-sequence activities. The IPGC website, hosted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides draft sequence data as it is made available from DOE Joint Genome Institute, genome analyses for Populus, lists of related publications and resources, and the science plan. The data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ipgc/ssr_resource.htm.

  6. Phytozome System for Comparative Plant Genomics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-09-27

    Phytozome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the UC Berkeley Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst green plants. Families of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These families allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of release 7.0, Phytozome providesmore » access to twenty-five sequenced and annotated green plant genomes which have been clustered into gene families at eleven evolutionarily significant nodes., Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, TAIR, JGI are lyper-linked and searchable.« less

  7. MycoCosm portal: gearing up for 1000 fungal genomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.; Nikitin, Roman; Haridas, Sajeet; Kuo, Alan; Ohm, Robin; Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Zhao, Xueling; Korzeniewski, Frank; Smirnova, Tatyana; Nordberg, Henrik; Dubchak, Inna; Shabalov, Igor

    2013-10-09

    MycoCosm is a fungal genomics portal (http://jgi.doe.gov/fungi), developed by the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute to support integration, analysis and dissemination of fungal genome sequences and other omics data by providing interactive web-based tools. MycoCosm also promotes and facilitates user community participation through the nomination of new species of fungi for sequencing, and the annotation and analysis of resulting data. By efficiently filling gaps in the Fungal Tree of Life, MycoCosm will help address important problems associated with energy and the environment, taking advantage of growing fungal genomics resources.

  8. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  9. Genome Improvement at JGI-HAGSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy J.; Myers, Richard M.

    2012-03-03

    Since the completion of the sequencing of the human genome, the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has rapidly expanded its scientific goals in several DOE mission-relevant areas. At the JGI-HAGSC, we have kept pace with this rapid expansion of projects with our focus on assessing, assembling, improving and finishing eukaryotic whole genome shotgun (WGS) projects for which the shotgun sequence is generated at the Production Genomic Facility (JGI-PGF). We follow this by combining the draft WGS with genomic resources generated at JGI-HAGSC or in collaborator laboratories (including BAC end sequences, genetic maps and FLcDNA sequences) to produce an improved draft sequence. For eukaryotic genomes important to the DOE mission, we then add further information from directed experiments to produce reference genomic sequences that are publicly available for any scientific researcher. Also, we have continued our program for producing BAC-based finished sequence, both for adding information to JGI genome projects and for small BAC-based sequencing projects proposed through any of the JGI sequencing programs. We have now built our computational expertise in WGS assembly and analysis and have moved eukaryotic genome assembly from the JGI-PGF to JGI-HAGSC. We have concentrated our assembly development work on large plant genomes and complex fungal and algal genomes.

  10. Joint BioEnergy Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water ...

  11. PNNL: About PNNL - Joint Appointments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yong Wang Dunning leads the Northwest Institute for Advanced Computing, a partnership of PNNL and the University of Washington. Joint Appointments PNNL seeks opportunities to build...

  12. Joint Facilities User Forum on Data Intensive Computing Lessons Learned

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Forum on Data Intensive Computing Lessons Learned - NERSC/JGI Partnership Kjiersten Fagnan, NERSC User Services/JGI --- 1 --- June 1 7, 2 013 Outline * Overview o f N ERSC/JGI P artnership - DOE J GI b ackground - Team o verview - Compute r esources * CompuBng S trategic P lan - JGI G oals - NERSC G oals * Lessons Learned --- 2 --- DOE Joint Genome Institute 3 DOE JGI, Serving as a genomic user facility in support of the DOE missions: * Walnut Creek, CA facility opened in 1999 * 250

  13. Phytozome: a Tool for Green Plant Comparative Genomics

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Phytozome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst green plants. Clusters of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These clusters allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of release v4.0, Phytozome provides access to nine sequenced and annotated green plant genomes, eight of which have been clustered into gene families at six evolutionarily significant nodes. Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, TAIR, JGI are hyper-linked and searchable. [Copied from the Overview at http://www.phytozome.net/Phytozome_info.php

  14. Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  15. Genomic Speciation and Adaptation in Aquilegia (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, Scott [University of California, Santa Barbara] [University of California, Santa Barbara

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Scott Hodges of the University of California, Santa Barbara gives a presentation on "Genomic Speciation and Adaptation in Aquilegia" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  16. Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University] [Penn State University

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  17. Genomic Speciation and Adaptation in Aquilegia (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hodges, Scott [University of California, Santa Barbara

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Scott Hodges of the University of California, Santa Barbara gives a presentation on "Genomic Speciation and Adaptation in Aquilegia" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  18. Institute of Development Studies Feed | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) Joint Implementation Network (JIN) Kumasi Institute of Technology and...

  19. ZipperDB: Predictions of Fibril-forming Segments within Proteins Identified by the 3D Profile Method (from the UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Goldschmidt, L.; Teng, P. K.; Riek, R.; Eisenberg, D.

    ZipperDB contains predictions of fibril-forming segments within proteins identified by the 3D Profile Method. The UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics has analyzed over 20,000 putative protein sequences for segments with high fibrillation propensity that could form a "steric zipper"ùtwo self-complementary beta sheets, giving rise to the spine of an amyloid fibril. The approach is unique in that structural information is used to evaluate the likelihood that a particular sequence can form fibrils. [copied with edits from http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/]. In addition to searching the database, academic and non-profit users may also submit their protein sequences to the database.

  20. ZipperDB: Predictions of Fibril-forming Segments within Proteins Identified by the 3D Profile Method (from the UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Goldschmidt, L.; Teng, P. K.; Riek, R.; Eisenberg, D.

    ZipperDB contains predictions of fibril-forming segments within proteins identified by the 3D Profile Method. The UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics has analyzed over 20,000 putative protein sequences for segments with high fibrillation propensity that could form a "steric zipper"two self-complementary beta sheets, giving rise to the spine of an amyloid fibril. The approach is unique in that structural information is used to evaluate the likelihood that a particular sequence can form fibrils. [copied with edits from http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/]. In addition to searching the database, academic and non-profit users may also submit their protein sequences to the database.

  1. Diverse Lifestyles and Strategies of Plant Pathogenesis Encoded in the Genomes of Eighteen Doethideomycetes Fungi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohm, Robin A.; Feau, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Schoch, Conrad L.; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Condon, Bradford J.; Copeland, Alex C.; Dhillon, Braham; Glaser, Fabien; Hesse, Cedar N.; Kosti, Idit; LaButti, Kurt; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf A.; Bradshaw, Rosie E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda; Hamelin, Richard C.; Kema, Gert H. J.; Lawrence, Christopher; Scott, James A.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Turgeon, B. Gillian; de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; Zhong, Shaobin; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2012-03-13

    The class of Dothideomycetes is one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related species can have very diverse host plants. Eighteen genomes of Dothideomycetes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. Here we describe the results of comparative analyses of the fungi in this group.

  2. Mapping the Topology of the Human Genome

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping the Topology of the Human Genome Mapping the Topology of the Human Genome Print Monday, 11 July 2016 00:00 Department of Energy facilities such as the Joint Genome ...

  3. PNNL: About PNNL - Institutional Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    we engage at the institutional level, inviting them to provide input into the Laboratory strategy. Joint Appointments To enable long term strategic collaborations with...

  4. Genomic and Systems Biology Analyses of Social Behavior or Evolutionary Genomic Analyses of Insect Society: Eat, Drink, and Be Scary (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Robinson, Gene

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gene Robinson of the University of Illinois on "Genomic and Systems Biology Analyses of Social Behavior" at the 6th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  5. Genomic and Systems Biology Analyses of Social Behavior or Evolutionary Genomic Analyses of Insect Society: Eat, Drink, and Be Scary (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Gene

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gene Robinson of the University of Illinois on "Genomic and Systems Biology Analyses of Social Behavior" at the 6th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  6. Complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakatsu, C. H.; Barabote, Ravi; Thompson, Sue; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Brettin, T.; Han, Cliff F.; Beasley, Federico; Chen, Weimin; Konopka, Allan; Xie, Gary

    2013-09-30

    Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 is a species in the genus Arthrobacter Conn and Dimmick 1947, in the family Micrococcaceae and class Actinobacteria. A number of Arthrobacter genome sequences have been completed because of their important role in soil, especially bioremediation. This isolate is of special interest because it is tolerant to multiple metals and it is extremely resistant to elevated concentrations of chromate. The genome consists of a 4,698,945 bp circular chromosome and three plasmids (96,488, 115,507, and 159,536 bp, a total of 5,070,478 bp), coding 4,536 proteins of which 1,257 are without known function. This genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program.

  7. The Genomes and Metagenomes (GEM) Catalogue (first presentation) and The ISA-GCDML Workshop (second presentation) (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Field, Dawn [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology]; Sansone, Susanna [EBI

    2011-04-29

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding ''Research Coordination Network'' from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Dawn Field of the NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology briefly introduces the GEM Catalogue, followed by Susanna Sansone of the European Bioinformatics Institute who talks about the ISA-GCDML workshop at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  8. Joint Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    institution or organization are encouraged to do so, or to check their institution's web site for information, and then contact their agency program officer, or agency contacts...

  9. Ceramic joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Bradley J.; Patten, Jr., Donald O.

    1991-01-01

    Butt joints between materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion are prepared having a reduced probability of failure of stress facture. This is accomplished by narrowing/tapering the material having the lower coefficient of thermal expansion in a direction away from the joint interface and not joining the narrow-tapered surface to the material having the higher coefficient of thermal expansion.

  10. Association Genetics of Populus trichocarpa or Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerry

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  11. Association Genetics of Populus trichocarpa or Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerry

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  12. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. Ai1a-2; a microsymbiont of Andira inermis discovered in Costa Rica

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tian, Rui; Parker, Matthew; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Baeshen, Mohammed; Baeshen, Nabih; et al

    2015-06-14

    Bradyrhizobium sp. Ai1a-2 is is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen fixing root nodule of Andira inermis collected from Tres Piedras in Costa Rica. In this report we describe, for the first time, the genome sequence information and annotation of this legume microsymbiont. The 9,029,266 bp genome has a GC content of 62.56% with 247 contigs arranged into 246 scaffolds. The assembled genome contains 8,482 protein-coding genes and 102 RNA-only encoding genes. Lastly, this rhizobial genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Rootmore » Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.« less

  13. Genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. WSM1253; a microsymbiont of Ornithopus compressus from the Greek Island of Sifnos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ron; Tian, Rui; Held, Britanny; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-11-30

    Bradyrhizobium sp. WSM1253 is a novel N2-fixing bacterium isolated from a root nodule of the herbaceous annual legume Ornithopus compressus that was growing on the Greek Island of Sifnos. WSM1253 emerged as a strain of interest in an Australian program that was selecting inoculant quality bradyrhizobial strains for inoculation of Mediterranean species of lupins ( Lupinus angustifolius, L. princei, L. atlanticus, L. pilosus ). In this report we describe, for the first time, the genome sequence information and annotation of this legume microsymbiont. The 8,719,808 bp genome has a G + C content of 63.09 % with 71 contigs arranged into two scaffolds. The assembled genome contains 8,432 protein-coding genes, 66 RNA genes and a single rRNA operon. In conclusion, this improved-high-quality draft rhizobial genome is one of 20 sequenced through a DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Project.

  14. Genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. WSM1253; a microsymbiont of Ornithopus compressus from the Greek Island of Sifnos

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ron; Tian, Rui; Held, Britanny; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Huntemann, Marcel; et al

    2015-11-30

    Bradyrhizobium sp. WSM1253 is a novel N2-fixing bacterium isolated from a root nodule of the herbaceous annual legume Ornithopus compressus that was growing on the Greek Island of Sifnos. WSM1253 emerged as a strain of interest in an Australian program that was selecting inoculant quality bradyrhizobial strains for inoculation of Mediterranean species of lupins ( Lupinus angustifolius, L. princei, L. atlanticus, L. pilosus ). In this report we describe, for the first time, the genome sequence information and annotation of this legume microsymbiont. The 8,719,808 bp genome has a G + C content of 63.09 % with 71 contigs arrangedmore » into two scaffolds. The assembled genome contains 8,432 protein-coding genes, 66 RNA genes and a single rRNA operon. In conclusion, this improved-high-quality draft rhizobial genome is one of 20 sequenced through a DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Project.« less

  15. Joint Coordinating Committee | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Joint Coordinating Committee

  16. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. Th.b2, a microsymbiont of Amphicarpaea bracteata collected in Johnson City, New York

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tian, Rui; Parker, Matthew; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Baeshen, Mohammed N.; Baeshen, Nabih A.; et al

    2015-05-16

    Bradyrhizobium sp. Th.b2 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen-fixing root nodule of Amphicarpaea bracteata collected in Johnson City, New York. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. Th.b2, together with high-quality permanent draft genome sequence information and annotation. The 10,118,060 high-quality draft genome is arranged in 266 scaffolds of 274 contigs, contains 9,809 protein-coding genes and 108 RNA-only encoding genes. In conclusion, this rhizobial genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  17. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. Tv2a.2, a microsymbiont of Tachigali versicolor discovered in Barro Colorado Island of Panama

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tian, Rui; Parker, Matthew; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, TBK; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Baeshen, Mohammed N.; Baeshen, Nabih A.; et al

    2015-05-17

    Bradyrhizobiumsp. Tv2a.2 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen-fixing root nodule of Tachigali versicolor collected in Barro Colorado Island of Panama. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobiumsp. Tv2a.2, together with high-quality permanent draft genome sequence information and annotation. The 8,496,279 bp high-quality draft genome is arranged in 87 scaffolds of 87 contigs, contains 8,109 protein-coding genes and 72 RNA-only encoding genes. In conclusion, this rhizobial genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  18. Comments of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies Comments of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies The Media and Technology Institute and the Climate Change Initiative at the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies ("Joint Center")1 respectfully submit these comments in response to the United States Department of Energy's ("DoE") Request for Information regarding its implementation of the Smart Grid provisions of Federal

  19. Comparative Genome Structure, Secondary Metabolite, and Effector Coding Capacity across Cochliobolus Pathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condon, Bradford J.; Leng, Yueqiang; Wu, Dongliang; Bushley, Kathryn E.; Ohm, Robin A.; Otillar, Robert; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Grimwood, Jane; MohdZainudin, NurAinlzzati; Xue, Chunsheng; Wang, Rui; Manning, Viola A.; Dhillon, Braham; Tu, Zheng Jin; Steffenson, Brian J.; Salamov, Asaf; Sun, Hui; Lowry, Steve; LaButti, Kurt; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Lindquist, Erika; Barry, Kerrie; Schmutz, Jeremy; Baker, Scott E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Zhong, Shaobin; Turgeon, B. Gillian

    2013-01-24

    The genomes of five Cochliobolus heterostrophus strains, two Cochliobolus sativus strains, three additional Cochliobolus species (Cochliobolus victoriae, Cochliobolus carbonum, Cochliobolus miyabeanus), and closely related Setosphaeria turcica were sequenced at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). The datasets were used to identify SNPs between strains and species, unique genomic regions, core secondary metabolism genes, and small secreted protein (SSP) candidate effector encoding genes with a view towards pinpointing structural elements and gene content associated with specificity of these closely related fungi to different cereal hosts. Whole-genome alignment shows that three to five of each genome differs between strains of the same species, while a quarter of each genome differs between species. On average, SNP counts among field isolates of the same C. heterostrophus species are more than 25 higher than those between inbred lines and 50 lower than SNPs between Cochliobolus species. The suites of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), polyketide synthase (PKS), and SSP encoding genes are astoundingly diverse among species but remarkably conserved among isolates of the same species, whether inbred or field strains, except for defining examples that map to unique genomic regions. Functional analysis of several strain-unique PKSs and NRPSs reveal a strong correlation with a role in virulence.

  20. Research and development joint ventures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Three panels made up of members of Congress and representatives of research and high technology industries testified at a hearing held to consider H.R. 1952 and H.R. 3393, both bills dealing with joint venture policies that diminish US competitiveness. The bills are designed to eliminate disincentives stemming from antitrust concerns about joint research and development (R and D) activities and to encourage private investment in R and D. The witnesses were asked to evaluate and compare the potential of these bills to overcome institutional barriers and to stimulate capital formation. Three appendices with statements from the National Association of Manufacturers, the Semiconductor Industry Association, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers submitted for the record follow the testimony of the eight witnesses. (DCK)

  1. Complete genome sequence of Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus type strain ARh 1T, an obligately chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from a Kenyan soda lake

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Kyrpides, Nikos; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Muyzer, Gerard

    2015-11-19

    Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus strain ARh 1T is a chemolithoautotrophic, non-motile, Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria that was isolated from samples of haloalkaline soda lakes. It derives energy from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and is notable for its ability to grow on thiocyanate as its sole source of electrons, sulfur and nitrogen. The full genome consists of 3,756,729 bp and comprises 3,500 protein-coding and 57 RNA-coding genes. Moreover, this organism was sequenced as part of the community science program at the DOE Joint Genome Institute.

  2. Financial Institutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A lending program begins with a financial institution that procures the funds they lend from a number of other sources.

  3. Seaborg Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Seaborg Institute The institute provides a primary mechanism for fostering cooperation and collaboration in actinide science among the national laboratories, university campuses, and the national and international actinide science community. Contact Director Albert Migliori (505) 663-5627 Email Deputy Director Franz Freibert (505) 667-6879 Email Professional Staff Assistant Susan Ramsay (505) 665-0858 Email actinide The Seaborg Institute at Los Alamos integrates research programs,

  4. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Engineering Institute Multidisciplinary engineering research that integrates advanced modeling and simulations, novel sensing systems and new developments in information technology. May 14, 2013 Los Alamos Research Park Los Alamos Research Park, the home of Engineering Institute Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505)

  5. Accelerating Biofuel Feedstock Crop Improvement with Miscanthus Genomics (2014 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaminathan, Kankshita

    2014-03-20

    Kankshita Swaminathan of the Energy Biosciences Institute speaks at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  6. Bonus Organisms in High-Throughput Eukaryotic Whole-Genome Shorgun Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank; Platt, Darren

    2006-02-06

    The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced over 50 eukaryotic genomes, ranging in size from 15 MB to 1.6 GB, over a wide range of organism types. In the course of doing so, it has become clear that a substantial fraction of these data sets contains bonus organisms, usually prokaryotes, in addition to the desired genome. While some of these additional organisms are extraneous contamination, they are sometimes symbionts, and so can be of biological interest. Therefore, it is desirable to assemble the bonus organisms along with the main genome. This transforms the problem into one of metagenomic assembly, which is considerably more challenging than traditional whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The different organisms will usually be present at different sequence depths, which is difficult to handle in most WGS assemblers. In addition, with multiple distinct genomes present, chimerism can produce cross-organism combinations. Finally, there is no guarantee that only a single bonus organism will be present. For example, one JGI project contained at least two different prokaryotic contaminants, plus a 145 KB plasmid of unknown origin. We have developed techniques to routinely identify and handle such bonus organisms in a high-throughput sequencing environment. Approaches include screening and partitioning the unassembled data, and iterative subassemblies. These methods are applicable not only to bonus organisms, but also to desired components such as organelles. These procedures have the additional benefit of identifying, and allowing for the removal of, cloning artifacts such as E.coli and spurious vector inclusions.

  7. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    upon completion of their graduate degrees Over the last seven years, 150 students from 50 academic institutions have participated in the summer school and sixteen such TSM's have...

  8. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Opportunities » Engineering Institute Engineering Institute Engineering dynamics that include flight, vibration isolation for precision manufacturing, earthquake engineering, blast loading, signal processing, and experimental model analysis. Contact Leader, Los Alamos Charles Farrar Email Leader, UCSD Michael Todd Email Los Alamos Program Administrator Jutta Kayser (505) 663-5649 Email Administrative Assistant Stacy Baker (505) 663-5233 Email Collaboration for conducting

  9. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  10. 2014 Joint Action Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Joint Action Workshop is an annual event for joint action agencies and their members to meet informally and discuss emerging policy, regulatory, and power supply issues, and other topics...

  11. Photo of the Week: Sequencing the Genome of the Poplar Tree ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -- and working to develop specific strains of poplars for various applications, like biofuel production. In 2006, researchers at the Energy Departments Joint Genome...

  12. Joint Facilities User Forum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) The environmental management system (EMS) has two areas of focus: environmental compliance and environmental sustainability. The environmental compliance aspect of the EMS consists of regulatory compliance and monitoring programs that implement federal, state, local, and tribal requirements; agreements; and permits under the Legacy Management contract. The

  13. Joint Electromagnetic Pulse Resilience Strategy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electromagnetic Pulse Resilience Strategy Joint Electromagnetic Pulse Resilience Strategy The Joint Electromagnetic Pulse Resilience Strategy is a collaboration between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) that enhances coordination and guides future efforts to help meet the growing demands for electromagnetic pulse (EMP) guidance. The Joint Strategy lays out five strategic goals to guide DOE and EPRI to minimize EMP impacts and improve resilience: 1.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus type strain ARh 1T, an obligately chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from a Kenyan soda lake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Kyrpides, Nikos; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Muyzer, Gerard

    2015-11-19

    Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus strain ARh 1T is a chemolithoautotrophic, non-motile, Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria that was isolated from samples of haloalkaline soda lakes. It derives energy from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and is notable for its ability to grow on thiocyanate as its sole source of electrons, sulfur and nitrogen. The full genome consists of 3,756,729 bp and comprises 3,500 protein-coding and 57 RNA-coding genes. Moreover, this organism was sequenced as part of the community science program at the DOE Joint Genome Institute.

  15. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Koval, Carl; Lee, Kenny; Houle, Frances; Lewis, Nate

    2013-12-19

    The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology. Established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, JCAP aims to find a cost-effective method to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide as inputs. JCAP brings together more than 140 top scientists and researchers from the California Institute of Technology and its lead partner, Berkeley Lab, along with collaborators from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of California campuses at Irvine and San Diego.

  16. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software Download and Data Sets First name * Last name * Email address * Institution * Software & Data Set Selection (Select one or more) SHMTools Software (0.20.0 Beta) mFUSE ...

  17. Quantum Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Institute Quantum Institute A new research frontier awaits! Our door is open and we thrive on mutually beneficial partnerships, collaborations that drive innovations and new technologies. Contact Leader Malcolm Boshier (505) 665-8892 Email Two of LANL's most successful quantum technology initiatives: quantum cryptography and the race for quantum computer The area of quantum information, science, and technology is rapidly evolving, with important applications in the areas of quantum

  18. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EI Software Download Request EI Software Download Request Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email Software Download and Data Sets First name * Last name * Email address * Institution * Software & Data Set Selection (Select one or more) SHMTools Software (0.20.0 Beta) mFUSE Interface (0.2.0 Beta) Datasets

  19. Celebration of the Genome - Secretary Abraham Statement 4/10...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA sequence of the human genome. This coming week, representatives of DOE and the National Institutes of Health will announce the completion of the sequencing of the human genome. ...

  20. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. WCH70, a thermophilic strain isolated from wood compost

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Mead, David

    2016-04-27

    Geobacillus sp. WCH70 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from hot composts in the Middleton, WI area. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences showed the strain may be a new species, and is most closely related to G. galactosidasius and G. toebii. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2009 (CP001638). The genome of Geobacillus species WCH70 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp with an average G + C content of 43 %, and two circular plasmids of 33,899 and 10,287 bp with anmore » average G + C content of 40 %. Among sequenced organisms, Geobacillus sp. WCH70 shares highest Average Nucleotide Identity (86 %) with G. thermoglucosidasius strains, as well as similar genome organization. Geobacillus sp. WCH70 appears to be a highly adaptable organism, with an exceptionally high 125 annotated transposons in the genome. The organism also possesses four predicted restriction-modification systems not found in other Geobacillus species.« less

  1. Genomics of Climate Resilience (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    2013-03-27

    Eldredge Bermingham of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute-Panama on "Genomics of climate resilience" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  2. WIPP - Joint Information Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Joint Information Center is located at 4021 National Parks Highway in Carlsbad, N.M. Joint Information Center In the unlikely event of an emergency, the WIPP Joint Information Center (JIC) serves as a central control point to coordinate multi-agency efforts to issue timely and accurate information to the public, news media and project employees. Emergency contact information: The public If the JIC is activated, members of the general public, including family members, may call (575) 234-7380

  3. Genomics and Systems Biology of Tuberculosis (2009 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Galagan, James

    2011-04-25

    James Galagan from the Broad Institute spoke about the "Genomics and Systems Biology of TB" on March 26, 2009 during the 4th Annual User Meeting

  4. Thomas Moore creates joint invention with MIT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thomas Moore creates joint invention with MIT 20 Nov 2009 For Arizona State University (ASU) Professor Thomas Moore, an invitation to guest lecture became a demonstration in a lab which led to a seafood lunch - which led to a joint invention with colleagues from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) that contributed to a sustainable energy start-up company. Moore had been asked to speak at a summer course taught by well-known MIT Professor Daniel Nocera and, after the lecture, Moore

  5. Complete genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic thiosulfate and sulfide-oxidizing γ-proteobacterium Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum type strain ALM 1 (DSM 14477T)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kappler, Ulrike; Davenport, Karen W.; Beatson, Scott; Lapidus, Alla L.; Pan, Chongle; Han, Cliff; Montero-Calasanz, Maria del Carmen; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren John; Rohde, Manfred; et al

    2016-06-03

    Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum (Sorokin et al. 2002) is a member of the family Piscirickettsiaceae in the order Thiotrichales. The -proteobacterium belongs to the colourless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from saline soda lakes with stable alkaline pH, such as Lake Mono (California) and Soap Lake (Washington State). Strain ALM 1T is characterized by its adaptation to life in the oxic/anoxic interface towards the less saline aerobic waters (mixolimnion) of the stable stratified alkaline salt lakes. Strain ALM 1T is the first representative of the genus Thioalkalimicrobium whose genome sequence has been deciphered and the fourth genome sequence of a type strain of themore » Piscirickettsiaceae to be published. As a result, the 1,932,455 bp long chromosome with its 1,684 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2008.« less

  6. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work ...

  7. Genome Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voytas, Dan

    2014-03-20

    Dan Voytas, University of Minnesota, at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  8. News Archive | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Archive CMI in the news 2016 Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Critical Materials Institute, Oddello Industries pursue recovery of rare-earth magnets from used hard drives, August 16, 2016 Colorado School of Mines: Solar panels power materials exhibit at Geology Museum, August 2, 2016 The White House: The Materials Genome Initiative: The First Five Years, August 2, 2016 Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Mirzadeh, Moyer, Wesolowski named ORNL Corporate Fellows, June 30, 2016 newswise: CMI taps the

  9. Building international genomics collaboration for global health security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Helen H.; Erkkila, Tracy; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Vuyisich, Momchilo

    2015-12-07

    Genome science and technologies are transforming life sciences globally in many ways and becoming a highly desirable area for international collaboration to strengthen global health. The Genome Science Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is leveraging a long history of expertise in genomics research to assist multiple partner nations in advancing their genomics and bioinformatics capabilities. The capability development objectives focus on providing a molecular genomics-based scientific approach for pathogen detection, characterization, and biosurveillance applications. The general approaches include introduction of basic principles in genomics technologies, training on laboratory methodologies and bioinformatic analysis of resulting data, procurement, and installation of next-generation sequencing instruments, establishing bioinformatics software capabilities, and exploring collaborative applications of the genomics capabilities in public health. Genome centers have been established with public health and research institutions in the Republic of Georgia, Kingdom of Jordan, Uganda, and Gabon; broader collaborations in genomics applications have also been developed with research institutions in many other countries.

  10. Genomes to Proteomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panisko, Ellen A.; Grigoriev, Igor; Daly, Don S.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Baker, Scott E.

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  11. Safety Monitor Joint Working Group (JWG) Tour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 th Meeting of the Joint Working Group of the U.S.-Japan Coordinating Committee of Fusion Energy on Safety in Inter-Institutional Collaborations (U.S.-Japan Safety Monitoring Program) Meeting in Japan, July 29-August 2, 2013 Submitted: October 16, 2013 Respectfully submitted to: Barry Sullivan Program Manager - ES&H U.S. DOE - Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Professor Kiyohiko Nishimura Head of Division for Health and Safety Management National Institute for Fusion Science Prepared by: Lee

  12. Joint BioEnergy Institute (Other) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Center dedicated to developing advanced biofuels-liquid fuels derived from the solar energy stored in plant biomass that can replace gasoline, diesel and jet fuels. ...

  13. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  14. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  15. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the extremely osmotolerant diphenol degrading bacterium Halotalea alkalilenta AW-7T, and emended description of the genus Halotalea

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ntougias, Spyridon; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor M.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Fasseas, Constantinos; et al

    2015-08-13

    Members of the genus Halotalea (family Halomonadaceae) are of high significance since they can tolerate the greatest glucose and maltose concentrations ever reported for known bacteria and are involved in the degradation of industrial effluents. Here, the characteristics and the permanent-draft genome sequence and annotation of Halotalea alkalilenta AW-7T are described. The microorganism was sequenced as a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project at the DOE Joint Genome Institute, and it is the only strain within the genus Halotalea having its genome sequenced. The genome is 4,467,826 bp longmore » and consists of 40 scaffolds with 64.62 % average GC content. A total of 4,104 genes were predicted, comprising of 4,028 protein-coding and 76 RNA genes. Most protein-coding genes (87.79 %) were assigned to a putative function. Halotalea alkalilenta AW-7T encodes the catechol and protocatechuate degradation to β-ketoadipate via the β-ketoadipate and protocatechuate ortho-cleavage degradation pathway, and it possesses the genetic ability to detoxify fluoroacetate, cyanate and acrylonitrile. Lastly, an emended description of the genus Halotalea Ntougias et al. 2007 is also provided in order to describe the delayed fermentation ability of the type strain.« less

  16. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the extremely osmotolerant diphenol degrading bacterium Halotalea alkalilenta AW-7T, and emended description of the genus Halotalea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ntougias, Spyridon; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor M.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Fasseas, Constantinos; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Zervakis, Georgios I.

    2015-08-13

    Members of the genus Halotalea (family Halomonadaceae) are of high significance since they can tolerate the greatest glucose and maltose concentrations ever reported for known bacteria and are involved in the degradation of industrial effluents. Here, the characteristics and the permanent-draft genome sequence and annotation of Halotalea alkalilenta AW-7T are described. The microorganism was sequenced as a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project at the DOE Joint Genome Institute, and it is the only strain within the genus Halotalea having its genome sequenced. The genome is 4,467,826 bp long and consists of 40 scaffolds with 64.62 % average GC content. A total of 4,104 genes were predicted, comprising of 4,028 protein-coding and 76 RNA genes. Most protein-coding genes (87.79 %) were assigned to a putative function. Halotalea alkalilenta AW-7T encodes the catechol and protocatechuate degradation to β-ketoadipate via the β-ketoadipate and protocatechuate ortho-cleavage degradation pathway, and it possesses the genetic ability to detoxify fluoroacetate, cyanate and acrylonitrile. Lastly, an emended description of the genus Halotalea Ntougias et al. 2007 is also provided in order to describe the delayed fermentation ability of the type strain.

  17. Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Former Workers Screening Program Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program The Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG) includes representatives from DOE, Department of Labor (DOL), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Offices of the Ombudsman for DOL and NIOSH, and the DOE-funded FWP projects. The JOTG was established in 2009 under the premise that agencies/programs with common goals can work together by combining resources and coordinating

  18. Whose genome is it, anyway?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, E.

    1996-09-27

    The genome program has issued guidelines to ensure that sequencing is done on DNA from diverse sources who have given informed consent and are anonymous. Most current sources don`t meet those criteria. It may be the first question every nonexpert asks on learning about the Human Genome Project: Whose genome are we studying, anyway? It sounds naive, says one government scientist-so naive, in fact, that {open_quotes}we chuckle as we explain that we aren`t sequencing anyone`s genome in particular; we`re sequencing a representative genome{close_quotes} made up of a mosaic of DNA from a variety of anonymous sources. And Bruce Birren, a clone-maker now at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s (MIT`s) Whitehead Center for Genome Research says: {open_quotes}We spent many years pooh-poohing the question{close_quotes} of whose genome would be stored in the database. But now that labs have begun working on large stretches of human DNA-aiming to identify all 3 billion base pairs in the genetic code-the question no longer seems to laughable. To the distress of program managers in Bethesda, Maryland, the initial sources of DNA are not as diverse or as anonymous as they had assumed.

  19. Joint NERSC/OLCF/NICS Cray XT5 Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events » Joint NERSC/OLCF/NICS Cray XT5 Workshop Joint NERSC/OLCF/NICS Cray XT5 Workshop February 1, 2010 February 1-3, 2010 Berkeley, CA The Joint Cray XT5 Workshop is designed to provide an in-depth introduction to using the world's newest and largest Cray XT5 systems. Representatives and staff from the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, the National Institute for Computational Science, Cray, and AMD will explain how to use XT5

  20. New Approaches and Technologies to Sequence de novo Plant reference Genomes (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmutz, Jeremy [HudsonAlpha Institute

    2013-03-01

    Jeremy Schmutz of the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology on "New approaches and technologies to sequence de novo plant reference genomes" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  1. US/Brazil joint pilot project objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a joint US/Brazil pilot project for rural electrification, whose major goals are: to establish technical, institutional, and economic confidence in using renewable energy (PV and wind) to meet the needs of the citizens of rural Brazil; to establish on-going institutional, individual and business relationships necessary to implement sustainable programs and commitments; to lay the groundwork for larger scale rural electrification through the use of distributed renewable technologies. The projects have supported low power home lighting systems, lighting and refrigeration for schools and medical centers, and water pumping systems. This is viewed as a long term project, where much of the equipment will come from the US, but Brazil will be responsible for program management, and sharing data gained from the program. The paper describes in detail the Brazilian program which was instituted to support this phased project.

  2. Incorporating Genomics and Bioinformatics across the Life Sciences Curriculum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ditty, Jayna L.; Kvaal, Christopher A.; Goodner, Brad; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Bailey, Cheryl; Britton, Robert A.; Gordon, Stuart G.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Reed, Kelynne; Xu, Zhaohui; Sanders-Lorenz, Erin R.; Axen, Seth; Kim, Edwin; Johns, Mitrick; Scott, Kathleen; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2011-08-01

    courses or independent research projects requires infrastructure for organizing and assessing student work. Here, we present a new platform for faculty to keep current with the rapidly changing field of bioinformatics, the Integrated Microbial Genomes Annotation Collaboration Toolkit (IMG-ACT). It was developed by instructors from both research-intensive and predominately undergraduate institutions in collaboration with the Department of Energy-Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI) as a means to innovate and update undergraduate education and faculty development. The IMG-ACT program provides a cadre of tools, including access to a clearinghouse of genome sequences, bioinformatics databases, data storage, instructor course management, and student notebooks for organizing the results of their bioinformatic investigations. In the process, IMG-ACT makes it feasible to provide undergraduate research opportunities to a greater number and diversity of students, in contrast to the traditional mentor-to-student apprenticeship model for undergraduate research, which can be too expensive and time-consuming to provide for every undergraduate. The IMG-ACT serves as the hub for the network of faculty and students that use the system for microbial genome analysis. Open access of the IMG-ACT infrastructure to participating schools ensures that all types of higher education institutions can utilize it. With the infrastructure in place, faculty can focus their efforts on the pedagogy of bioinformatics, involvement of students in research, and use of this tool for their own research agenda. What the original faculty members of the IMG-ACT development team present here is an overview of how the IMG-ACT program has affected our development in terms of teaching and research with the hopes that it will inspire more faculty to get involved.

  3. Complete genome sequence of the facultatively chemolithoautotrophic and methylotrophic alpha Proteobacterium Starkeya novella type strain (ATCC 8093T)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kappler, Ulrike; Davenport, Karen W.; Beatson, Scott; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Berry, Kerrie W.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Hammon, Nancy; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Richardson, P M; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Detter, J. Chris; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Goker, Markus; Ivanova, N; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Starkeya novella (Starkey 1934) Kelly et al. 2000 is a member of the family Xanthobacteraceae in the order Rhizobiales , which is thus far poorly characterized at the genome level. Cultures from this spe- cies are most interesting due to their facultatively chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, which allows them to both consume carbon dioxide and to produce it. This feature makes S. novella an interesting model or- ganism for studying the genomic basis of regulatory networks required for the switch between con- sumption and production of carbon dioxide, a key component of the global carbon cycle. In addition, S. novella is of interest for its ability to grow on various inorganic sulfur compounds and several C1- compounds such as methanol. Besides Azorhizobium caulinodans, S. novella is only the second spe- cies in the family Xanthobacteraceae with a completely sequenced genome of a type strain. The cur- rent taxonomic classification of this group is in significant conflict with the 16S rRNA data. The ge- nomic data indicate that the physiological capabilities of the organism might have been underestimat- ed. The 4,765,023 bp long chromosome with its 4,511 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes was se- quenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2008.

  4. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Rhizobium sullae strain WSM1592; a Hedysarum coronarium microsymbiont from Sassari, Italy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yates, Ron; Howieson, John; De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; et al

    2015-07-24

    Rhizobium sullae strain WSM1592 is an aerobic, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen (N2) fixing root nodule formed on the short-lived perennial legume Hedysarum coronarium (also known as Sulla coronaria or Sulla). WSM1592 was isolated from a nodule recovered from H. coronarium roots located in Ottava, bordering Sassari, Sardinia in 1995. WSM1592 is highly effective at fixing nitrogen with H. coronarium, and is currently the commercial Sulla inoculant strain in Australia. Here we describe the features of R. sullae strain WSM1592, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 7,530,820 bp high-quality permanent draft genomemore » is arranged into 118 scaffolds of 118 contigs containing 7.453 protein-coding genes and 73 RNA-only encoding genes. In conclusion, this rhizobial genome is sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.« less

  5. Gamesa Santana Joint Venture | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gamesa Santana Joint Venture Place: Spain Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind turbine manufacturing joint venture in Spain. References: Gamesa Santana Joint Venture1 This article...

  6. Development of Genomic and Genetic Tools for Foxtail Millet, and Use of These Tools in the Improvement of Biomass Production for Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doust, Andrew, N.

    2011-11-11

    The overall aim of this research was to develop genomic and genetic tools in foxtail millet that will be useful in improving biomass production in bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, napier grass, and pearl millet. A variety of approaches have been implemented, and our lab has been primarily involved in genome analysis and quantitative genetic analysis. Our progress in these activities has been substantially helped by the genomic sequence of foxtail millet produced by the Joint Genome Institute (Bennetzen et al., in prep). In particular, the annotation and analysis of candidate genes for architecture, biomass production and flowering has led to new insights into the control of branching and flowering time, and has shown how closely related flowering time is to vegetative architectural development and biomass accumulation. The differences in genetic control identified at high and low density plantings have direct relevance to the breeding of bioenergy grasses that are tolerant of high planting densities. The developmental analyses have shown how plant architecture changes over time and may indicate which genes may best be manipulated at various times during development to obtain required biomass characteristics. This data contributes to the overall aim of significantly improving genetic and genomic tools in foxtail millet that can be directed to improvement of bioenergy grasses such as switchgrass, where it is important to maximize vegetative growth for greatest biomass production.

  7. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Ensifer medicae strain WSM244, a microsymbiont isolated from Medicago polymorpha growing in alkaline soil

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; O’Hara, Graham; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; et al

    2015-12-01

    We report that Ensifer medicae WSM244 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Medicago species. WSM244 was isolated in 1979 from a nodule recovered from the roots of the annual Medicago polymorpha L. growing in alkaline soil (pH 8.0) in Tel Afer, Iraq. WSM244 is the only acid-sensitive E. medicae strain that has been sequenced to date. It is effective at fixing nitrogen with M. polymorpha L., as well as with more alkaline-adapted Medicago spp. such as M. littoralis Loisel., M. scutellata (L.) Mill., M. tornata (L.)more » Mill. and M. truncatula Gaertn. This strain is also effective with the perennial M. sativa L. Here we describe the features of E. medicae WSM244, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,650,282 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 91 scaffolds of 91 contigs containing 6,427 protein-coding genes and 68 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.« less

  8. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Ensifer medicae strain WSM244, a microsymbiont isolated from Medicago polymorpha growing in alkaline soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; O’Hara, Graham; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-12-01

    We report that Ensifer medicae WSM244 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Medicago species. WSM244 was isolated in 1979 from a nodule recovered from the roots of the annual Medicago polymorpha L. growing in alkaline soil (pH 8.0) in Tel Afer, Iraq. WSM244 is the only acid-sensitive E. medicae strain that has been sequenced to date. It is effective at fixing nitrogen with M. polymorpha L., as well as with more alkaline-adapted Medicago spp. such as M. littoralis Loisel., M. scutellata (L.) Mill., M. tornata (L.) Mill. and M. truncatula Gaertn. This strain is also effective with the perennial M. sativa L. Here we describe the features of E. medicae WSM244, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,650,282 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 91 scaffolds of 91 contigs containing 6,427 protein-coding genes and 68 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.

  9. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Ensifer meliloti strain 4H41, an effective salt- and drought-tolerant microsymbiont of Phaseolus vulgaris

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mhamdi, Ridha; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; et al

    2015-07-02

    We report that Ensifer meliloti 4H41 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Strain 4H41 was isolated in 2002 from root nodules of P. vulgaris grown in South Tunisia from the oasis of Rjim-Maatoug. Strain 4H41 is salt- and drought-tolerant and highly effective at fixing nitrogen with P. vulgaris. Here we describe the features of E. meliloti 4H41, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,795,637 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 47 scaffolds of 47 contigs containing 6,350more » protein-coding genes and 72 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.« less

  10. NREL Launches Strategic Energy Analysis Institute - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Launches Strategic Energy Analysis Institute Doug Arent named Executive Director by Lab, Academic Partners March 18, 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) announced today that it has established a new global institute dedicated to analyzing, speeding and smoothing the transition to sustainable energy worldwide. NREL Senior Scientist Doug Arent has been named executive director of the new Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) by its

  11. Double slotted socket spherical joint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2001-05-22

    A new class of spherical joints is disclosed. These spherical joints are capable of extremely large angular displacements (full cone angles in excess of 270.degree.), while exhibiting no singularities or dead spots in their range of motion. These joints can improve or simplify a wide range of mechanical devices.

  12. Italy Joint Statement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    JOINT STATEMENT BY SECRETARY SPENCER ABRAHAM OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND MINISTER ANTONIO MARZANO OF THE REPUBLIC OF ITALY ON COOPERATION IN ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES ROME, ITALY AUGUST , 2003 We affirm our commitment, on behalf of the United States of America and the Republic of Italy, to collaborate both bilaterally and multilaterally on accelerating the development of the hydrogen economy as part of our broadening cooperation on clean energy technologies. We aim to work together to enhance

  13. International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research Outline and Future Perspectives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research Outline and Future Perspectives P. Sofronis Professor and Director University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 7 March 2011 A World Premier Institute 2 There is no Time more Opportune for such an Effort (President Obama visited Tokyo on Nov. 13, 2009) Announcement of initial areas relevant to the Proposed Institute of Kyushu University for joint activities to strengthen US/Japan cooperation „ Acceleration of joint activities between

  14. Electrolyte Genome - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrofuels: Tiny Organisms Making a Big Impact Electrofuels: Tiny Organisms Making a Big Impact February 16, 2012 - 12:30pm Addthis Electrofuels: Tiny Organisms Making a Big Impact Alexa McClanahan Communications Support Contractor to ARPA-E They say a picture is worth a thousand words - but what happens when what you want to look at is impossible to see? That's where the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy's Electrofuels program comes in. The 13 projects that make up the program seek to

  15. Formation of tough composite joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brun, M.K.

    1997-05-01

    Joints which exhibit tough fracture behavior were formed in a composite with a Si/SiC matrix reinforced with Textron SCS-6 fibers with either boron nitride or silicon nitride fiber coatings. In composites with BN coatings fibers were aligned uniaxially, while composites with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-coated fibers had a 0/90{degree} architecture. Lapped joints (joints with overlapping fingers) were necessary to obtain tough behavior. Geometrical requirements necessary to avoid brittle joint failure have been proposed. Joints with a simple overlap geometry (only a few fingers) would have to be very long in order to prevent brittle failure. Typical failure in these joints is caused by a crack propagating along the interfaces between the joint fingers. Joints of the same overall length, but with geometry changed to be symmetric about the joint centerline and with an extra shear surface exhibited tough fractures accompanied with extensive fiber pullout. The initial matrix cracking of these joints was relatively low because cracks propagated easily through the ends of the fingers. Joints with an optimized stepped sawtooth geometry produced composite-like failures with the stress/strain curves containing an elastic region followed by a region of rising stress with an increase of strain. Increasing the fiber/matrix interfacial strength from 9 to 25 MPa, by changing the fiber coating, increased matrix cracking and ultimate strength of the composite significantly. The best joints had matrix cracking stress and ultimate strength of 138 and 240 MPa, respectively. Joint failure was preceded by multiple matrix cracking in the entire composite. The high strength of the joints will permit building of structures containing joints with only a minor reduction of design stresses.

  16. Stochastic Joint Inversion for Integrated Data Interpretation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stochastic Joint Inversion for Integrated Data Interpretation in Geothermal Exploration Stochastic Joint Inversion for Integrated Data Interpretation in Geothermal Exploration ...

  17. GOLD: The Genomes Online Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Liolios, Dinos; Chen, Amy; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Philip; Markowitz, Victor; Bernal, Alex

    Since its inception in 1997, GOLD has continuously monitored genome sequencing projects worldwide and has provided the community with a unique centralized resource that integrates diverse information related to Archaea, Bacteria, Eukaryotic and more recently Metagenomic sequencing projects. As of September 2007, GOLD recorded 639 completed genome projects. These projects have their complete sequence deposited into the public archival sequence databases such as GenBank EMBL,and DDBJ. From the total of 639 complete and published genome projects as of 9/2007, 527 were bacterial, 47 were archaeal and 65 were eukaryotic. In addition to the complete projects, there were 2158 ongoing sequencing projects. 1328 of those were bacterial, 59 archaeal and 771 eukaryotic projects. Two types of metadata are provided by GOLD: (i) project metadata and (ii) organism/environment metadata. GOLD CARD pages for every project are available from the link of every GOLD_STAMP ID. The information in every one of these pages is organized into three tables: (a) Organism information, (b) Genome project information and (c) External links. [The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: Status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata, Konstantinos Liolios, Konstantinos Mavromatis, Nektarios Tavernarakis and Nikos C. Kyrpides, Nucleic Acids Research Advance Access published online on November 2, 2007, Nucleic Acids Research, doi:10.1093/nar/gkm884]

    The basic tables in the GOLD database that can be browsed or searched include the following information:

    • Gold Stamp ID
    • Organism name
    • Domain
    • Links to information sources
    • Size and link to a map, when available
    • Chromosome number, Plas number, and GC content
    • A link for downloading the actual genome data
    • Institution that did the sequencing
    • Funding source
    • Database where information resides
    • Publication status and information

    • Genome patent fight erupts

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Roberts, L.

      1991-10-11

      At a Congressional briefing while describing a new project to sequence partially every gene active in the human brain, it was made known that the National Institutes of Health was planning to file patent applications on 1,000 of these sequences a month. The scheme has engendered a firestorm of criticism from genome scientists and project officials alike. The critics argue that these sequences probably can't be patented in the first place - and even if they can, they shouldn't be. The plan would undercut patent protection for those who labor long and hard at the real task of elucidating the function of the proteins encoded by the genes, thereby driving industry away from developing inventions based on that work.

    • Jointly Sponsored Research Program

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Everett A. Sondreal; John G. Hendrikson; Thomas A. Erickson

      2009-03-31

      U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40321 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying highly efficient, nonpolluting energy systems that meet the nation's requirements for clean fuels, chemicals, and electricity in the 21st century. The EERC in partnership with its nonfederal partners jointly performed 131 JSRP projects for which the total DOE cost share was $22,716,634 (38%) and the nonfederal share was $36,776,573 (62%). Summaries of these projects are presented in this report for six program areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, and (6) advanced materials. The work performed under this agreement addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration; near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources.

    • USDA and DOE Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research |

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Department of Energy Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research USDA and DOE Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research August 9, 2006 - 8:43am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Aug. 9, 2006 - Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns today announced that the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy (DOE) have jointly awarded nine grants totaling $5.7 million for biobased fuels research that will accelerate the development of alternative fuel

  1. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  2. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, John V.; Novak, Robert F.; McBride, James R.

    1991-01-01

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  3. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INSTITUTE INSTITUTE INSTITUTE INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS April 1, 2000-March 31, 2001 2000 April 4 Dr. B. Launé, Institut de Physique Nucléaire - Orsay, France GANIL: Overview and Perspectives April 11 Dr. Z. Lin, Cyclotron Institute, TAMU J/psi Absorption in Hadronic Matter April 20 Dr. R. Tribble, Texas A&M University Nuclear Astrophysics at Texas A&M April 23 Prof. S.A. Gurvitz, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel Confinement and Scaling in Deep Inelastic

  4. A Celebration of The Genome, 1953-2003

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Celebration of The Genome, 1953-2003 This April Join the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Energy in a month-long series of scientific, educational, cultural and ...

  5. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  6. Shock transmissibility of threaded joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, N.R.; Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with threaded joints that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil and rock penetration; drilling pipe strings that must survive rock-cutting, shock environments; and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact shock. This paper summarizes an analytical study and an experimental evaluation of compressive, one-dimensional, shock transmission through a threaded joint in a split Hopkinson bar configuration. Thread geometries were scaled to simulate large diameter threaded joints with loadings parallel to the axis of the threads. Both strain and acceleration were evaluated with experimental measurements and analysis. Analytical results confirm the experimental conclusions that in this split Hopkinson bar configuration, the change in the one-dimensional shock wave by the threaded joint is localized to a length equal to a few diameters` length beyond the threaded joint.

  7. Method of forming a joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butt, Darryl Paul; Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Rynders, Steven Walton; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2006-08-22

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, including providing a first multicomponent metallic oxide having a perovskitic or fluorite crystal structure; providing a second sintered body including a second multicomponent metallic oxide having a crystal structure of the same type as the first; and providing at an interface a joint material containing at least one metal oxide containing at least one metal identically contained in at least one of the first and second multicomponent metallic oxides. The joint material is free of cations of Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, P and Te and has a melting point below the sintering temperatures of both sintered bodies. The joint material is heated to a temperature above the melting point of the metal oxide(s) and below the sintering temperatures of the sintered bodies to form the joint. Structures containing such joints are also disclosed.

  8. The Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Critical Materials Institute Director Alex King, Operations Manager Cynthia Feller, Jenni Brockpahler and Melinda Thach. Photo left to right: CMI Director Alex King, Operations Manager Cynthia Feller, Jenni Brockpahler and Melinda Thach. Not pictured: Carol Bergman. CMI staff phone 515-296-4500, e-mail CMIdirector@ameslab.gov 2332 Pammel Drive, 134 Wilhelm Hall, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1025 The Critical Materials Institute focuses on technologies that make better use of

  9. Southern Research Institute Visit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern Reaserch Engineering Capabilities Briefing 2010 Southern Research Institute Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Research Briefing 2010 CAMD Introduction - Richard Kurtz Mary ...

  10. Advanced Studies Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute » Advanced Studies Institute Science of Signatures Advanced Studies Institute Developing innovative solution strategies for problems that support the forward deployment theme of the Science of Signatures Pillar, and building skills needed for successful research program development. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran

  11. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-March 31, 2006 2005 April 1 Dr. Ralf Rapp, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas Thermal Field Theory and Instantons II April 8 Mr. Deqiang Sun, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas Bottomonium in QGP and Heavy-Ion Collisions April 22 Dr. Ralf Rapp, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas Thermal Field Theory and Instantons III May 6 Dr. Massimo Mannarelli, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,

  12. Strategic Energy Analysis Institute to Hold Annual Meeting - News Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | NREL Strategic Energy Analysis Institute to Hold Annual Meeting Second Annual Meeting Brings Key Stakeholders Together March 5, 2012 The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA), a transdisciplinary global research group focused on the nexus of energy, environment, finance and society, headquartered at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), will address transformational trends in the global energy economy at its annual meeting, March 7-8

  13. Research Institutions, Businesses Launch Renewable Fuels Venture - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL Research Institutions, Businesses Launch Renewable Fuels Venture March 19, 2007 A joint venture among businesses and Colorado research institutions to further develop renewable fuels was announced today at the state capitol in Denver. The new Colorado Center for Biorefining and Biofuels (C2B2) is a research venture between large and small businesses and the newly formed Colorado Renewable Energy Collaboratory, the association of four of Colorado's premier research

  14. Italy Joint Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Italy Joint Statement Italy Joint Statement " U.S.-Italy Joint Statement prepared as part of the International Partnership for a Hydrogen Economy " italy_joint_statement.pdf (63.17 KB) More Documents & Publications (Energy Efficiency) Joint Statement by Energy Ministers of G8, The People's Republic of China, India and The Republic of Korea (June 2008) Joint Statement by Energy Ministers of G8, The People's Republic of China, India and The Republic of Korea

  15. Metagenomic and Metaproteomic Analyses of Symbioses between Bacteria and Gutless Marine Worms (2014 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubilier, Nicole

    2014-03-19

    Nicole Dubilier of the Max Planck Institute speaks at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  16. Russian Health Studies Program - Joint Coordinating Committee...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) All About the Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research What is the JCCRER? Why is it ...

  17. Climate Leaders Joint Venture | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Leaders Joint Venture Jump to: navigation, search Name: Climate Leaders' Joint Venture Place: Dallas, Texas Product: Tudor Investment and Camco International have partnered to...

  18. Malibu Joint Venture | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Malibu Joint Venture Jump to: navigation, search Name: Malibu Joint Venture Place: Germany Sector: Solar Product: String representation "German utility ... e of next year." is too...

  19. EPRI-DOE Joint Report on Fossil Fleet Transition with Fuel Changes and Large Scale Variable Renewable Integration Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new report “Fossil Fleet Transition with Fuel Changes and Large Scale Variable Renewable Integration” from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and jointly funded by the Offices of...

  20. Joint DOE-Rosatom Statement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Joint Statement on the U.S. - Russian Excess Weapon-grade Plutonium Disposition Program The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Atomic Energy Agency, Russian Federation ...

  1. Building international genomics collaboration for global health security

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cui, Helen H.; Erkkila, Tracy; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Vuyisich, Momchilo

    2015-12-07

    Genome science and technologies are transforming life sciences globally in many ways and becoming a highly desirable area for international collaboration to strengthen global health. The Genome Science Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is leveraging a long history of expertise in genomics research to assist multiple partner nations in advancing their genomics and bioinformatics capabilities. The capability development objectives focus on providing a molecular genomics-based scientific approach for pathogen detection, characterization, and biosurveillance applications. The general approaches include introduction of basic principles in genomics technologies, training on laboratory methodologies and bioinformatic analysis of resulting data, procurement, and installationmore » of next-generation sequencing instruments, establishing bioinformatics software capabilities, and exploring collaborative applications of the genomics capabilities in public health. Genome centers have been established with public health and research institutions in the Republic of Georgia, Kingdom of Jordan, Uganda, and Gabon; broader collaborations in genomics applications have also been developed with research institutions in many other countries.« less

  2. Graduate Studies - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Students wishing to carry out their dissertation research at the Cyclotron Institute must be formally enrolled in the graduate program of either the Department of Physics or the Department of Chemistry, but may elect to work with any Institute faculty research advisor, irrespective of that advisor's departmental affiliation. Research programs at the Cyclotron Institute are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the Robert A. Welch Foundation. Application

  3. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hass, The Weizmann Institute, Rehovot, Israel A New Precision Measurement of the 7 Be ... Yigal Ronen, Ben Gurion University Beer-Sheva, Israel Space Travel: Science or Fiction? ...

  4. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raymond Moreh, Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York Neutron Scattering of keV ...

  5. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeffrey W. Martin, Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Ultracold Neutrons April 20 Professor J. W. Watson, Department of Physics, ...

  6. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    professor in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. She was previously a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Integrated...

  7. Edison Electric Institute Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the current electricity landscape.

  8. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emeritus Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics (KIT) The Exotic World of Quantum Matter: Novel States Induced by Fluctuations Tuesday, June 30, 2015 2 - 3pm MSL...

  9. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China Probing the Nuclear Symmetry Energy with ... Jiansong Wang, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, China The Status of Hadronic Physics ...

  10. Information Science & Technology Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ISTI Information Science & Technology Institute Providing connection to program management for capability needs, as well as IS&T integration and support for mission-critical...

  11. Careers | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Careers The Critical Materials Institute at the The Ames Laboratory, a Department of Energy national laboratory affiliated with Iowa State University, offers a variety of career ...

  12. DOE-EERE/NIST Joint Workshop on Combinatorial Materials Science for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications in Energy | Department of Energy EERE/NIST Joint Workshop on Combinatorial Materials Science for Applications in Energy DOE-EERE/NIST Joint Workshop on Combinatorial Materials Science for Applications in Energy The Hydrogen Storage Subprogram of the U.S. Department of Energy co-hosted with the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) Combinatorial Methods Center (NCMC) a workshop titled "High-Throughput/Combinatorial Material Science for Applications in

  13. Human Genome: DOE Origins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Genome Research: DOE Origins Resources with Additional Information Charles DeLisi Charles DeLisi The genesis of the Department of Energy (DOE) human genome project took place ...

  14. The engineering institute of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, Charles R; Park, Gyuhae; Cornwell, Phillip J; Todd, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have taken the unprecedented step of creating a collaborative, multi-disciplinary graduate education program and associated research agenda called the Engineering Institute. The mission of the Engineering Institute is to develop a comprehensive approach for conducting LANL mission-driven, multidisciplinary engineering research and to improve recruiting, revitalization, and retention of the current and future staff necessary to support the LANL' s national security responsibilities. The components of the Engineering Institute are (1) a joint LANL/UCSD degree program, (2) joint LANL/UCSD research projects, (3) the Los Alamos Dynamic Summer School, (4) an annual workshop, and (5) industry short courses. This program is a possible model for future industry/government interactions with university partners.

  15. Genomic Data and Annotation from the SEED

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Fonstein, Michael; Kogan, Yakov; Osterman, Andrei; Overbeek, Ross; Vonstein, Veronika The Fellowship for Interpretation of Genomes (FIG)

    The SEED Project is a cooperative effort to annotate ever-expanding genomic data so researchers can conduct effective comparative analyses of genomes. Launched in 2003 by the Fellowship for Interpretation of Genomes (FIG), the project is one of several initiatives in ongoing development of data curation systems. SEED is designed to be used by scientists from numerous centers and with varied research objectives. As such, several institutions have since joined FIG in a consortium, including the University of Chicago, DOE’s Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and others. As one example, ANL has used SEED to develop the National Microbial Pathogen Data Resource. Other agencies and institutions have used the project to discover genome components and clarify gene functions such as metabolism. SEED also has enabled researchers to conduct comparative analyses of closely related genomes and has supported derivation of stoichiometric models to understand metabolic processes. The SEED Project has been extended to support metagenomic samples and concomitant analytical tools. Moreover, the number of genomes being introduced into SEED is growing very rapidly. Building a framework to support this growth while providing highly accurate annotations is centrally important to SEED. The project’s subsystem-based annotation strategy has become the technological foundation for addressing these challenges.(copied from Appendix 7 of Systems Biology Knowledgebase for a New Era in Biology, A Genomics:GTL Report from the May 2008 Workshop, DOE/SC-0113, Grequrick, S; Fredrickson, J.K.; Stevens, R., Pub March 1, 2009.)

  16. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work cover diverse fields such as energy, agriculture, and environmental cleanup. Contact Us Babetta Marrone Biofuels Program Manager Email Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Kirsten McCabe Emerging Threats Program Manager Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email "We

  17. Genome Science/Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genome Genome Science/Technologies Los Alamos using cutting-edge sequencing, finishing, and analysis, impact valuable genomic data. Srinivas Iyer Bioscience Group Leader Email Get Expertise David Bruce Bioscience Deputy Group Leader Email Momchilo Vuyisich Scientist Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email State-of-the art technology and extensive genomics expertise Protein research Read caption + Los Alamos National Laboratory graduate student, Patricia Langan, changes the

  18. Exploiting the genome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dyson, F.; Koonin, S.; Lewis, N.; Schwitters, R.

    1998-09-11

    In 1997, JASON conducted a DOE-sponsored study of the human genome project with special emphasis on the areas of technology, quality assurance and quality control, and informatics. The present study has two aims: first, to update the 1997 Report in light of recent developments in genome sequencing technology, and second, to consider possible roles for the DOE in the ''post-genomic" era, following acquisition of the complete human genome sequence.

  19. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yager, T.D.; Zewert, T.E.; Hood, L.E. )

    1994-04-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a coordinated worldwide effort to precisely map the human genome and the genomes of selected model organisms. The first explicit proposal for this project dates from 1985 although its foundations (both conceptual and technological) can be traced back many years in genetics, molecular biology, and biotechnology. The HGP has matured rapidly and is producing results of great significance.

  20. Facilities - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Cyclotron Institute has expanded steadily since commissioning the original cyclotron in 1967 and is currently upgrading again. The diagram to the left shows the variety of sophisticated detectors and spectrometers that enhance the Institute's capacity for nuclear research. Follow the above links for more detailed information about our facilities.

  1. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project - Facilities - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upgrade Overview / K150 Cyclotron / Light Ion Guide / Heavy Ion Guide / Negative Ion Source / CB-ECRIS Facility Upgrade White Paper Overview Picture of the experimental set up to measure beta-decay half-lives. On January 3, 2005 the Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project (CIUP) began with the approval of the CIUP management plan by the Department of Energy Nuclear Physics Office. The project will extend to the first quarter of calendar year 2011. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide

  2. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52, a xylan-degrading strain isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chang, Yun-Juan; Mead, David A.

    2015-10-19

    Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 was isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). Based on 16S rRNA genes and average nucleotide identity, Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 and the related Geobacillus sp. Y412MC61 appear to be members of a new species of Geobacillus. The genome of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,628,883 bp, an average G+C content of 52 % and one circular plasmid of 45,057 bp andmore » an average G+C content of 45 %. Y412MC52 possesses arabinan, arabinoglucuronoxylan, and aromatic acid degradation clusters for degradation of hemicellulose from biomass. Lastly, transport and utilization clusters are also present for other carbohydrates including starch, cellobiose, and α- and β-galactooligosaccharides.« less

  3. Complete genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93, a novel biomass degrader isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brumm, Phillip J.; Land, Miriam L.; Mead, David A.

    2015-10-05

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences confirmed the classification of the strain as a G. thermoglucosidasius species. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). The genome of G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp and two circular plasmids of 80,849 and 19,638 bp and an average G + C content of 43.93 %. G. thermoglucosidasiusmore » C56-YS93 possesses a xylan degradation cluster not found in the other G. thermoglucosidasius sequenced strains. This cluster appears to be related to the xylan degradation cluster found in G. stearothermophilus. G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 possesses two plasmids not found in the other two strains. Ultimately, one plasmid contains a novel gene cluster coding for proteins involved in proline degradation and metabolism, the other contains a collection of mostly hypothetical proteins.« less

  4. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-March 31, 2003 2002 April 2 Dr. Bency John, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University Isoscalar Giant Resonances in 12 C April 9 Professor J. Rapaport, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio Charge Exchange Reactions and Spin Transfer Measurements April 16 M. Sanchez-Vega and V. E. Jacob, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University Test of the Unitarity of the CKM Matrix via Superallowed β + decay. April 23 Dr. Subrata Pal, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University Strange Particle

  5. Classification Training Institute Catalog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Classification Training Institute Catalog Classification Training Institute Catalog Classification Training Institute (CTI) Catalog

  6. Financial Institution Lending Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Financial institution loans for clean energy projects are originated and serviced through an entity other than the government, typically banks. In this case, a state or local government is not the...

  7. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  8. New England Fuel Institute

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and CEO of the New England Fuel Institute Before the U.S. Department of Energy and the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Public Hearing on "New England Regional ...

  9. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PSI: the X-ray free electron laser SwissFEL and its future experimental capabilities. Biography: Prof. Dr. Jol Mesot is, since 2008, director of the Paul Scherrer Institute...

  10. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, J. Iwan

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  11. People - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview Dr. Ralf Rapp meets with his research group. At the Institute we focus on conducting basic research, educating students in accelerator-based science and technology, and providing technical capabilities for a wide variety of applications in space science, materials science, analytical procedures and nuclear medicine. Approximately 100 Institute members - scientists, engineers, technicians, support staff, graduate students and undergraduate students - are involved in these programs.

  12. Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources The Critical Materials Institute offers connections to resources, including: List of resources U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table Government agency contacts CMI unique facilities CMI recent presentations Photographs via Flick'r: Critical Materials Institute, The Ames Laboratory Videos from The Ames Laboratory Webinars from Colorado School of Mines To offer comments on the CMI website or to ask questions, please contact us via e-mail at CMIdirector@ameslab.gov or call 515-296-4500.

  13. Site Map - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Map Cyclotron Institute About K500 Beam Schedule Recent News Seminars and Colloquia Cyclotron Institute Safety (limited access) Radiation Effects Facility REU Program Research Heavy Ion Reactions Fundamental Interactions Nuclear Astrophysics Interactions of Highly Charged Ions With Matter Theoretical Nuclear Physics Nuclear Structure External Collaborations Publications Research Groups Facilities K500 Cyclotron ECR Ion Sources MARS Big Sol MDM Spectrometer NIMROD Precision On-Line Decay

  14. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS April 1, 2010-March 31, 2011 2010 May 11 Dr. J. J. Ressler, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California Surrogate Reactions for Nuclear Energy Application May 12 Professor Lie-Wen Chen, Institute of Nuclear, Particle Astronomy and Cosmology (INPAC) and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China Probing the Nuclear Symmetry Energy with Heavy-Ion Reactions and Neutron Skin Thickness of Heavy Nuclei May 13 Professor A. R.

  15. Jointly Sponsored Research Program Energy Related Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Western Research Institute

    2009-03-31

    Cooperative Agreement, DE-FC26-98FT40323, Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) Program at Western Research Institute (WRI) began in 1998. Over the course of the Program, a total of seventy-seven tasks were proposed utilizing a total of $23,202,579 in USDOE funds. Against this funding, cosponsors committed $26,557,649 in private funds to produce a program valued at $49,760,228. The goal of the Jointly Sponsored Research Program was to develop or assist in the development of innovative technology solutions that will: (1) Increase the production of United States energy resources - coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; (2) Enhance the competitiveness of United States energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; (3) Reduce the nation's dependence on foreign energy supplies and strengthen both the United States and regional economies; and (4) Minimize environmental impacts of energy production and utilization. Under the JSR Program, energy-related tasks emphasized enhanced oil recovery, heavy oil upgrading and characterization, coal beneficiation and upgrading, coal combustion systems development including oxy-combustion, emissions monitoring and abatement, coal gasification technologies including gas clean-up and conditioning, hydrogen and liquid fuels production, coal-bed methane recovery, and the development of technologies for the utilization of renewable energy resources. Environmental-related activities emphasized cleaning contaminated soils and waters, processing of oily wastes, mitigating acid mine drainage, and demonstrating uses for solid waste from clean coal technologies, and other advanced coal-based systems. Technology enhancement activities included resource characterization studies, development of improved methods, monitors and sensors. In general the goals of the tasks proposed were to enhance competitiveness of U.S. technology, increase production of domestic resources, and reduce environmental impacts

  16. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team genetically modified the organisms to harvest light more efficiently for maximum production. Overview of Research and Highlights Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are using their renowned expertise in genomics, computation, and experimental biology as the foundation of a dynamic systems biology capability. Systems

  17. Joint Munitions Program | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Joint Munitions Program DODDOE NNSA Joint Munitions Program: 30 years of collaborative ... This year marks more than 30 years of partnership through the JMP to improve and invest in ...

  18. Digital Sofcell Digital Ultracap joint venture | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ultracap joint venture Jump to: navigation, search Name: Digital Sofcell - Digital Ultracap joint venture Product: Digital Sofcell will joint venture with Digital Ultracap to...

  19. Human Genome: DOE Origins

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the Department of Energy; DOE Technical Report; 1988 Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome; DOE Technical Report; 1988 Understanding our Genetic Inheritance: The U.S....

  20. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial ... and experimental biology as the foundation of a dynamic systems biology capability. ...

  1. Fungal Genomics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-12

    The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

  2. Genomics Division Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the most primitive soil microbe represent a watershed opportunity for biology. The Genomics Division is taking advantage of this wealth of new information. While it is well...

  3. CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

  4. News - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News August 25th, 2016 12:46 AM "Texas A&M Science - Labors of Lab." REU student Kassie Marble featured in TAMU College of Science Video July 23rd, 2016 12:46 AM The 2015-2016 Cyclotron Institute Annual Report, "Progress in Research", is now available. You may view/download the complete document and you may also browse individual articles. July 7th, 2015 1:01 AM The 2014-2015 Cyclotron Institute Annual Report, "Progress in Research", is now available. You may

  5. Electrolyte Genome Reveals New Instability Mechanism in Mg Electrolytes -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint Center for Energy Storage Research February 10, 2015, Research Highlights Electrolyte Genome Reveals New Instability Mechanism in Mg Electrolytes (Top) The Mg salt and solvent combinations simulated for solvation shell structures and dynamics (Bottom) The TFSI- decomposition mechanism triggered by partial reduction of Mg2+ ->Mg+. This mechanism consumes anion, disrupts the deposition of Mg0 on the anode and may deposit anion fragments on the anode. Scientific Achievement Simulations

  6. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Jian

    2002-01-01

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  7. Intermetallic Layers in Soldered Joints

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-12-10

    ILAG solves the one-dimensional partial differential equations describing the multiphase, multicomponent, solid-state diffusion-controlled growth of intermetallic layers in soldered joints. This software provides an analysis capability for materials researchers to examine intermetallic growth mechanisms in a wide variety of defense and commercial applications involving both traditional and advanced materials. ILAG calculates the interface positions of the layers, as well as the spatial distribution of constituent mass fractions, and outputs the results at user-prescribed simulation times.

  8. Rahus Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Rahus Institute is a policy organization located in Martinez, California. References About Rahus Institute Retrieved...

  9. Institutional Change Process for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For establishing institutional change in a federal agency to achieve sustainability or other energy efficiency goals, follow the five-step institutional change process.

  10. Ecologic Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute Name: Ecologic Institute Address: Pfalzburger Strasse 4344 Place: Berlin, Germany Year Founded: 1995 Phone Number: +49 (30) 86880-0 Website: ecologic.eu...